Science.gov

Sample records for finder coronagraph simulations

  1. Terrestrial Planet Finder coronagraph status and enabling technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Virginia G.; Lisman, Douglas; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Ho, Timothy Y.; Kissil, Andrew; Kwack, Eug-Yun; Lowman, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Project Mission is to find life-bearing planets around nearby stars. Two types of instruments are competing for flight in 2015: a visible coronagraph and an infrared interferometer.

  2. The Terrestrial Planet Finder coronagraph dynamics error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Marchen, Luis; Green, Joseph J.; Lay, Oliver P.

    2005-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) demands extreme wave front control and stability to achieve its goal of detecting earth-like planets around nearby stars. We describe the performance models and error budget used to evaluate image plane contrast and derive engineering requirements for this challenging optical system.

  3. Comparison of several coronagraphic approaches to the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Burrows, Christopher J.; Friedman, Edward J.; Gezari, Daniel Y.; Harwit, Martin O.; Kaplan, Michael H.; Kaylor, Larry; Lyon, Richard G.; Melnick, Gary J.; Nisenson, Peter; Peterson, Lee D.; Spergel, David N.; Woodruff, Robert A.

    2003-10-01

    Planetological and technical issues have led to a renewed interest in visible coronographic concepts for a Terrestrial Planet Finder mission. This has stimulated rapid development of new, generalized coronagraphic techniques, including exotic apodizations and nulling schemes. Hitherto, it has been difficult to compare different concepts, owing to the complex interaction between details of the concepts and instrument and mission parameters and optimization.

  4. High Contrast Imaging Testbed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Andrew E.; Trauger, John T.; Gordon, Brian; Green, Joseph J.; Moody, Dwight; Niessner, Albert F.; Shi, Fang

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is planning to launch a visible coronagraphic space telescope in 2014. To achieve TPF science goals, the coronagraph must have extreme levels of wavefront correction (less than 1 Angstrom rms over controllable spatial frequencies) and stability to get the necessary suppression of diffracted starlight (approximately l0(exp -10)) contrast at an angular separation approximately 4 (lamda)/D). TPF Coronagraph's primary platform for experimentation is the High Contrast Imaging Testbed, which will provide laboratory validation of key technologies as well as demonstration of a flight-traceable approach to implementation. Precision wavefront control in the testbed is provided by a high actuator density deformable mirror. Diffracted light control is achieved through use of occulting or apodizing masks and stops. Contrast measurements will establish the technical feasibility of TPF requirements, while model and error budget validation will demonstrate implementation viability. This paper describes the current testbed design, development approach, and recent experimental results.

  5. Metrology system for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklin, Stuart; Marchen, Luis; Zhao, Feng; Peters, Robert D.; Ho, Tim; Holmes, Buck

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) employs an aggressive coronagraph designed to obtain better than 1e-10 contrast inside the third Airy ring. Minute changes in low-order aberration content scatter significant light at this position. One implication is the requirement to control low-order aberrations induced by motion of the secondary mirror relative to the primary mirror; sub-nanometer relative positional stability is required. We propose a 6-beam laser truss to monitor the relative positions of the two mirrors. The truss is based on laser metrology developed for the Space Interferometry Mission.

  6. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph overview of technology development & system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjuthapatham; Ford, Virginia; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Hoppe, Daniel; Shaklan, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have discovered over 150 planets orbiting other stars. NASA mission; Find and characterize terrestrial (or rocky) exo-planets that might harbor life (like Earth)liquid water on the planet (habitable zone). An atmosphere that indicates the presence of life water, oxygen, ozone, carbon dioxide, chlorophyll, and methane. Two missions under development: A coronagraph and an interferometer.

  7. The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph Optical Surface Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Green, Joseph J.; Palacios, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Coronagraph telescope and instrument optics for spatial frequencies within and beyond the spatial control bandwidth of the wave front control system. Three different wave front control systems are considered: a zero-path difference Michelson interferometer with two deformable mirrors at a pupil image; a sequential pair of deformable mirrors with one placed at a pupil image; and the Visible Nuller spatially-filtered controller. We show that the optical bandwidth limits the useful outer working angle.

  8. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph 2005: Overview of Technology Development and System Design Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Virginia G.

    2005-01-01

    Technology research, design trades, and modeling and analysis guide the definition of a Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph Mission that will search for and characterize earth-like planets around near-by stars. Operating in visible wavebands, this mission will use coronagraphy techniques to suppress starlight to enable capturing and imaging the reflected light from a planet orbiting in the habitable zone of its parent star. The light will be spectrally characterized to determine the presence of life-indicating chemistry in the planet atmosphere.

  9. Passive isolator design for jitter reduction in the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaurock, Carl; Liu, Kuo-Chia; Dewell, Larry; Alexander, James

    2005-01-01

    Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) is a mission to locate and study extrasolar Earth-like planets. The TPF Coronagraph (TPF-C), planned for launch in the latter half of the next decade, will use a coronagraphic mask and other optics to suppress the light of the nearby star in order to collect visible light from such planets. The required contrast ratio of 5e-11 can only be achieved by maintaining pointing accuracy to 4 milli-arcseconds, and limiting optics jitter to below 5 nm. Numerous mechanical disturbances act to induce jitter. This paper concentrates on passive isolation techniques to minimize the optical degradation introduced by disturbance sources. A passive isolation system, using compliant mounts placed at an energy bottleneck to reduce energy transmission above a certain frequency, is a low risk, flight proven design approach. However, the attenuation is limited, compared to an active system, so the feasibility of the design must be demonstrated by analysis. The paper presents the jitter analysis for the baseline TPF design, using a passive isolation system. The analysis model representing the dynamics of the spacecraft and telescope is described, with emphasis on passive isolator modeling. Pointing and deformation metrics, consistent with the TPF-C error budget, are derived. Jitter prediction methodology and results are presented. Then an analysis of the critical design parameters that drive the TPF-C jitter response is performed.

  10. An extensive coronagraphic simulation applied to LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassallo, D.; Carolo, E.; Farinato, J.; Bergomi, M.; Bonavita, M.; Carlotti, A.; D'Orazi, V.; Greggio, D.; Magrin, D.; Mesa, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Stangalini, M.; Verinaud, C.; Viotto, V.

    2016-08-01

    In this article we report the results of a comprehensive simulation program aimed at investigating coronagraphic capabilities of SHARK-NIR, a camera selected to proceed to the final design phase at Large Binocular Telescope. For the purpose, we developed a dedicated simulation tool based on physical optics propagation. The code propagates wavefronts through SHARK optical train in an end-to-end fashion and can implement any kind of coronagraph. Detection limits can be finally computed, exploring a wide range of Strehl values and observing conditions.

  11. Linear Thermal Expansion Measurements of Lead Magnesium Niobate (PMN) Electroceramic Material for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlmann, Paul B.; Halverson, Peter G.; Peters, Robert D.; Levine, Marie B.; VanBuren, David; Dudik, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Linear thermal expansion measurements of nine samples of Lead Magnesium Niobate (PMN) electroceramic material were recently performed in support of NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) mission. The TPF-C mission is a visible light coronagraph designed to look at roughly 50 stars pre- selected as good candidates for possessing earth-like planets. Upon detection of an earth-like planet, TPF-C will analyze the visible-light signature of the planet's atmosphere for specific spectroscopic indicators that life may exist there. With this focus, the project's primary interest in PMN material is for use as a solid-state actuator for deformable mirrors or compensating optics. The nine test samples were machined from three distinct boules of PMN ceramic manufactured by Xinetics Inc. Thermal expansion measurements were performed in 2005 at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in their Cryogenic Dilatometer Facility. All measurements were performed in vacuum with sample temperature actively controlled over the range of 270K to 3 10K. Expansion and contraction of the test samples with temperature was measured using a JPL developed interferometric system capable of sub-nanometer accuracy. Presented in this paper is a discussion of the sample configuration, test facilities, test method, data analysis, test results, and future plans.

  12. Development of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph membrane V-grooves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Ho, Timothy; Chen, Gun-Shing; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder mission will study all aaspecs of planets outside our solar system: from their formation and development in disks of dust and gas around newly forming stars to the presence of those planets orbiting the nearest stars; from the numbers at various sizes and places to their suitability as an abode for life.

  13. Band-limited image plane masks for the Terrestrial Planet Finder coronagraph: materials and designs for broadband performance.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2008-01-10

    Coronagraphs for detection and characterization of exosolar earthlike planets require accurate masks with broadband performance in the visible and near infrared spectrum. Design and fabrication of image plane masks capable of suppressing broadband starlight to 10(-10) level contrast presents technical challenges. We discuss basic approaches, material choices, designs, and fabrication options for image plane masks with particular focus on material properties to obtain adequate spectral performance. Based on theoretical analysis, we show that metals such as Pt and Ni, and alloys such as Inconel, may be employed as promising mask materials that can meet broadband performance requirements.

  14. End-to-end simulations of the E-ELT/METIS coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlomagno, Brunella; Absil, Olivier; Kenworthy, Matthew; Ruane, Garreth; Keller, Christoph U.; Otten, Gilles; Feldt, Markus; Hippler, Stefan; Huby, Elsa; Mawet, Dimitri; Delacroix, Christian; Surdej, Jean; Habraken, Serge; Forsberg, Pontus; Karlsson, Mikael; Vargas Catalan, Ernesto; Brandl, Bernhard R.

    2016-07-01

    The direct detection of low-mass planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars is an important science case for future E-ELT instruments such as the mid-infrared imager and spectrograph METIS, which features vortex phase masks and apodizing phase plates (APP) in its baseline design. In this work, we present end-to-end performance simulations, using Fourier propagation, of several METIS coronagraphic modes, including focal-plane vortex phase masks and pupil-plane apodizing phase plates, for the centrally obscured, segmented E-ELT pupil. The atmosphere and the AO contributions are taken into account. Hybrid coronagraphs combining the advantages of vortex phase masks and APPs are considered to improve the METIS coronagraphic performance.

  15. TPF coronagraph instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklan, S B.; Balasubramanian, K.; Ceperly, D.; Green, J.; Hoppe, D.; Lay, O. P.; Lisman, P. D.; Mouroulis, P. Z.

    2005-01-01

    For the past 2 years, NASA has invested substantial resources to study the design and performance of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C). The work, led by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with collaboration from Goddard Space Flight Center and several university and commercial entities, encompasses observatory design, performance modeling, materials characterization, primary mirror studies, and a significant technology development effort including a high-contrast imaging testbed that has achieved 1e-9 contrast in a laboratory experiment.

  16. Comparison of Simulated Contrast Performance of Different Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Kern, Brian; Kuhnert, Andreas; Shaklan, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We compare the broadband contrast performances of several Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph configurations through modeling and simulations. The basic optical design of the PIAA coronagraph is the same as NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) setup at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Using a deformable mirror and a broadband wavefront sensing and control algorithm, we create a "dark hole" in the broadband point-spread function (PSF) with an inner working angle (IWA) of 2(f lambda/D)(sub sky). We evaluate two systems in parallel. One is a perfect system having a design PIAA output amplitude and not having any wavefront error at its exit-pupil. The other is a realistic system having a design PIAA output amplitude and the measured residual wavefront error. We also investigate the effect of Lyot stops of various sizes when a postapodizer is and is not present. Our simulations show that the best 7.5%-broadband contrast value achievable with the current PIAA coronagraph is approximately 1.5x10(exp -8).

  17. Accurate time delay technology in simulated test for high precision laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Xiao, Wenjian; Wang, Weiming; Xue, Mingxi

    2015-10-01

    With the continuous development of technology, the ranging accuracy of pulsed laser range finder (LRF) is higher and higher, so the maintenance demand of LRF is also rising. According to the dominant ideology of "time analog spatial distance" in simulated test for pulsed range finder, the key of distance simulation precision lies in the adjustable time delay. By analyzing and comparing the advantages and disadvantages of fiber and circuit delay, a method was proposed to improve the accuracy of the circuit delay without increasing the count frequency of the circuit. A high precision controllable delay circuit was designed by combining the internal delay circuit and external delay circuit which could compensate the delay error in real time. And then the circuit delay accuracy could be increased. The accuracy of the novel circuit delay methods proposed in this paper was actually measured by a high sampling rate oscilloscope actual measurement. The measurement result shows that the accuracy of the distance simulated by the circuit delay is increased from +/- 0.75m up to +/- 0.15m. The accuracy of the simulated distance is greatly improved in simulated test for high precision pulsed range finder.

  18. Simulating a Direction-Finder Search for an ELT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bream, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A computer program simulates the operation of direction-finding equipment engaged in a search for an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) aboard an aircraft that has crashed. The simulated equipment is patterned after the equipment used by the Civil Air Patrol to search for missing aircraft. The program is designed to be used for training in radio direction-finding and/or searching for missing aircraft without incurring the expense and risk of using real aircraft and ground search resources. The program places a hidden ELT on a map and enables the user to search for the location of the ELT by moving a 14 NASA Tech Briefs, March 2005 small aircraft image around the map while observing signal-strength and direction readings on a simulated direction- finding locator instrument. As the simulated aircraft is turned and moved on the map, the program updates the readings on the direction-finding instrument to reflect the current position and heading of the aircraft relative to the location of the ELT. The software is distributed in a zip file that contains an installation program. The software runs on the Microsoft Windows 9x, NT, and XP operating systems.

  19. Path Finder

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J. Brian; Smith, Marcus Daniel; Mulder, Samuel A

    2014-01-07

    PathFinder is a graph search program, traversing a directed cyclic graph to find pathways between labeled nodes. Searches for paths through ordered sequences of labels are termed signatures. Determining the presence of signatures within one or more graphs is the primary function of Path Finder. Path Finder can work in either batch mode or interactively with an analyst. Results are limited to Path Finder whether or not a given signature is present in the graph(s).

  20. Simulation-Based Verification of Autonomous Controllers via Livingstone PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, A. E.; Pecheur, Charles

    2004-01-01

    AI software is often used as a means for providing greater autonomy to automated systems, capable of coping with harsh and unpredictable environments. Due in part to the enormous space of possible situations that they aim to addrs, autonomous systems pose a serious challenge to traditional test-based verification approaches. Efficient verification approaches need to be perfected before these systems can reliably control critical applications. This publication describes Livingstone PathFinder (LPF), a verification tool for autonomous control software. LPF applies state space exploration algorithms to an instrumented testbed, consisting of the controller embedded in a simulated operating environment. Although LPF has focused on NASA s Livingstone model-based diagnosis system applications, the architecture is modular and adaptable to other systems. This article presents different facets of LPF and experimental results from applying the software to a Livingstone model of the main propulsion feed subsystem for a prototype space vehicle.

  1. AHF: AMIGA'S HALO FINDER

    SciTech Connect

    Knollmann, Steffen R.; Knebe, Alexander

    2009-06-15

    Cosmological simulations are the key tool for investigating the different processes involved in the formation of the universe from small initial density perturbations to galaxies and clusters of galaxies observed today. The identification and analysis of bound objects, halos, is one of the most important steps in drawing useful physical information from simulations. In the advent of larger and larger simulations, a reliable and parallel halo finder, able to cope with the ever-increasing data files, is a must. In this work we present the freely available MPI parallel halo finder AHF. We provide a description of the algorithm and the strategy followed to handle large simulation data. We also describe the parameters a user may choose in order to influence the process of halo finding, as well as pointing out which parameters are crucial to ensure untainted results from the parallel approach. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of AHF to scale to high-resolution simulations.

  2. Fault finder

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  3. Planet Detection Algorithms for the Terrestrial Planet Finder-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasdin, N. J.; Braems, I.

    2005-12-01

    Critical to mission planning for the terrestrial planet finder coronagraph (TPF-C) is the ability to estimate integration times for planet detection. This detection is complicated by the presence of background noise due to local and exo-zodiacal dust, by residual speckle due optical errors, and by the dependence of the PSF shape on the specific coronagraph. In this paper we examine in detail the use of PSF fitting (matched filtering) for planet detection, derive probabilistic bounds for the signal-to-noise ratio by balancing missed detection and false alarm rates, and demonstrate that this is close to the optimal linear detection technique. We then compare to a Bayesian detection approach and show that for very low background the Bayesian method offers integration time improvements, but rapidly approaches the PSF fitting result for reasonable levels of background noise. We confirm via monte-carlo simulations. This work was supported under a grant from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and by a fellowship from the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique (INRIA).

  4. Optimizing WFIRST Coronagraph Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Bruce

    We propose an in-depth scientific investigation that will define how the WFIRST coronagraphic instrument will discover and characterize nearby planetary systems and how it will use observations of planets and disks to probe the diversity of their compositions, dynamics, and formation. Given the enormous diversity of known planetary systems it is not enough to optimize a coronagraph mission plan for the characterization of solar system analogs. Instead, we must design a mission to characterize a wide variety of planets, from gas and ice giant planets at a range of separations to mid-sized planets with no analogs in our solar system. We must consider updated planet distributions based on the results of the Kepler mission, long-term radial velocity (RV) surveys and updated luminosity distributions of exo-zodiacal dust from interferometric thermal infrared surveys of nearby stars. The properties of all these objects must be informed by our best models of planets and disks, and the process of using WFIRST observations to measure fundamental planetary properties such as composition must derive from rigorous methods. Our team brings a great depth of expertise to inform and accomplish these and all of the other tasks enumerated in the SIT proposal call. We will perform end-to-end modeling that starts with model spectra of planets and images of disks, simulates WFIRST data using these models, accounts for geometries of specific star / planet / disk systems, and incorporates detailed instrument performance models. We will develop and implement data analysis techniques to extract well-calibrated astrophysical signals from complex data, and propose observing plans that maximize the mission's scientific yield. We will work with the community to build observing programs and target lists, inform them of WFIRSTs capabilities, and supply simulated scientific observations for data challenges. Our work will be informed by the experience we have gained from building and observing with

  5. Skin Condition Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS Rash and Skin Condition Finder 1 Select Age Group Infant Child ... Toe Toe Webspace Toe Nail CLOSE About the Skin Condition Finder Have a health question or concern? ...

  6. The AFTA coronagraph instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Foote, Marc; Rodgers, Michael; Underhill, Michael; Marchen, Luis; Klein, Dan

    2013-09-01

    The Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (AFTA) study in 2012-2013 included a high-contrast stellar coronagraph to complement the wide-field infrared survey (WFIRST) instrument. The idea of flying a coronagraph on this telescope was met with some skepticism because the AFTA pupil has a large central obscuration with six secondary mirror struts that impact the coronagraph sensitivity. However, several promising coronagraph concepts have emerged, and a corresponding initial instrument design has been completed. Requirements on the design include observations centered 0.6 deg off-axis, on-orbit robotic serviceability, operation in a geosynchronous orbit, and room-temperature operation (driven by the coronagraph's deformable mirrors). We describe the instrument performance requirements, the optical design, an observational scenario, and integration times for typical detection and characterization observations.

  7. Terrestrial Planet Finder: science overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Beichman, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) seeks to revolutionize our understanding of humanity's place in the universe - by searching for Earth-like planets using reflected light, or thermal emission in the mid-infrared. Direct detection implies that TPF must separate planet light from glare of the nearby star, a technical challenge which has only in recent years been recognized as surmountable. TPF will obtain a low-resolution spectra of each planets it detects, providing some of its basic physical characteristics and its main atmospheric constituents, thereby allowing us to assess the likelihood that habitable conditions exist there. NASA has decided the scientific importance of this research is so high that TPF will be pursued as two complementary space observatories: a visible-light coronagraph and a mid-infrared formation flying interferometer. The combination of spectra from both wavebands is much more valuable than either taken separately, and it will allow a much fuller understanding of the wide diversity of planetary atmospheres that may be expected to exist. Measurements across a broad wavelength range will yield not only physical properties such as size and albedo, but will also serve as the foundations of a reliable and robust assessment of habitability and the presence of life.

  8. Holographic Vortex Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palacios, David

    2010-01-01

    A holographic vortex coronagraph (HVC) has been proposed as an improvement over conventional coronagraphs for use in high-contrast astronomical imaging for detecting planets, dust disks, and other broadband light scatterers in the vicinities of stars other than the Sun. Because such light scatterers are so faint relative to their parent stars, in order to be able to detect them, it is necessary to effect ultra-high-contrast (typically by a factor of the order of 1010) suppression of broadband light from the stars. Unfortunately, the performances of conventional coronagraphs are limited by low throughput, dispersion, and difficulty of satisfying challenging manufacturing requirements. The HVC concept offers the potential to overcome these limitations.

  9. Scaling An External Occulter Coronagraph Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, Martin C.

    2009-01-01

    An excellent candidate for the Terrestrial Planet Finder mission is an external occulter coronagraph like New Worlds Observer, in which the glare of the host star is blocked by an opaque starshade located between the star and the telescope which observes it. It has proven difficult to visualize and manage the interplay between starshade size and distance, telescope size, optical wavelength, and the depth of stellar suppression. The traditional method is to choose some parameters, calculate the stellar suppression, and iterate. This paper presents an alternate approach which exploits scaling relationships, allowing quick calculation of each new case and better visualization of the ramifications of a modest departure from that case. I apply this method to illustrate the pros and cons of a few different cases at different scales.

  10. The Sensitivity of Shaped Pupil Coronagraphs to Optical Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Joseph J.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Unlike focal-plane coronagraphs that use occulting spots and Lyot stops to eliminate diffraction, pupil-plane coronagraphs operate by shaping the pupil to redirect the diffracted stellar light into a tight core. As in focal-plane coronagraphs, the optical aberrations in the telescope must be sufficiently corrected to enable high contrast imaging. However, in shaped-pupil coronagraphs, the low-order aberrations resulting from misalignment and optical figure drift have a much smaller influence upon the contrast at at the inner working angle. These weaker sensitivities greatly relax the strict low-order wavefront stability required for high-contrast imaging the cost of some throughput. In this paper, we present the simulated performance of the concentric ring shaped pupil concepts comparing them to focal-plane coronagraphs that are optimized for the same inner working angles.

  11. Study of High-Performance Coronagraphic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Aziz, M. J.; Gonsalves, R. A.; Korzennik, S. G.; Labeyrie, A.; Lyon, R. G.; Melnick, G. J.; Somerstein, S.; Vasudevan, G.; Woodruff, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    We will provide a progress report about our study of high-performance coronagraphic techniques. At SAO we have set up a testbed to test coronagraphic masks and to demonstrate Labeyrie's multi-step speckle reduction technique. This technique expands the general concept of a coronagraph by incorporating a speckle corrector (phase or amplitude) and second occulter for speckle light suppression. The testbed consists of a coronagraph with high precision optics (2 inch spherical mirrors with lambda/1000 surface quality), lasers simulating the host star and the planet, and a single Labeyrie correction stage with a MEMS deformable mirror (DM) for the phase correction. The correction function is derived from images taken in- and slightly out-of-focus using phase diversity. The testbed is operational awaiting coronagraphic masks. The testbed control software for operating the CCD camera, the translation stage that moves the camera in- and out-of-focus, the wavefront recovery (phase diversity) module, and DM control is under development. We are also developing coronagraphic masks in collaboration with Harvard University and Lockheed Martin Corp. (LMCO). The development at Harvard utilizes a focused ion beam system to mill masks out of absorber material and the LMCO approach uses patterns of dots to achieve the desired mask performance. We will present results of both investigations including test results from the first generation of LMCO masks obtained with our high-precision mask scanner. This work was supported by NASA through grant NNG04GC57G, through SAO IR&D funding, and by Harvard University through the Research Experience for Undergraduate Program of Harvard's Materials Science and Engineering Center. Central facilities were provided by Harvard's Center for Nanoscale Systems.

  12. Terrestrial Planet Finder: Technology Development Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindensmith, Chris

    2004-01-01

    One of humanity's oldest questions is whether life exists elsewhere in the universe. The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission will survey stars in our stellar neighborhood to search for planets and perform spectroscopic measurements to identify potential biomarkers in their atmospheres. In response to the recently published President's Plan for Space Exploration, TPF has plans to launch a visible-light coronagraph in 2014, and a separated-spacecraft infrared interferometer in 2016. Substantial funding has been committed to the development of the key technologies that are required to meet these goals for launch in the next decade. Efforts underway through industry and university contracts and at JPL include a number of system and subsystem testbeds, as well as components and numerical modeling capabilities. The science, technology, and design efforts are closely coupled to ensure that requirements and capabilities will be consistent and meet the science goals.

  13. Pointing Control System Design and Performance Evaluation for TPF Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kuo-Chia; Blaurock, Carl; Mosier, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) program aims to detect and characterize extra-solar Earth-like planets. The coronagraph telescope is one of the four mission concepts being studied. In order to reject the star flux and detect the planet flux in the visible light range, the coronagraph telescope must achieve a rejection ratio on the order of a billion to one. Dynamic jitter, introduced by environmental and on-board mechanical disturbances, degrades the optical performance, as characterized primarily by contrast ratio. The feasibility of using passive vibration isolation combined with active attitude and line-of- sight control systems to stabilize the spacecraft and the optical components to the requisite level is being studied. The telescope is also required to slew between targets. The slew mode control law must be designed to balance the need for efficient large-angle maneuvers while simultaneously avoiding the excitation of flexible modes in order to minimize settling time.

  14. Small-Grid Dithers for the JWST Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Soummer, Remi; Pueyo, Laurent; Hines, Dean C.; Nelan, Edmund P.; Perrin, Marshall; Clampin, Mark; Isaacs, John C.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss new results of coronagraphic simulations demonstrating a novel mode for JWST that utilizes sub-pixel dithered reference images, called Small-Grid Dithers, to optimize coronagraphic PSF subtraction. These sub-pixel dithers are executed with the Fine Steering Mirror under fine guidance, are accurate to approx.2-3 milliarcseconds (1-s/axis), and provide ample speckle diversity to reconstruct an optimized synthetic reference PSF using LOCI or KLIP. We also discuss the performance gains of Small-Grid Dithers compared to the standard undithered scenario, and show potential contrast gain factors for the NIRCam and MIRI coronagraphs ranging from 2 to more than 10, respectively.

  15. Apodized Phase Mask Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Among the optical instruments proposed to detect and characterize exoplanets, phase masks coronagraphs offer very small inner working angles. Designed for off-axis telescopes, their performance is greatly reduced when used with centrally obstructed apertures such as those of the Palomar telescope, the very large telescope, or the James Webb space telescope. However, a clear circular aperture is not the only pupil shape for which a phase mask coronagraph can work properly. In fact, for a given centrally obstructed aperture, we show that it is possible to compute optimal apodizers that help achieve stellar extinction levels similar to those obtained in the ideal case of an off-axis telescope. Trade-offs exist between these levels, the transmission of the apodizer, and the area covered by the Lyot stop. We detail the Fourier optics formalism that makes these optimizations possible, as well as a few examples of shaped pupils. Some are designed for a four-quadrants phase mask, and some others for a vortex phase mask. We also offer a comparison with a coronagraph solely composed of a shaped pupil.

  16. Coronagraphic phase diversity for exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Mugnier, L. M.; N'Diaye, M.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Fusco, T.

    2012-09-01

    The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterisation (such as SPHERE on the VLT, GPI on Gemini North or EPICS on E-ELT) is limited by intensity residuals in the scientific image plane, which originate in uncorrected optical aberrations. After correction of the atmospheric turbulence, the main contribution to these residuals are the quasi-static aberrations introduced upstream of the coronagraphic mask. In order to reach the final detectivity, these aberrations have to be estimated and compensated for. Some of these aberrations are not seen by the wave-front sensor of the AO loop but only by the scientific instruments. In order to measure and compensate for these aberrations, we have recently proposed a dedicated focal-plane sensor called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), based on an analytical model for coronagraphic imaging. In this communication, we first present a thorough characterisation of COFFEE's performance, by means of numerical simulations. We additionally present an experimental validation of COFFEE for low orders aberrations using an in-house Adaptive Optics Bench and an apodized Roddier and Roddier phase mask coronagraph.

  17. Study of High Performance Coronagraphic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Phil (Technical Monitor); Tolls, Volker

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the Study of High Performance Coronagraphic Techniques project (called CoronaTech) is: 1) to verify the Labeyrie multi-step speckle reduction method and 2) to develop new techniques to manufacture soft-edge occulter masks preferably with Gaussian absorption profile. In a coronagraph, the light from a bright host star which is centered on the optical axis in the image plane is blocked by an occulter centered on the optical axis while the light from a planet passes the occulter (the planet has a certain minimal distance from the optical axis). Unfortunately, stray light originating in the telescope and subsequent optical elements is not completely blocked causing a so-called speckle pattern in the image plane of the coronagraph limiting the sensitivity of the system. The sensitivity can be increased significantly by reducing the amount of speckle light. The Labeyrie multi-step speckle reduction method implements one (or more) phase correction steps to suppress the unwanted speckle light. In each step, the stray light is rephased and then blocked with an additional occulter which affects the planet light (or other companion) only slightly. Since the suppression is still not complete, a series of steps is required in order to achieve significant suppression. The second part of the project is the development of soft-edge occulters. Simulations have shown that soft-edge occulters show better performance in coronagraphs than hard-edge occulters. In order to utilize the performance gain of soft-edge occulters. fabrication methods have to be developed to manufacture these occulters according to the specification set forth by the sensitivity requirements of the coronagraph.

  18. Hg-Mask Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.; Assus, P.; Colas, F.

    In order to optimize the occulting process of a Lyot coronagraph and to provide a high dynamic range imaging, a new kind of occulting disk has been developed at the National Observatory of Rio de Janeiro. A mercury (Hg) drop glued onto an optical window by molecular cohesion and compressed by a pellicle film is used as the occulting disk. The minimum of the superficial tension potential function provides an optical precision (lambda/100) of the toric free surface of the mercury. This process provides a size control for the adaptation to the seeing conditions and to the apparent diameter of a resolved object, and in the case of adaptive optics, to the Airy diameter fraction needed. The occultation is a three dimensional process near the focal plane on the toric free surface that provides an apodization of the occultation. The Hg-Mask coronagraph has been projected for astrometric observations of faint satellites near to Jovian planets and works since 2000 at the 1.6 m telescope of the Pico dos Dias Observatory (OPD - Brazil).

  19. SPECKLE NOISE SUBTRACTION AND SUPPRESSION WITH ADAPTIVE OPTICS CORONAGRAPHIC IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Deqing; Dou Jiangpei; Zhang Xi; Zhu Yongtian

    2012-07-10

    Future ground-based direct imaging of exoplanets depends critically on high-contrast coronagraph and wave-front manipulation. A coronagraph is designed to remove most of the unaberrated starlight. Because of the wave-front error, which is inherit from the atmospheric turbulence from ground observations, a coronagraph cannot deliver its theoretical performance, and speckle noise will limit the high-contrast imaging performance. Recently, extreme adaptive optics, which can deliver an extremely high Strehl ratio, is being developed for such a challenging mission. In this publication, we show that barely taking a long-exposure image does not provide much gain for coronagraphic imaging with adaptive optics. We further discuss a speckle subtraction and suppression technique that fully takes advantage of the high contrast provided by the coronagraph, as well as the wave front corrected by the adaptive optics. This technique works well for coronagraphic imaging with conventional adaptive optics with a moderate Strehl ratio, as well as for extreme adaptive optics with a high Strehl ratio. We show how to substrate and suppress speckle noise efficiently up to the third order, which is critical for future ground-based high-contrast imaging. Numerical simulations are conducted to fully demonstrate this technique.

  20. Post-coronagraphic wave-front sensing dedicated to exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Francois, Sauvage; Laurent, Mugnier; Baptiste, Paul

    2011-09-01

    The final performance of current instruments dedicated to exoplanet search and imaging (such as SPHERE and EPICS) is strongly limited by uncorrected optical aberrations. After correction of the atmospheric turbulence by an extreme AO system, the main contribution comes from the quasi-static aberrations introduced upstream of the coronagraph. In order to measure and precompensate for these, we propose a focal-plane sensor which we call coronagraphic phase diversity (CPD). It is an adaptation of conventional phase diversity to the coronagraphic case and uses an analytical model for coronagraphic imaging. In this communication, we validate two essential aspects of CPD: - we validate by realistic simulations that our analytical imaging model, which assumes a perfect coronagraph, can indeed be used with real-life coronagraphs, and we assess the CPD performance; - we perform the very first validation of CPD on experimental data obtained on an in-house AO bench.

  1. Coronagraph Focal-Plane Phase Masks Based on Photonic Crystal Technology: Recent Progress and Observational Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Naoshi; Nishikawa, Jun; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Ise, Akitoshi; Oka, Kazuhiko; Baba, Naoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Tamura, Motohide; Traub, Wesley A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Moody, Dwight C.; Kern, Brian D.; Trauger, John T.; Serabyn, Eugene; Hamaguchi, Shoki; Oshiyama, Fumika

    2012-01-01

    Photonic crystal, an artificial periodic nanostructure of refractive indices, is one of the attractive technologies for coronagraph focal-plane masks aiming at direct imaging and characterization of terrestrial extrasolar planets. We manufactured the eight-octant phase mask (8OPM) and the vector vortex mask (VVM) very precisely using the photonic crystal technology. Fully achromatic phase-mask coronagraphs can be realized by applying appropriate polarization filters to the masks. We carried out laboratory experiments of the polarization-filtered 8OPM coronagraph using the High-Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT), a state-of-the-art coronagraph simulator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). We report the experimental results of 10-8-level contrast across several wavelengths over 10% bandwidth around 800nm. In addition, we present future prospects and observational strategy for the photonic-crystal mask coronagraphs combined with differential imaging techniques to reach higher contrast. We proposed to apply a polarization-differential imaging (PDI) technique to the VVM coronagraph, in which we built a two-channel coronagraph using polarizing beam splitters to avoid a loss of intensity due to the polarization filters. We also proposed to apply an angular-differential imaging (ADI) technique to the 8OPM coronagraph. The 8OPM/ADI mode avoids an intensity loss due to a phase transition of the mask and provides a full field of view around central stars. We present results of preliminary laboratory demonstrations of the PDI and ADI observational modes with the phase-mask coronagraphs.

  2. Stability Error Budget for an Aggressive Coronagraph on a 3.8 m Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Marchen, Luis; Krist, John; Rud, Mayer

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate in detail the stability requirements for a band-limited coronagraph with an inner working angle as small as 2 lambda/D coupled to an off-axis, 3.8-m diameter telescope. We have updated our methodologies since presenting a stability error budget for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph mission that worked at 4 lambda/D and employed an 8th-order mask to reduce aberration sensitives. In the previous work, we determined the tolerances relative to the total light leaking through the coronagraph. Now, we separate the light into a radial component, which is readily separable from a planet signal, and an azimuthal component, which is easily confused with a planet signal. In the current study, throughput considerations require a 4th-order coronagraph. This, combined with the more aggressive working angle, places extraordinarily tight requirements on wavefront stability and opto-mechanical stability. We find that the requirements are driven mainly by coma that leaks around the coronagraph mask and mimics the localized signal of a planet, and pointing errors that scatter light into the background, decreasing SNR. We also show how the requirements would be relaxed if a low-order aberration detection system could be employed.

  3. The Achromatic Interfero Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbia, Yves; Gay, Jean; Rivet, Jean-Pierre

    2007-04-01

    We report on the Achromatic Interfero Coronagraph, a focal imaging device which aims at rejecting the energy contribution of a point-like source set on-axis, so as to make detectable its angularly-close environment (applicable to stellar environment: circumstellar matter, faint companions, planetary systems, but also conceivably to Active Galactic Nucleii and multiple asteroïds). With AIC, starlight rejection is based on destructive interference, which allows exploration of the star's neighbourhood at an angular resolution better than the diffraction limit of the hosting telescope. Thanks to the focus crossing property of light, rejection is achromatic thus yielding a large spectral bandwidth of work. Descriptions and comments are given regarding the principle, the device itself, the constraints and limitations, and the theoretical performance. Results are presented which demonstrate the close-sensing capability and which show images of a companion obtained in laboratory and ‘on the sky’ as well. A short pictorial description of the alternative AIC concepts, CIAXE and Open-Air CIAXE, currently under study, is given. To cite this article: Y. Rabbia et al., C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  4. Haloes gone MAD: The Halo-Finder Comparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knebe, Alexander; Knollmann, Steffen R.; Muldrew, Stuart I.; Pearce, Frazer R.; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel Angel; Ascasibar, Yago; Behroozi, Peter S.; Ceverino, Daniel; Colombi, Stephane; Diemand, Juerg; Dolag, Klaus; Falck, Bridget L.; Fasel, Patricia; Gardner, Jeff; Gottlöber, Stefan; Hsu, Chung-Hsing; Iannuzzi, Francesca; Klypin, Anatoly; Lukić, Zarija; Maciejewski, Michal; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Planelles, Susana; Potter, Doug; Quilis, Vicent; Rasera, Yann; Read, Justin I.; Ricker, Paul M.; Roy, Fabrice; Springel, Volker; Stadel, Joachim; Stinson, Greg; Sutter, P. M.; Turchaninov, Victor; Tweed, Dylan; Yepes, Gustavo; Zemp, Marcel

    2011-08-01

    We present a detailed comparison of fundamental dark matter halo properties retrieved by a substantial number of different halo finders. These codes span a wide range of techniques including friends-of-friends, spherical-overdensity and phase-space-based algorithms. We further introduce a robust (and publicly available) suite of test scenarios that allow halo finder developers to compare the performance of their codes against those presented here. This set includes mock haloes containing various levels and distributions of substructure at a range of resolutions as well as a cosmological simulation of the large-scale structure of the universe. All the halo-finding codes tested could successfully recover the spatial location of our mock haloes. They further returned lists of particles (potentially) belonging to the object that led to coinciding values for the maximum of the circular velocity profile and the radius where it is reached. All the finders based in configuration space struggled to recover substructure that was located close to the centre of the host halo, and the radial dependence of the mass recovered varies from finder to finder. Those finders based in phase space could resolve central substructure although they found difficulties in accurately recovering its properties. Through a resolution study we found that most of the finders could not reliably recover substructure containing fewer than 30-40 particles. However, also here the phase-space finders excelled by resolving substructure down to 10-20 particles. By comparing the halo finders using a high-resolution cosmological volume, we found that they agree remarkably well on fundamental properties of astrophysical significance (e.g. mass, position, velocity and peak of the rotation curve). We further suggest to utilize the peak of the rotation curve, vmax, as a proxy for mass, given the arbitrariness in defining a proper halo edge. Airport code for Madrid, Spain

  5. The VORTEX coronagraphic test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, A.; Piron, P.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Mawet, D.; Surdej, J.; Habraken, S.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present the infrared coronagraphic test bench of the University of Liège named VODCA (Vortex Optical Demonstrator for Coronagraphic Applications). The goal of the bench is to assess the performances of the Annular Groove Phase Masks (AGPMs) at near- to mid-infrared wavelengths. The AGPM is a subwavelength grating vortex coronagraph of charge two (SGVC2) made out of diamond. The bench is designed to be completely achromatic and will be composed of a super continuum laser source emitting in the near to mid-infrared, several parabolas, diaphragms and an infrared camera. This way, we will be able to test the different AGPMs in the M, L, K and H bands. Eventually, the bench will also allow the computation of the incident wavefront aberrations on the coronagraph. A reflective Lyot stop will send most of the stellar light to a second camera to perform low-order wavefront sensing. This second system coupled with a deformable mirror will allow the correction of the wavefront aberrations. We also aim to test other pre- and/or post-coronagraphic concepts such as optimal apodization.

  6. Analytical expression of a long exposure coronagraphic point spread function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herscovici-Schiller, Olivier; Mugnier, Laurent M.; Sauvage, Jean-François; Le Duigou, Jean-Michel; Cantalloube, Faustine

    2016-07-01

    The resolution of coronagraphic high contrast exoplanet imaging devices such as SPHERE is limited by quasistatic aberrations. These aberrations produce speckles that can be mistaken for planets in the image. In order to design instruments, correct quasi-static aberrations or analyze data, the expression of the point spread function of a coronagraphic telescope in the presence of residual turbulence is useful. We have derived an analytic formula for this point spread function. We explain physically its structure, we validate it by numerical simulations and we show that it is computationally efficient.

  7. Application of the Premature Chromosome Condensation Assay in Simulated Partial-Body Radiation Exposures: Evaluation of the Use of an Automated Metaphase-Finder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    DECLASSIFY ON: SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE 4 .ARMED FORCES RADIOSIOLOGY RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCIENTIFIC REPORT SR95-17 Application of the Premature ...Radiation Biophysics Department, Bethesda, Maryland, USA; bLoats Associates, Westminster, Maryland, USA Key Words. Premature chromosome condensation...assay • Lymphocytes • x-ray • Chromosome damage • Biodosimetry • Partial-body exposure • Metaphase-finder Abstract. The premature chromosome condensa

  8. Numerical modeling of the proposed WFIRST-AFTA coronagraphs and their predicted performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krist, John; Nemati, Bijan; Mennesson, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    The WFIRST-AFTA 2.37 m telescope will provide the opportunity to host a coronagraph for the imaging and spectroscopy of planets and disks in the next decade. The telescope, however, is not ideal, given its obscured aperture. Only recently have coronagraph designs been thoroughly investigated that can efficiently work with this configuration. Three coronagraph designs, the hybrid Lyot, shaped pupil, and phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph have been selected for further development by the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset project. Real-world testbed demonstrations of these have just begun, so for now, the most reliable means of evaluating their potential performance comes from numerical modeling incorporating diffraction propagation, realistic system models, and simulated wavefront sensing and control. Here, we present the methods of performance evaluation and results for the current coronagraph designs.

  9. Pointing control system design and performance evaluation of TPF coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kuo-Chia; Blaurock, Carl; Mosier, Gary E.

    2004-09-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project aims to detect and characterize extra-solar Earth-like planets. The coronagraph telescope is one of the two mission concepts being studied. To reject the star flux and detect the planet flux in the visible light range, the coronagraph telescope must achieve a rejection ratio on the order of a billion to one. Dynamic jitter, introduced by environmental and on-board mechanical disturbances, degrades the optical performance, as characterized primarily by contrast ratio. The feasibility of using passive vibration isolation combined with active attitude and line-of-sight (LOS) control systems to stabilize the spacecraft and the optical components to the requisite level is being studied. The telescope is also required to slew between targets or rotate around the LOS. The slew mode control law must be designed to balance the need for efficient large-angle maneuvers while simultaneously avoiding the excitation of flexible modes in order to minimize settling time. This paper provides an overview of the current control design concept and sensor/actuator topology for TPF Coronagraph and illustrates the fine pointing performance of the telescope. This performance is primarily a function of the rejection of high-frequency dynamic disturbances, in this case due to reaction wheel disturbance forces/torques transmitted through the passive isolation stage. Trade studies between isolator force rejection and disturbance level reduction via wheel redesign are also presented to illustrate the requirements imposed on current technologies. Finally, the paper summarizes preliminary results on the slew/settle performance of the telescope.

  10. Stray-light sources from pupil mask edges and mitigation techniques for the TPF Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, Daniel; Neureuther, Andrew; Miller, Marshall; Lieber, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2006-06-01

    Stray-light sources from pupil plane masks that may limit Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) performance are characterized 1,2 and mitigation strategies are discussed to provide a guide for future development. Rigorous vector simulation with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method is used to characterize waveguiding effects in narrow openings, sidewall interactions, manufacturing tool-marks, manufacturing roughness, mask tilt, and cross-wavelength performance of thick Silicon mask structures. These effects cause stray-light that is not accounted for in scalar thin-mask diffraction theory, the most important of which are sidewall interactions, waveguiding effects in narrow openings, and tilt. These results have been used to improve the scalar thin-mask theory used to simulate the TPF-C with the Integrated Telescope Model. 3 Of particular interest are simulations of 100m thick vertical sidewall openings that model features typically found on Ripple masks 4 fabricated by Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) processes. 5 This paper contributes fundamental data for systematically modeling these effects in end-to-end system simulation. Leakage straight through the mask material varies greatly with wavelength, especially in Silicon (an attractive mask material due to the precision manufacturing techniques developed by the IC industry). Coating Silicon with 200nm of Chrome effectively mitigates the leakage without causing additional scattering. Thick-mask diffraction differs from the predictions of scalar thin-mask theory because diffraction spreading is confined by the mask's sidewalls. This confinement can make a mask opening look electro-magnetically larger or smaller than designed, by up to 3λ per vertical sidewall on a 50μm thick mask yet this can be reduced an order of magnitude by undercutting the sidewalls 20°. These confinement effects are sensitive to mask tilt (if light reaches the sidewalls) which can lead to an imbalance in stray-light sources and

  11. Precursor Science for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R. (Editor); Unwin, S. C. (Editor); Beichman, C. A. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    This document outlines a path for the development of the field of extrasolar planet research, with a particular emphasis on the goals of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). Over the past decade, a new field of research has developed, the study of extrasolar planetary systems, driven by the discovery of massive planets around nearby stars. The planet count now stands at over 130. Are there Earth-like planets around nearby stars? Might any of those planets be conducive to the formation and maintenance of life? These arc the questions that TPF seeks to answer. TPF will be implemented as a suite of two space observatories, a 6-m class optical coronagraph, to be launched around 20 14, and a formation flying mid-infrared interferometer, to be launched sometime prior to 2020. These facilities will survey up to 165 or more nearby stars and detect planets like Earth should they be present in the 'habitable zone' around each star. With observations over a broad wavelength range, TPF will provide a robust determination of the atmospheric composition of planets to assess habitability and the presence of life. At this early stage of TPF's development, precursor observational and theoretical programs are essential to help define the mission, to aid our understanding of the planets that TPF could discover, and to characterize the stars that TPF will eventually study. This document is necessarily broad in scope because the significance of individual discoveries is greatly enhanced when viewed in thc context of the field as a whole. This document has the ambitious goal of taking us from our limited knowledge today, in 2004, to the era of TPF observations in the middle of the next decade. We must use the intervening years wisely. This document will be reviewed annually and updated as needed. The most recent edition is available online at http://tpf.jpl.nasa.gov/ or by email request to lawson@hucy.jpl.nasa.gov

  12. Target & Propagation Models for the FINDER Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Vaughn; Lux, James; Haque, Salmon

    2013-01-01

    Finding persons still alive in piles of rubble following an earthquake, a severe storm, or other disaster is a difficult problem. JPL is currently developing a victim detection radar called FINDER (Finding Individuals in Emergency and Response). The subject of this paper is directed toward development of propagation & target models needed for simulation & testing of such a system. These models are both physical (real rubble piles) and numerical. Early results from the numerical modeling phase show spatial and temporal spreading characteristics when signals are passed through a randomly mixed rubble pile.

  13. Rockstar: Phase-space halo finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, Peter; Wechsler, Risa; Wu, Hao-Yi

    2012-10-01

    Rockstar (Robust Overdensity Calculation using K-Space Topologically Adaptive Refinement) identifies dark matter halos, substructure, and tidal features. The approach is based on adaptive hierarchical refinement of friends-of-friends groups in six phase-space dimensions and one time dimension, which allows for robust (grid-independent, shape-independent, and noise-resilient) tracking of substructure. Our method is massively parallel (up to 10^5 CPUs) and runs on the largest current simulations (>10^10 particles) with high efficiency (10 CPU hours and 60 gigabytes of memory required per billion particles analyzed). Rockstar offers significant improvement in substructure recovery as compared to several other halo finders.

  14. Requirements for an Operational Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, R.; Vourlidas, A.; Harrison, R. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Plunkett, S. P.; Socker, D. G.; Eyles, C. J.; Webb, D. F.; DeForest, C. E.; Davies, J. A.; Howard, T. A.; de Koning, C. A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Davila, J. M.; Tappin, J.; Jackson, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been shown to be the major driver of the non-recurrent space weather events and geomagnetic storms. The utility of continuously monitoring such events has been very effectively demonstrated by the LASCO experiment on the SOHO mission. However SOHO is aging, having been launched 20 years ago on Dec 2, 1995. The STEREO mission, in which two spacecraft in orbits about the sun are drifting away from earth, has shown the utility of multiple viewpoints off the sun-earth line. Up to now the monitoring of CMES has been performed by scientific instruments such as LASCO and SECCHI with capabilities beyond those required to record the parameters that are needed to forecast the impact at earth. However, there is great interest within the US NOAA and the UK Met Office to launch operational coronagraphs to L1 and L5. An ad-hoc group was formed to define the requirements of the L5 coronagraph. In this paper we present some requirements that must be met by operational coronagraphs. The Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Optimal Jet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, D. Yu.; Jankowski, E.; Tkachov, F. V.

    2003-09-01

    We describe a FORTRAN 77 implementation of the optimal jet definition for identification of jets in hadronic final states of particle collisions. We discuss details of the implementation, explain interface subroutines and provide a usage example. The source code is available from http://www.inr.ac.ru/~ftkachov/projects/jets/. Program summaryTitle of program: Optimal Jet Finder (OJF_014) Catalogue identifier: ADSB Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSB Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: Any computer with the FORTRAN 77 compiler Tested with: g77/Linux on Intel, Alpha and Sparc; Sun f77/Solaris (thwgs.cern.ch); xlf/AIX (rsplus.cern.ch); MS Fortran PowerStation 4.0/Win98 Programming language used: FORTRAN 77 Memory required: ˜1 MB (or more, depending on the settings) Number of bytes in distributed program, including examples and test data: 251 463 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Hadronic jets, jet finding algorithms Nature of physical problem: Analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collision experiments often involves identification of hadronic jets. A large number of hadrons detected in the calorimeter is reduced to a few jets by means of a jet finding algorithm. The jets are used in further analysis which would be difficult or impossible when applied directly to the hadrons. Grigoriev et al. [ hep-ph/0301185] provide a brief introduction to the subject of jet finding algorithms and a general review of the physics of jets can be found in [Rep. Prog. Phys. 36 (1993) 1067]. Method of solution: The software we provide is an implementation of the so-called optimal jet definition ( OJD). The theory of OJD was developed by Tkachov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 2405; 74 (1995) 2618; Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 12 (1997) 5411; 17 (2002) 2783]. The desired jet configuration is obtained as the one that minimizes Ω R, a certain function of the input particles and jet

  16. Gemini Planet Imager coronagraph testbed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Mey, Jacob L.; Brenner, Doug; Mandeville, Charles W.; Zimmerman, Neil; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Graham, James R.; Saddlemyer, Les; Bauman, Brian; Carlotti, Alexis; Pueyo, Laurent; Tuthill, Peter G.; Dorrer, Christophe; Roberts, Robin; Greenbaum, Alexandra

    2010-07-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an extreme AO coronagraphic integral field unit YJHK spectrograph destined for first light on the 8m Gemini South telescope in 2011. GPI fields a 1500 channel AO system feeding an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and a nIR non-common-path slow wavefront sensor. It targets detection and characterizion of relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets up to 10 million times as faint as their primary star. We present the coronagraph subsystem's in-lab performance, and describe the studies required to specify and fabricate the coronagraph. Coronagraphic pupil apodization is implemented with metallic half-tone screens on glass, and the focal plane occulters are deep reactive ion etched holes in optically polished silicon mirrors. Our JH testbed achieves H-band contrast below a million at separations above 5 resolution elements, without using an AO system. We present an overview of the coronagraphic masks and our testbed coronagraphic data. We also demonstrate the performance of an astrometric and photometric grid that enables coronagraphic astrometry relative to the primary star in every exposure, a proven technique that has yielded on-sky precision of the order of a milliarsecond.

  17. Gemini Planet Imager Coronagraph Testbed Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaranmakrishnan, A.; Carr, G.; Soummer, R.; Oppenheimer, B.R.; Mey, J.L.; Brenner, D.; Mandeville, C.W.; Zimmerman, N. Macintosh, B.A.; Graham, J.R.; Saddlemyer, L.; Bauman, B.; Carlotti, A.; Pueyo, L.; Tuthill, P.G.; Dorrer, C.; Roberts, R.; Greenbaum, A.

    2010-12-08

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an extreme AO coronagraphic integral field unit YJHK spectrograph destined for first light on the 8m Gemini South telescope in 2011. GPI fields a 1500 channel AO system feeding an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and a nIR non-common-path slow wavefront sensor. It targets detection and characterizion of relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets up to 10 million times as faint as their primary star. We present the coronagraph subsystem's in-lab performance, and describe the studies required to specify and fabricate the coronagraph. Coronagraphic pupil apodization is implemented with metallic half-tone screens on glass, and the focal plane occulters are deep reactive ion etched holes in optically polished silicon mirrors. Our JH testbed achieves H-band contrast below a million at separations above 5 resolution elements, without using an AO system. We present an overview of the coronagraphic masks and our testbed coronagraphic data. We also demonstrate the performance of an astrometric and photometric grid that enables coronagraphic astrometry relative to the primary star in every exposure, a proven technique that has yielded on-sky precision of the order of a milliarsecond.

  18. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph: Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC will provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 3-year mission lifetime ( 5 year goal) and will revisit planets at least three times at intervals of 9 months. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables high order starlight suppression in broadband light. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Lockheed-Martin have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed,

  19. Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2009-01-01

    EPIC is a NASA mission being studied to detect and characterize Jovian and superEarth planets, and, the dust/debris disks surrounding the parent star. It will be launched into a heliocentric Earth trailing orbit and operate for 5 years. EPIC would operate over the wavelength range of 480 - 960 nm with spectral resolutions of R < 50 and employs a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) to suppress the starlight, yielding contrast ratios of greater than 9 orders of magnitude. We will discuss the science mission, and its role in the search for habitable planets.

  20. Coronagraphic Observations of Lunar Sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.; Sprague, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    This grant supported an investigation of lunar sodium by our coronagraph and spectrograph on nearby Mount Lemmon. We report successful operation and data analysis during International Lunar Atmosphere Week, September 15 - 22, 1995, and submittal of a paper to Icarus. The core of the proposed work was to observe the lunar sodium atmosphere with our classical Lyot coronagraph and specially-built grating spectrograph on Mount Lemmon, a 9400-foot peak about an hour's drive from Tucson. It is optimized for low scattered light and for observing from the Moon's limb to an altitude of approx.1 lunar radius. The grating has 600 lines/mm and a blaze angle of 49 deg., and is used with a somewhat wide slit at a resolving power of about 5000. It is called DARRK for the initials of the people who designed it. The rejection of stray light from the Moon's disk is spectacularly good: when the sky is clear this light is absent right up to a few arcsec from the limb. We use an excellent 1024 by 1024 pixel CCD camera, operated at -100 C; the exposures are 10 to 30 min. Data reduction is done with IRAF running on a Sun Sparcstation.

  1. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  2. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  3. Sensing Phase Aberrations behind Lyot Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Direct detection of young extrasolar planets orbiting nearby stars can be accomplished from the ground with extreme adaptive optics and coronagraphy in the near-infrared, as long as this combination can provide an image with a dynamic range of 107 after the data are processed. Slowly varying speckles due to residual phase aberrations that are not measured by the primary wave-front sensor are the primary obstacle to achieving such a dynamic range. In particular, non-common optical path aberrations occurring between the wave-front sensor and the coronagraphic occulting spot degrade performance the most. We analyze the passage of both low and high spatial frequency phase ripples, as well as low-order Zernike aberrations, through an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph in order to demonstrate the way coronagraphic filtering affects various aberrations. We derive the coronagraphically induced cutoff frequency of the filtering and estimate coronagraphic contrast losses due to low-order Zernike aberrations: tilt, astigmatism, defocus, coma, and spherical aberration. Such slowly varying path errors can be measured behind a coronagraph and corrected by a slowly updated optical path delay precompensation or offset asserted on the wave front by the adaptive optics (AO) system. We suggest ways of measuring and correcting all but the lowest spatial frequency aberrations using Lyot plane wave-front data, in spite of the complex interaction between the coronagraph and those mid-spatial frequency aberrations that cause image plane speckles near the coronagraphic focal plane mask occulter's edge. This investigation provides guidance for next-generation coronagraphic instruments currently under construction.

  4. A new deformable mirror architecture for coronagraphic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Lemmer, Aaron; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronagraphs are a promising solution for the next generation of exoplanet imaging instrumentation. While a coronagraph can have very good contrast and inner working angle performance, it is highly sensitive to optical aberrations. This necessitates a wavefront control system to correct aberrations within the telescope. The wavefront requirements and desired search area in a deformable mirror (DM) demand control of the electric field out to relatively high spatial frequencies. Conventional wisdom leads us to high stroke, high actuator density DMs that are capable of reaching these spatial frequencies on a single surface. Here we model a different architecture, where nearly every optical surface, powered or unpowered, is a controllable element. Rather than relying on one or two controllable surfaces for the success of the entire instrument the modeled instrument consists of a series of lower actuator count deformable mirrors to achieve the same result by leveraging the conjugate planes that exist in a coronagraphic instrument. To make such an instrument concept effective the imaging optics themselves must become precision deformable elements, akin to the deformable secondary mirrors at major telescope facilities. Such a DM does not exist commercially; all current DMs, while not necessarily incapable of carrying optical power, are manufactured with flat nominal surfaces. This simplifies control and manufacturing, but complicates their integration into an optical system because there is oftentimes a need to pack several into collimated space. Furthermore, high actuator count DMs cannot approximate low order shapes such as focus or tip-tilt without significant mid-spatial frequency residuals, which is not acceptable for a coronagraphic high-contrast imager. The ability to integrate the wavefront control system into the nominal coronagraphic optical train simplifies packaging, reduces cost and complexity, and increases optical throughput of any coronagraphic instrument

  5. Lyman alpha coronagraph research sounding rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Kohl, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The ultraviolet light coronagraph was developed and successfully flown on three rocket flights on 13 April 1979, 16 February 1980 and 20 July 1982. During each of these flights, the Ultraviolet Light Coronagraph was flown jointly with the White Light Coronagraph provided by the High Altitude Observatory. Ultraviolet diagnostic techniques and instrumentation for determining the basic plasma parameters of solar wind acceleration regions in the extended corona were developed and verified and the understanding of the physics of the corona through the performance, analysis and interpretation of solar observations advanced. Valuable UV diagnostics can be performed in the absence of a natural solar eclipse.

  6. Coronagraph for astronomical imaging and spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, Faith; Smith, Bradford A.

    1987-01-01

    A coronagraph designed to minimize scattered light in astronomical observations caused by the structure of the primary mirror, secondary mirror, and secondary support structure of a Cassegrainian telescope is described. Direct (1:1) and reducing (2.7:1) imaging of astronomical fields are possible. High-quality images are produced. The coronagraph can be used with either a two-dimensional charge-coupled device or photographic film camera. The addition of transmission dispersing optics converts the coronagraph into a low-resolution spectrograph. The instrument is modular and portable for transport to different observatories.

  7. Coronagraphic Observations of Lunar Sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.; Sprague, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    The core of the proposed work was to observe the lunar sodium atmosphere with our classical Lyot coronagraph and specially-built grating spectrograph on Mount Lemmon, a 9400-foot peak about an hour's drive from Tucson. It is optimized for low scattered light and for observing from the Moon's limb to an altitude of approx. 1 lunar radius. The grating has 600 lines/mm and a blaze angle of 49 deg, and is used with a somewhat wide slit at a resolving power of about 5000. It is called DARRK for the initials of the people who designed it. The rejection of stray light from the Moon's disk is spectacularly good: when the sky is clear this light is absent right up to a few arcsec from the limb. We use an excellent 1024 by 1024 pixel CCD camera, operated at -100 C; the exposures are 10 to 30 min. Data reduction is done with ERAF running on a Sun Sparcstation.

  8. Technology Plan for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R. (Editor); Dooley, Jennifer A. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    The technology plan for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I) describes the breadth of technology development currently envisaged to enable TPF-I to search for habitable worlds around nearby stars. TPF-I is currently in Pre-Phase A (the Advanced Study Phase) of its development. For planning purposes, it is expected to enter into Phase A in 2010 and be launched sometime before 2020. TPF-I is being developed concurrently with the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C), whose launch is anticipated in 201 6. The missions are being designed with the capability to detect Earth-like planets should they exist in the habitable zones of Sun-like (F,G, and K) stars out to a distance of about 60 light-years. Each mission will have the starlight-suppression and spectroscopic capability to enable the characterization of extrasolar planetary atmospheres, identifying biomarkers and signs of life. TPF-C is designed as a visible-light coronagraph; TPF-I is designed as a mid-infrared formation-flying interferometer. The two missions, working together, promise to yield unambiguous detections and characterizations of Earth-like planets. The challenges of planet detections with mid-infrared formation-flying interferometry are described within this technology plan. The approach to developing the technology is described through roadmaps that lead from our current state of the art through the different phases of mission development to launch. Technology metrics and milestones are given to measure progress. The emphasis of the plan is development and acquisition of technology during pre-Phase A to establish feasibility of the mission to enter Phase A sometime around 2010. Plans beyond 2010 are outlined. The plan contains descriptions of the development of new component technology as well as testbeds that demonstrate the viability of new techniques and technology required for the mission. Starlight-suppression (nulling) and formation-flying technology are highlighted

  9. Coronagraphic phase diversity: performance study and laboratory demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Mugnier, L. M.

    2013-04-01

    Context. The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization (such as SPHERE on the European Very Large Telescope, GPI on Gemini North, or future instruments on Extremely Large Telescopes) is limited by uncorrected quasi-static aberrations. These aberrations create long-lived speckles in the scientific image plane, which can easily be mistaken for planets. Aims: Common adaptive optics systems require dedicated components to perform wave-front analysis. The ultimate wave-front measurement performance is thus limited by the unavoidable differential aberrations between the wave-front sensor and the scientific camera. To reach the level of detectivity required by high-contrast imaging, these differential aberrations must be estimated and compensated for. In this paper, we characterize and experimentally validate a wave-front sensing method that relies on focal-plane data. Methods: Our method, called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), is based on a Bayesian approach, and it consists in an extension of phase diversity to high-contrast imaging. It estimates the differential aberrations using only two focal-plane coronagraphic images recorded from the scientific camera itself. Results: We first present a thorough characterization of COFFEE's performance by means of numerical simulations. This characterization is then compared with an experimental validation of COFFEE using an in-house adaptive optics bench and an apodized Roddier & Roddier phase mask coronagraph. An excellent match between experimental results and the theoretical study is found. Lastly, we present a preliminary validation of COFFEE's ability to compensate for the aberrations upstream of a coronagraph.

  10. Fine Guidance Sensing for Coronagraphic Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James W.; Trauger, John T.; Moody, Dwight C.

    2011-01-01

    Three options have been developed for Fine Guidance Sensing (FGS) for coronagraphic observatories using a Fine Guidance Camera within a coronagraphic instrument. Coronagraphic observatories require very fine precision pointing in order to image faint objects at very small distances from a target star. The Fine Guidance Camera measures the direction to the target star. The first option, referred to as Spot, was to collect all of the light reflected from a coronagraph occulter onto a focal plane, producing an Airy-type point spread function (PSF). This would allow almost all of the starlight from the central star to be used for centroiding. The second approach, referred to as Punctured Disk, collects the light that bypasses a central obscuration, producing a PSF with a punctured central disk. The final approach, referred to as Lyot, collects light after passing through the occulter at the Lyot stop. The study includes generation of representative images for each option by the science team, followed by an engineering evaluation of a centroiding or a photometric algorithm for each option. After the alignment of the coronagraph to the fine guidance system, a "nulling" point on the FGS focal point is determined by calibration. This alignment is implemented by a fine alignment mechanism that is part of the fine guidance camera selection mirror. If the star images meet the modeling assumptions, and the star "centroid" can be driven to that nulling point, the contrast for the coronagraph will be maximized.

  11. STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. We describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  12. Extra Solar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph and Science Requirements for the James Webb Telescope Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark

    2004-01-01

    1) Extra solar planetary imaging coronagraph. Direct detection and characterization of Jovian planets, and other gas giants, in orbit around nearby stars is a necessary precursor to Terrestrial Planet Finder 0 in order to estimate the probability of Terrestrial planets in our stellar neighborhood. Ground based indirect methods are biased towards large close in Jovian planets in solar systems unlikely io harbor Earthlike planets. Thus to estimate the relative abundances of terrestrial planets and to determine optimal observing strategies for TPF a pathfinder mission would be desired. The Extra-Solar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is such a pathfinder mission. Upto 83 stellar systems are accessible with a 1.5 meter unobscured telescope and coronagraph combination located at the Earth-Sun L2 point. Incorporating radiometric and angular resolution considerations show that Jovians could be directly detected (5 sigma) in the 0.5 - 1.0 micron band outside of an inner working distance of 5/D with integration times of -10 - 100 hours per observation. The primary considerations for a planet imager are optical wavefront quality due to manufacturing, alignment, structural and thermal considerations. pointing stability and control, and manufacturability of coronagraphic masks and stops to increase the planetary-to- stellar contrast and mitigate against straylight. Previously proposed coronagraphic concepts are driven to extreme tolerances. however. we have developed and studied a mission, telescope and coronagraphic detection concept, which is achievable in the time frame of a Discovery class NASA mission. 2) Science requirements for the James Webb Space Telescope observatory. The James Webb Space Observatory (JWST) is an infrared observatory, which will be launched in 201 1 to an orbit at L2. JWST is a segmented, 18 mirror segment telescope with a diameter of 6.5 meters, and a clear aperture of 25 mA2. The telescope is designed to conduct imaging and spectroscopic

  13. Artemis: A Stratospheric Planet Finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, H. C.; Petro, L. D.; Burrows, C.; Ftaclas, C.; Roggemann, M. C.; Trauger, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    The near-space environment of the stratosphere is far superior to terrestrial sites for optical and infrared observations. New balloon technologies will enable flights and safe recovery of 2-ton payloads at altitudes of 35 km for 100 days and longer. The combination of long flights and superb observing conditions make it possible to undertake science programs that otherwise could only be done from orbit. We propose to fly an "Ultra-Hubble" Stratospheric Telescope (UHST) equipped with a coronagraphic camera and active optics at 35 km to search for planets around 200 of the nearest stars. This ULDB mission will establish the frequency of solar-type planetary systems, and provide targets to search for earth-like planets.

  14. New Mauna Loa coronagraph systems.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R R; Lee, R H; Macqueen, R M; Poland, A I

    1981-03-15

    A new set of instruments, consisting of two coronagraph systems, has been installed and is operating at the Mauna Loa Observing Station, Hawaii, operated by the High Altitude Observatory of Boulder, Colorado. The instruments are the 23-cm objective Mark III K-coronameter (K-III) system, a photoelectric instrument used to observe the inner solar corona from 1.2 R(0) to 2.2 R(0) and the 12.5-cm objective Prominence Monitor system used for the detection of H(alpha) limb activity. New features of the K-coronameter system include the use of achromatic wave plates for wide bandpass operation and linear diode array detectors. Raster scans of the coronal image are obtained in 1.5 min for a critical sampling scheme of 20-sec of arc resolution (10 x 10-sec of arc pixels) in the coronal p(B) image. This represents a 350 information gain factor for each detection channel when compared with the previous Mauna Loa K-coronameters.

  15. A laboratory experiment for a new free-standing pupil mask coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haze, K.; Enya, K.; Kotani, T.; Abe, L.; Nakagawa, T.; Matsuhara, H.; Sato, T.; Yamamuro, T.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory experiment on a new free-standing pupil mask coronagraph for the direct observation of exoplanets. We focused on a binary-shaped pupil coronagraph, which is planned for installation in the next-generation infrared space telescope SPICA. Our laboratory experiments on the coronagraph were implemented inside a vacuum chamber (HOCT) to achieve greater thermal stability and to avoid air turbulence, and a contrast of 1.3×10-9 was achieved with PSF subtraction. We also carried out multi-color/broadband experiments to demonstrate that the pupil mask coronagraph works, in principle, at all wavelengths. We had previously manufactured a checker-board mask, a type of binary-shaped pupil mask, on a glass substrate, which had the disadvantages of light loss by transmission, ghosting from residual reflectance and a slightly different refractive index for each wavelength. Therefore, we developed a new free-standing mask in sheet metal, for which no substrate was needed. As a result of a He-Ne laser experiment with the free-standing mask, a contrast of 1.0×10-7 was achieved for the raw coronagraphic image. We also conducted rotated mask subtractions and numerical simulations of some errors in the mask shape and WFEs. Speckles are the major limiting factor. The free-standing mask exhibited about the same ability to improve contrast as the substrate mask. Consequently, the results of this study suggest that the binary-shaped pupil mask coronagraph can be applied to coronagraphic observations by SPICA and other telescopes.

  16. Digital laser range finder emulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Vaughn P.; Holland, Orgal T.; Wilkerson, Christina G.

    1993-05-01

    A digital laser range finder emulator receives N-bits of range-to-target data in a parallel format and generates N-bits of serial data representative of the range-to-target data and an external synchronization pulse whose presence is indicative of valid serial data. First and second clock pulses are generated such that the second clock pulse is delayed with respect to the first clock pulse. Control logic, responsive to the first clock pulse, generates validity logic while control logic, responsive to the second clock pulse, generates transmit logic. The parallel format range-to-target data is converted into the serial data in response to the first clock pulse. The serial data is then output in response to the transmit logic. A gate, responsive to the second clock pulse and the validity logic, generates the synchronization pulse when the second clock pulse and validity logic occupy a common logic state.

  17. The CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Track Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ero, J.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Guiducci, L.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Sphicas, P.; Triossi, A.; Wulz, C.

    2016-03-01

    The design and performance of the upgraded CMS Level-1 Trigger Barrel Muon Track Finder (BMTF) is presented. Monte Carlo simulation data as well as cosmic ray data from a CMS muon detector slice test have been used to study in detail the performance of the new track finder. The design architecture is based on twelve MP7 cards each of which uses a Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGA and can receive and transmit data at 10 Gbps from 72 input and 72 output fibers. According to the CMS Trigger Upgrade TDR the BMTF receives trigger primitive data which are computed using both RPC and DT data and transmits data from a number of muon candidates to the upgraded Global Muon Trigger. Results from detailed studies of comparisons between the BMTF algorithm results and the results of a C++ emulator are also presented. The new BMTF will be commissioned for data taking in 2016.

  18. AMA Physician Select: Online Doctor Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership | JAMA Network | AMA Store DoctorFinder This online physician Locator helps you find a perfect match for ... with basic professional information on virtually every licensed physician in the United States. This includes more than ...

  19. Internal polarization limits coronagraph contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James Bernard; Lam, Wai Sze T.; Chipman, Russell A.

    2015-08-01

    The performance of exoplanet imaging coronagraphs is limited by internal polarization. The point spread function (PSF) of these systems is determined by the details of the opto-mechanical layout selected to package the system and by the highly reflective metal thin films needed to maintain high optical system transmittance. To obtain the high contrast levels needed for terrestrial exoplanet science requires a comprehensive understanding of the vector electromagnetic wave from the source through the system. The literature contains many studies of polarization transmissivity of telescopes and instruments for the purpose of photo-polarimetry. Here we report for the first time the effects of polarization on high-performance image quality.We modeled a typical 2.4-meter Cassegrain telescope system with one 90-degree fold mirror and analyzed the system for polarization aberrations.We find: 1. The image plane irradiance distribution is the linear superposition of four PSF images: One for each of the two orthogonal polarizations and one for each of two cross-product polarization terms. 2. The PSF image is brighter by 9% for one polarization component compared to its orthogonal state. 3. The image of the PSF for orthogonal components are shifted across the focal plane with respect to each other, causing the PSF image for astronomical sources (polarized or unpolarized) to become slightly elongated (elliptical) with a centroid separation of about 0.6 masec. 4. The orthogonally polarized components of unpolarized sources contain different wavefront aberrations, which are separated by approximately 32 milliwaves. This implies that a wavefront correction system cannot optimally correct the aberrations for all polarizations simultaneously. 5. The polarization aberrations couple small parts (~1E-5) of each polarization component of the light into the orthogonal polarization to create highly distorted secondary, or “ghost” PSF image.. The radius of the spatial extent of the 90

  20. Characterizing Exoplanets with 2-meter Class Space-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T. D.; Marley, M. S.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Several concepts now exist for small, space-based missions to directly characterize exoplanets in reflected light. In this presentation, we explore how instrumental and astrophysical parameters will affect the ability of such missions to obtain spectral and photometric observations that are useful for characterizing their planetary targets. We discuss the development of an instrument noise model suitable for studying the spectral characterization potential of a coronagraph-equipped, space-based telescope. To be consistent with near-future missions and technologies, we assume a baseline set of telescope and instrument parameters that include a 2 meter diameter primary aperture, an operational wavelength range of 0.4-1.0 μm, and an instrument spectral resolution of λ/Δλ=70. We present applications of our baseline noise simulator to a variety of spectral models of different planet types, emphasizing Earth-like planets. With our exoplanet spectral models, we explore wavelength-dependent planet-star flux ratios for main sequence stars of various effective temperatures, and discuss how coronagraph inner and outer working angle constraints will influence the potential to study different types of planets. For planets most favorable to spectroscopic characterization—including nearby Earth twins and super-Earths—we study the integration times required to achieve moderate signal-to-noise ratio spectra. We also explore the sensitivity of the integration times required to detect the base of key absorption bands (for water vapor and molecular oxygen) to coronagraph raw contrast performance, exozodiacal light levels, and the distance to the planetary system. We will also discuss prospects for detecting ocean glint, a habitability signature, from nearby Earth-like planets, as well as the extension of our models to a more distant future Large UV-Optical-InfraRed (LUVOIR) mission.

  1. Linear-constraint wavefront control for exoplanet coronagraphic imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, He; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Groff, Tyler Dean

    2017-01-01

    A coronagraph is a leading technology for achieving high-contrast imaging of exoplanets in a space telescope. It uses a system of several masks to modify the diffraction and achieve extremely high contrast in the image plane around target stars. However, coronagraphic imaging systems are very sensitive to optical aberrations, so wavefront correction using deformable mirrors (DMs) is necessary to avoid contrast degradation in the image plane. Electric field conjugation (EFC) and Stroke minimization (SM) are two primary high-contrast wavefront controllers explored in the past decade. EFC minimizes the average contrast in the search areas while regularizing the strength of the control inputs. Stroke minimization calculates the minimum DM commands under the constraint that a target average contrast is achieved. Recently in the High Contrast Imaging Lab at Princeton University (HCIL), a new linear-constraint wavefront controller based on stroke minimization was developed and demonstrated using numerical simulation. Instead of only constraining the average contrast over the entire search area, the new controller constrains the electric field of each single pixel using linear programming, which could led to significant increases in speed of the wavefront correction and also create more uniform dark holes. As a follow-up of this work, another linear-constraint controller modified from EFC is demonstrated theoretically and numerically and the lab verification of the linear-constraint controllers is reported. Based on the simulation and lab results, the pros and cons of linear-constraint controllers are carefully compared with EFC and stroke minimization.

  2. Sensitivity of the terrestrial planet finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, Charles

    1998-01-01

    A key long-term goal of NASA's Origins program is the detection and characterization of habitable planets orbiting stars within the solar neighborhood. A cold, space-borne interferometer operating in the mid-infrared with a approx. 75 m baseline can null the light of a parent star and detect the million-times fainter radiation from an Earth-like planet located in the "habitable zone" around stars as far as 15 pc away. Such an interferometer, designated the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) by NASA, could even detect atmospheric signatures of species such as CO2, O3, and H2O indicative of either the possibility or presence of primitive life. This talk highlights some of the sensitivity issues affecting the detectability of terrestrial planets. Sensitivity calculations show that a system consisting of 2 m apertures operating at 5 AU or 4 m apertures operating at 1 AU can detect terrestrial planets in reasonable integration times for levels of exo-zodiacal emission up to 10 times that seen in our solar system (hereafter denoted as 10xSS). Additionally, simulations show that confusion noise from structures in the exo-zodiacal cloud should not impede planet detection until the exo-zodiacal emission reaches the 10xSS level.

  3. Modern Concepts for a Terrestrial Planet Finder Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasting, James

    2012-01-01

    Astronomers have now found over 500 exoplanets from radial velocity measurements and another 1200 or more "planet candidates” using the transit method from Kepler. Some of these planets are small enough to be rocky, like Earth, and orbit within the liquid water habitable zone of their parent star. We know next to nothing about conditions on these planets, though, because we have not yet developed the tools needed to study them. Even JWST, if it flies, will likely be unable to characterize the atmosphere of an Earth-analogue exoplanet. What we need for this task is a direct imaging mission that combines a large optical/near-IR telescope with a device that can block out the light from the star and retain the light from a nearby exoplanet. Both internal coronagraphs and external occulters (starshades) are being studied for this purpose. In principle, a thermal-IR telescope operating as an interferometer could accomplish the same task, but this would require formation flying of multiple cooled telescopes and is thought to be a more expensive option. The size of the optical telescope that would be needed to find and characterize an Earth depends on the frequency of Earth-like planet, Earth, and the brightness of the average exozodiacal background. The first parameter will hopefully be determined by Kepler, and the second may be measured by the Large Binary Telescope Interferometer, LBTI. Once this information is in hand, and if sufficient money can be found--currently, a big `if'--there should be little reason to hold back on designing and launching such a Terrestrial Planet Finder telescope.

  4. Mid-infrared coronagraph for SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Abe, L.; Haze, K.; Tanaka, S.; Nakagawa, T.; Kataza, H.; Higuchi, S.; Miyata, T.; Sako, S.; Nakamura, T.; Tamura, M.; Nishikawa, J.; Murakami, N.; Itoh, Y.; Wakayama, T.; Sato, T.; Nakagiri, N.; Guyon, O.; Venet, M.; Bierden, P.

    2008-07-01

    The SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) is a infrared space-borne telescope mission of the next generation following AKARI. SPICA will carry a telescope with a 3.5 m diameter monolithic primary mirror and the whole telescope will be cooled to 5 K. SPICA is planned to be launched in 2017, into the sun-earth L2 libration halo orbit by an H II-A rocket and execute infrared observations at wavelengths mainly between 5 and 200 micron. The large telescope aperture, the simple pupil shape, the capability of infrared observations from space, and the early launch gives us with the SPICA mission a unique opportunity for coronagraphic observation. We have started development of a coronagraphic instrument for SPICA. The primary target of the SPICA coronagraph is direct observation of extra-solar Jovian planets. The main wavelengths of observation, the required contrast and the inner working angle (IWA) of the SPICA coronagraph are set to be 5-27 micron (3.5-5 micron is optional), 10-6, and a few λ/D (and as small as possible), respectively, in which λ is the observation wavelength and D is the diameter of the telescope aperture (3.5m). For our laboratory demonstration, we focused first on a coronagraph with a binary shaped pupil mask as the primary candidate for SPICA because of its feasibility. In an experiment with a binary shaped pupil coronagraph with a He-Ne laser (λ=632.8nm), the achieved raw contrast was 6.7×10-8, derived from the average measured in the dark region without active wavefront control. On the other hand, a study of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) was initiated in an attempt to achieve better performance, i.e., smaller IWA and higher throughput. A laboratory experiment was performed using a He-Ne laser with active wavefront control, and a raw contrast of 6.5×10-7 was achieved. We also present recent progress made in the cryogenic active optics for SPICA. Prototypes of cryogenic deformable by Micro Electro

  5. Life Finder Detectors: An Overview of Detector Technologies for Detecting Life on Other Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; McElwain, Michael W.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Noroozian, Omid; Norton, Tim; Kutyrev, Alexander; Rinehart, Stephen; stock, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Future large space telescopes will seek evidence for life on other worlds by searching for spectroscopic biosignatures. Atmospheric biosignature gases include oxygen, ozone, water vapor, and methane. Non-biological gases, including carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, are important for discriminating false positives. All of these gases imprint spectroscopic features in the UV through mid-IR that are potentially detectable using future space based coronagraphs or star shades for starlight suppression.Direct spectroscopic biosignature detection requires sensors capable of robustly measuring photon arrival rates on the order of 10 per resolution element per hour. Photon counting is required for some wavefront sensing and control approaches to achieve the requisite high contrast ratios. We review life finder detector technologies that either exist today, or are under development, that have the potential to meet these challenging requirements. We specifically highlight areas where more work or development is needed.Life finder detectors will be invaluable for a wide variety of other major science programs. Because of its cross cutting nature; UV, optical, and infrared (UVOIR) detector development features prominently in the 2010 National Research Council Decadal Survey, 'New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics', and the NASA Cosmic Origins Program Technology Roadmap.

  6. Compensation of high-order quasi-static aberrations on SPHERE with the coronagraphic phase diversity (COFFEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Mugnier, L. M.; Dohlen, K.; Petit, C.; Fusco, T.; Mouillet, D.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Ferrari, M.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The second-generation instrument SPHERE, dedicated to high-contrast imaging, will soon be in operation on the European Very Large Telescope. Such an instrument relies on an extreme adaptive optics system coupled with a coronagraph that suppresses most of the diffracted stellar light. However, the coronagraph performance is strongly limited by quasi-static aberrations that create long-lived speckles in the scientific image plane, which can easily be mistaken for planets. Aims: The wavefront analysis performed by SPHERE's adaptive optics system uses a dedicated wavefront sensor. The ultimate performance is thus limited by the unavoidable differential aberrations between the wavefront sensor and the scientific camera, which have to be estimated and compensated for. In this paper, we use the COFFEE approach to measure and compensate for SPHERE's quasi-static aberrations. Methods: COronagraphic Focal-plane waveFront Estimation for Exoplanet detection (COFFEE), which consists in an extension of phase diversity to coronagraphic imaging, estimates the quasi-static aberrations, including the differential ones, using only two focal plane images recorded by the scientific camera. In this paper, we use coronagraphic images recorded from SPHERE's infrared detector IRDIS to estimate the aberrations upstream of the coronagraph, which are then compensated for using SPHERE's extreme adaptive optics loop SAXO. Results: We first validate the ability of COFFEE to estimate high-order aberrations by estimating a calibrated influence function pattern introduced upstream of the coronagraph. We then use COFFEE in an original iterative compensation process to compensate for the estimated aberrations, leading to a contrast improvement by a factor that varies from 1.4 to 4.7 between 2λ/D and 15λ/D on IRDIS. The performance of the compensation process is also evaluated through simulations. An excellent match between experimental results and these simulations is found.

  7. SMM coronagraph observations of particulate contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Warner, T.

    1991-01-01

    Some recent images taken by the white light coronagraph telescope aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observatory show bright streaks that are apparently caused by particles associated with the spacecraft. In this report we describe these observations, and we analyze the times of their occurrence. We demonstrate that the sightings occur most often near SMM's orbital dawn, and we speculate that thermal shock is the mechanism that produces the particles. Although these sightings have not seriously affected the coronagraph's scientific operations, the unexpected passage of bright material through the field of view of sensitive spaceborne telescopes can lead to data loss or, in some cases, serious detector damage. The topic of space debris has become a significant concern for designers of both manned and unmanned orbiting platforms. The returned samples from the SMM spacecraft and the observations reported here provide a baseline of experience for future orbital platforms that plan long duration missions.

  8. The JWST/NIRCam Coronagraph Flight Occulters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, John E.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Muller, Richard E.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Serabyn, Eugene; Mao, Yalan; Echternach, Pierre M.; Trauger, John T.; Liewer, Kurt M.

    2010-01-01

    The NIRCam instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope will have a Lyot coronagraph for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks at lambda = 2 - 5 micrometers. Half-tone patterns are used to create graded-transmission image plane masks. These are generated using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching of a metal layer on an antireflection coated sapphire substrate. We report here on the manufacture and evaluation of the flight occulters.

  9. General Tool for Evaluating High-Contrast Coronagraphic Telescope Performance Error Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchen, Luis F.

    2011-01-01

    computations. Other than this, the process is fully automated. The third process was developed based on the Terrestrial Planet Finder coronagraph Error Budget Tool, but was fully automated by using VBA code, form, and ActiveX controls.

  10. Speckle temporal stability in XAO coronagraphic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, P.; Loose, C.; Aller Carpentier, E.; Kasper, M.

    2012-05-01

    Context. The major source of noise limiting high-contrast imaging is caused by quasi-static speckles. Speckle noise originates from wavefront errors caused by various independent sources, and evolves on different timescales depending on their nature. An understanding of how quasi-static speckles originate from instrumental errors is paramount to the search for faint stellar companions. Instrumental speckles average to form a fixed pattern, which can be calibrated to a certain extent, but their temporal evolution ultimately limits this possibility. Aims: This study focuses on the laboratory evidence and characterization of the quasi-static pinned speckle phenomenon. Specifically, we examine the coherent amplification of the static speckle contribution to the noise variance in the scientific image, through its interaction with quasi-static speckles. Methods: The analysis of a time series of adaptively corrected, coronagraphic images recorded in the laboratory enables the characterization of the temporal stability of the residual speckle pattern in both direct and differential coronagraphic images. Results: We estimate that spoiled and rapidly evolving quasi-static speckles present in the system at the angstrom/nanometer level affect the stability of the static speckle noise in the final image after the coronagraph. The temporal evolution of the quasi-static wavefront error exhibits a linear power law, which can be used to first order to model quasi-static speckle evolution in high-contrast imaging instruments.

  11. SCORE - Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineschi, Silvano; Moses, Dan; Romoli, Marco

    The Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment - SCORE - is a The Sounding-rocket Coronagraphic Experiment - SCORE - is a coronagraph for multi-wavelength imaging of the coronal Lyman-alpha lines, HeII 30.4 nm and HI 121.6 nm, and for the broad.band visible-light emission of the polarized K-corona. SCORE has flown successfully in 2009 acquiring the first images of the HeII line-emission from the extended corona. The simultaneous observation of the coronal Lyman-alpha HI 121.6 nm, has allowed the first determination of the absolute helium abundance in the extended corona. This presentation will describe the lesson learned from the first flight and will illustrate the preparations and the science perspectives for the second re-flight approved by NASA and scheduled for 2016. The SCORE optical design is flexible enough to be able to accommodate different experimental configurations with minor modifications. This presentation will describe one of such configurations that could include a polarimeter for the observation the expected Hanle effect in the coronal Lyman-alpha HI line. The linear polarization by resonance scattering of coronal permitted line-emission in the ultraviolet (UV) can be modified by magnetic fields through the Hanle effect. Thus, space-based UV spectro-polarimetry would provide an additional new tool for the diagnostics of coronal magnetism.

  12. Coronagraphic Wavefront Control for the ATLAST-9.2m Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, RIchard G.; Oegerle, William R.; Feinberg, Lee D.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Dean, Bruce H.; Mosier, Gary E.; Postman, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology for Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) concept was assessed as one of the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concepts (ASMC) studies. Herein we discuss the 9.2-meter diameter segmented aperture version and its wavefront sensing and control (WFSC) with regards to coronagraphic detection and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanets. The WFSC would consist of at least two levels of sensing and control: (i) an outer coarser level of sensing and control to phase and control the segments and secondary mirror in a manner similar to the James Webb Space Telescope but operating at higher temporal bandwidth, and (ii) an inner, coronagraphic instrument based, fine level of sensing and control for both amplitude and wavefront errors operating at higher temporal bandwidths. The outer loop would control rigid-body actuators on the primary and secondary mirrors while the inner loop would control one or more segmented deformable mirror to suppress the starlight within the coronagraphic field-of view. Herein we discuss the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) and the requirements it levies on wavefront sensing and control and show the results of closed-loop simulations to assess performance and evaluate the trade space of system level stability versus control bandwidth.

  13. Extinction controlled adaptive mask coronagraph Lyot and phase mask dual concept for wide extinction area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, P.; Schuhler, N.; Mawet, D.; Haguenauer, P.; Girard, J.; Gonte, Frederic

    2012-09-01

    A dual coronagraph based on the Adaptive Mask concept is presented in this paper. ALyot coronagraph with a variable diameter occulting disk anda nulling stellar coronagraph based on the Adaptive Phase Mask concept using polarization interferometry are presented in this work. Observations on sky and numerical simulations show the usefulness of the proposed method to optimize the nulling efficiency of the coronagraphs. In the case of the phase mask, the active control system will correct for the detrimental effects of image instabilities on the destructive interference (low-order aberrations such as tip-tilt and focus). The phase mask adaptability both in size, phase and amplitude also compensate for manufacturing errors of the mask itself, and potentially for chromatic effects. Liquid-crystal properties are used to provide variable transmission of an annulus around the phase mask, but also to achieve the achromatic π phase shift in the core of the PSF by rotating the polarization by 180°.A compressed mercury (Hg) drop is used as an occulting disk for the Lyot mask, its size control offers an adaptation to the seeing conditions and provides an optimization of the Tip-tilt correction.

  14. Coronagraph project with the SPICA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Abe, L.; Tanaka, S.; Haze, K.; Venet, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Kataza, H.; Tamura, M.; Nishikawa, J.; Murakami, N.; Fujita, K.; Itoh, Y.; Guyon, O.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Wakayama, T.; Sato, T.; Nakagiri, N.

    2007-09-01

    We present the status of the development of a coronagraph for the Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). SPICA is the next generation of infrared space-borne telescope missions following to AKARI, led by Japan. SPICA will carry a telescope that has a 3.5 m diameter monolithic primary mirror and the whole telescope will be cooled to 4.5 K. It is planned to launch SPICA into the sun-earth L2 libration halo orbit using H II-A rocket in the middle of the 2010s and execute infrared observations at wavelengths mainly between 5 and 200 micron. The SPICA mission gives us a unique opportunity for coronagraph observations, because of the large telescope aperture, the simple pupil shape, the capability of infrared observations from space, and the early launch. We have started development of the SPICA coronagraph in which the primary target is direct observation of extra-solar Jovian planets. The main wavelengths of observation, the required contrast and the inner working angle (IWA) of the SPICA coronagraph instrument are set to be 5-27 micron, 10 -6, and a few λ/D (and as small as possible), respectively, in which λ is the observation wavelength and D is the diameter of the telescope aperture (3.5m). We focused on a coronagraph with a binary shaped pupil mask as the primary candidate for SPICA because of its feasibility. Nano-fabrication technology using electron beam lithography was applied to manufacture a high precision mask and a laboratory experiment with a He-Ne laser (λ=632.8nm) was performed in air without active wavefront control. The raw contrast derived from the average measured in the dark region reached 6.7×10 -8. On the other hand, a study of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) was started in an attempt to achieve higher performance, i.e., smaller IWA and higher throughput. A hybrid solution using PIAA and a shaped pupil mask was proposed. A laboratory experiment was performed using a He- Ne laser with active wavefront

  15. Laboratory Testing of a Phased Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Give'on, Amir; Kuhnert, Andreas; Niessner, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We present high-contrast images from laboratory testing of a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph at NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). Using a deformable mirror and wavefront estimation and control algorithms, we create a 'dark hole' in the monochromatic point-spread function with an inner working angle of (2.05 f lambda/D), with a mean intensity 3.5x10(exp -8). We discuss the contributions to this floor, and the techniques being developed to improve it. We also present simulations that investigate the effect of Lyot stops of various sizes, and conclude that a Lyot stop is necessary for 10(exp -9) performance but that an annular postapodizer is not necessary.

  16. Western Michigan University Libraries' "Electronic Journal Finder"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gedeon, Randle; Boston, George

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the development of the "Electronic Journal Finder," a TDNet installation for the University Libraries of Western Michigan University. Topics covered include: rationale for subscription project timeline, content, product customization, set-up, maintenance issues, reporting functions, directing URL links, searching…

  17. CellFinder: a cell data repository.

    PubMed

    Stachelscheid, Harald; Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Mah, Nancy; Neves, Mariana; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Leser, Ulf; Kurtz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    CellFinder (http://www.cellfinder.org) is a comprehensive one-stop resource for molecular data characterizing mammalian cells in different tissues and in different development stages. It is built from carefully selected data sets stemming from other curated databases and the biomedical literature. To date, CellFinder describes 3394 cell types and 50 951 cell lines. The database currently contains 3055 microscopic and anatomical images, 205 whole-genome expression profiles of 194 cell/tissue types from RNA-seq and microarrays and 553 905 protein expressions for 535 cells/tissues. Text mining of a corpus of >2000 publications followed by manual curation confirmed expression information on ∼900 proteins and genes. CellFinder's data model is capable to seamlessly represent entities from single cells to the organ level, to incorporate mappings between homologous entities in different species and to describe processes of cell development and differentiation. Its ontological backbone currently consists of 204 741 ontology terms incorporated from 10 different ontologies unified under the novel CELDA ontology. CellFinder's web portal allows searching, browsing and comparing the stored data, interactive construction of developmental trees and navigating the partonomic hierarchy of cells and tissues through a unique body browser designed for life scientists and clinicians.

  18. Closing the contrast gap between testbed and model prediction with WFIRST-CGI shaped pupil coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hanying; Nemati, Bijan; Krist, John; Cady, Eric; Prada, Camilo M.; Kern, Brian; Poberezhskiy, Ilya

    2016-07-01

    JPL has recently passed an important milestone in its technology development for a proposed NASA WFIRST mission coronagraph: demonstration of better than 1x10-8 contrast over broad bandwidth (10%) on both shaped pupil coronagraph (SPC) and hybrid Lyot coronagraph (HLC) testbeds with the WFIRST obscuration pattern. Challenges remain, however, in the technology readiness for the proposed mission. One is the discrepancies between the achieved contrasts on the testbeds and their corresponding model predictions. A series of testbed diagnoses and modeling activities were planned and carried out on the SPC testbed in order to close the gap. A very useful tool we developed was a derived "measured" testbed wavefront control Jacobian matrix that could be compared with the model-predicted "control" version that was used to generate the high contrast dark hole region in the image plane. The difference between these two is an estimate of the error in the control Jacobian. When the control matrix, which includes both amplitude and phase, was modified to reproduce the error, the simulated performance closely matched the SPC testbed behavior in both contrast floor and contrast convergence speed. This is a step closer toward model validation for high contrast coronagraphs. Further Jacobian analysis and modeling provided clues to the possible sources for the mismatch: DM misregistration and testbed optical wavefront error (WFE) and the deformable mirror (DM) setting for correcting this WFE. These analyses suggested that a high contrast coronagraph has a tight tolerance in the accuracy of its control Jacobian. Modifications to both testbed control model as well as prediction model are being implemented, and future works are discussed.

  19. First Light for the Lunar Robotic Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, T. H.; Tucker, R.; Killen, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    We report first results from a new lunar coronagraphic telescope operated in Sonoita, Arizona. Our coronagraph is an instrument designed for the express purpose of mapping the lunar extended sodium exosphere. Although lunar sodium was identified almost 30 years ago, we still have not identified which of at least three competing processes (sputtering, photon-stimulated-desorption, or impact vaporization) is the dominant source of the observed sodium. The spatial and temporal distributions of at least the prompt sodium produced by each process should be different. Separating out the effects of the respective source processes requires a much higher density of observations across a lunation than has heretofore been available. The spatial distribution of sodium with selenographic latitude and lunar phase will discriminate among the source processes, but only by almost continuous observing can we determine the effects of sporadic events such as meteor showers and coronal mass ejections or solar energetic particle events. Although the lunar exosphere is tenuous, the processes that create and remove sodium and other atoms work on exposed surfaces across the solar system. Thus, developing a detailed understanding of the physical processes at work to produce the sodium exosphere of the Moon (whose surface composition has been directly sampled) has applications across the solar system. This design uses an extremely narrow-band sodium D2 filter to isolate the Na emission. The science dictates a very wide field image that extends to one lunar diameter above the lunar limb. The imager has a 1.5 degree field of view. To image the extremely faint extended exospheric Na, an occulting disk is used to reject the bright light from the lunar disk while passing the surrounding light. A Lyot stop is placed at the pupil image to minimize the diffracted light from around the edge of the entrance pupil. The Lunar Coronagraph is remotely operated nearly autonomously and can observe

  20. Coronagraphic imaging on the VLTI with VIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardière, O.

    In a few years, the VLTI will be able to combine light from 4 to 8 telescopes equipped with adaptive optics. In order to exploit the full VLTI infrastructure, a second generation instrument, based on the densified pupil concept (VIDA), has been proposed for very high resolution direct imaging and coronagraphy. This paper presents some possible coronagraphic devices providing a total star extinction on the VLTI when there are no phase errors. Lastly, the expected performances considering cophasing and adaptive optics residual errors are also presented.

  1. Coronagraphic Notch Filter for Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, David; Stirbl, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A modified coronagraph has been proposed as a prototype of improved notch filters in Raman spectrometers. Coronagraphic notch filters could offer alternatives to both (1) the large and expensive double or triple monochromators in older Raman spectrometers and (2) holographic notch filters, which are less expensive but are subject to environmental degradation as well as to limitations of geometry and spectral range. Measurement of a Raman spectrum is an exercise in measuring and resolving faint spectral lines close to a bright peak: In Raman spectroscopy, a monochromatic beam of light (the pump beam) excites a sample of material that one seeks to analyze. The pump beam generates a small flux of scattered light at wavelengths slightly greater than that of the pump beam. The shift in wavelength of the scattered light from the pump wavelength is known in the art as the Stokes shift. Typically, the flux of scattered light is of the order of 10 7 that of the pump beam and the Stokes shift lies in the wave-number range of 100 to 3,000 cm 1. A notch filter can be used to suppress the pump-beam spectral peak while passing the nearby faint Raman spectral lines. The basic principles of design and operation of a coronagraph offer an opportunity for engineering the spectral transmittance of the optics in a Raman spectrometer. A classical coronagraph may be understood as two imaging systems placed end to end, such that the first system forms an intermediate real image of a nominally infinitely distant object and the second system forms a final real image of the intermediate real image. If the light incident on the first telescope is collimated, then the intermediate image is a point-spread function (PSF). If an appropriately tailored occulting spot (e.g., a Gaussian-apodized spot with maximum absorption on axis) is placed on the intermediate image plane, then the instrument inhibits transmission of light from an on-axis source. However, the PSFs of off-axis light sources are

  2. Estimating Coronagraph Visibility Functions - Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Xie, H.; Duncan, D.; Webb, D. F.; Howard, R.; Gurman, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Annual estimates of the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate have been well-documented and are quasi-continuous since the mid-1970s based on both groundbased and spacebased observations. However, coronagraphic observations from a single viewpoint are unable to detect all CMEs because they are limited by the properties of Thomson-scattered photospheric radiation by coronal electrons. To overcome this limitation and to extend the CME rate estimates beyond a single instrument, Webb & Howard (1994) formulated the "visibility function" as an instrument-specific calibration factor. Recently we have begun an investigation comparing visibility functions for SOHO LASCO, STEREO COR1/COR2, and the groundbased Mauna Loa Solar Observatory Mk3/Mk4 coronagraphs in order to extend the historical record of the CME rate. With the launch of the twin STEREO spacecraft in late 2006, we are able to use the combination of multiple instruments viewing from longitudinally-separated locations to obtain new estimates of the global CME rate. We provide a progress report on this activity.

  3. The Gemini Planet Imager coronagraph testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Roberts, Robin; Brenner, Douglas; Carlotti, Alexis; Pueyo, Laurent; Macintosh, Bruce; Bauman, Brian; Saddlemyer, Les; Palmer, David; Erickson, Darren; Dorrer, Christophe; Caputa, Kris; Marois, Christian; Wallace, Kent; Griffiths, Emily; Mey, Jacob

    2009-08-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new facility instrument to be commissioned at the 8-m Gemini South telescope in early 2011. It combines of several subsystems including a 1500 subaperture Extreme Adaptive Optics system, an Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph, a near-infrared high-accuracy interferometric wavefront sensor, and an Integral Field Unit Spectrograph, which serves as the science instrument. GPI's main scientific goal is to detect and characterize relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets with planet-star brightness ratios of <= 10-7 in the near infrared. Here we present an overview of the coronagraph subsystem, which includes a pupil apodization, a hard-edged focal plane mask and a Lyot stop. We discuss designs optimization, masks fabrication and testing. We describe a near infrared testbed, which achieved broadband contrast (H-band) below 10-6 at separations > 5λ/D, without active wavefront control (no deformable mirror). We use Fresnel propagation modeling to analyze the testbed results.

  4. Recent developments with the visible nulling coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Howard, Joseph M.; Miller, Ian J.

    2016-08-01

    A wide array of general astrophysics studies including detecting and characterizing habitable exoplanets could be enabled by a future large segmented telescope with sensitivity in the UV, optical, and infrared bands. When paired with a starshade or coronagraph, such an observatory could enable direct imaging and detailed spectroscopic observations of nearby Earth-like habitable zone planets. Over the past several years, a laboratory-based Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) has evolved to reach requisite contrasts over a 1 nm bandwidth at narrow source angle separation using a segmented deformable mirror in one arm of a Mach-Zehnder layout. More recent efforts targeted broadband performance following the addition of two sets of half-wave Fresnel rhomb achromatic phase shifters (APS) with the goal of reaching 10-9 contrast, at a separation of 2λ/D, using a 40 nm (6%) bandwidth single mode fiber source. Here we present updates on the VNC broadband nulling effort, including approaches to addressing system contrast limitations.

  5. Wheelchair assisted with laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Cheol U.; Wang, Hongbo; Ishimatsu, Takakazu; Ochiai, Tsumoru

    1995-12-01

    The paper presents a wheel chair system with the capability of self-localization and obstacle avoidance. Firstly, the approaches of landmark recognition and the self-localization of the wheel chair are described. Then, the principal of the obstacle avoidance using a laser range finder is described. Subsequently, the total system of the wheel chair is introduced. Finally, a navigation experiment is given. Experimental results indicate the effectiveness of our system.

  6. The design of ultrasonic range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Yongyi

    2017-03-01

    Electronic rangefinder measurement scope in 0.10˜5.00 m, 1 cm measurement precision, measurement with no direct contact with the object to be tested, able to display measurement results clear and stable. Because ultrasonic directivity is strong, energy consumption is slow, in the medium transmission distance is farther, so ultrasonic often used for distance measurement, such as range finder and level measurement instrument can be done by ultrasound.

  7. Phase-space structures - II. Hierarchical Structure Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, M.; Colombi, S.; Springel, V.; Alard, C.; Bouchet, F. R.

    2009-07-01

    A new multidimensional Hierarchical Structure Finder (HSF) to study the phase-space structure of dark matter in N-body cosmological simulations is presented. The algorithm depends mainly on two parameters, which control the level of connectivity of the detected structures and their significance compared to Poisson noise. By working in six-dimensional phase space, where contrasts are much more pronounced than in three-dimensional (3D) position space, our HSF algorithm is capable of detecting subhaloes including their tidal tails, and can recognize other phase-space structures such as pure streams and candidate caustics. If an additional unbinding criterion is added, the algorithm can be used as a self-consistent halo and subhalo finder. As a test, we apply it to a large halo of the Millennium Simulation, where 19 per cent of the halo mass is found to belong to bound substructures, which is more than what is detected with conventional 3D substructure finders, and an additional 23-36 per cent of the total mass belongs to unbound HSF structures. The distribution of identified phase-space density peaks is clearly bimodal: high peaks are dominated by the bound structures and show a small spread in their height distribution; low peaks belong mostly to tidal streams, as expected. However, the projected (3D) density distribution of the structures shows that some of the streams can have comparable density to the bound structures in position space. In order to better understand what HSF provides, we examine the time evolution of structures, based on the merger tree history. Given the resolution limit of the Millennium Simulation, bound structures typically make only up to six orbits inside the main halo. The number of orbits scales approximately linearly with the redshift corresponding to the moment of merging of the structures with the halo. At fixed redshift, the larger the initial mass of the structure which enters the main halo, the faster it loses mass. The difference in

  8. Astronomical Near-neighbor Detection with a Four-quadrant Phase Mask (FQPM) Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haguenauer, Pierre; Serabyn, Eugene; Mennesson, Bertrand; Wallace, James K.; Gappinger, Robert O.; Troy, Mitchell; Bloemhof, Eric E.; Moore, Jim; Koresko, Chris D.

    2006-01-01

    Direct detection of planets around nearby stars requires the development of high-contrast imaging techniques, because of their very different respective fluxes. We thus investigated the innovative coronagraphic approach based on the use of a four-quadrant phase mask (FQPM). Simulations showed that, combined with high-level wavefront correction on an unobscured off-axis section of a large telescope, this method allows high-contrast imaging very close to stars, with detection capability superior to that of a traditional coronagraph. A FQPM instrument was thus built to test the feasibility of near-neighbor observations with our new off-axis approach on a ground-based telescope. In June 2005, we deployed our instrument to the Palomar 200-inch telescope, using existing facilities as much as possible for rapid implementation. In these initial observations, using data processing techniques specific to FQPM coronagraphs, we reached extinction levels of the order of 200:1. Here we discuss our simulations and on-sky results obtained so far.

  9. Analytical expression of long-exposure adaptive-optics-corrected coronagraphic image. First application to exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Sauvage, J-F; Mugnier, L M; Rousset, G; Fusco, T

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we derive an analytical model of a long-exposure star image for an adaptive-optics(AO)-corrected coronagraphic imaging system. This expression accounts for static aberrations upstream and downstream of the coronagraphic mask as well as turbulence residuals. It is based on the perfect coronagraph model. The analytical model is validated by means of simulations using the design and parameters of the SPHERE instrument. The analytical model is also compared to a simulated four-quadrant phase-mask coronagraph. Then, its sensitivity to a miscalibration of structure function and upstream static aberrations is studied, and the impact on exoplanet detectability is quantified. Last, a first inversion method is presented for a simulation case using a single monochromatic image with no reference. The obtained result shows a planet detectability increase by two orders of magnitude with respect to the raw image. This analytical model presents numerous potential applications in coronographic imaging, such as exoplanet direct detection, and circumstellar disk observation.

  10. Laboratory validation of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph in broadband light at the high-contrast imaging THD testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, J. R.; N'Diaye, M.; Galicher, R.; Dohlen, K.; Baudoz, P.; Caillat, A.; Rousset, G.; Soummer, R.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Specific high-contrast imaging instruments are mandatory to characterize circumstellar disks and exoplanets around nearby stars. Coronagraphs are commonly used in these facilities to reject the diffracted light of an observed star and enable direct imaging and spectroscopy of its circumstellar environment. One important property of the coronagraph is to be able to work in broadband light. Aims: Among several proposed coronagraphs, the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is a promising solution for starlight rejection in broadband light. In this paper, we perform the first validation of this concept in laboratory. Methods: First, we consider the principle of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Then, we describe the high-contrast imaging THD testbed, the manufacturing of the components, and the quality control procedures. Finally, we study the sensitivity of our coronagraph to low-order aberrations (inner working angle and defocus) and estimate its contrast performance. Our experimental broadband light results are compared with numerical simulations to check agreement with the performance predictions. Results: With the manufactured prototype and using a dark hole technique based on the self-coherent camera, we obtain contrast levels down to 2 × 10-8 between 5 and 17λ0/D in monochromatic light (640 nm). We also reach contrast levels of 4 × 10-8 between 7 and 17λ0/D in broadband (λ0 = 675 nm, Δλ = 250 and Δλ/λ0 = 40%), which demonstrates the excellent chromatic performance of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Conclusions: The performance reached by the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to detect and spectrally characterize old or light gaseous planets.

  11. Technology Advancement of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Thompson, Patrick; Bolcar, Matt; Madison, Timothy; Woodruff, Robert; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The critical high contrast imaging technology for the Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) mission concept is the visible nulling coronagraph (VNC). EPIC would be capable of imaging jovian planets, dust/debris disks, and potentially super-Earths and contribute to answering how bright the debris disks are for candidate stars. The contrast requirement for EPIC is 10(exp 9) contrast at 125 milli-arseconds inner working angle. To advance the VNC technology NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with Lockheed-Martin, previously developed a vacuum VNC testbed, and achieved narrowband and broadband suppression of the core of the Airy disk. Recently our group was awarded a NASA Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions to achieve two milestones: (i) 10(exp 8) contrast in narrowband light, and, (ii) 10(ecp 9) contrast in broader band light; one milestone per year, and both at 2 Lambda/D inner working angle. These will be achieved with our 2nd generation testbed known as the visible nulling testbed (VNT). It contains a MEMS based hex-packed segmented deformable mirror known as the multiple mirror array (MMA) and coherent fiber bundle, i.e. a spatial filter array (SFA). The MMA is in one interferometric arm and works to set the wavefront differences between the arms to zero. Each of the MMA segments is optically mapped to a single mode fiber of the SFA, and the SFA passively cleans the sub-aperture wavefront error leaving only piston, tip and tilt error to be controlled. The piston degree of freedom on each segment is used to correct the wavefront errors, while the tip/tilt is used to simultaneously correct the amplitude errors. Thus the VNT controls both amplitude and wavefront errors with a single MMA in closed-loop in a vacuum tank at approx.20 Hz. Herein we will discuss our ongoing progress with the VNT.

  12. Modeling and Implementation of Multi-Position Non-Continuous Rotation Gyroscope North Finder.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Kuijper, Arjan; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin

    2016-09-20

    Even when the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal is blocked, a rate gyroscope (gyro) north finder is capable of providing the required azimuth reference information to a certain extent. In order to measure the azimuth between the observer and the north direction very accurately, we propose a multi-position non-continuous rotation gyro north finding scheme. Our new generalized mathematical model analyzes the elements that affect the azimuth measurement precision and can thus provide high precision azimuth reference information. Based on the gyro's principle of detecting a projection of the earth rotation rate on its sensitive axis and the proposed north finding scheme, we are able to deduct an accurate mathematical model of the gyro outputs against azimuth with the gyro and shaft misalignments. Combining the gyro outputs model and the theory of propagation of uncertainty, some approaches to optimize north finding are provided, including reducing the gyro bias error, constraining the gyro random error, increasing the number of rotation points, improving rotation angle measurement precision, decreasing the gyro and the shaft misalignment angles. According them, a north finder setup is built and the azimuth uncertainty of 18" is obtained. This paper provides systematic theory for analyzing the details of the gyro north finder scheme from simulation to implementation. The proposed theory can guide both applied researchers in academia and advanced practitioners in industry for designing high precision robust north finder based on different types of rate gyroscopes.

  13. Modeling and Implementation of Multi-Position Non-Continuous Rotation Gyroscope North Finder

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Kuijper, Arjan; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin

    2016-01-01

    Even when the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal is blocked, a rate gyroscope (gyro) north finder is capable of providing the required azimuth reference information to a certain extent. In order to measure the azimuth between the observer and the north direction very accurately, we propose a multi-position non-continuous rotation gyro north finding scheme. Our new generalized mathematical model analyzes the elements that affect the azimuth measurement precision and can thus provide high precision azimuth reference information. Based on the gyro’s principle of detecting a projection of the earth rotation rate on its sensitive axis and the proposed north finding scheme, we are able to deduct an accurate mathematical model of the gyro outputs against azimuth with the gyro and shaft misalignments. Combining the gyro outputs model and the theory of propagation of uncertainty, some approaches to optimize north finding are provided, including reducing the gyro bias error, constraining the gyro random error, increasing the number of rotation points, improving rotation angle measurement precision, decreasing the gyro and the shaft misalignment angles. According them, a north finder setup is built and the azimuth uncertainty of 18” is obtained. This paper provides systematic theory for analyzing the details of the gyro north finder scheme from simulation to implementation. The proposed theory can guide both applied researchers in academia and advanced practitioners in industry for designing high precision robust north finder based on different types of rate gyroscopes. PMID:27657067

  14. Laboratory demonstration of a dual-stage vortex coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, Eugene; Liewer, Kurt; Mawet, Dimitri

    2016-11-01

    While an ideal optical vortex coronagraph operating behind a clear, circular, unaberrated telescope aperture can theoretically provide perfect rejection of the incident plane wave from an unresolved star, use of a telescope with an on-axis secondary mirror limits the rejection. In theory, a dual-stage vortex coronagraph can provide improved starlight rejection for an on-axis telescope, and here we provide experimental confirmation of the predicted distribution of the residual light in the output pupil plane of a dual-stage vortex coronagraph. In addition, a simple method of further improving the rejection of such a coronagraph is suggested: by slightly oversizing the first Lyot stop and phase-shifting the light within the exposed annulus by half a wave, the residual starlight within the pupil can be canceled to deeper levels.

  15. The visible nulling coronagraph -- progress towards mission and technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. Martin; Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Liu, Duncan T.; Lane, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a space mission for visible direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth like extrasolar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a moderately sized telescope in space.

  16. The JWST/NIRCam Coronagraph: Mask Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krista, John E.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Beichman, Charles A.; Echternach, Pierre M.; Green, Joseph J.; Liewer, Kurt M.; Muller, Richard E.; Serabyn, Eugene; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Trauger, John T.; Wilson, Daniel W.; Horner, Scott D.; Mao, Yalan; Somerstein, Stephen F.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Kelly, Douglas M.; Rieke, Marcia J.

    2009-01-01

    The NIRCam instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope will provide coronagraphic imaging from lambda =1-5 microns of high contrast sources such as extrasolar planets and circumstellar disks. A Lyot coronagraph with a variety of circular and wedge-shaped occulting masks and matching Lyot pupil stops will be implemented. The occulters approximate grayscale transmission profiles using halftone binary patterns comprising wavelength-sized metal dots on anti-reflection coated sapphire substrates. The mask patterns are being created in the Micro Devices Laboratory at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory using electron beam lithography. Samples of these occulters have been successfully evaluated in a coronagraphic testbed. In a separate process, the complex apertures that form the Lyot stops will be deposited onto optical wedges. The NIRCam coronagraph flight components are expected to be completed this year.

  17. Diffraction effects in a giant saw-toothed edge externally occulted solar coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verroi, E.; Frassetto, F.; Naletto, G.

    2008-07-01

    Typical diffraction and vignetting effects associated to the use of both externally and internally occulted coronagraphs make the innermost solar corona quite unobserved. However, by increasing the distance between the coronagraph telescope and the external occulter to hundred of meters, it is possible to observe the solar corona down to 1.01 solar radii without vignetting. This is the case of ASPIICS (Association de Satellites Pour l'Imagerie et l'Interférométrie Coronographique Solaire), a mission proposed to ESA for the PROBA3 program for formation flying. ASPIICS foresees two satellites: the external occulter is located on one spacecraft, and the telescope on the other. In this work we present the results obtained by a theoretical analysis of the apodization of the external occulter. This technique allows the reduction of the diffracted light contribution. We have developed a code that can simulates the effects of the giant external occulter (1 m diameter) on the photospheric light, and calculates the intensity of the diffracted light on the coronagraph entrance aperture. It is possible, in this way, to analyze various shapes of the occulter edge. In particular, we have focused our attention in the case of the serrated disc with variable number of teeth of different length. We considered the simple occurrence of a point-like monochromatic source at infinity. The results show that, employing a toothed disc, improvement of the S/N ratio of many order of magnitude (whit respect to a simple circular flat disc) can be obtained.

  18. Testbed Demonstration of Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for WFIRST Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, K.; Cady, E.; Kern, B.; Lam, R.; Mandic, M.; Patterson, K.; Poberezhskiy, I.; Shields, J.; Seo, J.; Tang, H.; Truong, T.; Wilson, D.

    2017-01-01

    NASA’s WFIRST-AFTA Coronagraph will be capable of directly imaging and spectrally characterizing giant exoplanets similar to Neptune and Jupiter, and possibly even super-Earths, around nearby stars. To maintain the required coronagraph performance in a realistic space environment, a Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C will use the rejected stellar light to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront errors due to the changes in thermal loading of the telescope and the rest of the observatory. The LOWFS/C uses a Zernike phase contrast wavefront sensor with the phase shifting disk combined with the stellar light rejecting occulting mask, a key concept to minimize the non-common path error. Developed as a part of the Dynamic High Contrast Imaging Testbed (DHCIT), the LOWFS/C subsystem also consists of an Optical Telescope Assembly Simulator (OTA-S) to generate the realistic line-of-sight (LoS) drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront error from WFIRST-AFTA telescope’s vibration and thermal drift. The entire LOWFS/C subsystem have been integrated, calibrated, and tested in the Dynamic High Contrast Imaging Testbed. In this presentation we will show the results of LOWFS/C performance during the dynamic coronagraph tests in which we have demonstrated that LOWFS/C is able to maintain the coronagraph contrast with the presence of WFIRST like line-of-sight drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront drifts.

  19. The STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.; Schulz, M.W.; Short, P.; Woods, J.; Crosetto, D.

    1997-12-01

    STAR is a large TPC-based experiment at RHIC, the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. The authors describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  20. Contamination from Skylab as determined from the solar coronagraph data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    The white light solar coronagraph was one of the scientific telescopes flown on Skylab to study the sun. It studied the sun's atmosphere located from 0.5 to 5.0 solar radii above the sun's limb. Such a telescope is so sensitive to contamination around the spacecraft that it caused a major contamination abatement program to be initiated at the conception of Skylab. The coronagraph's data is analyzed showing the successfulness of that abatement program.

  1. Ames Coronagraph Experiment: Enabling Missions to Directly Image Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Technology to find biomarkers and life on other worlds is rapidly maturing. If there is a habitable planet around the nearest star, we may be able to detect it this decade with a small satellite mission. In the 2030 decade, we will likely know if there is life in our Galactic neighborhood (1000 nearest stars). The Ames Coronagraph Experiment is developing coronagraphic technologies to enable such missions.

  2. Comparison of Potential ASKAP HI Survey Source Finders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, A.; Jurek, R.; Westmeier, T.; Serra, P.; Flöer, L.; Meyer, M.; Koribalski, B.

    2012-02-01

    The large size of the ASKAP HI surveys DINGO and WALLABY necessitates automated 3D source finding. A performance difference of a few percent corresponds to a significant number of galaxies being detected or undetected. As such, the performance of the automated source finding is of paramount importance to both of these surveys. We have analysed the performance of various source finders to determine which will allow us to meet our survey goals during the DINGO and WALLABY design studies. Here we present a comparison of the performance of five different methods of automated source finding. These source finders are duchamp, gamma-finder, a CNHI finder, a 2d-1d wavelet reconstruction finder and a sigma clipping method (s+c finder). Each source finder was applied to the same three-dimensional data cubes containing (a) point sources with a Gaussian velocity profile and (b) spatially extended model-galaxies with inclinations and rotation profiles. We focus on the completeness and reliability of each algorithm when comparing the performance of the different source finders.

  3. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  4. 47 CFR 80.289 - Requirements for radio direction finder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for radio direction finder. 80.289 Section 80.289 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Requirements for radio direction finder. (a) The radio direction finding apparatus must: (1) Be capable...

  5. 47 CFR 80.289 - Requirements for radio direction finder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for radio direction finder. 80.289 Section 80.289 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Requirements for radio direction finder. (a) The radio direction finding apparatus must: (1) Be capable...

  6. 47 CFR 80.289 - Requirements for radio direction finder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for radio direction finder. 80.289 Section 80.289 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Requirements for radio direction finder. (a) The radio direction finding apparatus must: (1) Be capable...

  7. 47 CFR 80.289 - Requirements for radio direction finder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for radio direction finder. 80.289 Section 80.289 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Requirements for radio direction finder. (a) The radio direction finding apparatus must: (1) Be capable...

  8. 47 CFR 80.289 - Requirements for radio direction finder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for radio direction finder. 80.289 Section 80.289 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO... Requirements for radio direction finder. (a) The radio direction finding apparatus must: (1) Be capable...

  9. Humanitarian Mine Finder Experiment for Humanitarian Demining (HD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    surface and buried Airborne techniques offer safety and speed over traditional HD th d UHF Band 2-D SAR L-band 2 D SAR me o s underground ...Backup Slides 20 Mine Finder Phase 1 •Design Mine Finder Rader •Determine which frequency bands (VHF, UHF, L, S, C, X, K) will provide greatest

  10. CellFinder: a cell data repository

    PubMed Central

    Stachelscheid, Harald; Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Mah, Nancy; Neves, Mariana; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Leser, Ulf; Kurtz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    CellFinder (http://www.cellfinder.org) is a comprehensive one-stop resource for molecular data characterizing mammalian cells in different tissues and in different development stages. It is built from carefully selected data sets stemming from other curated databases and the biomedical literature. To date, CellFinder describes 3394 cell types and 50 951 cell lines. The database currently contains 3055 microscopic and anatomical images, 205 whole-genome expression profiles of 194 cell/tissue types from RNA-seq and microarrays and 553 905 protein expressions for 535 cells/tissues. Text mining of a corpus of >2000 publications followed by manual curation confirmed expression information on ∼900 proteins and genes. CellFinder’s data model is capable to seamlessly represent entities from single cells to the organ level, to incorporate mappings between homologous entities in different species and to describe processes of cell development and differentiation. Its ontological backbone currently consists of 204 741 ontology terms incorporated from 10 different ontologies unified under the novel CELDA ontology. CellFinder’s web portal allows searching, browsing and comparing the stored data, interactive construction of developmental trees and navigating the partonomic hierarchy of cells and tissues through a unique body browser designed for life scientists and clinicians. PMID:24304896

  11. Harnessing the Power of the WFIRST-Coronagraph: A Coordinated Plan for Exoplanet and Disk Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Margaret

    We propose to form a WFIRST Coronagraph Science Investigation Team (WFIRST-C SIT) for the purpose of defining the coronagraph scientific performance requirements, designing an exoplanet and debris disk observing program, and developing data analysis techniques including faint source detection and spectral retrieval. Our team will accomplish these tasks by: 1. Providing detailed characterization of the candidate target stars in terms of stellar/substeller companions, circumstellar debris, and astrophysical background in order to inform the final target selection by the community. As part of this effort, we will make a plan for coordination between WFIRST and Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) target selection, to obtain both scattered light and thermal emission observations of exozodiacal dust in the same systems. This will be important precursor science for future exoEarth direct imaging missions. 2. Creating simulated spatial-spectral data cubes representative of what the WFIRST coronagraph may see around the candidate targets, including known and hypothetical exoplanets, dynamically consistent interplanetary dust distributions, and astrophysical background contamination. The code framework to make the high-fidelity input models exists within our team, and we currently have a complete spectral data cube that allows us to generate images at any wavelength between 0.3 microns and 2.5 microns. To generate the simulated datasets for WFIRST, we will make use of instrument simulation tools provided by the coronagraph design team, spanning the range of expected coronagraph performance characteristics. We will also add functionality to these tools, or build our own, as required. 3. Designing and conducting a â€oeblind retrieval challenge― study to distribute these data amongst source detection and spectral modeling teams in the exoplanet and wider astrophysics community. Given the variety of sources expected in each planet-finding field, we expect

  12. Automated scheduler improvements and generalizations for the Automated Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Bradford P.; Burt, Jennifer A.; Deich, William T. S.

    2016-07-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) was originally designed as a single purpose facility to search for exoplanets. The APF, however, has become a general use observatory that is used by astronomers the world over. We describe the improvements to our software for operations that both optimize finding planets with known periods and supporting a much broader community of astronomers with a variety of interests and requirements. These include a variety of observing modes beyond the originally envisioned fixed target lists, such as time dependent priorities to meet the needs of rapid varying targets, and improved tools for simulating observing cadence for the planet hunting teams. We discuss the underlying software for the APF, illustrating why its simplicity of use allows users to write software that focuses on scientific productivity. Because of this simplicity, we can then develop scheduling software, which is easily integrated into the APF operations suite. We test these new scheduling modes using a nightly simulator which uses historical weather and seeing data. After discussing this new simulation tool, we measure how well the methods work after a 36 month simulated campaign to follow-up transiting targets. We find that the data yield of each of the tested schemes is similar. Therefore, we can focus on the best potential scientific return with little concern about the impact on the number or duration of observations.

  13. The Four Quadrant Phase Mask Coronagraph and its avatars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouan, Daniel; Baudrand, Jacques; Boccaletti, Anthony; Baudoz, Pierre; Mawet, Dimitri; Riaud, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    A renewal of interest into Lyot coronagraphy began about 10 years ago with the advent of the new and very demanding goal of detecting directly extrasolar planets. Among the new ideas, the Four Quadrant Phase Mask (4QPMC) has been rather prolific. The 4QPM coronagraph is based the peculiar design of binary phase mask (0,π) dividing the full field of view at the focal plane in four quadrants. The mutual destructive interferences of the coherent light of a source perfectly centered on the mask, produce a total nulling within the pupil image, as is demonstrated analytically. We first recall the concept and performance of the 4QPMC. We then analyse the different limitations in space or ground-based observations from simulations. We then address the issue of device manufacturing and give the status of the actual performance in laboratory. A section reviews the various instruments under development that are equipped with this component. We conclude with a panorama of the rest of the family of the 4QPMC, which comprises several variants proposed by different teams. More specifically we address the important question of the achromatization by describing the various ideas which are currently explored to solve this problem. Among them, some genuine ones, not yet published, are presented. To cite this article: D. Rouan et al., C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  14. A comparison between different coronagraphic data reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carolo, E.; Vassallo, D.; Farinato, J.; Bergomi, M.; Bonavita, M.; Carlotti, A.; D'Orazi, V.; Greggio, D.; Magrin, D.; Mesa, D.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Stangalini, M.; Verinaud, C.; Viotto, V.

    2016-07-01

    A robust post processing technique is mandatory for analysing the coronagraphic high contrast imaging data. Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) are the most used approaches to suppress the quasi-static structure presents in the Point Spread Function (PSF) for revealing planets at different separations from the host star. In this work, we present the comparison between ADI and PCA applied to System of coronagraphy with High order Adaptive optics from R to K band (SHARK-NIR), which will be implemented at Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The comparison has been carried out by using as starting point the simulated wavefront residuals of the LBT Adaptive Optics (AO) system, in different observing conditions. Accurate tests for tuning the post processing parameters to obtain the best performance from each technique were performed in various seeing conditions (0:4"-1") for star magnitude ranging from 8 to 12, with particular care in finding the best compromise between quasi static speckle subtraction and planets detection.

  15. Coronagraph instrument for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noecker, M. Charley; Zhao, Feng; Demers, Rick; Trauger, John; Guyon, Olivier; Jeremy Kasdin, N.

    2016-01-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is a NASA observatory concept, now in phase A study, which is designed to perform wide-field imaging and slitless spectroscopic surveys for dark energy research and other astrophysical studies. It will also perform microlensing surveys to look for distant exoplanets in our galaxy, and direct imaging studies of some of the very nearest exoplanets. The current astrophysics focused telescope assets (AFTA) design of the mission makes use of an existing 2.4-m telescope, which yields enhanced sensitivity and imaging performance in all these science programs. AFTA also enables the addition of a coronagraph instrument (CGI) for direct imaging and spectroscopy of nearby giant exoplanets (including some that were discovered by radial velocity and other methods), and also for observing debris disks around the candidate host stars. This paper outlines the context for the other papers in this special volume on the WFIRST-AFTA CGI, covering the science, design, engineering, and technology development of the observatory and its CGI.

  16. Statechart Analysis with Symbolic PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.

    2012-01-01

    We report here on our on-going work that addresses the automated analysis and test case generation for software systems modeled using multiple Statechart formalisms. The work is motivated by large programs such as NASA Exploration, that involve multiple systems that interact via safety-critical protocols and are designed with different Statechart variants. To verify these safety-critical systems, we have developed Polyglot, a framework for modeling and analysis of model-based software written using different Statechart formalisms. Polyglot uses a common intermediate representation with customizable Statechart semantics and leverages the analysis and test generation capabilities of the Symbolic PathFinder tool. Polyglot is used as follows: First, the structure of the Statechart model (expressed in Matlab Stateflow or Rational Rhapsody) is translated into a common intermediate representation (IR). The IR is then translated into Java code that represents the structure of the model. The semantics are provided as "pluggable" modules.

  17. Parallel HOP: A Scalable Halo Finder for Massive Cosmological Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skory, Stephen; Turk, Matthew J.; Norman, Michael L.; Coil, Alison L.

    2010-11-01

    Modern N-body cosmological simulations contain billions (109) of dark matter particles. These simulations require hundreds to thousands of gigabytes of memory and employ hundreds to tens of thousands of processing cores on many compute nodes. In order to study the distribution of dark matter in a cosmological simulation, the dark matter halos must be identified using a halo finder, which establishes the halo membership of every particle in the simulation. The resources required for halo finding are similar to the requirements for the simulation itself. In particular, simulations have become too extensive to use commonly employed halo finders, such that the computational requirements to identify halos must now be spread across multiple nodes and cores. Here, we present a scalable-parallel halo finding method called Parallel HOP for large-scale cosmological simulation data. Based on the halo finder HOP, it utilizes message passing interface and domain decomposition to distribute the halo finding workload across multiple compute nodes, enabling analysis of much larger data sets than is possible with the strictly serial or previous parallel implementations of HOP. We provide a reference implementation of this method as a part of the toolkit "yt", an analysis toolkit for adaptive mesh refinement data that include complementary analysis modules. Additionally, we discuss a suite of benchmarks that demonstrate that this method scales well up to several hundred tasks and data sets in excess of 20003 particles. The Parallel HOP method and our implementation can be readily applied to any kind of N-body simulation data and is therefore widely applicable.

  18. Spacelab Lyman Alpha-White Light Coronagraph Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Spacelab Lyman Alpha Coronagraph (SLAC) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the White Light Coronagraph (WLC) to be provided by the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) are two separate coronagraphs which would be operated in a joint fashion during Spacelab missions to be flown by the Space Shuttle. The two instruments would be used to perform joint observations of solar coronal structures from 1.2 to 8.0 solar radii from sun-center in vacuum ultraviolet and visible radiations. Temperatures, densities, and flow velocities throughout the solar wing acceleration region of the inner solar corona were measured. The Phase I Definition activity resulted in the successful definition and preliminary design of the experiment/instrumentation subsystem and associated software, ground support equipment and interfaces to the extended required to accurately estimate the scope of the investigation and prepare an Investigational Development Plan; the performance of the necessary functional, operations, and safety analyses necessary to complete the Experiment Requirements document.

  19. Apodized vortex coronagraph designs for segmented aperture telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth; Jewell, Jeffery; Mawet, Dimitri; Pueyo, Laurent; Shaklan, Stuart

    2016-07-01

    Current state-of-the-art high contrast imaging instruments take advantage of a number of elegant coronagraph designs to suppress starlight and image nearby faint objects, such as exoplanets and circumstellar disks. The ideal performance and complexity of the optical systems depends strongly on the shape of the telescope aperture. Unfortunately, large primary mirrors tend to be segmented and have various obstructions, which limit the performance of most conventional coronagraph designs. We present a new family of vortex coronagraphs with numerically-optimized gray-scale apodizers that provide the sensitivity needed to directly image faint exoplanets with large, segmented aperture telescopes, including the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) as well as potential next-generation space telescopes.

  20. Spacelab Lyman Alpha-White Light Coronagraph Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, J. L.

    1986-06-01

    The Spacelab Lyman Alpha Coronagraph (SLAC) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) and the White Light Coronagraph (WLC) to be provided by the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) are two separate coronagraphs which would be operated in a joint fashion during Spacelab missions to be flown by the Space Shuttle. The two instruments would be used to perform joint observations of solar coronal structures from 1.2 to 8.0 solar radii from sun-center in vacuum ultraviolet and visible radiations. Temperatures, densities, and flow velocities throughout the solar wing acceleration region of the inner solar corona were measured. The Phase I Definition activity resulted in the successful definition and preliminary design of the experiment/instrumentation subsystem and associated software, ground support equipment and interfaces to the extended required to accurately estimate the scope of the investigation and prepare an Investigational Development Plan; the performance of the necessary functional, operations, and safety analyses necessary to complete the Experiment Requirements document.

  1. The Spacelab Lyman alpha and white light coronagraphs program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Withbroe, G. L.; Weiser, H.; Macqueen, R. M.; Munro, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the High Altitude Observatory have defined a joint coronagraphs experiment for a future Spacelab mission. The instrumentation package would include an ultraviolet light coronagraph to measure the intensity and profiles of spectral lines formed between 1.2 and 8 solar radii from sun center and a white light coronagraph to measure the intensity and polarization of visible light. The overall goals of the joint program are to use new coronal plasma diagnostic techniques to understand the physical processes and mechanisms operating in the solar corona, to understand the acceleration of high-speed and low-speed solar wind streams and to extrapolate this knowledge to other stars in order to help understand the physics of stellar coronae and stellar mass loss.

  2. Analysis of Random Segment Errors on Coronagraph Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Mark T.; Stahl, H. Philip; Shaklan, Stuart B.; N'Diaye, Mamadou

    2016-01-01

    At 2015 SPIE O&P we presented "Preliminary Analysis of Random Segment Errors on Coronagraph Performance" Key Findings: Contrast Leakage for 4thorder Sinc2(X) coronagraph is 10X more sensitive to random segment piston than random tip/tilt, Fewer segments (i.e. 1 ring) or very many segments (> 16 rings) has less contrast leakage as a function of piston or tip/tilt than an aperture with 2 to 4 rings of segments. Revised Findings: Piston is only 2.5X more sensitive than Tip/Tilt

  3. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  4. 1. VIEW NORTHWEST, operations building, height finder radar tower, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTHWEST, operations building, height finder radar tower, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  5. Introduction to Searching with SciFinder Scholar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Damon D.

    2001-04-01

    With SciFinder Scholar now one of the preferred access routes to information in the sciences, many college information retrieval courses that dealt with online networks need to be redesigned. Although one of the basic assumptions within the design of SciFinder Scholar is that staff and students may retrieve valuable answers with little training, nevertheless, with a little instruction improved search results may be obtained. We present here our basic teaching program for senior undergraduate and postgraduate classes.

  6. Micro-Laser Range Finder Development: Using the Monolithic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Micro- Laser Range Finder Development: Using the Monolithic Approach February 1999 John... Nettleton , Dallas Barr, Brad Schilling & Jonathan Lei US ARMY CECOM RDEC NVESD Fort Belvoir, VA Samuel M. Goldwasser Engineering Consultant Bala-Cynwyd, PA...ABSTRACT Laser range finders are a vital component of high precision targeting engagements. The precise and accurate range-to-target information is

  7. Characterizing edge-generated stray light sources for TPF Coronagraph pupil masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, Daniel; Neureuther, Andrew; Lieber, Michael; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2005-08-01

    The edge generated stray-light from corner boundary conditions, interactions with the lower mask structure, and surface plasmon polaritons that may limit Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph performance are characterized. Previously a number of stray light sources, unaccounted for by the ideal thin mask theory used to design the pupil-plane masks, were identified. In this paper we illustrate and quantify the most important outstanding stray-light sources in the near-field in order to improve the model of pupil-plane mask transmission used by the Integrated Telescope Model. Corner spikes, caused by the need to bring the ideal top-hat field into compliance with the boundary conditions set forth by Maxwell's equations, form the strongest source of stray-light, accounting for up to a 1λ shift in the effective opening width per edge. Undercutting mask edges by 20° reduces this source of stray-light by more than a factor of five. Interactions between light and the lower mask structure, a secondary effect, account for only a few percent of the stray-light in the TE polarization but account for up to 50% of the stray-light in the TM polarization due to surface plasmon polaritons. Surface plasmon polaritons, surface waves that run for tens of microns and radiate at corners, form the final stray-light source. On thin masks they may account for up to a 1λ shift in the effective opening width; however, their effects can be easily mitigated by choosing a poor surface plasmon material, such as Chrome. The results presented here are being used to facilitate end-to-end system modeling through the Integrated Telescope Model.

  8. The automated planet finder at Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovan, Matt V.; Lanclos, Kyle; Holden, Bradford P.; Kibrick, Robert I.; Allen, S. L.; Deich, William T. S.; Rivera, Eugenio; Burt, Jennifer; Fulton, Benjamin; Butler, Paul; Vogt, Steven S.

    2014-07-01

    By July 2014, the Automated Planet Finder (APF) at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton will have completed its first year of operation. This facility combines a modern 2.4m computer-controlled telescope with a flexible development environment that enables efficient use of the Levy Spectrometer for high cadence observations. The Levy provides both sub-meter per second radial velocity precision and high efficiency, with a peak total system throughput of 24%. The modern telescope combined with efficient spectrometer routinely yields over 100 observations of 40 stars in a single night, each of which has velocity errors of 0.7 to 1.4 meters per second, all with typical seeing of < 1 arc second full-width-half-maximum (FWHM). The whole observing process is automated using a common application programming interface (API) for inter-process communication which allows scripting to be done in a variety of languages (Python, Tcl, bash, csh, etc.) The flexibility and ease-of-use of the common API allowed the science teams to be directly involved in the automation of the observing process, ensuring that the facility met their requirements. Since November 2013, the APF has been routinely conducting autonomous observations without human intervention.

  9. Imaging exoplanets with the WFIRST Coronagraph: A background check of high priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Guangwei; Turnbull, Margaret C.; Gallagher, John S.; Kotulla, Ralf C.; Merrelli, Aronne; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Hu, Renyu

    2016-01-01

    The WFIRST coronagraph is envisioned to achieve a limiting contrast for exoplanet detection of 10e-9. This revolutionary mission will enable the direct detection of known and newly discovered exoplanets amongst the nearest stars, from super-Earths to giants. However, at this contrast the coronagraph will essentially see a Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) in every image. For targets near the Galactic Plane on the sky, distant stars with varying levels of extinction and reddening will dominate the background. Away from the plane, we then expect extragalactic sources to dominate. What impact will these background sources have on the WFIRST exoplanet imaging program? How can we efficiently distinguish background sources from exoplanet targets in a single image? To have a comprehensive understanding of the distribution of background sources across the sky, we have used the HUDF to model extragalactic faint sources, and "Trilegal" simulations to model galactic background sources. Through some preliminary color and point source analysis, we offer a statistical estimation of expected background contamination and the probability of false positive background sources. In this poster we show plots relating number of extragalactic sources versus magnitude in HUDF and "Trilegal" simulation. We present a table of high priority WFIRST exoplanet imaging targets, with an assessment of the "background threat" due to background stars, galaxies, and binary companions.

  10. CoCo: an infrared cold coronagraph for astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-I.; Owensby, Pamela D.; Toomey, Douglas W.; Brown, Robert H.; Stahlberger, Werner E.; Cavedoni, Charles P.; Hua, Rong; Ftaclas, Christ

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the design of an IR cold coronagraph (CoCo) built by SETS Technology, Inc., for use at the NASA 3 m IR Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Mauna Kea Observatory, for the imaging of faint IR sources in proximity to bright sources. The coronagraph is designed to obtain high contrast photometric images by use of an occulting mask and a pupil mask. The coronagraph is to be used in combination with the IRTF NSFCAM, which covers 1-5 micrometers and uses a 256x256 InSb array. The platescale can be varied from 0.06'/pixel to 0.15'/pixel, covering a field of view of 14' and 38', respectively. Selectable apodized and hard occulting masks are mounted on a wheel as the first element in the system to reduce scattered light. Selectable pupil masks are cooled to 77K within the CoCo cryostat. The cryostat consists of a liquid nitrogen can for cooling the optics, masks, and baffles. The CoCo dewar is mounted on a slide in a housing to allow it to move out of the beam path so that the NSFCAM may be used with or without the coronagraph during the same observing period.

  11. Low order wavefront sensing and control for WFIRST coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Bartos, Randall; Hein, Randall; Lam, Raymond; Mandic, Milan; Moore, Douglas; Moore, James; Patterson, Keith; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Shields, Joel; Sidick, Erkin; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Wallace, James K.; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Daniel W.

    2016-07-01

    To maintain the required WFIRST Coronagraph starlight suppression performance in a realistic space environment, a low order wavefront sensing and control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C uses the rejected stellar light from coronagraph to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as the low order wavefront errors due to changes in thermal loading on the telescope and the rest of the observatory. In this paper we will present an overview of the low order wavefront sensing and control subsystem for the WFIRST Coronagraph and describe the WFIRST Coronagraph LOWFS function, its design, and modeled performance. We will present experimental results on a dedicated LOWFS/C testbed that show that the LOWFS/C subsystem not only can sense pointing errors better than 0.2 mas but has also experimentally demonstrated closed loop pointing error suppression with residuals better than 0.4 mas rms per axis for the vast majority of observatory reaction wheel speeds.

  12. Prospects for Observing Space Debris with Solar Coronagraphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-07

    mode designed to detect orbital debris . II 4- Coronagraph -2or -2- /• -. 0.001 s -4- -6. . . . . . -3 -2 -1 0 1 Log a (cm) Figure 1. Per-pixel signal...velocities of orbital debris and the typical direction and fast transit times of nearby particles under strong wind conditions, or random and nonlinear

  13. The COR1 Inner Coronagraph for STEREO-SECCHI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William T.; Davila, Joseph M.; Fisher, Richard R.; Orwig, Larry E.; Mentzell, John E.; Hetherington, Samuel E.; Derro, Rebecca J.; Ferderline, Robert E.; Clark, David C.; Chen, Philip T.

    2004-01-01

    The Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) is a pair of identical satellites that will orbit the Sun so as to drift ahead of and behind Earth respectively, to give a stereo view of the Sun. STEREO is currently scheduled for launch in November 2005. One of the instrument packages that will be own on each of the STEREO spacecrafts is the Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI), which consists of an extreme ultraviolet imager, two coronagraphs, and two side-viewing heliospheric imagers to observe solar coronal mass ejections all the way from the Sun to Earth. We report here on the inner coronagraph, labeled COR1. COR1 is a classic Lyot internally occulting refractive coronagraph, adapted for the first time to be used in space. The field of view is from 1.3 to 4 solar radii. A linear polarizer is used to suppress scattered light, and to extract the polarized brightness signal from the solar corona. The optical scattering performance of the coronagraph was first modeled using both the ASAP and APART numerical modeling codes, and then tested at the Vacuum Tunnel Facility at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. In this report, we will focus on the COR1 optical design, the predicted optical performance, and the observed performance in the lab. We will also discuss the mechanical and thermal design, and the cleanliness requirements needed to achieve the optical performance.

  14. MiniCOR: A miniature coronagraph for an interplanetary CUBESAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, A.; Korendyke, C.; Liewer, P. C.; Cutler, J.; Howard, R.; Plunkett, S. P.; Thernisien, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Coronagraphs occupy a unique place in Heliophysics, critical to both NAA and NOAA programs. They are the primary means for the study of the extended solar coorna and its short/long term activity. In addition coronagraphs are the only instrument that can image coronal mass ejections (CMEs) leaving the Sun and provide ciritical information for space weather forecasting. We descirbe a low cost miniaturzied CubeSat coronagraph, MiniCOR, designed to operate in deep space which will returndata with higher cadence and sensitivity than that from the SOHO/LASCO coronagraphs. MiniCOR is a six unit (6U) science craft with a tightly integrated, single instrument interplanetary flight system optiized for science. MiniCOR fully exploits recent technology advance in CubeSat technology and active pixel sensors. With a factor of 2.9 improvement in light gathering power over SOHO and quasi-continuous data collection, MiniCOR can observe the slow solar wind, CMEs and shocks with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to open new windows on our understanding of the inner Heliosphere. An operating Minic'OR would prvide coornagraphic observations in support of the upcoming Solar Probe Plus (SPP) and Solar Orbiter (SO) missions.

  15. Common-Path Wavefront Sensing for Advanced Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Serabyn, Eugene; Mawet, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    Imaging of faint companions around nearby stars is not limited by either intrinsic resolution of a coronagraph/telescope system, nor is it strictly photon limited. Typically, it is both the magnitude and temporal variation of small phase and amplitude errors imparted to the electric field by elements in the optical system which will limit ultimate performance. Adaptive optics systems, particularly those with multiple deformable mirrors, can remove these errors, but they need to be sensed in the final image plane. If the sensing system is before the final image plane, which is typical for most systems, then the non-common path optics between the wavefront sensor and science image plane will lead to un-sensed errors. However, a new generation of high-performance coronagraphs naturally lend themselves to wavefront sensing in the final image plane. These coronagraphs and the wavefront sensing will be discussed, as well as plans for demonstrating this with a high-contrast system on the ground. Such a system will be a key system-level proof for a future space-based coronagraph mission, which will also be discussed.

  16. ACCESS - A Science and Engineering Assessment of Space Coronagraph Concepts for the Direct Imaging and Spectroscopy of Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, John

    2008-01-01

    Topics include and overview, science objectives, study objectives, coronagraph types, metrics, ACCESS observatory, laboratory validations, and summary. Individual slides examine ACCESS engineering approach, ACCESS gamut of coronagraph types, coronagraph metrics, ACCESS Discovery Space, coronagraph optical layout, wavefront control on the "level playing field", deformable mirror development for HCIT, laboratory testbed demonstrations, high contract imaging with the HCIT, laboratory coronagraph contrast and stability, model validation and performance predictions, HCIT coronagraph optical layout, Lyot coronagraph on the HCIT, pupil mapping (PIAA), shaped pupils, and vortex phase mask experiments on the HCIT.

  17. A neural network gravitational arc finder based on the Mediatrix filamentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bom, C. R.; Makler, M.; Albuquerque, M. P.; Brandt, C. H.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Automated arc detection methods are needed to scan the ongoing and next-generation wide-field imaging surveys, which are expected to contain thousands of strong lensing systems. Arc finders are also required for a quantitative comparison between predictions and observations of arc abundance. Several algorithms have been proposed to this end, but machine learning methods have remained as a relatively unexplored step in the arc finding process. Aims: In this work we introduce a new arc finder based on pattern recognition, which uses a set of morphological measurements that are derived from the Mediatrix filamentation method as entries to an artificial neural network (ANN). We show a full example of the application of the arc finder, first training and validating the ANN on simulated arcs and then applying the code on four Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of strong lensing systems. Methods: The simulated arcs use simple prescriptions for the lens and the source, while mimicking HST observational conditions. We also consider a sample of objects from HST images with no arcs in the training of the ANN classification. We use the training and validation process to determine a suitable set of ANN configurations, including the combination of inputs from the Mediatrix method, so as to maximize the completeness while keeping the false positives low. Results: In the simulations the method was able to achieve a completeness of about 90% with respect to the arcs that are input into the ANN after a preselection. However, this completeness drops to 70% on the HST images. The false detections are on the order of 3% of the objects detected in these images. Conclusions: The combination of Mediatrix measurements with an ANN is a promising tool for the pattern-recognition phase of arc finding. More realistic simulations and a larger set of real systems are needed for a better training and assessment of the efficiency of the method.

  18. Optimization of Planet Finder Observing Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinukoff, E.

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate radial velocity observing strategies to be considered for future planethunting surveys with the Automated Planet Finder, a new 2.4-m telescope at Lick Observatory. Observing strategies can be optimized to mitigate stellar noise, which can mask and imitate the weak Doppler signals of low-mass planets. We estimate and compare sensitivities of 5 different observing strategies to planets around G2-M2 dwarfs, constructing RV noise models for each stellar spectral type, accounting for acoustic, granulation, and magnetic activity modes. The strategies differ in exposure time, nightly and monthly cadence, and number of years. Synthetic RV time-series are produced by injecting a planet signal onto the stellar noise, sampled according to each observing strategy. For each star and each observing strategy, thousands of planet injection recovery trials are conducted to determine the detection efficiency as a function of orbital period, minimum mass, and eccentricity. We find that 4-year observing strategies of 10 nights per month are sensitive to planets ~25-40% lower in mass than the corresponding 1 year strategies of 30 nights per month. Three 5-minute exposures spaced evenly throughout each night provide a 10% gain in sensitivity over the corresponding single 15-minute exposure strategies. All strategies are sensitive to planets of lowest mass around the modeled K7 dwarf. This study indicates that APF surveys adopting the 4-year strategies should detect Earth-mass planets on < 10-day orbits around quiet late-K dwarfs as well as > 1.6 Earth-mass planets in their habitable zones.

  19. Optimization of the occulter for the Solar Orbiter/METIS coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Federico; Vivès, Sébastien; Romoli, Marco; Guillon, Christophe; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Escolle, Clement; Focardi, Mauro; Antonucci, Ester; Fineschi, Silvano; Naletto, Giampiero; Nicolini, Gianalfredo; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio; Spadaro, Daniele

    2012-09-01

    METIS (Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy investigation), selected to fly aboard the Solar Orbiter ESA/NASA mission, is conceived to perform imaging (in visible, UV and EUV) and spectroscopy (in EUV) of the solar corona, by means of an integrated instrument suite located on a single optical bench and sharing the same aperture on the satellite heat shield. As every coronagraph, METIS is highly demanding in terms of stray light suppression. Coronagraphs history teaches that a particular attention must be dedicated to the occulter optimization. The METIS occulting system is of particular interest due to its innovative concept. In order to meet the strict thermal requirements of Solar Orbiter, METIS optical design has been optimized by moving the entrance pupil at the level of the external occulter on the S/C thermal shield, thus reducing the size of the external aperture. The scheme is based on an inverted external-occulter (IEO). The IEO consists of a circular aperture on the Solar Orbiter thermal shield. A spherical mirror rejects back the disk-light through the IEO. A breadboard of the occulting assembly (BOA) has been manufactured in order to perform stray light tests in front of two solar simulators (in Marseille, France and in Torino, Italy). A first measurement campaign has been carried on at the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. In this paper we describe the BOA design, the laboratory set-up and the preliminary results.

  20. Development of PIAA Complex Mask Coronagraphs for large aperture ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin; Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph (PIAACMC) is an architecture for directly observing extra-solar planets, and can achieve performance near the theoretical limits for any direct-detection instrument. The PIAACMC architecture includes aspheric PIAA optics, and a complex phase-shifting focal plane mask that provides a pi phase shift to a portion of the on-axis starlight. The phase-shifted starlight is forced to interfere destructively with the un-shifted starlight, causing the starlight to be eliminated, and allowing a region for high-contrast imaging near the star. The PIAACMC architecture can be designed for segmented and obscured apertures, so it is particularly well suited for ground-based observing with the next generation of large telescopes. There will be unique scientific opportunities for directly observing Earth-like planets around nearby low-mass stars. We will discuss design strategies for adapting PIAACMC for the next generation of large ground-based telescopes, and present progress on the development of the focal plane mask technology. We also present simulations of wave-front control with PIAACMC, and suggest directions to apply the coronagraph architecture to future telescopes.

  1. Demonstration of Broadband Contrast at 1.2 Lambda/D for the EXCEDE Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Thomas, Sandrine J.; Belikov, Ruslan; Lozi, Julien; Bendek, Eduardo; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Lynch, Dana H.; Hix, Troy; Zell, Peter; Schneider, Glenn; Guyon, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The proposed coronagraph instrument on the EXCEDE (EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer) mission study uses a Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph architecture to enable high-contrast imaging of circumstellar debris disks and giant planets at angular separations as close in as the habitable zone of nearby host stars. We report on the experimental results obtained in the vacuum chamber at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in 10 percent broadband light centered about 650 nanometers, with a median contrast of 1 x 10 (sup -5) between 1.2 and 2.0 lambda /D simultaneously with 3 x 10 (sup -7) contrast between 2 and 11 =D between 2 and 11 lambda/D for a single-sided dark hole using a deformable mirror (DM) upstream of the PIAA coronagraph. The results are stable and repeatable as demonstrated by three measurements runs with DM settings set from scratch and maintained on the best 90 percent out of the 1000 collected frames. We compare the reduced experimental data with simulation results from modeling observed experimental limits; performance is consistent with uncorrected low-order modes not estimated by the Low Order Wavefront Sensor (LOWFS). Modeled sensitivity to bandwidth and residual tip/tilt modes is well-matched to the experiment.

  2. Tracking of Humans and Robots Using Laser Range Finders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bršcic, Drazen; Sasaki, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Hideki

    There exist various applications where tracking of humans or robots in an area is needed. An example of such applications are Intelligent Spaces, where humans and robots share a common space and their positions are tracked by a system of sensors in the space. In this paper a system for tracking both humans and robots that utilizes laser range finders as sensing devices is described. The details of the extraction of objects from the laser scan, data association and estimation are given, and results of tracking humans and robots are described. Calibration of the distributed laser range finders, which is important for the operation of the tracking system is also described, both in a manual and automated variant and experimental results are given. Finally, the inclusion of a laser range finder onboard the mobile robot in the tracking process is described and accompanied with experimental results. The distributed fusion of static and onboard sensors is also discussed.

  3. Control design for momentum-compensated fast steering mirror for WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Keith; Shields, Joel; Wang, Xu; Tang, Hong; Azizi, Ali; Brugarolas, Paul; Mandic, Milan; Shi, Fang

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents results of the feedback control design for JPL's Fast Steering Mirror (FSM) for the WFIRST- AFTA coronagraph instrument. The objective of this controller is to cancel jitter disturbances in the beam from the spacecraft to a pointing stability of 0.4 masec over the duration of the observation using a momentum- compensated FSM. The plant model for the FSM was characterized experimentally, and the sensor model is based on simulated modeling. The control approach is divided between feedback compensation of low frequency attitude control system (ACS) drift, and feedforward cancellation of high frequency tonal disturbances originating from reaction wheel excitation of the telescope structure. This paper will present various aspects of the controller design, plant characterization, sensor modeling, disturbance estimation, performance simulation, and preliminary experimental testing results.

  4. Electric field conjugation with the project 1640 coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Eric; Baranec, Christoph; Beichman, Charles; Brenner, Douglas; Burruss, Rick; Crepp, Justin; Dekany, Richard; Hale, David; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hinkley, Sasha; Ligon, E. Robert; Lockhart, Thomas; Oppenheimer, Ben; Parry, Ian; Pueyo, Laurent; Rice, Emily; Roberts, Lewis C.; Roberts, Jennifer; Shao, Michael; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Remi; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Vasisht, Gautam; Vescelus, Fred; Wallace, J. Kent; Zhai, Chengxing; Zimmerman, Neil

    2013-09-01

    The Project 1640 instrument on the 200-inch Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory is a coronagraphic instru- ment with an integral eld spectrograph at the back end, designed to nd young, self-luminous planets around nearby stars. To reach the necessary contrast for this, the PALM-3000 adaptive optics system corrects for fast atmospheric speckles, while CAL, a phase-shifting interferometer in a Mach-Zehnder con guration, measures the quasistatic components of the complex electric eld in the pupil plane following the coronagraphic stop. Two additional sensors measure and control low-order modes. These eld measurements may then be combined with a system model and data taken separately using a white-light source internal to the AO system to correct for both phase and amplitude aberrations. Here, we discuss and demonstrate the procedure to maintain a half-plane dark hole in the image plane while the spectrograph is taking data, including initial on-sky performance.

  5. FilFinder: Filamentary structure in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2016-08-01

    FilFinder extracts and analyzes filamentary structure in molecular clouds. In particular, it is capable of uniformly extracting structure over a large dynamical range in intensity. It returns the main filament properties: local amplitude and background, width, length, orientation and curvature. FilFinder offers additional tools to, for example, create a filament-only image based on the properties of the radial fits. The resulting mask and skeletons may be saved in FITS format, and property tables may be saved as a CSV, FITS or LaTeX table.

  6. Respective capabilities of affordable Coronagraphs and Interferometers searching for Biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, Alain M.

    2015-12-01

    We describe an analytic model to estimate the capabilities of space missions dedicated to the search for biosignatures in the atmosphere of rocky planets located in the Habitable Zone of nearby stars. Relations between performance and parameters such as mirror diameter, distance to target, stellar properties, are obtained.Two types of instruments are considered: Coronagraphs observing in the visible, and Nulling Interferometers observing in the thermal infrared. Missions considered as affordable are single-pupil coronagraphs with a 2.4 m primary mirror, and formation flying interferometers with 4 x 0.75 m collecting mirrors with baselines ranging from a few decameters to a few hectometers.The numbers of accessible planets are calculated as a function of ηearth, the mean number of Earth analogues and super-Earths in stellar Habitable Zones.Based on current estimates, ηearth=10% around FGK stars and 20% around M stars, the built-in coronagraph and starshade could study only ~2.0 relevant planets, and the interferometer ~14. These numbers are obtained under the major assumption that the exozodiacal light around the target stars is not an issue for any of these instruments.For the coronagraphs, our estimates are in agreement with the values recently published by Stark et al. (2014), but these authors did not consider the case of interferometers.For the long-term future, building both types of spectroscopic instruments, and using them on the same targets, will be the optimal solution because they provide complementary information. But as a first affordable space mission, the interferometer looks the more promising in term of biosignature harvest.

  7. Coronagraph particulate measurements. Skylab flight experiment T025

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, J. M.; Schuerman, D. W.; Giovane, F.; Wang, R. T.; Hardy, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Major results of the Skylab T025 Coronagraph experiment designed to monitor the particulate contamination about the spacecraft and to study the earth's atmospheric aerosol distribution are presented. A model for comet outbursts based on the properties of amorphous ice and ground based narrow-band and white light photography of comet Kohoutek ten days to perihelion are included. The effect of atmospheric refraction on the analysis of the T025 atmospheric data was also investigated.

  8. CME dynamics using coronagraph and interplanetary ejecta observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, Alisson; Demítrio Gonzalez Alarcon, Walter; da Silva, Marlos; de Lucas, Aline; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Ramos Vieira, Lucas

    One of the key issues of Space Weather is the dynamics of coronal mass ejections, from their release from the Sun, their propagation throughout the interplanetary space, eventually im-pacting the earth and other planets. These impacts of CMEs are the most important drivers of space weather phenomena. A number of empirical and analytical studies have addressed this point so far, using observations from coronagraphs and interplanetary monitors, in order to correlate CMEs observed near the Sun and in situ (e.g. earth vincity). However, results are far from conclusive. Error bars in CME travel time predictions from the Sun to earth, are of the order of 1 day, which is considerably big for the typical time scale of 1 to 3 days of their travel time. After many years of intensive investigations of CMEs observed with the Large An-gle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO), abord the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), we found that the subset of interplanetary counterparts of CMEs, the ICMEs, with a well defined ejecta structure are those with best predictable behaviour. The prediction of these interplanetary ejecta travel time to earth, using coronagraph observations is the one with lowest error bar among other sets of events, such as interplanetary shock. We present a statistic study of all the CME-ejecta events observed by SOHO and by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite since 1997.

  9. Laboratory Demonstration of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph with Better than 10(exp -9) Contrast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Kuhnert, Andreas; Niessner, Albert; Martinache, Frantz; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    We present coronagraphic images from the Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph on NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Lab, showing contrasts of 5x10(exp -1) averaged from 2-4 lambda/D, in monochromatic light at 808 nm. In parallel with the coronagraph and its deformable mirror and coronagraphic wavefront control, we also demonstrate a low-order wavefront control system, giving 100 x rms suppression of introduced tip/tilt disturbances down to residual levels of 10(exp -3) lambda/D. Current limitations, as well as broadband (10% fractional bandpass) preliminary results are discussed.

  10. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  11. FACTOR FINDER CD-ROM | Science Inventory | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Factor Finder CD-ROM is a user-friendly, searchable tool used to locate exposure factors and sociodemographic data for user-defined populations. Factor Finder improves the exposure assessors and risk assessors (etc.) ability to efficiently locate exposure-related information for a population of concern. Users can either enter keywords into a user-defined search box or use pull-down menus to help pinpoint specific information. The pull-down menu features general categories such as chemicals of concern, contaminated media, geographic region, exposure pathways and routes, age, food categories, and activities to name just a few. Numerous subcategories are available for selection from the pull down menu as well. Factor Finder searches both documents to retrieve the specified data and displays the information on the user's personal computer (PC) screen. Factor Finder is used by exposure assessors, risk assessors, and other concerned communities to locate exposure-related data contained within the Exposure Factors Handbook (EFH) and Sociodemographic Data Used in Identifying Potentially Highly Exposed Populations (HEP). The EFH and the HEP are companion guidance documents produced by the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) within EPA's Office of Research and Development. The Exposure Factors Handbook (EFH) summarizes data on exposure factors (values that describe human behaviors and characteristics that affect exposure to environmental cont

  12. NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder: The Search for (Habitable) Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C.

    1999-01-01

    One of the primary goals of NASA's Origins program is the search for habitable planets. I will describe how the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) will revolutionize our understanding of the origin and evolution of planetary systems, and possibly even find signs of life beyond the Earth.

  13. NASA's terrestial planet finder: the search for (habitable) planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of NASA's Origins program is the search for hospitable planets. I will describe how the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) will revolutionize our understanding of the origin and evolution of planetary systems, and possibly even find signs of life beyond Earth.

  14. 12 CFR 7.1002 - National bank acting as finder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OPERATIONS Bank Powers § 7.1002 National bank acting as finder. (a) General. It is part of the business of... and terms to potential markets for these products and services; (2) Communicating to the seller an... sellers, and conducting market research to identify potential new customers for retailers; (5)...

  15. The coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor: a hybrid focal-plane sensor for the high-contrast imaging of circumstellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, M. J.; Keller, C. U.; Snik, F.; Korkiakoski, V.; Pietrow, A. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    The raw coronagraphic performance of current high-contrast imaging instruments is limited by the presence of a quasi-static speckle (QSS) background, resulting from instrumental Non-Common Path Errors (NCPEs). Rapid development of efficient speckle subtraction techniques in data reduction has enabled final contrasts of up to 10-6 to be obtained, however it remains preferable to eliminate the underlying NCPEs at the source. In this work we introduce the coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor (cMWS), a new wavefront sensor suitable for real-time NCPE correction. This combines the Apodizing Phase Plate (APP) coronagraph with a holographic modal wavefront sensor to provide simultaneous coronagraphic imaging and focal-plane wavefront sensing with the science point-spread function. We first characterise the baseline performance of the cMWS via idealised closed-loop simulations, showing that the sensor is able to successfully recover diffraction-limited coronagraph performance over an effective dynamic range of ±2.5 radians root-mean-square (rms) wavefront error within 2-10 iterations, with performance independent of the specific choice of mode basis. We then present the results of initial on-sky testing at the William Herschel Telescope, which demonstrate that the sensor is capable of NCPE sensing under realistic seeing conditions via the recovery of known static aberrations to an accuracy of 10 nm (0.1 radians) rms error in the presence of a dominant atmospheric speckle foreground. We also find that the sensor is capable of real-time measurement of broadband atmospheric wavefront variance (50% bandwidth, 158 nm rms wavefront error) at a cadence of 50 Hz over an uncorrected telescope sub-aperture. When combined with a suitable closed-loop adaptive optics system, the cMWS holds the potential to deliver an improvement of up to two orders of magnitude over the uncorrected QSS floor. Such a sensor would be eminently suitable for the direct imaging and spectroscopy of

  16. Post-Coronagraph Wavefront Sensor for Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Burruss, Rick; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Remi; Shelton, Chris; Bartos, Randall; Fregoso, Felipe; Nemati, Bijan; Best, Paul; Angione, John

    2009-01-01

    The calibration wavefront system for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) will measure the complex wavefront at the apodized pupil and provide slow phase errors to the AO system to mitigate against image plane speckles that would cause a loss in contrast. This talk describes both the low-order and high-order sensors in the calibration wavefront sensor and how the information is combined to form the wavefront estimate before the coronagraph. We will show laboratory results from our calibration testbed that demonstrate the subsystem performance at levels commensurate with those required on the final instrument.

  17. Coronagraphic Amplitude and Phase Correction for Detecting Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Bowers, Charles W.

    2003-01-01

    Detection of earth-like planets around other stars using coronagraphy requires the optical beam into the coronagraph to be extremely uniform in both phase and amplitude. Errors in phase can be corrected using a deformable mirror, and error in amplitude can be corrected using a spatial light modulator, both in the pupil plan,a. These corrections can be combined using a Michelson interferometer. If amplitude corrections of only a few percent range are needed, the required accuracy of 10 (circumflex) -4 can be obtained with spatial light modulators with the modest dynamic range of 8 bits.

  18. Stray-light analyses of the METIS coronagraph on Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineschi, S.; Sandri, P.; Landini, F.; Romoli, M.; DaDeppo, V.; Frassetto, F.; Verroi, E.; Naletto, G.; Morea, D.; Antonucci, E.; Spadaro, D.; Andretta, V.

    2015-09-01

    The METIS coronagraph on board the Solar Orbiter mission will have the unique opportunity of observing the solar outer atmosphere as close to the Sun as 0.28 A.U., and from up to 35° out-of-ecliptic. The telescope design of the METIS coronagraph includes two optical paths: i) broad-band imaging of the full corona in linearly polarized visible-light (VL: 580-640 nm), ii) narrow-band imaging of the full corona in the ultraviolet (UV) Lyman α (121.6 nm). This paper describes the stray-light analyses performed on the UV and VL channels of the METIS Telescope with the nonsequential modality of Zemax OpticStudio. A detailed opto-mechanical model of the METIS Telescope is simulated by placing the CAD parts of all the sub-assemblies at the nominal position. Each surface, mechanical and optical, is provided with a modelled coating and BSDF reproducing the optical and the diffusing properties. The geometric model allows for the verification of the correct functioning of the blocking elements inside the telescope and for an evaluation of the stray-light level due to surface roughness. The diffraction off the inner edge of the IEO on the plane of the IO is modelled separately from the contributor of the surface micro-roughness. The contributors due to particle contamination and cosmetic defects are also analysed. The results obtained are merged together and compared to the requirements of stray-light. The results of this analysis together with those from two different analyses based on a Montecarlo ray-trace and a semi-analytical model are consistent with each other and indicate that the METIS design meets the stray-light level requirements

  19. First Year of WFIRST/AFTA Coronagraph Technology Development: Testbed Progress Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Zhao, Feng; An, Xin; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Belikov, Rus; Cady, Eric; Diaz, Rosemary; Gordon, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Kern, Brian; Kuhnert, Andreas; Moody, Dwight; Muller, Richard; Nemati, Bijan; Patterson, Keith; Riggs, A. J.; Ryan, Daniel; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Sidick, Erkin; Shi, Fang; Tang, Hong; Trauger, John; Wallace, Kent; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Daniel; White, Victor; Yee, Karl; Zhou, Hanying; Zimmerman, Neil

    2015-01-01

    NASA's WFIRST/AFTA mission study includes the first high-contrast stellar coronagraph in space. This coronagraph will be capable of imaging and spectrally characterizing giant exoplanets similar to Neptune and Jupiter and possibly super-Earths, as well as circumstellar disks. After a transparent and rigorous downselect process, NASA chose in December of 2013 a primary design called an Occulting Mask Coronagraph (OMC) that combines two technical approaches, Shaped Pupil and Hybrid Lyot, in one instrument. The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization Complex Mask Coronagraph was selected as the backup design.The OMC coronagraph technologies were assessed to have the highest likelihood of passing the WFIRST/AFTA flight readiness gates and the ability to produce compelling science by working with the existing 2.4-meter telescope 'as is,' including its central obscuration, expected thermal drift, and the observatory pointing jitter. NASA set us the objective of maturing the WFIRST/AFTA coronagraph to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5 by October 1, 2016. A set of technical milestones was agreed upon to track the progress toward achieving TRL 5.Substantial advances in WFIRST/AFTA coronagraph technology have been made during 2014, and the OMC progress is currently running ahead of the schedule laid out by the milestones. Our poster will present some of these key recent results to the community, including:(1) Fabrication and characterization of WFIRST/AFTA coronagraph pupil plane and focal plane masks designed to work with the existing 2.4 telescope.(2) Experimental results demonstrating high contrast achieved on a coronagraph testbed in narrowband and broadband light - first such results obtained with an obscured pupil.(3) Progress in the development of the low-order wavefront sensing and control subsystem that will use rejected starlight to sense and correct both high frequency pointing jitter and slow varying low order aberrations. This subsystem will be integrated with the

  20. Testing the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph on the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Soummer, Rémi; Dillon, Daren; Macintosh, Bruce; Gavel, Donald; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand

    2011-10-01

    We present testbed results of the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics (LAO). These results are part of the validation and tests of the coronagraph and of the Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The apodizer component is manufactured with a halftone technique using black chrome microdots on glass. Testing this APLC (like any other coronagraph) requires extremely good wavefront correction, which is obtained to the 1 nm rms level using the microelectricalmechanical systems (MEMS) technology, on the ExAO visible testbed of the LAO at the University of Santa Cruz. We used an APLC coronagraph without central obstruction, both with a reference super-polished flat mirror and with the MEMS to obtain one of the first images of a dark zone in a coronagraphic image with classical adaptive optics using a MEMS deformable mirror (without involving dark hole algorithms). This was done as a complementary test to the GPI coronagraph testbed at American Museum of Natural History, which studied the coronagraph itself without wavefront correction. Because we needed a full aperture, the coronagraph design is very different from the GPI design. We also tested a coronagraph with central obstruction similar to that of GPI. We investigated the performance of the APLC coronagraph and more particularly the effect of the apodizer profile accuracy on the contrast. Finally, we compared the resulting contrast to predictions made with a wavefront propagation model of the testbed to understand the effects of phase and amplitude errors on the final contrast.

  1. TESTING THE APODIZED PUPIL LYOT CORONAGRAPH ON THE LABORATORY FOR ADAPTIVE OPTICS EXTREME ADAPTIVE OPTICS TESTBED

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Dillon, Daren; Gavel, Donald; Macintosh, Bruce; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand E-mail: dillon@ucolick.org E-mail: soummer@stsci.edu E-mail: anand@amnh.org

    2011-10-15

    We present testbed results of the Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics (LAO). These results are part of the validation and tests of the coronagraph and of the Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The apodizer component is manufactured with a halftone technique using black chrome microdots on glass. Testing this APLC (like any other coronagraph) requires extremely good wavefront correction, which is obtained to the 1 nm rms level using the microelectricalmechanical systems (MEMS) technology, on the ExAO visible testbed of the LAO at the University of Santa Cruz. We used an APLC coronagraph without central obstruction, both with a reference super-polished flat mirror and with the MEMS to obtain one of the first images of a dark zone in a coronagraphic image with classical adaptive optics using a MEMS deformable mirror (without involving dark hole algorithms). This was done as a complementary test to the GPI coronagraph testbed at American Museum of Natural History, which studied the coronagraph itself without wavefront correction. Because we needed a full aperture, the coronagraph design is very different from the GPI design. We also tested a coronagraph with central obstruction similar to that of GPI. We investigated the performance of the APLC coronagraph and more particularly the effect of the apodizer profile accuracy on the contrast. Finally, we compared the resulting contrast to predictions made with a wavefront propagation model of the testbed to understand the effects of phase and amplitude errors on the final contrast.

  2. Curved track segment finding using Tiny Triplet Finder (TTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin-Yuan; Wang, M.; Gottschalk, E.; Shi, Z.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    We describe the applications of a track segment recognition scheme called the Tiny Triplet Finder (TTF) that involves the grouping of three hits satisfying a constraint forming of a track segment. The TTF was originally developed solving straight track segment finding problem, however, it is also suitable in many curved track segment finding problems. The examples discussed in this document are among popular detector layouts in high-energy/nuclear physics experiments. Although it is not practical to find a universal recipe for arbitrary detector layouts, the method of the TTF application is illustrated via the discussion of the examples. Generally speaking, whenever the data item to be found in a pattern recognition problem contains two free parameters, and if the constraint connecting the measurements and the two free parameters has an approximate shift invariant property, the Tiny Triplet Finder can be used.

  3. Detectability of active triangulation range finder: a solar irradiance approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huizhe; Gao, Jason; Bui, Viet Phuong; Liu, Zhengtong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Png, Ching Eng

    2016-06-27

    Active triangulation range finders are widely used in a variety of applications such as robotics and assistive technologies. The power of the laser source should be carefully selected in order to satisfy detectability and still remain eye-safe. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to assess the detectability of an active triangulation range finder in an outdoor environment. For the first time, we accurately quantify the background noise of a laser system due to solar irradiance by coupling the Perez all-weather sky model and ray tracing techniques. The model is validated with measurements with a modeling error of less than 14.0%. Being highly generic and sufficiently flexible, the proposed model serves as a guide to define a laser system for any geographical location and microclimate.

  4. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer: 2007-2008 Progress and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, P. R.; Lay, O. P.; Martin, S. R.; Peters, R. D.; Gappinger, R. O.; Ksendzov, A.; Scharf, D. P.; Booth, A. J.; Beichman, C. A.; Serabyn, E.; Johnston, K. J.; Danchi, W. C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of technology development for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I). TPF-I is a mid-infrared space interferometer being designed with the capability of detecting Earth-like planets in the habitable zones around nearby stars. The overall technology roadmap is presented and progress with each of the testbeds is summarized. The current interferometer architecture, design trades, and the viability of possible reduced-scope mission concepts are also presented.

  5. Adaptive Nulling for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Lay, Oliver P.; Jeganathan, Muthu; Hirai, Akiko

    2006-01-01

    A description of adaptive nulling for Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPFI) is presented. The topics include: 1) Nulling in TPF-I; 2) Why Do Adaptive Nulling; 3) Parallel High-Order Compensator Design; 4) Phase and Amplitude Control; 5) Development Activates; 6) Requirements; 7) Simplified Experimental Setup; 8) Intensity Correction; and 9) Intensity Dispersion Stability. A short summary is also given on adaptive nulling for the TPFI.

  6. Location Of A Vehicle With A Laser Range Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C. J.; Monchaud, S.; Marce, L.; Julliere, M.

    1984-02-01

    Absolute location of a mobile robot is necessary to improve the autonomy of vehicle built for hostile environments. We are developing a scanning laser range finder based on triangulation to get range data about the edges of a cylindrical polyhedral world. From the matching between the measurements and data computed from a model of the a priori known environment, the position of the robot is deduced accurately.

  7. Efficient decoding algorithms for generalized hidden Markov model gene finders

    PubMed Central

    Majoros, William H; Pertea, Mihaela; Delcher, Arthur L; Salzberg, Steven L

    2005-01-01

    Background The Generalized Hidden Markov Model (GHMM) has proven a useful framework for the task of computational gene prediction in eukaryotic genomes, due to its flexibility and probabilistic underpinnings. As the focus of the gene finding community shifts toward the use of homology information to improve prediction accuracy, extensions to the basic GHMM model are being explored as possible ways to integrate this homology information into the prediction process. Particularly prominent among these extensions are those techniques which call for the simultaneous prediction of genes in two or more genomes at once, thereby increasing significantly the computational cost of prediction and highlighting the importance of speed and memory efficiency in the implementation of the underlying GHMM algorithms. Unfortunately, the task of implementing an efficient GHMM-based gene finder is already a nontrivial one, and it can be expected that this task will only grow more onerous as our models increase in complexity. Results As a first step toward addressing the implementation challenges of these next-generation systems, we describe in detail two software architectures for GHMM-based gene finders, one comprising the common array-based approach, and the other a highly optimized algorithm which requires significantly less memory while achieving virtually identical speed. We then show how both of these architectures can be accelerated by a factor of two by optimizing their content sensors. We finish with a brief illustration of the impact these optimizations have had on the feasibility of our new homology-based gene finder, TWAIN. Conclusions In describing a number of optimizations for GHMM-based gene finders and making available two complete open-source software systems embodying these methods, it is our hope that others will be more enabled to explore promising extensions to the GHMM framework, thereby improving the state-of-the-art in gene prediction techniques. PMID:15667658

  8. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer: Architecture, Mission Design, and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Curt

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation represents an overview progress report about the system design and technology development of two interferometer concepts studied for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project. The two concepts are a structurally-connected interferometer (SCI) intended to fulfill minimum TPF science goals and a formation-flying interferometer (FFI) intended to fulfill full science goals. Described are major trades, analyses, and technology experiments completed. Near term plans are also described. This paper covers progress since August 2003

  9. Fusion of a Variable Baseline System and a Range Finder

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aceituno, Javier; Acosta, Leopoldo; Arnay, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    One of the greatest difficulties in stereo vision is the appearance of ambiguities when matching similar points from different images. In this article we analyze the effectiveness of using a fusion of multiple baselines and a range finder from a theoretical point of view, focusing on the results of using both prismatic and rotational articulations for baseline generation, and offer a practical case to prove its efficiency on an autonomous vehicle. PMID:22368469

  10. Utilization of SciFinder Scholar at an Undergraduate Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Stacy A.; Wilson, Anne M.; Howes, Barbara

    2002-04-01

    The use of tools to search chemical information databases continues to be important to science educators. The ability to perform online searches of Chemical Abstracts Service can have a significant impact on teaching and research. The implementation of SciFinder Scholar at Butler University has resulted in significant changes in teaching, student-based research, and faculty development in the Chemistry Department. Details of these changes in courses, student research projects and proposals, and the professional growth of the faculty are discussed.

  11. Lyot coronagraph design study for large, segmented space telescope apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Neil T.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; St. Laurent, Kathryn E.; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Stark, Christopher C.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Perrin, Marshall; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Kasdin, N. J.; Shaklan, Stuart; Carlotti, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    Recent efforts combining the optimization techniques of apodized pupil Lyot coronagraphs (APLC) and shaped pupils have demonstrated the viability of a binary-transmission mask architecture for extremely high contrast (10-10) exoplanet imaging. We are now building on those innovations to carry out a survey of Lyot coronagraph performance for large, segmented telescope apertures. These apertures are of the same kind under considera- tion for NASA's Large UV/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) observatory concept. To map the multi-dimensional design parameter space, we have developed a software toolkit to manage large sets of mask optimization programs and execute them on a computing cluster. Here we summarize a preliminary survey of 500 APLC solutions for 4 reference hexagonal telescope apertures. Several promising designs produce annular, 10-10 contrast dark zones down to inner working angle 4λ0=D over a 15% bandpass, while delivering a half-max PSF core throughput of 18%. We also report our progress on devising solutions to the challenges of Lyot stop alignment/fabrication tolerance that arise in this contrast regime.

  12. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO Project: Progress and Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, F.; Guyon, O.; Clergeon, C.; Garrel, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) instrument consists of a high performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraph combined with an extreme Adaptive Optics (AO) system operating in the near-infrared (H band). The extreme AO system driven by the 2000 element deformable mirror will allow for Strehl ratios>90% to be achieved in the H-band when it goes closed loop. This makes the SCExAO instrument a powerful platform for high contrast imaging down to angular separations of the order of 1 λ/D. In this paper we report on the recent progress in regards to the development of the instrument, which includes the addition of a visible bench that makes use of the light at shorter wavelengths not currently utilized by SCExAO and closing the loop on the tip/tilt wavefront sensor. We will also discuss two exciting guest instruments which will expand the capabilities of SCExAO over the next few years; namely CHARIS which is a integral field spectrograph as well as VAMPIRES, a visible aperture masking experiment based on polarimetric analysis of circumstellar disks.

  13. Stop-less Lyot coronagraph for exoplanet characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; N'Diaye, M.; Dohlen, K.

    2012-09-01

    The characterization of directly-imaged exoplanets at very small angular separations requires high-contrast spec-troscopic capabilities. For this purpose, the new generation of instruments dedicated to direct imaging of massive exoplanets at large orbital radii, such as VLT/SPHERE and Gemini/GPI, includes integral field spectroscopy (IFS) and/or long slit spectroscopy (LSS) coupled with coronography. LSS is particularly challenging since observations will be stronly limited by quasi-static speckles and diffraction residuals that need to be removed with a posteriori data analysis methods. It is therefore necessary to limit as much as possible the influence of diffraction in the data. In this work we compare the use of the classical Lyot coronagraph (CLC) and the stop- less Lyot coronagraph (SLLC) with LSS for the characterization of exoplanets. SLLC uses a grey apodization to suppress the diffraction above 4.53 λ/D and does not require the use of any Lyot stop, offering a convenient implementation. We show that this apodized long slit spectroscopy (ALSS) improves notably the performance at small angular separations (0.3"-0.4"), allowing the spectral analysis of colder planets.

  14. The mounting system of lenses in ASPIICS coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselý, Martin; Vít, Tomáš; Pleštil, Jan

    2016-11-01

    This article describes the mounting system of lenses in a coronagraph ASPIICS (Association of Spacecraft for Polarimetric Imaging Investigation of the Corona of the Sun). ASPIICS is developed and produced in cooperation of twenty partners from seven countries. It is a part of the ESA's PROBA-3 mission, which includes a formation flight of a pair of satellites at orbit. Coronagraph itself consists of three objectives, where the last one is composed by one objective tube for each lens plus holder and Lyot stop. To achieve high accuracy of mounting of the individual lenses, it was necessary to achieve tight geometric and dimensional tolerances for manufacturing of the objectives barrels. In order to minimize the stress and to prevent the displacement of the lens from ideal position during a temperature change on orbit, an athermal solution was proposed. This is achieved by inserting a Teflon ring of a suitable thickness between the lens surface, objective barrel and the spring washer with a precisely defined contact force. It was necessary to find a suitable technological process of manufacturing, because of the specific behavior of PTFE during turning and complex design of other parts. All parameters of mounting system were repeatedly verified by a thermomechanical analysis in FEM software, based on tests of real parts.

  15. CIAXE: co-axial achromatic interferential coronagraph: first laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, Fatmé; Gay, Jean; Rabbia, Yves; Assus, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    In 1996, Jean Gay and Yves Rabbia presented their Achromatic Interferential Coronagraph (AIC) for detecting and imaging faint companions (ultimately exoplanets) in the neighboring of a star. As presented then, the Michleson-like Interferometer configuration of the AIC hardens its insertion into an existing (coaxial) optical train, the output beam of the AIC being delivered at right angle from the input beam. To overcome this, they reconfigured the AIC into a compact and fully axial coronagraph, the CIAXE, which main feature consists of using two thick lenses machined in the same optical material. For the CIAXE to deliver the output beam along the same axis as the input beam, the two lenses are coaxially disposed on the optical axis and are separated, at their common spherical contact surface by a thin air gap acting like a beam splitter. We have set up a laboratory experiment aiming at validating the principle of the concept. Our first step was to equalize the thicknesses of the two lenses, so as to make zero the optical path difference between both arms. For this, the (residual) value of the OPD has been evaluated and then the lenses have been re-machined so as to decrease as far as technologically possible, the thicknesses mismatch. As a second step, a micro-controlled rotation around the common curvature center of the spherical surfaces of the lenses is applied. This allows a fine tuning of the residual OPD at the required accuracy level. Are presented here test bench, steps and results.

  16. High Contrast Imaging with the JWST NIRCAM Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Joseph J.; Beichman, Charles; Basinger, Scott A.; Horner, Scott; Meyer, Michael; Redding, David C.; Rieke, Marcia; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Relative to ground-based telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a substantial sensitivity advantage in the 2.2-5pm wavelength range where brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters are thought to have significant brightness enhancements. To facilitate high contrast imaging within this band, the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCAM) will employ a Lyot coronagraph with an array of band-limited image-plane occulting spots. In this paper, we provide the science motivation for high contrast imaging with NIRCAM, comparing its expected performance to that of the Keck, Gemini and 30 m (TMT) telescopes equipped with Adaptive Optics systems of different capabilities. We then describe our design for the NIRCAM coronagraph that enables imaging over the entire sensitivity range of the instrument while providing significant operational flexibility. We describe the various design tradeoffs that were made in consideration of alignment and aberration sensitivities and present contrast performance in the presence of JWST's expected optical aberrations. Finally we show an example of a that can provide 10-5 companion sensitivity at sub-arcsecond separations.

  17. The Voronoi Tessellation Cluster Finder in 2 1 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Santos, Marcelle; de Carvalho, Reinaldo R.; Annis, James; Gal, Roy R.; La Barbera, Francesco; Lopes, Paulo A.A.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.; Gerke, Brian F.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-06-23

    We present a detailed description of the Voronoi Tessellation (VT) cluster finder algorithm in 2+1 dimensions, which improves on past implementations of this technique. The need for cluster finder algorithms able to produce reliable cluster catalogs up to redshift 1 or beyond and down to 10{sup 13.5} solar masses is paramount especially in light of upcoming surveys aiming at cosmological constraints from galaxy cluster number counts. We build the VT in photometric redshift shells and use the two-point correlation function of the galaxies in the field to both determine the density threshold for detection of cluster candidates and to establish their significance. This allows us to detect clusters in a self-consistent way without any assumptions about their astrophysical properties. We apply the VT to mock catalogs which extend to redshift 1.4 reproducing the ?CDM cosmology and the clustering properties observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. An objective estimate of the cluster selection function in terms of the completeness and purity as a function of mass and redshift is as important as having a reliable cluster finder. We measure these quantities by matching the VT cluster catalog with the mock truth table. We show that the VT can produce a cluster catalog with completeness and purity >80% for the redshift range up to {approx}1 and mass range down to {approx}10{sup 13.5} solar masses.

  18. The Voronoi Tessellation cluster finder in 2+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Soares-Santos, Marcelle; de Carvalho, Reinaldo R.; Annis, James; Gal, Roy R.; La Barbera, Francesco; Lopes, Paulo A.A.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael T.; Gerke, Brian F.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-11-01

    We present a detailed description of the Voronoi Tessellation (VT) cluster finder algorithm in 2+1 dimensions, which improves on past implementations of this technique. The need for cluster finder algorithms able to produce reliable cluster catalogs up to redshift 1 or beyond and down to 10{sup 13.5} solar masses is paramount especially in light of upcoming surveys aiming at cosmological constraints from galaxy cluster number counts. We build the VT in photometric redshift shells and use the two-point correlation function of the galaxies in the field to both determine the density threshold for detection of cluster candidates and to establish their significance. This allows us to detect clusters in a self-consistent way without any assumptions about their astrophysical properties. We apply the VT to mock catalogs which extend to redshift 1.4 reproducing the {Lambda}CDM cosmology and the clustering properties observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. An objective estimate of the cluster selection function in terms of the completeness and purity as a function of mass and redshift is as important as having a reliable cluster finder. We measure these quantities by matching the VT cluster catalog with the mock truth table. We show that the VT can produce a cluster catalog with completeness and purity >80% for the redshift range up to {approx}1 and mass range down to {approx}10{sup 13.5} solar masses.

  19. A new active method to correct for the effects of complex apertures on coronagraph performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Fogarty, Kevin; Perrin, Marshall D.; Soummer, Remi; Norman, Colin Arthur

    2017-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the aperture geometry of the future space (WFIRST, LUVOIR) and ground based-telescope (E-ELT, TMT) will limit the performance of the next generation of coronagraphic instruments for high contrast imaging of exoplanets.We propose here a new closed-loop optimization technique to use the deformable mirrors to correct for the effects of complex apertures on coronagraph performance. This method is a new alternative to the ACAD technique previously developed by our group. This technique allows the use of any coronagraph designed for continuous apertures, with complex, segmented, apertures, maintaining high performance in contrast and throughput. Finally, this closed loop technique allows flexibility to adapt for changing pupil geometries (e.g. in case of segment failure or maintenance for ground-based telescopes), or "manufacturing imperfections in the coronagraph assembly and alignment.We present a numerical study on several pupil geometries (segmented LUVOIR type aperture, WFIRST, ELTs) for which we obtained high contrast levels with several deformable mirror setups (size, number of actuators, separation between them), coronagraphs (apodized pupil lyot and vortex coronagraphs) and spectral bandwidths. Finally, using the results of this study, we will present recommendations for future coronagraphic instruments.

  20. The Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO): Visible light coronal imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, Guenter E.; Howard, Russell A.; Koomen, Martin J.; Korendyke, C.; Michels, D. J.; Socker, D. G.; Lamy, Philippe; Llebaria, Antoine; Maucherat, J.; Schwenn, Rainer

    1992-01-01

    The Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) is a triple coronagraph being jointly developed for the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission. LASCO comprises three nested coronagraphs (C1, C2, and C3) that image the solar corona for 1.1 to 30 solar radii (C1: 1.1 to 3 solar radii, C2: 1.5 to 6 solar radii, and C3: 3 to 30.0 solar radii). The inner coronagraph (C1) is a newly developed mirror version of the classic Lyot coronagraph without an external occultor, while the middle coronagraph (C2) and the outer coronagraph (C3) are externally occulted instruments. High resolution coronal spectroscopy from 1.1 to 3 R solar radii can be performed by using a Fabry-Perot interferometer, which is part of C1. High volume memories and a high speed microprocessor enable extensive onboard image processing. Image compression by factors of 10 to 20 will result in the transmission of 10 to 20 full images per hour.

  1. Requirements and design reference mission for the WFIRST/AFTA coronagraph instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Richard T.; Dekens, Frank; Calvet, Rob; Chang, Zensheu; Effinger, Robert; Ek, Eric; Hovland, Larry; Jones, Laura; Loc, Anthony; Nemati, Bijan; Noecker, Charley; Neville, Timothy; Pham, Hung; Rud, Mike; Tang, Hong; Villalvazo, Juan

    2015-09-01

    The WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph instrument takes advantage of AFTAs 2.4-meter aperture to provide novel exoplanet imaging science at approximately the same instrument cost as an Explorer mission. The AFTA coronagraph also matures direct imaging technologies to high TRL for an Exo-Earth Imager in the next decade. The coronagraph Design Reference Mission (DRM) optical design is based on the highly successful High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT), with modifications to accommodate the AFTA telescope design, service-ability, volume constraints, and the addition of an Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS). In order to optimally satisfy the three science objectives of planet imaging, planet spectral characterization and dust debris imaging, the coronagraph is designed to operate in two different modes: Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph or Shaped Pupil Coronagraph. Active mechanisms change pupil masks, focal plane masks, Lyot masks, and bandpass filters to shift between modes. A single optical beam train can thus operate alternatively as two different coronagraph architectures. Structural Thermal Optical Performance (STOP) analysis predicts the instrument contrast with the Low Order Wave Front Control loop closed. The STOP analysis was also used to verify that the optical/structural/thermal design provides the extreme stability required for planet characterization in the presence of thermal disturbances expected in a typical observing scenario. This paper describes the instrument design and the flow down from science requirements to high level engineering requirements.

  2. Test technology on divergence angle of laser range finder based on CCD imaging fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Sheng-bing; Chen, Zhen-xing; Lv, Yao

    2016-09-01

    Laser range finder has been equipped with all kinds of weapons, such as tank, ship, plane and so on, is important component of fire control system. Divergence angle is important performance and incarnation of horizontal resolving power for laser range finder, is necessary appraised test item in appraisal test. In this paper, based on high accuracy test on divergence angle of laser range finder, divergence angle test system is designed based on CCD imaging, divergence angle of laser range finder is acquired through fusion technology for different attenuation imaging, problem that CCD characteristic influences divergence angle test is solved.

  3. CONSTRUCTION OF A SMALL AUTOMATED CORONAGRAPH FOR OBSERVATIONS OF THE LUNAR Na EXOSPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Roy; Morgan, T. H.; Killen, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the final optical and mechanical design and the construction and initial testing of a small coronagraph at the Winer Observatory, near Sonoita, Arizona. The coronagraph includes a narrow band filter and low-light level camera to observe lunar exospheric sodium in the resonance lines of that element near 590 nm. Without the use of a coronagraph, the signal from sodium would be lost against light scattered by the Earth’s atmosphere and scattered light in the telescope. The design uses Commercial Off the Shelf Technology (COTS), and our goal is to obtain observations while the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission is still in orbit.

  4. PISCES: an integral field spectrograph technology demonstration for the WFIRST coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Mandell, Avi M.; Gong, Qian; Llop-Sayson, Jorge; Brandt, Timothy; Chambers, Victor J.; Grammer, Bryan; Greeley, Bradford; Hilton, George; Perrin, Marshall D.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Demers, Richard; Tang, Hong; Cady, Eric

    2016-07-01

    We present the design, integration, and test of the Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) integral field spectrograph (IFS). The PISCES design meets the science requirements for the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). PISCES was integrated and tested in the integral field spectroscopy laboratory at NASA Goddard. In June 2016, PISCES was delivered to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) where it was integrated with the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). The SPC/PISCES configuration will demonstrate high contrast integral field spectroscopy as part of the WFIRST CGI technology development program.

  5. An innovative concept for the AsteroidFinder/SSB focal plane assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Karsten; Tschentscher, Matthias; Koncz, Alexander; Solbrig, Michael; Michaelis, Harald

    2012-06-01

    This paper gives a summary on the system concept and design of the focal plane assembly of AsteroidFinder/SSB, a small satellite mission which is currently under development at the German Aerospace Center (DLR). An athermal design concept has been developed in accordance to the requirements of the instrument and spacecraft. Key aspects leading to this approach have been a trade-off study of the mechanical telescope interface, the definition of electrical and thermal interfaces and a material selection which minimizes thermally induced stresses. As a novelty, the structure will be manufactured from a machinable AlN-BN composite ceramic. To enable rapid design iterations and development, an integrated modeling approach has been used to conduct a thermo-mechanical analysis of the proposed concept in order to proof its feasibility. The steady-state temperature distribution for various load cases and the resulting stress and strain within the assembly have both been computed using a finite element simulation.

  6. The Gemini Planet Imager Coronagraph Testbed Preliminary Performance Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a new science instrument being developed and slated for first light early 2011 on the twin 8m Gemini telescopes. Operating in the near infrared, this ground-based, extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) coronographic instrument will provide the ability to detect, characterize and analyze young (< 2GYr), self-luminous, extrasolar planets with brightness contrast ratios ≤ 10-7 when compared to their parent star. The coronagraph subsystem includes a pupil apodization, a hard-edged focal plane mask as well as a Lyot stop. Preliminary results indicate that the testbed is performing at very high contrast, having achieved broadband contrasts (H-band) below 10-6 at separations > 5λ/D. Fraunhoffer and Fresnel propagation modeling were used to analyze the testbed results.

  7. SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) Mission Operations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, John L.; Gurman, Joseph B. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The scientific goal of Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) is to obtain detailed empirical descriptions of the extended solar corona as it evolves through the solar activity cycle and to use those descriptions to identify and understand the physical processes responsible for coronal heating, solar wind acceleration, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and the phenomena that establish the plasma properties of the solar wind as measured by 'in situ' solar wind instruments. The UVCS on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) has made major advances in identifying the physical processes responsible for solar wind acceleration, and it has made the first high resolution ultraviolet spectroscopic measurements of CMEs. The UVCS has resulted in over 220 scientific publications.

  8. The Visible Nulling Coronagraph--Architecture Definition and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. Martin; Wallace, J. Kent; Liu, Duncan T.; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Serabyn, Eugene; Mennesson, Bertrand; Green, Joseph J.; Aguayo, Francisco; Fregoso, S. Felipe; Lane, Benjamin F.; Samuele, Rocco; Tuttle, Carl

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the advantages of visible direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth-like extrasolar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a moderately sized single aperture space telescope. Our concept synthesizes a nulling interferometer by shearing the telescope pupil, with the resultant producing a deep null. We describe nulling configurations that also include methods to mitigate stellar leakage, such as spatial filtering by a coherent array of single mode fibers, and post-starlight suppression wavefront sensing and control. With diffraction limited telescope optics and similar quality components in the optical train (lambda/20), suppression of the starlight to 1e-10 is readily achievable. We describe key features of the architecture and analysis, present latest results of laboratory measurements demonstrating achievable null depth and component development, and discuss future key technical milestones.

  9. CORONAGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS OF FOMALHAUT AT SOLAR SYSTEM SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Meshkat, Tiffany; Quanz, Sascha P.; Meyer, Michael R.; Girard, Julien H.; Kasper, Markus

    2013-02-10

    We report on a search for low mass companions within 10 AU of the star Fomalhaut, using narrowband observations at 4.05 {mu}m obtained with the Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph on the VLT/NaCo. Our observations place a model-dependent upper mass limit of 12-20 M {sub jup} from 4 to 10 AU, covering the semimajor axis search space between interferometric imaging measurements and other direct imaging non-detections. These observations rule out models where the large semimajor axis for the putative candidate companion Fomalhaut b is explained by dynamical scattering from a more massive companion in the inner stellar system, where such giant planets are thought to form.

  10. A coronagraphic search for brown dwarfs around nearby stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakajima, T.; Durrance, S. T.; Golimowski, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Brown dwarf companions have been searched for around stars within 10 pc of the Sun using the Johns-Hopkins University Adaptive Optics Coronagraph (AOC), a stellar coronagraph with an image stabilizer. The AOC covers the field around the target star with a minimum search radius of 1 sec .5 and a field of view of 1 arcmin sq. We have reached an unprecedented dynamic range of Delta m = 13 in our search for faint companions at I band. Comparison of our survey with other brown dwarf searches shows that the AOC technique is unique in its dynamic range while at the same time just as sensitive to brown dwarfs as the recent brown dwarf surveys. The present survey covered 24 target stars selected from the Gliese catalog. A total of 94 stars were detected in 16 fields. The low-latitude fields are completely dominated by background star contamination. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests were carried out for a sample restricted to high latitudes and a sample with small angular separations. The high-latitude sample (b greater than or equal to 44 deg) appears to show spatial concentration toward target stars. The small separation sample (Delta Theta less than 20 sec) shows weaker dependence on Galactic coordinates than field stars. These statistical tests suggest that both the high-latitude sample and the small separation sample can include a substantial fraction of true companions. However, the nature of these putative companions is mysterious. They are too faint to be white dwarfs and too blue for brown dwarfs. Ignoring the signif icance of the statistical tests, we can reconcile most of the detections with distant main-sequence stars or white dwarfs except for a candidate next to GL 475. Given the small size of our sample, we conclude that considerably more targets need to be surveyed before a firm conclusion on the possibility of a new class of companions can be made.

  11. Fabrication of Soft-Edged Occulting Masks for Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolls, Volker; Aziz, M. J.; Raja, S.

    2009-01-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets is important for determining the properties of individual planets and to study multi-planet systems. Obtaining spectra of extra-solar planets enables us to constrain the composition of planetary atmospheres and surfaces, their climates, their evolution, and their rotation periods. The Lyot coronagraph is one of the important techniques to acquire these spectra. In its simplest design it consists of a telescope, an occulter mask in the first focal plane, a Lyot stop in the following pupil plane, and the detector in the final focal plane. The goal of ongoing research is to achieve the best possible performance from a Lyot coronagraph. Among the study objects is the occulter mask. We are studying a new manufacturing method to overcome the main problems of occulter masks: undesired chromatic effects and intolerable phase distortions. Our method utilizes substrates covered with highly absorbing dye mixtures (optical density of 1 per micron) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling of the mask profiles into these dyes. By combining several dyes with pre-determined mixing ratios, we are able to control the chromaticity of the mask from decreasing to flat to increasing absorptivity with wavelengths. Phase effects occur in these masks only at the transition from the dye to its surrounding medium. The idea is to control these phase effects by embedding the masks in clear, phase-matching glass. This poster will present the progress we made in finding and characterizing suitable materials and the results of first optical tests of FIB machined mask-like structures in dye-doped PMMA. This work was supported by NASA through grant NNG04GC57G and NSF through grant AST-0750222, through SAO IR&D funding and by Harvard University. Central facilities were provided by Harvard's Center for Nanoscale Systems.

  12. StarFinder: A code for stellar field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diolaiti, Emiliano; Bendinelli, Orazio; Bonaccini, Domenico; Close, Laird M.; Currie, Doug G.; Parmeggiani, Gianluigi

    2000-11-01

    StarFinder is an IDL code for the deep analysis of stellar fields, designed for Adaptive Optics well-sampled images with high and low Strehl ratio. The Point Spread Function is extracted directly from the frame, to take into account the actual structure of the instrumental response and the atmospheric effects. The code is written in IDL language and organized in the form of a self-contained widget-based application, provided with a series of tools for data visualization and analysis. A description of the method and some applications to Adaptive Optics data are presented.

  13. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer Technology Status and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Perter R.; Ahmed, A.; Gappinger, R. O.; Ksendzov, A.; Lay, O. P.; Martin, S. R.; Peters, R. D.; Scharf, D. P.; Wallace, J. K.; Ware, B.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the technology status and plans for Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer is shown. The topics include: 1) The Navigator Program; 2) TPF-I Project Overview; 3) Project Organization; 4) Technology Plan for TPF-I; 5) TPF-I Testbeds; 6) Nulling Error Budget; 7) Nulling Testbeds; 8) Nulling Requirements; 9) Achromatic Nulling Testbed; 10) Single Mode Spatial Filter Technology; 11) Adaptive Nuller Testbed; 12) TPF-I: Planet Detection Testbed (PDT); 13) Planet Detection Testbed Phase Modulation Experiment; and 14) Formation Control Testbed.

  14. Status of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, Charles; Lawson, Peter; Lay, Oliver; Ahmed, Asif; Unwin, Steve; Johnston, K.

    2006-01-01

    The interferometric version of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-I) has the potential to find and characterize earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of over 250 nearby stars and to search for life using biomarkers in the atmospheres of any planets found. The scientific case for such a mission continues to be strengthened by on-going progress in the detection of planets via indirect means. This paper summarizes the status of TPF-I, illustrative scientific requirements for the mission, and its enabling technologies.

  15. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer: Architecture, Mission Design and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Curt; Lay, Oliver; Aung, MiMi; Gunter, Steven M.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Blackwood, Gary

    2004-01-01

    This overview paper is a progress report about the system design and technology development of two interferometer concepts studied for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) project. The two concepts are a structurally-connected interferometer (SCI) intended to fulfill minimum TPF science goals and a formation-flying interferometer (FFI) intended to fulfill full science goals. Described are major trades, analyses, and technology experiments completed. Near term plans are also described. This paper covers progress since August 2003 and serves as an update to a paper presented at that month's SPIE conference, 'Techniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets.

  16. Key software architecture decisions for the automated planet finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanclos, Kyle; Deich, William T. S.; Holden, Bradford P.; Allen, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton is a modern 2.4 meter computer controlled telescope. At one Nasmyth focus is the Levy Spectrometer, at present the sole instrument used with the APF. The primary research mission of the APF and the Levy Spectrometer is high-precision Doppler spectroscopy. Observing at the APF is unattended; custom software written by diverse authors in diverse languages manage all aspects of a night's observing. This paper will cover some of the key software architecture decisions made in the development of autonomous observing at the APF. The relevance to future projects of these decisions will be emphasized throughout.

  17. Strategies for chemical reaction searching in SciFinder

    PubMed

    Ridley

    2000-09-01

    The bibliographic, chemical structure, and chemical reaction databases produced by Chemical Abstracts Service allow a number of possibilities for chemical reaction searching. While these same databases may be searched through the STN network, many end-users find the intuitive software interface SciFinder simpler, but there still are issues to address. Searching may be performed through keywords, chemical structures, or chemical reactions, and the answers may vary with respect to precision and comprehension. Often combinations of search options may be needed to best solve the problem. Retrosynthetic analyses are easily performed in the chemical reaction database and can give unique insights into synthetic alternatives.

  18. Introduction to Structure Searching with SciFinder Scholar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridley, Damon D.

    2001-04-01

    CAS Registry Numbers provide a key to searching for chemical substances in CAS databases, and the challenge is to obtain the Registry Numbers for all the substances required. When the substances can be represented by structures, then one option is to find the Registry Numbers through structure searches. With SciFinder Scholar, the process of drawing and searching structures is intuitive; however, there are underlying issues and opportunities that need some explanation in courses on chemical information retrieval.We describe here our introductory course, which addresses the major ones.

  19. The W. M. Keck Observatory Infrared Vortex Coronagraph and a First Image of HIP 79124 B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serabyn, E.; Huby, E.; Matthews, K.; Mawet, D.; Absil, O.; Femenia, B.; Wizinowich, P.; Karlsson, M.; Bottom, M.; Campbell, R.; Carlomagno, B.; Defrère, D.; Delacroix, C.; Forsberg, P.; Gomez Gonzalez, C.; Habraken, S.; Jolivet, A.; Liewer, K.; Lilley, S.; Piron, P.; Reggiani, M.; Surdej, J.; Tran, H.; Vargas Catalán, E.; Wertz, O.

    2017-01-01

    An optical vortex coronagraph has been implemented within the NIRC2 camera on the Keck II telescope and used to carry out on-sky tests and observations. The development of this new L‧-band observational mode is described, and an initial demonstration of the new capability is presented: a resolved image of the low-mass companion to HIP 79124, which had previously been detected by means of interferometry. With HIP 79124 B at a projected separation of 186.5 mas, both the small inner working angle of the vortex coronagraph and the related imaging improvements were crucial in imaging this close companion directly. Due to higher Strehl ratios and more relaxed contrasts in L‧ band versus H band, this new coronagraphic capability will enable high-contrast, small-angle observations of nearby young exoplanets and disks on a par with those of shorter-wavelength extreme adaptive optics coronagraphs.

  20. Demonstration of high contrast with an obscured aperture with the WFIRST-AFTA shaped pupil coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Eric; Prada, Camilo Mejia; An, Xin; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Diaz, Rosemary; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Kern, Brian; Kuhnert, Andreas; Nemati, Bijan; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Zimmer, Robert; Zimmerman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The coronagraph instrument on the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics-Focused Telescope Asset (WFIRST-AFTA) mission study has two coronagraphic architectures, shaped pupil and hybrid Lyot, which may be interchanged for use in different observing scenarios. Each architecture relies on newly developed mask components to function in the presence of the AFTA aperture, and so both must be matured to a high technology readiness level in advance of the mission. A series of milestones were set to track the development of the technologies required for the instrument; we report on completion of WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph milestone 2-a narrowband 10-8 contrast test with static aberrations for the shaped pupil-and the plans for the upcoming broadband coronagraph milestone 5.

  1. Managing the optical wavefront for high contrast exoplanet imaging with the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Krist, John E.; Moody, Dwight

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of extreme high contrast astronomical imaging from space has inspired developments of new coronagraph methods for exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. However, the requisite contrast, at levels of a billion to one or better for the direct imaging of cool mature exoplanets in reflected visible starlight, leads to challenging new requirements on the stability and control of the optical wavefront at levels currently beyond the reach of ground based telescopes. We briefly review the designs, laboratory validations, and science prospects for direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet systems with an actively corrected Lyot coronagraph. We review exoplanet science performance predicted for NASA's WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph. Together with a pair of deformable mirrors for optical wavefront control, the Lyot coronagraph creates high contrast dark fields of view extending to angular separations within 0.1 arcsec from the central star at visible wavelengths. Performance metrics are presented, including image contrast and spectral bandwidth, and laboratory validation experience.

  2. Improved high-contrast imaging with on-axis telescopes using a multistage vortex coronagraph.

    PubMed

    Mawet, Dimitri; Serabyn, Eugene; Wallace, J Kent; Pueyo, Laurent

    2011-04-15

    The vortex coronagraph is one of the most promising coronagraphs for high-contrast imaging because of its simplicity, small inner working angle, high throughput, and clear off-axis discovery space. However, as with most coronagraphs, centrally obscured on-axis telescopes degrade contrast. Based on the remarkable ability of vortex coronagraphs to move light between the interior and exterior of pupils, we propose a method based on multiple vortices, that without sacrificing throughput, reduces the residual light leakage to (a/A)(n), with n ≥ 4, and a and A being the radii of the central obscuration and primary mirror, respectively. This method thus enables high contrasts to be reached even with an on-axis telescope.

  3. Detecting protostellar jets with the Goddard Fabry-Perot coronagraph, and modification for adaptive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Grady, Carol A.; Wassell, Edward J.; Palunas, Povilas

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Fabry-Perot has been used at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope to diagnose jets from young Herbig Ae (HD163296) and T Tauri stars (DL Tau and CW Tau), detected by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The additional spectral discrimination of the Fabry-Perot allows these faint jets to be detected from the ground, to obtain velocities and densities, and to find further extensions. In order to plan what measurements require space coronagraphs, we need to explore the extent to which coronagraphic detections can be made from the ground, including using adaptive optics. Modifications to the Fabry-Perot tunable narrow band coronagraph for possible use with the AEOS 3.65-m telescope will be described.

  4. Detecting Protostellar Jets with the Goddard Fabry-Perot Coronagraph, and Modification for Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, Bruce E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Grady, Carol A.; Wassell, Edward J.; Palunas, Povilas

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Fabry-Perot has been used at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-m telescope to diagnose jets from young Herbig Ae (HD163296) and T Tauri stars (DL Tau and CW Tau), detected by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The additional spectral discrimination of the Fabry-Perot allows these faint jets to be detected from the ground, to obtain velocities and densities, and to find further extensions. In order to plan what measurements require space coronagraphs, we need to explore the extent to which coronagraphic detections can be made from the ground, including using adaptive optics. Modifications to the Fabry-Perot tunable narrow band coronagraph for possible use with the AEOS 3.65-m telescope will be described.

  5. Polarization compensating protective coatings for TPF-Coronagraph optics to control contrast degrading cross polarization leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis Z.; Marchen, Luis F.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2005-01-01

    We describe here the design approaches and performance analysis of the OTA in the wavelength band of interest. Coronagraph performance at 600nm wavelength based on a particular coating and occulting focal plane mask is also presented.

  6. WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph shaped pupil masks: design, fabrication, and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; White, Victor; Yee, Karl; Echternach, Pierre; Muller, Richard; Dickie, Matthew; Cady, Eric; Prada, Camilo Mejia; Ryan, Daniel; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Kern, Brian; Zhou, Hanying; Krist, John; Nemati, Bijan; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    NASA WFIRST-AFTA mission study includes a coronagraph instrument to find and characterize exoplanets. Various types of masks could be employed to suppress the host starlight to about 10-9 level contrast over a broad spectrum to enable the coronagraph mission objectives. Such masks for high-contrast internal coronagraphic imaging require various fabrication technologies to meet a wide range of specifications, including precise shapes, micron scale island features, ultralow reflectivity regions, uniformity, wave front quality, and achromaticity. We present the approaches employed at JPL to produce pupil plane and image plane coronagraph masks by combining electron beam, deep reactive ion etching, and black silicon technologies with illustrative examples of each, highlighting milestone accomplishments from the High Contrast Imaging Testbed at JPL and from the High Contrast Imaging Lab at Princeton University.

  7. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST/AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Hilton, George; Perrin, Marshall; Sayson, Llop; Domingo, Jorge; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a prototype lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey TelescopeAstrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRSTAFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC). We will present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the compatibility to upgrade from the current 1k x 1k detector array to 4k x 4k detector array. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  8. Achromatic interfero-coronagraph with variable rotational shear in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Pavel; Kiselev, Alexander; Tavrov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Direct imaging of earth-like extrasolar planets in the habitable zone and the search for possible biological signatures are among the key scientific objectives in the modern astronomy. Stellar coronagraph such as achromatic interfero coronagraph (AIC) with a small inner working angle has limited possibilities to detect and characterize planets around nearby stars due to the star leakage effect caused by incomplete suppression of the star of finite angular size. We report on an improved instrument for direct imaging of exoplanets and the study of stellar environment - common-path achromatic interfero-coronagraph with variable rotational shear (common-path achromatic rotation-shearing coronagraph, CP-ARC) - a common path implementation of rotation shearing interferometer. We detail CP-ARC approach and discuss its optical configuration, laboratory prototype and experimental results.

  9. SPICA infrared coronagraph for the direct observation of exo-planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, Keigo; Spica Working Group

    2010-04-01

    We present a mid-infrared coronagraph to target the direct observation of extrasolar planets, for Space Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). SPICA is a proposed JAXA-ESA mission, which will carry a telescope cooled to 5 K with a 3.5 m diameter aperture, and is planned to be launched in 2018 by an H II family rocket. The SPICA mission gives us a unique opportunity for high-contrast observations because of the large telescope aperture, the simple pupil shape, and the capability for infrared observations from space. We have commenced studies for a coronagraph for SPICA, in which this coronagraph is currently regarded as an option of the focal plane instruments. The primary target of the SPICA coronagraph is the direct observation of Jovian exo-planets. A strategy of the baseline survey and the specifications for the coronagraph instrument for the survey are introduced together. The main wavelengths and the contrast required for the observations are 3.5-27 μm, and 10 -6, respectively. Laboratory experiments were performed with a visible laser to demonstrate the principles of the coronagraphs. In an experiment using binary-shaped pupil coronagraphs, a contrast of 6.7 × 10 -8 was achieved, as derived from the linear average in the dark region and the core of the point spread function (PSF). A coronagraph by a binary-shaped pupil mask is a baseline solution for SPICA because of its feasibility and robustness. On the other hand, a laboratory experiment of the phase induced amplitude apodization/binary-mask hybrid coronagraph has been executed to obtain an option of higher performance (i.e., smaller inner working angle and higher throughput), and a contrast of 6.5 × 10 -7 was achieved with active wavefront control. Potentially important by-product of the instrument, transit monitoring for characterization of exo-planets, is also described. We also present recent progress of technology on a design of a binary-shaped pupil mask for the actual pupil of

  10. FEM analysis of bonding process used for minimization of deformation of optical surface under Metis coronagraph mirrors manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procháska, F.; Vít, T.; Matoušek, O.; Melich, R.

    2016-11-01

    High demands on the final surfaces micro-roughness as well as great shape accuracy have to be achieved under the manufacturing process of the precise mirrors for Metis orbital coronagraph. It is challenging engineering task with respect to lightweight design of the mirrors and resulting objectionable optical surface shape stability. Manufacturing of such optical elements is usually affected by number of various effects. Most of them are caused by instability of temperature field. It is necessary to explore, comprehend and consequently minimize all thermo - mechanical processes which take place during mirror cementing, grinding and polishing processes to minimize the optical surface deformation. Application of FEM simulation was proved as a useful tool to help to solve this task. FEM simulations were used to develop and virtually compare different mirror holders to minimize the residual stress generated by temperature changes and to suppress the shape deformation of the optical surface below the critical limit of about 100 nm.

  11. Super-Gaussian apodization in ground based telescopes for high contrast coronagraph imaging.

    PubMed

    Cagigas, Miguel A; Valle, Pedro J; Cagigal, Manuel P

    2013-05-20

    We introduce the use of Super-Gaussian apodizing functions in the telescope pupil plane and/or the coronagraph Lyot plane to improve the imaging contrast in ground-based coronagraphs. We describe the properties of the Super-Gaussian function, we estimate its second-order moment in the pupil and Fourier planes and we check it as an apodizing function. We then use Super-Gaussian function to apodize the telescope pupil, the coronagraph Lyot plane or both of them. The result is that a proper apodizing masks combination can reduce the exoplanet detection distance up to a 45% with respect to the classic Lyot coronagraph, for moderately aberrated wavefronts. Compared to the prolate spheroidal function the Super-Gaussian apodizing function allows the planet light up to 3 times brighter. An extra help to increase the extinction rate is to perform a frame selection (Lucky Imaging technique). We show that a selection of the 10% best frames will reduce up to a 20% the detection angular distance when using the classic Lyot coronagraph but that the reduction is only around the 5% when using an apodized coronagraph.

  12. LinkFinder: An expert system that constructs phylogenic trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inglehart, James; Nelson, Peter C.

    1991-01-01

    An expert system has been developed using the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) that automates the process of constructing DNA sequence based phylogenies (trees or lineages) that indicate evolutionary relationships. LinkFinder takes as input homologous DNA sequences from distinct individual organisms. It measures variations between the sequences, selects appropriate proportionality constants, and estimates the time that has passed since each pair of organisms diverged from a common ancestor. It then designs and outputs a phylogenic map summarizing these results. LinkFinder can find genetic relationships between different species, and between individuals of the same species, including humans. It was designed to take advantage of the vast amount of sequence data being produced by the Genome Project, and should be of value to evolution theorists who wish to utilize this data, but who have no formal training in molecular genetics. Evolutionary theory holds that distinct organisms carrying a common gene inherited that gene from a common ancestor. Homologous genes vary from individual to individual and species to species, and the amount of variation is now believed to be directly proportional to the time that has passed since divergence from a common ancestor. The proportionality constant must be determined experimentally; it varies considerably with the types of organisms and DNA molecules under study. Given an appropriate constant, and the variation between two DNA sequences, a simple linear equation gives the divergence time.

  13. Knickpoint finder: A software tool that improves neotectonic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, G. L.; Salamuni, E.; Nascimento, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a new software tool for morphometric analysis of drainage networks based on the methods of Hack (1973) and Etchebehere et al. (2004). This tool is applicable to studies of morphotectonics and neotectonics. The software used a digital elevation model (DEM) to identify the relief breakpoints along drainage profiles (knickpoints). The program was coded in Python for use on the ArcGIS platform and is called Knickpoint Finder. A study area was selected to test and evaluate the software's ability to analyze and identify neotectonic morphostructures based on the morphology of the terrain. For an assessment of its validity, we chose an area of the James River basin, which covers most of the Piedmont area of Virginia (USA), which is an area of constant intraplate seismicity and non-orogenic active tectonics and exhibits a relatively homogeneous geodesic surface currently being altered by the seismogenic features of the region. After using the tool in the chosen area, we found that the knickpoint locations are associated with the geologic structures, epicenters of recent earthquakes, and drainages with rectilinear anomalies. The regional analysis demanded the use of a spatial representation of the data after processing using Knickpoint Finder. The results were satisfactory in terms of the correlation of dense areas of knickpoints with active lineaments and the rapidity of the identification of deformed areas. Therefore, this software tool may be considered useful in neotectonic analyses of large areas and may be applied to any area where there is DEM coverage.

  14. Laser Range and Bearing Finder for Autonomous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granade, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has recently re-confirmed their interest in autonomous systems as an enabling technology for future missions. In order for autonomous missions to be possible, highly-capable relative sensor systems are needed to determine an object's distance, direction, and orientation. This is true whether the mission is autonomous in-space assembly, rendezvous and docking, or rover surface navigation. Advanced Optical Systems, Inc. has developed a wide-angle laser range and bearing finder (RBF) for autonomous space missions. The laser RBF has a number of features that make it well-suited for autonomous missions. It has an operating range of 10 m to 5 km, with a 5 deg field of view. Its wide field of view removes the need for scanning systems such as gimbals, eliminating moving parts and making the sensor simpler and space qualification easier. Its range accuracy is 1% or better. It is designed to operate either as a stand-alone sensor or in tandem with a sensor that returns range, bearing, and orientation at close ranges, such as NASA's Advanced Video Guidance Sensor. We have assembled the initial prototype and are currently testing it. We will discuss the laser RBF's design and specifications. Keywords: laser range and bearing finder, autonomous rendezvous and docking, space sensors, on-orbit sensors, advanced video guidance sensor

  15. A Fast Apparent-Horizon Finder for 3-Dimensional Cartesian Grids in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornburg, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    In 3 + 1 numerical simulations of dynamic black hole spacetimes, it's useful to be able to find the apparent horizon(s) (AH) in each slice of a time evolution. A number of AH finders are available, but they often take many minutes to run, so they're too slow to be practically usable at each time step. Here I present a new AH finder, AHFINDERDIRECT, which is very fast and accurate, typically taking only a few seconds to find an AH to ~ 10-5m accuracy on a GHz-class processor. I assume that an AH to be searched for is a Strahlkörper (``star-shaped region'') with respect to some local origin, and so parameterize the AH shape by r = h(angle) for some single-valued function h: S2 --> R+. The AH equation then becomes a nonlinear elliptic PDE in h on S2, whose coefficients are algebraic functions of gij, Kij, and the Cartesian-coordinate spatial derivatives of gij. I discretize S2 using 6 angular patches (one each in the neighborhood of the +/-x, +/-y, and +/-z axes) to avoid coordinate singularities, and finite difference the AH equation in the angular coordinates using 4th order finite differencing. I solve the resulting system of nonlinear algebraic equations (for h at the angular grid points) by Newton's method, using a ``symbolic differentiation'' technique to compute the Jacobian matrix. AHFINDERDIRECT is implemented as a thorn in the CACTUS computational toolkit, and will be made freely available starting in fall 2003.

  16. Performance of the hybrid externally occulted Lyot solar coronagraph. Application to ASPIICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougeot, R.; Flamary, R.; Galano, D.; Aime, C.

    2017-02-01

    Context. High-contrast hybrid coronagraphs, which combine an external occulter and a Lyot-style coronagraph became a reality in recent years, despite the lack of analytic and numerical end-to-end performance studies. The solar coronagraph ASPIICS which will fly on the future ESA Formation Flying mission Proba-3 is a good example of such a hybrid coronograph. Aims: We aim to provide a numerical model to compute theoretical performance of the hybrid externally occulted Lyot-style coronagraph, which we then aim to compare to the performance of the classical Lyot coronagraph and the externally occulted solar coronagraph. We will provide the level and intensity distribution of the stray light, when the Sun is considered as an extended source. We also investigate the effect of different sizes for the internal occulter and Lyot stop. Methods: First, we have built on a recently published approach, to express the diffracted wave front from Fresnel diffraction produced by an external occulter at the entrance aperture of the coronagraph. Second, we computed the coherent propagation of the wave front coming from a given point of the Sun through the instrument. This is performed in three steps: from the aperture to the image of the external occulter, where the internal occulter is set, from this plane to the image of the entrance aperture, where the Lyot stop is set, and from there to the final image plane. Making use of the axis-symmetry, we considered wave fronts originating from one radius of the Sun and we circularly average the intensities. Our numerical computation used the parameters of ASPIICS. Results: The hybrid externally occulted Lyot coronagraph rejects sunlight below 10-8B⊙ from 1.3 R⊙ - in the particular configuration of ASPIICS. The Lyot coronagraph effectively complements the external occultation. We show that reducing the Lyot stop allows a clear gain in rejection, being even better than oversizing the internal occulter, that tends to exclude observations

  17. Debris Disk Science Enabled by a Probe-scale Space Coronagraph Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Trauger, J. T.; Krist, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are the signposts of planetary systems: collisions between rocky/icy parent bodies maintain debris dust around main sequence stars against losses to radiation pressure and P-R drag. Debris disk structures show the location of asteroid/Kuiper belts around nearby stars, and reflect dynamical interactions with local extrasolar planets. Only 17 debris disks with high optical depth have been spatially resolved to date in scattered light images made with the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based adaptive optics. Hundreds more with lower optical depth have been identified among nearby stars through far-IR photometry with the Spitzer Space Telescope, and more should follow in the next few years from Herschel. The most capable means for imaging this larger disk population is a next-generation coronagraphic instrument on a 1.5m class optical space telescope. Utilizing high-contrasat imaging simulations validated by laboratory demonstrations on the JPL High Contrast Imaging Testbed, we show that such a mission will be capable of imaging Kuiper disk structures down to the 10 zodi level, and exozodiacal dust down to the 1 zodi level, around a major sample of nearby stars. This performance goes well beyond what is about to be achieved with upcoming extreme adaptive optics systems or the ALMA array, and thus provides the best path for imaging exploration of planetary systems in the solar neighborhood.

  18. Telescope polarization and image quality: Lyot coronagraph performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Chipman, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we apply a vector representation of physical optics, sometimes called polarization aberration theory to study image formation in astronomical telescopes and instruments. We describe image formation in-terms of interferometry and use the Fresnel polarization equations to show how light, upon propagation through an optical system become partially polarized. We make the observation that orthogonally polarized light does not interfere to form an intensity image. We show how the two polarization aberrations (diattenuation and and retardance) distort the system PSF, decrease transmittance, and increase unwanted background above that predicted using the nonphysical scalar models. We apply the polarization aberration theory (PolAbT) described earlier (Breckinridge, Lam and Chipman, 2015, PASP 127, 445-468) to the fore-optics of the system designed for AFTA-WFIRST- CGI to obtain a performance estimate. Analysis of the open-literature design using PolAbT leads us to estimate that the WFIRST-CGI contrast will be in the 10-5 regime at the occulting mask. Much above the levels predicted by others (Krist, Nemati and Mennesson, 2016, JATIS 2, 011003). Remind the reader: 1. Polarizers are operators, not filters in the same sense as colored filters, 2. Adaptive optics does not correct polarization aberrations, 3. Calculations of both diattenuation and retardance are needed to model real-world telescope/coronagraph systems.

  19. CME dynamics using coronagraph and interplanetary ejecta data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Lago, Alisson; Gonzalez, Walter D.; De Lucas, Aline; Braga, Carlos Roberto; Vieira, Lucas Ramos; Stekel, Tardelli Ronan Coelho; Rockenbach, Marlos

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we present a study of the coronal mass ejection (CME) dynamics using LASCO coronagraph observations combined with in-situ ACE plasma and magnetic field data, covering a continuous period of time from January 1997 to April 2001, complemented by few extreme events observed in 2001 and 2003. We show, for the first time, that the CME expansion speed correlates very well with the travel time to 1 AU of the interplanetary ejecta (or ICMEs) associated with the CMEs, as well as with their preceding shocks. The events analyzed in this work are a subset of the events studied in Schwenn et al. (2005), from which only the CMEs associated with interplanetary ejecta (ICMEs) were selected. Three models to predict CME travel time to Earth, two proposed by Gopalswamy et al. (2001) and one by Schwenn et al. (2005), were used to characterize the dynamical behavior of this set of events. Extreme events occurred in 2001 and 2003 were used to test the prediction capability of the models regarding CMEs with very high LASCO C3 speeds.

  20. The ROCKSTAR Phase-space Temporal Halo Finder and the Velocity Offsets of Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wu, Hao-Yi

    2013-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for identifying dark matter halos, substructure, and tidal features. The approach is based on adaptive hierarchical refinement of friends-of-friends groups in six phase-space dimensions and one time dimension, which allows for robust (grid-independent, shape-independent, and noise-resilient) tracking of substructure; as such, it is named ROCKSTAR (Robust Overdensity Calculation using K-Space Topologically Adaptive Refinement). Our method is massively parallel (up to 105 CPUs) and runs on the largest current simulations (>1010 particles) with high efficiency (10 CPU hours and 60 gigabytes of memory required per billion particles analyzed). A previous paper has shown ROCKSTAR to have excellent recovery of halo properties; we expand on these comparisons with more tests and higher-resolution simulations. We show a significant improvement in substructure recovery compared to several other halo finders and discuss the theoretical and practical limits of simulations in this regard. Finally, we present results that demonstrate conclusively that dark matter halo cores are not at rest relative to the halo bulk or substructure average velocities and have coherent velocity offsets across a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. For massive clusters, these offsets can be up to 350 km s-1 at z = 0 and even higher at high redshifts. Our implementation is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/rockstar.

  1. Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, N. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An echo tracker/range finder or altimeter is described. The pulse repetition frequency (PFR) of a predetermined plurality of transmitted pulses is adjusted so that echo pulses received from a reflecting object are positioned between transmitted pulses and divided their interpulse time interval into two time intervals having a predetermined ratio with respect to each other. The invention described provides a means whereby the arrival time of a plurality of echo pulses is defined as the time at which a composite echo pulse formed of a sum of the individual echo pulses has the highest amplitude. The invention is applicable to radar systems, sonar systems, or any other kind of system in which pulses are transmitted and echoes received therefrom.

  2. Design for a source-agile automatic direction finder (ADF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myler, Harley

    2015-05-01

    The design is intended for aircraft although any vehicle or even a man-mobile system could use the concept. An automatically reconfigurable antenna using MEMS RF switches is driven to seek signals consistent with the current location of the system. The antenna feeds a Software Defined Radio (SDR) that scans for signals and when a signal is found, it is identified and then the azimuth to the signal is used, along with a signal strength parameter, to confirm the location of the system. This is an extension of the now obsolete Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) aircraft navigation tool that used AM broadcast non-directional beacons (NDB), many of which are still in service. The current system can access any radio signal within the limits of the reconfigurable antenna and the SDR.

  3. Terrestrial Planet Finder: Coda to 10 Years of Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) was proposed as a mission concept to the 2000 Decadal Survey, and received a very high ranking amongst the major initiatives that were then reviewed. As proposed, it was a formation flying array of four 3-m class mid-infrared telescopes, linked together as an interferometer. Its science goal was to survey 150 nearby stars for the presence of Earth-like planets, to detect signs of life or habitability, and to enable revolutionary advances in high angular resolution astrophysics. The Decadal Survey Committee recommended that $200M be invested to advance TPF technology development in the Decade of 2000-2010. This paper presents the results of NASA's investment.

  4. Electromagnetic formation flight for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Daniel W.; Miller, David W.

    2005-08-01

    Current techniques for actuating spacecraft in formation flying systems such as NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) use propellant-based systems. While maintaining relative orientation, propellant can become a critical consumable which can limit the mission lifetime. Additionally, propellant can cause optimal contamination, plume impingement, thermal emission, and vibration excitation. A novel technique called Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF) can be used to eliminate propellant-based systems to control the relative degrees of freedom for TPF. The EMFF system consists of electromagnets in concert with reaction wheels and is used to replace the consumables. Solar energy, a renewable resource provides power for EMFF. This paper investigates the design for TPF using EMFF. The results show that EMFF is a viable option for TPF and compares favorably in terms of mass to propellant-based systems.

  5. Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer Science Working Group Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R. (Editor); Lay, Oliver P. (Editor); Johnston, Kenneth J. (Editor); Beichman, Charles A. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    Over the past two years, the focus of the project for the interferometric version of the Terrestrial Planet Finder(TPF-I) has been on the development of the scientific rational for the mission, the assessment of TPF-I architectures, the laboratory demonstration of key technologies, and the development of a detailed technology roadmap. The Science Working Group (SWG), in conjunction with European colleagues working on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) Darwin project, has reaffirmed the goals of TPF-I as part of a broad vision for the detection and characterization of Earth-like planets orbiting nearby stars and for the search for life on those planets. The SWG also helped to assess the performance of different interferometric configurations for TPF-I/Darwin. Building on earlier SWG reports, this document restates the scientific case for TPF-I, assesses suitable target stars and relevant wavelengths for observation, discusses dramatic new capabilities for general astrophysical observations, and summarizes how Spitzer has improved our knowledge of the incidence of zodiacal emission on the search for planets. This document discusses in some detail on laboratory advances in interferometric nulling and formation flying. Laboratory experiments have now achieved stable narrow- and broad-band nulling the levels of 10-6 and 2.0x10-5, respectively. A testbed has demonstrated formation flying using two realistic spacecraft mockups. With a suitably funded program of technology development, as summarized herein and described in more detail in the Technology Plan for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (2005), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and ESA would be able to start within the coming decade a full-scale TPF-I/Darwin mission capable of finding Earths orbiting more than 150 nearby stars, or a scaled back interferometer capable of studying more than 30 stars. Finding evidence for life on just one of those planets would revolutionize our

  6. Laser Range and Bearing Finder with No Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Thomas C.; Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    A proposed laser-based instrument would quickly measure the approximate distance and approximate direction to the closest target within its field of view. The instrument would not contain any moving parts and its mode of operation would not entail scanning over of its field of view. Typically, the instrument would be used to locate a target at a distance on the order of meters to kilometers. The instrument would be best suited for use in an uncluttered setting in which the target is the only or, at worst, the closest object in the vicinity; for example, it could be used aboard an aircraft to detect and track another aircraft flying nearby. The proposed instrument would include a conventional time-of-flight or echo-phase-shift laser range finder, but unlike most other range finders, this one would not generate a narrow cylindrical laser beam; instead, it would generate a conical laser beam spanning the field of view. The instrument would also include a quadrant detector, optics to focus the light returning from the target onto the quadrant detector, and circuitry to synchronize the acquisition of the quadrant-detector output with the arrival of laser light returning from the nearest target. A quadrant detector constantly gathers information from the entire field of view, without scanning; its output is a direct measure of the position of the target-return light spot on the focal plane and is thus a measure of the direction to the target. The instrument should be able to operate at a repetition rate high enough to enable it to track a rapidly moving target. Of course, a target that is not sufficiently reflective could not be located by this instrument. Preferably, retroreflectors should be attached to the target to make it sufficiently reflective.

  7. An Overview of the Formation and Attitude Control System for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Formation Flying Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Rahman, Zahidul H.; Shields, Joel F.; Singh, Gurkipal

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder formation flying Interferometer (TPF-I) will be a five-spacecraft, precision formation operating near a Sun-Earth Lagrange point. As part of technology development for TPF-I, a formation and attitude control system (FACS) is being developed that achieves the precision and functionality associated with the TPF-I formation. This FACS will be demonstrated in a distributed, real-time simulation environment. In this paper we present an overview of the FACS and discuss in detail its constituent formation estimation, guidance and control architectures and algorithms. Since the FACS is currently being integrated into a high-fidelity simulation environment, component simulations demonstrating algorithm performance are presented.

  8. An Overview of the Formation and Attitude Control System for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Formation Flying Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Rahman, Zahidul H.; Shields, Joel F.; Singh, Gurkipal; Wette, Matthew R.

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder formation flying Interferometer (TPF-I) will be a five-spacecraft, precision formation operating near the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point. As part of technology development for TPF-I, a formation and attitude control system (FACS) is being developed that achieves the precision and functionality needed for the TPF-I formation and that will be demonstrated in a distributed, real-time simulation environment. In this paper we present an overview of FACS and discuss in detail its formation estimation, guidance and control architectures and algorithms. Since FACS is currently being integrated into a high-fidelity simulation environment, component simulations demonstrating algorithm performance are presented.

  9. Stop-less Lyot coronagraph for exoplanet characterization: first on-sky validation in VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; N'Diaye, M.; Dohlen, K.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Costille, A.; Caillat, A.; Baruffolo, A.; Blanchard, P.; Carle, M.; Ferrari, M.; Fusco, T.; Gluck, L.; Hugot, E.; Jaquet, M.; Langlois, M.; Le Mignant, D.; Llored, M.; Madec, F.; Mouillet, D.; Origné, A.; Puget, P.; Salasnich, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.

    2016-07-01

    The VLT/SPHERE instrument includes a unique long-slit spectroscopy (LSS) mode coupled with Lyot coronagraphy dedicated to the spectral characterization of directly imaged giant exoplanets. The performance of this mode is limited by its non-optimal coronagraph, but in a previous work we demonstrated that it could be significantly improved at small inner-working angles using the stop-less Lyot coronagraph (SLLC). A prototype of the SLLC was installed in VLT/SPHERE in 2014 during the reintegration of the instrument in Paranal, and it was extensively tested in 2015 to characterize its performance. The performance is tested in both imaging and spectroscopy using data acquired on the internal source of SPHERE. In imaging, we obtain a raw contrast gain of a factor 10 at 0.3" with the SLLC. We also demonstrate that no Lyot stop is required to reach the full performance, which validates the SLLC concept. Comparison with a realistic simulation model shows that we are currently limited by the internal phase aberrations of SPHERE. In spectroscopy, we obtain a gain of 1 mag in a limited range of angular separations. Simulations show that although the main limitation comes from phase errors, the performance in the non-SLLC case is very close to the ultimate limit of the LSS mode. We present the very first on-sky data with the SLLC, which appear extremely promising for the future scientific exploitation of an apodized LSS mode in SPHERE. Finally, we explore a new possibility for the speckle subtraction in the LSS mode that could significantly improve the data analysis with respect to methods based on spectral differences.

  10. Technologies Required to Image Earth 2.0 with a Space Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegler, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) guides the development of technology that enables the direct imaging and characterization of exo-Earths in the habitable zone of their stars for future space observatories. Here we present the coronagraph portion of the 2017 ExEP Technology Gap List, an annual update to ExEP's list of of technologies, to be advanced in the next 1-5 years. A coronagraph is an internal occulter that allows a space telescope to achieve exo-Earth imaging contrast requirements (more than 10 billion) by blocking on-axis starlight while allowing the reflected light of off-axis exoplanets be detected. Building and operating a space coronagraph capable of imaging an exo-Earth will require new technologies beyond those of WFIRST, the first high-contrast conronagraph in space. We review the current state-of-the-art performance of space coronagraphs and the performance level that must be achieved for a coronagraph..

  11. The Vector Vortex Coronagraph: sensitivity to central obscuration, low-order aberrations, chromaticism, and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawet, Dimitri; Pueyo, Laurent; Moody, Dwight; Krist, John; Serabyn, Eugene

    2010-07-01

    The Vector Vortex Coronagraph is a phase-based coronagraph, one of the most efficient in terms of inner working angle, throughput, discovery space, contrast, and simplicity. Using liquid-crystal polymer technology, this new coronagraph has recently been the subject of lab demonstrations in the near-infrared, visible and was also used on sky at the Palomar observatory in the H and K bands (1.65 and 2.2 μm, respectively) to image the brown dwarf companion to HR 7672, and the three extra-solar planets around HR 8799. However, despite these recent successes, the Vector Vortex Coronagraph is, as are most coronagraphs, sensitive to the central obscuration and secondary support structures, low-order aberrations (tip-tilt, focus, etc), bandwidth (chromaticism), and polarization when image-plane wavefront sensing is performed. Here, we consider in detail these sensitivities as a function of the topological charge of the vortex and design features inherent to the manufacturing technology, and show that in practice all of them can be mitigated to meet specific needs.

  12. RING-APODIZED VORTEX CORONAGRAPHS FOR OBSCURED TELESCOPES. I. TRANSMISSIVE RING APODIZERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mawet, D.; Pueyo, L.; Carlotti, A.; Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Wallace, J. K.

    2013-11-01

    The vortex coronagraph (VC) is a new generation small inner working angle (IWA) coronagraph currently offered on various 8 m class ground-based telescopes. On these observing platforms, the current level of performance is not limited by the intrinsic properties of actual vortex devices, but by wavefront control residuals and incoherent background (e.g., thermal emission of the sky), or the light diffracted by the imprint of the secondary mirror and support structures on the telescope pupil. In the particular case of unfriendly apertures (mainly large central obscuration) when very high contrast is needed (e.g., direct imaging of older exoplanets with extremely large telescopes or space-based coronagraphs), a simple VC, like most coronagraphs, cannot deliver its nominal performance because of the contamination due to the diffraction from the obscured part of the pupil. Here, we propose a novel yet simple concept that circumvents this problem. We combine a vortex phase mask in the image plane of a high-contrast instrument with a single pupil-based amplitude ring apodizer, tailor-made to exploit the unique convolution properties of the VC at the Lyot-stop plane. We show that such a ring-apodized vortex coronagraph (RAVC) restores the perfect attenuation property of the VC regardless of the size of the central obscuration, and for any (even) topological charge of the vortex. More importantly, the RAVC maintains the IWA and conserves a fairly high throughput, which are signature properties of the VC.

  13. Shaped pupil Lyot coronagraphs: high-contrast solutions for restricted focal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Neil T.; Eldorado Riggs, A. J.; Jeremy Kasdin, N.; Carlotti, Alexis; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Coronagraphs of the apodized pupil and shaped pupil varieties use the Fraunhofer diffraction properties of amplitude masks to create regions of high contrast in the vicinity of a target star. Here we present a hybrid coronagraph architecture in which a binary, hard-edged shaped pupil mask replaces the gray, smooth apodizer of the apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph (APLC). For any contrast and bandwidth goal in this configuration, as long as the prescribed region of contrast is restricted to a finite area in the image, a shaped pupil is the apodizer with the highest transmission. We relate the starlight cancellation mechanism to that of the conventional APLC. We introduce a new class of solutions in which the amplitude profile of the Lyot stop, instead of being fixed as a padded replica of the telescope aperture, is jointly optimized with the apodizer. Finally, we describe shaped pupil Lyot coronagraph (SPLC) designs for the baseline architecture of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) coronagraph. These SPLCs help to enable two scientific objectives of the WFIRST-AFTA mission: (1) broadband spectroscopy to characterize exoplanet atmospheres in reflected starlight and (2) debris disk imaging.

  14. Exoplanet coronagraph shaped pupil masks and laboratory scale star shade masks: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; White, Victor; Yee, Karl; Echternach, Pierre; Muller, Richard; Dickie, Matthew; Cady, Eric; Mejia Prada, Camilo; Ryan, Daniel; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Zhou, Hanying; Kern, Brian; Riggs, A. J.; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Sirbu, Dan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2015-09-01

    Star light suppression technologies to find and characterize faint exoplanets include internal coronagraph instruments as well as external star shade occulters. Currently, the NASA WFIRST-AFTA mission study includes an internal coronagraph instrument to find and characterize exoplanets. Various types of masks could be employed to suppress the host star light to about 10-9 level contrast over a broad spectrum to enable the coronagraph mission objectives. Such masks for high contrast internal coronagraphic imaging require various fabrication technologies to meet a wide range of specifications, including precise shapes, micron scale island features, ultra-low reflectivity regions, uniformity, wave front quality, achromaticity, etc. We present the approaches employed at JPL to produce pupil plane and image plane coronagraph masks by combining electron beam, deep reactive ion etching, and black silicon technologies with illustrative examples of each, highlighting milestone accomplishments from the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at JPL and from the High Contrast Imaging Lab (HCIL) at Princeton University. We also present briefly the technologies applied to fabricate laboratory scale star shade masks.

  15. The Vector Vortex Coronagraph: Sensitivity to Low-Order Aberrations, Central Obscuration, Chromaticism, and Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawet, Dimitri; Pueyo, Laurent; Moody, Dwight; Krist, John; Serabyn, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The Vector Vortex Coronagraph is a phase-based coronagraph, one of the most efficient in terms of inner working angle, throughput, discovery space, contrast, and simplicity. Using liquid-crystal polymer technology, this new coronagraph has recently been the subject of lab demonstrations in the near-infrared, visible and was also used on sky at the Palomar observatory in the H and K bands (1.65 and 2.2 micrometers, respectively) to image the brown dwarf companion to HR 7672, and the three extasolar planets around HR 8799. However, despite these recent successes, the Vector Vortex Coronagraph is, as are most coronagraphs, sensitive to the central obscuration and secondary support structures, low-order aberrations (tip-tilt, focus, etc), bandwidth (chromaticism), and polarization when image-plane wavefront sensing is performed. Here, we consider in detail these sensitivities as a function of the topological charge of the vortex and design properties inherent to the manufacturing technology, and show that in practice all of them can be mitigated to meet specific needs.

  16. THERMAL STRUCTURE OF CORONAL LOOPS AS SEEN WITH NORIKURA CORONAGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Singh, Jagdev; Ichimoto, K.

    2013-03-10

    The thermal structure of a coronal loop, both along and across the loop, is vital in determining the exact plasma heating mechanism. High-resolution spectroscopic observations of the off-limb corona were made using the 25 cm Norikura coronagraph, located at Norikura, Japan. Observations on a number of days were made simultaneously in four forbidden iron emission lines, namely, the [Fe XI] 7892 A line, the [Fe XIII] 10747 A and 10798 A lines, and the [Fe XIV] 5303 A line and on some days made only in the [Fe XI] 7892 A and [Fe X] 6374 A lines. Using temperature sensitive emission line ratios [Fe XIV] 5303 A/[Fe XIII] 10747 A and [Fe XI] 7892 A/[Fe X] 6374 A, we compute the electron temperatures along 18 different loop structures observed on different days. We find a significant negative temperature gradient in all of the structures observed in Fe XIV and Fe XIII and a positive temperature gradient in the structures observed in Fe XI and Fe X. Combining these results with the previous investigations by Singh and his collaborators, we infer that the loop tops, in general, appear hotter when observed in colder lines and colder when observed in relatively hotter lines as compared to their coronal foot points. We suggest that this contrasting trend observed in the temperature variation along the loop structures can be explained by a gradual interaction of different temperature plasma. The exact mechanism responsible for this interaction must be investigated further and has the potential to constrain loop heating models.

  17. Coronagraphic search for exo-planets with a hypertelescope. I. In the thermal IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, P.; Boccaletti, A.; Gillet, S.; Schneider, J.; Labeyrie, A.; Arnold, L.; Baudrand, J.; Lardiè, O.; Dejonghe, J.; Borkowski, V.

    2002-12-01

    Following the idea developed in Boccaletti et al. (2000), a snapshot imaging interferometer is proposed as an alternative to the nulling interferometer for the NASA Origin project, ``Terrestrial Planet Finder". This concept is based on hypertelescope, i.e. densified-pupil, imaging (Labeyrie \\cite{l96}) and phase-mask coronagraphy (Rouan et al. \\cite{ro00}) to combine a very high angular resolution and a deep attenuation of starlight (10-8) as required to image extra-terrestrial planets. This article aims at presenting thorough estimations of the signal to noise ratio for different classes of stars (from F0V to M5V) and includes several sources of background noise (zodiacal and exozodiacal lights for instance). In addition, numerical simulations have been carried out and are compared to the analytical results. We find that the image of Earth-like planets can be formed with a large hypertelescope ( ~ 80 m) in the thermal infra-red for about 73% of the stars within 25pc. The Appendix is only available in electonic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  18. Method for reducing sidelobe impact of low order aberration in a coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ftaclas, Christ (Inventor); Crout, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for reducing a sidelobe impact of low order aberrations using a coronagraph (2) having an apodized occulting mask (10), comprising the steps of: (a) providing in the coronagraph (2) the apodized occulting disk (10) having a transmission profile which graduates from opaque to transparent along its radius and the negative of whose amplitude transmission is a Gaussian profile; (b) determining a predicted sidelobe impact of the aberrations from a particular mix of low order aberration measured in a system as described by the Zernike polynomials; (c) applying the coronagraph to a system point spread function using a given rms width for the Gaussian profile describing the apodized occulting mask (10) and determining an attenuation level of the aberration sidelobes; (d) scaling the Gaussian occulting mask (10) profile to a wider rms width if the sidelobe attenuation level is too low; and (e) repeating the steps (b) through (d) until the attenuation level is acceptable.

  19. On the 3-D reconstruction of Coronal Mass Ejections using coronagraph data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierla, M.; Inhester, B.; Antunes, A.; Boursier, Y.; Byrne, J. P.; Colaninno, R.; Davila, J.; de Koning, C. A.; Gallagher, P. T.; Gissot, S.; Howard, R. A.; Howard, T. A.; Kramar, M.; Lamy, P.; Liewer, P. C.; Maloney, S.; Marqué, C.; McAteer, R. T. J.; Moran, T.; Rodriguez, L.; Srivastava, N.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Stenborg, G.; Temmer, M.; Thernisien, A.; Vourlidas, A.; West, M. J.; Wood, B. E.; Zhukov, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    Coronal Mass ejections (CMEs) are enormous eruptions of magnetized plasma expelled from the Sun into the interplanetary space, over the course of hours to days. They can create major disturbances in the interplanetary medium and trigger severe magnetic storms when they collide with the Earth's magnetosphere. It is important to know their real speed, propagation direction and 3-D configuration in order to accurately predict their arrival time at the Earth. Using data from the SECCHI coronagraphs onboard the STEREO mission, which was launched in October 2006, we can infer the propagation direction and the 3-D structure of such events. In this review, we first describe different techniques that were used to model the 3-D configuration of CMEs in the coronagraph field of view (up to 15 R⊙). Then, we apply these techniques to different CMEs observed by various coronagraphs. A comparison of results obtained from the application of different reconstruction algorithms is presented and discussed.

  20. Science yield estimate with the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traub, Wesley A.; Breckinridge, James; Greene, Thomas P.; Guyon, Olivier; Jeremy Kasdin, N.; Macintosh, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The coronagraph instrument (CGI) on the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope will directly image and spectrally characterize planets and circumstellar disks around nearby stars. Here we estimate the expected science yield of the CGI for known radial-velocity (RV) planets and potential circumstellar disks. The science return is estimated for three types of coronagraphs: the hybrid Lyot and shaped pupil are the currently planned designs, and the phase-induced amplitude apodizing complex mask coronagraph is the backup design. We compare the potential performance of each type for imaging as well as spectroscopy. We find that the RV targets can be imaged in sufficient numbers to produce substantial advances in the science of nearby exoplanets. To illustrate the potential for circumstellar disk detections, we estimate the brightness of zodiacal-type disks, which could be detected simultaneously during RV planet observations.

  1. Assessing the Performance Limits of Internal Coronagraphs Through End-to-End Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, John E.; Belikov, Ruslan; Pueyo, Laurent; Mawet, Dimitri P.; Moody, Dwight; Trauger, John T.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the NASA ROSES Technology Demonstrations for Exoplanet Missions (TDEM) program, we conducted a numerical modeling study of three internal coronagraphs (PIAA, vector vortex, hybrid bandlimited) to understand their behaviors in realistically-aberrated systems with wavefront control (deformable mirrors). This investigation consisted of two milestones: (1) develop wavefront propagation codes appropriate for each coronagraph that are accurate to 1% or better (compared to a reference algorithm) but are also time and memory efficient, and (2) use these codes to determine the wavefront control limits of each architecture. We discuss here how the milestones were met and identify some of the behaviors particular to each coronagraph. The codes developed in this study are being made available for community use. We discuss here results for the HBLC and VVC systems, with PIAA having been discussed in a previous proceeding.

  2. Optimizing the subwavelength grating of L-band annular groove phase masks for high coronagraphic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Catalán, E.; Huby, E.; Forsberg, P.; Jolivet, A.; Baudoz, P.; Carlomagno, B.; Delacroix, C.; Habraken, S.; Mawet, D.; Surdej, J.; Absil, O.; Karlsson, M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The annular groove phase mask (AGPM) is one possible implementation of the vector vortex coronagraph, where the helical phase ramp is produced by a concentric subwavelength grating. For several years, we have been manufacturing AGPMs by etching gratings into synthetic diamond substrates using inductively coupled plasma etching. Aims: We aim to design, fabricate, optimize, and evaluate new L-band AGPMs that reach the highest possible coronagraphic performance, for applications in current and forthcoming infrared high-contrast imagers. Methods: Rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) is used for designing the subwavelength grating of the phase mask. Coronagraphic performance evaluation is performed on a dedicated optical test bench. The experimental results of the performance evaluation are then used to accurately determine the actual profile of the fabricated gratings, based on RCWA modeling. Results: The AGPM coronagraphic performance is very sensitive to small errors in etch depth and grating profile. Most of the fabricated components therefore show moderate performance in terms of starlight rejection (a few 100:1 in the best cases). Here we present new processes for re-etching the fabricated components in order to optimize the parameters of the grating and hence significantly increase their coronagraphic performance. Starlight rejection up to 1000:1 is demonstrated in a broadband L filter on the coronagraphic test bench, which corresponds to a raw contrast of about 10-5 at two resolution elements from the star for a perfect input wave front on a circular, unobstructed aperture. Conclusions: Thanks to their exquisite performance, our latest L-band AGPMs are good candidates for installation in state of the art and future high-contrast thermal infrared imagers, such as METIS for the E-ELT.

  3. 77 FR 47911 - Notice of a Change in Direction Finder Availability in Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    .... Newer technologies such as Global Positioning System (GPS) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of a Change in Direction Finder Availability in Alaska...

  4. Progress in four-beam nulling: results from the Terrestrial Planet Finder Planet Detection Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I) is a large space telescope consisting of four 4 meter diameter telescopes flying in formation in space together with a fifth beam combiner spacecraft.

  5. Progress in four-beam nulling: results from the Terrestrial Planet Finder planet detection testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer (TPF-I) is a large space telescope consisting of four 4 meter diameter telescopes flying in formation in space together with a fifth beam combiner spacecraft.

  6. Recognition of three dimensional obstacles by an edge detection scheme. [for Mars roving vehicle using laser range finder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    The need for an obstacle detection system on the Mars roving vehicle was assumed, and a practical scheme was investigated and simulated. The principal sensing device on this vehicle was taken to be a laser range finder. Both existing and original algorithms, ending with thresholding operations, were used to obtain the outlines of obstacles from the raw data of this laser scan. A theoretical analysis was carried out to show how proper value of threshold may be chosen. Computer simulations considered various mid-range boulders, for which the scheme was quite successful. The extension to other types of obstacles, such as craters, was considered. The special problems of bottom edge detection and scanning procedure are discussed.

  7. Photographic coronagraph, Skylab particulate experiment T025. [earth atmospheric pollution and Kohoutek Comet monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovane, F.; Schuerman, D. W.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A photographic coronagraph, built to monitor Skylab's extravehicular contamination, is described. This versatile instrument was used to observe the earth's vertical aerosol distribution and Comet Kohoutek (1973f) near perihelion. Although originally designed for deployment from the solar airlock, the instrument was modified for EVA operation when the airlock was rendered unusable. The results of the observations made in four EVA's were almost completely ruined by the failure of a Skylab operational camera used with the coronagraph. Nevertheless, an aerosol layer at 48 km was discovered in the southern hemisphere from the few useful photographs.

  8. Utilizing Astrometric Orbits to Obtain Coronagraphic Images of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John M.

    2011-08-01

    this target pool with a probability of unity and that the maximum number of visits required (i.e., the worst case) is 36 visits. The probable number of visits is considerably smaller, about 18. This is a dramatic improvement in efficiency over previous methods proposed for utilizing astrometric orbits. We examine how the implementation of this approach is complicated and limited by operational constraints and how it is impacted by formal errors. We find that it can be fully implemented for internal coronagraph and visual nuller missions, with a success rate approaching 100%. External occulter missions will also benefit, but to a lesser degree.

  9. 4D Cellular Automaton Track Finder in the CBM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    The CBM experiment (FAIR/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. It requires a novel read-out and data-acquisition concept with self-triggered electronics and free-streaming data. In this case resolving different collisions is a non-trivial task and event building must be performed in software online. That requires full online event reconstruction and selection not only in space, but also in time, so-called 4D event building and selection. This is a task of the First-Level Event Selection (FLES). The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. The Cellular Automaton (CA) track finder algorithm was adapted towards time-based reconstruction. In this article, we describe in detail the modification done to the algorithm, as well as the performance of the developed time-based CA approach.

  10. Lightning Radio Source Retrieval Using Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of tile measurements mentioned above. Tests of the retrieval method are provided using computer-simulated data sets. We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. In the absence of measurement errors, quadratic root degeneracy (no source location ambiguity) is shown to exist exactly on the outer sensor baselines for arbitrary non-collinear network geometries. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer generated data sets. The results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg. We also note some of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods over the nonlinear method of chi(sup 2) minimization employed by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and discussed in Cummins et al.(1993, 1995, 1998).

  11. Design and Fabrication of the All-Reflecting H-Lyman alpha Coronagraph/Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Johnson, R. Barry; Fineschi, Silvano; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Baker, Phillip C.; Zukic , Muamer; Kim, Jongmin

    1993-01-01

    We have designed, analyzed, and are now fabricating an All-Reflecting H-Lyman alpha Coronagraph/Polarimeter for solar research. This new instrument operates in a narrow bandpass centered at lambda 1215.7 A-the neutral hydrogen Lyman alpha (Ly-alpha) line. It is shorter and faster than the telescope which produced solar Ly-alpha images as a part of the MSSTA payload that was launched on May 13, 1991. The Ly-alpha line is produced and linearly polarized in the solar corona by resonance scattering, and the presence of a magnetic field modifies this polarization according to the Hanle effect. The Lyman alpha Coronagraph/Polarimeter instrument has been designed to measure coronal magnetic fields by interpreting, via the Hanle effect, the measured linear polarization of the coronal Ly-alpha line. Ultrasmooth mirrors, polarizers, and filters are being flow-polished for this instrument from CVD silicon carbide substrates. These optical components will be coated using advanced induced transmission and absorption thin film multilayer coatings, to optimize the reflectivity and polarization properties at 1215.7 A. We describe some of the solar imaging results obtained with the MSSTA Lyman alpha coronagraph. We also discuss the optical design parameters and fabrication plans for the All-Reflecting H-Lyman alpha Coronagraph/Polarimeter.

  12. Lyot-plane phase masks for improved high-contrast imaging with a vortex coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, G. J.; Huby, E.; Absil, O.; Mawet, D.; Delacroix, C.; Carlomagno, B.; Swartzlander, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The vortex coronagraph is an optical instrument that precisely removes on-axis starlight allowing for high contrast imaging at small angular separation from the star, a crucial capability for direct detection and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks. Telescopes with aperture obstructions, such as secondary mirrors and spider support structures, require advanced coronagraph designs to provide adequate starlight suppression. Aims: We introduce a phase-only Lyot-plane optic to the vortex coronagraph, which offers improved contrast performance on telescopes with complicated apertures. Potential solutions for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) are described. Methods: Adding a Lyot-plane phase mask relocates residual starlight away from a region of the image plane, thereby reducing stellar noise and improving sensitivity to off-axis companions. The phase mask is calculated using an iterative phase retrieval algorithm. Results: Numerically, we achieve a contrast on the order of 10-6 for a companion with angular displacement as small as 4λ/D with an E-ELT type aperture. Even in the presence of aberrations, improved performance is expected compared to either a conventional vortex coronagraph or an optimized pupil plane phase element alone.

  13. A 4-meter wide field coronagraph space telescope for general astrophysics and exoplanet observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerelli, Domenick; Angel, Roger; Burge, Jim; Guyon, Olivier; Zabludoff, Ann; Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Egerman, Robert

    2010-07-01

    The Wide Field Coronagraph Telescope (WFCT) is a 4-meter space telescope for general astrophysics and exoplanet observations that meets the 2000 Decadal Committee requirements. This paper presents a design for a 4-m diameter, off-axis space telescope that offers high performance in both wide field and coronagraphic imaging modes. A 3.8 x 3.3-m unobstructed elliptical pupil is provided for direct coronagraphic imaging of exoplanets and a 4-m diameter pupil for wide-field imaging from far-ultraviolet (UV) to near-infrared (IR). The off-axis wide-field optics are all reflective and designed to deliver an average of 12 nm wavefront aberrations over a 6 x 24 arcminute field of view (FOV), therefore providing diffraction-limited images down to 300 nm wavelength and 15 mas images down to a wavelength limit set only by the mirror coatings. The coronagraph with phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) provides diffraction suppression around a 360-degree field with high Strehl and sensitivity at the 1e-10 level to an inner working angle of 2 λ/D (or 50 mas at 500 nm wavelength). This paper focuses on the optical design that allows the above imaging features to be combined in single telescope, and gives a preliminary spacecraft design and costing, assuming a distant trailing orbit.

  14. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST/AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Mcelwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hilton, George; Sayson, Jorge Llop; Perrin, Marshall; Demer, Richard; Tang, Hong; Kern, Brian; Ferdosi, Janan

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope/Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST/AFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) cofigurations. We discuss why the lenslet array based IFS is selected for PISCES. We present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the specific function of our pinhole mask on the back surface of the lenslet array to further suppress star light introduced speckles. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  15. Low-order wavefront sensing and control for WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Hein, Randall; Lam, Raymond; Moore, Douglas; Moore, James; Patterson, Keith; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Shields, Joel; Sidick, Erkin; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Wallace, J. Kent; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    To maintain the required Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) coronagraph performance in a realistic space environment, a low-order wavefront sensing and control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C uses the rejected stellar light from the coronagraph to sense and suppress the telescope pointing errors as well as low-order wavefront errors (WFEs) due to changes in thermal loading of the telescope and the rest of the observatory. We will present a conceptual design of a LOWFS/C subsystem for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph. This LOWFS/C uses a Zernike phase contrast wavefront sensor (ZWFS) with a phase shifting disk combined with the stellar light rejecting occulting masks, a key concept to minimize the noncommon path error. We will present our analysis of the sensor performance and evaluate the performance of the line-of-sight jitter suppression loop, as well as the low-order WFE correction loop with a deformable mirror on the coronagraph. We will also report the LOWFS/C testbed design and the preliminary in-air test results, which show a very promising performance of the ZWFS.

  16. Low order wavefront sensing and control for WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Bartos, Randall; Hein, Randall; Kern, Brian; Krist, John; Lam, Raymond; Moore, Douglas; Moore, James; Patterson, Keith; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Shields, Joel; Sidick, Erkin; Tang, Hong; Truong, Tuan; Wallace, Kent; Wang, Xu; Wilson, Dan

    2015-09-01

    To maintain the required WFIRST Coronagraph starlight suppression performance in a realistic space environment, a low order wavefront sensing and control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C uses the rejected stellar light from coronagraph to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as the low order wavefront errors due to changes in thermal loading on the telescope and the rest of the observatory. In this paper we will present an overview of the low order wavefront sensing and control subsystem for the WFIRST Coronagraph. We will describe LOWFS/C's Zernike wavefront sensor concept and control design, and present an overview of sensing performance analysis and modeling, predicted line-of-sight jitter suppression loop performance, as well as the low order wavefront error correction with the coronagraph's deformable mirror. We will also report the LOWFS/C testbed design and the preliminary in-air test results, which show promising performance of the Zernike wavefront sensor and FSM feedback loop.

  17. Double stage Lyot coronagraph with the apodized reticulated stop for the Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaitskova, Natalia

    2005-08-01

    One of the science drivers for the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) is imaging and spectroscopy of exo-solar planets located as close as 20mas to their parent star [1]. The application requires a well thought-out design of the high contrast imaging instrumentation. Several working coronagraphic concepts have already been developed for the monolithic telescope with the diameter up to 8 meter. Nevertheless the conclusions made about the performance of these systems cannot be applied directly to the telescope of the diameter 30-100m. The existing schemes are needed to be reconsidered taking into account the specific characteristics of a segmented surface. We start this work with the classical system - Lyot coronagraph. We show that while the increase in telescope diameter is an advantage for the high contrast range science, the segmentation sets a limit on the performance of the coronagraph. Diffraction from intersegment gaps sets a floor to the achievable extinction of the starlight. Masking out the bright segment gaps in the Lyot plane although helps increasing the contrast, does not solve completely the problem: the high spatial frequency component of the diffractive light remains. We suggest using the Lyot stop which acts on the light within gaps in order to produce the uniform illumination in the Lyot plane. We show that for the diffraction limit regime and a perfect phasing this type of coronagraph achieves a sufficient star light extinction.

  18. A coronagraph based on two spatial light modulators for active amplitude apodizing and phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Zhen; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chengchao; Yang, Feng; Yang, Chao

    2014-08-01

    Almost all high-contrast imaging coronagraphs proposed until now are based on passive coronagraph optical components. Recently, Ren and Zhu proposed for the first time a coronagraph that integrates a liquid crystal array (LCA) for the active pupil apodizing and a deformable mirror (DM) for the phase corrections. Here, for demonstration purpose, we present the initial test result of a coronagraphic system that is based on two liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLM). In the system, one SLM is served as active pupil apodizing and amplitude correction to suppress the diffraction light; another SLM is used to correct the speckle noise that is caused by the wave-front distortions. In this way, both amplitude and phase error can be actively and efficiently compensated. In the test, we use the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to control two SLMs, which is based on the point spread function (PSF) sensing and evaluation and optimized for a maximum contrast in the discovery area. Finally, it has demonstrated a contrast of 10-6 at an inner working angular distance of ~6.2 λ/D, which is a promising technique to be used for the direct imaging of young exoplanets on ground-based telescopes.

  19. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Mcelwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hilton, George; Sayson, Jorge Llop; Perrin, Marshall; Demers, Richard; Tang, Hong; Kern, Brian; Ferdosi, Janan

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope/Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) configurations. We discuss why the lenslet array based IFS was selected for PISCES. We present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the specific function of our pinhole mask on the back surface of the lenslet array to reduce the diffraction from the edge of the lenslets. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  20. Reconstructing the open-field magnetic geometry of solar corona using coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.; Jones, Shaela; Burkepile, Joan

    2015-04-01

    The upcoming Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions will provide an new insight into the inner heliosphere magnetically connected with the topologically complex and eruptive solar corona. Physical interpretation of these observations will be dependent on the accurate reconstruction of the large-scale coronal magnetic field. We argue that such reconstruction can be performed using photospheric extrapolation codes constrained by white-light coronagraph images. The field extrapolation component of this project is featured in a related presentation by S. Jones et al. Here, we focus on our image-processing algorithms conducting an automated segmentation of coronal loop structures. In contrast to the previously proposed segmentation codes designed for detecting small-scale closed loops in the vicinity of active regions, our technique focuses on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal features observed at significant radial distances from the solar surface. Coronagraph images are transformed into a polar coordinate system and undergo radial detrending and initial noise reduction followed by an adaptive angular differentiation. An adjustable threshold is applied to identify candidate coronagraph features associated with the large-scale coronal field. A blob detection algorithm is used to identify valid features against a noisy background. The extracted coronal features are used to derive empirical directional constraints for magnetic field extrapolation procedures based on photospheric magnetograms. Two versions of the method optimized for processing ground-based (Mauna Loa Solar Observatory) and satellite-based (STEREO Cor1 and Cor2) coronagraph images are being developed.

  1. On-sky Performance Analysis of the Vector Apodizing Phase Plate Coronagraph on MagAO/Clio2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Gilles P. P. L.; Snik, Frans; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Keller, Christoph U.; Males, Jared R.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Codona, Johanan L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hornburg, Kathryn J.; Brickson, Leandra L.; Escuti, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the performance of a vector apodizing phase plate coronagraph that operates over a wavelength range of 2–5 μm and is installed in MagAO/Clio2 at the 6.5 m Magellan Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The coronagraph manipulates the phase in the pupil to produce three beams yielding two coronagraphic point-spread functions (PSFs) and one faint leakage PSF. The phase pattern is imposed through the inherently achromatic geometric phase, enabled by liquid crystal technology and polarization techniques. The coronagraphic optic is manufactured using a direct-write technique for precise control of the liquid crystal pattern and multitwist retarders for achromatization. By integrating a linear phase ramp to the coronagraphic phase pattern, two separated coronagraphic PSFs are created with a single pupil-plane optic, which makes it robust and easy to install in existing telescopes. The two coronagraphic PSFs contain a 180° dark hole on each side of a star, and these complementary copies of the star are used to correct the seeing halo close to the star. To characterize the coronagraph, we collected a data set of a bright (mL = 0–1) nearby star with ∼1.5 hr of observing time. By rotating and optimally scaling one PSF and subtracting it from the other PSF, we see a contrast improvement by 1.46 magnitudes at 3.5 λ /D. With regular angular differential imaging at 3.9 μm, the MagAO vector apodizing phase plate coronagraph delivers a 5σ {{Δ }}{mag} contrast of 8.3 (={10}-3.3) at 2 λ /D and 12.2 (={10}-4.8) at 3.5 λ /D.

  2. Design status of ASPIICS, an externally occulted coronagraph for PROBA-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renotte, Etienne; Alia, Andres; Bemporad, Alessandro; Bernier, Joseph; Bramanti, Cristina; Buckley, Steve; Capobianco, Gerardo; Cernica, Ileana; Dániel, Vladimir; Darakchiev, Radoslav; Darmetko, Marcin; Debaize, Arnaud; Denis, François; Desselle, Richard; de Vos, Lieve; Dinescu, Adrian; Fineschi, Silvano; Fleury-Frenette, Karl; Focardi, Mauro; Fumel, Aurélie; Galano, Damien; Galy, Camille; Gillis, Jean-Marie; Górski, Tomasz; Graas, Estelle; Graczyk, Rafał; Grochowski, Konrad; Halain, Jean-Philippe A.; Hermans, Aline; Howard, Russ; Jackson, Carl; Janssen, Emmanuel; Kasprzyk, Hubert; Kosiec, Jacek; Koutchmy, Serge; Kovačičinová, Jana; Kranitis, Nektarios; Kurowski, Michał; Ładno, Michał; Lamy, Philippe; Landini, Federico; Lapáček, Radek; Lédl, Vít.; Liebecq, Sylvie; Loreggia, Davide; McGarvey, Brian; Massone, Giuseppe; Melich, Radek; Mestreau-Garreau, Agnes; Mollet, Dominique; Mosdorf, Łukasz; Mosdorf, Michał; Mroczkowski, Mateusz; Muller, Raluca; Nicolini, Gianalfredo; Nicula, Bogdan; O'Neill, Kevin; Orleański, Piotr; Palau, Marie-Catherine; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Paschalis, Antonios; Patočka, Karel; Peresty, Radek; Popescu, Irina; Psota, Pavel; Rataj, Miroslaw; Rautakoski, Jan; Romoli, Marco; Rybecký, Roman; Salvador, Lucas; Servaye, Jean-Sébastien; Solomon, Cornel; Stockman, Yvan; Swat, Arkadiusz; Thizy, Cédric; Thomé, Michel; Tsinganos, Kanaris; Van der Meulen, Jim; Van Vooren, Nico; Vit, Tomáš; Walczak, Tomasz; Zarzycka, Alicja; Zender, Joe; Zhukov, Andrei

    2015-09-01

    The "sonic region" of the Sun corona remains extremely difficult to observe with spatial resolution and sensitivity sufficient to understand the fine scale phenomena that govern the quiescent solar corona, as well as phenomena that lead to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which influence space weather. Improvement on this front requires eclipse-like conditions over long observation times. The space-borne coronagraphs flown so far provided a continuous coverage of the external parts of the corona but their over-occulting system did not permit to analyse the part of the white-light corona where the main coronal mass is concentrated. The proposed PROBA-3 Coronagraph System, also known as ASPIICS (Association of Spacecraft for Polarimetric and Imaging Investigation of the Corona of the Sun), with its novel design, will be the first space coronagraph to cover the range of radial distances between ~1.08 and 3 solar radii where the magnetic field plays a crucial role in the coronal dynamics, thus providing continuous observational conditions very close to those during a total solar eclipse. PROBA-3 is first a mission devoted to the in-orbit demonstration of precise formation flying techniques and technologies for future European missions, which will fly ASPIICS as primary payload. The instrument is distributed over two satellites flying in formation (approx. 150m apart) to form a giant coronagraph capable of producing a nearly perfect eclipse allowing observing the sun corona closer to the rim than ever before. The coronagraph instrument is developed by a large European consortium including about 20 partners from 7 countries under the auspices of the European Space Agency. This paper is reviewing the recent improvements and design updates of the ASPIICS instrument as it is stepping into the detailed design phase.

  3. Enceladus Life Finder: Search for Life in a Habitable Moon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Spilker, L. J.; Postberg, F.; Cable, M. L.; Srama, R.; Clark, K.; Lee, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    A thousand times smaller in mass than Ganymede, Enceladus was known from Voyager data to be extremely bright and a dearth of craters on some parts of its surface suggested geologic activity. Cassini discovered the presence and composition of a plume erupting from the south polar terrain of Enceladus, approximately 100 narrow, distinct "geysers" or "jets" that feed it, and anomalous thermal signatures along fractures from which the geysers erupt. Cassini discovered organic and nitrogen-bearing molecules in the plume vapor, and detected salts in the plume icy grains, arguing strongly for ocean water being in contact with a rocky core. As much as Cassini has done, it cannot tell us whether the ocean of Enceladus hosts an active biota today. Enceladus Life Finder (ELF) is a Discovery-class solar-powered Saturn orbiter designed to fly multiple times through the plume of Enceladus. It carries two state-of-the-art mass spectrometers designed to analyze the gas and grains in the plume. The goals of the mission are derived directly from the most recent decadal survey: first, to determine primordial sources of organics and sites of organic synthesis today, second, to determine if there are modern habitats in the solar system beyond Earth where the conditions for life exist today and third, if life exists there now. ELF conducts three tests for life. The first test looks for a non-abiotic distribution of amino acids, the second determines whether the carbon number distribution in fatty acids or isoprenoids is biased toward a particular rule, and the third measures carbon and hydrogen isotopic ratios, together with the abundance of methane relative to other alkanes, to assess whether the values fall in the range for biological processes. The ELF mission spacecraft conducts ten science plume fly-throughs; the baseline science is completed in the first five plume passages.

  4. Eye safe short range standoff aerosol cloud finder.

    SciTech Connect

    Bambha, Ray P.; Schroder, Kevin L.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2005-02-01

    Because many solid objects, both stationary and mobile, will be present in an indoor environment, the design of an indoor aerosol cloud finding lidar (light detection and ranging) instrument presents a number of challenges. The cloud finder must be able to discriminate between these solid objects and aerosol clouds as small as 1-meter in depth in order to probe suspect clouds. While a near IR ({approx}1.5-{micro}m) laser is desirable for eye-safety, aerosol scattering cross sections are significantly lower in the near-IR than at visible or W wavelengths. The receiver must deal with a large dynamic range since the backscatter from solid object will be orders of magnitude larger than for aerosol clouds. Fast electronics with significant noise contributions will be required to obtain the necessary temporal resolution. We have developed a laboratory instrument to detect aerosol clouds in the presence of solid objects. In parallel, we have developed a lidar performance model for performing trade studies. Careful attention was paid to component details so that results obtained in this study could be applied towards the development of a practical instrument. The amplitude and temporal shape of the signal return are analyzed for discrimination of aerosol clouds in an indoor environment. We have assessed the feasibility and performance of candidate approaches for a fieldable instrument. With the near-IR PMT and a 1.5-{micro}m laser source providing 20-{micro}J pulses, we estimate a bio-aerosol detection limit of 3000 particles/l.

  5. The Integrated Cluster Finder for the ARCHES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, Alexey; Schwope, Axel; Rosen, Simon; Pineau, François-Xavier; Carrera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Context. Clusters of galaxies are important for cosmology and astrophysics. They may be discovered through either the summed optical/IR radiation originating from their member galaxies or via X-ray emission originating from the hot intracluster medium. X-ray samples are not affected by projection effects but a redshift determination typically needs optical and infrared follow-up to then infer X-ray temperatures and luminosities. Aims: We want to confirm serendipitously discovered X-ray emitting cluster candidates and measure their cosmological redshift through the analysis and exploration of multi-wavelength photometric catalogues. Methods: We developed a tool, the Integrated Cluster Finder (ICF), to search for clusters by determining overdensities of potential member galaxies in optical and infrared catalogues. Based on a spectroscopic meta-catalogue we calibrated colour-redshift relations that combine optical (SDSS) and IR data (UKIDSS, WISE). The tool is used to quantify the overdensity of galaxies against the background via a modified redMaPPer technique and to quantify the confidence of a cluster detection. Results: Cluster finding results are compared to reference catalogues found in the literature. The results agree to within 95-98%. The tool is used to confirm 488 out of 830 cluster candidates drawn from 3XMMe in the footprint of the SDSS and CFHT catalogues. Conclusions: The ICF is a flexible and highly efficient tool to search for galaxy clusters in multiple catalogues and is freely available to the community. It may be used to identify the cluster content in future X-ray catalogues from XMM-Newton and eventually from eROSITA.

  6. The Automated Planet Finder's automation & first two years of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jennifer; Laughlin, Greg; Vogt, Steven S.; Holden, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) is the newest facility at Lick Observatory, comprised of a 2.4m telescope coupled with the high-resolution Levy echelle spectrograph. Purpose built for exoplanet detection and characterization, 80% of the telescope's observing time is dedicated to these science goals. The APF has demonstrated 1 m/s radial velocity precision on bright, RV standard stars and performs with the same speed-on-sky as Keck/HIRES when observing M-dwarfs.The telesope is fully automated for RV operations, using a dynamic scheduler that makes informed decisions on which targets to observe based on scientific interest, desired cadence, required precision levels and current observing conditions, all on a minute-to-minute basis. This ensures that time is not wasted chasing non-optimal targets on nights with poor conditions and enables rapid changes to the overall science observing strategy.The APF has contributed to the detection of four planetary systems in its first two years of scientific operations. Our most recent detection is that of a 6-planet system around the bright (V=5.5), nearby (d=6.5pc), K3V star HD 219134. The planets in this system have masses ranging from 3.5 to108 MEarth, with orbital periods from 3 to 2247 days. An independent detection of the inner 4 planets in this system by the HARPS-N team has shown that the 3d planet transits the star, making this system ideal for follow-up observations.I will discuss the design and implementation of the APF's dynamic scheduler, the telescope's planet detections to date, overall performance results of the telescope and our future observing strategy.

  7. IC-Finder: inferring robustly the hierarchical organization of chromatin folding.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Noelle; Vaillant, Cédric; Jost, Daniel

    2017-01-26

    The spatial organization of the genome plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. Recent experimental techniques like Hi-C have emphasized the segmentation of genomes into interaction compartments that constitute conserved functional domains participating in the maintenance of a proper cell identity. Here, we propose a novel method, IC-Finder, to identify interaction compartments (IC) from experimental Hi-C maps. IC-Finder is based on a hierarchical clustering approach that we adapted to account for the polymeric nature of chromatin. Based on a benchmark of realistic in silico Hi-C maps, we show that IC-Finder is one of the best methods in terms of reliability and is the most efficient numerically. IC-Finder proposes two original options: a probabilistic description of the inferred compartments and the possibility to explore the various hierarchies of chromatin organization. Applying the method to experimental data in fly and human, we show how the predicted segmentation may depend on the normalization scheme and how 3D compartmentalization is tightly associated with epigenomic information. IC-Finder provides a robust and generic 'all-in-one' tool to uncover the general principles of 3D chromatin folding and their influence on gene regulation. The software is available at http://membres-timc.imag.fr/Daniel.Jost/DJ-TIMC/Software.html.

  8. Exhaustive Search for Over-represented DNA Sequence Motifs with CisFinder

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Ko, Minoru S.H.

    2009-01-01

    We present CisFinder software, which generates a comprehensive list of motifs enriched in a set of DNA sequences and describes them with position frequency matrices (PFMs). A new algorithm was designed to estimate PFMs directly from counts of n-mer words with and without gaps; then PFMs are extended over gaps and flanking regions and clustered to generate non-redundant sets of motifs. The algorithm successfully identified binding motifs for 12 transcription factors (TFs) in embryonic stem cells based on published chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data. Furthermore, CisFinder successfully identified alternative binding motifs of TFs (e.g. POU5F1, ESRRB, and CTCF) and motifs for known and unknown co-factors of genes associated with the pluripotent state of ES cells. CisFinder also showed robust performance in the identification of motifs that were only slightly enriched in a set of DNA sequences. PMID:19740934

  9. LISA and LISA PathFinder, the endeavour to detect low frequency GWs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, H.; Boatella, C.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; García-Berro, E.; Grimani, C.; Hajdas, W.; Lobo, A.; Martínez, Ll; Nofrarias, M.; Ortega, J. A.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuán, J.; Wass, P.; Xirgu, X.

    2007-05-01

    This is a review about LISA and its technology demonstrator, LISAPathFinder. We first describe the conceptual problems which need to be overcome in order to set up a working interferometric detector of low frequency Gravitational Waves (GW), then summarise the solutions to them as currently conceived by the LISA mission team. This will show that some of these solutions require new technological abilities which are still under development, and which need proper test before being fully implemented. LISAPathFinder (LPF) is the the testbed for such technologies. The final part of the paper will address the ideas and concepts behind the PathFinder as well as their impact on LISA.

  10. CT-Finder: A Web Service for CRISPR Optimal Target Prediction and Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Houxiang; Misel, Lauren; Graham, Mitchell; Robinson, Michael L.; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR system holds much promise for successful genome engineering, but therapeutic, industrial, and research applications will place high demand on improving the specificity and efficiency of this tool. CT-Finder (http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/ct-finder) is a web service to help users design guide RNAs (gRNAs) optimized for specificity. CT-Finder accommodates the original single-gRNA Cas9 system and two specificity-enhancing paired-gRNA systems: Cas9 D10A nickases (Cas9n) and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs). Optimal target candidates can be chosen based on the minimization of predicted off-target effects. Graphical visualization of on-target and off-target sites in the genome is provided for target validation. Major model organisms are covered by this web service. PMID:27210050

  11. Recent Improvements to the Finite-Fault Rupture Detector Algorithm: FinDer II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.; Boese, M.; Heaton, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the finite-fault rupture extent and azimuth is crucial for accurately estimating ground-motion in large earthquakes. Detecting and modeling finite-fault ruptures in real-time is thus essential to both earthquake early warning (EEW) and rapid emergency response. Following extensive real-time and offline testing, the finite-fault rupture detector algorithm, FinDer (Böse et al., 2012 & 2015), was successfully integrated into the California-wide ShakeAlert EEW demonstration system. Since April 2015, FinDer has been scanning real-time waveform data from approximately 420 strong-motion stations in California for peak ground acceleration (PGA) patterns indicative of earthquakes. FinDer analyzes strong-motion data by comparing spatial images of observed PGA with theoretical templates modeled from empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs). If the correlation between the observed and theoretical PGA is sufficiently high, a report is sent to ShakeAlert including the estimated centroid position, length, and strike, and their uncertainties, of an ongoing fault rupture. Rupture estimates are continuously updated as new data arrives. As part of a joint effort between USGS Menlo Park, ETH Zurich, and Caltech, we have rewritten FinDer in C++ to obtain a faster and more flexible implementation. One new feature of FinDer II is that multiple contour lines of high-frequency PGA are computed and correlated with templates, allowing the detection of both large earthquakes and much smaller (~ M3.5) events shortly after their nucleation. Unlike previous EEW algorithms, FinDer II thus provides a modeling approach for both small-magnitude point-source and larger-magnitude finite-fault ruptures with consistent error estimates for the entire event magnitude range.

  12. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders - from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-03-13

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrialautomation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passiverange finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive rangefinders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive rangefinders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chieflyconsist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. Theimplementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjustthe exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance oftriangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experimentswere conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From theexperimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active rangefinder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within themeasurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests onapplications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotivefield were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders arewell-suited for distance measurements in this field.

  13. GLS-Finder: An Automated Data-Mining System for Fast Profiling Glucosinolates and its Application in Brassica Vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid computer-aided program for profiling glucosinolates, “GLS-Finder", was developed. GLS-Finder is a Matlab script based expert system that is capable for qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of glucosinolates in samples using data generated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatograph...

  14. Unique criterion to estimate the performances of some laser diode range finders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, Bernard A.; Bazin, Gaelle; Durieu, Cecile

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general method to estimate the intrinsic performances of some laser range finders based on flight time measurement. Classically this flight time can be measured directly, or after a conversion into a phase shift, or into a beat frequency. We prose here a criterion based on signal processing notions, as matched filtering to get the best detection, and ambiguity function to estimate the quality of the detection. The concept of characteristic length is introduced and applied to the different kind of laser range finders, which suggest a new possibility for flight time measurement.

  15. Planet detection and spectroscopy in visible light with a single aperture telescope and a nulling coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Serabyn, Eugene; Levine, Bruce Martin; Beichman, Charles; Liu, Duncan; Martin, Stefan; Orton, Glen; Mennesson, Bertrand; Morgan, Rhonda; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Wallace, J. Kent; Unwin, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This talk describes a new concept for visible direct detection of Earth like extra solar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a 4m telescope in space. In the baseline design, a 4 beam nulling interferometer is synthesized from the telescope pupil, producing a very deep theta^4null which is then filtered by a coherent array of single mode fibers to suppress the residual scattered light. With perfect optics, the stellar leakage is less than 1e-11 of the starlight at the location of the planet. With diffraction limited telescope optics (lambda/20), suppression of the starlight to 1e-10 is possible. The concept is described along with the key advantages over more traditional approaches such as apodized aperture telescopes and Lyot type coronagraphs.

  16. High Contrast Internal and External Coronagraph Masks Produced by Various Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatha; Wilson, Daniel; White, Victor; Muller, Richard; Dickie, Matthew; Yee, Karl; Ruiz, Ronald; Shaklan, Stuart; Cady, Eric; Kern, Brian; Belikov, Ruslan; Guyon, Olivier; Kasdin, N. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Masks for high contrast internal and external coronagraphic imaging require a variety of masks depending on different architectures to suppress star light. Various fabrication technologies are required to address a wide range of needs including gradient amplitude transmission, tunable phase profiles, ultra-low reflectivity, precise small scale features, and low-chromaticity. We present the approaches employed at JPL to produce pupil plane and image plane coronagraph masks, and lab-scale external occulter type masks by various techniques including electron beam, ion beam, deep reactive ion etching, and black silicon technologies with illustrative examples of each. Further development is in progress to produce circular masks of various kinds for obscured aperture telescopes.

  17. Stochastic parallel gradient descent based adaptive optics used for a high contrast imaging coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bing; Ren, De-Qing; Zhang, Xi

    2011-08-01

    An adaptive optics (AO) system based on a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm is proposed to reduce the speckle noises in the optical system of a stellar coronagraph in order to further improve the contrast. The principle of the SPGD algorithm is described briefly and a metric suitable for point source imaging optimization is given. The feasibility and good performance of the SPGD algorithm is demonstrated by an experimental system featured with a 140-actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shark wavefront sensor. Then the SPGD based AO is applied to a liquid crystal array (LCA) based coronagraph to improve the contrast. The LCA can modulate the incoming light to generate a pupil apodization mask of any pattern. A circular stepped pattern is used in our preliminary experiment and the image contrast shows improvement from 10-3 to 10-4.5 at an angular distance of 2λ/D after being corrected by SPGD based AO.

  18. Optimized focal and pupil plane masks for vortex coronagraphs on telescopes with obstructed apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.; Absil, Olivier; Huby, Elsa; Mawet, Dimitri; Delacroix, Christian; Carlomagno, Brunella; Piron, Pierre; Swartzlander, Grover A.

    2015-09-01

    We present methods for optimizing pupil and focal plane optical elements that improve the performance of vortex coronagraphs on telescopes with obstructed or segmented apertures. Phase-only and complex masks are designed for the entrance pupil, focal plane, and the plane of the Lyot stop. Optimal masks are obtained using both analytical and numerical methods. The latter makes use of an iterative error reduction algorithm to calculate "correcting" optics that mitigate unwanted diffraction from aperture obstructions. We analyze the achieved performance in terms of starlight suppression, contrast, off-axis image quality, and chromatic dependence. Manufacturing considerations and sensitivity to aberrations are also discussed. This work provides a path to joint optimization of multiple coronagraph planes to maximize sensitivity to exoplanets and other faint companions.

  19. Development and characterization of Four-Quadrant Phase Mask coronagraph (FQPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonafous, M.; Galicher, R.; Baudoz, P.; Firminy, J.; Boussaha, F.

    2016-07-01

    The goal of a coronagraph is to reduce the flux of a bright object (e.g. a star) in order to distinguish its faint neighborhood (e.g. exoplanets and disks). In this context, we proposed one coronagraph that uses a four quadrant phase mask (FQPM). Since 2000, we fabricated several monochromatic FQPM working in visible and near-infrared light at the Paris Observatory. We have developed systematic procedures for fabrication and characterization of the phase masks. Visual inspections with an optical microscope are performed for every component and a coronagraphic performance measurement based on inclination of the component is done on a dedicated bench that is set up in a clean room. This procedure gives a quick feedback on the quality and performance of the component. Depending on the results, images of the central transition can be recorded with an electron microscope to understand the limitations of the fabrication process. This procedure allowed us to understand the influence of various parameters such as the width of the transitions between the quadrants, the alignment of the transitions or the step depth. Based on these results, we modified the mask design and the fabrication process to improve our success rate to nearly 100% when building a FQPM for any given optimal wavelength in visible or near-infrared. Moreover, we improved the performance of the components, reaching attenuations of more than 20,000 on the central peak in raw images for most coronagraphs. The best of these components are now used on the THD bench, an optical/NIR bench developed for the study of high contrast imaging techniques, reaching 10-8 contrast level routinely.

  20. Laboratory demonstration of a mid-infrared AGPM vector vortex coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacroix, C.; Absil, O.; Forsberg, P.; Mawet, D.; Christiaens, V.; Karlsson, M.; Boccaletti, A.; Baudoz, P.; Kuittinen, M.; Vartiainen, I.; Surdej, J.; Habraken, S.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Coronagraphy is a powerful technique to achieve high contrast imaging, hence to image faint companions around bright targets. Various concepts have been used in the visible and near-infrared regimes, while coronagraphic applications in the mid-infrared nowadays remain largely unexplored. Vector vortex phase masks based on concentric subwavelength gratings show great promise for such applications. Aims: We aim at producing and validating the first high-performance broadband focal plane phase mask coronagraphs for applications in the mid-infrared regime, and in particular the L band with a fractional bandwidth of ~16% (3.5-4.1 μm). Methods: Based on rigorous coupled wave analysis, we designed an annular groove phase mask (AGPM) producing a vortex effect in the L band, and etched it onto a series of diamond substrates. The grating parameters were measured by means of scanning electron microscopy. The resulting components were then tested on a mid-infrared coronagraphic test bench. Results: A broadband raw null depth of 2 × 10-3 was obtained for our best L-band AGPM after only a few iterations between design and manufacturing. This corresponds to a raw contrast of about 6 × 10-5 (10.5 mag) at 2λ/D. This result is fully in line with our projections based on rigorous coupled wave analysis modelling, using the measured grating parameters. The sensitivity to tilt and focus has also been evaluated. Conclusions: After years of technological developments, mid-infrared vector vortex coronagraphs have finally become a reality and live up to our expectations. Based on their measured performance, our L-band AGPMs are now ready to open a new parameter space in exoplanet imaging at major ground-based observatories.

  1. Calibrating IR optical densities for the Gemini Planet Imager extreme adaptive optics coronagraph apodizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Carr, G. Lawrence; Dorrer, Christophe; Bolognesi, Allen; Zimmerman, Neil; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Roberts, Robin; Greenbaum, Alexandra

    2009-08-01

    High contrast imaging sometimes uses apodized masks in coronagraphs to suppress diffracted starlight from a bright source in order to observe its environs. Continuously graded opacity material and metallic half-tone dots are two possible apodizers fabrication techniques. In the latter approach if dot sizes are comparable to the wavelength of the light, surface plasmon effects can complicate the optical density (OD) vs. superficial dot density relation. OD can also be a complicated function of wavelength. We measured half-tone microdot screens' and continuous materials' transmissions. Our set-up replicated the f/ 64 optical configuration of the Gemini Planet Imager's Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph pupil plane, where we plan to place our pupil plane masks. Our half-tone samples were fabricated with 2, 5, and 10 micron dot sizes, our continuous greyscale was High Energy Electron Beam Sensitive (HEBS) glass (Canyon Materials Inc.). We present optical density (OD) vs. wavelength curves for our half-tone and continuous greyscale samples 1.1 - 2.5 μm wavelength range. Direct measurements of the beam intensity in the far field using a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrograph on Beamline U4IR at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) provided transmission spectra of test patches and apodizers. We report the on-axis IR transmission spectra through screens composed of metallic dots that are comparable in size with the wavelength of the light used, over a range of optical densities. We also measured departures from simple theory describing the array of satellite spots created by thin periodic grids in the pupil of the system. Such spots are used for photometry and astrometry in coronagraphic situations. Our results pertain to both ground and space based coronagraphs that use spatially variable attenuation, typically in focal plane or pupil plane masks.

  2. Design of a mirror pointing and occulting mechanism for the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highman, Clifton O.; Woolaway, Scott M.; Belmont, Kenneth L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mirror and Occulter Mechanism (MOM), a lightweight stable optical assembly which is a critical component to the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer to be flown on the European SOHO spacecraft, is discussed. The MOM combines the functions of precision mirror pointing and occultation of stray light into a single package. The mirror mechanism and occulter mechanism designs are described and development testing and life testing activities are discussed.

  3. Flight System Implementation of the Pupil-Mapping Exoplanet Coronagraphic Observer (PECO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerelli, Domenick; PECO Team

    2009-01-01

    The 3-year Pupil Mapping Exoplanet Coronagraphic Observer (PECO) mission concept is a 1.4-m coronagraphic telescope aimed at directly imaging the habitable zones of nearby stars at optical wavelengths. PECO detects and characterizes planets down to Earth size and maps dust clouds to a fraction of our zodiacal cloud dust brightness. It uses a low CTE substrate 1.4 m diameter off-axis narrow field telescope in an Earth drift-away achieving its goals using a Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph combining high contrast, high throughput, low inner working angle and full angular resolution. Telescope heritage is TDM and NextView. It incorporates quality optics and coatings and operates in the visible (400-900 mm) region. The secondary mirror has a linear focus actuator. The structure is thermally and vibrationally stable. PIAA's highly aspheric optics apodize the telescope's beam without losing light. PECO also includes a high accuracy wavefront control system. Pointing is controlled at the sub-milliarcsecond level using starlight in the coronagraph. Each of the spectral channels is designed to be very compact and stable, with a small beam size to maintain high wavefront quality. The PIAA design is fine-tuned in each channel ensuring minimal inner working angle. The SC structure is a modular design built of dimensionally stable composite material with 6 bays. We are considering the Disturbance Free Payload (DFP) which eliminates vibration coupling between the SC reaction wheels and the optical system payload. The SC pointing control system (PCS) provides 1 mas at the focal plane with a 1 Hz pointing correction bandwidth and payload provided accurate control signal from a bright star image. Propulsion employs a Spitzer-heritage redundant cold gas system using nitrogen propellant sized for 5 years. SC I&T uses the existing LM LOTIS facility to demonstrate required light contrast under Thermal Vacuum conditions.

  4. PIAA Coronagraph Development at NASA Ames: High Contrast Laboratory Demonstration at 2 l/D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Ruslan; Pluzhnik, E.; Witteborn, F. C.; Lynch, D. H.; Greene, T. P.; Zell, P. T.; Balasubramanian, K.; Guyon, O.

    2011-01-01

    Coronagraph technology is advancing and promises to directly image and spectrally characterize extrasolar Earth-like planets in the foreseeable future (such as the 2020 decade) with a telescope as small as 1.5m. A small Explorer-sized telescope can also be launched in the 2010 decade capable of seeing debris disks as small as 10s of zodis and potentially a few large planets. The Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph makes such aggressive performance possible. We report on the latest results from a testbed at NASA Ames that is focused on developing and testing the PIAA coronagraph. This laboratory facility was built in 2008 and is designed to be flexible, operated in an actively thermally stabilized air environment, and to complement collaborative efforts at NASA JPL's High Contrast Imaging Testbed. For our wavefront control we are using small Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System deformable mirrors (MEMS DMs), which promise to reduce the size of the beam and overall instrument, a consideration that becomes very important for small telescopes. We describe our lab efforts and results, which include: the operation of our new active thermal control system; the demonstration of 5.4x10-8 (at time of this writing) average raw contrast in a dark zone from 2.0 - 5.2 λ/D in monochromatic light with a refractive PIAA system; preliminary results with an innovative low-cost set of reflective PIAA from JPL; preliminary results with a set of next-generation reflective PIAA built by Tinsley and designed to have the best theoretical broadband performance so far; and finally, an innovative design for a chromatically compensated focal plane occulter that promises to enhance broadband performance by matching the wavelength-dependent inner working angle of coronagraphs such as PIAA.

  5. Coronagraphic methods for detecting faint astronomical objects near bright ones: Application to the 2.5-m telescope of Sternberg Astronomical Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Bugaenko, O. I.; Kim, I. S.; Popov, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    Possible methods for reducing the instrumental background of astronomical telescopes are discussed: the classical Lyot coronagraphic method, the multi-cascade coronagraphic method, the use of special masks in the plane of the entrance aperture, and the use of super-smooth and medium-smooth primary optics. For the first time, analytical expressions describing the intensity distribution at the exit pupil are presented for the case when a mask is placed in the primary focal plane in order to block the light from a bright object. An algorithm for computing the point-spread function (PSF) of a coronagraphic telescope employing super-smooth primary optics and the coronagraphic method is proposed. Computed PSFs for the 2.5-m telescope of the Caucasian Mountain Observatory of Sternberg Astronomical Institute are presented, without allowance for diffusive and turbulent scattering in the Earth's atmosphere, and for operation both without coronagraphic elements and in the coronagraphic mode of the telescope.

  6. Coronagraphic wavefront sensing with COFFEE: high spatial-frequency diversity and other news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnier, L. M.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Herscovici-Schiller, O.; Baudoz, P.; Galicher, R.; Le Duigou, J.-M.

    2016-07-01

    The final performance of current and future instruments dedicated to exoplanet detection and characterization is limited by intensity residuals in the scientific image plane, which originate in uncorrected optical aberrations. In order to reach very high contrasts, these aberrations needs to be compensated for. We have proposed a focalplane wave-font sensor called COFFEE (for COronagraphic Focal-plane wave-Front Estimation for Exoplanet detection), which consists in an extension of conventional phase diversity to a coronagraphic system. In this communication, we study the extension of COFFEE to the joint estimation of the phase and the amplitude in the context of space-based coronagraphic instruments: we optimize the diversity phase in order to minimize the reconstruction error; we also propose and optimize a novel low-amplitude high-frequency diversity that should allow the phase-diverse images to still be used for science. Lastly, we perform a first experimental validation of COFFEE in the very high, space-like contrast conditions of the THD bench and show that COFFEE is able to distinguish between phase and amplitude aberrations.

  7. Optical Vectorial Vortex Coronagraphs using Liquid Crystal Polymers: theory, manufacturing and laboratory demonstration.

    PubMed

    Mawet, D; Serabyn, E; Liewer, K; Hanot, Ch; McEldowney, S; Shemo, D; O'Brien, N

    2009-02-02

    In this paper, after briefly reviewing the theory of vectorial vortices, we describe our technological approach to generating the necessary phase helix, and report results obtained with the first optical vectorial vortex coronagraph (OVVC) in the laboratory. To implement the geometrical phase ramp, we make use of Liquid Crystal Polymers (LCP), which we believe to be the most efficient technological path to quickly synthesize optical vectorial vortices of virtually any topological charge. With the first prototype device of topological charge 2, a maximum peak-to-peak attenuation of 1.4x10(-2) and a residual light level of 3x10(-5) at an angular separation of 3.5 lambda/d (at which point our current noise floor is reached) have been obtained at a wavelength of 1.55 microm. These results demonstrate the validity of using space-variant birefringence distributions to generate a new family of coronagraphs usable in natural unpolarized light, opening a path to high performance coronagraphs that are achromatic and have low-sensitivity to low-order wavefront aberrations.

  8. AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND TRACKING OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. MULTISCALE FILTERING OF CORONAGRAPH IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Jason P.; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia R.; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2012-06-20

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), and future coronagraph missions also makes manual cataloging of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloging packages such as CACTus, SEEDS, and ARTEMIS. Here, we present the development of a new CORIMP (coronal image processing) CME detection and tracking technique that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogs. It works by first employing the dynamic CME separation technique outlined in a companion paper, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane of sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. The algorithms described in this article are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI data sets, and a catalog of results will soon be available to the public.

  9. Automatic Detection and Tracking of Coronal Mass Ejections. II. Multiscale Filtering of Coronagraph Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason P.; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia R.; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2012-06-01

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), and future coronagraph missions also makes manual cataloging of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloging packages such as CACTus, SEEDS, and ARTEMIS. Here, we present the development of a new CORIMP (coronal image processing) CME detection and tracking technique that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogs. It works by first employing the dynamic CME separation technique outlined in a companion paper, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane of sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. The algorithms described in this article are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI data sets, and a catalog of results will soon be available to the public.

  10. Color Differential Astrometry: a proposed observing mode for the SPICA Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Lyu; Vannier, Martin; Petrov, Romain; Enya, Keigo; Kataza, Hirokazu

    The SPICA coronagraph will be dedicated to detecting and observing extra-solar planets. How-ever, the limited angular resolution of SPICA in the Near/Mid Infrared (0.2 arcsec at 3.5 mi-cron) will prevent the study of very close-in planets, closer than a few A.U. from their parent star. We propose to implement Color Differential Astrometry (originally proposed by Petrov), a complementary observing mode for the coronagraph. It is a spectro-astrometric method which would push the detection range to very close-in planets and up to a few AUs, thus nicely com-plementing the imaging coronagraph. We describe the CDA method and show that it could directly recover the planet orbital elements and low resolution spectrum. The analysis of the fundamental contributions to the SNR (source and background noise, detector noise) give a substantial range of application to the technique provided that certain characteristics of instru-ment stability or calibration methods are met. These instrumental requirements for CDA are then discussed in detail, and we lastly present the current status of a laboratory demonstration of the CDA method.

  11. Subaru Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Images of LkHalpha 234

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Eri; Fukagawa, Misato; Shibai, Hiroshi; Ito, Yusuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2009-08-05

    We present high-resolution (0''.2) near-infrared images of the Herbig Ae/Be star LkHalpha 234 taken with the stellar coronagraphic camera CIAO (Coronagraphic Imager with Adaptive Optics) on the Subaru Telescope. We have observed LkHalpha 234, located in the NGC 7129 star formation region at 1.25 kpc, using the adaptive optics and the coronagraph. Near-infrared (J, H, K, L' and M' bands) images obtained reveal detailed circumstellar structures around LkHalpha 234. Six young stellar object (YSO) candidates are detected at 2''-10'' from LkHalpha 234, and four out of six candidates are identified for the first time. Our high-resolution imaging reveals the complex morphology of the reflection nebula which is located at approximately 3'' from LkHalpha 234 and extended more than 10'' toward the west. The newly found object in H and K bands may be the source of the reflection nebula.

  12. Optimal Jet Finder (v1.0 C++)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, S.; Jankowski, E.; Tkachov, F. V.

    2006-10-01

    We describe a C++ implementation of the Optimal Jet Definition for identification of jets in hadronic final states of particle collisions. We explain interface subroutines and provide a usage example. The source code is available from http://www.inr.ac.ru/~ftkachov/projects/jets/. Program summaryTitle of program: Optimal Jet Finder (v1.0 C++) Catalogue identifier: ADSB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSB_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: any computer with a standard C++ compiler Tested with:GNU gcc 3.4.2, Linux Fedora Core 3, Intel i686; Forte Developer 7 C++ 5.4, SunOS 5.9, UltraSPARC III+; Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit 2003 (compiler 13.10.3077, linker 7.10.30777, option /EHsc), Windows XP, Intel i686. Programming language used: C++ Memory required:˜1 MB (or more, depending on the settings) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3047 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 884 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: Analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collision experiments often involves identification of hadronic jets. A large number of hadrons detected in the calorimeter is reduced to a few jets by means of a jet finding algorithm. The jets are used in further analysis which would be difficult or impossible when applied directly to the hadrons. Grigoriev et al. [D.Yu. Grigoriev, E. Jankowski, F.V. Tkachov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 061801] provide brief introduction to the subject of jet finding algorithms and a general review of the physics of jets can be found in [R. Barlow, Rep. Prog. Phys. 36 (1993) 1067]. Method of solution: The software we provide is an implementation of the so-called Optimal Jet Definition (OJD). The theory of OJD was developed in [F.V. Tkachov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 2405; Erratum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74 (1995) 2618; F.V. Tkachov, Int. J. Modern Phys

  13. High-order myopic coronagraphic phase diversity (COFFEE) for wave-front control in high-contrast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Paul, B; Mugnier, L M; Sauvage, J-F; Dohlen, K; Ferrari, M

    2013-12-30

    The estimation and compensation of quasi-static aberrations is mandatory to reach the ultimate performance of high-contrast imaging systems. COFFEE is a focal plane wave-front sensing method that consists in the extension of phase diversity to high-contrast imaging systems. Based on a Bayesian approach, it estimates the quasi-static aberrations from two focal plane images recorded from the scientific camera itself. In this paper, we present COFFEE's extension which allows an estimation of low and high order aberrations with nanometric precision for any coronagraphic device. The performance is evaluated by realistic simulations, performed in the SPHERE instrument framework. We develop a myopic estimation that allows us to take into account an imperfect knowledge on the used diversity phase. Lastly, we evaluate COFFEE's performance in a compensation process, to optimize the contrast on the detector, and show it allows one to reach the 10(-6) contrast required by SPHERE at a few resolution elements from the star. Notably, we present a non-linear energy minimization method which can be used to reach very high contrast levels (better than 10(7) in a SPHERE-like context).

  14. Test of the principle of operation of a wideband magnetic direction finder for lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrman, B. D.; Uman, M. A.; Brantley, R. D.; Krider, E. P.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of operation of a wideband crossed-loop magnetic-field direction finder is studied by comparing the bearing determined from the NS and EW magnetic fields at various times up to 155 microsec after return stroke initiation with the TV-determined lightning channel base direction. For 40 lightning strokes in the 3 to 12 km range, the difference between the bearings found from magnetic fields sampled at times between 1 and 10 microsec and the TV channel-base data has a standard deviation of 3-4 deg. Included in this standard deviation is a 2-3 deg measurement error. For fields sampled at progressively later times, both the mean and the standard deviation of the difference between the direction-finder bearing and the TV bearing increase. Near 150 microsec, means are about 35 deg and standard deviations about 60 deg. The physical reasons for the late-time inaccuracies in the wideband direction finder and the occurrence of these effects in narrow-band VLF direction finders are considered.

  15. 75 FR 25864 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Lost People Finder System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... information (e.g., the Google Person Finder system that was deployed during the 2010 earthquakes in Haiti.... Using the 2010 earthquake in Haiti as a model, we estimate that some 500 emergency responders might use... earthquake (which contained information on 55,000 people as of April 2010, most of whom were missing...

  16. Subtle.Nets.Finder: finely tuned interaction networks in DNA/RNA/protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2017-03-01

    Graphical Abstract Subtle.Nets.Finder is a workflow of algorithms for identification of subtly interacting groups in DNA/RNA/protein complexes. It is founded on detailed and sophisticated evaluation of the self-consistency in the cooperative network of residue interactions via a combination of advanced calculations (fast multipole method and statistical mechanics) supplemented with graph-theoretical procedures.

  17. General Astrophysics and Comparative Planetology with the Terrestrial Planet Finder Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc J. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) for general astrophysics beyond its base mission, focusing on science obtainable with no or minimal modifications to the mission design, but also exploring possible modifications of TPF with high scientific merit and no impact on the basic search for extrasolar Earth analogs.

  18. The Relationship between Kolb's Learning Styles and StrengthsFinder's Talent Themes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Adonna B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if there were relationships between college students' talent themes as defined by the Clifton StrengthsFinder(TM) Instrument and their learning style as defined by Kolb Learning Styles Inventory. Logistical regression methodology was utilized to assess the relationship between learning styles and talent…

  19. Precise pulsed time-of-flight laser range finder for industrial distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpelä, Ari; Pennala, Riku; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2001-04-01

    A pulsed time-of-flight laser range finder with a 1 GHz avalanche photo diode (APD) receiver and a laser pulser with ˜35 ps pulse width has been developed and tested. The receiver channel is constructed using a silicon ASIC chip and a commercially available silicon APD placed on a hybrid ceramic susbstrate. The laser pulser utilizes a single heterostructure laser operating in Q-switching mode. It is shown that the single-shot precision of the complete laser range finder is ˜2.1 mm (σ value) at best. The nonaccuracy in the distance range of 0.5-34.5 m was ˜±2 mm excluding errors caused by the statistical variations and long-term instability. The single-shot precision is clearly better than the single-shot precision of the earlier laser range finders with ˜100-200 MHz bandwidths. Also, two types of optics, coaxial and paraxial, were tested. The linearity of the coaxial optics was better, especially with a long (4 m) receiver fiber. Some possible applications of the laser range finder utilizing ps level pulses are, for example, fast three-dimensional vision in industrial environments and structure analysis of materials.

  20. Teenage Pregnancy: An Intensive and Critical Problem in Search of a Solution. Student Fact Finder Leaflet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover-Smith, Alma

    This document presents materials from a course designed to teach adolescents about teenage pregnancy and parenting. The materials are organized into nine modules, each of which contains instructions on how to use the module; a pre- and post-test on the information presented in the module; a fact finder leaflet of information; and relevant…

  1. Microlithography and resist technology information at your fingertips via SciFinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konuk, Rengin; Macko, John R.; Staggenborg, Lisa

    1997-07-01

    Finding and retrieving the information you need about microlithography and resist technology in a timely fashion can make or break your competitive edge in today's business environment. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) provides the most complete and comprehensive database of the chemical literature in the CAplus, REGISTRY, and CASREACT files including 13 million document references, 15 million substance records and over 1.2 million reactions. This includes comprehensive coverage of positive and negative resist formulations and processing, photoacid generation, silylation, single and multilayer resist systems, photomasks, dry and wet etching, photolithography, electron-beam, ion-beam and x-ray lithography technologies and process control, optical tools, exposure systems, radiation sources and steppers. Journal articles, conference proceedings and patents related to microlithography and resist technology are analyzed and indexed by scientific information analysts with strong technical background in these areas. The full CAS database, which is updated weekly with new information, is now available at your desktop, via a convenient, user-friendly tool called 'SciFinder.' Author, subject and chemical substance searching is simplified by SciFinder's smart search features. Chemical substances can be searched by chemical structure, chemical name, CAS registry number or molecular formula. Drawing chemical structures in SciFinder is easy and does not require compliance with CA conventions. Built-in intelligence of SciFinder enables users to retrieve substances with multiple components, tautomeric forms and salts.

  2. Threshold raw retrieved contrast in coronagraphs is limited by internal polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckinridge, James

    The objective of this work is to provide the exoplanet program with an accurate model of the coronagraph complex point spread function, methods to correct chromatic aberration in the presence of polarization aberrations, device requirements to minimize and compensate for these aberrations at levels needed for exoplanet coronagraphy, and exoplanet retrieval algorithms in the presence of polarizaiton aberrations. Currently, space based coronagraphs are designed and performance analyzed using scalar wave aberration theory. Breckinridge, Lam & Chipman (2015) PASP 127: 445-468 and Breckinridge & Oppenheimer (2004) ApJ 600: 1091-1098 showed that astronomical telescopes designed for exoplanet and precision astrometric science require polarization or vector-wave analysis. Internal instrument polarization limits both threshold raw contrast and measurements of the vector wave properties of the electromagnetic radiation from stars, exoplanets, gas and dust. The threshold raw contrast obtained using only scalar wave theory is much more optimistic than that obtained using the more hardware-realistic vector wave theory. Internal polarization reduces system contrast, increases scattered light, alters radiometric measurements, distorts diffraction-limited star images and reduces signal-to-noise ratio. For example, a vector-wave analysis shows that the WFIRST-CGI instrument will have a threshold raw contrast of 10-7 not the 10-8 forecasted using the scalar wave analysis given in the WFIRST-CGI 2015 report. The physical nature of the complex point spread function determines the exoplanet scientific yield of coronagraphs. We propose to use the Polaris-M polarization aberration ray-tracing software developed at the College of Optical Science of the University of Arizona to ray trace both a "typical" exoplanet coronagraph system as well as the WFIRST-CGI system. Threshold raw contrast and the field across the complex PSF will be calculated as a function of optical device vector E

  3. Lead Finder docking and virtual screening evaluation with Astex and DUD test sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Fedor N.; Stroylov, Viktor S.; Zeifman, Alexey A.; Stroganov, Oleg V.; Kulkov, Val; Chilov, Ghermes G.

    2012-06-01

    Lead Finder is a molecular docking software. Sampling uses an original implementation of the genetic algorithm that involves a number of additional optimization procedures. Lead Finder's scoring functions employ a set of semi-empiric molecular mechanics functionals that have been parameterized independently for docking, binding energy predictions and rank-ordering for virtual screening. Sampling and scoring both utilize a staged approach, moving from fast but less accurate algorithm versions to computationally more intensive but more accurate versions. Lead Finder includes tools for the preparation of full atom protein and ligand models. In this exercise, Lead Finder achieved 72.9% docking success rate on the Astex test set when the original author-prepared full atom models were used, and 74.1% success rate when the structures were prepared by Lead Finder. The major cause of docking failures were scoring errors resulting from the use of imperfect solvation models. In many cases, docking errors could be corrected by the proper protonation and the use of correct cyclic conformations of ligands. In virtual screening experiments on the DUD test set the early enrichment factor of several tens was achieved on average. However, the area under the ROC curve ("AUC ROC") ranged from 0.70 to 0.74 depending on the screening protocol used, and the separation from the null model was not perfect—0.12-0.15 units of AUC ROC. We assume that effective virtual screening in the whole range of enrichment curve and not just at the early enrichment stages requires more accurate solvation modeling and accounting for the protein backbone flexibility.

  4. Applications of the Integrated High-Performance CMOS Image Sensor to Range Finders — from Optical Triangulation to the Automotive Field

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jih-Huah; Pen, Cheng-Chung; Jiang, Joe-Air

    2008-01-01

    With their significant features, the applications of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors covers a very extensive range, from industrial automation to traffic applications such as aiming systems, blind guidance, active/passive range finders, etc. In this paper CMOS image sensor-based active and passive range finders are presented. The measurement scheme of the proposed active/passive range finders is based on a simple triangulation method. The designed range finders chiefly consist of a CMOS image sensor and some light sources such as lasers or LEDs. The implementation cost of our range finders is quite low. Image processing software to adjust the exposure time (ET) of the CMOS image sensor to enhance the performance of triangulation-based range finders was also developed. An extensive series of experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the designed range finders. From the experimental results, the distance measurement resolutions achieved by the active range finder and the passive range finder can be better than 0.6% and 0.25% within the measurement ranges of 1 to 8 m and 5 to 45 m, respectively. Feasibility tests on applications of the developed CMOS image sensor-based range finders to the automotive field were also conducted. The experimental results demonstrated that our range finders are well-suited for distance measurements in this field. PMID:27879789

  5. Solar wind research with the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) experiment onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    The ESA-NASA satellite, to be launched in October 1995, carries three nested coronagraphs, which will image the solar corona from 1.1 R(solar mass) to 30 R(solar mass). Super polished mirrors have been developed for the design of a mirror Lyot coronagraph which has a straylight level comparable with the coronal intensity from 1.1 R, to 30 R(solar mass) Coronal details can be imaged with a spatial resolution of 6 arc seconds. A Fabry Perot interferometer with a spectral resolution of 0.7 A at the wavelength of the green coronal emission line will allow the simultaneous construction of spectra over the entire field of view of 10(exp 6) pixels. The middle coronagraph (1.5 R(solar mass) - 6 R(solar mass)) and the outer coronagraph (3 R(solar mass) - 30 R(solar mass)) are externally occulted lens Lyot coronagraphs. Their straylight level 10(exp -11) B(solar mass) and 10(exp -12) B(solar mass) respectively is an order of magnitude smaller than the intensity of the corona. The sensitivity of LASCO to distinguish between different solar wind acceleration mechanisms will be discussed as well as its ability to discern different CME models.

  6. Stop-less Lyot coronagraph for exoplanet characterization: design, manufacturing, and tests of the apodizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; N'Diaye, M.; Dohlen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Upcoming high-contrast imagers will all provide spectroscopic capabilities for the characterization of directly detected giant planets in wide orbits. While integral field spectroscopy (IFS) can provide both spatial and spectral information, it is usually limited in terms of field of view and resolution. The alternative is to use long slit spectroscopy coupled with coronagraphy (LSC), which can easily provide higher resolution and larger field of view. The SPHERE instrument for the VLT provides a LSC mode in its near-infrared imager and spectrograph, IRDIS. However, the fact that the occulting coronagraphic mask is merged in the focal plane with the slit reduces significantly its capacity to attenuate the diffraction, limiting the high-contrast capabilities of the instrument at close angular separations (0.3"-0.4"). To improve the diffraction suppression of the LSC in IRDIS, we recently proposed to use the stop-less Lyot coronagraph (SLLC) to build an apodized long slit coronagraph (ALSC), and we demonstrated that it improves notably the performance at small angular separation, allowing the spectral analysis of colder planets. The design of the SLLC apodizer has been optimized for an implementation in SPHERE/IRDIS, and it has recently been manufactured before being inserted into the instrument during reintegration of SPHERE in Paranal. In the current work, we present the final design of the SLLC apodizer, its specifications for the manufacturing step, and the first results obtained on SPHERE. We compare the results between the simple LSC and the new ALSC, and we draw the conclusions on the advantages and drawbacks of our design.

  7. High-Contrast Imaging and Wavefront Control with a PIAA Coronagraph: Laboratory System Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Olivier; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Martinache, Frantz; Totems, Julien; Tanaka, Shinichiro; Matsuo, Taro; Blain, Celia; Belikov, Ruslan

    2010-01-01

    The Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph is a high-performance coronagraph concept able to work at small angular separation with little loss in throughput. We present results obtained with a laboratory PIAA system including active wavefront control. The system has a 94.3% throughput (excluding coating losses) and operates in air with monochromatic light. Our testbed achieved a 2.27 × 10-7 raw contrast between 1.65λ/D (inner working angle of the coronagraph configuration tested) and 4.4λ/D (outer working angle). Through careful calibration, we were able to separate this residual light into a dynamic coherent component (turbulence, vibrations) at 4.5 × 10-8 contrast and a static incoherent component (ghosts and/or polarization mismatch) at 1.6 × 10-7 contrast. Pointing errors are controlled at the 10-3λ/D level using a dedicated low-order wavefront sensor. While not sufficient for direct imaging of Earthlike planets from space, the 2.27 × 10-7 raw contrast achieved already exceeds requirements for a ground-based extreme adaptive optics system aimed at direct detection of more massive exoplanets. We show that over a 4 hr period, averaged wavefront errors have been controlled to the 3.5 × 10-9 contrast level. This result is particularly encouraging for ground-based extreme-AO systems relying on long-term stability and absence of static wavefront errors to recover planets much fainter than the fast boiling speckle halo.

  8. In-orbit determination of the straylight in the SOHO/LASCO-C2 coronagraph and its temporal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llebaria, A.; Loirat, J.; Lamy, P.

    2012-09-01

    The LASCO-C2 coronagraph aboard SOHO (the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory) is continuously observing the solar corona since early 1996. The instrument as well as the experimental context underwent during this period many changes and observational constraints. The consequences for the in-orbit calibration procedures are illustrated with the systematic measure of the coronagraph straylight. Disentangle the coronal signal and the straylight is the crucial point. The separation and monitoring of the straylight component rely on the daily sets of polarized observations of the corona and a minimal set of assumptions about the symmetry of the F-corona (the dust component of the solar corona). Four main changes have been detected since 1996. Specific recommendations for the in-orbit calibration of future spatial coronagraphs will be presented.

  9. Phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph mask fabrication, characterization, and modeling for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Wilson, Daniel; Muller, Richard; Sidick, Erkin; Balasubramanian, Bala; Krist, John; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and modeling of a second-generation occulting mask for a phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph, designed for use on the WFIRST-AFTA mission. The mask has many small features (˜micron lateral scales) and was fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Microdevices Laboratory, then characterized using a scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and optical interferometric microscope. The measured fabrication errors were then fed to a wavefront control model which predicts the contrast performance of a full coronagraph. The expected coronagraphic performance using this mask is consistent with observing ˜15 planetary targets with WFIRST-AFTA in a reasonable time (<1 day/target).

  10. An Off-Axis Four-Quadrant Phase Mask (FQPM) Coronagraph for Palomar: High-Contrast Near Bright Stars Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haguenauer, Pierre; Serabyn, Eugene; Bloemhof, Eric E.; Troy, Mitchell; Wallace, James K.; Koresko, Chris D.; Mennesson, Bertrand

    2005-01-01

    Direct detection of planets around nearby stars requires the development of high-contrast imaging techniques because of the high difference between their respective fluxes. This led us to test a new coronagraphic approach based on the use of phase mask instead of dark occulting ones. Combined with high-level wavefront correction on an unobscured off-axis section of a large telescope, this method allows imaging very close to the star. Calculations indicate that for a given ground-based on-axis telescope, use of such an off-axis coronagraph provides a near-neighbor detection capability superior to that of a traditional coronagraph utilizing the full telescope aperture. Setting up a laboratory experiment working in near infrared allowed us to demonstrate the principle of the method, and a rejection of 2000:1 has already been achieved.

  11. Coronagraphic technique to infer the nature of the Skylab particulate environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerman, D. W.; Beeson, D. E.; Giovane, F.

    1977-01-01

    Photographs taken with the High Altitude Observatory's White Light Coronagraph (Skylab experiment S052) are shown to contain information on the sizes and velocities of contaminant particulates around Skylab. Sizes as small as 5 micron (radius) are derived for particles as far away as 200 m from the spacecraft. The random error in the size derivation is about 30%, and no particle larger than 120 micron was observed. Transverse velocities are determined to within 0.08 m/sec and radial velocities to within 9 m/sec. The S052 data bank contains about 3500 contaminated frames from which the nature of the Skylab environment can be inferred.

  12. Moisture effects and control for the UVCS composite structure. [Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrograph (UVCS) is an optical instrument to be flown on the European spacecraft Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) to the sun-earth L1 point. The stability requirements of the instrument require the moisture content of the pseudoisotropic composite material not to exceed 0.06 percent during alignment and calibration. This paper describes the steps necessary to meet this requirement. These steps include a dynamic moisture content analysis, selection of bake out conditions and moisture controls, verification sampling, and use of witness specimens to monitor the moisture content during the prelaunch life of the structure.

  13. The High Altitude Observatory Coronagraph/Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macqueen, R. M.; Csoeke-Poeckh, A.; Hildner, E.; House, L.; Reynolds, R.; Stanger, A.; Tepoel, H.; Wagner, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines the High Altitude Observatory Coronagraph/Polarimeter designed to produce images of the solar corona in 7 wavelength bands in the visible spectral range, and to be flown on the NASA Solar Maximum Mission satellite. The spectral bands were chosen to exclude or include 'chromospheric' spectral lines, so as to allow discrimination between ejecta at coronal and chromospheric temperatures. The major goals of the instrument include: (1) observation of the corona in the flare process and of the ejecta from the flare site and the overlying corona, and (2) examination of the evolution of the solar corona near the period of solar maximum activity.

  14. Fabrication and Characteristics of Free Standing Shaped Pupil Masks for TPF-Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Echternach, Pierre M.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Muller, Richard E.; White, Victor E.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Belikov, Ruslan; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Ceperley, Daniel; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2006-01-01

    Direct imaging and characterization of exo-solar terrestrial planets require coronagraphic instruments capable of suppressing star light to 10-10. Pupil shaping masks have been proposed and designed1 at Princeton University to accomplish such a goal. Based on Princeton designs, free standing (without a substrate) silicon masks have been fabricated with lithographic and deep etching techniques. In this paper, we discuss the fabrication of such masks and present their physical and optical characteristics in relevance to their performance over the visible to near IR bandwidth.

  15. On the acceleration of the N-FINDER algorithm for hyperspectral endmembers extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Raul; López, Sebastian; Callicó, Gustavo M.; Lopez, Jose F.; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a new method in order to perform the endmembers extraction with the same accuracy in the results that the well known Winter's N-Finder algorithm but with less computational effort. In particular, our proposal makes use of the Orthogonal Subspace Projection algorithm, OSP, as well as the information provided by the dimensionality reduction step that takes place prior to the endmembers extraction itself. The results obtained using the proposed methodology demonstrate that more than half of the computing time is saved with negligible variations in the quality of the endmembers extracted, compared with the results obtained with the Winter's N-Finder algorithm. Moreover, this is achieved with independence of the amount of noise and/or the number of endmembers of the hyperspectral image under processing.

  16. Searching the Web for Influenza Vaccines: HealthMap Vaccine Finder

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Jane E.; Mekaru, Sumiko R.; Kluberg, Sheryl; Brownstein, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of the HealthMap Vaccine Finder is to provide a free, comprehensive, online service where users can search for locations that offer immunizations. In this article, we describe the data and systems underlying the HealthMap Vaccine Finder (HVF) and summarize the project’s first year of operations. Methods We collected data on vaccination services from a variety of providers for 2012–2013. Data are used to populate an online, public, searchable map. Results In its first year, HVF collected information from 1256 providers representing 46 381 locations. The public Web site received 625 124 visits during the 2012–2013 influenza vaccination season. Conclusions HVF is a unique tool that connects the public to vaccine providers in their communities. During the 2012–2013 influenza season, HVF experienced significant usage and was able to respond to user feedback with new features. PMID:25880945

  17. Captain Cook, the Terrestrial Planet Finder and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichman, C.

    2002-01-01

    A recently completed NASA study has concluded that a Terrestrial Planet Finder could be launched within a decade to detect terrestrial planets around nearby stars. Such a mission, complemented by projects (Kepler and Eddington) that will provide statistical information on the frequency of Earth-sized planets in the habitable zone, will determine key terms in the Drake equation that describes the number of intelligent civilizations in the Universe.

  18. Providing a USSD location based clinic finder in South Africa: did it work?

    PubMed

    Parsons, Annie Neo; Timler, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    A new mHealth service, Clinic Finder, was designed to provide a location-based service for any cellphone user in South Africa dialing a dedicated USSD string to find the nearest public primary health care facility. The service was funded by a European Union grant to Cell-Life to support the National Department of Health. Clinic Finder's aims were to provide a reliable and accurate service, and to assess both the most effective means of advertising the service as well as interest in the service. Users dialing the USSD string are asked to agree to geo-location (Vodacom and MTN users) or asked to enter their province, town and street (virtual network users and those choosing not to geo-locate). The service provider, AAT, sends the data to Cell-Life where an SMS with details of the nearest public primary health care facility is sent to the user by Cell-Life's open-source Communicate platform. The service was advertised on 3 days in 2014 using two different means: a newspaper ad on 20 May 2014 and Please Call Me ads on 30 July 2014 and 14 August 2014. 28.2% of unique users on 20 May 2014, 10.5% of unique users on 30 July 2014 and 92.8% of unique users on 14 August 2014 who agreed to geo-location successfully received SMSs. However, only 4.2%, 0.5%, and 2.4% of unique users responding to each advertisement who did not geo-locate then received an SMS. A small survey of users following the 20 May 2014 newspaper ad found overall interest in the idea of Clinic Finder, though unsuccessful users were more likely to dislike the service. The overall experience of using location based services and USSD for Clinic Finder suggests a need in the field of mHealth for wider availability of data on service usability and effectiveness.

  19. PPInterFinder--a mining tool for extracting causal relations on human proteins from literature.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kalpana; Subramani, Suresh; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common and challenging problem in biomedical text mining is to mine protein-protein interactions (PPIs) from MEDLINE abstracts and full-text research articles because PPIs play a major role in understanding the various biological processes and the impact of proteins in diseases. We implemented, PPInterFinder--a web-based text mining tool to extract human PPIs from biomedical literature. PPInterFinder uses relation keyword co-occurrences with protein names to extract information on PPIs from MEDLINE abstracts and consists of three phases. First, it identifies the relation keyword using a parser with Tregex and a relation keyword dictionary. Next, it automatically identifies the candidate PPI pairs with a set of rules related to PPI recognition. Finally, it extracts the relations by matching the sentence with a set of 11 specific patterns based on the syntactic nature of PPI pair. We find that PPInterFinder is capable of predicting PPIs with the accuracy of 66.05% on AIMED corpus and outperforms most of the existing systems. DATABASE URL: http://www.biomining-bu.in/ppinterfinder/

  20. A comparison of efficiency of manual and automatic fibres search with the Maxcan fibre finder.

    PubMed

    Monard Sermier, F; Massonnet, G; Buzzini, P; Fortini, A; Gason, F; De Wael, K; Rovas, P

    2006-07-13

    The aim of this work was to study the efficiency of automatic fibre searching with the Maxcan fibre finder (Cox Analytical Systems, Sweden) in comparison to manual searching. The influence of some parameters (color, thickness, background noise) on the results of a fibre search was considered. Eighteen experimental tapes with different target fibres and different background noises were prepared in the laboratory. Searching of fibres was performed manually and with the Maxcan fibre finder by different operators from four European laboratories. Two laboratories have the Maxcan fibre finder system and the two instruments were used and compared in this study. The results show that searching with the Maxcan is generally as efficient as manual searching, except for very pale or very dark fibres. Note that the tapes used for these experiments were prepared in laboratory, and are not completely representative of the tape that could be obtained in real cases. To generalize the results obtained, further research on real case samples would be necessary.

  1. LipidFinder: A computational workflow for discovery of lipids identifies eicosanoid-phosphoinositides in platelets

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Anne; Brasher, Christopher J.; Slatter, David A.; Meckelmann, Sven W.; Hawksworth, Jade I.; Allen, Stuart M.; O’Donnell, Valerie B.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate and high-quality curation of lipidomic datasets generated from plasma, cells, or tissues is becoming essential for cell biology investigations and biomarker discovery for personalized medicine. However, a major challenge lies in removing artifacts otherwise mistakenly interpreted as real lipids from large mass spectrometry files (>60 K features), while retaining genuine ions in the dataset. This requires powerful informatics tools; however, available workflows have not been tailored specifically for lipidomics, particularly discovery research. We designed LipidFinder, an open-source Python workflow. An algorithm is included that optimizes analysis based on users’ own data, and outputs are screened against online databases and categorized into LIPID MAPS classes. LipidFinder outperformed three widely used metabolomics packages using data from human platelets. We show a family of three 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid phosphoinositides (16:0/, 18:1/, 18:0/12-HETE-PI) generated by thrombin-activated platelets, indicating crosstalk between eicosanoid and phosphoinositide pathways in human cells. The software is available on GitHub (https://github.com/cjbrasher/LipidFinder), with full userguides.

  2. PubFinder: a tool for improving retrieval rate of relevant PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Thomas; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm

    2005-07-01

    Since it is becoming increasingly laborious to manually extract useful information embedded in the ever-growing volumes of literature, automated intelligent text analysis tools are becoming more and more essential to assist in this task. PubFinder (www.glycosciences.de/tools/PubFinder) is a publicly available web tool designed to improve the retrieval rate of scientific abstracts relevant for a specific scientific topic. Only the selection of a representative set of abstracts is required, which are central for a scientific topic. No special knowledge concerning the query-syntax is necessary. Based on the selected abstracts, a list of discriminating words is automatically calculated, which is subsequently used for scoring all defined PubMed abstracts for their probability of belonging to the defined scientific topic. This results in a hit-list of references in the descending order of their likelihood score. The algorithms and procedures implemented in PubFinder facilitate the perpetual task for every scientist of staying up-to-date with current publications dealing with a specific subject in biomedicine.

  3. End-to-end simulation of high-contrast imaging systems: methods and results for the PICTURE mission family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Ewan S.; Hewasawam, Kuravi; Mendillo, Christopher B.; Cahoy, Kerri L.; Cook, Timothy A.; Finn, Susanna C.; Howe, Glenn A.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Marinan, Anne D.; Mawet, Dimitri; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2015-09-01

    We describe a set of numerical approaches to modeling the performance of space flight high-contrast imaging payloads. Mission design for high-contrast imaging requires numerical wavefront error propagation to ensure accurate component specifications. For constructed instruments, wavelength and angle-dependent throughput and contrast models allow detailed simulations of science observations, allowing mission planners to select the most productive science targets. The PICTURE family of missions seek to quantify the optical brightness of scattered light from extrasolar debris disks via several high-contrast imaging techniques: sounding rocket (the Planet Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Rocket Experiment) and balloon flights of a visible nulling coronagraph, as well as a balloon flight of a vector vortex coronagraph (the Planetary Imaging Concept Testbed Using a Recoverable Experiment - Coronagraph, PICTURE-C). The rocket mission employs an on-axis 0.5m Gregorian telescope, while the balloon flights will share an unobstructed off-axis 0.6m Gregorian. This work details the flexible approach to polychromatic, end-to-end physical optics simulations used for both the balloon vector vortex coronagraph and rocket visible nulling coronagraph missions. We show the preliminary PICTURE-C telescope and vector vortex coronagraph design will achieve 10-8 contrast without post-processing as limited by realistic optics, but not considering polarization or low-order errors. Simulated science observations of the predicted warm ring around Epsilon Eridani illustrate the performance of both missions.

  4. Electron multiplication CCD detector technology advancement for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Leon K.; Demers, Richard T.; Hoenk, Michael; Peddada, Pavani; Nemati, Bijan; Cherng, Michael; Michaels, Darren; Loc, Anthony; Bush, Nathan; Hall, David; Murray, Neil; Gow, Jason; Burgon, Ross; Holland, Andrew; Reinheimer, Alice; Jorden, Paul R.; Jordan, Douglas

    2015-11-01

    The WFIRST-AFTA (Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset) is a NASA space observatory. It will host two major astronomical instruments: a wide-field imager (WFI) to search for dark energy and carry out wide field near infrared (NIR) surveys, and a coronagraph instrument (CGI) to image and spectrally characterize extrasolar planets. In this paper, we discuss the work that has been carried out at JPL in advancing Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD) technology to higher flight maturity, with the goal of reaching a NASA technology readiness level of 6 (TRL-6) by early-to-mid 2016. The EMCCD has been baselined for both the coronagraph's imager and integral field spectrograph (IFS) based on its sub-electron noise performance at extremely low flux levels - the regime where the AFTA CGI will operate. We present results from a study that fully characterizes the beginning of life performance of the EMCCD. We also discuss, and present initial results from, a recent radiation test campaign that was designed and carried out to mimic the conditions of the WFIRST-AFTA space environment in an L2 orbit, where we sought to assess the sensor's end of life performance, particularly degradation of its charge transfer efficiency, in addition to other parameters such as dark current, electron multiplication gain, clock induced charge and read noise.

  5. The CORIMP CME Catalogue: Automatically Detecting and Tracking CMEs in Coronagraph Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, H.; Habbal, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    Studying CMEs in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the SOHO and STEREO missions also makes manual cataloguing of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloguing packages such as CACTus, SEEDS and ARTEMIS. Here we present the development of the CORIMP (coronal image processing) Catalogue: a new, automated, multiscale, CME detection and tracking catalogue, that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogues. It works by first employing a dynamic CME separation technique to remove the static background, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane-of-sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. These algorithms are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI datasets, and a CORIMP catalogue of results will soon be available to the community.

  6. A General Tool for Evaluating High-Contrast Coronagraphic Telescope Performance Error Budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchen, Luis F.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a general purpose Coronagraph Performance Error Budget (CPEB) tool that we have developed under the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program. The CPEB automates many of the key steps required to evaluate the scattered starlight contrast in the dark hole of a space-based coronagraph. It operates in 3 steps: first, a CodeV or Zemax prescription is converted into a MACOS optical prescription. Second, a Matlab program calls ray-trace code that generates linear beam-walk and aberration sensitivity matrices for motions of the optical elements and line-of-sight pointing, with and without controlled coarse and fine-steering mirrors. Third, the sensitivity matrices are imported by macros into Excel 2007 where the error budget is created. Once created, the user specifies the quality of each optic from a predefined set of PSDs. The spreadsheet creates a nominal set of thermal and jitter motions and combines them with the sensitivity matrices to generate an error budget for the system. The user can easily modify the motion allocations to perform trade studies.

  7. The Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph Pathfinder Mission for the Detection of Coronal Suprathermal Seed Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Leonard; Laming, J. Martin; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Tun Beltran, Samuel; Socker, Dennis G.; Brown, Charles; Provornikova, Elena

    2016-05-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph (UVSC) Pathfinder is a Naval Research Laboratory experiment designed to make the first detection of suprathermal seed particles close to the Sun. It uses an innovative “stacked” occulting system to significantly increase the effective light gathering power of a traditional, 1-meter length, externally occulted coronagraph. The external occultation in combination with a low scatter variable line spaced grating provide the stray light suppression needed to measure non-Maxwellian departures in the wings of the H Lyman alpha emission line profile. After the removal of other factors, these departures may be interpreted as the signature of suprathermal tails of the proton velocity distribution in the corona. UVSC Pathfinder will provide information on the origins and spatial/temporal variability of proton seed particle populations. We will discuss the accuracy needed to make such measurements and describe how the results can be used to develop a capability for predicting the onset of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) storms. The experiment is scheduled for a launch by the DoD Space Test Program in late 2018/early 2019 and should have excellent overlap with the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions.UVSC Pathfinder is supported by funds from the Chief of Naval Research (via the NRL basic research program) and from NASA (via NDPR NNG13WF951 and NNH16AC29I).

  8. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012. PMID:26347393

  9. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Peter R; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-07-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  10. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-Based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Frazin, Richard; Barrett, Harrison; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gladysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jerome; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Remi

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We provide a formal comparison of techniques through a blind data challenge and evaluate performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  11. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter; Frazin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012

  12. On advanced estimation techniques for exoplanet detection and characterization using ground-based coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2012-07-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  13. Testing and Calibration of the NASA COR1 Coronagraph for the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkepile, J. T.

    2001-01-01

    This proposal is for a no cost extension on the period of performance of the existing grant. The period of performance shall be extended to the end of FY 2003. This extension is required due to schedule changes in the COR1 program. Funding for Phase II and Phase III of this grant has been obtained. This unsolicited proposal was for scientific and engineering collaboration between NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and HAO. Performance testing of the COR1 engineering test unit has been partially completed. The COR1 coronagraph engineering test unit requires further testing at NASA s GSFC and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), operated by the High Altitude Observatory (HAO). HAO personnel have recently supported efforts to test component and breadboard versions of the COR1 using the NCAR Vacuum Tunnel Facility (NVTF). HAO personnel will continue to work closely with scientists and engineers at NASA/GSFC in the development, design, assembly, testing, and operation of this key element of NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission. The element is an internally-occulted coronagraphic telescope, and the design and development effort is already underway at GSFC.

  14. A general tool for evaluating high-contrast coronagraphic telescope performance error budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchen, Luis F.; Shaklan, Stuart B.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes a general purpose Coronagraph Performance Error Budget (CPEB) tool that we have developed under the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program. The CPEB automates many of the key steps required to evaluate the scattered starlight contrast in the dark hole of a space-based coronagraph. It operates in 3 steps: first, a CodeV or Zemax prescription is converted into a MACOS optical prescription. Second, a Matlab program calls ray-trace code that generates linear beam-walk and aberration sensitivity matrices for motions of the optical elements and line-ofsight pointing, with and without controlled coarse and fine-steering mirrors. Third, the sensitivity matrices are imported by macros into Excel 2007 where the error budget is created. Once created, the user specifies the quality of each optic from a predefined set of PSDs. The spreadsheet creates a nominal set of thermal and jitter motions and combines them with the sensitivity matrices to generate an error budget for the system. The user can easily modify the motion allocations to perform trade studies.

  15. The Debris Disk Explorer: A Balloon-Borne Coronagraph for Observing Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lewis C. Jr; Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk structure, and explore the physics and history of debris disks by characterizing the size and composition of disk dust. The DDX instrument is a 0.75-m diameter off-axis telescope and a coronagraph carried by a stratospheric balloon. DDX will take high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a month-long science flight launched from New Zealand. The long flight will fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to DDX. It will achieve a raw contrast of 10(exp -7), with a processed contrast of 10(exp -8). A technology benefit of DDX is that operation in the near-space environment will raise the Technology Readiness Level of internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  16. Conceptual Design of the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) for the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Mary Anne; Groff, Tyler; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; McElwain, Michael W.; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert; Gunn, James E.; Knapp, Gillian; Gong, Qian; Carlotti, Alexis; Brandt, Timothy; Janson, Markus; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Hayashi, Masahiko; Takato, Naruhisa

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in high-contrast imaging techniques now make possible both imaging and spectroscopy of planets around nearby stars. We present the conceptual design of the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), a lenslet-based, cryogenic integral field spectrograph (IFS) for imaging exoplanets on the Subaru telescope. The IFS will provide spectral information for 140 x 140 spatial elements over a 1.75 arcsecs x 1.75 arcsecs field of view (FOV). CHARIS will operate in the near infrared (lambda = 0.9 - 2.5 micron) and provide a spectral resolution of R = 14, 33, and 65 in three separate observing modes. Taking advantage of the adaptive optics systems and advanced coronagraphs (AO188 and SCExAO) on the Subaru telescope, CHARIS will provide sufficient contrast to obtain spectra of young self-luminous Jupiter-mass exoplanets. CHARIS is in the early design phases and is projected to have first light by the end of 2015. We report here on the current conceptual design of CHARIS and the design challenges.

  17. Life Finder Detectors; Detector Needs and Status for Spectroscopic Biosignature Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; McElwain, Michael W.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Stahle, Carl; Stark, Christopher C.; Thronson, Harley A.

    2016-01-01

    The search for life on other worlds looms large in NASA's future. Outside our solar system, direct spectroscopic biosignature characterization using very large UV-Optical-IR telescopes with coronagraphs or starshades is a core technique to both AURA's High Definition Space Telescope (HDST) concept and NASA's 30-year strategic plan. These giant space observatories require technological advancements in several areas, one of which is detectors. In this presentation, we review the detector requirements for spectroscopic biosignature characterization and discuss the status of some existing and proposed detector technologies for meeting them.

  18. Astronaut operations requirements document for the White Light Coronagraph experiment s-052 for the Apollo Telescope Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Information necessary for successful performance of the observer's function in the White Light Coronagraph portion of the Apollo Telescope Mount experiments is presented. The pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight operations required to perform the S-052 experiment are described. A discussion of the scientific objectives of the experiment and a description of the hardware are provided.

  19. A high dynamic-range instrument for SPICA for coronagraphic observation of exoplanets and monitoring of transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enya, K.; Abe, L.; Takeuchi, S.; Kotani, T.; Yamamuro, T.

    2011-09-01

    This paper, first, presents introductory reviews of the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) mission and the SPICA Coronagraph Instrument (SCI). SPICA will realize a 3m class telescope cooled to 6K in orbit. The launch of SPICA is planned to take place in FY2018. The SPICA mission provides us with a unique opportunity to make high dynamic-range observations because of its large telescope aperture, high stability, and the capability for making infrared observations from deep space. The SCI is a high dynamic-range instrument proposed for SPICA. The primary objectives for the SCI are the direct coronagraphic detection and spectroscopy of Jovian exoplanets in the infrared region, while the monitoring of transiting planets is another important target owing to the non-coronagraphic mode of the SCI. Then, recent technical progress and ideas in conceptual studies are presented, which can potentially enhance the performance of the instrument: the designs of an integral 1-dimensional binary-shaped pupil mask coronagraph with general darkness constraints, a concentric ring mask considering the obscured pupil for surveying a wide field, and a spectral disperser for simultaneous wide wavelength coverage, and the first results of tests of the toughness of MEMS deformable mirrors for the rocket launch are introduced, together with a description of a passive wavefront correction mirror using no actuator.

  20. Factors important for women who breastfeed in public: a content analysis of review data from FeedFinder

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Emma; Garbett, Andrew; Comber, Rob; Balaam, Madeline

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine how the breastfeeding experience is represented by users of FeedFinder (a mobile phone application for finding, reviewing and sharing places to breastfeed in public). Design Content analysis using FeedFinder database. Setting FeedFinder, UK, September 2013–June 2015. Methods Reviews obtained through FeedFinder over a period of 21 months were systematically coded using a conventional content analysis approach, average review scores were calculated for the rating criteria in FeedFinder (comfort, hygiene, privacy, baby facilities) and review texts were analysed for sentiment. We used data from Foursquare to describe the type of venues visited and cross-referenced the location of venues with the Indices of Multiple Deprivation. Results A total of 1757 reviews were analysed. Of all the reviews obtained, 80% of those were classified as positive, 15.4% were classified as neutral and 4.3% were classified as negative. Important factors that were discussed by women include facilities, service, level of privacy available and qualities of a venue. The majority of venues were classified as cafes (26.4%), shops (24.4%) and pubs (13.4%). Data on IMD were available for 1229 venues mapped within FeedFinder, 23% were located within the most deprived quintile and 16% were located in the least deprived quintile. Conclusions Women create content that is positive and informative when describing their breastfeeding experience in public. Public health bodies and business owners have the potential to use the data from FeedFinder to impact on service provision. Further work is needed to explore the demographic differences that may help to tailor public health interventions aimed at increasing breastfeeding rates in the UK. PMID:27797996

  1. Laser scanning methods and a phase comparison, modulated laser range finder for terrain sensing on a Mars roving vehicle. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herb, G. T.

    1973-01-01

    Two areas of a laser range finder for a Mars roving vehicle are investigated: (1) laser scanning systems, and (2) range finder methods and implementation. Several ways of rapidly scanning a laser are studied. Two digital deflectors and a matrix of laser diodes, are found to be acceptable. A complete range finder scanning system of high accuracy is proposed. The problem of incident laser spot distortion on the terrain is discussed. The instrumentation for a phase comparison, modulated laser range finder is developed and sections of it are tested.

  2. The PCA Lens-Finder: application to CFHTLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraficz, D.; Courbin, F.; Tramacere, A.; Joseph, R.; Metcalf, R. B.; Kneib, J.-P.; Dubath, P.; Droz, D.; Filleul, F.; Ringeisen, D.; Schäfer, C.

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of a new search for galaxy-scale strong lensing systems in CFHTLS Wide. Our lens-finding technique involves a preselection of potential lens galaxies, applying simple cuts in size and magnitude. We then perform a Principal Component Analysis of the galaxy images, ensuring a clean removal of the light profile. Lensed features are searched for in the residual images using the clustering topometric algorithm DBSCAN. We find 1098 lens candidates that we inspect visually, leading to a cleaned sample of 109 new lens candidates. Using realistic image simulations we estimate the completeness of our sample and show that it is independent of source surface brightness, Einstein ring size (image separation) or lens redshift. We compare the properties of our sample to previous lens searches in CFHTLS. Including the present search, the total number of lenses found in CFHTLS amounts to 678, which corresponds to ˜4 lenses per square degree down to i(AB) = 24.8. This is equivalent to ˜60.000 lenses in total in a survey as wide as Euclid, but at the CFHTLS resolution and depth.

  3. NEOCE: a new external occulting coronagraph experiment for ultimate observations of the chromosphere, corona and interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc; Fineschi, Silvano; Kuzin, Sergey; Von Fay-Siebenburgen, Erdélyi Robert

    Several ground facilities and space missions are currently dedicated to the study of the Sun at high resolution and of the solar corona in particular. However, and despite significant progress with the advent of space missions and UV, EUV and XUV direct observations of the hot chromosphere and million-degrees coronal plasma, much is yet to be achieved in the understanding of these high temperatures, fine dynamic dissipative structures and of the coronal heating in general. Recent missions have shown the definite role of a wide range of waves and of the magnetic field deep in the inner corona, at the chromosphere-corona interface, where dramatic and physically fundamental changes occur. The dynamics of the chromosphere and corona is controlled and governed by the emerging magnetic field. Accordingly, the direct measurement of the chromospheric and coronal magnetic fields is of prime importance. The solar corona consists of many localised loop-like structures or threads with the plasmas brightening and fading independently. The plasma evolution in each thread is believed to be related to the formation of filaments, each one being dynamic, in a non-equilibrium state. The mechanism sustaining this dynamics, oscillations or waves (Alfvén or other magneto-plasma waves), requires both very high-cadence, multi-spectral observations, and high resolution and coronal magnetometry. This is foreseen in the future Space Mission NEOCE (New External Occulting Coronagraph Experiment), the ultimate new generation high-resolution coronagraphic heliospheric mission, to be proposed for ESA M4. NEOCE, an evolution of the HiRISE mission, is ideally placed at the L5 Lagrangian point (for a better follow-up of CMEs), and provides FUV imaging and spectro-imaging, EUV and XUV imaging and spectroscopy, and ultimate coronagraphy by a remote external occulter (two satellites in formation flying 375 m apart minimizing scattered light) allowing to characterize temperature, densities and

  4. Experimental demonstration of binary shaped pupil mask coronagraphs for telescopes with obscured pupils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haze, Kanae; Enya, Keigo; Abe, Lyu; Takahashi, Aoi; Kotani, Takayuki; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu

    2015-04-01

    We present the fabrication and experimental demonstration of three free-standing binary shaped pupil mask coronagraphs, which are applicable for telescopes with partially obscured pupils. Three masks, designed to be complementary (labeled Mask-A, Mask-B, and Mask-C), were formed in 5 μm thick nickel. The design of Mask-A is based on a one-dimensional barcode mask. The design principle of Mask-B is similar, but has a smaller inner working angle and a lower contrast than Mask-A. Mask-C is based on a concentric ring mask and provides the widest dark region and a symmetric point spread function. Mask-A and Mask-C were both designed to produce a flexibly tailored dark region (i.e., non-uniform contrast). The contrast was evaluated using a light source comprising a broadband super-luminescent light-emitting diode with a center wavelength of 650 nm, and the measurements were carried out in a large vacuum chamber. Active wavefront control was not applied in this work. The coronagraphic images obtained by experiment were mostly consistent with the designs. The contrast of Mask-A within the ranges 3.3-8 λ/D and 8-12 λ/D was ˜ 10-4-10-7 and ˜ 10-7, respectively, where λ is the wavelength and D is the pupil diameter. The contrast of Mask-B was ˜ 10-4 and that of Mask-C over an extended field of view (5-25 λ/D) was ˜ 10-5-10-6. The effect of tilting the masks was investigated, and found to be irrelevant at the ˜ 10-7 contrast level. Therefore the masks can be tilted to avoid ghosting. These high-contrast free-standing masks have the potential to enable coronagraphic imaging over a wide wavelength range using both ground-based and space-borne general-purpose telescopes with pupil structures not specifically designed for coronagraphy.

  5. Characterizing Rocky and Gaseous Exoplanets with 2 m Class Space-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-02-01

    Several concepts now exist for small, space-based missions to directly characterize exoplanets in reflected light. While studies have been performed that investigate the potential detection yields of such missions, little work has been done to understand how instrumental and astrophysical parameters will affect the ability of these missions to obtain spectra that are useful for characterizing their planetary targets. Here, we develop an instrument noise model suitable for studying the spectral characterization potential of a coronagraph-equipped, space-based telescope. We adopt a baseline set of telescope and instrument parameters appropriate for near-future planned missions like WFIRST-AFTA, including a 2 m diameter primary aperture, an operational wavelength range of 0.4-1.0 μm, and an instrument spectral resolution of λ/Δλ = 70, and apply our baseline model to a variety of spectral models of different planet types, including Earth twins, Jupiter twins, and warm and cool Jupiters and Neptunes. With our exoplanet spectral models, we explore wavelength-dependent planet-star flux ratios for main-sequence stars of various effective temperatures and discuss how coronagraph inner and outer working angle constraints will influence the potential to study different types of planets. For planets most favorable to spectroscopic characterization—cool Jupiters and Neptunes as well as nearby super-Earths—we study the integration times required to achieve moderate signal-to-noise ratio spectra. We also explore the sensitivity of the integration times required to either detect the bottom or presence of key absorption bands (for methane, water vapor, and molecular oxygen) to coronagraph raw contrast performance, exozodiacal light levels, and the distance to the planetary system. Decreasing detector quantum efficiency at longer visible wavelengths makes the detection of water vapor in the atmospheres of Earth-like planets extremely challenging, and also hinders detections

  6. Cryogenic irradiation of an EMCCD for the WFIRST coronagraph: preliminary performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Nathan; Hall, David; Holland, Andrew; Burgon, Ross; Murray, Neil; Gow, Jason; Jordan, Douglas; Demers, Richard; Harding, Leon K.; Nemati, Bijan; Hoenk, Michael; Michaels, Darren; Peddada, Pavani

    2016-08-01

    The Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is a NASA observatory scheduled to launch in the next decade that will settle essential questions in exoplanet science. The Wide Field Instrument (WFI) offers Hubble quality imaging over a 0.28 square degree field of view and will gather NIR statistical data on exoplanets through gravitational microlensing. An on-board coronagraph will for the first time perform direct imaging and spectroscopic analysis of exoplanets with properties analogous to those within our own solar system, including cold Jupiters, mini Neptunes and potentially super Earths. The Coronagraph Instrument (CGI) will be required to operate with low signal flux for long integration times, demanding all noise sources are kept to a minimum. The Electron Multiplication (EM)-CCD has been baselined for both the imaging and spectrograph cameras due its ability to operate with sub-electron effective read noise values with appropriate multiplication gain setting. The presence of other noise sources, however, such as thermal dark signal and Clock Induced Charge (CIC), need to be characterized and mitigated. In addition, operation within a space environment will subject the device to radiation damage that will degrade the Charge Transfer Effciency (CTE) of the device throughout the mission lifetime. Irradiation at the nominal instrument operating temperature has the potential to provide the best estimate of performance degradation that will be experienced in-flight, since the final population of silicon defects has been shown to be dependent upon the temperature at which the sensor is irradiated. Here we present initial findings from pre- and post- cryogenic irradiation testing of the e2v CCD201-20 BI EMCCD sensor, baselined for the WFIRST coronagraph instrument. The motivation for irradiation at cryogenic temperatures is discussed with reference to previous investigations of a similar nature. The results are presented in context with those from a previous

  7. ThioFinder: a web-based tool for the identification of thiopeptide gene clusters in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Qu, Xudong; He, Xinyi; Duan, Lian; Wu, Guojun; Bi, Dexi; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Wen; Ou, Hong-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Thiopeptides are a growing class of sulfur-rich, highly modified heterocyclic peptides that are mainly active against Gram-positive bacteria including various drug-resistant pathogens. Recent studies also reveal that many thiopeptides inhibit the proliferation of human cancer cells, further expanding their application potentials for clinical use. Thiopeptide biosynthesis shares a common paradigm, featuring a ribosomally synthesized precursor peptide and conserved posttranslational modifications, to afford a characteristic core system, but differs in tailoring to furnish individual members. Identification of new thiopeptide gene clusters, by taking advantage of increasing information of DNA sequences from bacteria, may facilitate new thiopeptide discovery and enrichment of the unique biosynthetic elements to produce novel drug leads by applying the principle of combinatorial biosynthesis. In this study, we have developed a web-based tool ThioFinder to rapidly identify thiopeptide biosynthetic gene cluster from DNA sequence using a profile Hidden Markov Model approach. Fifty-four new putative thiopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters were found in the sequenced bacterial genomes of previously unknown producing microorganisms. ThioFinder is fully supported by an open-access database ThioBase, which contains the sufficient information of the 99 known thiopeptides regarding the chemical structure, biological activity, producing organism, and biosynthetic gene (cluster) along with the associated genome if available. The ThioFinder website offers researchers a unique resource and great flexibility for sequence analysis of thiopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters. ThioFinder is freely available at http://db-mml.sjtu.edu.cn/ThioFinder/.

  8. PEP-SiteFinder: a tool for the blind identification of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Saladin, Adrien; Rey, Julien; Thévenet, Pierre; Zacharias, Martin; Moroy, Gautier; Tufféry, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Peptide–protein interactions are important to many processes of life, particularly for signal transmission or regulatory mechanisms. When no information is known about the interaction between a protein and a peptide, it is of interest to propose candidate sites of interaction at the protein surface, to assist the design of biological experiments to probe the interaction, or to serve as a starting point for more focused in silico approaches. PEP-SiteFinder is a tool that will, given the structure of a protein and the sequence of a peptide, identify protein residues predicted to be at peptide–protein interface. PEP-SiteFinder relies on the 3D de novo generation of peptide conformations given its sequence. These conformations then undergo a fast blind rigid docking on the complete protein surface, and we have found, as the result of a benchmark over 41 complexes, that the best poses overlap to some extent the experimental patch of interaction for close to 90% complexes. In addition, PEP-SiteFinder also returns a propensity index we have found informative about the confidence of the prediction. The PEP-SiteFinder web server is available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/PEP-SiteFinder. PMID:24803671

  9. PEP-SiteFinder: a tool for the blind identification of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Adrien; Rey, Julien; Thévenet, Pierre; Zacharias, Martin; Moroy, Gautier; Tufféry, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Peptide-protein interactions are important to many processes of life, particularly for signal transmission or regulatory mechanisms. When no information is known about the interaction between a protein and a peptide, it is of interest to propose candidate sites of interaction at the protein surface, to assist the design of biological experiments to probe the interaction, or to serve as a starting point for more focused in silico approaches. PEP-SiteFinder is a tool that will, given the structure of a protein and the sequence of a peptide, identify protein residues predicted to be at peptide-protein interface. PEP-SiteFinder relies on the 3D de novo generation of peptide conformations given its sequence. These conformations then undergo a fast blind rigid docking on the complete protein surface, and we have found, as the result of a benchmark over 41 complexes, that the best poses overlap to some extent the experimental patch of interaction for close to 90% complexes. In addition, PEP-SiteFinder also returns a propensity index we have found informative about the confidence of the prediction. The PEP-SiteFinder web server is available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/PEP-SiteFinder.

  10. Concept study of a UV coronagraph spectrometer for the pinhole-occulter facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a very short study to define an Ultraviolet Coronagraph-Spectrometer (UVCS) for the Pinhole/Occulter Facility (P/OF) are summarized. The P/OF instrument was based on docummentation from the Definition Phase of the Spacelab Coronographs Program which was effectively completed in August 1980. The primary differences between the P/OF instrument and the Spacelab experiment are the remote occulter mask, the telescope size , and the deployable structure to accommodate P/OF's length restrictions. Requirement for P/OF that are associated with these features are briefly considered, but further study is need to more fully consider the unusual implications, particularly in the interplay between the instrument pointing and the P/OF boom control.

  11. Stray-light suppression in a reflecting white-light coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romoli, Marco; Weiser, Heinz; Gardner, Larry D.; Kohl, John L.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of stray-light suppression in the white-light channel of the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer experiment for the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory is reported. The white-light channel consists of a reflecting telescope with external and internal occultation and a polarimeter section. Laboratory tests and analytical methods are used to perform the analysis. The various stray-light contributions are classified in two main categories: the contribution from sunlight that passes directly through the entrance aperture and the contribution of sunlight that is diffracted by the edges of the entrance aperture. Values of the stray-light contributions from various sources and the total stray-light level for observations at heliocentric heights from 1.4 to 5 solar radii are derived. Anticipated signal-to-stray-light ratios are presented together with the effective stray-light rejection by the polarimeter, demonstrating the efficacy of the stray-light suppression design.

  12. A Data-Cube Extraction Pipeline for a Coronagraphic Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Neil; Brenner, Douglas; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Parry, Ian R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Hunt, Stephanie; Roberts, Robin

    2011-06-01

    Project 1640 is a high-contrast near-infrared instrument probing the vicinities of nearby stars through the unique combination of an integral field spectrograph with a Lyot coronagraph and a high-order adaptive optics system. The extraordinary data-reduction demands, similar to those that several new exoplanet imaging instruments will face in the near future, have been met by the novel software algorithms described herein. The Project 1640 Data Cube Extraction Pipeline (PCXP) automates the translation of 3.8 × 104 closely packed, coarsely sampled spectra to a data cube. We implement a robust empirical model of the spectrograph focal-plane geometry to register the detector image at subpixel precision, and we map the cube extraction. We demonstrate our ability to accurately retrieve source spectra based on an observation of Saturn’s moon Titan.

  13. The Visible Nulling Coronagraph--Progress Toward Mission and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Levine, B. Martin; Liu, Duncan; Wallace, J. Kent

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a space mission for visible direct detection and spectroscopy of Earth like extrasolar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a moderately sized (approximately 4m) telescope in space. In our design, a 4 beam nulling interferometer is synthesized from the telescope pupil, producing a deep null proportional to theta (sup 4) which is then filtered by a coherent array of single mode fibers to suppress the residual scattered light. With diffraction limited telescope optics and similar quality components in the optical train (lambda/20), suppression of the starlight to 10 (exp -10) is achievable. We describe key features of the basic analysis, show how this effects a space mission design, present latest results of laboratory measurements demonstrating achievable null depth and component development, and discuss future key technical milestones.

  14. Demonstrating Broadband Billion-to-One Contrast with the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Petrone, Peter, III; Miller, Ian J.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Mallik, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The key to broadband operation of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) is achieving a condition of quasi- achromatic destructive interference between combined beams. Here we present efforts towards meeting this goal using Fresnel rhombs in each interferometric arm as orthogonally aligned half wave phase retarders. The milestone goal of the demonstration is to achieve 1 × 10-9 contrast at 2/D over a 40 nm bandpass centered at 633 nm. Rhombs have been designed and fabricated, and a multi-step approach to alignment using coarse positioners for each rhomb and pair has been developed to get within range of piezo stages used for fine positioning. The previously demonstrated narrowband VNC sensing and control approach that uses a segmented deformable mirror is being adapted to broadband to include fine positioning of the piezo-mounted rhombs, all demonstrated in a low-pressure environment.

  15. Demonstrating broadband billion-to-one contrast with the Visible Nulling Coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Brian A.; Lyon, Richard G.; Petrone, Peter; Miller, Ian J.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Helmbrecht, Michael A.; Mallik, Udayan

    2015-09-01

    The key to broadband operation of the Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) is achieving a condition of quasi-achromatic destructive interference between combined beams. Here we present efforts towards meeting this goal using Fresnel rhombs in each interferometric arm as orthogonally aligned half wave phase retarders. The milestone goal of the demonstration is to achieve 1 × 10-9 contrast at 2λ/D over a 40 nm bandpass centered at 633 nm. Rhombs have been designed and fabricated, and a multi-step approach to alignment using coarse positioners for each rhomb and pair has been developed to get within range of piezo stages used for fine positioning. The previously demonstrated narrowband VNC sensing and control approach that uses a segmented deformable mirror is being adapted to broadband to include fine positioning of the piezo-mounted rhombs, all demonstrated in a low-pressure environment.

  16. Development and recent results from the Subaru coronagraphic extreme adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, N.; Guyon, O.; Martinache, F.; Clergeon, C.; Singh, G.; Kudo, T.; Newman, K.; Kuhn, J.; Serabyn, E.; Norris, B.; Tuthill, P.; Stewart, P.; Huby, E.; Perrin, G.; Lacour, S.; Vievard, S.; Murakami, N.; Fumika, O.; Minowa, Y.; Hayano, Y.; White, J.; Lai, O.; Marchis, F.; Duchene, G.; Kotani, T.; Woillez, J.

    2014-07-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument is one of a handful of extreme adaptive optics systems set to come online in 2014. The extreme adaptive optics correction is realized by a combination of precise wavefront sensing via a non-modulated pyramid wavefront sensor and a 2000 element deformable mirror. This system has recently begun on-sky commissioning and was operated in closed loop for several minutes at a time with a loop speed of 800 Hz, on ~150 modes. Further suppression of quasi-static speckles is possible via a process called "speckle nulling" which can create a dark hole in a portion of the frame allowing for an enhancement in contrast, and has been successfully tested on-sky. In addition to the wavefront correction there are a suite of coronagraphs on board to null out the host star which include the phase induced amplitude apodization (PIAA), the vector vortex, 8 octant phase mask, 4 quadrant phase mask and shaped pupil versions which operate in the NIR (y-K bands). The PIAA and vector vortex will allow for high contrast imaging down to an angular separation of 1 λ/D to be reached; a factor of 3 closer in than other extreme AO systems. Making use of the left over visible light not used by the wavefront sensor is VAMPIRES and FIRST. These modules are based on aperture masking interferometry and allow for sub-diffraction limited imaging with moderate contrasts of ~100-1000:1. Both modules have undergone initial testing on-sky and are set to be fully commissioned by the end of 2014.

  17. Statistical study of coronal mass ejection source locations: Understanding CMEs viewed in coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Chen, Caixia; Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2011-04-01

    How to properly understand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) viewed in white light coronagraphs is crucial to many relative researches in solar and space physics. The issue is now particularly addressed in this paper through studying the source locations of all the 1078 Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) CMEs listed in Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) CME catalog during 1997-1998 and their correlation with CMEs' apparent parameters. By manually checking LASCO and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) movies of these CMEs, we find that, except 231 CMEs whose source locations cannot be identified due to poor data, there are 288 CMEs with location identified on the frontside solar disk, 234 CMEs appearing above solar limb, and 325 CMEs without evident eruptive signatures in the field of view of EIT. On the basis of the statistical results of CMEs' source locations, there are four physical issues: (1) the missing rate of CMEs by SOHO LASCO and EIT, (2) the mass of CMEs, (3) the causes of halo CMEs, and (4) the deflections of CMEs in the corona, are exhaustively analyzed. It is found that (1) about 32% frontside CMEs cannot be recognized by SOHO, (2) the brightness of a CME at any heliocentric distance is roughly positively correlated with its speed, and the CME mass derived from the brightness is probably overestimated, (3) both projection effect and violent eruption are the major causes of halo CMEs, and especially for limb halo CMEs the latter is the primary one, and (4) most CMEs deflected toward equator near the solar minimum; these deflections can be classified into three types: the asymmetrical expansion, the nonradial ejection, and the deflected propagation.

  18. A Multiscale Technique for Automatically Detecting and Tracking CMEs in Coronagraph Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, H.; Habbal, S.

    2011-05-01

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amounts of data available from the SOHO, STEREO, and future Solar Orbiter missions, also makes manual cataloguing of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloguing packages such as CACTus, SEEDS and ARTEMIS. However, the main drawbacks of these catalogues are: the CACTus method of detection fails to resolve CME acceleration profiles; the CACTus and SEEDS running-difference images suffer from spatiotemporal crosstalk; and the SEEDS and ARTEMIS detections are limited to only the LASCO/C2 field-of-view. Recently, the benefits of multiscale filtering of coronagraph data have been demonstrated in an effort to overcome current cataloguing issues. A multiscale decomposition can be applied to individual images in order to enhance the structure of CMEs whilst removing noise and small-scale features like stars. Here we present the development of a new, automated, multiscale, CME detection & tracking technique. It works by first separating the dynamic CME signal from the background corona and then characterising CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are then chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane-of-sky. We demonstrate its application to a sample of LASCO data and prove its efficacy in detecting and tracking CMEs. This technique is being applied to the complete LASCO dataset, and it is planned to further develop it for implementation on the SECCHI/COR dataset in the near future.

  19. SciFinder Scholar 2006: an empirical analysis of research topic query processing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A Ben

    2006-01-01

    Topical search queries in SciFinder Scholar are processed through an extensive set of natural language processing algorithms that greatly enhance the relevance and comprehensiveness of the search results. Little detailed documentation on these algorithms has been published. However, a careful examination of the highlighted hit terms coupled with a comparison of results from small variations in query language reveal much additional, useful information about these algorithms. An understanding of how these algorithms work can lead to better search results and explain many unexpected results, including differing hit counts for singular versus plural query words and phrases.

  20. HCIT Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies: Simulation Versus Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Krist, John; Cady, Eric J.; Kern, Brian; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    Using NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we have experimentally investigated the sensitivity of dark hole contrast in a Lyot coronagraph for the following factors: 1) Lateral and longitudinal translation of an occulting mask; 2) An opaque spot on the occulting mask; 3) Sizes of the controlled dark hole area. Also, we compared the measured results with simulations obtained using both MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems) and PROPER optical analysis programs with full three-dimensional near-field diffraction analysis to model HCIT's optical train and coronagraph.

  1. PartitionFinder 2: New Methods for Selecting Partitioned Models of Evolution for Molecular and Morphological Phylogenetic Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lanfear, Robert; Frandsen, Paul B; Wright, April M; Senfeld, Tereza; Calcott, Brett

    2017-03-01

    PartitionFinder 2 is a program for automatically selecting best-fit partitioning schemes and models of evolution for phylogenetic analyses. PartitionFinder 2 is substantially faster and more efficient than version 1, and incorporates many new methods and features. These include the ability to analyze morphological datasets, new methods to analyze genome-scale datasets, new output formats to facilitate interoperability with downstream software, and many new models of molecular evolution. PartitionFinder 2 is freely available under an open source license and works on Windows, OSX, and Linux operating systems. It can be downloaded from www.robertlanfear.com/partitionfinder. The source code is available at https://github.com/brettc/partitionfinder.

  2. Effects of Optical-density and Phase Dispersion of an Imperfect Band-limited Occulting Mask on the Broadband Performance of a TPF Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidiek, Erkin; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2007-01-01

    Practical image-plane occulting masks required by high-contrast imaging systems such as the TPF-Coronagraph introduce phase errors into the transmitting beam., or, equivalently, diffracts the residual starlight into the area of the final image plane used for detecting exo-planets. Our group at JPL has recently proposed spatially Profiled metal masks that can be designed to have zero parasitic phase at the center wavelength of the incoming broadband light with small amounts of' 00 and phase dispersions at other wavelengths. Work is currently underway to design. fabricate and characterize such image-plane masks. In order to gain some understanding on the behaviors of these new imperfect band-limited occulting masks and clarify how such masks utilizing different metals or alloys compare with each other, we carried out some modeling and simulations on the contrast performance of the high-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at .JPL. In this paper we describe the details of our simulations and present our results.

  3. CORONAL MASS EJECTION RECONSTRUCTION FROM THREE VIEWPOINTS VIA SIMULATION MORPHING. I. THEORY AND EXAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Frazin, Richard A.

    2012-12-10

    The problem of reconstructing the three-dimensional (3D) density distribution of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from three simultaneous coronagraph observations is timely in that the COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs on the dual-spacecraft STEREO mission complement the LASCO coronagraphs on the SOHO satellite and the Mk4 on Mauna Loa. While the separation angle between the STEREO spacecraft and the Earth depends on the time since the launch in 2006, the reconstruction problem is always severely underinformed. So far, all 3D reconstruction efforts have made use of relatively simple parameterized models in order to determine the 3D structure of the CME. Such approaches do not utilize the power of 3D MHD simulation to inform the reconstruction. This paper considers the situation in which a specific CME event observed in coronagraphs from three viewpoints is later simulated by solving MHD equations. The reconstruction is then subjected to an invertible morphological operator chosen so that morphed MHD simulation is most consistent with the three-viewpoint coronagraph data. The morphological operations are explained mathematically and synthetic examples are given. The practical application to reconstructing CMEs from STEREO and SOHO data is discussed.

  4. Surging Seas Risk Finder: A Tool for Local-Scale Flood Risk Assessments in Coastal Cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, S. A.; Strauss, B.

    2015-12-01

    Local decision makers in coastal cities require accurate, accessible, and thorough assessments of flood exposure risk within their individual municipality, in their efforts to mitigate against damage due to future sea level rise. To fill this need, we have developed Climate Central's Surging Seas Risk Finder, an interactive data toolkit which presents our sea level rise and storm surge analysis for every coastal town, city, county, and state within the USA. Using this tool, policy makers can easily zoom in on their local place of interest to receive a detailed flood risk assessment, which synthesizes a wide range of features including total population, socially vulnerable population, housing, property value, road miles, power plants, schools, hospitals, and many other critical facilities. Risk Finder can also be used to identify specific points of interest in danger of exposure at different flood levels. Additionally, this tool provides localized storm surge probabilities and sea level rise projections at tidal gauges along the coast, so that users can quickly understand the risk of flooding in their area over the coming decades.

  5. Relevance and feasibility of Diagnostics Subsystems in LISA PathFinder and LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Alberto; Grimani, Catia; Canizares, Priscilla; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Diaz-Aguilo, Marc; Conchillo, Aleix; Gesa, Lluis; Lloro, Ivan; Mateos, Ignacio; Nofrarias, Miquel; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Sanjuan, Josep; Sopuerta, Carlos

    LISA PathFinder will fly equipped with a Diagnostics Subsystem which includes: 1) a Radi-ation Monitor, providing almost real time charged particle counting and spectral resolution, 2) a thermal diagnostics set with high sensitivity temperature sensors and precision heaters, and 3) four fluxgate vector magnetometers plus a pair of induction coils. The role of this in-strumentation in LISA PathFinder is to provide the necessary tools to evaluate the effect of charging, temperature and magnetic fluctuations on the interferometer readout. The use of this is to understand how the mentioned fluctuations in the LTP (LISA Technology Package) can be modelled, then use the measured data to quantify their contribution to the overall LTP noise. In this presentation we will review the LPF Diagnostics System, recently delivered for LTP and spacecraft integration. We will also make some considerations on the meaning of the diagnostics for the future LISA, and propose lines of action to meet the more severe requirements which LISA will impose on environmental conditions.

  6. Monoblock laser for a low-cost, eyesafe, microlaser range finder.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, J E; Schilling, B W; Barr, D N; Lei, J S

    2000-05-20

    A small, lightweight, low-cost prototype laser has been developed for use in a microlaser range finder (muLRF). The laser design is based on a flash-lamp-pumped, Nd:YAG laser with a Cr(4+) passive Q switch. The design incorporates a monolithic potassium titanyl arsenide (KTA) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) in an intracavity configuration, producing output at 1.54 mum. Precisely cut, properly coated crystals make up the laser resonator, reducing the number of components and enabling laser oscillation with the simplest of alignment fixtures. The 1.54-mum laser cavity consists of only four rectangular-shaped crystals: a Nd:YAG laser rod, a Nd:YAG endcap, a Cr(4+) Q switch, and a KTA OPO. Along with a ceramic laser pallet and a flash lamp, these six components make up a prototype monoblock (essentially a one-piece) laser transmitter. Several of these simple prototypes have been built and tested, giving a nominal output of >3.0 mJ at 1.54 mum with a 27-ns pulse width. The transmitter was incorporated into a breadboard laser range finder, and successful ranging operations were performed to targets at ranges in excess of 3 km.

  7. Fat Finders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie-Blick, Kottie

    2006-01-01

    Every day the media bombards the nation with concern over childhood obesity. More American children than ever before are developing health problems related to their eating habits and lack of exercise. The classroom is the perfect place to deal with this national crisis by speaking directly to the children. If children could become more aware of…

  8. Performance of the VLT Planet Finder SPHERE. I. Photometry and astrometry precision with IRDIS and IFS in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurlo, A.; Vigan, A.; Mesa, D.; Gratton, R.; Moutou, C.; Langlois, M.; Claudi, R. U.; Pueyo, L.; Boccaletti, A.; Baruffolo, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Costille, A.; Desidera, S.; Dohlen, K.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Henning, T.; Kasper, M.; Martinez, P.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Mouillet, D.; Pavlov, A.; Puget, P.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Waters, R.; Wildi, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The new planet finder for the Very Large Telescope (VLT), the Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE), just had its first light in Paranal. A dedicated instrument for the direct detection of planets, SPHERE, is composed of a polametric camera in visible light, the Zurich IMager POLarimeter (ZIMPOL), and two near-infrared sub-systems: the Infra-Red Dual-beam Imager and Spectrograph (IRDIS), a multi-purpose camera for imaging, polarimetry, and long-slit spectroscopy, and the integral field spectrograph (IFS), an integral field spectrograph. Aims: We present the results obtained from the analysis of data taken during the laboratory integration and validation phase, after the injection of synthetic planets. Since no continuous field rotation could be performed in the laboratory, this analysis presents results obtained using reduction techniques that do not use the angular differential imaging (ADI) technique. Methods: To perform the simulations, we used the instrumental point spread function (PSF) and model spectra of L and T-type objects scaled in contrast with respect to the host star. We evaluated the expected error in astrometry and photometry as a function of the signal to noise of companions, after spectral differential imaging (SDI) reduction for IRDIS and spectral deconvolution (SD) or principal component analysis (PCA) data reductions for IFS. Results: We deduced from our analysis, for example, that β Picb, a 12 Myr old planet of ~10 MJup and semi-major axis of 9-10 AU, would be detected with IRDIS with a photometric error of 0.16 mag and with a relative astrometric position error of 1.1 mas. With IFS, we could retrieve a spectrum with error bars of about 0.15 mag on each channel and astrometric relative position error of 0.6 mas. For a fainter object such as HR 8799d, a 13 MJup planet at a distance of 27 AU, IRDIS could obtain a relative astrometric error of 3 mas.

  9. Study of sungrazing comets with space-based coronagraphs: New possibilities offered by METIS on board Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemporad, A.; Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.; Knight, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    Thanks to the launch of SOHO in the end of 1995 and to the continuous monitoring of the white light (WL) corona offered by the LASCO coronagraphs, it was discovered that sungrazing comets are much more common than previously thought. More than 2800 comets have been discovered so far over nearly 20 years, hence slightly less than a comet every 2 days is observed by coronagraphs. The WL emission seen by SOHO/LASCO and more recently also by the STEREO/SECCHI instruments provides information not only on the comet orbits (hence on their origin), but also on the dust-tail formation, dust-tail disconnection, occurrence of nucleus fragmentation and nucleus disintegration processes. Very interestingly, a few sungrazing comets have also been observed spectroscopically in the UV by the SOHO UV Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS), and the strong emission observed in the HI Lyman- α 1216 Å line provides direct information also on the water outgassing rate, tail chemical composition, nucleus size, and occurrence of nucleus fragmentation. Moreover, the UV cometary emission provides a new method to estimate physical parameters of the coronal plasma met by the comet (like electron density, proton temperature and solar wind velocity), so that these comets can be considered as "local probes" for the solar corona. Unique observations of comets will be provided in the near future by the METIS coronagraph on board the Solar Orbiter mission: METIS will simultaneously observe the corona in WL and in UV (HI Lyman- α), hence it will be a unique instrument capable of studying at the same time the transiting comets and the solar corona. Previous results and new possibilities offered by METIS on these topics are summarized and discussed here.

  10. Intercomparison of the LASCO-C2, SECCHI-COR1, SECCHI-COR2, and Mk4 Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazin, Richard A.; Vasquez, Alberto M.; Thompson, William T.; Hewett, Russell J.; Lamy, Philippe; Llebaria, Antoine; Vourlidas, Angelos; Burkepile, Joan

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the reliability and consistency of white-light coronagraph measurements, we report on quantitative comparisons between polarized brightness [pB] and total brightness [B] images taken by the following white-light coronagraphs: LASCO-C2 on SOHO, SECCHI-COR1 and -COR2 on STEREO, and the ground-based MLSO-Mk4. The data for this comparison were taken on 16 April 2007, when both STEREO spacecraft were within 3.1 deg. of Earth’s heliographic longitude, affording essentially the same view of the Sun for all of the instruments. Due to the difficulties of estimating stray-light backgrounds in COR1 and COR2, only Mk4 and C2 produce reliable coronal-hole values (but not at overlapping heights), and these cannot be validated without rocket flights or ground-based eclipse measurements. Generally, the agreement between all of the instruments’ pB values is within the uncertainties in bright streamer structures, implying that measurements of bright CMEs also should be trustworthy. Dominant sources of uncertainty and stray light are discussed, as is the design of future coronagraphs from the perspective of the experiences with these instruments.

  11. Data processing and algorithm development for the WFIRST coronagraph: comparison of RDI and ADI strategies and impact of spatial sampling on post-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ygouf, Marie; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; Perrin, Marshall D.; Mennesson, Bertrand E.; Krist, John E.; Vasisht, Gautam; Nemati, Bijan; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2016-07-01

    Direct detection and characterization of mature giant or sub-Neptune exoplanets in the visible will require space- based instruments optimized for high-contrast imaging with contrasts of 10-9. In this context, the coronagraph instrument (CGI) on the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will reach raw contrasts of about 10-8 or better using state-of-the-art starlight suppression and wavefront control techniques. A ten-fold contrast improvement is therefore required using post-processing techniques in order to detect 10-9 planets from speckles. Post-processing techniques that are successful on both ground-based and space-based instruments need to be validated at such high contrast levels. In this communication, we investigate speckle subtraction techniques for different observation strategies and hardware parameters on WFIRST-like simulated images in the presence of deformable mirrors and an hybrid lyot coronagraph (HLC). We compare the contrast gain after post-processing in both speckle-noise and photon-noise dominated regimes for two different observing scenarios: the reference star differential imaging (RDI) and the angular differential imaging (ADI). We find that the ADI observing strategy is more robust to speckle and photon noises than the RDI observing strategy, enabling up to a threefold gain with respect to the latter. Thus, we recommend that the telescope be able to roll by at least 13° off nominal. We investigated the impact of spatial sampling on post-processed sensitivity, in the context of design trade studies for the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) component of the instrument. Our preliminary results suggest that the spatial sampling can be halved from the baseline sampling rate (~4 lenslets per λ/D) without any degradation in final contrast, thereby reducing the integration time required for spectroscopic characterization. In the speckle-noise dominated regime, we also find that at Nyquist sampling or higher, sub-pixel reference- to

  12. Validation of the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli (STEC) Detection Workflow.

    PubMed

    Cloke, Jonathan; Matheny, Sharon; Swimley, Michelle; Tebbs, Robert; Burrell, Angelia; Flannery, Jonathan; Bastin, Benjamin; Bird, Patrick; Benzinger, M Joseph; Crowley, Erin; Agin, James; Goins, David; Salfinger, Yvonne; Brodsky, Michael; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-11-01

    The Applied Biosystems™ RapidFinder™ STEC Detection Workflow (Thermo Fisher Scientific) is a complete protocol for the rapid qualitative detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7 and the "Big 6" non-O157 Shiga-like toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) serotypes (defined as serogroups: O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145). The RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow makes use of either the automated preparation of PCR-ready DNA using the Applied Biosystems PrepSEQ™ Nucleic Acid Extraction Kit in conjunction with the Applied Biosystems MagMAX™ Express 96-well magnetic particle processor or the Applied Biosystems PrepSEQ Rapid Spin kit for manual preparation of PCR-ready DNA. Two separate assays comprise the RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow, the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder STEC Screening Assay and the Applied Biosystems RapidFinder STEC Confirmation Assay. The RapidFinder STEC Screening Assay includes primers and probes to detect the presence of stx1 (Shiga toxin 1), stx2 (Shiga toxin 2), eae (intimin), and E. coli O157 gene targets. The RapidFinder STEC Confirmation Assay includes primers and probes for the "Big 6" non-O157 STEC and E. coli O157:H7. The use of these two assays in tandem allows a user to detect accurately the presence of the "Big 6" STECs and E. coli O157:H7. The performance of the RapidFinder STEC Detection Workflow was evaluated in a method comparison study, in inclusivity and exclusivity studies, and in a robustness evaluation. The assays were compared to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook (MLG) 5.09: Detection, Isolation and Identification of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Meat Products and Carcass and Environmental Sponges for raw ground beef (73% lean) and USDA/FSIS-MLG 5B.05: Detection, Isolation and Identification of Escherichia coli non-O157:H7 from Meat Products and Carcass and Environmental Sponges for raw beef trim. No statistically significant

  13. On-sky performance of the QACITS pointing control technique with the Keck/NIRC2 vortex coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huby, E.; Bottom, M.; Femenia, B.; Ngo, H.; Mawet, D.; Serabyn, E.; Absil, O.

    2017-03-01

    Context. A vortex coronagraph is now available for high contrast observations with the Keck/NIRC2 instrument at L band. The vortex coronagraph uses a vortex phase mask in a focal plane and a Lyot stop in a downstream pupil plane to provide high contrast at small angular separations from the observed host star. Aims: Reaching the optimal performance of the coronagraph requires fine control of the wavefront incident on the phase mask. In particular, centering errors can lead to significant stellar light leakage that degrades the contrast performance and prevents the observation of faint planetary companions around the observed stars. It is thus critical to correct for the possible slow drift of the star image from the phase mask center, generally due to mechanical flexures induced by temperature and/or gravity field variation, or to misalignment between the optics that rotate in pupil tracking mode. Methods: A control loop based on the QACITS algorithm for the vortex coronagraph has been developed and deployed for the Keck/NIRC2 instrument. This algorithm executes the entire observing sequence, including the calibration steps, initial centering of the star on the vortex center, and stabilisation during the acquisition of science frames. Results: On-sky data show that the QACITS control loop stabilizes the position of the star image down to 2.4 mas rms at a frequency of about 0.02 Hz. However, the accuracy of the estimator is probably limited by a systematic error due to a misalignment of the Lyot stop with respect to the entrance pupil, estimated to be on the order of 4.5 mas. A method to reduce the amplitude of this bias down to 1 mas is proposed. Conclusions: The QACITS control loop has been successfully implemented and provides a robust method to center and stabilize the star image on the vortex mask. In addition, QACITS ensures a repeatable pointing quality and significantly improves the observing efficiency compared to manual operations. It is now routinely used

  14. The "Giant Virus Finder" discovers an abundance of giant viruses in the Antarctic dry valleys.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2017-02-28

    Mimivirus was identified in 2003 from a biofilm of an industrial water-cooling tower in England. Later, numerous new giant viruses were found in oceans and freshwater habitats, some of them having 2,500 genes. We have demonstrated their likely presence in four soil samples taken from the Kutch Desert (Gujarat, India). Here we describe a bioinformatics work-flow, called the "Giant Virus Finder" that is capable of discovering the likely presence of the genomes of giant viruses in metagenomic shotgun-sequenced datasets. The new workflow is applied to numerous hot and cold desert soil samples as well as some tundra- and forest soils. We show that most of these samples contain giant viruses, especially in the Antarctic dry valleys. The results imply that giant viruses could be frequent not only in aqueous habitats, but in a wide spectrum of soils on our planet.

  15. Fragment Finder: a web-based software to identify similar three-dimensional structural motif

    PubMed Central

    Ananthalakshmi, P.; Kumar, Ch. Kiran; Jeyasimhan, M.; Sumathi, K.; Sekar, K.

    2005-01-01

    FF (Fragment Finder) is a web-based interactive search engine developed to retrieve the user-desired similar 3D structural fragments from the selected subset of 25 or 90% non-homologous protein chains. The search is based on the comparison of the main chain backbone conformational angles (φ and ϕ). Additionally, the queried motifs can be superimposed to find out how similar the structural fragments are, so that the information can be effectively used in molecular modeling. The engine has facilities to view the resultant superposed or individual 3D structure(s) on the client machine. The proposed web server is made freely accessible at the following URL: or . PMID:15980587

  16. Milli-Hertz Gravitational Waves: LISA and LISA PathFinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, H.; Cañizares, P.; Chmeissani, M.; Conchillo, A.; Díaz-Aguiló, M.; García-Berro, E.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Grimani, C.; Hajdas, W.; Hollington, D.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Mateos, I.; Nofrarias, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Sanjuán, J.; Sopuerta, Cf; Wass, P.

    2011-09-01

    Ground based GW detectors are limited at their lower frequency band (1-10 Hz) by settlement gravity gradients and seismic noise, and their sensitivity peaks at around 100 Hz. Sources in this band are mostly short duration signals, and their rates uncertain. Going down to milli-Hertz frequencies significantly increases the number and types of available sources. LISA was planned with the idea to explore a likely richer region of the GW spectrum, beyond that accessible to ground detectors; the latter are however expected to produce the first GW observations. In this paper I will present the main LISA concepts; in particular, emphasis will be placed on LISAPathFinder, the ESA precursor of LISA, in which our research group in Barcelona is heavily involved.

  17. Implementation of the data acquisition system for the Overlap Muon Track Finder in the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabołotny, W. M.; Bluj, M.; Buńkowski, K.; Byszuk, A. P.; Dobosz, J.; Doroba, K.; Drabik, P.; Górski, M.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K. Z.; Konecki, M.; Okliński, W.; Olszewski, M.; Poźniak, K.; Zawistowski, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF) is the new system developed during the upgrade of the CMS experiment which includes the upgrade of its Level-1 trigger. It uses the novelty approach to finding muon candidates based on data received from three types of detectors: RPC, DT, and CSC . The upgrade of the trigger system requires also upgrade of the associated Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. The OMTF DAQ transmits the data from the connected detectors that were the basis for the Level-1 trigger decision. To increase its diagnostic potential, it may also transmit the data from a few bunch crossings (BXes) preceding or following the BX, in which the L1 trigger was generated. The paper describes the technical concepts and solutions used in the OMTF DAQ system. The system is still under development. However, it successfully passed the first tests.

  18. Preliminary analysis of effect of random segment errors on coronagraph performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Mark T.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-09-01

    "Are we alone in the Universe?" is probably the most compelling science question of our generation. To answer it requires a large aperture telescope with extreme wavefront stability. To image and characterize Earth-like planets requires the ability to block 1010 of the host star's light with a 10-11 stability. For an internal coronagraph, this requires correcting wavefront errors and keeping that correction stable to a few picometers rms for the duration of the science observation. This requirement places severe specifications upon the performance of the observatory, telescope and primary mirror. A key task of the AMTD project (initiated in FY12) is to define telescope level specifications traceable to science requirements and flow those specifications to the primary mirror. From a systems perspective, probably the most important question is: What is the telescope wavefront stability specification? Previously, we suggested this specification should be 10 picometers per 10 minutes; considered issues of how this specification relates to architecture, i.e. monolithic or segmented primary mirror; and asked whether it was better to have few or many segments. This paper reviews the 10 picometers per 10 minutes specification; provides analysis related to the application of this specification to segmented apertures; and suggests that a 3 or 4 ring segmented aperture is more sensitive to segment rigid body motion that an aperture with fewer or more segments.

  19. A virtual appliance as proxy pipeline for the Solar Orbiter/Metis coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancrazzi, M.; Straus, T.; Andretta, V.; Spadaro, D.; Haugan, S. V.; de Groof, A.; Carr, R.; Focardi, M.; Nicolini, G.; Landini, F.; Baccani, C.; Romoli, M.; Antonucci, E.

    2016-08-01

    Metis is the coronagraph on board Solar Orbiter, the ESA mission devoted to the study of the Sun that will be launched in October 2018. Metis is designed to perform imaging of the solar corona in the UV at 121.6 nm and in the visible range where it will accomplish polarimetry studies thanks to a variable retarder plate. Due to mission constraints, the telemetry downlink on the spacecraft will be limited and data will be downloaded with delays that could reach, in the worst case, several months. In order to have a quick overview on the ongoing operations and to check the safety of the 10 instruments on board, a high-priority downlink channel has been foreseen to download a restricted amount of data. These so-called Low Latency Data will be downloaded daily and, since they could trigger possible actions, they have to be quickly processed on ground as soon as they are delivered. To do so, a proper processing pipeline has to be developed by each instrument. This tool will then be integrated in a single system at the ESA Science Operation Center that will receive the downloaded data by the Mission Operation Center. This paper will provide a brief overview of the on board processing and data produced by Metis and it will describe the proxy-pipeline currently under development to deal with the Metis low-latency data.

  20. Coronagraphic Observations of the Lunar Sodium Exosphere Near the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Morgan, T. H.

    1998-01-01

    The sodium exosphere of the Moon was observed using a solar coronagraph to occult the illuminated surface of the Moon. Exceptionally dust-free atmospheric conditions were required to allow the faint emission from sunlight scattered by lunar sodium atoms to be distinguished from moonlight scattered from atmospheric dust. At 0300 UT on April 22, 1994, ideal conditions prevailed for a few hours, and one excellent image of the sodium exosphere was measured, with the Moon at a phase angle of 51 deg, 81 % illuminated. Analysis of the image data showed that the weighted mean temperature of the exosphere was 1280 K and that the sodium column density varied approximately as cosine-cubed of the latitude. A cosine-cubed variation is an unexpected result, since the flux per unit area of solar photons and solar particles varies as the cosine of latitude. It is suggested that this can be explained by a temperature dependence for the sputtering of sodium atoms from the surface. This is a characteristic feature of chemical sputtering, which has been previously proposed to explain the sodium exosphere of Mercury. A possible interaction between chemical sputtering and solar photons is suggested.

  1. Design of a precise and stable composite telescope structure for the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilpatrick, Mark C.; Girard, Joseph D.; Dodson, Kelly J.

    1992-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer is a state of the art instrument which will be flown aboard the ESA SOHO spacecraft in 1995. A major objective of the SOHO is to investigate the solar corona and the solar wind by measuring parameters of the plasma, both in the source and acceleration regions, and in interplanetary space. The UVCS will provide ultraviolet spectroscopic diagnostics of temperature, density, and outflow velocity for coronal ions located between the base of the solar corona and 10 solar radii. The requirements placed on the UVCS telescope structure by the science and the spacecraft are challenging. Obtaining this scientific data requires that the telescope maintain pointing stability within a few arc-seconds in a transient thermal environment and an imaging stability within a few microns. Strict mass allowances permit only 22 kg for the 2.5 meter long telescope structure out of a total instrument allotment of 124 kg. The instrument is required to have a high minimum natural frequency of 70 Hertz and withstand launch inertia loads in excess of 18-G's while kinematically supported.

  2. Update of the Photometric Calibration of the LASCO-C2 Coronagraph Using Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaninno, Robin; Howard, Russell

    2015-04-01

    We present an update to the photometric calibration of the LASCO-C2 coronagraph onboard the SOHO spacecraft. We obtained the new calibration using data from the beginning of the mission in 1996 until 2013. We re-examined the LASCO-C2 photometric calibration by comparing the past three calibrations and the present calibration with the goal of validating an in-flight calibration. We find a photometric calibration factor (PCF) that is very similar to the factor recently published in Gardès, Lamy, and Llebaria (Solar Phys. 283, 667, 2013), which calculated a calibration between 1996 and 2009. The average of our PCF between 1999 and 2009 is the same, within our margin of error, as the average given by Gardès, Lamy, and Llebaria (Solar Phys. 283, 667, 2013) during the same time period. However, we find a different evolution of the calibration over the lifetime of the LASCO-C2 instrument compared with past results. We find that the sensitivity of the instrument is decreasing by a constant 0.20 [±0.03] % per year. We also find no significant difference in the signal degradation before and after the SOHO interruption. We discuss the effects of this new PCF on the calibrated data set and the potential impact on scientific results derived from the previous calibration.

  3. Update of the Photometric Calibration of the LASCO-C2 Coronagraph Using Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaninno, R. C.; Howard, R. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an update to the photometric calibration of the LASCO-C2 coronagraph onboard the SOHO spacecraft. We obtained the new calibration using data from the beginning of the mission in 1996 until 2013. We re-examined the LASCO-C2 photometric calibration by comparing the past three calibrations and the present calibration with the goal of validating an in-flight calibration. We find a photometric calibration factor (PCF) that is very similar to the factor recently published in Gardès, Lamy, and Llebaria ( Solar Phys. 283, 667, 2013), which calculated a calibration between 1996 and 2009. The average of our PCF between 1999 and 2009 is the same, within our margin of error, as the average given by Gardès, Lamy, and Llebaria ( Solar Phys. 283, 667, 2013) during the same time period. However, we find a different evolution of the calibration over the lifetime of the LASCO-C2 instrument compared with past results. We find that the sensitivity of the instrument is decreasing by a constant 0.20 [±0.03] % per year. We also find no significant difference in the signal degradation before and after the SOHO interruption. We discuss the effects of this new PCF on the calibrated data set and the potential impact on scientific results derived from the previous calibration.

  4. Coronagraphic Imaging of Debris Disks from a High Altitude Balloon Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen; Traub, Wesley; Bryden, Geoffrey; Brugarolas, Paul; Chen, Pin; Guyon, Olivier; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Krist, John; Macintosh, Bruce; Mawet, Dimitri; Mennesson, Bertrand; Moody, Dwight; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Stuchlik, David; Trauger, John; Vasisht, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Debris disks around nearby stars are tracers of the planet formation process, and they are a key element of our understanding of the formation and evolution of extrasolar planetary systems. With multi-color images of a significant number of disks, we can probe important questions: can we learn about planetary system evolution; what materials are the disks made of; and can they reveal the presence of planets? Most disks are known to exist only through their infrared flux excesses as measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, and through images measaured by Herschel. The brightest, most extended disks have been imaged with HST, and a few, such as Fomalhaut, can be observed using ground-based telescopes. But the number of good images is still very small, and there are none of disks with densities as low as the disk associated with the asteroid belt and Edgeworth-Kuiper belt in our own Solar System. Direct imaging of disks is major observational challenge, demanding high angular resolution and extremely high dynamic range close to the parent star. The ultimate experiment requires a space-based platform, but demonstrating much of the needed technology, mitigating the technical risks of a space-based coronagraph, and performing valuable measurements of circumstellar debris disks, can be done from a high-altitude balloon platform. In this paper we present a balloon-borne telescope concept based on the Zodiac II design that could undertake compelling studies of a sample of debris disks.

  5. Preliminary Analysis of Effect of Random Segment Errors on Coronagraph Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Mark T.; Shaklan, Stuart B.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2015-01-01

    Are we alone in the Universe is probably the most compelling science question of our generation. To answer it requires a large aperture telescope with extreme wavefront stability. To image and characterize Earth-like planets requires the ability to block 10(exp 10) of the host stars light with a 10(exp -11) stability. For an internal coronagraph, this requires correcting wavefront errors and keeping that correction stable to a few picometers rms for the duration of the science observation. This requirement places severe specifications upon the performance of the observatory, telescope and primary mirror. A key task of the AMTD project (initiated in FY12) is to define telescope level specifications traceable to science requirements and flow those specifications to the primary mirror. From a systems perspective, probably the most important question is: What is the telescope wavefront stability specification? Previously, we suggested this specification should be 10 picometers per 10 minutes; considered issues of how this specification relates to architecture, i.e. monolithic or segmented primary mirror; and asked whether it was better to have few or many segmented. This paper reviews the 10 picometers per 10 minutes specification; provides analysis related to the application of this specification to segmented apertures; and suggests that a 3 or 4 ring segmented aperture is more sensitive to segment rigid body motion that an aperture with fewer or more segments.

  6. Accurate Astrometry and Photometry of Saturated and Coronagraphic Point Spread Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Lafreniere, D; Macintosh, B; Doyon, R

    2006-02-07

    For ground-based adaptive optics point source imaging, differential atmospheric refraction and flexure introduce a small drift of the point spread function (PSF) with time, and seeing and sky transmission variations modify the PSF flux. These effects need to be corrected to properly combine the images and obtain optimal signal-to-noise ratios, accurate relative astrometry and photometry of detected companions as well as precise detection limits. Usually, one can easily correct for these effects by using the PSF core, but this is impossible when high dynamic range observing techniques are used, like coronagraphy with a non-transmissive occulting mask, or if the stellar PSF core is saturated. We present a new technique that can solve these issues by using off-axis satellite PSFs produced by a periodic amplitude or phase mask conjugated to a pupil plane. It will be shown that these satellite PSFs track precisely the PSF position, its Strehl ratio and its intensity and can thus be used to register and to flux normalize the PSF. This approach can be easily implemented in existing adaptive optics instruments and should be considered for future extreme adaptive optics coronagraph instruments and in high-contrast imaging space observatories.

  7. Update of the Photometric Calibration of the LASCO-C2 Coronagraph Using Stars.

    PubMed

    Colaninno, R C; Howard, R A

    We present an update to the photometric calibration of the LASCO-C2 coronagraph onboard the SOHO spacecraft. We obtained the new calibration using data from the beginning of the mission in 1996 until 2013. We re-examined the LASCO-C2 photometric calibration by comparing the past three calibrations and the present calibration with the goal of validating an in-flight calibration. We find a photometric calibration factor (PCF) that is very similar to the factor recently published in Gardès, Lamy, and Llebaria (Solar Phys.283, 667, 2013), which calculated a calibration between 1996 and 2009. The average of our PCF between 1999 and 2009 is the same, within our margin of error, as the average given by Gardès, Lamy, and Llebaria (Solar Phys.283, 667, 2013) during the same time period. However, we find a different evolution of the calibration over the lifetime of the LASCO-C2 instrument compared with past results. We find that the sensitivity of the instrument is decreasing by a constant 0.20 [±0.03] % per year. We also find no significant difference in the signal degradation before and after the SOHO interruption. We discuss the effects of this new PCF on the calibrated data set and the potential impact on scientific results derived from the previous calibration.

  8. Optimized principal component analysis on coronagraphic images of the fomalhaut system

    SciTech Connect

    Meshkat, Tiffany; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Quanz, Sascha P.; Amara, Adam

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a study to optimize the principal component analysis (PCA) algorithm for planet detection, a new algorithm complementing angular differential imaging and locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) for increasing the contrast achievable next to a bright star. The stellar point spread function (PSF) is constructed by removing linear combinations of principal components, allowing the flux from an extrasolar planet to shine through. The number of principal components used determines how well the stellar PSF is globally modeled. Using more principal components may decrease the number of speckles in the final image, but also increases the background noise. We apply PCA to Fomalhaut Very Large Telescope NaCo images acquired at 4.05 μm with an apodized phase plate. We do not detect any companions, with a model dependent upper mass limit of 13-18 M {sub Jup} from 4-10 AU. PCA achieves greater sensitivity than the LOCI algorithm for the Fomalhaut coronagraphic data by up to 1 mag. We make several adaptations to the PCA code and determine which of these prove the most effective at maximizing the signal-to-noise from a planet very close to its parent star. We demonstrate that optimizing the number of principal components used in PCA proves most effective for pulling out a planet signal.

  9. Feasibility of Virtual Research Visits in Fox Trial Finder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, E. Ray; Wagner, Joseph D.; Bull, Michael T.; Rizzieri, Ashley; Grischkan, Justin; Achey, Meredith A.; Sherer, Todd; Chowdhury, Sohini; Meunier, Claire; Cappelletti, Lily; Rocker, Charlotte; Richard, Irene H.; Schwarz, Heidi; Kang, Gail; Ahmad, Stacy H.; Biemiller, Rachel A.; Biglan, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fox Trial Finder is an online registry for individuals with and without Parkinson disease (PD) interested in participating in PD research. However, distance or disability could prevent such individuals from participating in traditional, clinic-based research at major centers. Objective: Use videoconferencing to connect participants to specialists to: (1) demonstrate feasibility of virtual research visits within this population (2) collect phenotypic data of the participants, (3) validate self-reported diagnosis, and (4) gauge interest in virtual research visits. Methods: We solicited volunteers throughout the United States through Fox Trial Finder. Interested individuals with PD provided consent, were given web cameras if needed, completed baseline surveys, and downloaded videoconferencing software remotely. Participants had a test connection and assessment appointment which included the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), then a virtual research visit with a neurologist who reviewed their history and assessed their PD using a modified Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale. Neurologists assessed PD diagnosis and symptomatology. Physicians and participants were surveyed about their experience. Results: Of 204 individuals who consented, 166 (81% ) individuals from 39 states completed all visits. The mean age was 62 and mean disease duration was 8.0 years. Mean MoCA score was 26.5, and mean modified MDS-UPDRS motor score was 22.8 (out of a possible 124). Neurologists judged PD as the most likely diagnosis in 97% of cases. Overall satisfaction with the visits was 79% (satisfied or very satisfied) among neurologists and 93% among participants. Conclusions: Through virtual research visits, neurologists engaged, characterized, and validated self-reported diagnosis in individuals with PD over a broad geography. This model may facilitate future research participation. PMID:26406130

  10. Seekers, Finders, Settlers, and Stumblers: Identifying the Career Paths of Males in the Genetic Counseling Profession.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anthony; Veach, Pat McCarthy; Schoonveld, Cheri; Zierhut, Heather

    2017-03-14

    Genetic counseling is a female-dominated profession, with 96% of counselors self-identifying as female. Research suggests gender diversification benefits healthcare professionals and the populations they serve. Therefore, this study explored how men choose a genetic counseling career, associations between career satisfaction and their career entry dynamics and experience levels, and differences due to experience level in how they decide on this profession. Twenty-five novice, experienced, or seasoned male counselors and 8 male genetic counseling students participated in semi-structured phone interviews. Interpretive content and cross-case analyses of interview data were informed by Simpson's "Seekers, Finders, and Settlers" theory describing career entry dynamics of men in non-traditional (i.e., female-dominated) fields. Results revealed 13 interviewees were Seekers, who initially knew they wanted a career in genetic counseling, actively chose the profession, and were satisfied with their decision. Eleven were Settlers, who had tried different, traditional jobs, with limited satisfaction before actively finding and choosing genetic counseling. Two were Finders, who discovered genetic counseling while in the career decision making process and made a passive choice to pursue it as they had no feasible, satisfactory alternative. Seven men fit a new category, we termed "Stumblers," who were in another career and satisfied, but changed to genetic counseling after happening to hear about it. Prevalent themes pertaining to participants' experiences in the career include desire for a multidisciplinary career; lack of a priori knowledge of genetic counselor roles; late exposure to the profession; and varied perceptions of being in a non-traditional career. There were few differences due to experience level and career satisfaction was high across the sample. Results suggest earlier exposure to the career and availability of detailed descriptions of its multidisciplinary

  11. Detecting and Characterizing Exoplanets with the WFIRST Coronagraph: Colors of Planets in Standard and Designer Bandpasses-SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Margaret

    The WFIRST mission is now envisioned to include a coronagraph for the purpose of direct detection of nearby exoplanets, including planets known to exist via radial velocity detection and new discoveries. Assuming that starlight rejection sufficient for planet detection (~1e-9) can be achieved, what can be learned about these planets given a realistic spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio? We propose to investigate the potential for WFIRST to efficiently discriminate planets from background sources, and to characterize planets in terms of important diagnostic atmospheric features, using broad- and intermediate band color data. We will map out this capability as a function of signal-to-noise ratio, bandpass location, and bandpass width. Our investigation will place emphasis on gas giants, ice giants, and mini-Neptunes (compatible with current AFTA-C baseline performance specifications), as well as a variety of super-Earths (an AFTA-C "stretch" goal). We will explore a variety of compositions, cloud types, phase angles, and (in the case of super-Earths with semi-transparent atmospheres) surface types. Noiseless spectra generated for these model planets will be passed through (a) standard bandpasses for comparison to prior work and (b) filter transmission curves corresponding to bandpasses of 5-20% over the full range of WFIRST's expected bandpass (400 - 1,000 nm). From this, filter combinations will be used to generate planet colors and find filter sets that most efficiently discriminate between planets and background sources, and between planets of different type. We will then repeat this exercise for S/N levels of 1-1,000 in order to (1) explore the true efficacy of broadband measurements in exoplanet studies, and (2) provide an estimate of total required integration time for a compelling WFIRST exoplanet program. To accomplish this, we will use model spectra for mini-Neptunes, and ice and gas giants of varying composition (Hu et al. 2013), and observed

  12. STIS Coronagraphic Imaging of Fomalhaut: Main Belt Structure and the Orbit of Fomalhaut b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalas, Paul; Graham, James R.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Clampin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We present new optical coronagraphic data of Fomalhaut obtained with HST/STIS in 2010 and 2012. Fomalhaut b is recovered at both epochs to high significance. The observations include the discoveries of tenuous nebulosity beyond the main dust belt detected to at least 209AU projected radius, and a approx. 50AU wide azimuthal gap in the belt northward of Fomalhaut b. The two epochs of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) photometry exclude optical variability greater than 35%. A Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis demonstrates that the orbit of Fomalhaut b is highly eccentric, with e = 0.8 +/- 0.1, a = 177 +/- 68AU, and q = 32 +/- 24AU. Fomalhaut b is apsidally aligned with the belt and 90% of allowed orbits have mutual inclination <=36 deg. Fomalhaut b's orbit is belt crossing in the sky plane projection, but only 12% of possible orbits have ascending or descending nodes within a 25AU wide belt annulus. The high eccentricity invokes a dynamical history where Fomalhaut b may have experienced a significant dynamical interaction with a hypothetical planet Fomalhaut c, and the current orbital configuration may be relatively short-lived. The Tisserand parameter with respect to a hypothetical Fomalhaut planet at 30AU or 120AU lies in the range 2-3, similar to highly eccentric dwarf planets in our solar system. We argue that Fomalhaut b's minimum mass is that of a dwarf planet in order for a circumplanetary satellite system to remain bound to a sufficient radius from the planet to be consistent with the dust scattered light hypothesis. In the coplanar case, Fomalhaut b will collide with the main belt around 2032, and the subsequent emergent phenomena may help determine its physical nature.

  13. Planet Imaging Coronagraphic Technology Using a Reconfigurable Experimental Base (PlCTURE B)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Supriya

    We propose PICTURE B, the Planet Imaging Coronagraphic Technology Using a Reconfigurable Experimental Base. PICTURE B is a sub-orbital research program to fly the PICTURE experiment as a sounding rocket (flight 1 early in 2014 to observe epsilon Eridani) in order to measure exozodiacal light and debris disks around those stars. PICTURE works in to very small (1.5 lambda/D) inner working angles (IWA) and thus matches or exceeds the ability of current space based systems nearly five times its size. The first objective of the PICTURE B effort will be to fly PICTURE on a sounding rocket to image the debris disk around epsilon Eridani. PICTURE has been designed, qualified, and survived flight (36.225UG) and recovery in a sounding rocket environment. Unfortunately, a NASA telemetry failure during its maiden flight prevented us from obtaining data from the science cameras. As a result, while we know that the instrument survived the flight and that the tracking system stabilized the target to ~3 milliarcseconds (mas) - the tracking data was on a different telemetry link - we do not have in-flight science data from the instrument. Our first task will be to collect the science data that so much effort has been invested in. This will also allow us to raise several key technologies -- particularly nullers and deformable mirrors (DMs) and their control systems -- to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6. These images of exoplanetary systems will allow us to assess the exozodiacal background against which all other exoplanet observations will have to be made. This is a key driving parameter of the design of all exoplanet imaging missions yet it remains unknown.

  14. Estimating Travel Times of Coronal Mass Ejections to 1 AU Using Multi-spacecraft Coronagraph Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Mierla, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Zhukov, A. N.; Srivastava, N.; West, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    We study the relationship between the speeds of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) obtained close to the Sun and in the interplanetary medium during the low solar-activity period from 2008 to 2010. We use a multi-spacecraft forward-modeling technique to fit a flux-rope-like model to white-light coronagraph images from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft to estimate the geometrical configuration, propagation in three-dimensions (3D), and the radial speeds of the observed CMEs. The 3D speeds obtained in this way are used in existing CME travel-time prediction models. The results are compared to the actual CME transit times from the Sun to STEREO, ACE, and Wind spacecraft as well as to the transit times calculated using projected CME speeds. CME 3D speeds give slightly better predictions than projected CME speeds, but a large scatter is observed between the predicted and observed travel times, even when 3D speeds are used. We estimate the possible sources of errors and find a weak tendency for large interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) with high magnetic fields to arrive faster than predicted and small, low-magnetic-field ICMEs to arrive later than predicted. The observed CME transit times from the Sun to 1 AU show a particularly good correlation with the upstream solar-wind speed. Similar trends have not been observed in previous studies using data sets near solar maximum. We suggest that near solar minimum a relatively narrow range of CME initial speeds, sizes, and magnetic-field magnitudes led to a situation where aerodynamic drag between CMEs and ambient solar wind was the primary cause of variations in CME arrival times from the Sun to 1 AU.

  15. STIS CORONAGRAPHIC IMAGING OF FOMALHAUT: MAIN BELT STRUCTURE AND THE ORBIT OF FOMALHAUT b

    SciTech Connect

    Kalas, Paul; Graham, James R.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Clampin, Mark

    2013-09-20

    We present new optical coronagraphic data of Fomalhaut obtained with HST/STIS in 2010 and 2012. Fomalhaut b is recovered at both epochs to high significance. The observations include the discoveries of tenuous nebulosity beyond the main dust belt detected to at least 209 AU projected radius, and a ∼50 AU wide azimuthal gap in the belt northward of Fomalhaut b. The two epochs of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) photometry exclude optical variability greater than 35%. A Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis demonstrates that the orbit of Fomalhaut b is highly eccentric, with e = 0.8 ± 0.1, a = 177 ± 68 AU, and q = 32 ± 24 AU. Fomalhaut b is apsidally aligned with the belt and 90% of allowed orbits have mutual inclination ≤36°. Fomalhaut b's orbit is belt crossing in the sky plane projection, but only 12% of possible orbits have ascending or descending nodes within a 25 AU wide belt annulus. The high eccentricity invokes a dynamical history where Fomalhaut b may have experienced a significant dynamical interaction with a hypothetical planet Fomalhaut c, and the current orbital configuration may be relatively short-lived. The Tisserand parameter with respect to a hypothetical Fomalhaut planet at 30 AU or 120 AU lies in the range 2-3, similar to highly eccentric dwarf planets in our solar system. We argue that Fomalhaut b's minimum mass is that of a dwarf planet in order for a circumplanetary satellite system to remain bound to a sufficient radius from the planet to be consistent with the dust scattered light hypothesis. In the coplanar case, Fomalhaut b will collide with the main belt around 2032, and the subsequent emergent phenomena may help determine its physical nature.

  16. APODIZED PUPIL LYOT CORONAGRAPHS FOR ARBITRARY APERTURES. IV. REDUCED INNER WORKING ANGLE AND INCREASED ROBUSTNESS TO LOW-ORDER ABERRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi

    2015-02-01

    The Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) is a diffraction suppression system installed in the recently deployed instruments Palomar/P1640, Gemini/GPI, and VLT/SPHERE to allow direct imaging and spectroscopy of circumstellar environments. Using a prolate apodization, the current implementations offer raw contrasts down to 10{sup –7} at 0.2 arcsec from a star over a wide bandpass (20%), in the presence of central obstruction and struts, enabling the study of young or massive gaseous planets. Observations of older or lighter companions at smaller separations would require improvements in terms of the inner working angle (IWA) and contrast, but the methods originally used for these designs were not able to fully explore the parameter space. We propose a novel approach to improve the APLC performance. Our method relies on the linear properties of the coronagraphic electric field with the apodization at any wavelength to develop numerical solutions producing coronagraphic star images with high-contrast region in broadband light. We explore the parameter space by considering different aperture geometries, contrast levels, dark-zone sizes, bandpasses, and focal plane mask sizes. We present an application of these solutions to the case of Gemini/GPI with a design delivering a 10{sup –8} raw contrast at 0.19 arcsec and offering a significantly reduced sensitivity to low-order aberrations compared to the current implementation. Optimal solutions have also been found to reach 10{sup –10} contrast in broadband light regardless of the aperture shape, with effective IWA in the 2-3.5 λ/D range, therefore making the APLC a suitable option for the future exoplanet direct imagers on the ground or in space.

  17. Automatically Detecting and Tracking Coronal Mass Ejections. I. Separation of Dynamic and Quiescent Components in Coronagraph Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Huw; Byrne, Jason P.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    2012-06-01

    Automated techniques for detecting and tracking coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data are of ever increasing importance for space weather monitoring and forecasting. They serve to remove the biases and tedium of human interpretation, and provide the robust analysis necessary for statistical studies across large numbers of observations. An important requirement in their operation is that they satisfactorily distinguish the CME structure from the background quiescent coronal structure (streamers, coronal holes). Many studies resort to some form of time differencing to achieve this, despite the errors inherent in such an approach—notably spatiotemporal crosstalk. This article describes a new deconvolution technique that separates coronagraph images into quiescent and dynamic components. A set of synthetic observations made from a sophisticated model corona and CME demonstrates the validity and effectiveness of the technique in isolating the CME signal. Applied to observations by the LASCO C2 and C3 coronagraphs, the structure of a faint CME is revealed in detail despite the presence of background streamers that are several times brighter than the CME. The technique is also demonstrated to work on SECCHI/COR2 data, and new possibilities for estimating the three-dimensional structure of CMEs using the multiple viewing angles are discussed. Although quiescent coronal structures and CMEs are intrinsically linked, and although their interaction is an unavoidable source of error in any separation process, we show in a companion paper that the deconvolution approach outlined here is a robust and accurate method for rigorous CME analysis. Such an approach is a prerequisite to the higher-level detection and classification of CME structure and kinematics.

  18. Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraphs for Arbitrary Apertures. IV. Reduced Inner Working Angle and Increased Robustness to Low-order Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi

    2015-02-01

    The Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph (APLC) is a diffraction suppression system installed in the recently deployed instruments Palomar/P1640, Gemini/GPI, and VLT/SPHERE to allow direct imaging and spectroscopy of circumstellar environments. Using a prolate apodization, the current implementations offer raw contrasts down to 10-7 at 0.2 arcsec from a star over a wide bandpass (20%), in the presence of central obstruction and struts, enabling the study of young or massive gaseous planets. Observations of older or lighter companions at smaller separations would require improvements in terms of the inner working angle (IWA) and contrast, but the methods originally used for these designs were not able to fully explore the parameter space. We propose a novel approach to improve the APLC performance. Our method relies on the linear properties of the coronagraphic electric field with the apodization at any wavelength to develop numerical solutions producing coronagraphic star images with high-contrast region in broadband light. We explore the parameter space by considering different aperture geometries, contrast levels, dark-zone sizes, bandpasses, and focal plane mask sizes. We present an application of these solutions to the case of Gemini/GPI with a design delivering a 10-8 raw contrast at 0.19 arcsec and offering a significantly reduced sensitivity to low-order aberrations compared to the current implementation. Optimal solutions have also been found to reach 10-10 contrast in broadband light regardless of the aperture shape, with effective IWA in the 2-3.5 λ/D range, therefore making the APLC a suitable option for the future exoplanet direct imagers on the ground or in space.

  19. The impact of radiation damage on photon counting with an EMCCD for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Nathan; Hall, David; Holland, Andrew; Burgon, Ross; Murray, Neil; Gow, Jason; Soman, Matthew; Jordan, Douglas; Demers, Richard; Harding, Leon; Hoenk, Michael; Michaels, Darren; Nemati, Bijan; Peddada, Pavani

    2015-09-01

    WFIRST-AFTA is a 2.4m class NASA observatory designed to address a wide range of science objectives using two complementary scientific payloads. The Wide Field Instrument (WFI) offers Hubble quality imaging over a 0.28 square degree field of view, and will gather NIR statistical data on exoplanets through gravitational microlensing. The second instrument is a high contrast coronagraph that will carry out the direct imaging and spectroscopic analysis of exoplanets, providing a means to probe the structure and composition of planetary systems. The coronagraph instrument is expected to operate in low photon flux for long integration times, meaning all noise sources must be kept to a minimum. In order to satisfy the low noise requirements, the Electron Multiplication (EM)-CCD has been baselined for both the imaging and spectrograph cameras. The EMCCD was selected in comparison with other candidates because of its low effective electronic read noise at sub-electron values with appropriate multiplication gain setting. The presence of other noise sources, however, such as thermal dark signal and Clock Induced Charge (CIC), need to be characterised and mitigated. In addition, operation within a space environment will subject the device to radiation damage that will degrade the Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) of the device throughout the mission lifetime. Here we present our latest results from pre- and post-irradiation testing of the e2v CCD201-20 BI EMCCD sensor, baselined for the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph instrument. A description of the detector technology is presented, alongside considerations for operation within a space environment. The results from a room temperature irradiation are discussed in context with the nominal operating requirements of AFTA-C and future work which entails a cryogenic irradiation of the CCD201-20 is presented.

  20. Deep UV to NIR Space Telescopes and Exoplanet Coronagraphs: A Trade Study on Throughput, Polarization, Mirror Coating Options and Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Shaklan, Stuart; Give'on, Amir; Cady, Eric; Marchen, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Exoplanet program and the Cosmic Origins program are exploring technical options to combine the visible to NIR performance requirements of a space coronagraph with the general astrophysics requirements of a space telescope covering the deep UV spectrum. Are there compatible options in terms of mirror coatings and telescope architecture to satisfy both goals? In this paper, we address some of the main concerns, particularly relating to polarization in the visible and throughput in the UV. Telescope architectures employing different coating options compatible with current technology are considered in this trade study.

  1. MinFinder: Locating all the local minima of a function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoulos, Ioannis G.; Lagaris, Isaac E.

    2006-01-01

    A new stochastic clustering algorithm is introduced that aims to locate all the local minima of a multidimensional continuous and differentiable function inside a bounded domain. The accompanying software (MinFinder) is written in ANSI C++. However, the user may code his objective function either in C++, C or Fortran 77. We compare the performance of this new method to the performance of Multistart and Topographical Multilevel Single Linkage Clustering on a set of benchmark problems. Program summaryTitle of program:MinFinder Catalogue identifier:ADWU Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWU Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:The tool is designed to be portable in all systems running the GNU C++ compiler Installation:University of Ioannina, Greece Programming language used:GNU-C++, GNU-C, GNU Fortran 77 Memory required to execute with typical data:200 KB No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?:no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:5797 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:588 121 Distribution format:gzipped tar file Nature of the physical problem:A multitude of problems in science and engineering are often reduced to minimizing a function of many variables. There are instances that a local optimum does not correspond to the desired physical solution and hence the search for a better solution is required. Local optimization techniques can be trapped in any local minimum. Global optimization is then the appropriate tool. For example, solving a non-linear system of equations via optimization, employing a "least squares" type of objective, one may encounter many local minima that do not correspond to solutions, i.e. they are far from zero. Method of solution:Using a uniform pdf, points are sampled from the

  2. ColoFinder: a prognostic 9-gene signature improves prognosis for 871 stage II and III colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with a high mortality rate and is still lacking an effective treatment. Our goal is to develop a robust prognosis model for predicting the prognosis in CRC patients. In this study, 871 stage II and III CRC samples were collected from six gene expression profilings. ColoFinder was developed using a 9-gene signature based Random Survival Forest (RSF) prognosis model. The 9-gene signature recurrence score was derived with a 5-fold cross validation to test the association with relapse-free survival, and the value of AUC was gained with 0.87 in GSE39582(95% CI [0.83–0.91]). The low-risk group had a significantly better relapse-free survival (HR, 14.8; 95% CI [8.17–26.8]; P < 0.001) than the high-risk group. We also found that the 9-gene signature recurrence score contributed more information about recurrence than standard clinical and pathological variables in univariate and multivariate Cox analyses when applied to GSE17536(p = 0.03 and p = 0.01 respectively). Furthermore, ColoFinder improved the predictive ability and better stratified the risk subgroups when applied to CRC gene expression datasets GSE14333, GSE17537, GSE12945and GSE24551. In summary, ColoFinder significantly improves the risk assessment in stage II and III CRC patients. The 9-gene prognostic classifier informs patient prognosis and treatment response. PMID:26989635

  3. Environmental use of a Laser Range Finder and the Advanced Visualization System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, E. N.; Bohn, S.; Baker, C. P.; Jones, D. R.; Strope, L. A.

    1993-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a large task in characterizing and remediating the contents of hazardous waste inside storage tanks. The characterization process of these tanks is a key step to the remediation process. Due to the hazardous materials inside the waste tanks, all of the work must be done remotely utilizing robotic systems. The Laser Range Finder (LRF) is a single point sensor used to remotely collect range and intensity data. The LRF sensor data is used to reconstruct the tank surface environment based on multiple LRF scans. This reconstructed surface definition can be used by a robotic controller to perform obstacle avoidance with items in the tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has used Advanced Visualization System (AVS) to prototype the filtering, transformation, and reconstructing process. AVS software modules have been written to address LRF filtering on both the range and intensity images. A coordinate transformation module was constructed to convert the raw LRF data into a Cartesian coordinate reference frame. The results of filtering and transforms are integrated into a master map of the tank using an octree database. Master octrees are traversed and made into AVS geometry to visualize the tank interior. The graphical display of the tank interior can be used for robotic path planning and monitoring waste removal progress.

  4. Parallel 4-Dimensional Cellular Automaton Track Finder for the CBM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishina, Valentina; Kisel, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    The CBM experiment (FAIR/GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) will focus on the measurement of rare probes at interaction rates up to 10 MHz with data flow of up to 1 TB/s. It requires a novel read-out and data-acquisition concept with self-triggered electronics and free-streaming data. In this case resolving different collisions is not a trivial task and event building must be performed in software online. That requires full online event reconstruction and selection not only in space, but also in time, so-called 4D event building and selection. This is a task of the First-Level Event Selection (FLES). The FLES reconstruction and selection package consists of several modules: track finding, track fitting, short-lived particles finding, event building and event selection. The Cellular Automaton (CA) track finder algorithm was adapted towards time-slice-based reconstruction and included into the CBMROOT framework. In this article, we describe the modification done to the algorithm, as well as the performance of the developed time-based approach.

  5. FINDER, A system providing complex decision support for commercial transport replanning operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittermann, Vincent; Deker, Guy; Sassus, Pierre; Mielnik, Jean-Christophe; Jud, Jean-Marie

    1994-03-01

    Decision-aid systems, likely to appear in future aircraft generations, could play a central role in the cockpit thanks to the broad spectrum of functionalities and decision support facilities they will offer to the crew. As part of such systems, the exploratory FINDER mock-up is a knowledge based system (KBS) designed to help crew members continually optimize their flight plan by suggesting solutions considering exhaustive information related to flight context, either on pilot request or upon external information occurrence. The successful evaluation by Air France pilots of that first mock-up dedicated to diversion procedure on pilot request has led to the current development of an enhanced system with nominal enroute operations and real-time capabilities. Nominal enroute operations concern the optimization with respect to an evolutive constraining of favoring environment (due to weather, traffic or regulated areas, and ETOPS constraints). This study paves the way for a future flight assistant system concept which is already under investigation and may take place in SEXTANT Avionique's future development steps.

  6. Recognition of flow in everyday life using sensor agent robot with laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshima, Misa; Mita, Akira

    2011-04-01

    In the present paper, we suggest an algorithm for a sensor agent robot with a laser range finder to recognize the flows of residents in the living spaces in order to achieve flow recognition in the living spaces, recognition of the number of people in spaces, and the classification of the flows. House reform is or will be demanded to prolong the lifetime of the home. Adaption for the individuals is needed for our aging society which is growing at a rapid pace. Home autonomous mobile robots will become popular in the future for aged people to assist them in various situations. Therefore we have to collect various type of information of human and living spaces. However, a penetration in personal privacy must be avoided. It is essential to recognize flows in everyday life in order to assist house reforms and aging societies in terms of adaption for the individuals. With background subtraction, extra noise removal, and the clustering based k-means method, we got an average accuracy of more than 90% from the behavior from 1 to 3 persons, and also confirmed the reliability of our system no matter the position of the sensor. Our system can take advantages from autonomous mobile robots and protect the personal privacy. It hints at a generalization of flow recognition methods in the living spaces.

  7. Out-of-the-ecliptic Trajectories to Reduce Zodiacal Dust Interference for Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrell, R.; Gurfil, P.; Kasdin, J.; Seager, S.; Nissanke, S.

    2001-05-01

    Out-of-the-ecliptic trajectories that are beneficial to space observatories such as the Terrestrial Planet Finder and other potential mid-IR missions are introduced. These novel trajectories result in significantly reduced background noise from the zodiacal dust and therefore allow a reduction in the necessary size of the telescope collecting area. The reduced size of the mirrors allows for a considerable reduction in payload mass and manufacturing costs. Two types of optimal trajectories that are energetically feasible were derived using genetic algorithms. These are highly inclined non-Keplerian heliocentric orbits. We use the zodiacal dust model from the COBE data (Kelsall et al. 1998) to determine how well the orbits mitigate the zodi dust interference. The first optimal trajectory can use existing launch technology and yields a maximum decrease of 67% in the zodiacal cloud brightness. The zodi brightness for this trajectory is reduced by at least 50% for 60% of the mission lifetime. The second optimal trajectory requires planned improvement in launch technology but it renders a dramatic 97% maximum noise decrease. The zodi brightness is reduced by at least 70% for 82% of the mission lifetime for this trajectory. Heliocentric orbits at 5 AU have been discussed because the zodi dust concentration is extremely low there. Unfortunately such orbits are exceedingly impractical because of high cost, power source constraints (inability to use solar cells), and a long travel time before science return.

  8. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-05-04

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach.

  9. Using a laser range finder mounted on a MicroVision robot to estimate environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, Duc; Papanikolopoulos, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    In this article we will present a new robot (MicroVision) that has been designed at the University of Minnesota (UMN), Center for Distributed Robotics. Its design reminds of the designs of previous robots built at the UMN such as the COTS Scouts or the eROSIs. It is composed of a body with two wheels and a tail just like the two aforementioned robots. However, the MicroVision has more powerful processing and sensing capabilities and we utilized these to compute areas in the surrounding environment by using a convex hull approach. We are trying to estimate the projected area of an object onto the ground. This is done by the computation of convex hulls that are based on the data received from the MicroVision's laser range finder. Although localization of the robot is an important feature in being able to compute these convex hulls, localization and mapping techniques are only used as a tool and are not an end in this work. The main idea of this work is to demonstrate the ability of the laser carrying MicroVision robot to move around an object in order to get a scan from each side. From these scans, the convex hull of the shape is deduced and its projected area onto the ground is estimated.

  10. ProGeRF: Proteome and Genome Repeat Finder Utilizing a Fast Parallel Hash Function

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Walas Jhony Lopes; Rodrigues, Thiago de Souza; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive element sequences are adjacent, repeating patterns, also called motifs, and can be of different lengths; repetitions can involve their exact or approximate copies. They have been widely used as molecular markers in population biology. Given the sizes of sequenced genomes, various bioinformatics tools have been developed for the extraction of repetitive elements from DNA sequences. However, currently available tools do not provide options for identifying repetitive elements in the genome or proteome, displaying a user-friendly web interface, and performing-exhaustive searches. ProGeRF is a web site for extracting repetitive regions from genome and proteome sequences. It was designed to be efficient, fast, and accurate and primarily user-friendly web tool allowing many ways to view and analyse the results. ProGeRF (Proteome and Genome Repeat Finder) is freely available as a stand-alone program, from which the users can download the source code, and as a web tool. It was developed using the hash table approach to extract perfect and imperfect repetitive regions in a (multi)FASTA file, while allowing a linear time complexity. PMID:25811026

  11. The instrument control software package for the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Chad F.; Robertson, Paul; Stefansson, Gudmundur Kari; Monson, Andrew; Anderson, Tyler; Halverson, Samuel; Hearty, Frederick; Levi, Eric; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Nelson, Matthew; Ramsey, Larry; Roy, Arpita; Schwab, Christian; Shetrone, Matthew; Terrien, Ryan

    2016-08-01

    We describe the Instrument Control Software (ICS) package that we have built for The Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HPF) spectrometer. The ICS controls and monitors instrument subsystems, facilitates communication with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope facility, and provides user interfaces for observers and telescope operators. The backend is built around the asynchronous network software stack provided by the Python Twisted engine, and is linked to a suite of custom hardware communication protocols. This backend is accessed through Python-based command-line and PyQt graphical frontends. In this paper we describe several of the customized subsystem communication protocols that provide access to and help maintain the hardware systems that comprise HPF, and show how asynchronous communication benefits the numerous hardware components. We also discuss our Detector Control Subsystem, built as a set of custom Python wrappers around a C-library that provides native Linux access to the SIDECAR ASIC and Hawaii-2RG detector system used by HPF. HPF will be one of the first astronomical instruments on sky to utilize this native Linux capability through the SIDECAR Acquisition Module (SAM) electronics. The ICS we have created is very flexible, and we are adapting it for NEID, NASA's Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer for the WIYN telescope; we will describe this adaptation, and describe the potential for use in other astronomical instruments.

  12. Capabilities and performance of the Automated Planet Finder telescope with the implementation of a dynamic scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jennifer; Holden, Bradford; Hanson, Russell; Laughlin, Greg; Vogt, Steve; Butler, Paul; Keiser, Sandy; Deich, William

    2015-10-01

    We report initial performance results emerging from 600 h of observations with the Automated Planet Finder (APF) telescope and Levy spectrometer located at UCO/Lick Observatory. We have obtained multiple spectra of 80 G, K, and M-type stars, which comprise 4954 individual Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurements with a median internal uncertainty of 1.35 ms-1. We find a strong, expected correlation between the number of photons accumulated in the 5000 to 6200 Å iodine region of the spectrum and the resulting internal uncertainty estimates. Additionally, we find an offset between the population of G and K stars and the M stars within the dataset when comparing these parameters. As a consequence of their increased spectral line densities, M-type stars permit the same level of internal uncertainty with 2× fewer photons than G-type and K-type stars. When observing M stars, we show that the APF/Levy has essentially the same speed-on-sky as Keck/high resolution echelle spectrometer (HIRES) for precision RVs. In the interest of using the APF for long-duration RV surveys, we have designed and implemented a dynamic scheduling algorithm. We discuss the operation of the scheduler, which monitors ambient conditions and combines on-sky information with a database of survey targets to make intelligent, real-time targeting decisions.

  13. On-board SLAM for indoor UAV using a laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpen, M.; Willrodt, C.; Frick, K.; Horn, J.

    2010-04-01

    Here we present a real-time algorithm for on-board SLAM (simultaneous localization and mapping) of a quadrotor using a laser range finder. Based on successfully implemented techniques for ground robots, we developed an algorithm that merges a new scan into the global map without any iteration. This causes some inaccuracy of the global map which leads to an error propagation during the robot's mission. Therefore an optimization algorithm reducing this inaccuracy is essential. Within this optimization lines with the same orientation and an overlapping in one of the two possible coordinates of a 2D-plane are merged if their distance is below a certain threshold value. Due to reduction of the required computing power for SLAM calculation by using orthogonal SLAM a real time SLAM running on a microcontroller becomes possible. Because of the small weight and the low electric power consumption, this controller can be mounted on an industrial quadrotor. Therefore acting autonomously in an unknown indoor environment becomes possible. In this paper we also show the validation of the presented SLAM algorithm. The first step of validation is an offline implementation in Matlab and the second step is the online validation of our algorithm on the industrial quadrotor AR100B of the AirRobot Company.

  14. Integrated modeling of optical performance for the Terrestrial Planet Finder structurally connected interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoBosco, David M.; Blaurock, Carl; Chung, Soon-Jo; Miller, David W.

    2004-09-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, to be launched in 2014 as a part of NASA's Origins Program, will search for Earth-like planets orbiting other stars. One main concept under study is a structurally connected interferometer. Integrated modeling of all aspects of the flight system is necessary to ensure that the stringent dynamic stability requirements imposed by the mission are met. The MIT Space Systems Laboratory has developed a suite of analysis tools known as DOCS (Disturbances Optics Controls Structures) that provides a MATLAB environment for managing integrated models and performing analysis and design optimization. DOCS provides a framework for identifying critical subsystem design parameters and efficiently computing system performance as a function of subsystem design. Additionally, the gradients of the performance outputs with respect to design variables can be analytically computed and used for automated exploration and optimization of the design space. The TPF integrated model consists of a structural finite element model, optical performance model, reaction wheel isolation stage, and attitude/optical control systems. The integrated model is expandable and upgradeable due to the modularity of the state-space subsystem models. Optical performance under reaction wheel disturbances is computed, and the effects of changing design parameters are explored. The results identify redesign options that meet performance requirements with improved margins, reduced cost and minimized risk.

  15. Compact MEMS mirror based Q-switch module for pulse-on-demand laser range finders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanović, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Atwood, Bryan; Su, Yu; Limkrailassiri, Kevin; Nettleton, John E.; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian J.; Hough, Nathaniel

    2015-02-01

    A highly compact and low power consuming Q-switch module was developed based on a fast single-axis MEMS mirror, for use in eye-safe battery-powered laser range finders The module's 1.6mm x 1.6mm mirror has <99% reflectance at 1535nm wavelength and can achieve mechanical angle slew rates of over 500 rad/sec when switching the Er/Yb:Glass lasing cavity from pumping to lasing state. The design targeted higher efficiency, smaller size, and lower cost than the traditional Electro-Optical Q-Switch. Because pulse-on-demand capability is required, resonant mirrors cannot be used to achieve the needed performance. Instead, a fast point-to-point analog single-axis tilt actuator was designed with a custom-coated high reflectance (HR) mirror to withstand the high intra-cavity laser fluence levels. The mirror is bonded on top of the MEMS actuator in final assembly. A compact MEMS controller was further implemented with the capability of autonomous on-demand operation based on user-provided digital trigger. The controller is designed to receive an external 3V power supply and a digital trigger and it consumes ~90mW during the short switching cycle and ~10mW in standby mode. Module prototypes were tested in a laser cavity and demonstrated high quality laser pulses with duration of ~20ns and energy of over 3mJ.

  16. Environmental use of a Laser Range Finder and the Advanced Visualization System

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, E.N.; Bohn, S.; Baker, C.P.; Jones, D.R.; Strope, L.A.

    1993-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a large task in characterizing and remediating the contents of hazardous waste inside storage tanks. The characterization process of these tanks is a key step to the remediation process. Due to the hazardous materials inside the waste tanks, all of the work must be done remotely utilizing robotic systems. The Laser Range Finder (LRF) is a single point sensor used to remotely collect range and intensity data. The LRF sensor data is used to reconstruct the tank surface environment based on multiple LRF scans. This reconstructed surface definition can be used by a robotic controller to perform obstacle avoidance with items in the tank. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has used Advanced Visualization System (AVS) to prototype the filtering, transformation and reconstructing process. AVS software modules have been written to address LRF filtering on both the range and intensity images. A coordinate transformation module was constructed to convert the raw LRF data into a Cartesian coordinate reference frame. The results of filtering and transforms are integrated into a master map of the tank using an octree database. Master octrees are traversed and made into AVS geometry to visualize the tank interior. The graphical display of the tank interior can be used for robotic path planning and monitoring waste removal progress.

  17. Exploration tools for drug discovery and beyond: applying SciFinder to interdisciplinary research.

    PubMed

    Haldeman, Margaret; Vieira, Barbara; Winer, Fred; Knutsen, Lars J S

    2005-06-01

    Chemists have long recognized the value of online databases for surveying the literature of their field. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) databases covering almost a century's worth of journal articles and patent documents are among the best known and widely used for searching information on compounds. Today's research presents a new challenge, however, as the boundaries of chemistry and biological sciences overlap increasingly. This trend is especially true in the drug discovery field where published findings relating to both chemical and biological entities and their interactions are examined. CAS has expanded its resources to meet the requirements of the new, interdisciplinary challenges faced by today's researchers. This is evident both in the content of CAS databases, which have been expanded to include more biology-related information, and in the technology of the search tools now available to researchers on their desktop. It is the integration of content and search-and-retrieval technology that enables new insights to be made in the vast body of accumulated information. CAS's SciFinder is a widely used research tool for this purpose.

  18. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  19. Technology advancement of the CCD201-20 EMCCD for the WFIRST coronagraph instrument: sensor characterization and radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Leon K.; Demers, Richard T.; Hoenk, Michael; Peddada, Pavani; Nemati, Bijan; Cherng, Michael; Michaels, Darren; Neat, Leo S.; Loc, Anthony; Bush, Nathan; Hall, David; Murray, Neil; Gow, Jason; Burgon, Ross; Holland, Andrew; Reinheimer, Alice; Jorden, Paul R.; Jordan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The Wide Field InfraRed Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset (WFIRST-AFTA) mission is a 2.4-m class space telescope that will be used across a swath of astrophysical research domains. JPL will provide a high-contrast imaging coronagraph instrument-one of two major astronomical instruments. In order to achieve the low noise performance required to detect planets under extremely low flux conditions, the electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) has been baselined for both of the coronagraph's sensors-the imaging camera and integral field spectrograph. JPL has established an EMCCD test laboratory in order to advance EMCCD maturity to technology readiness level-6. This plan incorporates full sensor characterization, including read noise, dark current, and clock-induced charge. In addition, by considering the unique challenges of the WFIRST space environment, degradation to the sensor's charge transfer efficiency will be assessed, as a result of damage from high-energy particles such as protons, electrons, and cosmic rays. Science-grade CCD201-20 EMCCDs have been irradiated to a proton fluence that reflects the projected WFIRST orbit. Performance degradation due to radiation displacement damage is reported, which is the first such study for a CCD201-20 that replicates the WFIRST conditions. In addition, techniques intended to identify and mitigate radiation-induced electron trapping, such as trap pumping, custom clocking, and thermal cycling, are discussed.

  20. Diffraction modeling of finite subband EFC probing on dark hole contrast with WFIRST-CGI shaped pupil coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hanying; Krist, John; Nemati, Bijan

    2016-08-01

    Current coronagraph instrument design (CGI), as a part of a proposed NASA WFIRST (Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope) mission, allocates two subband filters per full science band in order to contain system complexity and cost. We present our detailed investigation results on the adequacy of such limited number of finite subband filters in achieving full band dark hole contrast with shaped pupil coronagraph. The study is based on diffraction propagation modeling with realistic WFIRST optics, where each subband's complex field estimation is obtained, using Electric Field Conjugation (EFC) wavefront sensing / control algorithm, from pairwise pupil plane deformable mirror (DM) probing and image plane intensity averaging of the resulting fields of multiple (subband) wavelengths. Multiple subband choices and probing and control strategies are explored, including standard subband probing; mixed wavelength and/or weighted Jacobian matrix; subband probing with intensity subtraction; and extended subband probing with intensity subtraction. Overall, the investigation shows that the achievable contrast with limited number of finite subband EFC probing is about 2 2.5x worse than the designed post-EFC contrast for current SPC design. The result suggests that for future shaped pupil design, slightly larger over intended full bandwidth should be considered if it will be used with limited subbands for probing.

  1. A Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph for the Direct Imaging and Spectroscopy of Exoplanet Systems: Recent Results and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Gordon, Brian; Krist, John; Mawet, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    We report our best laboratory contrast demonstrations achieved to date. We review the design, fabrication, performance, and future prospects of a hybrid focal plane occulter for exoplanet coronagraphy. Composed of thickness-profiled metallic and dielectric thin films vacuum deposited on a fused silica substrate, the hybrid occulter uses two superimposed thin films for control over both the real and imaginary parts of the complex attenuation pattern. Together with a deformable mirror for adjustment of wavefront phase, the hybrid Lyot coronagraph potentially exceeds billion-to one contrast over dark fields extending to within angular separations of 3 lambda/D (3 x the cosmological constant / diameter of the telescope) from the central star, over spectral bandwidths of 20 percent or more, and with throughput efficiencies up to 60 percent. We report laboratory contrasts of 3 x 10 (sup -10) degrees over 2 percent bandwidths, 6 x 10 (sup -10) degrees over 10 percent bandwidths, and 2 x 10 (sup -9) over 20 percent bandwidths, achieved across high contrast fields extending from an inner working angle of 3 lambda/D to a radius of 15 lambda/D. Occulter performance is analyzed in light of recent experiments and optical models, and prospects for further improvements are summarized. The science capabilities of the hybrid Lyot coronagraph are compared with requirements of the ACCESS mission, a representative exoplanet space telescope concept study for the direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanet systems. This work has been supported by NASA's Technology Demonstration for Exoplanet Missions (TDEM) program.

  2. Coronagraphic imaging of pre-main-sequence stars: Remnant evvelopes of star formation seen in reflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Golimowski, David A.

    1995-01-01

    We have obtained R- and I-band coronagraphic images of the vicinities of 11 pre-main sequence (PMS) stars to search for faint, small-scale reflection nebulae. The inner radius of the search and the field of view are 1.9 arcsec and 1x1 arcmin, respectively. Reflection nebulae were imaged around RY Tau, T Tau,DG Tau, SU Aur, AB Aur, FU Ori, and Z CMa. No nebulae were detected around HBC 347, GG Tau, V773 Tau, and V830 Tau. Categorically speaking, most of the classical T Tauri program stars and all the FU Orionis-type program stars are associated with the reflection nebulae, while none of the weak-line T Tauri program stars are associated with nebulae. The detected nebulae range in size from 250 to 37 000 AU. From the brightness ratios of the stars and nebulae, we obtain a lower limit to the visual extinction of PMS star light through the nebulae of (A(sub V))(sub neb) = 0.1. The lower limits of masses and volume densities of the nebulae associated with the classical T Tauri stars are 10(exp-6) Solar mass and N(sub H) = 10(exp 5)/cu cm, respectively. Lower limits for the nebulae around FU Orionis stars are 10(exp -5) Solar mass and n(sub H) = 10 (exp 5)/cu cm, respectively. Some reflection nebulae may trace the illuminated surfaces of the optically thick dust nebulae, so these mass estimates are not stringent. All the PMS stars with associated nebulae are strong far-infrared emitters. Both the far-infrared emission and the reflection nebulae appear to originate from the remnant envelopes of star formation. The 100 micrometers emitting regions of SU Aur and FU Ori are likely to be cospatial with the reflection nebulae. A spatial discontinuity between FU Ori and its reflection nebula may explain the dip in the far-infrared spectral energy distribution at 60 micrometers. The warped, disk-like nebulae around T Tau and Z CMa are aligned with and embrace the inner star/circumstellar disk systems. The arc-shaped nebula around DG Tau may be in contact with the coaligned inner

  3. Electric Field Reconstruction in the Image Plane of a High-Contrast Coronagraph Using a Set of Pinholes Around the Lyot Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giveon, Amir; Kern, Brian; Shaklan, Stuart; Wallace, Kent; Noecker, Charley

    2012-01-01

    The pair-wise estimation has been used now on various testbeds with different coronagraphs with the best contrast results to date. Pinholes estimate has been implemented and ready to be tested in closed loop correction. Pinholes estimate offers an independent method. We hope to improve the calibration process to gain better estimates.

  4. The Microlensing Planet Finder: A Census Of Planetary Systems Like Our Own.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.; Cheng, E.; Kimble, R.; Mather, J.; Gould, A.; Brown, M.; Anderson, J.; Beaulieu, J.; Bond, I.; Cook, K.; Friedman, S.; Gaudi, S.; Gilliland, R.; Griest, K.; Jenkins, J.; Lunine, J.; Minniti, D.; Paczynski, B.; Peale, S.; Rich, M.; Sahu, K.; Shao, M.; Tenerelli, D.; Udalski, A.; Yock, P.

    2006-09-01

    The Microlensing Planet Finder (MPF) will complete the first census of extrasolar planets with sensitivity to planets like those in our own Solar System. MPF uses a proven low-mass planet detection method to detect planets with masses of 0.1 Earth masses or more at all separations of 0.5 AU or larger from their host stars. MPF's planetary census provides critical data for understanding planet formation and habitability that cannot be obtained by other means. MPF's results complement those of the Kepler mission, which detects Earth-like planets at separations of 1 AU or less. MPF and Kepler overlap at a 1 AU, in the habitable zone for Solar type stars. MPF's employs a 1.1m telescope with a 0.65 square degree FOV that images in the near IR (600-1700nm). MPF's inclined geosynchronous orbit allows continuous data transmission to a dedicated ground station while maintaining continuous, high angular resolution observations of 2.5 square degrees of the central Galactic bulge. This is necessary to discovery terrestrial extrasolar planets at a wide range of orbital separations. If every planetary system has the same planet-star mass ratios and separations as our own Solar System, then MPF detects 150 terrestrial planets, 6000 gas giants, and 130 ice giants. MPF also detects 60 free-floating Earths if there is one such planet per Galactic star. During the 3 months per year when the Galactic bulge cannot be observed, addresses other science goals, such as the follow-up of Kepler planet candidates observations to exclude "false positive” Kepler planet detections. MPF also searches beyond the Kuiper Belt for objects like Sedna to test theories of the Solar System's formation and runs a General Observer program.

  5. Development and validation of the Overlap Muon Track Finder for the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, J.; Mietki, P.; Zawistowski, K.; Żarnecki, G.

    2016-09-01

    Present article is a description of the authors contribution in upgrade and analysis of performance of the Level-1 Muon Trigger of the CMS experiment. The authors are students of University of Warsaw and Gdansk University of Technology. They are collaborating with the CMS Warsaw Group. This article summarises students' work presented during the Students session during the Workshop XXXVIII-th IEEE-SPIE Joint Symposium Wilga 2016. In the first section the CMS experiment is briefly described and the importance of the trigger system is explained. There is also shown basic difference between old muon trigger strategy and the upgraded one. The second section is devoted to Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF). This is one of the crucial components of the Level-1 Muon Trigger. The algorithm of OMTF is described. In the third section there is discussed one of the event selection aspects - cut on the muon transverse momentum pT . Sometimes physical muon with pT bigger than a certain threshold is unnecessarily cut and physical muon with lower pT survives. To improve pT selection modified algorithm was proposed and its performance was studied. One of the features of the OMTF is that one physical muon often results in several muon candidates. The Ghost-Buster algorithm is designed to eliminate surplus candidates. In the fourth section this algorithm and its performance on different data samples are discussed. In the fifth section Local Data Acquisition System (Local DAQ) is briefly described. It supports initial system commissioning. The test done with OMTF Local DAQ are described. In the sixth section there is described development of web application used for the control and monitoring of CMS electronics. The application provides access to graphical user interface for manual control and the connection to the CMS hierarchical Run Control.

  6. Referral Finder: Saving Time and Improving The Quality of In-hospital Referrals.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Jennifer; Cowan, Neil; Tully, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Making referrals to other hospital specialties is one of the key duties of the foundation doctor, which can be difficult and time consuming. In Ninewells hospital, Scotland, in our experience the effectiveness of referrals is limited by contact details not being readily accessible and foundation doctors not knowing what information is relevant to each specialty. We surveyed foundation doctors on their experience of the existing referral process to identify where we needed to focus to improve the process. The doctors reported significant delays in obtaining contact details from the operator, and found they did not know the specific information needed in each referral. To increase the information available to foundation doctors, we set up a page on the staff intranet called 'Referral Finder'. This page includes contact details, guidelines for referral, and links to relevant protocols for each specialty. By making this information readily accessible our objective was to increase the speed and quality of referrals. When surveyed two months after the web page was established, foundation doctors reported a reduction in calls to operator from baseline and reported achieving more effective referrals. When asked to comment, many doctors asked if the page could include details for other hospitals in our health board and provide more specialty specific information. This feedback prompted us to extend the scope of the page to include the district general hospital in our region, and update many of the existing details. Doctors were then surveyed after the updates, 100% agreed that the website saved time and there was a 49.3% reduction in doctors who reported not knowing the specific information needed for a referral. Having adequate information improved referrals and resulted in time saved. This would allow more time for patient care. The quality improvement project was praised among doctors as a useful, innovative and replicable project.

  7. AsteroidFinder - The Space-Borne Telescope to Search for NEO Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, M.; Mosebach, H.; Schubert, J.; Michaelis, H.; Mottola, S.; Kührt, E.; Schindler, K.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents the mission profile as well as the optical configuration of the space-borne AsteroidFinder telescope. Its main objective is to retrieve asteroids with orbits interior to the earth's orbit. The instrument requires high sensitivity to detect asteroids with a limiting magnitude of equal or larger than 18.5mag (V-Band) and astrometric accuracy of 1arcsec (1σ). This requires a telescope aperture greater than 400cm2, high image stability, detector with high quantum efficiency (peak > 90%) and very low noise, which is only limited by zodiacal background. The telescope will observe the sky between 30° and 60° in solar elongation. The telescope optics is based on a Cook type TMA. An effective 2°×2° field of view (FOV) is achieved by a fast F/3.4 telescope with near diffraction-limited performance. The absence of centre obscuration or spiders in combination with an accessible intermediate field plane and exit pupil allow for efficient stray light mitigation. Design drivers for the telescope are the required point spread function (PSF) values, an extremely efficient stray light suppression (due to the magnitude requirement mentioned above), the detector performance, and the overall optical and mechanical stability for all orientations of the satellite. To accommodate the passive thermal stabilization scheme and the necessary structural stability, the materials selection for the telescope main structure and the mirrors are of vital importance. A focal plane with four EMCCD detectors is envisaged. The EMCCD technology features shorter integration times, which is in favor regarding the pointing performance of the satellite. The launch of the mission is foreseen for the year 2013 with a subsequent mission lifetime of at least 1 year.

  8. The Automated Planet Finder telescope's automation and first three years of planet detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) is a 2.4m, f/15 telescope located at the UCO's Lick Observatory, atop Mt. Hamilton. The telescope has been specifically optimized to detect and characterize extrasolar planets via high precision, radial velocity (RV) observations using the high-resolution Levy echelle spectrograph. The telescope has demonstrated world-class internal precision levels of 1 m/s when observing bright, RV standard stars. Observing time on the telescope is divided such that ˜80% is spent on exoplanet related research and the remaining ˜20% is made available to the University of California consortium for other science goals. The telescope achieved first light in 2013, and this work describes the APF's early science achievements and its transition from a traditional observing approach to a fully autonomous facility. First we provide a characteristic look at the APF telescope and the Levy spectrograph, focusing on the stability of the instrument and its performance on RV standard stars. Second, we describe the design and implementation of the dynamic scheduling software which has been running our team's nightly observations on the APF for the past year. Third, we discuss the detection of a Neptune-mass planet orbiting the nearby, low-mass star GL687 by the APF in collaboration with the HIRES instrument on Keck I. Fourth, we summarize the APF's detection of two multi-planet systems: the four planet system orbiting HD 141399 and the 6 planet system orbiting HD 219134. Fifth, we expand our science focus to assess the impact that the APF - with the addition of a new, time-varying prioritization scheme to the telescope's dynamic scheduling software - can have on filling out the exoplanet Mass-Radius diagram when pursuing RV follow-up of transiting planets detected by NASA's TESS satellite. Finally, we outline some likely next science goals for the telescope.

  9. A Coronagraphic Survey for Circumstellar Disks Around Main Sequence and Pre-Main Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Paul George

    1996-12-01

    We search for optical reflection nebulosity around ~100 main sequence and pre-main sequence stars to test the hypothesis that Vega-like stars possess replenished dust disks. A Lyot coronagraph is used to suppress light from the central star and to observe the circumstellar environment closer to planet-forming regions than is possible through direct imaging. A model of scattered light from axisymmetric circumstellar disks is developed to establish the sensitivity limits of our observations. Circumstellar nebulosities are detected around four main sequence stars: β Pic, BD +31o 643, HR 241, and HR 1307. No circumstellar disks are found around ~100 other main sequence stars, including Vega, Fomalhaut, HD 98800, HR 4796, and 51 Oph. Non-detections of disks in the main sequence sample, combined with the sensitivity limits, suggest that the optical scattering cross-section of dust at 102 - 103 AU radii is not strongly correlated to the thermal cross-section at 1-10 AU radii. We show that the prominence of the β Pic disk is primarily a result of its large scattering cross-section, rather than its edge-on inclination or close proximity to the Sun (Kalas & Jewitt 1996). Five types of asymmetry are identified and measured in the disk morphology (Kalas & Jewitt 1995). The observed tilt of the midplane may result from a small inclination (<= 5o) of the disk to our line of sight, combined with a non-isotropic scattering phase function. The remaining four asymmetries indicate a non-axisymmetric distribution of orbiting dust particles between 150 and 800 AU projected radius. The disk may have been gravitationally perturbed in the past 102 to 103 years, though a perturbing agent is not detected. A nebulosity imaged near the B5V double star BD +31o 643 is identified as a circumstellar disk candidate based on its morphological similarity to β Pic and our model disks (Kalas & Jewitt 1997). The disk has a position angle 131o, a projected radius of ~2000 AU, an inclination of i

  10. Science yield modeling with the Exoplanet Open-Source Imaging Mission Simulator (EXOSIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacroix, Christian; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel; Lowrance, Patrick; Morgan, Rhonda

    2016-08-01

    We report on our ongoing development of EXOSIMS and mission simulation results for WFIRST. We present the interface control and the modular structure of the software, along with corresponding prototypes and class definitions for some of the software modules. More specifically, we focus on describing the main steps of our high-fidelity mission simulator EXOSIMS, i.e., the completeness, optical system and zodiacal light modules definition, the target list module filtering, and the creation of a planet population within our simulated universe module. For the latter, we introduce the integration of a recent mass-radius model from the FORECASTER software. We also provide custom modules dedicated to WFIRST using both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) for detection and characterization, respectively. In that context, we show and discuss the results of some preliminary WFIRST simulations, focusing on comparing different methods of integration time calculation, through ensembles (large numbers) of survey simulations.

  11. Debris Disks in Aggregate: Using Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphic Imagery to Understand the Scattered-Light Disk Detection Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of coronagraphic imaging of debris disk candidate stars, only 16 have been imaged in scattered light. Since imaged disks provide our best insight into processes which sculpt disks, and can provide signposts of the presence of giant planets at distances which would elude radial velocity and transit surveys, we need to understand under what conditions we detect the disks in scattered light, how these disks differ from the majority of debris disks, and how to increase the yield of disks which are imaged with 0.1" angular resolution. In this talk, I will review what we have learned from a shallow HSTINICMOS NIR survey of debris disks, and present first results from our on-going HST /STIS optical imaging of bright scattered-light disks.

  12. Range estimation techniques in single-station thunderstorm warning sensors based upon gated, wideband, magnetic direction finder technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifer, Alburt E.; Hiscox, William L.; Cummins, Kenneth L.; Neumann, William T.

    1991-01-01

    Gated, wideband, magnetic direction finders (DFs) were originally designed to measure the bearing of cloud-to-ground lightning relative to the sensor. A recent addition to this device uses proprietary waveform discrimination logic to select return stroke signatures and certain range dependent features in the waveform to provide an estimate of range of flashes within 50 kms. The enhanced ranging techniques are discussed which were designed and developed for use in single station thunderstorm warning sensor. Included are the results of on-going evaluations being conducted under a variety of meteorological and geographic conditions.

  13. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  14. Coronagraphic imaging of three weak-line T Tauri stars: evidence of planetary formation around PDS 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, P.; Mawet, D.; Absil, O.; Boccaletti, A.; Baudoz, P.; Herwats, E.; Surdej, J.

    2006-10-01

    Context: .High angular resolution imaging of nearby pre-main sequence stars with ages between 1 and 30 Myr can give valuable information on planet formation mechanisms. This range of ages is thought to correspond to the dissipation of the optically thick dust disks surrounding young stars and to the end of the planet formation. Aims: .This paper presents new observations of three weak-line T Tauri Stars (WTTS) of intermediate ages ranging from 7 to 16 Myr. It aims at increasing the knowledge and sample of circumstellar disks around "old" WTTS. Methods: .We observed three stars with the VLT's NAOS-CONICA adaptive optics system in coronagraphic mode. The four-quadrant phase mask coronagraph was used to improve the dynamic range (by a factor of 100) while preserving the high angular resolution (inner working angle of 0farcs 15). Results: .One object of our sample (PDS 70), a K5 star, exhibits a brown dwarf companion and a disk in scattered light with a surface brightness power law of r-2.8, extending from a distance of 14 to 140 AU (assuming a stellar distance of 140 pc) and an integrated luminosity of 16.7 mJy in the K_s-band. The mass of the companion can be estimated to be within a range between 27 and 50 Jupiter masses with an effective temperature of 2750 ± 100 K. This object also shows a resolved outflow stretching up to 550 AU. Conclusions: .This newly detected circumstellar disk shows strong similarities with the disk around TW Hya, and adds to the observed population of "old" TTS surrounded by circumstellar material. Moreover, three clues of planetary formation are brought to light by this study.

  15. The opto-mechanical design of the GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Mark; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Baldwin, Daniel; Bean, Jacob; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Brennan, Patricia; Budynkiewicz, J.; Chun, Moo-Yung; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Epps, Harland; Evans, Ian; Evans, Janet; Foster, Jeff; Frebel, Anna; Gauron, Thomas; Glenday, Alex; Hare, Tyson; Jang, Bi-Ho; Jang, Jeong-Gyun; Jordan, Andreas; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Kang-Min; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; McCracken, Kenneth; McMuldroch, Stuart; Miller, Joseph; Oh, Jae Sok; Onyuksel, Cem; Ordway, Mark; Park, Chan; Park, Sung-Joon; Paxson, Charles; Phillips, David; Plummer, David; Podgorski, William; Seifahrt, Andreas; Steiner, Joao; Uomoto, Alan; Walsworth, Ronald; Yu, Young-Sam

    2016-08-01

    The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is a fiber-fed, optical echelle spectrograph selected as the first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) now under construction at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. G-CLEF has been designed to be a general-purpose echelle spectrograph with precision radial velocity (PRV) capability for exoplanet detection. The radial velocity (RV) precision goal of G-CLEF is 10 cm/sec, necessary for detection of Earth-sized exoplanets. This goal imposes challenging stability requirements on the optical mounts and the overall spectrograph support structures especially when considering the instrument's operational environment. The accuracy of G-CLEF's PRV measurements will be influenced by minute changes in temperature and ambient air pressure as well as vibrations and micro gravity-vector variations caused by normal telescope slewing. For these reasons we have chosen to enclose G-CLEF's spectrograph in a well-insulated, vibration isolated vacuum chamber in a gravity invariant location on GMT's azimuth platform. Additional design constraints posed by the GMT telescope include: a limited space envelope, a thermal emission ceiling, and a maximum weight allowance. Other factors, such as manufacturability, serviceability, available technology and budget are also significant design drivers. All of the above considerations must be managed while ensuring performance requirements are achieved. In this paper, we discuss the design of G-CLEF's optical mounts and support structures including the choice of a low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) carbon-fiber optical bench to minimize the system's sensitivity to thermal soaks and gradients. We discuss design choices made to the vacuum chamber geared towards minimize the influence of daily ambient pressure variations on image motion during observation. We discuss the design of G-CLEF's insulated enclosure and thermal control systems which will maintain the spectrograph at

  16. The opto-mechanical design of the GMT-consortium large earth finder (G-CLEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Mark; Baldwin, Daniel; Bean, Jacob; Bergner, Henry; Bigelow, Bruce; Chun, Moo-Young; Crane, Jeffrey; Foster, Jeff; Fżrész, Gabor; Gauron, Thomas; Guzman, Dani; Hertz, Edward; Jordán, Andrés.; Kim, Kang-Min; McCracken, Kenneth; Norton, Timothy; Ordway, Mark; Park, Chan; Park, Sang; Podgorski, William A.; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Uomoto, Alan; Yuk, In-Soo

    2014-08-01

    The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is a fiber fed, optical echelle spectrograph that has been selected as a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) currently under construction at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile's Atacama desert region. We designed G-CLEF as a general-purpose echelle spectrograph with precision radial velocity (PRV) capability used for exoplanet detection. The radial velocity (RV) precision goal of GCLEF is 10 cm/sec, necessary for detection of Earth-sized planets orbiting stars like our Sun in the habitable zone. This goal imposes challenging stability requirements on the optical mounts and the overall spectrograph support structures. Stability in instruments of this type is typically affected by changes in temperature, orientation, and air pressure as well as vibrations caused by telescope tracking. For these reasons, we have chosen to enclose G-CLEF's spectrograph in a thermally insulated, vibration isolated vacuum chamber and place it at a gravity invariant location on GMT's azimuth platform. Additional design constraints posed by the GMT telescope include: a limited space envelope, a thermal emission ceiling, and a maximum weight allowance. Other factors, such as manufacturability, serviceability, available technology and budget are also significant design drivers. All of the previously listed considerations must be managed while ensuring that performance requirements are achieved. In this paper, we discuss the design of G-CLEF's optical mounts and support structures including technical choices made to minimize the system's sensitivity to thermal gradients. A more general treatment of the properties of G-CLEF can be found elsewhere in these proceedings1. We discuss the design of the vacuum chamber which houses the irregularly shaped optical bench and optics while conforming to a challenging space envelope on GMT's azimuth platform. We also discuss the design of G-CLEF's insulated enclosure and thermal

  17. Gene analogue finder: a GRID solution for finding functionally analogous gene products

    PubMed Central

    Tulipano, Angelica; Donvito, Giacinto; Licciulli, Flavio; Maggi, Giorgio; Gisel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background To date more than 2,1 million gene products from more than 100000 different species have been described specifying their function, the processes they are involved in and their cellular localization using a very well defined and structured vocabulary, the gene ontology (GO). Such vast, well defined knowledge opens the possibility of compare gene products at the level of functionality, finding gene products which have a similar function or are involved in similar biological processes without relying on the conventional sequence similarity approach. Comparisons within such a large space of knowledge are highly data and computing intensive. For this reason this project was based upon the use of the computational GRID, a technology offering large computing and storage resources. Results We have developed a tool, GENe AnaloGue FINdEr (ENGINE) that parallelizes the search process and distributes the calculation and data over the computational GRID, splitting the process into many sub-processes and joining the calculation and the data on the same machine and therefore completing the whole search in about 3 days instead of occupying one single machine for more than 5 CPU years. The results of the functional comparison contain potential functional analogues for more than 79000 gene products from the most important species. 46% of the analyzed gene products are well enough described for such an analysis to individuate functional analogues, such as well-known members of the same gene family, or gene products with similar functions which would never have been associated by standard methods. Conclusion ENGINE has produced a list of potential functionally analogous relations between gene products within and between species using, in place of the sequence, the gene description of the GO, thus demonstrating the potential of the GO. However, the current limiting factor is the quality of the associations of many gene products from non-model organisms that often have

  18. Autonomous Observing and Planet Discovery with the Automated Planet Finder (APF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jennifer; Hanson, Russell; Holden, Bradford; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, Steven S.; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) is a dedicated, ground-based precision radial velocity facility located at Lick Observatory, operated by University of California Observatories (UCO). The 2.4-m telescope and accompanying high-resolution echelle spectrograph were specifically designed for the purpose of detecting planets in the habitable zone of low-mass stars. The telescope is operated every night (weather permitting) to achieve meaningful signal-to-noise gains from high cadence observing and to avoid the aliasing problems inherent to planets whose periods are close to the lunar month.The APF has been taking science quality data for over a year and has contributed to two planet discovery papers with data at a 1 m/s level of precision. The detection of these planets, especially the Uranus mass planet around GL687, indicates that the APF telescope is well suited to the discovery of low-mass planets orbiting low-mass stars in the as-yet relatively un-surveyed region of the sky near the north celestial pole.To take full advantage of the consistent influx of data it is necessary to analyze each night's results before deciding the next evening's targets. We are in the process of developing a fully automated reduction pipeline that will take data from raw FITS files to final radial velocity values and integrate those values into a master database. The database is then run through the publicly available Systemic console, a publically available software package for the analysis and combined multiparameter fitting of Doppler radial velocity observations. Systemic will re-calculate the possibility of planetary signals in the data and use this value, along with other considerations such as the star's brightness and chromospheric activity level, to assign it a priority rating for future observations.When the telescope is again on sky it uses a suite of stellar and atmospheric calibrations derived from the part year's observations to calculate the expected exposure time for

  19. StrengthsFinder Signature Themes of Talent in Doctor of Pharmacy Students in Five Midwestern Pharmacy Schools

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Karen B.; Kelley, Katherine A.; Marshall, Vincent D.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Scott, Steven A.; Sorensen, Todd D.; Yee, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe student pharmacists’ Signature Themes from the Clifton StrengthsFinder across 5 Midwestern pharmacy institutions and to compare themes by gender, institution, and undergraduate population. Methods. Student pharmacists completed the StrengthsFinder 2.0 assessment and received their top 5 Signature Themes. Themes were organized and examined by domains (Executing, Influencing, Relationship Building, Strategic Thinking). The distribution of the themes was compared between student pharmacists and undergraduates and themes and domains were compared by institution and gender. Results. Although results varied by institution, the top 5 themes among the 1244 of 1250 students (99.5%) who completed the assessment were: Achiever, Harmony, Learner, Responsibility, and Empathy. Female student pharmacists had more themes in Executing and Relationship Building, while males had more themes in Influencing and Strategic Thinking. Pharmacy students exhibit more Executing domain talents and fewer Influencing domain talents compared with undergraduates. Conclusion. Signature Themes were consistent among student pharmacists across 5 Midwestern colleges of pharmacy. PMID:26089558

  20. Forecast-based Integrated Flood Detection System for Emergency Response and Disaster Risk Reduction (Flood-FINDER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcorace, Mauro; Silvestro, Francesco; Rudari, Roberto; Boni, Giorgio; Dell'Oro, Luca; Bjorgo, Einar

    2016-04-01

    Most flood prone areas in the globe are mainly located in developing countries where making communities more flood resilient is a priority. Despite different flood forecasting initiatives are now available from academia and research centers, what is often missing is the connection between the timely hazard detection and the community response to warnings. In order to bridge the gap between science and decision makers, UN agencies play a key role on the dissemination of information in the field and on capacity-building to local governments. In this context, having a reliable global early warning system in the UN would concretely improve existing in house capacities for Humanitarian Response and the Disaster Risk Reduction. For those reasons, UNITAR-UNOSAT has developed together with USGS and CIMA Foundation a Global Flood EWS called "Flood-FINDER". The Flood-FINDER system is a modelling chain which includes meteorological, hydrological and hydraulic models that are accurately linked to enable the production of warnings and forecast inundation scenarios up to three weeks in advance. The system is forced with global satellite derived precipitation products and Numerical Weather Prediction outputs. The modelling chain is based on the "Continuum" hydrological model and risk assessments produced for GAR2015. In combination with existing hydraulically reconditioned SRTM data and 1D hydraulic models, flood scenarios are derived at multiple scales and resolutions. Climate and flood data are shared through a Web GIS integrated platform. First validation of the modelling chain has been conducted through a flood hindcasting test case, over the Chao Phraya river basin in Thailand, using multi temporal satellite-based analysis derived for the exceptional flood event of 2011. In terms of humanitarian relief operations, the EO-based services of flood mapping in rush mode generally suffer from delays caused by the time required for their activation, programming, acquisitions and

  1. A Case Study in High Contrast Coronagraph for Planet Discovery: The Eclipse Concept and Support Laboratory Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Eclipse is a proposed NASA Discovery mission to perform a sensitive imaging survey of nearby planetary systems, including a survey for jovian-sized planets orbiting Sun-like stars to distances of 15 pc. We outline the science objectives of the Eclipse mission and review recent developments in the key enabling technologies. Eclipse is a space telescope concept for high-contrast visible-wavelength imaging and spectrophotometry. Its design incorporates a telescope with an unobscured aperture of 1.8 meters, a coronographic camera for suppression of diffracted light, and precise active wavefront correction for the suppression of scattered background light. For reference, Eclipse is designed to reduce the diffracted and scattered starlight between 0.33 and 1.5 arcseconds from the star by three orders of magnitude compared to any HST instrument. The Eclipse mission provides precursor science exploration and technology experience in support of NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) program.

  2. A 3D Voronoi+Gapper Galaxy Cluster Finder in Redshift Space to z≈ 0.2 I: An Algorithm Optimized for the 2dFGRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Sebastián; Campusano, Luis E.; Hitschfeld-Kahler, Nancy; Pizarro, Daniel; Haines, Christopher P.; Clowes, Roger G.; Marinello, Gabriel; Söchting, Ilona K.

    2017-04-01

    This paper is the first in a series, presenting a new galaxy cluster finder based on a three-dimensional Voronoi Tesselation plus a maximum likelihood estimator, followed by gapping-filtering in radial velocity(VoML+G). The scientific aim of the series is a reassessment of the diversity of optical clusters in the local universe. A mock galaxy database mimicking the southern strip of the magnitude(blue)-limited 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), for the redshift range 0.009 < z < 0.22, is built on the basis of the Millennium Simulation of the LCDM cosmology and a reference catalog of “Millennium clusters,” spannning across the 1.0 × 1012–1.0 × 1015 M ⊙ h ‑1 dark matter (DM) halo mass range, is recorded. The validation of VoML+G is performed through its application to the mock data and the ensuing determination of the completeness and purity of the cluster detections by comparison with the reference catalog. The execution of VoML+G over the 2dFGRS mock data identified 1614 clusters, 22% with N g ≥ 10, 64 percent with 10 > N g ≥ 5, and 14% with N g < 5. The ensemble of VoML+G clusters has a ∼59% completeness and a ∼66% purity, whereas the subsample with N g ≥ 10, to z ∼ 0.14, has greatly improved mean rates of ∼75% and ∼90%, respectively. The VoML+G cluster velocity dispersions are found to be compatible with those corresponding to “Millennium clusters” over the 300–1000 km s‑1 interval, i.e., for cluster halo masses in excess of ∼3.0 × 1013 M ⊙ h ‑1.

  3. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets coronagraphic operations: lessons learned from the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, John H.; Ygouf, Marie; Choquet, Elodie; Hines, Dean C.; Perrin, Marshall D.; Golimowski, David A.; Lajoie, Charles-Phillipe; Mazoyer, Johan; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Rémi; van der Marel, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    The coronagraphic instrument (CGI) currently proposed for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope-Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) mission will be the first example of a space-based coronagraph optimized for extremely high contrasts that are required for the direct imaging of exoplanets reflecting the light of their host star. While the design of this instrument is still in progress, this early stage of development is a particularly beneficial time to consider the operation of such an instrument. We review current or planned operations on the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope with a focus on which operational aspects will have relevance to the planned WFIRST-AFTA CGI. We identify five key aspects of operations that will require attention: (1) detector health and evolution, (2) wavefront control, (3) observing strategies/postprocessing, (4) astrometric precision/target acquisition, and (5) polarimetry. We make suggestions on a path forward for each of these items.

  4. Planet Imaging Coronagraphic Technology Using a Reconfigurable Experimental Base (PICTURE-B): The Second in the Series of Suborbital Exoplanet Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Supriya; Mendillo, Christopher B.; Cook, Timothy A.; Martel, Jason F.; Finn, Susanna C.; Howe, Glenn A.; Hewawasam, Kuravi; Douglas, Ewan S.

    2016-03-01

    The PICTURE-B sounding rocket mission is designed to directly image the exozodiacal light and debris disk around the Sun-like star Epsilon Eridani. The payload used a 0.5m diameter silicon carbide primary mirror and a visible nulling coronagraph which, in conjunction with a fine pointing system capable of 5milliarcsecond stability, was designed to image the circumstellar environment around a nearby star in visible light at small angles from the star and at high contrast. Besides contributing an important science result, PICTURE-B matures essential technology for the detection and characterization of visible light from exoplanetary environments for future larger missions currently being imagined. The experiment was launched from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico on 2015 November 24 and demonstrated the first space operation of a nulling coronagraph and a deformable mirror. Unfortunately, the experiment did not achieve null, hence did not return science results.

  5. Electric Field Reconstruction in the Image Plane of a High-Contrast Coronagraph Using a Set of Pinholes around the Lyot Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giveona, Amir; Shaklan, Stuart; Kern, Brian; Noecker, Charley; Kendrick, Steve; Wallace, Kent

    2012-01-01

    In a setup similar to the self coherent camera, we have added a set of pinholes in the diffraction ring of the Lyot plane in a high-contrast stellar Lyot coronagraph. We describe a novel complex electric field reconstruction from image plane intensity measurements consisting of light in the coronagraph's dark hole interfering with light from the pinholes. The image plane field is modified by letting light through one pinhole at a time. In addition to estimation of the field at the science camera, this method allows for self-calibration of the probes by letting light through the pinholes in various permutations while blocking the main Lyot opening. We present results of estimation and calibration from the High Contrast Imaging Testbed along with a comparison to the pair-wise deformable mirror diversity based estimation technique. Tests are carried out in narrow-band light and over a composite 10% bandpass.

  6. Physical Properties of a Coronal Hole from a Coronal Diagnostics Spectrometer, Mauna Loa Coronagraph, and LASCO Observations during the Whole Sun Month

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, M.; Fludra, A.; Gibson, S. E.; Biesecker, D.; Fisher, R.

    2004-01-01

    Until recently, inference of electron density distribution in the solar corona was limited by the field of view of white-light coronagraphs (typically out to 6 Rs). Now, for the first time we have a series of white- light coronagraphs (SOHO/LASCO) whose combined field of view extends from 1.1 - 30 Rs. Quantitative information on electron density distribution of coronal hole and coronal plumes/rays are estimated by using white-light, polarized brightness (pB) observations from the SOHO/LASCO/C2 and C3 and HAO/Mauna Loa Mark III coronagraphs from 1.15 to 8.0 Rs. Morphological information on the boundary of the polar coronal hole and streamer interface is determined from the white-light observations in a manner similar to the Skylab polar coronal hole boundary estimate. The average coronal hole electron density in the region 1 - 1.15 Rs is estimated from the density-sensitive EUV line ratios of Si IX 3501342 A observed by the SOHO/coronal diagnostic spectrometer (CDS). We combine these numbers with the estimate from white-light (WL) observations to obtain a density profile from 1 to 8 Rs for the plumes and the polar coronal hole. We find that white light and spectral analysis produce consistent density information. Extrapolated densities inferred from SOHO observations are compared to Ulysses in situ observations of density. Like the density inferred from the Spartan 201-03 coronagraph, the current SOHO density profiles suggest that the acceleration of the fast solar wind takes place very close to the Sun, within 10-15 Rs. The density information is used to put constraints on solar wind flow velocities and effective temperatures. Finally, these results are compared to the recent analysis of the Spartan 201-03 white-light observations.

  7. Enceladus life finder: the search for life in a habitable moon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, Jonathan; Waite, Hunter; Postberg, Frank; Spilker, Linda; Clark, Karla

    2015-04-01

    Is there life elsewhere in the solar system? Guided by the principle that we can most easily recognize life as we know it -- life that requires liquid water -- Enceladus is particularly attractive because liquid water from its deep interior is actively erupting into space, making sampling of the interior straightforward. The Cassini Saturn Orbiter has provided the motivation. In particular, at high resolution, spatial coincidences between individual geysers and small-scale hot spots revealed the liquid reservoir supplying the eruptions to be not in the near-surface but deeper within the moon [1], putting on a firm foundation the principle that sampling the plume allows us to know the composition of the ocean. Sensitive gravity and topography measurements established the location and dimensions of that reservoir: ~ 35 km beneath the SPT ice shell and extending out to at least 50 degrees latitude, implying an interior ocean large enough to have been stable over geologic time [2]. The Cassini ion neutral mass spectrometer (INMS) discovered organic and nitrogen-bearing molecules in the plume vapour, and the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) detected salts in the plume icy grains, arguing strongly for ocean water being in con-tact with a rocky core [3], [4]. As much as Cassini has done, it cannot provide detailed information on the ocean environment that allow for a quantitative assessment of the potential for life. Acquiring such knowledge represents the essential first step in characterizing the nature of the subsurface ocean and its biological potential. Enceladus Life Finder, or ELF, is a solar-powered Saturn orbiter designed to fly multiple times through the plume of Enceladus.The goals of the mission are derived directly from the most recent decadal survey: first, to determine primordial sources of organics and the sites of organic synthesis today, and second, to determine if there are modern habitats in the solar system beyond Earth where the conditions for life exist

  8. Hybrid Lyot coronagraph for wide-field infrared survey telescope-astrophysics focused telescope assets: occulter fabrication and high contrast narrowband testbed demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Byoung-Joon; Gordon, Brian; Kern, Brian; Kuhnert, Andy; Moody, Dwight; Muller, Richard; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Trauger, John; Wilson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid Lyot coronagraph (HLC) is one of the two operating modes of the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph instrument. It produces starlight suppression over the full 360-deg annular region and thus is particularly suitable to improve the discovery space around WFIRST-AFTA targets. Since being selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in December 2013, the coronagraph technology is being matured to technology readiness level 5 by September 2016. We present the progress of HLC key component fabrication and testbed demonstrations with the WFIRST-AFTA pupil. For the first time, a circular HLC occulter mask consisting of metal and dielectric layers is fabricated and characterized. Wavefront control using two deformable mirrors is successfully demonstrated in a vacuum testbed with narrowband light (<1-nm bandwidth at 516 nm) to obtain repeatable convergence below 8×10-9 mean contrast in the 360-deg dark hole with a working angle between 3λ/D and 9λ/D with arbitrary polarization. We detail the hardware and software used in the testbed, the results, and the associated analysis.

  9. Designing and testing the coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor: a fast non-common path error sensor for high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilby, M. J.; Keller, C. U.; Haffert, S.; Korkiakoski, V.; Snik, F.; Pietrow, A. G. M.

    2016-07-01

    Non-Common Path Errors (NCPEs) are the dominant factor limiting the performance of current astronomical high-contrast imaging instruments. If uncorrected, the resulting quasi-static speckle noise floor limits coronagraph performance to a raw contrast of typically 10-4, a value which does not improve with increasing integration time. The coronagraphic Modal Wavefront Sensor (cMWS) is a hybrid phase optic which uses holographic PSF copies to supply focal-plane wavefront sensing information directly from the science camera, whilst maintaining a bias-free coronagraphic PSF. This concept has already been successfully implemented on-sky at the William Herschel Telescope (WHT), La Palma, demonstrating both real-time wavefront sensing capability and successful extraction of slowly varying wavefront errors under a dominant and rapidly changing atmospheric speckle foreground. In this work we present an overview of the development of the cMWS and recent first light results obtained using the Leiden EXoplanet Instrument (LEXI), a high-contrast imager and high-dispersion spectrograph pathfinder instrument for the WHT.

  10. Commissioning and first light results of an L'-band vortex coronagraph with the Keck II adaptive optics NIRC2 science instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femenía Castellá, Bruno; Serabyn, Eugene; Mawet, Dimitri; Absil, Olivier; Wizinowich, Peter; Matthews, Keith; Huby, Elsa; Bottom, Michael; Campbell, Randy; Chan, Dwight; Carlomagno, Brunella; Cetre, Sylvain; Defrère, Denis; Delacroix, Christian; Gomez Gonzalez, Carlos; Jolivet, Aïssa; Karlsson, Mikael; Lanclos, Kyle; Lilley, Scott; Milner, Steven; Ngo, Henry; Reggiani, Maddalena; Simmons, Julia; Tran, Hien; Vargas Catalan, Ernesto; Wertz, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    On March 2015 an L'-band vortex coronagraph based on an Annular Groove Phase Mask made up of a diamond sub-wavelength grating was installed on NIRC2 as a demonstration project. This vortex coronagraph operates in the L' band not only in order to take advantage from the favorable star/planet contrast ratio when observing beyond the K band, but also to exploit the fact that the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system delivers nearly extreme adaptive optics image quality (Strehl ratios values near 90%) at 3.7μm. We describe the hardware installation of the vortex phase mask during a routine NIRC2 service mission. The success of the project depends on extensive software development which has allowed the achievement of exquisite real-time pointing control as well as further contrast improvements by using speckle nulling to mitigate the effect of static speckles. First light of the new coronagraphic mode was on June 2015 with already very good initial results. Subsequent commissioning nights were interlaced with science nights by members of the VORTEX team with their respective scientific programs. The new capability and excellent results so far have motivated the VORTEX team and the Keck Science Steering Committee (KSSC) to offer the new mode in shared risk mode for 2016B.

  11. A Concept for Small, Remotely Operated, Coronagraph located at Small Observatory to Obtain Frequent Low-cost Remote Observations of the Lunar Exosphere and the Mercurian Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. H.; Plymate, C.; Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The sodium in the lunar exosphere is a marker species for studying the lunar exosphere because the element possesses two strong resonance transitions from the ground state whose wavelengths fall in the visible spectrum near 590 nm. Emissions at these wavelengths are thus, observable from Earth. Observations have shown that the exosphere responds in a complex way to the external processes (impact vaporization, sputtering, and photon stimulated desorption) that weather the lunar regolith to produce the sodium. Unraveling the sodium production allows us to study the processes that weather the regolith. Obtaining the extensive time sequence of observations required to unravel the sources of sodium using conventional observatories is impractical, and too expensive. Effectively imaging the lunar sodium exosphere dose to the Moon requires an off-axis rejection of scattered light that can only be obtained with a coronagraph. A related problem. the observation of the sodium tail of Mercury, can be addressed as well only by coronagraphic observations. We present here a concept for a small, rugged coronagraph sited at an observatory dedicated to remote robotic observing (the Winer Observatory in Sonoita Arizona) that can obtain the quality and quantity of lunar sodium observations needed to answer these questions. The design uses Commercial Off the Shelf Technology (COTS). If this facility is operational by 2013. the observations will be concurrent with the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission.

  12. 100 and counting : SOHO's score as the world's top comet finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    Like nearly all of SOHO's discoveries, the 100th comet showed up in images from the LASCO instrument. This is a set of coronagraphs that view the space around the Sun out to 20 million kilometres, while blotting out the bright solar disk with masks. Developed for SOHO by a multinational team led by the US Naval Research Laboratory, LASCO watches for mass ejections from the Sun that threaten to disturb the Earth's space environment. The comet discoveries are a big bonus. SOHO's experts spot many of the comets as soon as the images come in. But still pictures and movies from LASCO are freely available on the Internet to astronomers around the world, who can discover less obvious comets without leaving their desks. This was the case when Kazimieras Cernis of the Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy in Vilnius, Lithuania, found SOHO-100. "On 4 February I saw the comet as a small speck of light in the previous day's LASCO images," Cernis explained. "It had no visible tail, but it was too fuzzy to be an asteroid. By the time I had seen the object moving steadily across the sky in six successive images, I was convinced it was a comet and I sent the details to the SOHO scientists for verification." The competition to find SOHO's 100th comet was keen. An amateur astronomer, Maik Meyer of Frauenstein, Germany, discovered SOHO-98 and 99. On 5 February, less than 24 hours after Cernis reported the candidate SOHO-100, Meyer found the candidate SOHO-101. On the same day and in the same LASCO images Douglas Biesecker, a member of the SOHO science team, spotted the candidate SOHO-102 travelling ahead of 101. Computations have now validated the orbits for all three candidates, and shown them to be bona fide comet discoveries. Other amateur astronomers have used the LASCO images to find comets. In the summer of 1999 Terry Lovejoy in Australia found five, and since September 1999 an amateur in England, Jonathan Shanklin, has spotted three more. "SOHO is a special chance for

  13. PISCES High Contrast Integral Field Spectrograph Simulations and Data Reduction Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llop Sayson, Jorge Domingo; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; McElwain, Michael W.; Gong, Qian; Perrin, Marshall; Brandt, Timothy; Grammer, Bryan; Greeley, Bradford; Hilton, George; Marx, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The PISCES (Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrograph (IFS) designed to advance the technology readiness of the WFIRST (Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope)-AFTA (Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets) high contrast Coronagraph Instrument. We present the end to end optical simulator and plans for the data reduction pipeline (DRP). The optical simulator was created with a combination of the IDL (Interactive Data Language)-based PROPER (optical propagation) library and Zemax (a MatLab script), while the data reduction pipeline is a modified version of the Gemini Planet Imager's (GPI) IDL pipeline. The simulations of the propagation of light through the instrument are based on Fourier transform algorithms. The DRP enables transformation of the PISCES IFS data to calibrated spectral data cubes.

  14. Patch Finder Plus (PFplus): a web server for extracting and displaying positive electrostatic patches on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Celniker, Gershon; Haber, Omer; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2007-07-01

    Positively charged electrostatic patches on protein surfaces are usually indicative of nucleic acid binding interfaces. Interestingly, many proteins which are not involved in nucleic acid binding possess large positive patches on their surface as well. In some cases, the positive patches on the protein are related to other functional properties of the protein family. PatchFinderPlus (PFplus) http://pfp.technion.ac.il is a web-based tool for extracting and displaying continuous electrostatic positive patches on protein surfaces. The input required for PFplus is either a four letter PDB code or a protein coordinate file in PDB format, provided by the user. PFplus computes the continuum electrostatics potential and extracts the largest positive patch for each protein chain in the PDB file. The server provides an output file in PDB format including a list of the patch residues. In addition, the largest positive patch is displayed on the server by a graphical viewer (Jmol), using a simple color coding.

  15. Development of Measurement Device of Working Radius of Crane Based on Single CCD Camera and Laser Range Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nara, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Satoru

    In this paper, what we want to do is to develop an observation device to measure the working radius of a crane truck. The device has a single CCD camera, a laser range finder and two AC servo motors. First, in order to measure the working radius, we need to consider algorithm of a crane hook recognition. Then, we attach the cross mark on the crane hook. Namely, instead of the crane hook, we try to recognize the cross mark. Further, for the observation device, we construct PI control system with an extended Kalman filter to track the moving cross mark. Through experiments, we show the usefulness of our device including new control system of mark tracking.

  16. Piles of Rocks Create Mountains of Understanding; The Fossil Finders Model for success in Earth Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pella-Donnelly, M. A.; Daley, B.; Crawford, B.

    2010-12-01

    Through the implementation of the Fossil Finders Resources and Tools Project; students across the country have found increased academic understanding of biological evolution. Evolution curriculum is currently covered minimally in many elementary and middle schools. Fossil Finders is a collaboration of the Cornell University Department of Education, The Paleontological Institution of Ithaca, New York and classrooms all over the United States. Essential elements of this curriculum include a scaffolded series of lessons on nature of science, making observations and inferences of fossils and development of an increased understanding of essential earth science topics including the Law of Uniformitarianism and the principle of superposition . Through these hands-on lessons, students begin to understand evolutionary theory and nature of science. The rewards of implementing this curriculum can be observed with student excitement as they engage in authentic research; they become student paleontologists as they scour bags of rocks for the fossils that may be unearthed. The rocks had been collected during a field study, by the teachers and are well known to contain a multitude of Devonian era fossils. Students become researchers as they examine, identify, measure and quantify all fossils found in these rocks. As the children contribute their own data to an online database of an actual paleontological study, they become self driven to examine that compiled data in order to construct explanations of past life in that collection area. This presentation will focus on personal experiences of two teachers, as they engaged their students in authentic research in earth science It will focus on using inquiry-based strategies that can be transferred to a multitude of classrooms and how to use this basic format to engage, excite and develop understanding of earth science. Teachers will learn about effective inquiry-based lessons that incorporate aspects nature of science. Additionally

  17. Predicting the near-Sun and Interplanetary Magnetic Field of CMEs using photospheric magnetograms and coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, Spiros; Georgoulis, Manolis

    2016-04-01

    Earth-directed Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) containing a strong southward magnetic-field component upon arrival at 1 AU statistically account for the most powerful geomagnetic storms. Unfortunately, though, we currently lack routine diagnostics of the magnetic field of CMEs and its evolution in the inner heliosphere and the interplanetary (IP) medium. We hereby present a simple, yet powerful and easy-to-implement, method to deduce the near-Sun and IP magnetic field entrained in CMEs, by using photospheric magnetograms of the solar source regions and multi-viewpoint coronagraph images of the corresponding CMEs. The method relies on the principle of magnetic-helicity conservation in low plasma-beta, flux-rope CMEs and a power-law prescription of the radial evolution of the CME magnetic field in the IP medium. We outline a parametric study based on the observed statistics of input parameters to calculate a matrix of magnetic-field solutions for 10000 synthetic CMEs. The robustness and possible limitations / ramifications of the method are deduced by a comparison with the distributions of the predicted CME-ICME magnetic fields at 0.3 and 1 AU using actual Messenger and ACE published observations.

  18. IMAGING THE DEBRIS DISK OF HD 32297 WITH A PHASE-MASK CORONAGRAPH AT HIGH STREHL RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    Mawet, D.; Serabyn, E.; Stapelfeldt, K.; Crepp, J.

    2009-09-01

    We present the first K{sub s} -band image of the scattered light from HD 32297's debris disk. HD 32297 is an A5 star known to possess a nearly edge-on disk with a high fractional luminosity L{sub d} /L{sub *} {approx} 0.003 in the infrared. Our image was obtained using phase-mask coronagraphy on the 1.6 m well-corrected subaperture on the 5 m Palomar Hale telescope, and reaches an inner working angle of 400 mas. We confirm the previously reported disk asymmetry and central hole. The gray J - K{sub s} disk color appears similar on the two sides of the disk, which would demand a minimum grain size of at least a few microns, larger than thermal arguments suggest. One possible explanation is a planetesimal clump in a resonant orbit with an outward migrating giant planet, located at larger radii than the warm dust emitting at longer wavelengths. Our observations also clearly demonstrate the benefits of operating in the extreme adaptive optics regime with a coronagraph able to reach a very small inner working angle.

  19. Behavior of imperfect band-limited coronagraphic masks in a high-contrast imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sidick, Erkin; Wilson, Daniel W

    2007-03-20

    We investigate the behavior of imperfect band-limited occulting masks in a high-contrast imaging system through modeling and simulations. Grayscale masks having 1D Sinc(2) (linear-Sinc(2)) amplitude transmission coefficient (Sinc(4) intensity transmittance) profiles as well as optical density and wavelength-dependent parasitic phases are considered occulters. We compare the behaviors of several, slightly different occulter transmittance profiles by evaluating the contrast performance of the high-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). These occulters include a measured occulter, a standard Sinc(2) occulter, and several of its variations. We show that when an occulting mask has a parasitic phase, a modified Sinc(2) transmittance profile works much better than the standard Sinc(2) mask. We examine the impact of some fabrication errors of the occulter on the HCIT's contrast performance. We find through modeling and simulations that starlight suppression by a factor of more than 10(10) is achievable at least monochromatically on the HCIT with the occulting mask and the optics currently being used on the testbed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that we investigate the behavior of a real (or fabricated) focal plane occulting mask in a high-contrast imaging system. We also briefly describe the approach used at JPL in fabricating a grayscale occulting mask and characterizing its transmittance and phase profiles.

  20. HST/ACS Coronagraphic Observations of the HD 163296 Circumstellar Disk: Evidence of Time-Variable Self-Shadowing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisniewski, J.; Dowling, Lorraine; Clampin, Mark; Grady, C.; Ardila, D.; Golimowski, D.; Illingworth, G.; Krist, J.

    2007-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) coronagraphic observations of the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HD 163296's scattered light disk was resolved in the F606W and F814W filters in observations obtained In 2003 and in the F435W filter in observations obtained in 2004. Analysis of single-epoch data indicates that the disk (V-I) color is redder than the observed stellar (V-I) color. This spatially uniform red disk color might be indicative of either an evolution in the grain size distribution (i.e. grain growth) and/or composition. Both of these processes would be consistent with the observed flat geometry of the outer disk, as diagnosed by the observed r$(exp -3)$ power law behavior of its median azimuthally averaged disk surface brightness, which suggest that grain evolution is occurring. Comparison of ACS and STIS epoch scattered light data reveals differences in the observed disk surface brightnesses, of order 1 mag arcsec$(exp -2)$, in both V and white-light filter bandpasses. Along with the observed variability in the visibility and surface brightness of the ansa(e) in the disk, and spectropolarimetric variability of the system, these results suggest that the resolved scattered light disk is variable, a phenomenon not previously observed in any other Herbig protoplanetary system We speculate that the observed behavior might be attributable to the variable inflation of the scale height of the inner disk wall, which results in variable self-shadowing of the outer disk.

  1. In-flight UV and polarized-VL radiometric calibrations of the solar orbiter/METIS imaging coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, M.; Capobianco, G.; Andretta, V.; Sasso, C.; Romoli, M.; Landini, F.; Fineschi, S.; Pancrazzi, M.; Bemporad, A.; Nicolini, G.; Pucci, S.; Uslenghi, M.; Naletto, G.; Nicolosi, P.; Spadaro, D.; Teriaca, L.; SchuÌhle, U. H.; Antonucci, E.

    2014-07-01

    METIS is an innovative inverted occulted solar coronagraph capable of obtaining for the first time simultaneous imaging of the full corona in linearly polarized visible-light (580-640 nm) and narrow-band (+/- 10 nm) ultraviolet H I Ly-α (121.6 nm). It has been selected to fly aboard the Solar Orbiter1 spacecraft, whose launch is foreseen in July 2017. Thanks to its own capabilities and exploiting the peculiar opportunities offered by the Solar Orbiter planned orbit, METIS will address some of the still open issues in understanding the physical processes in the corona and inner heliosphere. The Solar Orbiter Nominal Mission Phase (NMP) will be characterized by three scientific observing windows per orbit and METIS will perform at least one in-flight calibration per observing window. The two imaging channels of METIS will be calibrated on ground and periodically checked, verified and re-calibrated in-flight. In particular, radiometric calibration images will be needed to determine the absolute brightness of the solar corona. For UV radiometric calibration a set of targets is represented by continuum-emitting early type bright stars (e.g. A and B spectral types) whose photospheres produce a bright far-ultraviolet continuum spectrum stable over long timescales. These stars represent an important reference standard not only for METIS in-flight calibrations but also for other Solar Orbiter instruments and they will be crucial for instruments cross-calibrations as well. For VL radiometric calibration, a set of linearly polarized stars will be used. These targets shall have a minimum degree of linear polarization (DoLP > 5%) and a detectable magnitude, compatible with the instrument integration times constrained by the desired S/N ratio and the characteristics of the spacecraft orbit dynamics.

  2. A glimpse at quasar host galaxy far-UV emission using damped Lyα's as natural coronagraphs

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Finley, Hayley; Petitjean, Patrick; Carithers, Bill; Bian, Fuyan; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ge, Jian; Slosar, Anze

    2014-10-01

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. We have stacked the spectra of ∼2000 DLA systems (N {sub H} {sub I} > 10{sup 20.6} cm{sup –2}) with a median absorption redshift (z) = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift (z) = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ((L) = 2.5 × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} Å{sup –1}; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  3. A Glimpse at Quasar Host Galaxy Far-UV Emission, Using Damped Lyα's as Natural Coronagraphs

    DOE PAGES

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; ...

    2014-09-16

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. Here, we have stacked the spectra of ~2000 DLA systems (NHI > 1020.6cm–2) with a median absorption redshiftmore » $$\\langle$$z$$\\rangle$$ = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift $$\\langle$$z$$\\rangle$$ = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Finally, assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ($$\\langle$$L$$\\rangle$$ = 2.5 × 1013 L⊙), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 1040 erg s–1 Å–1; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M⊙ yr–1.« less

  4. A Glimpse at Quasar Host Galaxy Far-UV Emission, Using Damped Lyα's as Natural Coronagraphs

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian; Carithers, Bill; Bian, Fuyan; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Finley, Hayley; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ge, Jian; Petitjean, Patrick; Slosar, Anze

    2014-09-16

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. Here, we have stacked the spectra of ~2000 DLA systems (NHI > 1020.6cm–2) with a median absorption redshift $\\langle$z$\\rangle$ = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift $\\langle$z$\\rangle$ = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Finally, assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ($\\langle$L$\\rangle$ = 2.5 × 1013 L), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 1040 erg s–1 Å–1; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M yr–1.

  5. Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraphs for Arbitrary Apertures. V. Hybrid Shaped Pupil Designs for Imaging Earth-like planets with Future Space Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Carlotti, Alexis; Stark, Christopher C.; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a new class of solutions for Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraphs (APLC) with segmented aperture telescopes to remove broadband diffracted light from a star with a contrast level of 1010. These new coronagraphs provide a key advance to enabling direct imaging and spectroscopy of Earth twins with future large space missions. Building on shaped pupil (SP) apodization optimizations, our approach enables two-dimensional optimizations of the system to address any aperture features such as central obstruction, support structures, or segment gaps. We illustrate the technique with a design that could reach a 1010 contrast level at 34 mas for a 12 m segmented telescope over a 10% bandpass centered at a wavelength of {λ }0 = 500 nm. These designs can be optimized specifically for the presence of a resolved star and, in our example, for stellar angular size up to 1.1 mas. This would allow one to probe the vicinity of Sun-like stars located beyond 4.4 pc, therefore, fully retiring this concern. If the fraction of stars with Earth-like planets is {η }\\oplus =0.1, with 18% throughput, assuming a perfect, stable wavefront and considering photon noise only, 12.5 exo-Earth candidates could be detected around nearby stars with this design and a 12 m space telescope during a five-year mission with two years dedicated to exo-Earth detection (one total year of exposure time and another year of overheads). Our new hybrid APLC/SP solutions represent the first numerical solution of a coronagraph based on existing mask technologies and compatible with segmented apertures, and that can provide contrast compatible with detecting and studying Earth-like planets around nearby stars. They represent an important step forward toward enabling these science goals with future large space missions.

  6. Interplanetary dust close to the Sun (F corona): Its observation in the visible and infrared by a rocket-borne coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissel, B.; Mann, I.; Vandermeer, H.

    1989-06-01

    The observation of the Frauenhofer corona (F corona) is discussed. It provides the opportunity for studying the annihilation and creation of dust within circumstellar dust clouds. The specific patterns of scattering light and thermal radiation in the infrared, are studied. A spaceborne remote sensing experiment regarding the radiation properties of dust, in the visible for scattered sunlight, and in the infrared for the thermal emission of grains, is effectuated. It allows the analysis of this complex scenario. A rocketborne twin coronagraph is shown to be needed.

  7. IsoCleft Finder – a web-based tool for the detection and analysis of protein binding-site geometric and chemical similarities

    PubMed Central

    Najmanovich, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    IsoCleft Finder is a web-based tool for the detection of local geometric and chemical similarities between potential small-molecule binding cavities and a non-redundant dataset of ligand-bound known small-molecule binding-sites. The non-redundant dataset developed as part of this study is composed of 7339 entries representing unique Pfam/PDB-ligand (hetero group code) combinations with known levels of cognate ligand similarity. The query cavity can be uploaded by the user or detected automatically by the system using existing PDB entries as well as user-provided structures in PDB format. In all cases, the user can refine the definition of the cavity interactively via a browser-based Jmol 3D molecular visualization interface. Furthermore, users can restrict the search to a subset of the dataset using a cognate-similarity threshold. Local structural similarities are detected using the IsoCleft software and ranked according to two criteria (number of atoms in common and Tanimoto score of local structural similarity) and the associated Z-score and p-value measures of statistical significance. The results, including predicted ligands, target proteins, similarity scores, number of atoms in common, etc., are shown in a powerful interactive graphical interface. This interface permits the visualization of target ligands superimposed on the query cavity and additionally provides a table of pairwise ligand topological similarities. Similarities between top scoring ligands serve as an additional tool to judge the quality of the results obtained. We present several examples where IsoCleft Finder provides useful functional information. IsoCleft Finder results are complementary to existing approaches for the prediction of protein function from structure, rational drug design and x-ray crystallography. IsoCleft Finder can be found at: http://bcb.med.usherbrooke.ca/isocleftfinder. PMID:24555058

  8. LobeFinder: A Convex Hull-Based Method for Quantitative Boundary Analyses of Lobed Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Belteton, Samuel A.; Szymanski, Daniel B.; Umulis, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Dicot leaves are composed of a heterogeneous mosaic of jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells that vary greatly in size and the complexity of their shape. Given the importance of the epidermis and this particular cell type for leaf expansion, there is a strong need to understand how pavement cells morph from a simple polyhedral shape into highly lobed and interdigitated cells. At present, it is still unclear how and when the patterns of lobing are initiated in pavement cells, and one major technological bottleneck to addressing the problem is the lack of a robust and objective methodology to identify and track lobing events during the transition from simple cell geometry to lobed cells. We developed a convex hull-based algorithm termed LobeFinder to identify lobes, quantify geometric properties, and create a useful graphical output of cell coordinates for further analysis. The algorithm was validated against manually curated images of pavement cells of widely varying sizes and shapes. The ability to objectively count and detect new lobe initiation events provides an improved quantitative framework to analyze mutant phenotypes, detect symmetry-breaking events in time-lapse image data, and quantify the time-dependent correlation between cell shape change and intracellular factors that may play a role in the morphogenesis process. PMID:27288363

  9. Fusing Range Measurements from Ultrasonic Beacons and a Laser Range Finder for Localization of a Mobile Robot

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Nak Yong; Kuc, Tae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for mobile robot localization in a partially unknown indoor environment. The method fuses two types of range measurements: the range from the robot to the beacons measured by ultrasonic sensors and the range from the robot to the walls surrounding the robot measured by a laser range finder (LRF). For the fusion, the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is utilized. Because finding the Jacobian matrix is not feasible for range measurement using an LRF, UKF has an advantage in this situation over the extended KF. The locations of the beacons and range data from the beacons are available, whereas the correspondence of the range data to the beacon is not given. Therefore, the proposed method also deals with the problem of data association to determine which beacon corresponds to the given range data. The proposed approach is evaluated using different sets of design parameter values and is compared with the method that uses only an LRF or ultrasonic beacons. Comparative analysis shows that even though ultrasonic beacons are sparsely populated, have a large error and have a slow update rate, they improve the localization performance when fused with the LRF measurement. In addition, proper adjustment of the UKF design parameters is crucial for full utilization of the UKF approach for sensor fusion. This study contributes to the derivation of a UKF-based design methodology to fuse two exteroceptive measurements that are complementary to each other in localization. PMID:25970259

  10. Local Context Finder (LCF) reveals multidimensional relationships among mRNA expression profiles of Arabidopsis responding to pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Fumiaki; Glazebrook, Jane

    2003-09-16

    A major task in computational analysis of mRNA expression profiles is definition of relationships among profiles on the basis of similarities among them. This is generally achieved by pattern recognition in the distribution of data points representing each profile in a high-dimensional space. Some drawbacks of commonly used pattern recognition algorithms stem from their use of a globally linear space and/or limited degrees of freedom. A pattern recognition method called Local Context Finder (LCF) is described here. LCF uses nonlinear dimensionality reduction for pattern recognition. Then it builds a network of profiles based on the nonlinear dimensionality reduction results. LCF was used to analyze mRNA expression profiles of the plant host Arabidopsis interacting with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. In one case, LCF revealed two dimensions essential to explain the effects of the NahG transgene and the ndr1 mutation on resistant and susceptible responses. In another case, plant mutants deficient in responses to pathogen infection were classified on the basis of LCF analysis of their profiles. The classification by LCF was consistent with the results of biological characterization of the mutants. Thus, LCF is a powerful method for extracting information from expression profile data.

  11. LobeFinder: A Convex Hull-Based Method for Quantitative Boundary Analyses of Lobed Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Belteton, Samuel A; Pack, Jessica; Szymanski, Daniel B; Umulis, David M

    2016-08-01

    Dicot leaves are composed of a heterogeneous mosaic of jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells that vary greatly in size and the complexity of their shape. Given the importance of the epidermis and this particular cell type for leaf expansion, there is a strong need to understand how pavement cells morph from a simple polyhedral shape into highly lobed and interdigitated cells. At present, it is still unclear how and when the patterns of lobing are initiated in pavement cells, and one major technological bottleneck to addressing the problem is the lack of a robust and objective methodology to identify and track lobing events during the transition from simple cell geometry to lobed cells. We developed a convex hull-based algorithm termed LobeFinder to identify lobes, quantify geometric properties, and create a useful graphical output of cell coordinates for further analysis. The algorithm was validated against manually curated images of pavement cells of widely varying sizes and shapes. The ability to objectively count and detect new lobe initiation events provides an improved quantitative framework to analyze mutant phenotypes, detect symmetry-breaking events in time-lapse image data, and quantify the time-dependent correlation between cell shape change and intracellular factors that may play a role in the morphogenesis process.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of the CellFinder literature curation pipeline for gene expression in kidney cells and anatomical parts.

    PubMed

    Neves, Mariana; Damaschun, Alexander; Mah, Nancy; Lekschas, Fritz; Seltmann, Stefanie; Stachelscheid, Harald; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Kurtz, Andreas; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical literature curation is the process of automatically and/or manually deriving knowledge from scientific publications and recording it into specialized databases for structured delivery to users. It is a slow, error-prone, complex, costly and, yet, highly important task. Previous experiences have proven that text mining can assist in its many phases, especially, in triage of relevant documents and extraction of named entities and biological events. Here, we present the curation pipeline of the CellFinder database, a repository of cell research, which includes data derived from literature curation and microarrays to identify cell types, cell lines, organs and so forth, and especially patterns in gene expression. The curation pipeline is based on freely available tools in all text mining steps, as well as the manual validation of extracted data. Preliminary results are presented for a data set of 2376 full texts from which >4500 gene expression events in cell or anatomical part have been extracted. Validation of half of this data resulted in a precision of ~50% of the extracted data, which indicates that we are on the right track with our pipeline for the proposed task. However, evaluation of the methods shows that there is still room for improvement in the named-entity recognition and that a larger and more robust corpus is needed to achieve a better performance for event extraction. Database URL: http://www.cellfinder.org/

  13. Preliminary evaluation of the CellFinder literature curation pipeline for gene expression in kidney cells and anatomical parts

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Mariana; Damaschun, Alexander; Mah, Nancy; Lekschas, Fritz; Seltmann, Stefanie; Stachelscheid, Harald; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Kurtz, Andreas; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical literature curation is the process of automatically and/or manually deriving knowledge from scientific publications and recording it into specialized databases for structured delivery to users. It is a slow, error-prone, complex, costly and, yet, highly important task. Previous experiences have proven that text mining can assist in its many phases, especially, in triage of relevant documents and extraction of named entities and biological events. Here, we present the curation pipeline of the CellFinder database, a repository of cell research, which includes data derived from literature curation and microarrays to identify cell types, cell lines, organs and so forth, and especially patterns in gene expression. The curation pipeline is based on freely available tools in all text mining steps, as well as the manual validation of extracted data. Preliminary results are presented for a data set of 2376 full texts from which >4500 gene expression events in cell or anatomical part have been extracted. Validation of half of this data resulted in a precision of ∼50% of the extracted data, which indicates that we are on the right track with our pipeline for the proposed task. However, evaluation of the methods shows that there is still room for improvement in the named-entity recognition and that a larger and more robust corpus is needed to achieve a better performance for event extraction. Database URL: http://www.cellfinder.org/ PMID:23599415

  14. Observations and physical interpretations of the solar wind flow properties as obtained from white light coronagraph aboard SPARTAN 201-01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Fisher, Richard; Ofman, Leon

    1995-01-01

    The solar corona was observed with an externally occulted White Light Coronagraph (WLC) carried on the SPARTAN 201-1 spacecraft on 11-12 Apr. 1993. With observations from WLC and the ground based Mauna Loa White Light Coronagraph, a large number of polar plumes both in the north and south polar holes were traced from 1.16 to 5.5 Rs. Flow properties of the solar wind in coronal holes have been determined (Habbal et al., 1995) by using a two fluid model constrained by density profiles and scale height temperatures from the white light observations, and interplanetary measurements of the flow speed and proton mass flux from Ulysses' south polar passage. Provisions for acceleration by Alfven waves, as well as electron and proton heating, are included in the momentum and the energy equations respectively. The model computations fit remarkably well the empirical constraints of the two different density structures (plumes and coronal holes) for a range of input parameters. In this study we investigate the physical nature of the heating function used in the two-fluid model. Alfven waves have been suggested as the possible source of heating that accelerates the solar wind (Ofman and Davila, 1995). We utilize the density contrast observed in WLC data in the plume and ambient coronal hole region to estimate the Alfven wave frequencies responsible for heating these structures. The source heating function utilized in the two fluid model of the solar wind acceleration will be compared with the resonant Alfven wave heating function.

  15. Dual instrument for Flare and CME onset observations - Double solar Coronagraph with Solar Chromospheric Detector and Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter at Lomnicky stit Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Ales; Tomczyk, Steven; Rybak, Jan; Sewell, Scott; Gomory, Peter; Schwartz, Pavol; Ambroz, Jaroslav; Kozak, Matus

    2015-08-01

    We report on unique dual instrument developed for simultaneous measurements of velocity and magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere and corona. We describe the technical parameters and capability of the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP-S) and Solar Chromospheric detector (SCD) mounted at the Double solar coronagraph at Lomnicky Stit Observatory and working simultaneously with strictly parallel pointing of both coronagraphs. The CoMP-S is 2D spectropolarimeter designed for observations of VIS and near-IR emission lines of prominences and corona with operating spectral range: 500 - 1100 nm, sequential measurement of several VIS and near-IR lines. Its field of view is 14 arcmin x 11 arcmin. It consists of 4-stage calcite Lyot filter followed by the ferro-liquid crystal polarizer and four cameras (2 visible, 2 infrared). The capability is to deliver 2D full Stokes I, Q, U, V, using registration with 2 IR cameras (line + background) and 2 VIS cameras (line + background) SCD is a single beam instrument to observe bright chromosphere. It is a combination of tunable filter and polarimeter. Spectral resolution of the SCD ranges from 0.046 nm for observations of the HeI 1083 nm line up to to 25 pm is for observation of the HeI 587.6 nm line. The birefringent filter of the SCD has high spectral resolution, as well as spatial resolution (1.7 arcseconds) and temporal resolution (10 seconds) First results are also reported and discussed.

  16. Wireless Laser Range Finder System for Vertical Displacement Monitoring of Mega-Trusses during Construction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Seon; Son, Sewook; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-01-01

    As buildings become increasingly complex, construction monitoring using various sensors is urgently needed for both more systematic and accurate safety management and high-quality productivity in construction. In this study, a monitoring system that is composed of a laser displacement sensor (LDS) and a wireless sensor node was proposed and applied to an irregular building under construction. The subject building consists of large cross-sectional members, such as mega-columns, mega-trusses, and edge truss, which secured the large spaces. The mega-trusses and edge truss that support this large space are of the cantilever type. The vertical displacement occurring at the free end of these members was directly measured using an LDS. To validate the accuracy and reliability of the deflection data measured from the LDS, a total station was also employed as a sensor for comparison with the LDS. In addition, the numerical simulation result was compared with the deflection obtained from the LDS and total station. Based on these investigations, the proposed wireless displacement monitoring system was able to improve the construction quality by monitoring the real-time behavior of the structure, and the applicability of the proposed system to buildings under construction for the evaluation of structural safety was confirmed. PMID:23648650

  17. Wireless laser range finder system for vertical displacement monitoring of mega-trusses during construction.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Seon; Son, Sewook; Choi, Se Woon; Kim, Yousok

    2013-05-06

    As buildings become increasingly complex, construction monitoring using various sensors is urgently needed for both more systematic and accurate safety management and high-quality productivity in construction. In this study, a monitoring system that is composed of a laser displacement sensor (LDS) and a wireless sensor node was proposed and applied to an irregular building under construction. The subject building consists of large cross-sectional members, such as mega-columns, mega-trusses, and edge truss, which secured the large spaces. The mega-trusses and edge truss that support this large space are of the cantilever type. The vertical displacement occurring at the free end of these members was directly measured using an LDS. To validate the accuracy and reliability of the deflection data measured from the LDS, a total station was also employed as a sensor for comparison with the LDS. In addition, the numerical simulation result was compared with the deflection obtained from the LDS and total station. Based on these investigations, the proposed wireless displacement monitoring system was able to improve the construction quality by monitoring the real-time behavior of the structure, and the applicability of the proposed system to buildings under construction for the evaluation of structural safety was confirmed.

  18. Small satellites for big science: the challenges of high-density design in the DLR Kompaktsatellit AsteroidFinder/SSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thimo Grundmann, Jan

    initiated the Kompaktsatellit line of development. It is intended to enable dedicated missions for science projects that would earlier have resulted in one full-scale scientific instrument among many sharing a ride on a large platform without the perspective of follow-on within an academic career lifetime. In an internal competition, the AsteroidFinder instrument dedicated to the search for small bodies orbiting the Sun interior to Earth's orbit has been selected as the payload to fly first on a Kompaktsatellit. Alongside, the Standard Satellite Bus kit, /SSB, is being developed, based on extensive re-use of experience, concepts, and components of the DLR satellites BIRD and TET. It is designed to avoid the overhead carried by pre-defined standard bus concepts while allowing for seamless integration of the payload into an organic spacecraft design. Challenges encountered and solutions found across the subsystems of AsteroidFinder/SSB will be presented.

  19. The Microlensing Planet Finder: A Census Of Planetary Systems Like Our Own and Objects Beyond the Kuiper Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.; Cheng, E.; Kimble, R.; Mather, J.; Brown, M.; Gould, A.; Anderson, J.; Beaulieu, J.; Bond, I.; Cook, K.; Friedman, S.; Gaudi, S.; Gilliland, R.; Griest, K.; Jenkins, J.; Minniti, D.; Paczynski, B.; Peale, S.; Rich, M.; Sahu, K.; Shao, M.; Tenerelli, D.; Udalski, A.; Yock, P.

    2006-09-01

    The Microlensing Planet Finder (MPF) will complete the first census of extrasolar planets with sensitivity to planets like those in our own Solar System. MPF uses a proven low-mass planet detection method to detect planets with masses greater than 0.1 Earth masses at all separations greater than 0.5 AU from their host stars. MPF's planetary census provides critical data for understanding planet formation and habitability that cannot be obtained by other means. MPF's results complement those of the Kepler mission, which detects Earth-like planets at separations of 1 AU or less. MPF and Kepler overlap at a 1 AU, in the habitable zone for Solar type stars. MPF's employs a 1.1m telescope with a 0.65 square degree FOV that images in the near IR (600-1700nm). MPF's inclined geosynchronous orbit allows continuous data transmission to a dedicated ground station while maintaining continuous, high angular resolution observations of 2.5 square degrees of the central Galactic bulge. This is necessary to discovery terrestrial extrasolar planets at a wide range of orbital separations. If every planetary system has the same planet-star mass ratios and separations as our own Solar System, then MPF detects 150 terrestrial planets, 6000 gas giants, and 130 ice giants. MPF also detects 60 free-floating Earths if there is one such planet per Galactic star. During the 3 months per year when the Galactic bulge cannot be observed, addresses other science goals, such as the follow-up of Kepler planet candidates observations to exclude "false positive” Kepler planet detections. MPF also searches beyond the Kuiper Belt for objects like Sedna to test theories of the Solar System's formation and runs a General Observer program.

  20. Coupled mutation finder: A new entropy-based method quantifying phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of significant compensatory mutation signals in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is often complicated by noise. A challenging problem in bioinformatics is remains the separation of significant signals between two or more non-conserved residue sites from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. Determination of these non-conserved residue sites is as important as the recognition of strictly conserved positions for understanding of the structural basis of protein functions and identification of functionally important residue regions. In this study, we developed a new method, the Coupled Mutation Finder (CMF) quantifying the phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations. Results To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we analyzed essential sites of two human proteins: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and glucokinase (GCK). Our results suggest that the CMF is able to separate significant compensatory mutation signals from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. The vast majority of compensatory mutation sites found by the CMF are related to essential sites of both proteins and they are likely to affect protein stability or functionality. Conclusions The CMF is a new method, which includes an MSA-specific statistical model based on multiple testing procedures that quantify the error made in terms of the false discovery rate and a novel entropy-based metric to upscale BLOSUM62 dissimilar compensatory mutations. Therefore, it is a helpful tool to predict and investigate compensatory mutation sites of structural or functional importance in proteins. We suggest that the CMF could be used as a novel automated function prediction tool that is required for a better understanding of the structural basis of proteins. The CMF server is freely accessible at http://cmf.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de. PMID:22963049