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Sample records for finding srna generative

  1. Finding sRNA generative locales from high-throughput sequencing data with NiBLS

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing technologies allow researchers to obtain millions of sequence reads in a single experiment. One important use of the technology is the sequencing of small non-coding regulatory RNAs and the identification of the genomic locales from which they originate. Currently, there is a paucity of methods for finding small RNA generative locales. Results We describe and implement an algorithm that can determine small RNA generative locales from high-throughput sequencing data. The algorithm creates a network, or graph, of the small RNAs by creating links between them depending on their proximity on the target genome. For each of the sub-networks in the resulting graph the clustering coefficient, a measure of the interconnectedness of the subnetwork, is used to identify the generative locales. We test the algorithm over a wide range of parameters using RFAM sequences as positive controls and demonstrate that the algorithm has good sensitivity and specificity in a range of Arabidopsis and mouse small RNA sequence sets and that the locales it generates are robust to differences in the choice of parameters. Conclusions NiBLS is a fast, reliable and sensitive method for determining small RNA locales in high-throughput sequence data that is generally applicable to all classes of small RNA. PMID:20167070

  2. A Novel Mechanism of Host-Pathogen Interaction through sRNA in Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Koeppen, Katja; Hampton, Thomas H.; Jarek, Michael; Scharfe, Maren; Gerber, Scott A.; Mielcarz, Daniel W.; Demers, Elora G.; Dolben, Emily L.; Hammond, John H.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-mediated delivery of proteins to host cells is an important mechanism of host-pathogen communication. Emerging evidence suggests that OMVs contain differentially packaged short RNAs (sRNAs) with the potential to target host mRNA function and/or stability. In this study, we used RNA-Seq to characterize differentially packaged sRNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa OMVs, and to show transfer of OMV sRNAs to human airway cells. We selected one sRNA for further study based on its stable secondary structure and predicted mRNA targets. Our candidate sRNA (sRNA52320), a fragment of a P. aeruginosa methionine tRNA, was abundant in OMVs and reduced LPS-induced as well as OMV-induced IL-8 secretion by cultured primary human airway epithelial cells. We also showed that sRNA52320 attenuated OMV-induced KC cytokine secretion and neutrophil infiltration in mouse lung. Collectively, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that sRNA52320 in OMVs is a novel mechanism of host-pathogen interaction whereby P. aeruginosa reduces the host immune response. PMID:27295279

  3. Novel small RNA (sRNA) landscape of the starvation-stress response transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shivam V.; Roberts, Justin T.; Patterson, Dillon G.; Coley, Alexander B.; Allred, Jonathan A.; Denner, Jason M.; Johnson, Justin P.; Mullen, Genevieve E.; O'Neal, Trenton K.; Smith, Jason T.; Cardin, Sara E.; Carr, Hank T.; Carr, Stacie L.; Cowart, Holly E.; DaCosta, David H.; Herring, Brendon R.; King, Valeria M.; Polska, Caroline J.; Ward, Erin E.; Wise, Alice A.; McAllister, Kathleen N.; Chevalier, David; Spector, Michael P.; Borchert, Glen M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small RNAs (sRNAs) are short (∼50–200 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate cellular activities across bacteria. Salmonella enterica starved of a carbon-energy (C) source experience a host of genetic and physiological changes broadly referred to as the starvation-stress response (SSR). In an attempt to identify novel sRNAs contributing to SSR control, we grew log-phase, 5-h C-starved and 24-h C-starved cultures of the virulent Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and comprehensively sequenced their small RNA transcriptomes. Strikingly, after employing a novel strategy for sRNA discovery based on identifying dynamic transcripts arising from “gene-empty” regions, we identify 58 wholly undescribed Salmonella sRNA genes potentially regulating SSR averaging an ∼1,000-fold change in expression between log-phase and C-starved cells. Importantly, the expressions of individual sRNA loci were confirmed by both comprehensive transcriptome analyses and northern blotting of select candidates. Of note, we find 43 candidate sRNAs share significant sequence identity to characterized sRNAs in other bacteria, and ∼70% of our sRNAs likely assume characteristic sRNA structural conformations. In addition, we find 53 of our 58 candidate sRNAs either overlap neighboring mRNA loci or share significant sequence complementarity to mRNAs transcribed elsewhere in the SL1344 genome strongly suggesting they regulate the expression of transcripts via antisense base-pairing. Finally, in addition to this work resulting in the identification of 58 entirely novel Salmonella enterica genes likely participating in the SSR, we also find evidence suggesting that sRNAs are significantly more prevalent than currently appreciated and that Salmonella sRNAs may actually number in the thousands. PMID:26853797

  4. Novel small RNA (sRNA) landscape of the starvation-stress response transcriptome of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Shivam V; Roberts, Justin T; Patterson, Dillon G; Coley, Alexander B; Allred, Jonathan A; Denner, Jason M; Johnson, Justin P; Mullen, Genevieve E; O'Neal, Trenton K; Smith, Jason T; Cardin, Sara E; Carr, Hank T; Carr, Stacie L; Cowart, Holly E; DaCosta, David H; Herring, Brendon R; King, Valeria M; Polska, Caroline J; Ward, Erin E; Wise, Alice A; McAllister, Kathleen N; Chevalier, David; Spector, Michael P; Borchert, Glen M

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are short (∼50-200 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs that regulate cellular activities across bacteria. Salmonella enterica starved of a carbon-energy (C) source experience a host of genetic and physiological changes broadly referred to as the starvation-stress response (SSR). In an attempt to identify novel sRNAs contributing to SSR control, we grew log-phase, 5-h C-starved and 24-h C-starved cultures of the virulent Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serovar Typhimurium strain SL1344 and comprehensively sequenced their small RNA transcriptomes. Strikingly, after employing a novel strategy for sRNA discovery based on identifying dynamic transcripts arising from "gene-empty" regions, we identify 58 wholly undescribed Salmonella sRNA genes potentially regulating SSR averaging an ∼1,000-fold change in expression between log-phase and C-starved cells. Importantly, the expressions of individual sRNA loci were confirmed by both comprehensive transcriptome analyses and northern blotting of select candidates. Of note, we find 43 candidate sRNAs share significant sequence identity to characterized sRNAs in other bacteria, and ∼70% of our sRNAs likely assume characteristic sRNA structural conformations. In addition, we find 53 of our 58 candidate sRNAs either overlap neighboring mRNA loci or share significant sequence complementarity to mRNAs transcribed elsewhere in the SL1344 genome strongly suggesting they regulate the expression of transcripts via antisense base-pairing. Finally, in addition to this work resulting in the identification of 58 entirely novel Salmonella enterica genes likely participating in the SSR, we also find evidence suggesting that sRNAs are significantly more prevalent than currently appreciated and that Salmonella sRNAs may actually number in the thousands.

  5. The sRNA SorY confers resistance during photooxidative stress by affecting a metabolite transporter in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Fazal; Weber, Lennart; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to oxygen and light generates photooxidative stress by the bacteriochlorophyll a mediated formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We have identified SorY as an sRNA, which is induced under several stress conditions and confers increased resistance against 1O2. SorY by direct interaction affects the takP mRNA, encoding a TRAP-T transporter. We present a model in which SorY reduces the metabolite flux into the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) by reducing malate import through TakP. It was previously shown that oxidative stress in bacteria leads to switch from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway and to reduced activity of the TCA cycle. As a consequence the production of the prooxidant NADH is reduced and production of the protective NADPH is enhanced. In R. sphaeroides enzymes for glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, Entner–Doudoroff pathway and gluconeogenesis are induced in response to 1O2 by the alternative sigma factor RpoHII. The same is true for the sRNA SorY. By limiting malate import SorY thus contributes to the balance of the metabolic fluxes under photooxidative stress conditions. This assigns a so far unknown function to an sRNA in oxidative stress response. PMID:25833751

  6. Assembly of the archaeal box C/D sRNP can occur via alternative pathways and requires temperature-facilitated sRNA remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Keith T; Zhang, Xinxin; Agris, Paul F; Maxwell, E Stuart

    2006-10-06

    Archaeal dual-guide box C/D small nucleolar RNA-like RNAs (sRNAs) bind three core proteins in sequential order at both terminal box C/D and internal C'/D' motifs to assemble two ribonuclear protein (RNP) complexes active in guiding nucleotide methylation. Experiments have investigated the process of box C/D sRNP assembly and the resultant changes in sRNA structure or "remodeling" as a consequence of sRNP core protein binding. Hierarchical assembly of the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii sR8 box C/D sRNP is a temperature-dependent process with binding of L7 and Nop56/58 core proteins to the sRNA requiring elevated temperature to facilitate necessary RNA structural dynamics. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and RNA thermal denaturation revealed an increased order and stability of sRNA folded structure as a result of L7 binding. Subsequent binding of the Nop56/58 and fibrillarin core proteins to the L7-sRNA complex further remodeled sRNA structure. Assessment of sR8 guide region accessibility using complementary RNA oligonucleotide probes revealed significant changes in guide region structure during sRNP assembly. A second dual-guide box C/D sRNA from M. jannaschii, sR6, also exhibited RNA remodeling during temperature-dependent sRNP assembly, although core protein binding was affected by sR6's distinct folded structure. Interestingly, the sR6 sRNP followed an alternative assembly pathway, with both guide regions being continuously exposed during sRNP assembly. Further experiments using sR8 mutants possessing alternative guide regions demonstrated that sRNA folded structure induced by specific guide sequences impacted the sRNP assembly pathway. Nevertheless, assembled sRNPs were active for sRNA-guided methylation independent of the pathway followed. Thus, RNA remodeling appears to be a common and requisite feature of archaeal dual-guide box C/D sRNP assembly and formation of the mature sRNP can follow different assembly pathways in generating catalytically active

  7. Plasticity of archaeal C/D box sRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Vanessa; Martin, Roman; Orell, Alvaro; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Backofen, Rolf; Randau, Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Archaeal and eukaryotic organisms contain sets of C/D box s(no)RNAs with guide sequences that determine ribose 2'-O-methylation sites of target RNAs. The composition of these C/D box sRNA sets is highly variable between organisms and results in varying RNA modification patterns which are important for ribosomal RNA folding and stability. Little is known about the genomic organization of C/D box sRNA genes in archaea. Here, we aimed to obtain first insights into the biogenesis of these archaeal C/D box sRNAs and analyzed the genetic context of more than 300 archaeal sRNA genes. We found that the majority of these genes do not possess independent promoters but are rather located at positions that allow for co-transcription with neighboring genes and their start or stop codons were frequently incorporated into the conserved boxC and D motifs. The biogenesis of plasmid-encoded C/D box sRNA variants was analyzed in vivo in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. It was found that C/D box sRNA maturation occurs independent of their genetic context and relies solely on the presence of intact RNA kink-turn structures. The observed plasticity of C/D box sRNA biogenesis is suggested to enable their accelerated evolution and, consequently, allow for adjustments of the RNA modification landscape.

  8. Ultra Deep Sequencing of Listeria monocytogenes sRNA Transcriptome Revealed New Antisense RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Widder, Stefanie; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Qing, Xiaoxing; Madhugiri, Ramakanth; Kefer, Nathalie; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Rattei, Thomas; Hain, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive pathogen, and causative agent of listeriosis, has become a widely used model organism for intracellular infections. Recent studies have identified small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) as important factors for regulating gene expression and pathogenicity of L. monocytogenes. Increased speed and reduced costs of high throughput sequencing (HTS) techniques have made RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) the state-of-the-art method to study bacterial transcriptomes. We created a large transcriptome dataset of L. monocytogenes containing a total of 21 million reads, using the SOLiD sequencing technology. The dataset contained cDNA sequences generated from L. monocytogenes RNA collected under intracellular and extracellular condition and additionally was size fractioned into three different size ranges from <40 nt, 40–150 nt and >150 nt. We report here, the identification of nine new sRNAs candidates of L. monocytogenes and a reevaluation of known sRNAs of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Automatic comparison to known sRNAs revealed a high recovery rate of 55%, which was increased to 90% by manual revision of the data. Moreover, thorough classification of known sRNAs shed further light on their possible biological functions. Interestingly among the newly identified sRNA candidates are antisense RNAs (asRNAs) associated to the housekeeping genes purA, fumC and pgi and potentially their regulation, emphasizing the significance of sRNAs for metabolic adaptation in L. monocytogenes. PMID:24498259

  9. The intracellular sRNA transcriptome of Listeria monocytogenes during growth in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Billion, André; Mohamed, Walid; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Kuenne, Carsten; Pischimarov, Jordan; Krawitz, Christian; Retey, Julia; Hartsch, Thomas; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hain, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are widespread effectors of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. Currently extensive information exists on the sRNAs of Listeria monocytogenes expressed during growth in extracellular environments. We used deep sequencing of cDNAs obtained from fractioned RNA (<500 nt) isolated from extracellularly growing bacteria and from L. monocytogenes infected macrophages to catalog the sRNA repertoire during intracellular bacterial growth. Here, we report on the discovery of 150 putative regulatory RNAs of which 71 have not been previously described. A total of 29 regulatory RNAs, including small non-coding antisense RNAs, are specifically expressed intracellularly. We validated highly expressed sRNAs by northern blotting and demonstrated by the construction and characterization of isogenic mutants of rli31, rli33-1 and rli50* for intracellular expressed sRNA candidates, that their expression is required for efficient growth of bacteria in macrophages. All three mutants were attenuated when assessed for growth in mouse and insect models of infection. Comparative genomic analysis revealed the presence of lineage specific sRNA candidates and the absence of sRNA loci in genomes of naturally occurring infection-attenuated bacteria, with additional loss in non-pathogenic listerial genomes. Our analyses reveal extensive sRNA expression as an important feature of bacterial regulation during intracellular growth. PMID:21278422

  10. sRNATarget: a web server for prediction of bacterial sRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Zhao, Yalin; Cha, Lei; Ying, Xiaomin; Wang, Ligui; Shao, Ningsheng; Li, Wuju

    2009-04-29

    In bacteria, there exist some small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) with 40-500 nucleotides in length. Most of them function as posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression through binding to their target mRNAs, in which Hfq protein acts as RNA chaperone. With the increase of identified sRNA genes in the bacterium, prediction of sRNA targets plays a more important role in determining sRNA functions. However, there are few available computational tools for predicting sRNA targets at present. Here we introduced a web server, sRNATarget, for genome-scale prediction of bacterial sRNA targets. The server is based on a recently published model which uses Naive Bayes method as the supervised method and take RNA secondary structure profile as the feature. The prediction results will be returned to the users through E-mail. sRNATarget web server is freely available athttp://ccb.bmi.ac.cn/srnatarget/

  11. A survey of sRNA families in α-proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Peregrina, Alexandra; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2012-01-01

    We have performed a computational comparative analysis of six small non-coding RNA (sRNA) families in α-proteobacteria. Members of these families were first identified in the intergenic regions of the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont S. meliloti by a combined bioinformatics screen followed by experimental verification. Consensus secondary structures inferred from covariance models for each sRNA family evidenced in some cases conserved motifs putatively relevant to the function of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs i.e., Hfq-binding signatures and exposed anti Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Two particular family models, namely αr15 and αr35, shared own sub-structural modules with the Rfam model suhB (RF00519) and the uncharacterized sRNA family αr35b, respectively. A third sRNA family, termed αr45, has homology to the cis-acting regulatory element speF (RF00518). However, new experimental data further confirmed that the S. meliloti αr45 representative is an Hfq-binding sRNA processed from or expressed independently of speF, thus refining the Rfam speF model annotation. All the six families have members in phylogenetically related plant-interacting bacteria and animal pathogens of the order of the Rhizobiales, some occurring with high levels of paralogy in individual genomes. In silico and experimental evidences predict differential regulation of paralogous sRNAs in S. meliloti 1021. The distribution patterns of these sRNA families suggest major contributions of vertical inheritance and extensive ancestral duplication events to the evolution of sRNAs in plant-interacting bacteria. PMID:22418845

  12. A survey of sRNA families in α-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Romero-Zaliz, Rocío; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Peregrina, Alexandra; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2012-02-01

    We have performed a computational comparative analysis of six small non-coding RNA (sRNA) families in α-proteobacteria. Members of these families were first identified in the intergenic regions of the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont S. meliloti by a combined bioinformatics screen followed by experimental verification. Consensus secondary structures inferred from covariance models for each sRNA family evidenced in some cases conserved motifs putatively relevant to the function of trans-encoded base-pairing sRNAs i.e., Hfq-binding signatures and exposed anti Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Two particular family models, namely αr15 and αr35, shared own sub-structural modules with the Rfam model suhB (RF00519) and the uncharacterized sRNA family αr35b, respectively. A third sRNA family, termed αr45, has homology to the cis-acting regulatory element speF (RF00518). However, new experimental data further confirmed that the S. meliloti αr45 representative is an Hfq-binding sRNA processed from or expressed independently of speF, thus refining the Rfam speF model annotation. All the six families have members in phylogenetically related plant-interacting bacteria and animal pathogens of the order of the Rhizobiales, some occurring with high levels of paralogy in individual genomes. In silico and experimental evidences predict differential regulation of paralogous sRNAs in S. meliloti 1021. The distribution patterns of these sRNA families suggest major contributions of vertical inheritance and extensive ancestral duplication events to the evolution of sRNAs in plant-interacting bacteria.

  13. Genetic basis of sRNA quantitative variation analyzed using an experimental population derived from an elite rice hybrid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Yao, Wen; Zhu, Dan; Xie, Weibo; Zhang, Qifa

    2015-03-30

    We performed a genetic analysis of sRNA abundance in flag leaf from an immortalized F2 (IMF2) population in rice. We identified 53,613,739 unique sRNAs and 165,797 sRNA expression traits (s-traits). A total of 66,649 s-traits mapped 40,049 local-sQTLs and 30,809 distant-sQTLs. By defining 80,362 sRNA clusters, 22,263 sRNA cluster QTLs (scQTLs) were recovered for 20,249 of all the 50,139 sRNA cluster expression traits (sc-traits). The expression levels for most of s-traits from the same genes or the same sRNA clusters were slightly positively correlated. While genetic co-regulation between sRNAs from the same mother genes and between sRNAs and their mother genes was observed for a portion of the sRNAs, most of the sRNAs and their mother genes showed little co-regulation. Some sRNA biogenesis genes were located in distant-sQTL hotspots and showed correspondence with specific length classes of sRNAs suggesting their important roles in the regulation and biogenesis of the sRNAs.

  14. sRNA154 a newly identified regulator of nitrogen fixation in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Daniela; Förstner, Konrad U; Jäger, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2017-03-15

    Trans-encoded sRNA154 is exclusively expressed under nitrogen (N)-deficiency in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1. The sRNA154 deletion strain showed a significant decrease in growth under N-limitation, pointing toward a regulatory role of sRNA154 in N-metabolism. Aiming to elucidate its regulatory function we characterized sRNA154 by means of biochemical and genetic approaches. 24 homologs of sRNA154 were identified in recently reported draft genomes of Methanosarcina strains, demonstrating high conservation in sequence and predicted secondary structure with two highly conserved single stranded loops. Transcriptome studies of sRNA154 deletion mutants by an RNA-seq approach uncovered nifH- and nrpA-mRNA, encoding the α-subunit of nitrogenase and the transcriptional activator of the nitrogen fixation (nif)-operon, as potential targets besides other components of the N-metabolism. Furthermore, results obtained from stability, complementation and western blot analysis, as well as in silico target predictions combined with electrophoretic mobility shift-assays, argue for a stabilizing effect of sRNA154 on the polycistronic nif-mRNA and nrpA-mRNA by binding with both loops. Further identified N-related targets were studied, which demonstrates that translation initiation of glnA2-mRNA, encoding glutamine synthetase2, appears to be affected by sRNA154 masking the ribosome binding site, whereas glnA1-mRNA appears to be stabilized by sRNA154. Overall, we propose that sRNA154 has a crucial regulatory role in N-metabolism in M. mazei by stabilizing the polycistronic mRNA encoding nitrogenase and glnA1-mRNA, as well as allowing a feed forward regulation of nif-gene expression by stabilizing nrpA-mRNA. Consequently, sRNA154 represents the first archaeal sRNA, for which a positive posttranscriptional regulation is demonstrated as well as inhibition of translation initiation.

  15. Identification of metE as a Second Target of the sRNA scr5239 in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Vockenhuber, Michael-Paul; Heueis, Nona; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    While transcriptional regulation of the primary and secondary metabolism of the model organism Streptomyces coelicolor is well studied, little is still known about the role small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) play in regulating gene expression in this organism. Here, we report the identification of a second target of the sRNA scr5239, an sRNA highly conserved in streptomycetes. The 159 nt long sRNA binds its target, the mRNA of the cobalamin independent methionine synthase metE (SCO0985), at the 5’ end of its open reading frame thereby repressing translation. We show that a high methionine level induces expression of scr5239 itself. This leads, in a negative feedback loop, to the repression of methionine biosynthesis. In contrast to the first reported target of this sRNA, the agarase dagA, this interaction seems to be conserved in a wide number of streptomycetes. PMID:25785836

  16. Identification of metE as a second target of the sRNA scr5239 in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Vockenhuber, Michael-Paul; Heueis, Nona; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    While transcriptional regulation of the primary and secondary metabolism of the model organism Streptomyces coelicolor is well studied, little is still known about the role small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) play in regulating gene expression in this organism. Here, we report the identification of a second target of the sRNA scr5239, an sRNA highly conserved in streptomycetes. The 159 nt long sRNA binds its target, the mRNA of the cobalamin independent methionine synthase metE (SCO0985), at the 5' end of its open reading frame thereby repressing translation. We show that a high methionine level induces expression of scr5239 itself. This leads, in a negative feedback loop, to the repression of methionine biosynthesis. In contrast to the first reported target of this sRNA, the agarase dagA, this interaction seems to be conserved in a wide number of streptomycetes.

  17. A Novel Mechanism Underlying the Innate Immune Response Induction upon Viral-Dependent Replication of Host Cell mRNA: A Mistake of +sRNA Viruses' Replicases.

    PubMed

    Delgui, Laura R; Colombo, María I

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are lifeless particles designed for setting virus-host interactome assuring a new generation of virions for dissemination. This interactome generates a pressure on host organisms evolving mechanisms to neutralize viral infection, which places the pressure back onto virus, a process known as virus-host cell co-evolution. Positive-single stranded RNA (+sRNA) viruses are an important group of viral agents illustrating this interesting phenomenon. During replication, their genomic +sRNA is employed as template for translation of viral proteins; among them the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is responsible of viral genome replication originating double-strand RNA molecules (dsRNA) as intermediates, which accumulate representing a potent threat for cellular dsRNA receptors to initiate an antiviral response. A common feature shared by these viruses is their ability to rearrange cellular membranes to serve as platforms for genome replication and assembly of new virions, supporting replication efficiency increase by concentrating critical factors and protecting the viral genome from host anti-viral systems. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding cellular dsRNA receptors and describes prototype viruses developing replication niches inside rearranged membranes. However, for several viral agents it's been observed both, a complex rearrangement of cellular membranes and a strong innate immune antiviral response induction. So, we have included recent data explaining the mechanism by, even though viruses have evolved elegant hideouts, host cells are still able to develop dsRNA receptors-dependent antiviral response.

  18. A Novel Mechanism Underlying the Innate Immune Response Induction upon Viral-Dependent Replication of Host Cell mRNA: A Mistake of +sRNA Viruses' Replicases

    PubMed Central

    Delgui, Laura R.; Colombo, María I.

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are lifeless particles designed for setting virus-host interactome assuring a new generation of virions for dissemination. This interactome generates a pressure on host organisms evolving mechanisms to neutralize viral infection, which places the pressure back onto virus, a process known as virus-host cell co-evolution. Positive-single stranded RNA (+sRNA) viruses are an important group of viral agents illustrating this interesting phenomenon. During replication, their genomic +sRNA is employed as template for translation of viral proteins; among them the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is responsible of viral genome replication originating double-strand RNA molecules (dsRNA) as intermediates, which accumulate representing a potent threat for cellular dsRNA receptors to initiate an antiviral response. A common feature shared by these viruses is their ability to rearrange cellular membranes to serve as platforms for genome replication and assembly of new virions, supporting replication efficiency increase by concentrating critical factors and protecting the viral genome from host anti-viral systems. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding cellular dsRNA receptors and describes prototype viruses developing replication niches inside rearranged membranes. However, for several viral agents it's been observed both, a complex rearrangement of cellular membranes and a strong innate immune antiviral response induction. So, we have included recent data explaining the mechanism by, even though viruses have evolved elegant hideouts, host cells are still able to develop dsRNA receptors-dependent antiviral response. PMID:28164038

  19. RNomics in Escherichia coli detects new sRNA species and indicates parallel transcriptional output in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jörg; Bartels, Verena; Tang, Thean Hock; Churakov, Gennady; Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G.; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.

    2003-01-01

    Recent bioinformatics-aided searches have identified many new small RNAs (sRNAs) in the intergenic regions of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, a shot-gun cloning approach (RNomics) was used to generate cDNA libraries of small sized RNAs. Besides many of the known sRNAs, we found new species that were not predicted previously. The present work brings the number of sRNAs in E.coli to 62. Experimental transcription start site mapping showed that some sRNAs were encoded from independent genes, while others were processed from mRNA leaders or trailers, indicative of a parallel transcriptional output generating sRNAs co-expressed with mRNAs. Two of these RNAs (SroA and SroG) consist of known (THI and RFN) riboswitch elements. We also show that two recently identified sRNAs (RyeB and SraC/RyeA) interact, resulting in RNase III-dependent cleavage. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case of two non-coding RNAs interacting by a putative antisense mechanism. In addition, intracellular metabolic stabilities of sRNAs were determined, including ones from previous screens. The wide range of half-lives (<2 to >32 min) indicates that sRNAs cannot generally be assumed to be metabolically stable. The experimental characterization of sRNAs analyzed here suggests that the definition of an sRNA is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:14602901

  20. RNomics in Escherichia coli detects new sRNA species and indicates parallel transcriptional output in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Jörg; Bartels, Verena; Tang, Thean Hock; Churakov, Gennady; Slagter-Jäger, Jacoba G; Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Wagner, E Gerhart H

    2003-11-15

    Recent bioinformatics-aided searches have identified many new small RNAs (sRNAs) in the intergenic regions of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Here, a shot-gun cloning approach (RNomics) was used to generate cDNA libraries of small sized RNAs. Besides many of the known sRNAs, we found new species that were not predicted previously. The present work brings the number of sRNAs in E.coli to 62. Experimental transcription start site mapping showed that some sRNAs were encoded from independent genes, while others were processed from mRNA leaders or trailers, indicative of a parallel transcriptional output generating sRNAs co-expressed with mRNAs. Two of these RNAs (SroA and SroG) consist of known (THI and RFN) riboswitch elements. We also show that two recently identified sRNAs (RyeB and SraC/RyeA) interact, resulting in RNase III-dependent cleavage. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case of two non-coding RNAs interacting by a putative antisense mechanism. In addition, intracellular metabolic stabilities of sRNAs were determined, including ones from previous screens. The wide range of half-lives (<2 to >32 min) indicates that sRNAs cannot generally be assumed to be metabolically stable. The experimental characterization of sRNAs analyzed here suggests that the definition of an sRNA is more complex than previously assumed.

  1. An archaeal sRNA targeting cis- and trans-encoded mRNAs via two distinct domains

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Dominik; Pernitzsch, Sandy R.; Richter, Andreas S.; Backofen, Rolf; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the characterization and target analysis of the small (s)RNA162 in the methanoarchaeon Methanosarcina mazei. Using a combination of genetic approaches, transcriptome analysis and computational predictions, the bicistronic MM2441-MM2440 mRNA encoding the transcription factor MM2441 and a protein of unknown function was identified as a potential target of this sRNA, which due to processing accumulates as three stabile 5′ fragments in late exponential growth. Mobility shift assays using various mutants verified that the non-structured single-stranded linker region of sRNA162 (SLR) base-pairs with the MM2440-MM2441 mRNA internally, thereby masking the predicted ribosome binding site of MM2441. This most likely leads to translational repression of the second cistron resulting in dis-coordinated operon expression. Analysis of mutant RNAs in vivo confirmed that the SLR of sRNA162 is crucial for target interactions. Furthermore, our results indicate that sRNA162-controlled MM2441 is involved in regulating the metabolic switch between the carbon sources methanol and methylamine. Moreover, biochemical studies demonstrated that the 5′ end of sRNA162 targets the 5′-untranslated region of the cis-encoded MM2442 mRNA. Overall, this first study of archaeal sRNA/mRNA-target interactions unraveled that sRNA162 acts as an antisense (as)RNA on cis- and trans-encoded mRNAs via two distinct domains, indicating that cis-encoded asRNAs can have larger target regulons than previously anticipated. PMID:22965121

  2. Retargeting a Dual-Acting sRNA for Multiple mRNA Transcript Regulation.

    PubMed

    Lahiry, Ashwin; Stimple, Samuel D; Wood, David W; Lease, Richard A

    2017-01-24

    Multitargeting small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) represent a potentially useful tool for metabolic engineering applications. Natural multitargeting sRNAs govern bacterial gene expression by binding to the translation initiation regions of protein-coding mRNAs through base pairing. We designed an Escherichia coli based genetic system to create and assay dual-acting retargeted-sRNA variants. The variants can be assayed for coordinate translational regulation of two alternate mRNA leaders fused to independent reporter genes. Accordingly, we began with the well-characterized E. coli native DsrA sRNA. The merits of using DsrA include its well-characterized separation of function into two independently folded stem-loop domains, wherein alterations at one stem do not necessarily abolish activity at the other stem. Expression of the sRNA and each reporter mRNA was independently controlled by small inducer molecules, allowing precise quantification of the regulatory effects of each sRNA:mRNA interaction in vivo with a microtiter plate assay. Using this system, we semirationally designed DsrA variants screened in E. coli for their ability to regulate key mRNA leader sequences from the Clostridium acetobutylicum n-butanol synthesis pathway. To coordinate intervention at two points in a metabolic pathway, we created bifunctional sRNA prototypes by combining sequences from two singly retargeted DsrA variants. This approach constitutes a platform for designing sRNAs to specifically target arbitrary mRNA transcript sequences, and thus provides a generalizable tool for retargeting and characterizing multitarget sRNAs for metabolic engineering.

  3. Prediction of Sinorhizobium meliloti sRNA genes and experimental detection in strain 2011

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Claudio; Livny, Jonathan; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Reinkensmeier, Jan; Becker, Anke; Parisi, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Background Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as ubiquitous regulatory elements in bacteria and other life domains. However, few sRNAs have been identified outside several well-studied species of gamma-proteobacteria and thus relatively little is known about the role of RNA-mediated regulation in most other bacterial genera. Here we have conducted a computational prediction of putative sRNA genes in intergenic regions (IgRs) of the symbiotic α-proteobacterium S. meliloti 1021 and experimentally confirmed the expression of dozens of these candidate loci in the closely related strain S. meliloti 2011. Results Our first sRNA candidate compilation was based mainly on the output of the sRNAPredictHT algorithm. A thorough manual sequence analysis of the curated list rendered an initial set of 18 IgRs of interest, from which 14 candidates were detected in strain 2011 by Northern blot and/or microarray analysis. Interestingly, the intracellular transcript levels varied in response to various stress conditions. We developed an alternative computational method to more sensitively predict sRNA-encoding genes and score these predicted genes based on several features to allow identification of the strongest candidates. With this novel strategy, we predicted 60 chromosomal independent transcriptional units that, according to our annotation, represent strong candidates for sRNA-encoding genes, including most of the sRNAs experimentally verified in this work and in two other contemporary studies. Additionally, we predicted numerous candidate sRNA genes encoded in megaplasmids pSymA and pSymB. A significant proportion of the chromosomal- and megaplasmid-borne putative sRNA genes were validated by microarray analysis in strain 2011. Conclusion Our data extend the number of experimentally detected S. meliloti sRNAs and significantly expand the list of putative sRNA-encoding IgRs in this and closely related α-proteobacteria. In addition, we have developed a computational

  4. Prediction of Sinorhizobium meliloti sRNA genes and experimental detection in strain 2011.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Claudio; Livny, Jonathan; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Reinkensmeier, Jan; Becker, Anke; Parisi, Gustavo

    2008-09-16

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as ubiquitous regulatory elements in bacteria and other life domains. However, few sRNAs have been identified outside several well-studied species of gamma-proteobacteria and thus relatively little is known about the role of RNA-mediated regulation in most other bacterial genera. Here we have conducted a computational prediction of putative sRNA genes in intergenic regions (IgRs) of the symbiotic alpha-proteobacterium S. meliloti 1021 and experimentally confirmed the expression of dozens of these candidate loci in the closely related strain S. meliloti 2011. Our first sRNA candidate compilation was based mainly on the output of the sRNAPredictHT algorithm. A thorough manual sequence analysis of the curated list rendered an initial set of 18 IgRs of interest, from which 14 candidates were detected in strain 2011 by Northern blot and/or microarray analysis. Interestingly, the intracellular transcript levels varied in response to various stress conditions. We developed an alternative computational method to more sensitively predict sRNA-encoding genes and score these predicted genes based on several features to allow identification of the strongest candidates. With this novel strategy, we predicted 60 chromosomal independent transcriptional units that, according to our annotation, represent strong candidates for sRNA-encoding genes, including most of the sRNAs experimentally verified in this work and in two other contemporary studies. Additionally, we predicted numerous candidate sRNA genes encoded in megaplasmids pSymA and pSymB. A significant proportion of the chromosomal- and megaplasmid-borne putative sRNA genes were validated by microarray analysis in strain 2011. Our data extend the number of experimentally detected S. meliloti sRNAs and significantly expand the list of putative sRNA-encoding IgRs in this and closely related alpha-proteobacteria. In addition, we have developed a computational method that proved useful

  5. Modularity of Escherichia coli sRNA regulation revealed by sRNA-target and protein network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background sRNAs, which belong to the non-coding RNA family and range from approximately 50 to 400 nucleotides, serve various important gene regulatory roles. Most are believed to be trans-regulating and function by being complementary to their target mRNAs in order to inhibiting translation by ribosome occlusion. Despite this understanding of their functionality, the global properties associated with regulation by sRNAs are not yet understood. Here we use topological analysis of sRNA targets in terms of protein-protein interaction and transcription-regulatory networks in Escherichia coli to shed light on the global correlation between sRNA regulation and cellular control networks. Results The analysis of sRNA targets in terms of their networks showed that some specific network properties could be identified. In protein-protein interaction network, sRNA targets tend to occupy more central positions (higher closeness centrality, p-val = 0.022) and more cliquish (larger clustering coefficient, p-val = 0.037). The targets of the same sRNA tend to form a network module (shorter characteristic path length, p-val = 0.015; larger density, p-val = 0.019; higher in-degree ratio, p-val = 0.009). Using the transcription-regulatory network, sRNA targets tend to be under multiple regulation (higher indegree, p-val = 0.013) and the targets usually are important to the transfer of regulatory signals (higher betweenness, p-val = 0.012). As was found for the protein-protein interaction network, the targets that are regulated by the same sRNA also tend to be closely knit within the transcription-regulatory network (larger density, p-val = 0.036), and inward interactions between them are greater than the outward interactions (higher in-degree ratio, p-val = 0.023). However, after incorporating information on predicted sRNAs and down-stream targets, the results are not as clear-cut, but the overall network modularity is still evident. Conclusions Our results indicate that sRNA

  6. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  7. Finding Funding: Check Out These Dozen Daring Ideas for Generating Extra Cash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Gwen

    2006-01-01

    As state coffers continue to shrink this year, there is less money for education, and much of what is available is earmarked for mandates. Yet the money is out there if one knows how to find, create, or borrow it; the trick is to be creative. In this article, the author offers a dozen daring ideas for generating extra cash. The highest-profile…

  8. Disclosure of Incidental Findings From Next-Generation Sequencing in Pediatric Genomic Research

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Karim, Ruqayyah; Berkman, Benjamin E.; Wendler, David; Rid, Annette; Khan, Javed; Badgett, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies will likely be used with increasing frequency in pediatric research. One consequence will be the increased identification of individual genomic research findings that are incidental to the aims of the research. Although researchers and ethicists have raised theoretical concerns about incidental findings in the context of genetic research, next-generation sequencing will make this once largely hypothetical concern an increasing reality. Most commentators have begun to accept the notion that there is some duty to disclose individual genetic research results to research subjects; however, the scope of that duty remains unclear. These issues are especially complicated in the pediatric setting, where subjects cannot currently but typically will eventually be able to make their own medical decisions at the age of adulthood. This article discusses the management of incidental findings in the context of pediatric genomic research. We provide an overview of the current literature and propose a framework to manage incidental findings in this unique context, based on what we believe is a limited responsibility to disclose. We hope this will be a useful source of guidance for investigators, institutional review boards, and bioethicists that anticipates the complicated ethical issues raised by advances in genomic technology. PMID:23400601

  9. C-terminal domain of the RNA chaperone Hfq drives sRNA competition and release of target RNA

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Frangos, Andrew; Kavita, Kumari; Schu, Daniel J.; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial Sm protein and RNA chaperone Hfq stabilizes small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and facilitates their annealing to mRNA targets involved in stress tolerance and virulence. Although an arginine patch on the Sm core is needed for Hfq’s RNA chaperone activity, the function of Hfq’s intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD) has remained unclear. Here, we use stopped flow spectroscopy to show that the CTD of Escherichia coli Hfq is not needed to accelerate RNA base pairing but is required for the release of dsRNA. The Hfq CTD also mediates competition between sRNAs, offering a kinetic advantage to sRNAs that contact both the proximal and distal faces of the Hfq hexamer. The change in sRNA hierarchy caused by deletion of the Hfq CTD in E. coli alters the sRNA accumulation and the kinetics of sRNA regulation in vivo. We propose that the Hfq CTD displaces sRNAs and annealed sRNA⋅mRNA complexes from the Sm core, enabling Hfq to chaperone sRNA–mRNA interactions and rapidly cycle between competing targets in the cell. PMID:27681631

  10. An inhibitor of eIF2 activity in the sRNA pool of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Centrella, Michael; Porter, David L; McCarthy, Thomas L

    2011-08-15

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis is a multi-step and highly controlled process that includes an early initiation complex containing eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), GTP, and methionine-charged initiator methionyl-tRNA (met-tRNAi). During studies to reconstruct formation of the ternary complex containing these molecules, we detected a potent inhibitor in low molecular mass RNA (sRNA) preparations of eukaryotic tRNA. The ternary complex inhibitor (TCI) was retained in the total sRNA pool after met-tRNAi was charged by aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, co-eluted with sRNA by size exclusion chromatography, but resolved from met-tRNAi by ion exchange chromatography. The adverse effect of TCI was not overcome by high GTP or magnesium omission and was independent of GTP regeneration. Rather, TCI suppressed the rate of ternary complex formation, and disrupted protein synthesis and the accumulation of heavy polymeric ribosomes in reticulocyte lysates in vitro. Lastly, a component or components in ribosome depleted cell lysate significantly reversed TCI activity. Since assembly of the met-tRNAi/eIF2/GTP ternary complex is integral to protein synthesis, awareness of TCI is important to avoid confusion in studies of translation initiation. A clear definition of TCI may also allow a better appreciation of physiologic or pathologic situations, factors, and events that control protein synthesis in vivo.

  11. Sibling sRNA RyfA1 Influences Shigella dysenteriae Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fris, Megan E.; Broach, William H.; Klim, Sarah E.; Coschigano, Peter W.; Carroll, Ronan K.; Caswell, Clayton C.; Murphy, Erin R.

    2017-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) of Shigella dysenteriae and other pathogens are vital for the regulation of virulence-associated genes and processes. Here, we characterize RyfA1, one member of a sibling pair of sRNAs produced by S. dysenteriae. Unlike its nearly identical sibling molecule, RyfA2, predicted to be encoded almost exclusively by non-pathogenic species, the presence of a gene encoding RyfA1, or a RyfA1-like molecule, is strongly correlated with virulence in a variety of enteropathogens. In S. dysenteriae, the overproduction of RyfA1 negatively impacts the virulence-associated process of cell-to-cell spread as well as the expression of ompC, a gene encoding a major outer membrane protein important for the pathogenesis of Shigella. Interestingly, the production of RyfA1 is controlled by a second sRNA, here termed RyfB1, the first incidence of one regulatory small RNA controlling another in S. dysenteriae or any Shigella species. PMID:28134784

  12. Ms1, a novel sRNA interacting with the RNA polymerase core in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Jirát Matějčková, Jitka; Šiková, Michaela; Pospíšil, Jiří; Halada, Petr; Pánek, Josef; Krásný, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are molecules essential for a number of regulatory processes in the bacterial cell. Here we characterize Ms1, a sRNA that is highly expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis during stationary phase of growth. By glycerol gradient ultracentrifugation, RNA binding assay, and RNA co-immunoprecipitation, we show that Ms1 interacts with the RNA polymerase (RNAP) core that is free of the primary sigma factor (σA) or any other σ factor. This contrasts with the situation in most other species where it is 6S RNA that interacts with RNAP and this interaction requires the presence of σA. The difference in the interaction of the two types of sRNAs (Ms1 or 6S RNA) with RNAP possibly reflects the difference in the composition of the transcriptional machinery between mycobacteria and other species. Unlike Escherichia coli, stationary phase M. smegmatis cells contain relatively few RNAP molecules in complex with σA. Thus, Ms1 represents a novel type of small RNAs interacting with RNAP. PMID:25217589

  13. Next generation sequencing in psychiatric research: what study participants need to know about research findings.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Ghislaine; Groisman, Iris Jaitovich; Godard, Beatrice

    2013-10-01

    The use of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies in psychiatric genetics research and its potential to generate individual research results will likely have far reaching implications for predictive and diagnostic practices. The extent of this impact may not be easily understood by psychiatric research participants during the consent process. The traditional consent process for studies involving human subjects does not address critical issues specific to NGS research, such as the return of results. We examined which type of research findings should be communicated, how this information should be conveyed during the consent process and what guidance is required by researchers and IRBs to help psychiatric research participants understand the peculiarities, the limits and the impact of NGS. Strong standards are needed to ensure appropriate use of data generated by NGS, to meet participants' expectations and needs, and to clarify researchers' duties regarding the disclosure of data and their subsequent management. In the short term, researchers and IRBs need to be proactive in revising current consent processes that deal with the disclosure of research findings.

  14. Management of Incidental Findings in the Era of Next-generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Heather L.; Schroeder, Bradley; Turner, Clesson; Shriver, Craig D.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.; Ellsworth, Rachel E.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies allow for the generation of whole exome or whole genome sequencing data, which can be used to identify novel genetic alterations associated with defined phenotypes or to expedite discovery of functional variants for improved patient care. Because this robust technology has the ability to identify all mutations within a genome, incidental findings (IF)- genetic alterations associated with conditions or diseases unrelated to the patient’s present condition for which current tests are being performed- may have important clinical ramifications. The current debate among genetic scientists and clinicians focuses on the following questions: 1) should any IF be disclosed to patients, and 2) which IF should be disclosed – actionable mutations, variants of unknown significance, or all IF? Policies for disclosure of IF are being developed for when and how to convey these findings and whether adults, minors, or individuals unable to provide consent have the right to refuse receipt of IF. In this review, we detail current NGS technology platforms, discuss pressing issues regarding disclosure of IF, and how IF are currently being handled in prenatal, pediatric, and adult patients. PMID:26069456

  15. Comprehensive processing of high throughput small RNA sequencing data including quality checking, normalization and differential expression analysis using the UEA sRNA Workbench.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Matthew L; Mohorianu, Irina; Stocks, Matthew B; Applegate, Christopher; Dalmay, Tamas; Moulton, Vincent

    2017-03-13

    Recently High Throughput Sequencing (HTS) has revealed compelling details about the small RNA (sRNA) population in eukaryotes. These 20-25 nt non-coding RNAs can influence gene expression by acting as guides for the sequence-specific regulatory mechanism known as RNA silencing. The increase in sequencing depth and number of samples per project enables a better understanding of the role sRNAs play by facilitating the study of expression patterns. However, the intricacy of the biological hypotheses coupled with a lack of appropriate tools often leads to inadequate mining of the available data and thus, an incomplete description of the biological mechanisms involved. To enable a comprehensive study of differential expression in sRNA datasets we present a new interactive pipeline that guides researchers through the various stages of data pre-processing and analysis. This includes various tools, some of which we specifically developed for sRNA analysis, for quality checking and normalization of sRNA samples as well as tools for the detection of differentially expressed sRNAs and identification of the resulting expression patterns. The pipeline is available within the UEA sRNA Workbench, a user-friendly software package for the processing of sRNA datasets. We demonstrate the use of the pipeline on a H. sapiens dataset; additional examples on a B. terrestris dataset and on an A. thaliana dataset are described in the supplementary information. A comparison with existing approaches is also included, which exemplifies some of the issues that need to be addressed for sRNA analysis, and how the new pipeline may be used to do this.

  16. A novel Hfq-dependent sRNA that is under FNR control and is synthesized in oxygen limitation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Fantappiè, Laura; Oriente, Francesca; Muzzi, Alessandro; Serruto, Davide; Scarlato, Vincenzo; Delany, Isabel

    2011-04-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) are emerging as key elements of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. The conserved Hfq protein is thought to function as an RNA chaperone and facilitate base-pairing between sRNAs and mRNA targets. In this study we identify a novel sRNA of Neisseria meningitidis through global gene expression studies of regulated transcripts in the Hfq mutant. The synthesis of this sRNA, named AniS, is anaerobically induced through activation of its promoter by the FNR global regulator. Whole-genome expression analyses led to the identification of putative mRNA targets, two of which are predicted to base pair with AniS. We show that Hfq binds the AniS transcript in vitro and is necessary for the downregulation of the identified target mRNAs in vivo. Contrary to many Hfq-dependent sRNA of the Enterobacteriaceae, Hfq promotes decay of AniS in N. meningitidis. Our analysis shows that the AniS regulator is part of the FNR regulon and may be responsible for the downregulation of FNR-repressed genes. Furthermore the presence of similar conserved regulatory sequences in all Neisseria spp. to date suggests that an analogous FNR-regulated sRNA, with a variable 5' sequence, may be ubiquitous to all commensals and pathogens of the Genus.

  17. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles target sara through srna-teg49, a key mediator of hfq, in staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hu; Liao, Qiande; Liu, Meizhou; Hou, Jianhong; Zhang, Yangde; Liu, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Attributed to its antimicrobial effect, Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is widely used in various fields, such as biomedicine, textiles, health care products and food, etc. However, the antibacterial mechanism of AgNPs in staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) by regulating sRNA expression remains largely unknown. Objectives: This study was performed to investigate the involvement of the antibacterial mechanism of AgNPs through sRNA-TEG49, a key mediator of Hfq, in S. aureus. Methods: Through the antimicrobial tests of AgNPs, its antibacterial laps and minimum inhibitory concentration was measured. A hierarchical cluster analysis of the differentially expressed sRNA in S. aureus was performed to investigate the relationship between AgNPs and sRNA. Expression of genes was analyzed by real-time PCR. Results: In the present study we found that at the concentrations higher than 1 mg/L, AgNPs could completely restrain bacteria growth, and the antibacterial activity of AgNPs apparently declined at the concentrations lower than 1 mg/L. S. aureus exposure to AgNPs, the expression of sRNA-TEG49, Hfq and sarA was significantly up-regulated in wild-type S. aureus. Moreover, Hfq loss-of-function inhibited the expression of sRNA-TEG49 in mutant-type S. aureus. Furthermore, sRNA-TEG49 loss-of-function associated with down-regulation the expression of sarA in mutant-type S. aureus. Conclusions: It was reasonable that Hfq regulated a distinct underlying molecular and antibacterial mechanism of AgNPs by forming a positive feedback loop with sRNA-TEG49. These observations suggested that Hfq plays an important role in the antibacterial mechanism of AgNPs by regulating sRNA-TEG49 expression, via its target sarA. PMID:26131167

  18. sRNA roles in regulating transcriptional regulators: Lrp and SoxS regulation by sRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jung; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of transcription factors contributes to regulatory circuits. We created translational reporter fusions for multiple central regulators in Escherichia coli and examined the effect of Hfq-dependent non-coding RNAs on these fusions. This approach yields an ‘RNA landscape,’ identifying Hfq-dependent sRNAs that regulate a given fusion. No significant sRNA regulation of crp or fnr was detected. hns was regulated only by DsrA, as previously reported. Lrp and SoxS were both found to be regulated post-transcriptionally. Lrp, ‘leucine-responsive regulatory protein,’ regulates genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and catabolism and other cellular functions. sRNAs DsrA, MicF and GcvB each independently downregulate the lrp translational fusion, confirming previous reports for MicF and GcvB. MicF and DsrA interact with an overlapping site early in the lrp ORF, while GcvB acts upstream at two independent sites in the long lrp leader. Surprisingly, GcvB was found to be responsible for significant downregulation of lrp after oxidative stress; MicF also contributed. SoxS, an activator of genes used to combat oxidative stress, is negatively regulated by sRNA MgrR. This study demonstrates that while not all global regulators are subject to sRNA regulation, post-transcriptional control by sRNAs allows multiple environmental signals to affect synthesis of the transcriptional regulator. PMID:27137887

  19. Small RNA Library Preparation Method for Next-Generation Sequencing Using Chemical Modifications to Prevent Adapter Dimer Formation.

    PubMed

    Shore, Sabrina; Henderson, Jordana M; Lebedev, Alexandre; Salcedo, Michelle P; Zon, Gerald; McCaffrey, Anton P; Paul, Natasha; Hogrefe, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    For most sample types, the automation of RNA and DNA sample preparation workflows enables high throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) library preparation. Greater adoption of small RNA (sRNA) sequencing has been hindered by high sample input requirements and inherent ligation side products formed during library preparation. These side products, known as adapter dimer, are very similar in size to the tagged library. Most sRNA library preparation strategies thus employ a gel purification step to isolate tagged library from adapter dimer contaminants. At very low sample inputs, adapter dimer side products dominate the reaction and limit the sensitivity of this technique. Here we address the need for improved specificity of sRNA library preparation workflows with a novel library preparation approach that uses modified adapters to suppress adapter dimer formation. This workflow allows for lower sample inputs and elimination of the gel purification step, which in turn allows for an automatable sRNA library preparation protocol.

  20. Genrate: a generative model that finds and scores new genes and exons in genomic microarray data.

    PubMed

    Frey, Brendan J; Morris, Quaid D; Zhang, Wen; Mohammad, Naveed; Hughes, Timothy R

    2005-01-01

    Recently, researchers have made some progress in using microarrays to validate predicted exons in genome sequence and find new gene structures. However, current methods rely on separately making threshold-based decisions on intensity of expression, similarity of expression profiles, and arrangements of exons in the genome. We have taken a Bayesian approach and developed GenRate, a generative model that accounts for both genome-wide expression data taken from multiple conditions (e.g. tissues) and co-location and density of probes in DNA sequence data. GenRate balances probabilistic evidence derived from different sources and outputs scores (log-likelihoods) for each gene model, enabling the estimation of false-positive and false-negative rates. The model has a number of local minima that is exponential in the length of the DNA sequence data, so direct application of the EM learning algorithm produces poor results. We describe a novel way of parameterizing the model using examples from the data set, so that good solutions are found using an efficient algorithm. We apply GenRate to a subset of mouse genome-wide expression data that we have created, and discuss the statistical significance of the genes found by GenRate. Three of the highest-ranking gene structures found by GenRate, each containing thousands of bases from the genome, are confirmed using RT-PCR experiments.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of target genes by the sRNA FnrS in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Tanwer, Pooja; Bauer, Susanne; Heinrichs, Elisabeth; Panda, Gurudutta; Saluja, Daman; Rudel, Thomas; Beier, Dagmar

    2017-07-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are well-established post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in bacteria that respond to a variety of environmental stimuli. They usually act by base-pairing with their target mRNAs, which is commonly facilitated by the RNA chaperone Hfq. In this study we initiated the analysis of the sRNA FnrS of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which is induced under anaerobic conditions. We identified four putative FnrS target genes using bioinformatics approaches and validated these target genes using translational reporter gene fusions in both Escherichia coli and N. gonorrhoeae, thereby demonstrating their downregulation by direct base-pairing between the respective mRNA and FnrS. We demonstrate deregulation of target mRNAs upon deletion of fnrS and provide evidence that the isc gene cluster required for iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, which harbours iscS, which is a direct target of FnrS, is coordinately downregulated by the sRNA. By mutational analysis we show that, surprisingly, three distinct regions of FnrS are employed for interaction with different target genes.

  2. Retiring the Generation Gap: How Employees Young and Old Can Find Common Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Jennifer J.

    2007-01-01

    How different are the generations, really? Everybody knows that the "generation gap" between younger and older people causes stress and frustration at work. Are the differences people complain about just a big misunderstanding, or are they real? And most important, how can one use similarities and differences among the generations to be more…

  3. Retiring the Generation Gap: How Employees Young and Old Can Find Common Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Jennifer J.

    2007-01-01

    How different are the generations, really? Everybody knows that the "generation gap" between younger and older people causes stress and frustration at work. Are the differences people complain about just a big misunderstanding, or are they real? And most important, how can one use similarities and differences among the generations to be more…

  4. Regulation of a polyamine transporter by the conserved 3' UTR-derived sRNA SorX confers resistance to singlet oxygen and organic hydroperoxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A; Oh, Jeong-Il; Weber, Lennart; Schirmer, Jasmin; Schwarz, Johannes; Glaeser, Jens; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-10-02

    Singlet oxygen is generated by bacteriochlorophylls when light and oxygen are simultaneously present in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Singlet oxygen triggers a specific response that is partly regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoHI/HII. The sRNA RSs2461 has previously been identified as an RpoHI/HII-dependent sRNA and is derived from the 3' UTR of the mRNA for an OmpR-type transcriptional regulator. Similar to the RpoHI/HII-dependent CcsR and SorY sRNAs, RSs2461 affects the resistance of R. sphaeroides against singlet oxygen and was therefore renamed here SorX. Furthermore, SorX has a strong impact on resistance against organic hydroperoxides that usually occur as secondary damages downstream of singlet oxygen. The 75-nt SorX 3' fragment, which is generated by RNase E cleavage and highly conserved among related species, represents the functional entity. A target search identified potA mRNA, which encodes a subunit of a polyamine transporter, as a direct SorX target and stress resistance via SorX could be linked to potA. The PotABCD transporter is an uptake system for spermidine in E. coli. While spermidine is generally described as beneficial during oxidative stress, we observed significantly increased sensitivity of R. sphaeroides to organic hydroperoxides in the presence of spermidine. We therefore propose that the diminished import of spermidine, due to down-regulation of potA by SorX, counteracts oxidative stress. Together with results from other studies this underlines the importance of regulated transport to bacterial stress defense.

  5. Regulation of a polyamine transporter by the conserved 3′ UTR-derived sRNA SorX confers resistance to singlet oxygen and organic hydroperoxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Berghoff, Bork A.; Oh, Jeong-Il; Weber, Lennart; Schirmer, Jasmin; Schwarz, Johannes; Glaeser, Jens; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Singlet oxygen is generated by bacteriochlorophylls when light and oxygen are simultaneously present in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Singlet oxygen triggers a specific response that is partly regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoHI/HII. The sRNA RSs2461 has previously been identified as an RpoHI/HII-dependent sRNA and is derived from the 3′ UTR of the mRNA for an OmpR-type transcriptional regulator. Similar to the RpoHI/HII-dependent CcsR and SorY sRNAs, RSs2461 affects the resistance of R. sphaeroides against singlet oxygen and was therefore renamed here SorX. Furthermore, SorX has a strong impact on resistance against organic hydroperoxides that usually occur as secondary damages downstream of singlet oxygen. The 75-nt SorX 3′ fragment, which is generated by RNase E cleavage and highly conserved among related species, represents the functional entity. A target search identified potA mRNA, which encodes a subunit of a polyamine transporter, as a direct SorX target and stress resistance via SorX could be linked to potA. The PotABCD transporter is an uptake system for spermidine in E. coli. While spermidine is generally described as beneficial during oxidative stress, we observed significantly increased sensitivity of R. sphaeroides to organic hydroperoxides in the presence of spermidine. We therefore propose that the diminished import of spermidine, due to down-regulation of potA by SorX, counteracts oxidative stress. Together with results from other studies this underlines the importance of regulated transport to bacterial stress defense. PMID:27420112

  6. A new cis-encoded sRNA, BsrH, regulating the expression of hemH gene in Brucella abortus 2308.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaowei; Dong, Hao; Wu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    A total of 129 sRNA candidates were identified in Brucella abortus 2308 in our previous work, and one candidate with potential to regulate expression of hemH gene was further analyzed in this study. We found that the novel sRNA can inhibit the expression of hemH and called it BsrH (Brucella sRNA regulating HemH). The expression level of BsrH was tested in four different stress conditions. A significant upregulation was detected during the growth in acidic and Brucella minimal media, as well as in the presence of hydroxyl peroxide, while iron deficiency caused the opposite effect. As expected, BsrH strongly affected the survival ratio of the Brucella cells under iron-limitation conditions, though overexpression of BsrH did not affect Brucella virulence. Thus, we conclude that BsrH plays a regulatory role in bacterial heme biosynthesis and can be considered as the first Brucella sRNA involved in stress responses.

  7. On Wiener-Masani's algorithm for finding the generating function of multivariate stochastic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the algorithms for determining the generating function and prediction error matrix of multivariate stationary stochastic processes developed by Wiener and Masani (1957), and later by Masani (1960) will work in some more general setting.

  8. The VrrA sRNA controls a stationary phase survival factor Vrp of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Dharmesh; Song, Tianyan; Papenfort, Kai; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging regulatory elements in bacteria. The Vibrio cholerae sRNA VrrA has previously been shown to down-regulate outer membrane proteins (OmpA and OmpT) and biofilm matrix protein (RbmC) by base-pairing with the 5' region of the corresponding mRNAs. In this study, we present an additional target of VrrA in V. cholerae, the mRNA coding for the ribosome binding protein Vrp. Vrp is homologous to ribosome-associated inhibitor A (RaiA) of Escherichia coli which facilitates stationary phase survival through ribosome hibernation. We show that VrrA down-regulates Vrp protein synthesis by base-pairing to the 5' region of vrp mRNA and that the regulation requires the RNA chaperone protein, Hfq. We further demonstrate that Vrp is highly expressed during stationary phase growth and associates with the ribosome of V. cholerae. The effect of the Vrp protein in starvation survival is synergistic with that of the VC2530 protein, a homolog of the E. coli hibernation promoting factor HPF, suggesting a combined role for these proteins in ribosome hibernation in V. cholerae. Vrp and VC2530 are important for V. cholerae starvation survival under nutrient deficient conditions. While VC2530 is down-regulated in cells lacking vrrA, mutation of vrp results in VC2530 activation. This is the first report indicating a regulatory role for an sRNA, modulating stationary factors involved in bacterial ribosome hibernation.

  9. The VrrA sRNA controls a stationary phase survival factor Vrp of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Dharmesh; Song, Tianyan; Papenfort, Kai; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2015-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are emerging regulatory elements in bacteria. The Vibrio cholerae sRNA VrrA has previously been shown to down-regulate outer membrane proteins (OmpA and OmpT) and biofilm matrix protein (RbmC) by base-pairing with the 5′ region of the corresponding mRNAs. In this study, we present an additional target of VrrA in V. cholerae, the mRNA coding for the ribosome binding protein Vrp. Vrp is homologous to ribosome-associated inhibitor A (RaiA) of Escherichia coli which facilitates stationary phase survival through ribosome hibernation. We show that VrrA down-regulates Vrp protein synthesis by base-pairing to the 5′ region of vrp mRNA and that the regulation requires the RNA chaperone protein, Hfq. We further demonstrate that Vrp is highly expressed during stationary phase growth and associates with the ribosome of V. cholerae. The effect of the Vrp protein in starvation survival is synergistic with that of the VC2530 protein, a homolog of the E. coli hibernation promoting factor HPF, suggesting a combined role for these proteins in ribosome hibernation in V. cholerae. Vrp and VC2530 are important for V. cholerae starvation survival under nutrient deficient conditions. While VC2530 is down-regulated in cells lacking vrrA, mutation of vrp results in VC2530 activation. This is the first report indicating a regulatory role for an sRNA, modulating stationary factors involved in bacterial ribosome hibernation. PMID:25826569

  10. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  11. EPA's Endangerment Finding: Paving the Way Toward the Next Generation of Cars and Trucks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View a fact sheet on how the Final Endangerment Finding will allow EPA to finalize the first greenhouse gas standards for new light-duty vehicles as part of the joint rulemaking with the Department of Transportation.

  12. Generative Perspectives on Language Acquisition: Empirical Findings, Theoretical Considerations, and Crosslinguistic Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clahsen, Harald, Ed.

    The collection of essays and studies concerning generative grammar and first and second language acquisition includes: "The Optional-Infinitive Stage in Child English: Evidence from Negation" (Tony Harris, Ken Wexler); "Towards a Structure-Building Model of Acquisition" (Andrew Radford); "The Underspecification of…

  13. Generative Perspectives on Language Acquisition: Empirical Findings, Theoretical Considerations, and Crosslinguistic Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clahsen, Harald, Ed.

    The collection of essays and studies concerning generative grammar and first and second language acquisition includes: "The Optional-Infinitive Stage in Child English: Evidence from Negation" (Tony Harris, Ken Wexler); "Towards a Structure-Building Model of Acquisition" (Andrew Radford); "The Underspecification of…

  14. Familial Dyslexia: Genetic and Medical Findings in Eleven Three-Generation Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubs, Herbert A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 11 3-generation families supported the hypothesis of autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance. Data did not support an increased frequency of males, left-handedness, or autoimmune disorders in dyslexics. Severity was greater in males. Long-term outcome was comparable in dyslexics and nondyslexics. (JDD)

  15. Finding Alignment: The Perceptions and Integration of the Next Generation Science Standards Practices by Elementary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Janette; Nadelson, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Preparing elementary-level teachers to teach in alignment with the eight Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) practices could prove to be a daunting endeavor. However, the process may be catalyzed by leveraging elements of teacher science instruction that inherently attend to the practice standards. In this study, we investigated the science…

  16. Familial Dyslexia: Genetic and Medical Findings in Eleven Three-Generation Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubs, Herbert A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 11 3-generation families supported the hypothesis of autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance. Data did not support an increased frequency of males, left-handedness, or autoimmune disorders in dyslexics. Severity was greater in males. Long-term outcome was comparable in dyslexics and nondyslexics. (JDD)

  17. Community views of inter-generational sex: findings from focus groups in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, Anne; Kunda, John Lengwe; Kgakole, Leagajang; Masisi, Mokgweetsi; Laetsang, Ditiro; Ho-Foster, Ari; Marokoane, Nobantu; Andersson, Neil

    2010-10-01

    Inter-generational sex is an important driver of the AIDS epidemic in Southern Africa, contributing to the high incidence of HIV among young women. We conducted 12 focus group discussions with women aged 15-24 years and 11 with men aged 40-55 years in urban and rural locations in Botswana, Namibia and Swaziland. There was consensus that inter-generational sex is commonplace. The young women were clear they had sex with older men to get money and material goods. In urban sites, they spoke about requirements for a "modern" lifestyle and to keep up with their friends, but in rural sites they also said they needed money for school fees, food and household goods. Young women used disparaging names for the older men and they were well aware of the risk of HIV from inter-generational sex. They believed older men were more risky than younger men: They were more likely to be infected and it was harder to negotiate use of a condom with them. They were willing to take the risk to get what they wanted; some also had a fatalistic attitude. Older men described sexual motivation and blamed young women for seducing them. They believed there was a higher risk of HIV from younger women, because they have more partners and do not insist on using a condom. But this did not deter them from taking the risk. Older men and young women discount the risks of inter-generational sex against short-term benefits. Isolated efforts to increase risk awareness are unlikely to be effective. Making older men aware they are ridiculed by young women may be a promising approach, combined with interventions that give alternatives to young women and increase their self-worth.

  18. [Objective audiometry with DPOAEs : New findings for generation mechanisms and clinical applications. German version].

    PubMed

    Zelle, D; Dalhoff, E; Gummer, A W

    2016-11-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) are sound waves generated as byproducts of the cochlear amplifier. These are measurable in the auditory canal and represent an objective method for diagnosing functional disorders of the inner ear. Conventional DPOAE and TEOAE methods permit detection of hearing impairment, but with less than desirable accuracy. By accounting for DPOAE generation mechanisms, the aim is to improve the accuracy of inner-ear diagnosis. DPOAEs consist of two components, which emerge at different positions along the cochlea and which may cause artifacts due to mutual interference. Here, the two components are separated in the time domain using short stimulus pulses. Optimized stimulus levels facilitate the acquisition of DPOAEs with maximum amplitudes. DPOAE and Békésy audiograms were recorded from 41 subjects in a clinically relevant frequency range of 1.5 to 6 kHz. The short stimulus pulses allowed artifact-free measurement of DPOAEs. Semilogarithmic input-output functions yielded estimated distortion product thresholds, which were significantly correlated with the subjectively acquired Békésy thresholds. In addition, they allowed detection of hearing impairment from 20 dB HL, with 95 % sensitivity and only a 5 % false-positive rate. This accuracy was achieved with a measurement time of about 1-2 min per frequency. Compared to conventional DPOAE and TEOAE methods, separation of DPOAE components using short-pulse DPOAEs in combination with optimized stimulus parameters considerably enhances the accuracy of DPOAEs for diagnosing impairment of the cochlear amplifier.

  19. Summary and early findings from a second generation information monitoring and diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Bourassa, Norman; Kinney, Kristopher L.; Shockman, Christine

    2003-04-02

    Private sector commercial office buildings are challenging environments for energy efficiency projects. This challenge is related to the complexity of business environments that involve ownership, operation, and tenant relationships. This research project was developed to examine the environment for building operations and identify causes of inefficient use of energy related to technical and organizational issues. This paper discusses a second-generation Information Monitoring and Diagnostic System (IMDS) installed at a leased office building in Sacramento, California. The underlying principle of this project is that high quality building performance data can help show where energy is being used and how buildings systems actually perform. Such data are an important first step toward improving building energy efficiency. This project has demonstrated that the IMDS is valuable to the building operators at the Sacramento site. The building operators not only accept the technology, but it has become the core of their day-to-day building control concepts. One objective of this project was to evaluate the costs and benefits of the IMDS. The system cost about $0.70 per square foot, which includes the design, hardware, software, and installation, which is about 30% less than the previous IMDS in San Francisco. A number of operational problems have been identified with the IMDS.

  20. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25891276

  1. Next generation sequencing on patients with LGMD and nonspecific myopathies: Findings associated with ANO5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Marco; Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Tasca, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Lucia; Janssens, Sandra; De Bleecker, Jan; Delpech, Marc; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Angelini, Corrado; Sacconi, Sabrina; Santoro, Lucio; Ricci, Enzo; Claes, Kathleen; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    We studied 786 undiagnosed patients with LGMD or nonspecific myopathic features to investigate the role of ANO5 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) and in nonspecific myopathies using the next generation sequencing (NGS) approach. In 160 LGMD patients, we first sequenced hotspot exons 5 and 20 and then sequenced the remaining part of the coding region. Another 626 patients, recruited using broader inclusion criteria, were directly analyzed by targeted NGS. By combining NGS and Sanger sequencing, we identified 33/786 (4%) patients carrying putative pathogenic changes in both alleles and 23 ANO5 heterozygotes (3%). The phenotypic spectrum is broader than expected, from hyperCKemia to myopathies, with lack of genotype/phenotype correlations. In particular, this is currently the largest screening of the ANO5 gene. The large number of heterozygotes for damaging mutations suggests that anoctaminopathies should be frequent and often nonpenetrant. We propose the multiple genetic testing by targeted NGS as a first step to analyze patients with nonspecific myopathic presentations. This represents a straightforward approach to overcome the difficulties of clinical heterogeneity of ANO5 patients, and to test, at the same time, many other genes involved in neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An in vivo reporter assay for sRNA-directed gene control in Gram-positive bacteria: identifying a novel sRNA target in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Ivain, Lorraine; Bordeau, Valérie; Eyraud, Alex; Hallier, Marc; Dreano, Stéphane; Tattevin, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) play a major role in the regulation of various cellular functions. Most sRNAs interact with mRNA targets via an antisense mechanism, modifying their translation and/or degradation. Despite considerable progresses in discovering sRNAs in Gram-positive bacteria, their functions, for the most part, are unknown. This is mainly due to difficulties in identifying their targets. To aid in the identification of sRNA targets in Gram-positive bacteria, we set up an in vivo method for fast analysis of sRNA-mediated post-transcriptional control at the 5΄ regions of target mRNAs. The technology is based on the co-expression of an sRNA and a 5΄ sequence of an mRNA target fused to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The system was challenged on Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic Gram-positive pathogen. We analyzed several established sRNA–mRNA interactions, and in addition, we identified the ecb mRNA as a novel target for SprX2 sRNA. Using our in vivo system in combination with in vitro experiments, we demonstrated that SprX2 uses an antisense mechanism to prevent ecb mRNA translation initiation. Furthermore, we used our reporter assay to validate sRNA regulations in other Gram-positive organisms, Bacillus subtilis and Listeria monocytogenes. Overall, our method is broadly applicable to challenge the predicted sRNA–mRNA interactions in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:28369640

  3. Small RNA Profiling by Next-Generation Sequencing Using High-Definition Adapters.

    PubMed

    Billmeier, Martina; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) as key regulators of gene expression play fundamental roles in many biological processes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become an important tool for sRNA discovery and profiling. However, NGS data often show bias for or against certain sequences which is mainly caused by adapter oligonucleotides that are ligated to sRNAs more or less efficiently by RNA ligases. In order to reduce ligation bias, High-definition (HD) adapters for the Illumina sequencing platform were developed. However, a large amount of direct 5' and 3' adapter ligation products are often produced when the current commercially available kits are used for cloning with HD adapters. In this chapter we describe a protocol for sRNA library construction using HD adapters with drastically reduced direct 5' adapter-3' adapter ligation product. The protocol can be used for sRNA library preparation from total RNA or sRNA of various plant, animal, insect, or fungal samples. The protocol includes total RNA extraction from plant leaf tissue and cultured mammalian cells and sRNA library construction using HD adapters.

  4. Escherichia coli responds to environmental changes using enolasic degradosomes and stabilized DicF sRNA to alter cellular morphology.

    PubMed

    Murashko, Oleg N; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2017-09-05

    Escherichia coli RNase E is an essential enzyme that forms multicomponent ribonucleolytic complexes known as "RNA degradosomes." These complexes consist of four major components: RNase E, PNPase, RhlB RNA helicase, and enolase. However, the role of enolase in the RNase E/degradosome is not understood. Here, we report that presence of enolase in the RNase E/degradosome under anaerobic conditions regulates cell morphology, resulting in Ecoli MG1655 cell filamentation. Under anaerobic conditions, enolase bound to the RNase E/degradosome stabilizes the small RNA (sRNA) DicF, i.e., the inhibitor of the cell division gene ftsZ, through chaperon protein Hfq-dependent regulation. RNase E/enolase distribution changes from membrane-associated patterns under aerobic to diffuse patterns under anaerobic conditions. When the enolase-RNase E/degradosome interaction is disrupted, the anaerobically induced characteristics disappear. We provide a mechanism by which Ecoli uses enolase-bound degradosomes to switch from rod-shaped to filamentous form in response to anaerobiosis by regulating RNase E subcellular distribution, RNase E enzymatic activity, and the stability of the sRNA DicF required for the filamentous transition. In contrast to Ecoli nonpathogenic strains, pathogenic Ecoli strains predominantly have multiple copies of sRNA DicF in their genomes, with cell filamentation previously being linked to bacterial pathogenesis. Our data suggest a mechanism for bacterial cell filamentation during infection under anaerobic conditions.

  5. A cis-encoded sRNA, Hfq and mRNA secondary structure act independently to suppress IS200 transposition

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael J.; Trussler, Ryan S.; Haniford, David B.

    2015-01-01

    IS200 is found throughout Enterobacteriaceae and transposes at a notoriously low frequency. In addition to the transposase protein (TnpA), IS200 encodes an uncharacterized Hfq-binding sRNA that is encoded opposite to the tnpA 5'UTR. In the current work we asked if this sRNA represses tnpA expression. We show here that the IS200 sRNA (named art200 for antisense regulator of transposase IS200) basepairs with tnpA to inhibit translation initiation. Unexpectedly, art200-tnpA pairing is limited to 40 bp, despite 90 nt of perfect complementarity. Additionally, we show that Hfq and RNA secondary structure in the tnpA 5'UTR each repress tnpA expression in an art200-independent manner. Finally, we show that disrupting translational control of tnpA expression leads to increased IS200 transposition in E. coli. The current work provides new mechanistic insight into why IS200 transposition is so strongly suppressed. The possibility of art200 acting in trans to regulate a yet-unidentified target is discussed as well as potential applications of the IS200 system for designing novel riboregulators. PMID:26044710

  6. A cis-encoded sRNA, Hfq and mRNA secondary structure act independently to suppress IS200 transposition.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Trussler, Ryan S; Haniford, David B

    2015-07-27

    IS200 is found throughout Enterobacteriaceae and transposes at a notoriously low frequency. In addition to the transposase protein (TnpA), IS200 encodes an uncharacterized Hfq-binding sRNA that is encoded opposite to the tnpA 5'UTR. In the current work we asked if this sRNA represses tnpA expression. We show here that the IS200 sRNA (named art200 for antisense regulator of transposase IS200) basepairs with tnpA to inhibit translation initiation. Unexpectedly, art200-tnpA pairing is limited to 40 bp, despite 90 nt of perfect complementarity. Additionally, we show that Hfq and RNA secondary structure in the tnpA 5'UTR each repress tnpA expression in an art200-independent manner. Finally, we show that disrupting translational control of tnpA expression leads to increased IS200 transposition in E. coli. The current work provides new mechanistic insight into why IS200 transposition is so strongly suppressed. The possibility of art200 acting in trans to regulate a yet-unidentified target is discussed as well as potential applications of the IS200 system for designing novel riboregulators.

  7. The Nop5-L7A-fibrillarin RNP complex and a novel box C/D containing sRNA of Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Jasmin; Wagner, Steffen; Klug, Gabriele

    2010-04-09

    RNA 2'O-methylation is a frequent modification of rRNA and tRNA and supposed to influence RNA folding and stability. Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, containing the proteins Nop5, L7A, fibrillarin, and a box C/D sRNA, are guided for 2'O-methylation by interactions of their RNA component with their target RNA. In vitro complex assembly was analyzed for several thermophilic Archaea but in vivo studies are rare, even unavailable for halophilic Archaea. To analyze the putative box C/D RNP complex in the extremely halophilic Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 we performed pull-down analysis and identified the proteins Nop5, L7A, and fibrillarin and the tRNA(Trp) intron, as a typical box C/D sRNA of this RNP complex in vivo. We show for the first time a ribonucleolytic activity of the purified RNP complex proteins, as well as for the RNP complex containing pull-down fractions. Furthermore, we identified a novel RNA (OE4630R-3'sRNA) as part of the complex, containing the typical boxes C/D and C'/D' sequence motifs and being twice as abundant as the tRNA(Trp) intron. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The research mentoring relationship in family medicine: findings from the grant generating project.

    PubMed

    Longo, Daniel R; Katerndahl, David A; Turban, Daniel B; Griswold, Kim; Ge, Bin; Hewett, John E; Dougherty, Thomas W; Schubert, Shari

    2011-04-01

    Mentoring has been acknowledged as a critical factor in the development of family medicine academicians. Specific aims were to describe the research mentoring in family medicine from the experience of both mentors and protégés and identify characteristics that mentors and protégés associated with a successful mentoring relationship. The Grant Generating Project (GGP) Fellowship, a training and mentoring program for family medicine researchers, provided a natural opportunity to study these issues and better understand what is successful in research mentoring. Separate mentor and protégés surveys measured perceptions about the extent of mentoring assistance, perceived relationship success, costs and benefits of the relationship, and the nature and duration of the relationship. Correlations between demographic characteristics and the mentoring relationship were also examined. Mentors were generally professors (78%), male (82%), with a mean age of 53 years, while protégés were assistant professors (53%) and almost evenly divided between male (51%) and female (49%) with mean age of 44 years. Both mentors and protégés describe the mentoring relationship in general to be of benefit to both mentor and protégé. Nonetheless, statistically significant differences between mentor-protégé responses were found for nine of the 20 survey items. Mentors tended to give higher values in their ratings of specific mentor-protégé relationship variables. Significant positive correlations were found between benefit, quality of the relationship, and mentoring assistance and the number of hours per month of mentor-protégé interaction, the number of mentor-protégé meetings per month, and the number of months the mentor worked with the protégé. Mentor-protégé acquaintance before the GGP fellowship was significantly correlated with cost, benefit, and mentoring assistance. This study shows agreement between mentor and protégé regarding the mentors' ability to promote

  9. Dual-function sRNA encoded peptide SR1P modulates moonlighting activity of B. subtilis GapA

    PubMed Central

    Gimpel, Matthias; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT SR1 is a dual-function sRNA from B. subtilis that acts as a base-pairing regulatory RNA and as a peptide-encoding mRNA. Both functions of SR1 are highly conserved. Previously, we uncovered that the SR1 encoded peptide SR1P binds the glycolytic enzyme GapA resulting in stabilization of gapA mRNA. Here, we demonstrate that GapA interacts with RNases Y and J1, and this interaction was RNA-independent. About 1% of GapA molecules purified from B. subtilis carry RNase J1 and about 2% RNase Y. In contrast to the GapA/RNase Y interaction, the GapA/RNaseJ1 interaction was stronger in the presence of SR1P. GapA/SR1P-J1/Y displayed in vitro RNase activity on known RNase J1 substrates. Moreover, the RNase J1 substrate SR5 has altered half-lives in a ΔgapA strain and a Δsr1 strain, suggesting in vivo functions of the GapA/SR1P/J1 interaction. Our results demonstrate that the metabolic enzyme GapA moonlights in recruiting RNases while GapA bound SR1P promotes binding of RNase J1 and enhances its activity. PMID:27449348

  10. Antagonistic functions between the RNA chaperone Hfq and an sRNA regulate sensitivity to the antibiotic colicin

    PubMed Central

    Salvail, Hubert; Caron, Marie-Pier; Bélanger, Justine; Massé, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq is a key regulator of the function of small RNAs (sRNAs). Hfq has been shown to facilitate sRNAs binding to target mRNAs and to directly regulate translation through the action of sRNAs. Here, we present evidence that Hfq acts as the repressor of cirA mRNA translation in the absence of sRNA. Hfq binding to cirA prevents translation initiation, which correlates with cirA mRNA instability. In contrast, RyhB pairing to cirA mRNA promotes changes in RNA structure that displace Hfq, thereby allowing efficient translation as well as mRNA stabilization. Because CirA is a receptor for the antibiotic colicin Ia, in addition to acting as an Fur (Ferric Uptake Regulator)-regulated siderophore transporter, translational activation of cirA mRNA by RyhB promotes colicin sensitivity under conditions of iron starvation. Altogether, these results indicate that Fur and RyhB modulate an unexpected feed-forward loop mechanism related to iron physiology and colicin sensitivity. PMID:24065131

  11. [sRNA (sraB) regulate the resistant ability of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis to egg albumen].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyuan; Cao, Minhui; Cao, Xuesong; Gu, Hongwei; Zeng, Ke

    2010-11-01

    Salmonella species are important food-borne pathogens of human and animal. S. enterica serovar Enteritidis is the only serovar that routinely causes human infection through intact egg, the molecular basis of its ability to survive in egg is poorly understood. The importance of post-transcriptional regulation by small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) has recently been recognized. The sRNAs play diverse physiological roles in stress responses, regulation of metabolism, control of bacterial envelope composition and bacterial virulence. In this study, we studied regulatory function of salmonella sRNA sraB associated with survival ability of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis in egg albumen. To study the contribution of sraB to the survival ability of S. Enteritidis in egg albumen, we constructed sraB deletion strain (SE2472 delta sraB) with wild type S. Enteritidis SE2472, using red recombination system. For complementation of sraB, complete fragment sraB was amplified from SE2472 and inserted into plasmid pHDB3 to overexpress sraB. We carried out the egg albumen bactericidal experiment with strains of SE2472, SE2472 delta sraB (sraB deletion), SE2472 delta sraB-comp (sraB complement) and control. To explore the regulatory role of sraB, we assayed the bactericidal activity of the two important antimicrobial components of egg albumen: lysozyme and transferrin. In the egg albumen bactericidal experiment, the survival rate of SE2472 delta sraB was only about 61%-70% of that of SE2472; while SE2472 delta sraB-comp improve the survival rate of SE2472 delta sraB by 10%-33% . In the transferrin bactericidal experiment, the survival rate of SE2472 delta sraB was 38% of that of SE2472 at 8 h incubation, and 23% at 24 h incubation. SE2472 delta sraB-comp played an important role in improving the survival rate rescued the defect by 14% than SE2472 delta sraB at 8 h of incubation, but failed to rescue the defect at 24 h incubation. In the Lysozyme experiment, the survival rate of SE2472 delta

  12. Reflecting on Earlier Experiences with Unsolicited Findings: Points to Consider for Next-Generation Sequencing and Informed Consent in Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Rigter, Tessel; Henneman, Lidewij; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Hall, Alison; Yntema, Helger G; Borry, Pascal; Tönnies, Holger; Waisfisz, Quinten; Elting, Mariet W; Dondorp, Wybo J; Cornel, Martina C

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput nucleotide sequencing (often referred to as next-generation sequencing; NGS) is increasingly being chosen as a diagnostic tool for cases of expected but unresolved genetic origin. When exploring a higher number of genetic variants, there is a higher chance of detecting unsolicited findings. The consequential increased need for decisions on disclosure of these unsolicited findings poses a challenge for the informed consent procedure. This article discusses the ethical and practical dilemmas encountered when contemplating informed consent for NGS in diagnostics from a multidisciplinary point of view. By exploring recent similar experiences with unsolicited findings in other settings, an attempt is made to describe what can be learned so far for implementing NGS in standard genetic diagnostics. The article concludes with a set of points to consider in order to guide decision-making on the extent of return of results in relation to the mode of informed consent. We hereby aim to provide a sound basis for developing guidelines for optimizing the informed consent procedure. PMID:23784691

  13. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Colgan, Aoife M; Kröger, Carsten; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C D

    2016-08-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon.

  14. The Impact of 18 Ancestral and Horizontally-Acquired Regulatory Proteins upon the Transcriptome and sRNA Landscape of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Aoife M.; Diard, Médéric; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Puente, José L.; Sivasankaran, Sathesh K.; Hokamp, Karsten; Hinton, Jay C. D.

    2016-01-01

    We know a great deal about the genes used by the model pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to cause disease, but less about global gene regulation. New tools for studying transcripts at the single nucleotide level now offer an unparalleled opportunity to understand the bacterial transcriptome, and expression of the small RNAs (sRNA) and coding genes responsible for the establishment of infection. Here, we define the transcriptomes of 18 mutants lacking virulence-related global regulatory systems that modulate the expression of the SPI1 and SPI2 Type 3 secretion systems of S. Typhimurium strain 4/74. Using infection-relevant growth conditions, we identified a total of 1257 coding genes that are controlled by one or more regulatory system, including a sub-class of genes that reflect a new level of cross-talk between SPI1 and SPI2. We directly compared the roles played by the major transcriptional regulators in the expression of sRNAs, and discovered that the RpoS (σ38) sigma factor modulates the expression of 23% of sRNAs, many more than other regulatory systems. The impact of the RNA chaperone Hfq upon the steady state levels of 280 sRNA transcripts is described, and we found 13 sRNAs that are co-regulated with SPI1 and SPI2 virulence genes. We report the first example of an sRNA, STnc1480, that is subject to silencing by H-NS and subsequent counter-silencing by PhoP and SlyA. The data for these 18 regulatory systems is now available to the bacterial research community in a user-friendly online resource, SalComRegulon. PMID:27564394

  15. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5’ Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5’ UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5’ UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5’ UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5’ UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. PMID:27802301

  16. Box C/D sRNA stem ends act as stabilizing anchors for box C/D di-sRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Yip, W. S. Vincent; Shigematsu, Hideki; Taylor, David W.; Baserga, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) modifications are essential for ribosome function in all cellular organisms. Box C/D small (nucleolar) ribonucleoproteins [s(no)RNPs] catalyze 2′-O-methylation, one rRNA modification type in Eukarya and Archaea. Negatively stained electron microscopy (EM) models of archaeal box C/D sRNPs have demonstrated the dimeric sRNP (di-sRNP) architecture, which has been corroborated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Due to limitations of the structural techniques, the orientation of the box C/D sRNAs has remained unclear. Here, we have used cryo-EM to elucidate the sRNA orientation in a M. jannaschii box C/D di-sRNP. The cryo-EM reconstruction suggests a parallel orientation of the two sRNAs. Biochemical and structural analyses of sRNPs assembled with mutant sRNAs indicate a potential interaction between the sRNA stem ends. Our results suggest that the parallel arrangement of the sRNAs juxtaposes their stem ends into close proximity to allow for a stabilizing interaction that helps maintain the di-sRNP architecture. PMID:27342279

  17. Posttranscriptional regulation of PhbR, the transcriptional activator of polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis, by iron and the sRNA ArrF in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Muriel-Millán, Luis Felipe; Castellanos, Mildred; Hernandez-Eligio, Jose Alberto; Moreno, Soledad; Espín, Guadalupe

    2014-03-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii is a Gram-negative bacterium able to synthesize poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), a biodegradable plastic of industrial interest. The phbBAC operon encodes the enzymes of PHB synthesis and is activated by the transcriptional regulator PhbR and the sigma factor RpoS. Iron limitation has been previously reported to increase PHB accumulation in A. vinelandii; however, the mechanism by which iron controls PHB synthesis is unknown. Under iron starvation in Escherichia coli, the RyhB sRNA modulates the translation of genes involved in iron homeostasis. ArrF is the RyhB analogue in A. vinelandii and similarly increases in quantity during Fe(2+) depletion. In this study, we evaluate the effect of iron and ArrF on PHB accumulation, and on phbR and phbBAC expression in A. vinelandii strain UW136. Using transcriptional and translational fusions of phbR and phbB with gusA reporter gene, we found that iron limitation increased the expression of phbBAC at the transcriptional level and posttranscriptionally increased the expression of phbR. We also found that the ArrF sRNA is a positive regulator of phbR expression at the posttranscriptional level. Collectively, these data suggest that iron limitation increases the translation of phbR through ArrF.

  18. The Conserved Dcw Gene Cluster of R. sphaeroides Is Preceded by an Uncommonly Extended 5' Leader Featuring the sRNA UpsM.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lennart; Thoelken, Clemens; Volk, Marcel; Remes, Bernhard; Lechner, Marcus; Klug, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Cell division and cell wall synthesis mechanisms are similarly conserved among bacteria. Consequently some bacterial species have comparable sets of genes organized in the dcw (division and cell wall) gene cluster. Dcw genes, their regulation and their relative order within the cluster are outstandingly conserved among rod shaped and gram negative bacteria to ensure an efficient coordination of growth and division. A well studied representative is the dcw gene cluster of E. coli. The first promoter of the gene cluster (mraZ1p) gives rise to polycistronic transcripts containing a 38 nt long 5' UTR followed by the first gene mraZ. Despite reported conservation we present evidence for a much longer 5' UTR in the gram negative and rod shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and in the family of Rhodobacteraceae. This extended 268 nt long 5' UTR comprises a Rho independent terminator, which in case of termination gives rise to a non-coding RNA (UpsM). This sRNA is conditionally cleaved by RNase E under stress conditions in an Hfq- and very likely target mRNA-dependent manner, implying its function in trans. These results raise the question for the regulatory function of this extended 5' UTR. It might represent the rarely described case of a trans acting sRNA derived from a riboswitch with exclusive presence in the family of Rhodobacteraceae.

  19. Antagonistic control of the turnover pathway for the global regulatory sRNA CsrB by the CsrA and CsrD proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vakulskas, Christopher A.; Leng, Yuanyuan; Abe, Hazuki; Amaki, Takumi; Okayama, Akihiro; Babitzke, Paul; Suzuki, Kazushi; Romeo, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The widely conserved protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator A) globally regulates bacterial gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In many species, CsrA activity is governed by untranslated sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC in Escherichia coli, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, sequestering them from lower affinity mRNA targets. Both the synthesis and turnover of CsrB/C are regulated. Their turnover requires the housekeeping endonuclease RNase E and is activated by the presence of a preferred carbon source via the binding of EIIAGlc of the glucose transport system to the GGDEF-EAL domain protein CsrD. We demonstrate that the CsrB 3′ segment contains the features necessary for CsrD-mediated decay. RNase E cleavage in an unstructured segment located immediately upstream from the intrinsic terminator is necessary for subsequent degradation to occur. CsrA stabilizes CsrB against RNase E cleavage by binding to two canonical sites adjacent to the necessary cleavage site, while CsrD acts by overcoming CsrA-mediated protection. Our genetic, biochemical and structural studies establish a molecular framework for sRNA turnover by the CsrD-RNase E pathway. We propose that CsrD evolution was driven by the selective advantage of decoupling Csr sRNA decay from CsrA binding, connecting it instead to the availability of a preferred carbon source. PMID:27235416

  20. Second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplantation: MRI findings and clinical correlations at a minimum 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kon, E; Di Martino, A; Filardo, G; Tetta, C; Busacca, M; Iacono, F; Delcogliano, M; Albisinni, U; Marcacci, M

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of hyaluronan-based arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation at a minimum of 5 years of follow-up and to correlate it with the MRI evaluation parameters. Fifty consecutive patients were included in the study and evaluated clinically using the Cartilage Standard Evaluation Form as proposed by ICRS and the Tegner score. Forty lesions underwent MRI evaluation at a minimum 5-year follow-up. For the description and evaluation of the graft, we employed the MOCART-scoring system. A statistically significant improvement in all clinical scores was observed at 2 and over 5 years. The total MOCART score and the signal intensity (3D-GE-FS) of the repair tissue were statistically correlated to the IKDC subjective evaluation. Larger size of the treated cartilage lesions had a negative influence on the degree of defect repair and filling, the integration to the border zone and the subchondral lamina integrity, whereas more intensive sport activity had a positive influence on the signal intensity of the repair tissue, the repair tissue surface, and the clinical outcome. Our findings confirm the durability of the clinical results obtained with Hyalograft C and the usefulness of MRI as a non-invasive method for the evaluation of the repaired tissue and the outcome after second-generation autologous transplantation over time. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Finding Purpose in Pain: Using Logotherapy as a Method for Addressing Survivor Guilt in First-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Kevin A.; Williams, Cyrus, III; Harden, Dia

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students face a variety of academic and personal challenges, including survivor guilt (Piorkowski, 1983). Survivor guilt for these students involves negative emotions related to leaving family and friends "behind" in difficult contexts and lived experiences. This article provides (a) an overview of first-generation college…

  2. Finding Purpose in Pain: Using Logotherapy as a Method for Addressing Survivor Guilt in First-Generation College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Kevin A.; Williams, Cyrus, III; Harden, Dia

    2013-01-01

    First-generation college students face a variety of academic and personal challenges, including survivor guilt (Piorkowski, 1983). Survivor guilt for these students involves negative emotions related to leaving family and friends "behind" in difficult contexts and lived experiences. This article provides (a) an overview of first-generation college…

  3. Transcription of eucaryotic tRNA1met and 5SRNA genes by RNA polymerase III is blocked by base mismatches in the intragenic control regions.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Folk, W R

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed duplex DNAs containing single G-T or A-C mismatches in the X. laevis tRNA1met gene. Mismatches within regions of this gene which are bound by transcription factor TFIIIC prevent transcription by RNA polymerase III. Homoduplexes with G-C----A-T mutations at some of the same sites, however, are transcribed efficiently in oocytes. Mismatches outside of the tRNA1met gene have no effect upon transcription. A survey of several point mutants in the Syrian hamster 5SRNA gene indicates that mismatches outside the internal control region somewhat reduce transcription, but a mismatch within the internal control region blocks transcription. Thus, the presence of mismatched bases in the region of DNA which interacts with RNA polymerase III transcription factors blocks transcription, perhaps by interfering with DNA renaturation following transit of the RNA polymerase. Images PMID:3645544

  4. Antagonistic control of the turnover pathway for the global regulatory sRNA CsrB by the CsrA and CsrD proteins.

    PubMed

    Vakulskas, Christopher A; Leng, Yuanyuan; Abe, Hazuki; Amaki, Takumi; Okayama, Akihiro; Babitzke, Paul; Suzuki, Kazushi; Romeo, Tony

    2016-09-19

    The widely conserved protein CsrA (carbon storage regulator A) globally regulates bacterial gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In many species, CsrA activity is governed by untranslated sRNAs, CsrB and CsrC in Escherichia coli, which bind to multiple CsrA dimers, sequestering them from lower affinity mRNA targets. Both the synthesis and turnover of CsrB/C are regulated. Their turnover requires the housekeeping endonuclease RNase E and is activated by the presence of a preferred carbon source via the binding of EIIA(Glc) of the glucose transport system to the GGDEF-EAL domain protein CsrD. We demonstrate that the CsrB 3' segment contains the features necessary for CsrD-mediated decay. RNase E cleavage in an unstructured segment located immediately upstream from the intrinsic terminator is necessary for subsequent degradation to occur. CsrA stabilizes CsrB against RNase E cleavage by binding to two canonical sites adjacent to the necessary cleavage site, while CsrD acts by overcoming CsrA-mediated protection. Our genetic, biochemical and structural studies establish a molecular framework for sRNA turnover by the CsrD-RNase E pathway. We propose that CsrD evolution was driven by the selective advantage of decoupling Csr sRNA decay from CsrA binding, connecting it instead to the availability of a preferred carbon source. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Elaborative encoding through self-generation enhances outcomes with errorless learning: Findings from the Skypekids memory study.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Catherine; Wagner, Joseph; Wegener, Signy; Malouf, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Errorless learning has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of memory impairment in adults and older adults with acquired brain injury. In the same population, use of elaborative encoding through supported self-generation in errorless paradigms has been shown to further enhance memory performance. However, the evidence base relevant to application of both standard and self-generation forms of errorless learning in children is far weaker. We address this limitation in the present study to examine recall performance in children with brain injury (n = 16) who were taught novel age-appropriate science and social science facts through the medium of Skype. All participants were taught these facts under conditions of standard errorless learning, errorless learning with self-generation, and trial-and-error learning after which memory was tested at 5-minute, 30-minute, 1-hour and 24-hour delays. Analysis revealed no main effect of time, with participants retaining most information acquired over the 24-hour testing period, but a significant effect of condition. Notably, self-generation proved more effective than both standard errorless and trial-and-error learning. Further analysis of the data revealed that severity of attentional impairment was less detrimental to recall performance under errorless conditions. This study extends the literature to provide further evidence of the value of errorless learning methods in children with ABI and the first demonstration of the effectiveness of self-generation when delivered via the Internet.

  6. Assessing Adolescents' Communicative Self-Efficacy to Discuss Controversial Issues: Findings from a Randomized Study of the Word Generation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Alex R.; Lawrence, Joshua F.; Snow, Catherine E.; Taylor, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Communicative self-efficacy serves as an important link between discussing controversial issues and civic engagement because confidence in one's discourse skills is important to managing conflicting perspectives and developing solutions to community-based problems. Freely available to schools, "Word Generation" is a cross-content…

  7. Assessing Adolescents' Communicative Self-Efficacy to Discuss Controversial Issues: Findings from a Randomized Study of the Word Generation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Alex R.; Lawrence, Joshua F.; Snow, Catherine E.; Taylor, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Communicative self-efficacy serves as an important link between discussing controversial issues and civic engagement because confidence in one's discourse skills is important to managing conflicting perspectives and developing solutions to community-based problems. Freely available to schools, "Word Generation" is a cross-content…

  8. Improving Mathematics Learning by Integrating Curricular Activities with Innovative and Developmentally Appropriate Digital Apps: Findings from the Next Generation Preschool Math Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presser, Ashley Lewis; Vahey, Philip; Dominguez, Ximena

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes findings from a blocked randomized design (BRD) field study conducted to examine the "Next Generation Preschool Math" (NGPM) program's implementation in preschool classrooms and promise in improving young children's mathematic learning. NGPM integrates traditional preschool activities with developmentally appropriate…

  9. Small RNA Library Preparation Method for Next-Generation Sequencing Using Chemical Modifications to Prevent Adapter Dimer Formation

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Jordana M.; Lebedev, Alexandre; Salcedo, Michelle P.; Zon, Gerald; McCaffrey, Anton P.; Paul, Natasha; Hogrefe, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    For most sample types, the automation of RNA and DNA sample preparation workflows enables high throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS) library preparation. Greater adoption of small RNA (sRNA) sequencing has been hindered by high sample input requirements and inherent ligation side products formed during library preparation. These side products, known as adapter dimer, are very similar in size to the tagged library. Most sRNA library preparation strategies thus employ a gel purification step to isolate tagged library from adapter dimer contaminants. At very low sample inputs, adapter dimer side products dominate the reaction and limit the sensitivity of this technique. Here we address the need for improved specificity of sRNA library preparation workflows with a novel library preparation approach that uses modified adapters to suppress adapter dimer formation. This workflow allows for lower sample inputs and elimination of the gel purification step, which in turn allows for an automatable sRNA library preparation protocol. PMID:27875576

  10. Adult congenital heart disease imaging with second-generation dual-source computed tomography: initial experiences and findings.

    PubMed

    Ghoshhajra, Brian B; Sidhu, Manavjot S; El-Sherief, Ahmed; Rojas, Carlos; Yeh, Doreen Defaria; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Liberthson, Richard; Abbara, Suhny; Bhatt, Ami

    2012-01-01

    Adult congenital heart disease patients present a unique challenge to the cardiac imager. Patients may present with both acute and chronic manifestations of their complex congenital heart disease and also require surveillance for sequelae of their medical and surgical interventions. Multimodality imaging is often required to clarify their anatomy and physiology. Radiation dose is of particular concern in these patients with lifelong imaging needs for their chronic disease. The second-generation dual-source scanner is a recently available advanced clinical cardiac computed tomography (CT) scanner. It offers a combination of the high-spatial resolution of modern CT, the high-temporal resolution of dual-source technology, and the wide z-axis coverage of modern cone-beam geometry CT scanners. These advances in technology allow novel protocols that markedly reduce scan time, significantly reduce radiation exposure, and expand the physiologic imaging capabilities of cardiac CT. We present a case series of complicated adult congenital heart disease patients imaged by the second-generation dual-source CT scanner with extremely low-radiation doses and excellent image quality. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  12. Generational Status and Family Cohesion Effects on the Receipt of Mental Health Services Among Asian Americans: Findings From the National Latino and Asian American Study

    PubMed Central

    Holck, Peter; Gee, Gilbert C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the relative strengths of generational status and family cohesion effects on current use of mental health services (past 12 months) among Asian Americans. Methods. We conducted a secondary data analysis with data from the National Latino and Asian American Study, 2002 to 2003, restricted to Asian American respondents (n = 2087). The study's outcome was current use (past 12 months) of any mental health services. Respondents included Chinese, Filipino, Vietnamese, and other Asian Americans. Results. Multivariate analyses suggest no significant interaction exists between second- versus first-generation Asian Americans and family cohesion. The impact of generational status on mental health service use was significant for third- or later-generation Asian Americans (versus first-generation Asian Americans) and varied with family cohesion score. Conclusions. Family cohesion and generational status both affect the likelihood of Asian Americans to seek mental health services. Our findings also highlight the need for primary care and other providers to consistently screen for mental health status particularly among first-generation Asian Americans. Mental health service programs should target recent immigrants and individuals lacking a strong family support system. PMID:19910344

  13. Waking Up the Mind: Qualitative Study Findings About the Process Through Which Programs Combining Income Generation and Health Education Can Empower Indigenous Guatemalan Women.

    PubMed

    Gurman, Tilly A; Ballard, Anne; Kerr, Samantha; Walsh, Janée; Petrocy, Amy

    2016-01-01

    We explored the process through which two income-generation programs that include health education empower indigenous Guatemalan women artisans. Both artisans (n = 44) and program staff (n = 11) participated in semistructured interviews. Respondents expressed that women gained support about personal issues and experienced an awakening of the mind (despertar la mente). Through active participation, women's fear of strangers and speaking in public decreased. Women also gained mobility, awareness of their rights as women, and self-confidence from earning and managing their own income. Given our findings, we suggest that programs combining income generation and health education have the potential to empower women.

  14. The generation of purinome-targeted libraries as a means to diversify ATP-mimetic chemical classes for lead finding.

    PubMed

    Felder, Eduard R; Badari, Alessandra; Disingrini, Teresa; Mantegani, Sergio; Orrenius, Christian; Avanzi, Nilla; Isacchi, Antonella; Salom, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    The generation of novel chemotypes in support of our oncology research projects expanded in recent years from a canonical design of kinase-targeted compound libraries to a broader interpretation of purinome-targeted libraries (PTL) addressing the specificity of cancer relevant targets such as kinases and ATPases. Successful screening of structurally diverse ATP-binding targets requires compound libraries covering multiple design elements, which may include phosphate surrogate moieties in ATPase inhibitors or far reaching lipophilic residues stabilizing inactive kinase conformations. Here, we exemplify the design and preparation of drug-like combinatorial libraries and report significantly enhanced screening performance on purinomic targets. We compared overall hit rates of PTL with a simultaneously tested unbiased collection of 200,000 compounds and found consistent superiority of the targeted libraries in all cases. We also analyzed the performance of the largest targeted libraries in comparison with each other and often found striking differences in how a specific target responds to various chemotypes and to whole collections.

  15. High school cigarette smoking and post-secondary education enrollment: Longitudinal findings from the NEXT Generation Health Study.

    PubMed

    Sabado, Melanie D; Haynie, Denise; Gilman, Stephen E; Simons-Morton, Bruce; Choi, Kelvin

    2017-09-28

    The inverse association between smoking and educational attainment has been reported in cross-sectional studies. Temporality between smoking and education remains unclear. Our study examines the prospective association between high school cigarette and smoking post-secondary education enrollment. Data were collected from a nationally representative cohort of 10th graders who participated in the Next Generation Health Study (2010-2013). Ethnicity/race, urbanicity, parental education, depression symptoms, and family affluence were assessed at baseline. Self-reported 30-day smoking was assessed annually from 2010 to 2012. Post-secondary education enrollment was measured in 2013 and categorized as either not enrolled or enrolled in technical school, community college, or 4-year college/university. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between cigarette smoking duration and post-secondary education enrollment (N=1681). Participants who smoked 1, 2, or 3years during high school had lower odds of attending a 4-year college (relative to a no enrollment) than non-smokers (adjusted OR: smoking 1year=0.30, 2years=0.28, 3years=0.14). Similarly, participants who smoked for 2 or 3years were less likely than non-smokers to enroll in community college (adjusted OR: 2years=0.31, 3years=0.40). These associations were independent of demographic and socioeconomic factors. There was a prospective association between high school smoking and the unlikelihood of enrollment in post-secondary education. If this represents a causal association, strategies to prevent/delay smoking onset and promote early cessation in adolescents may provide further health benefits by promoting higher educational attainment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Have health inequalities changed during childhood in the New Labour generation? Findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rougeaux, Emeline; Hope, Steven; Law, Catherine; Pearce, Anna

    2017-01-01

    . Further research examining and comparing the pathways through which SECs influence health may further our understanding of how inequalities could be prevented in future generations of children. PMID:28077409

  17. Mitochondrial COI and 16sRNA Evidence for a Single Species Hypothesis of E. vitis, J. formosana and E. onukii in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian-Yu; Han, Bao-Yu; Xiao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most damaging tea pests in main tea production regions of East Asia. For lack of recognized morphological characters, the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan have always been named as Empoasca vitis Göthe, Jacobiasca formosana Paoli and Empoasca onukii MATSUDA, respectively. Furthermore, nothing is known about the genetic relationships among them. In this study, we collected six populations from Mainland China, four populations from Japan and one population from Taiwan, and examined the genetic distances in the COI and 16sRNA regions of mtDNA among them. The results showed that the genetic distances based on single gene or the combined sequences among eleven leafhopper populations were 0.3–1.2%, which were all less than the species boundary of 2%. Moreover, there were at least two haplotypes shared by two distinct populations from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis based on single gene or combined sets also supported that tea green leafhoppers from Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan were closely related to each other, and there were at least two specimens from different regions clustered ahead of those from the same region. Therefore, we propose that the view of recognizing the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in three adjacent tea production regions of East Asia as different species is unreliable or questionable and suggest that they are a single species. PMID:25506929

  18. MicL, a new σE-dependent sRNA, combats envelope stress by repressing synthesis of Lpp, the major outer membrane lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Monica S.; Updegrove, Taylor B.; Gogol, Emily B.; Shabalina, Svetlana A.; Gross, Carol A.; Storz, Gisela

    2014-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, the transcription factor σE maintains membrane homeostasis by inducing synthesis of proteins involved in membrane repair and two small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that down-regulate synthesis of abundant membrane porins. Here, we describe the discovery of a third σE-dependent sRNA, MicL (mRNA-interfering complementary RNA regulator of Lpp), transcribed from a promoter located within the coding sequence of the cutC gene. MicL is synthesized as a 308-nucleotide (nt) primary transcript that is processed to an 80-nt form. Both forms possess features typical of Hfq-binding sRNAs but surprisingly target only a single mRNA, which encodes the outer membrane lipoprotein Lpp, the most abundant protein of the cell. We show that the copper sensitivity phenotype previously ascribed to inactivation of the cutC gene is actually derived from the loss of MicL and elevated Lpp levels. This observation raises the possibility that other phenotypes currently attributed to protein defects are due to deficiencies in unappreciated regulatory RNAs. We also report that σE activity is sensitive to Lpp abundance and that MicL and Lpp comprise a new σE regulatory loop that opposes membrane stress. Together MicA, RybB, and MicL allow σE to repress the synthesis of all abundant outer membrane proteins in response to stress. PMID:25030700

  19. Mitochondrial COI and 16sRNA evidence for a single species hypothesis of E. vitis, J. formosana and E. onukii in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Yu; Han, Bao-Yu; Xiao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most damaging tea pests in main tea production regions of East Asia. For lack of recognized morphological characters, the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan have always been named as Empoasca vitis Göthe, Jacobiasca formosana Paoli and Empoasca onukii MATSUDA, respectively. Furthermore, nothing is known about the genetic relationships among them. In this study, we collected six populations from Mainland China, four populations from Japan and one population from Taiwan, and examined the genetic distances in the COI and 16sRNA regions of mtDNA among them. The results showed that the genetic distances based on single gene or the combined sequences among eleven leafhopper populations were 0.3-1.2%, which were all less than the species boundary of 2%. Moreover, there were at least two haplotypes shared by two distinct populations from different regions. The phylogenetic analysis based on single gene or combined sets also supported that tea green leafhoppers from Mainland China, Taiwan and Japan were closely related to each other, and there were at least two specimens from different regions clustered ahead of those from the same region. Therefore, we propose that the view of recognizing the dominant species of tea green leafhoppers in three adjacent tea production regions of East Asia as different species is unreliable or questionable and suggest that they are a single species.

  20. The role of maternal early-life and later-life risk factors on offspring low birth weight: findings from a three-generational study.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Amelia R; Hill, Karl G; Hawkins, J David; Maas, Carl

    2011-08-01

    This study examined three research questions: (1) Is there an association between maternal early-life economic disadvantage and the birth weight of later-born offspring? (2) Is there an association between maternal abuse in childhood and the birth weight of later-born offspring? (3) To what extent are these early-life risks mediated through adolescent and adult substance use, mental and physical health status, and adult socioeconomic status (SES)? Analyses used structural equation modeling to examine data from two longitudinal studies, which included three generations. The first generation (G1) and the second generation (G2) were enrolled in the Seattle Social Development Project (SSDP), and the third generation (G3) was enrolled in the SSDP Intergenerational Project. Data for the study (N = 136) focused on (G2) mothers enrolled in the SSDP and their children (G3). Analyses revealed that G2 low childhood SES predicted G3 offspring birth weight. Early childhood abuse among G2 respondents predicted G3 offspring birth weight through a mediated pathway including G2 adolescent substance use and G2 prenatal substance use. Birth weight was unrelated to maternal adult SES, depression, or obesity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify the effect of maternal early-life risks of low childhood SES and child maltreatment on later-born offspring birth weight. These findings have far-reaching effects on the cumulative risk associated with early-life economic disadvantage and childhood maltreatment. Such findings encourage policies and interventions that enhance child health at birth by taking the mother's own early-life and development into account. Copyright © 2011 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The sRNA NsiR4 is involved in nitrogen assimilation control in cyanobacteria by targeting glutamine synthetase inactivating factor IF7.

    PubMed

    Klähn, Stephan; Schaal, Christoph; Georg, Jens; Baumgartner, Desirée; Knippen, Gernot; Hagemann, Martin; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2015-11-10

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in biological nitrogen assimilation, is regulated in multiple ways in response to varying nitrogen sources and levels. Here we show a small regulatory RNA, NsiR4 (nitrogen stress-induced RNA 4), which plays an important role in the regulation of GS in cyanobacteria. NsiR4 expression in the unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and in the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is stimulated through nitrogen limitation via NtcA, the global transcriptional regulator of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. NsiR4 is widely conserved throughout the cyanobacterial phylum, suggesting a conserved function. In silico target prediction, transcriptome profiling on pulse overexpression, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments using a heterologous reporter system showed that NsiR4 interacts with the 5'UTR of gifA mRNA, which encodes glutamine synthetase inactivating factor (IF)7. In Synechocystis, we observed an inverse relationship between the levels of NsiR4 and the accumulation of IF7 in vivo. This NsiR4-dependent modulation of gifA (IF7) mRNA accumulation influenced the glutamine pool and thus [Formula: see text] assimilation via GS. As a second target, we identified ssr1528, a hitherto uncharacterized nitrogen-regulated gene. Competition experiments between WT and an ΔnsiR4 KO mutant showed that the lack of NsiR4 led to decreased acclimation capabilities of Synechocystis toward oscillating nitrogen levels. These results suggest a role for NsiR4 in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in cyanobacteria, especially for the adaptation to rapid changes in available nitrogen sources and concentrations. NsiR4 is, to our knowledge, the first identified bacterial sRNA regulating the primary assimilation of a macronutrient.

  2. Fast-forward generation of effective artificial small RNAs for enhanced antiviral defense in plants.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Alberto; Carrington, James C; Daròs, José-Antonio

    Artificial small RNAs (sRNAs) are short ≈21-nt non-coding RNAs engineered to inactivate sequence complementary RNAs. In plants, they have been extensively used to silence cellular transcripts in gene function analyses and to target invading RNA viruses to induce resistance. Current artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants is mainly limited to a single virus, and is jeopardized by the emergence of mutations in the artificial sRNA target site or by the presence of co-infecting viruses. Hence, there is a need to further develop the artificial sRNA approach to generate more broad and durable antiviral resistance in plants. A recently developed toolbox allows for the time and cost-effective large-scale production of artificial sRNA constructs in plants. The toolbox includes the P-SAMS web tool for the automated design of artificial sRNAs, and a new generation of artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA (syn-tasiRNA) vectors for direct cloning and high expression of artificial sRNAs. Here we describe how the simplicity and high-throughput capability of these new technologies should accelerate the study of artificial sRNA-based antiviral resistance in plants. In particular, we discuss the potential of the syn-tasiRNA approach as a promising strategy for developing more effective, durable and broad antiviral resistance in plants.

  3. Integration Host Factor Is Required for RpoN-Dependent hrpL Gene Expression and Controls Motility by Positively Regulating rsmB sRNA in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Zhao, Youfu

    2016-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora requires an hrp-type III secretion system (T3SS) to cause disease. It has been reported that HrpL, the master regulator of T3SS, is transcriptionally regulated by sigma factor 54 (RpoN), YhbH, and HrpS. In this study, the role of integration host factor (IHF) in regulating hrpL and T3SS gene expression was investigated. IHF is a nucleoid-associated protein that regulates gene expression by influencing nucleoid structure and DNA bending. Our results showed that both ihfA and ihfB mutants of E. amylovora did not induce necrotic lesions on pear fruits. Growth of both mutants was greatly reduced, and expression of the hrpL and T3SS genes was significantly down-regulated as compared with those of the wild type. In addition, expression of the ihfA, but not the ihfB gene, was under auto-suppression by IHF. Furthermore, both ihfA and ihfB mutants were hypermotile, due to significantly reduced expression of small RNA (sRNA) rsmB. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay further confirmed that IHF binds to the promoters of the hrpL and ihfA genes, as well as the rsmB sRNA gene. These results indicate that IHF is required for RpoN-dependent hrpL gene expression and virulence, and controls motility by positively regulating the rsmB sRNA in E. amylovora.

  4. sRNA-Xcc1, an integron-encoded transposon- and plasmid-transferred trans-acting sRNA, is under the positive control of the key virulence regulators HrpG and HrpX of Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Lin; Tang, Dong-Jie; Jiang, Rui-Ping; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2011-01-01

    sRNA-Xcc1 is a trans-acting sRNA recently identified from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc). Here, the phylogenetic distribution, predicted secondary structure and regulation of expression of sRNA-Xcc1 were analyzed. The analysis showed (1) a total 81 sRNA-Xcc1 homologs that are found in some bacterial strains that are taxonomically unrelated, belonging to the α-, β-, γ- and δ-proteobacteria (2) that some sRNA-Xcc1 homologs are located in a plasmid-borne transposon or near a transposase coding gene, (3) that sRNA-Xcc1 is encoded by a integron gene cassette in Xcc and sRNA-Xcc1 homologs occur in integron gene cassettes of some uncultured bacteria and (4) that sRNA-Xcc1 homologs have a highly conserved sequence motif and a stable consensus secondary structure. These findings strongly support the idea that sRNA-Xcc1 represents a novel family of sRNAs which may be originally captured by integrons from natural environments and then spread among different bacterial species via horizontal gene transfer, possibly by means of transposons and plasmids. The expression analysis results demonstrated that the transcription of sRNA-Xcc1 is under the positive control of the key virulence regulators HrpG and HrpX, indicating that sRNA-Xcc1 may be involved in the virulence regulation of Xcc.

  5. Final environmental assessment and Finding-of-No-Significant-Impact - drum storage facility for interim storage of materials generated by environmental restoration operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0995, for the construction and operation of a drum storage facility at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado. The proposal for construction of the facility was generated in response to current and anticipated future needs for interim storage of waste materials generated by environmental restoration operations. A public meeting was held on July 20, 1994, at which the scope and analyses of the EA were presented. The scope of the EA included evaluation of alternative methods of storage, including no action. A comment period from July 5, 1994 through August 4, 1994, was provided to the public and the State of Colorado to submit written comment on the EA. No written comments were received regarding this proposed action, therefore no comment response is included in the Final EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  6. Evaluation of a binary optimization approach to find the optimum locations of energy storage devices in a power grid with stochastically varying loads and wind generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, Zamiyad

    The prices in the electricity market change every five minutes. The prices in peak demand hours can be four or five times more than the prices in normal off peak hours. Renewable energy such as wind power has zero marginal cost and a large percentage of wind energy in a power grid can reduce the price significantly. The variability of wind power prevents it from being constantly available in peak hours. The price differentials between off-peak and on-peak hours due to wind power variations provide an opportunity for a storage device owner to buy energy at a low price and sell it in high price hours. In a large and complex power grid, there are many locations for installation of a storage device. Storage device owners prefer to install their device at locations that allow them to maximize profit. Market participants do not possess much information about the system operator's dispatch, power grid, competing generators and transmission system. The publicly available data from the system operator usually consists of Locational Marginal Prices (LMP), load, reserve prices and regulation prices. In this thesis, we develop a method to find the optimum location of a storage device without using the grid, transmission or generator data. We formulate and solve an optimization problem to find the most profitable location for a storage device using only the publicly available market pricing data such as LMPs, and reserve prices. We consider constraints arising due to storage device operation limitations in our objective function. We use binary optimization and branch and bound method to optimize the operation of a storage device at a given location to earn maximum profit. We use two different versions of our method and optimize the profitability of a storage unit at each location in a 36 bus model of north eastern United States and south eastern Canada for four representative days representing four seasons in a year. Finally, we compare our results from the two versions of our

  7. The Next Generation of Risk Assessment Multi-Year Study-Highlights of Findings, Applications to Risk Assessment, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Cote, Ila; Andersen, Melvin E; Ankley, Gerald T; Barone, Stanley; Birnbaum, Linda S; Boekelheide, Kim; Bois, Frederic Y; Burgoon, Lyle D; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Crofton, Kevin M; DeVito, Michael; Devlin, Robert B; Edwards, Stephen W; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Hattis, Dale; Judson, Richard S; Knight, Derek; Krewski, Daniel; Lambert, Jason; Maull, Elizabeth Anne; Mendrick, Donna; Paoli, Gregory M; Patel, Chirag Jagdish; Perkins, Edward J; Poje, Gerald; Portier, Christopher J; Rusyn, Ivan; Schulte, Paul A; Simeonov, Anton; Smith, Martyn T; Thayer, Kristina A; Thomas, Russell S; Thomas, Reuben; Tice, Raymond R; Vandenberg, John J; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Wesselkamper, Scott; Whelan, Maurice; Whittaker, Christine; White, Ronald; Xia, Menghang; Yauk, Carole; Zeise, Lauren; Zhao, Jay; DeWoskin, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    The Next Generation (NexGen) of Risk Assessment effort is a multi-year collaboration among several organizations evaluating new, potentially more efficient molecular, computational, and systems biology approaches to risk assessment. This article summarizes our findings, suggests applications to risk assessment, and identifies strategic research directions. Our specific objectives were to test whether advanced biological data and methods could better inform our understanding of public health risks posed by environmental exposures. New data and methods were applied and evaluated for use in hazard identification and dose-response assessment. Biomarkers of exposure and effect, and risk characterization were also examined. Consideration was given to various decision contexts with increasing regulatory and public health impacts. Data types included transcriptomics, genomics, and proteomics. Methods included molecular epidemiology and clinical studies, bioinformatic knowledge mining, pathway and network analyses, short-duration in vivo and in vitro bioassays, and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling. NexGen has advanced our ability to apply new science by more rapidly identifying chemicals and exposures of potential concern, helping characterize mechanisms of action that influence conclusions about causality, exposure-response relationships, susceptibility and cumulative risk, and by elucidating new biomarkers of exposure and effects. Additionally, NexGen has fostered extensive discussion among risk scientists and managers and improved confidence in interpreting and applying new data streams. While considerable uncertainties remain, thoughtful application of new knowledge to risk assessment appears reasonable for augmenting major scope assessments, forming the basis for or augmenting limited scope assessments, and for prioritization and screening of very data limited chemicals. Citation: Cote I, Andersen ME, Ankley GT, Barone S, Birnbaum LS, Boekelheide K

  8. The Next Generation of Risk Assessment Multi-Year Study—Highlights of Findings, Applications to Risk Assessment, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Ila; Andersen, Melvin E.; Ankley, Gerald T.; Barone, Stanley; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Boekelheide, Kim; Bois, Frederic Y.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Crofton, Kevin M.; DeVito, Michael; Devlin, Robert B.; Edwards, Stephen W.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Hattis, Dale; Judson, Richard S.; Knight, Derek; Krewski, Daniel; Lambert, Jason; Maull, Elizabeth Anne; Mendrick, Donna; Paoli, Gregory M.; Patel, Chirag Jagdish; Perkins, Edward J.; Poje, Gerald; Portier, Christopher J.; Rusyn, Ivan; Schulte, Paul A.; Simeonov, Anton; Smith, Martyn T.; Thayer, Kristina A.; Thomas, Russell S.; Thomas, Reuben; Tice, Raymond R.; Vandenberg, John J.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Wesselkamper, Scott; Whelan, Maurice; Whittaker, Christine; White, Ronald; Xia, Menghang; Yauk, Carole; Zeise, Lauren; Zhao, Jay; DeWoskin, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Next Generation (NexGen) of Risk Assessment effort is a multi-year collaboration among several organizations evaluating new, potentially more efficient molecular, computational, and systems biology approaches to risk assessment. This article summarizes our findings, suggests applications to risk assessment, and identifies strategic research directions. Objective: Our specific objectives were to test whether advanced biological data and methods could better inform our understanding of public health risks posed by environmental exposures. Methods: New data and methods were applied and evaluated for use in hazard identification and dose–response assessment. Biomarkers of exposure and effect, and risk characterization were also examined. Consideration was given to various decision contexts with increasing regulatory and public health impacts. Data types included transcriptomics, genomics, and proteomics. Methods included molecular epidemiology and clinical studies, bioinformatic knowledge mining, pathway and network analyses, short-duration in vivo and in vitro bioassays, and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling. Discussion: NexGen has advanced our ability to apply new science by more rapidly identifying chemicals and exposures of potential concern, helping characterize mechanisms of action that influence conclusions about causality, exposure–response relationships, susceptibility and cumulative risk, and by elucidating new biomarkers of exposure and effects. Additionally, NexGen has fostered extensive discussion among risk scientists and managers and improved confidence in interpreting and applying new data streams. Conclusions: While considerable uncertainties remain, thoughtful application of new knowledge to risk assessment appears reasonable for augmenting major scope assessments, forming the basis for or augmenting limited scope assessments, and for prioritization and screening of very data limited chemicals. Citation: Cote I

  9. Does war contribute to family violence against children? Findings from a two-generational multi-informant study in Northern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Saile, Regina; Ertl, Verena; Neuner, Frank; Catani, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    After 20 years of civil war in Northern Uganda, the continuity of violence within the family constitutes a major challenge to children's healthy development in the post-conflict era. Previous exposure to trauma and ongoing psychopathology in guardians potentially contribute to parental perpetration against children and dysfunctional interactions in the child's family ecology that increase children's risk of maltreatment. In order to investigate distal and proximal risk factors of child victimization, we first aimed to identify factors leading to more self-reported perpetration in guardians. Second, we examined factors in the child's family environment that promote child-reported experiences of maltreatment. Using a two-generational design we interviewed 368 children, 365 female guardians, and 304 male guardians from seven war-affected rural communities in Northern Uganda on the basis of standardized questionnaires. We found that the strongest predictors of self-reported aggressive parenting behaviors toward the child were guardians' own experiences of childhood maltreatment, followed by female guardians' victimization experiences in their intimate relationship and male guardians' posttrautmatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and alcohol-related problems. Regarding children's self-report of victimization in the family, proximal factors including violence between adults in the household and male guardians' PTSD symptom severity level predicted higher levels of maltreatment. Distal variables such as female guardians' history of childhood victimization and female guardians' exposure to traumatic war events also increased children's report of maltreatment. The current findings suggest that in the context of organized violence, an intergenerational cycle of violence persists that is exacerbated by female guardians' re-victimization experiences and male guardians' psychopathological symptoms.

  10. Analytical Validation of the Next-Generation Sequencing Assay for a Nationwide Signal-Finding Clinical Trial: Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Lih, Chih-Jian; Harrington, Robin D; Sims, David J; Harper, Kneshay N; Bouk, Courtney H; Datta, Vivekananda; Yau, Jonathan; Singh, Rajesh R; Routbort, Mark J; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Patel, Keyur P; Mantha, Geeta S; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Ronski, Karyn; Walther, Zenta; Finberg, Karin E; Canosa, Sandra; Robinson, Hayley; Raymond, Amelia; Le, Long P; McShane, Lisa M; Polley, Eric C; Conley, Barbara A; Doroshow, James H; Iafrate, A John; Sklar, Jeffrey L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Williams, P Mickey

    2017-03-01

    The National Cancer Institute-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH) trial is a national signal-finding precision medicine study that relies on genomic assays to screen and enroll patients with relapsed or refractory cancer after standard treatments. We report the analytical validation processes for the next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay that was tailored for regulatory compliant use in the trial. The Oncomine Cancer Panel assay and the Personal Genome Machine were used in four networked laboratories accredited for the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments. Using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded clinical specimens and cell lines, we found that the assay achieved overall sensitivity of 96.98% for 265 known mutations and 99.99% specificity. High reproducibility in detecting all reportable variants was observed, with a 99.99% mean interoperator pairwise concordance across the four laboratories. The limit of detection for each variant type was 2.8% for single-nucleotide variants, 10.5% for insertion/deletions, 6.8% for large insertion/deletions (gap ≥4 bp), and four copies for gene amplification. The assay system from biopsy collection through reporting was tested and found to be fully fit for purpose. Our results indicate that the NCI-MATCH NGS assay met the criteria for the intended clinical use and that high reproducibility of a complex NGS assay is achievable across multiple clinical laboratories. Our validation approaches can serve as a template for development and validation of other NGS assays for precision medicine. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Generation R Study: A Review of Design, Findings to Date, and a Study of the 5-HTTLPR by Environmental Interaction from Fetal Life Onward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiemeier, Henning; Velders, Fleur P.; Szekely, Eszter; Roza, Sabine J.; Dieleman, Gwen; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; White, Tonya J. H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Hofman, Albert; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Hudziak, James J.; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: First, we give an overview of child psychiatric research in the Generation R Study, a population-based cohort from fetal life forward. Second, we examine within Generation R whether the functional polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene interacts with prenatal maternal chronic difficulties, prenatal…

  12. The Generation R Study: A Review of Design, Findings to Date, and a Study of the 5-HTTLPR by Environmental Interaction from Fetal Life Onward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiemeier, Henning; Velders, Fleur P.; Szekely, Eszter; Roza, Sabine J.; Dieleman, Gwen; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; White, Tonya J. H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Hofman, Albert; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Hudziak, James J.; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: First, we give an overview of child psychiatric research in the Generation R Study, a population-based cohort from fetal life forward. Second, we examine within Generation R whether the functional polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene interacts with prenatal maternal chronic difficulties, prenatal…

  13. Parental Influences on Adolescent Marijuana Use and the Baby Boom Generation: Findings from the 1979-1996 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse. Analytic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Denise B.; Griesler, Pamela C.; Lee, Gang; Davies, Mark; Schaffsan, Christine

    This report uses the 1979-1996 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse to investigate the role of parents, especially members of the baby boom generation, on the marijuana use of children. The association of marijuana use between parents and children, the differences among parental birth cohorts, and the determinants of child marijuana use are…

  14. TECHNICAL SUPPORT DOCUMENT: NATIONAL-SCALE MERCURY RISK ASSESSMENT SUPPORTING THE APPROPRIATE AND NECESSARY FINDING FOR COAL- AND OIL-FIRED ELECTRIC GENERATING UNITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA has completed a national-scale risk assessment for mercury to inform the appropriate and necessary determination for electric utility steam generating unites in the United States (U.S. EGU's), persuant to Section 112(n)(1)(A) of the Clean Air Act. This document describes...

  15. Direction finding of half-gyrofrequency VLF emissions in the off-equatorial region of the magnetosphere and their generation and propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, H.; Hayakawa, M. ); Parrot, M.; Lefeuvre, F. )

    1987-07-01

    The spectra of VLF/ELF emissions in the off-equatorial region in the outer magnetosphere are, on occasion, found to consist of upper and lower bands with a frequency gap between them. The wave normal directions of the upper band VLF emissions have been determined by means of wave distribution function analyses based first on the measurement of three magnetic field components only, and then with the additional use of an electric field component. It is found that the wave distribution functions are composed of two peaks whose central wave normal angles {theta} with respect to the magnetic field at a geomagnetic latitude of {approximately} 17{degree} are close to the local oblique resonance cone {theta}{sub res} but whose values of {theta} are always about 15{degree}-20{degree} less than {theta}{sub res} at a higher latitude of {approximately}26{degree}. This observed wave normal behavior is compared with the theoretical prediction from direct ray tracing studies using the hypothesis deduced from a previous investigation that the waves are generated at the equator with wave normals close to {theta}{sub res}. A combination of this comparison and inverse ray tracing in which the initial wave normal directions are those determined from the wave distribution analysis has yielded the results that the {theta} values of the upper band VLF emissions are very close to {theta}{sub res} at the equator and that the normalized frequency there, {Lambda}{sub eq}, is above 0.5. Hence the upper band VLF emissions are identified as being half-gyrofrequency VLF emissions generated in the vicinity of the magnetic equator, with their wave normals close to {theta}{sub res}. The characteristics of propagation between the equatorial source region and the observing positions have been investigated by direct ray tracing. The generation mechanism is also discussed.

  16. Finding a Potential Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) Inhibitor for Type-2 Diabetes Treatment Based on Molecular Docking, Pharmacophore Generation, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Meduru, Harika; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Tsai, Jeffrey J. P.; Chen, Yu-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is the vital enzyme that is responsible for inactivating intestinal peptides glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), which stimulates a decline in blood glucose levels. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition activity of small molecule inhibitors to DPP-4 following a computational strategy based on docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations. The thorough docking protocol we applied allowed us to derive good correlation parameters between the predicted binding affinities (pKi) of the DPP-4 inhibitors and the experimental activity values (pIC50). Based on molecular docking receptor-ligand interactions, pharmacophore generation was carried out in order to identify the binding modes of structurally diverse compounds in the receptor active site. Consideration of the permanence and flexibility of DPP-4 inhibitor complexes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation specified that the inhibitors maintained the binding mode observed in the docking study. The present study helps generate new information for further structural optimization and can influence the development of new DPP-4 inhibitors discoveries in the treatment of type-2 diabetes. PMID:27304951

  17. Leukaemia mortality in relation to magnetic field exposure: findings from a study of United Kingdom electricity generation and transmission workers, 1973-97.

    PubMed

    Harrington, J M; Nichols, L; Sorahan, T; van Tongeren, M

    2001-05-01

    To investigate whether risks of leukaemia are related to occupational exposure to magnetic fields. The mortality experienced by a cohort of 83 997 employees of the former Central Electricity Generating Board of England and Wales was investigated for the period 1973-97. All employees were employed for at least 6 months with some employment in the period 1973-82. Computerised work histories were available for 79 972 study subjects for the period 1971-93. Detailed calculations were performed by others to enable a novel assessment to be made of exposures to magnetic fields. Two analytical approaches were used, indirect standardisation (n=83 997) and Poisson regression (n=79 972). Based on serial mortalities for England and Wales, the standardised mortality ratio of 84 for all leukaemias (observed 111, expected 132.3) was similar to that of 83 for all causes (observed 14 845, expected 17 918). No significant positive trends were found for the risks of various types of leukaemia (chronic lymphatic leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, all leukaemia) either with lifetime cumulative exposure to magnetic fields or with such exposures received in the most recent 5 years. There are no discernible excess risks of leukaemia as a consequence of occupational exposure to magnetic fields in United Kingdom electricity generation and transmission workers.

  18. Mortality from Alzheimer's, motor neuron and Parkinson's disease in relation to magnetic field exposure: findings from the study of UK electricity generation and transmission workers, 1973-2004.

    PubMed

    Sorahan, T; Kheifets, L

    2007-12-01

    There are a number of reports linking magnetic field exposure to increased risks of Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease. The mortality experienced by a cohort of 83 997 employees of the former Central Electricity Generating Board of England and Wales was investigated for the period 1973-2004. All employees were employed for at least six months with some employment in the period 1973-82. Computerised work histories were available for 79 972 study subjects for the period 1971-93. Information on job and facility (location) were used to estimate exposures to magnetic fields. Two analytical approaches were used to evaluate risks, indirect standardisation (n = 83 997) and Poisson regression (n = 79 972). Based on serial mortality rates for England and Wales, deaths from Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease were unexceptional. There was an excess of deaths from Parkinson's disease of borderline significance. No statistically significant trends were shown for risks of any of these diseases to increase with lifetime cumulative exposure to magnetic fields (RR per 10 μT-y: Alzheimer's disease 1.10 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.33); motor neuron disease 1.06 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.32); Parkinson's disease 0.88 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.05)) There is no convincing evidence that UK electricity generation and transmission workers have suffered increased risks from neurodegenerative diseases as a consequence of exposure to magnetic fields.

  19. Finding a Potential Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 (DPP-4) Inhibitor for Type-2 Diabetes Treatment Based on Molecular Docking, Pharmacophore Generation, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Meduru, Harika; Wang, Yeng-Tseng; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Chen, Yu-Ching

    2016-06-13

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) is the vital enzyme that is responsible for inactivating intestinal peptides glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), which stimulates a decline in blood glucose levels. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition activity of small molecule inhibitors to DPP-4 following a computational strategy based on docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations. The thorough docking protocol we applied allowed us to derive good correlation parameters between the predicted binding affinities (pKi) of the DPP-4 inhibitors and the experimental activity values (pIC50). Based on molecular docking receptor-ligand interactions, pharmacophore generation was carried out in order to identify the binding modes of structurally diverse compounds in the receptor active site. Consideration of the permanence and flexibility of DPP-4 inhibitor complexes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation specified that the inhibitors maintained the binding mode observed in the docking study. The present study helps generate new information for further structural optimization and can influence the development of new DPP-4 inhibitors discoveries in the treatment of type-2 diabetes.

  20. Numerical investigation for finding the appropriate design parameters of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger with delta-winglet vortex generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behfard, M.; Sohankar, A.

    2016-01-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to investigate the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of three-row inline tube bundles as a part of a heat exchanger (Re = 1000, Pr = 4.29). To enhance heat transfer, two pairs of delta winglet-type vortex generators (VGs) installed beside the first row and between the first and second rows of the tube bundles. The diameter of the second row of the tubes is chosen smaller than those of the first and third. A comprehensive study on the effects of various geometrical parameters such as transverse and longitudinal positions of VGs, length and height of VGs and angle of attack of the delta winglets is performed to augment heat transfer. Based on this study the best values of these design parameters are determined. The results showed that the best model increases the convective heat transfer ratio and thermal performance factor about 59 and 43 %, respectively, in compare with the geometry without VG.

  1. Mortality from cardiovascular disease in relation to magnetic field exposure: findings from a study of UK electricity generation and transmission workers, 1973-1997.

    PubMed

    Sorahan, Tom; Nichols, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological studies have indicated that magnetic field exposure might influence heart rate variability and consequent risks of arrhythmia related deaths. The mortality experience of a cohort of 83,997 employees of the former Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) of England and Wales was investigated for the period 1973-1997. Cohort members were employed for at least 6 months from 1973 to 1982. Computerized work histories were available for 79,972 study subjects for the period 1971-1993. Detailed calculations had been performed by others to enable a novel assessment to be made of exposures to magnetic fields. Two analytical approaches were used, indirect standardization (n = 83,997) and Poisson regression (n = 79,972). Based on serial mortality rates for England and Wales, deaths from four categories of cardiovascular disease were below expectation: arrhythmia-related disease (ICD-9 426-7), observed (obs) 32, expected (exp) 43.5, standardized mortality ratio (SMR) 74; acute myocardial infarction (ICD-9 410), obs 3,320, exp 3878.3, SMR 86; atherosclerosis (ICD-9 440), obs 25, exp 39.2, SMR 64; chronic/sub-acute coronary disease (ICD-9 411-414), obs 1,552, exp 2021.7, SMR 77). No statistically significant trends were shown for risks of any of these four disease groupings to increase either with lifetime cumulative exposure to magnetic fields or with such exposures received in the most recent 5 years. There are no discernible excess risks of mortality from cardiovascular diseases as a consequence of occupational exposure to magnetic fields in UK electricity generation and transmission workers. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Mortality from Alzheimer's, motor neuron and Parkinson's disease in relation to magnetic field exposure: findings from the study of UK electricity generation and transmission workers, 1973–2004

    PubMed Central

    Sorahan, T; Kheifets, L

    2007-01-01

    Background There are a number of reports linking magnetic field exposure to increased risks of Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease. Methods The mortality experienced by a cohort of 83 997 employees of the former Central Electricity Generating Board of England and Wales was investigated for the period 1973–2004. All employees were employed for at least six months with some employment in the period 1973–82. Computerised work histories were available for 79 972 study subjects for the period 1971–93. Information on job and facility (location) were used to estimate exposures to magnetic fields. Two analytical approaches were used to evaluate risks, indirect standardisation (n = 83 997) and Poisson regression (n = 79 972). Results Based on serial mortality rates for England and Wales, deaths from Alzheimer's disease and motor neuron disease were unexceptional. There was an excess of deaths from Parkinson's disease of borderline significance. No statistically significant trends were shown for risks of any of these diseases to increase with lifetime cumulative exposure to magnetic fields (RR per 10 μT-y: Alzheimer's disease 1.10 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.33); motor neuron disease 1.06 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.32); Parkinson's disease 0.88 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.05)) Conclusions There is no convincing evidence that UK electricity generation and transmission workers have suffered increased risks from neurodegenerative diseases as a consequence of exposure to magnetic fields. PMID:17626136

  3. Gender Differences in Five Factor Model Personality Traits in an Elderly Cohort: Extension of Robust and Surprising Findings to an Older Generation

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Duberstein, Paul R.; Sörensen, Slivia; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    In college and adult samples, women score higher then men on the Five Factor Model (FFM) personality traits of Neuroticism and Agreeableness. The present study assessed the extent to which these gender differences held in a sample of 486 older adults, ranging in age from 65-98 (M = 75, SD = 6.5), using the NEO-Five Factor Inventory. Mean and Covariance Structure models testing gender differences at the level of latent traits revealed higher levels of Neuroticism (d = .52) and Agreeableness (d = .35) in older women than older men. The consistency of these findings with prior work in younger samples attests to the stability of gender differentiation on Neuroticism and Agreeableness across the lifespan. Gender differences on these traits should be considered in personality research among older, as well as middle age and younger adults. PMID:18836509

  4. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  5. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  6. Double-blind comparison of first- and second-generation antipsychotics in early-onset schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder: findings from the treatment of early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders (TEOSS) study.

    PubMed

    Sikich, Linmarie; Frazier, Jean A; McClellan, Jon; Findling, Robert L; Vitiello, Benedetto; Ritz, Louise; Ambler, Denisse; Puglia, Madeline; Maloney, Ann E; Michael, Emily; De Jong, Sandra; Slifka, Karen; Noyes, Nancy; Hlastala, Stefanie; Pierson, Leslie; McNamara, Nora K; Delporto-Bedoya, Denise; Anderson, Robert; Hamer, Robert M; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2008-11-01

    and schizoaffective disorder. The safety findings related to weight gain and metabolic problems raise important public health concerns, given the widespread use of second-generation antipsychotics in youth for nonpsychotic disorders.

  7. Deep sequencing of wheat sRNA transcriptome reveals distinct temporal expression pattern of miRNAs in response to heat, light and UV

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathy, Raja; Ravichandran, Sridhar; Mahdi, Md. Safiur Rahman; Huang, Douglas; Reimer, Elsa; Domaratzki, Michael; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of plant adaptation to abiotic stresses has implications in plant breeding, especially in the context of climate change. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs play a crucial role in gene regulation. Here, wheat plants were exposed to one of the following stresses: continuous light, heat or ultraviolet radiations over five consecutive days and leaf tissues from three biological replicates were harvested at 0, 1, 2, 3, 7 and 10 days after treatment (DAT). A total of 72 small RNA libraries were sequenced on the Illumina platform generating ~524 million reads corresponding to ~129 million distinct tags from which 232 conserved miRNAs were identified. The expression levels of 1, 2 and 79 miRNAs were affected by ultraviolet radiation, continuous light and heat, respectively. Approximately 55% of the differentially expressed miRNAs were downregulated at 0 and 1 DAT including miR398, miR528 and miR156 that control mRNAs involved in activation of signal transduction pathways and flowering. Other putative targets included histone variants and methyltransferases. These results suggest a temporal miRNA-guided post-transcriptional regulation that enables wheat to respond to abiotic stresses, particularly heat. Designing novel wheat breeding strategies such as regulatory gene-based marker assisted selection depends on accurate identification of stress induced miRNAs. PMID:28004741

  8. Finding food

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Ann; Lytle, Leslie; Riper, David Van

    2011-01-01

    A significant amount of travel is undertaken to find food. This paper examines challenges in measuring access to food using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), important in studies of both travel and eating behavior. It compares different sources of data available including fieldwork, land use and parcel data, licensing information, commercial listings, taxation data, and online street-level photographs. It proposes methods to classify different kinds of food sales places in a way that says something about their potential for delivering healthy food options. In assessing the relationship between food access and travel behavior, analysts must clearly conceptualize key variables, document measurement processes, and be clear about the strengths and weaknesses of data. PMID:21837264

  9. An Integrated Approach for Finding Overlooked Genes in Shigella

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Junping; Yang, Jian; Jin, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Background The completion of numerous genome sequences introduced an era of whole-genome study. However, many genes are missed during genome annotation, including small RNAs (sRNAs) and small open reading frames (sORFs). In order to improve genome annotation, we aimed to identify novel sRNAs and sORFs in Shigella, the principal etiologic agents of bacillary dysentery. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 64 sRNAs in Shigella, which were experimentally validated in other bacteria based on sequence conservation. We employed computer-based and tiling array-based methods to search for sRNAs, followed by RT-PCR and northern blots, to identify nine sRNAs in Shigella flexneri strain 301 (Sf301) and 256 regions containing possible sRNA genes. We found 29 candidate sORFs using bioinformatic prediction, array hybridization and RT-PCR verification. We experimentally validated 557 (57.9%) DOOR operon predictions in the chromosomes of Sf301 and 46 (76.7%) in virulence plasmid.We found 40 additional co-expressed gene pairs that were not predicted by DOOR. Conclusions/Significance We provide an updated and comprehensive annotation of the Shigella genome. Our study increased the expected numbers of sORFs and sRNAs, which will impact on future functional genomics and proteomics studies. Our method can be used for large scale reannotation of sRNAs and sORFs in any microbe with a known genome sequence. PMID:21483688

  10. Size Unbiased Representative Enzymatically Generated RNAi (SURER) Library and Application for RNAi Therapeutic Screens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiejun; Chen, Li; Sun, Yuncheng; Yuan, Jian; Graham, Michael; French, Peter

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) libraries screens have become widely used for small RNA (sRNA) therapeutic targets development. However, conventional enzymatically libraries, typically prepared using the type 2 restriction enzyme MmeI, produce sRNAs between 18 and 20 bp, much shorter than the usual lengths of 19–23 bp. Here we develop a size unbiased representative enzymatically generated RNAi (SURER) library, which employs type 3 restriction modification enzyme EcoP15I to produce sRNAs ranging from 19 to 23 bp using a group of rationally designed linkers, which can completely mimic the length of sRNAs naturally generated by Dicer enzyme in living cells, and the screening results of SURER libraries showed high recombination rate and knockdown efficiency. SURER library provides a useful tool for RNAi therapeutics screening in a fast and simple way. PMID:25493330

  11. miRMOD: a tool for identification and analysis of 5' and 3' miRNA modifications in Next Generation Sequencing small RNA data.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Abhinav; Saraf, Shradha; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Gupta, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged to be important regulators of gene expression across various species. Several studies have confirmed different types of post-transcriptional modifications at terminal ends of miRNAs. The reports indicate that miRNA modifications are conserved and functionally significant as it may affect miRNA stability and ability to bind mRNA targets, hence affecting target gene repression. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of the small RNA (sRNA) provides an efficient and reliable method to explore miRNA modifications. The need for dedicated software, especially for users with little knowledge of computers, to determine and analyze miRNA modifications in sRNA NGS data, motivated us to develop miRMOD. miRMOD is a user-friendly, Microsoft Windows and Graphical User Interface (GUI) based tool for identification and analysis of 5' and 3' miRNA modifications (non-templated nucleotide additions and trimming) in sRNA NGS data. In addition to identification of miRNA modifications, the tool also predicts and compares the targets of query and modified miRNAs. In order to compare binding affinities for the same target, miRMOD utilizes minimum free energies of the miRNA:target and modified-miRNA:target interactions. Comparisons of the binding energies may guide experimental exploration of miRNA post-transcriptional modifications. The tool is available as a stand-alone package to overcome large data transfer problems commonly faced in web-based high-throughput (HT) sequencing data analysis tools. miRMOD package is freely available at http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/miRMOD.

  12. Revisiting the Archival Finding Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Archivists have been creating finding aids for generations, and in the last three decades they have done this work via a succession of standardized formats. However, like many other disciplines, they have carried out such work in violation of systems analysis. Although purporting to have the users of finding aids systems first and foremost in…

  13. Sustained safety and performance of the second-generation drug-eluting absorbable metal scaffold in patients with de novo coronary lesions: 12-month clinical results and angiographic findings of the BIOSOLVE-II first-in-man trial

    PubMed Central

    Haude, Michael; Ince, Hüseyin; Abizaid, Alexandre; Toelg, Ralph; Lemos, Pedro Alves; von Birgelen, Clemens; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Wijns, William; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Kaiser, Christoph; Eeckhout, Eric; Lim, Soo Teik; Escaned, Javier; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Garcia-Garcia, Hector M.; Waksman, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Aims Metal absorbable scaffolds constitute a conceptually attractive alternative to polymeric scaffolds. Promising 6-month outcomes of a second-generation drug-eluting absorbable metal scaffold (DREAMS 2G), consisting of an absorbable magnesium scaffold backbone, have been reported. We assessed the 12-month safety and performance of this novel device. Methods and results The prospective, international, multi-centre, first-in-man BIOSOLVE-II trial enrolled 123 patients with up to two de novo lesions with a reference diameter between 2.2 and 3.7 mm. All patients were scheduled for angiographic follow-up at 6 months, and—if subjects consented—at 12 months. Dual antiplatelet therapy was recommended for 6 months. Quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) parameters remained stable from 6 to 12 months [paired data of 42 patients: in-segment late lumen loss 0.20 ± 0.21 mm vs. 0.25 ± 0.22 mm, P = 0.117, Δ 0.05 ± 0.21 mm (95% CI: −0.01;0.12); in-scaffold late lumen loss 0.37 ± 0.25 mm vs. 0.39 ± 0.27 mm, P = 0.446, Δ 0.03 ± 0.22 (95% CI: −0.04;0.10), respectively]. Intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography findings corroborated the QCA results. Target lesion failure occurred in four patients (3.4%), consisting of one death of unknown cause, one target-vessel myocardial infarction, and two clinically driven target lesion revascularization. No additional event occurred beyond the 6-month follow-up. During the entire follow-up of 12 months, none of the patients experienced a definite or probable scaffold thrombosis. Conclusion The novel drug-eluting metal absorbable scaffold DREAMS 2G showed a continuous favourable safety profile up to 12 months and stable angiographic parameters between 6 and 12 months. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01960504. PMID:27190094

  14. Generative Contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyles, Dan Allen

    Educational research has identified how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice and education have underperforming metrics in racial and gender diversity, despite decades of intervention. These disparities are part of the construction of a culture of science that is alienating to these populations. Recent studies in a social science framework described as "Generative Justice" have suggested that the context of social and scientific practice might be modified to bring about more just and equitable relations among the disenfranchised by circulating the value they and their non-human allies create back to them in unalienated forms. What is not known are the underlying principles of social and material space that makes a system more or less generative. I employ an autoethnographic method at four sites: a high school science class; a farm committed to "Black and Brown liberation"; a summer program geared towards youth environmental mapping; and a summer workshop for Harlem middle school students. My findings suggest that by identifying instances where material affinity, participatory voice, and creative solidarity are mutually reinforcing, it is possible to create educational contexts that generate unalienated value, and circulate it back to the producers themselves. This cycle of generation may help explain how to create systems of justice that strengthen and grow themselves through successive iterations. The problem of lack of diversity in STEM may be addressed not merely by recruiting the best and the brightest from underrepresented populations, but by changing the context of STEM education to provide tools for its own systematic restructuring.

  15. Finding Dental Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Finding Dental Care Where can I find low-cost dental care? Dental schools often have clinics that allow dental ... can I find more information? See Finding Low Cost Dental Care . ​​​​ WWNRightboxRadEditor2 Contact Us 1-866-232-4528 nidcrinfo@ ...

  16. Find a Surgeon

    MedlinePlus

    ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... find out more. Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  17. Find a Massage Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletter Student Experience Newsletter AMTA News Find a Massage Therapist Find a qualified massage therapist near you ... massage therapy school Proprietary Information and Legal Notice Massage is Good Medicine 25 Reasons to Get a ...

  18. Leiomyosarcoma: computed tomographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, A.J.; Zornoza, J.; Shirkhoda, A.

    1984-07-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 118 patients with the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma were reviewed. The tumor masses visualized in these patients were often quite large; extensive necrotic or cystic change was a frequent finding. Calcification was not observed in these tumors. The liver was the most common site of metastasis in these patients, with marked necrosis of the liver lesions a common finding. Other manifestations of tumor spread included pulmonary metastases, mesenteric or omental metastases, retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, soft-tissue metastases, bone metastases, splenic metastases, and ascites. Although the CT appearance of leiomyosarcoma is not specific, these findings, when present, suggest consideration of this diagnosis.

  19. Profiling of small RNAs involved in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dongdong; Wang, Zhaoyun; Wang, Shune; Qiao, Lulu; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing is an important gene expression regulatory mechanism conserved in eukaryotes. Such sRNAs, first discovered in plants, are involved in diverse biological processes. In plants, sRNAs participate in many growth and developmental processes, such as embryo development, seed germination, flowering, hormone synthesis and distribution, and nutrient assimilation. However, the significance of sRNA in shaping the relationship between plants and their symbiotic microbes or pathogens has been underestimated. Recent progress in profiling sRNA, especially advances in next-generation sequencing technology, has revealed its extensive and complicated involvement in interactions between plants and viruses, bacteria, and fungi. In this review, we will summarize recent findings regarding sRNA in plant-pathogen interactions.

  20. Find a Nurse Practitioner

    MedlinePlus

    Find a Nurse Practitioner AANP Home MyAANP Contact Us Find an NP near me or near Search Reset I accept AANP's Terms of Use Overall Focus All Primary ... practice site(s) to NP Finder, and enjoy many more member benefits.

  1. Find a Midwife

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Find a Midwife practice locator is a web-based service that allows you to find midwifery practices in your area. It also supplies you with basic contact information like practice name, address, phone number, e-mail address, web site and a map of the area. If ...

  2. Controversial ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Meredith; Eddleman, Keith

    2004-03-01

    This article has reviewed a few of the more controversial findings in the field of obstetric ultrasound. For each one evidence-based strategies for the management of affected pregnancies have been suggested, derived from what the authors believe is the best information available. In some cases, this information is very limited, which can make counseling these patients extremely difficult. Some physicians find using specific likelihood ratios helpful in these complex discussions. An example of the relative likelihood ratios for several markers of trisomy 21 is illustrated in Table 10. Although the management of each of the findings discussed in this article is different, a few generalizations can be made. To begin with, the detection of any abnormal finding on ultrasound should prompt an immediate detailed ultrasound evaluation of the fetus by someone experienced in the diagnosis of fetal anomalies. If there is more than one abnormal finding on ultrasound, if the patient is over the age of 35, or if the multiple marker screen is abnormal, an amniocentesis to rule out aneuploidy should be recommended. Of the six ultrasound findings reviewed here, the authors believe that only echogenic bowel as an isolated finding confers a high enough risk of aneuploidy to recommend an amniocentesis in a low-risk patient. The other findings in isolation in a low-risk patient seem to confer only a modest increased risk of aneuploidy, if any, and this risk is certainly less than the risk of unintended loss from amniocentesis. Wherever possible, modifiers of this risk, such as maternal age, history, and first and second multiple marker screening, should be used to define more clearly the true risk of aneuploidy. As obstetric ultrasound moves forward, particularly into the uncharted waters of clinical use of three- and four-dimensional ultrasound, one can expect a whole new crop of ultrasound findings with uncertain clinical significance. Clinicians are well advised to await well

  3. Generational diversity.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Linda W

    2010-01-01

    Generational diversity has proven challenges for nurse leaders, and generational values may influence ideas about work and career planning. This article discusses generational gaps, influencing factors and support, and the various generational groups present in today's workplace as well as the consequences of need addressing these issues. The article ends with a discussion of possible solutions.

  4. Planar antenna system for direction finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardale, Iulia-Cezara; Cocias, Gabriela; Dumitrascu, Ana; Tamas, Razvan; Berescu, Serban

    2015-02-01

    Applications of direction finding techniques include detection and localization of pulsed electromagnetic sources. This paper presents the design and analysis of a planar antenna system for direction finding. Our proposed system includes 4 hybrid couplers that generate 900 shifted signals, 2 crossover couplers also known as 0dB couplers, two 450 phase shifters, two 00 phase shifters and 4 patch antennas.

  5. Find a Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact Find an ... more. Disclaimer of Liabilities The Academy of General Dentistry's (AGD) Web site provides a listing of members ...

  6. Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Doctor Finding a doctor with special training in movement disorders can make a big difference in your ... Goldstein Goldstone Gollomp Goodman Gorman Gottschalk Graff Greeley Green Gregory Griffith Grill Grillone Grist Grossman Groves Gudesblatt ...

  7. Find a Rheumatologist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Opportunities Awards Mentoring Find a Rheumatologist Cart Join Login Keep me signed in Passwords are Case Sensitive. ... as follows: Smith Forgot Username/Password? Toggle navigation Login I Am A Rheumatologist Education Practice & Quality Administrative ...

  8. Finding Treatment Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment Caregivers and Family Children and Cancer End of Life Care Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area Back To Top Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make it a reality. ...

  9. Finding the Correct Location.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiter, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Provides educational resources from ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) to help teachers find the material to teach the five themes of geography. An annotated bibliography of seven ERIC documents on geographic location is provided. (LS)

  10. Find a Cancer Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Status message Locating you... The Find an Oncologist Database is made available by ASCO as an informational resource for patients and caregivers. The database includes the names of physicians and other health ...

  11. Pathological findings in homocystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J. B.; Carson, Nina A. J.; Neill, D. W.

    1964-01-01

    Pathological findings are described in four cases of a new aminoaciduria in which homocystine is excreted in the urine. All the patients were mentally retarded children. Three of them presented diagnostic features of Marfan's syndrome. Necropsy on one case and biopsy findings in the others are described. Fatty change occurs in the liver. The most striking lesions are vascular. Metachromatic medial degeneration of the aorta and of the elastic arteries in the necropsied case are considered in relation to Marfan's syndrome. Other changes, particularly thrombosis which is prevalent in homocystinuria, suggest the possibility of a platelet defect. The findings are discussed in respect of an upset in the metabolism of sulphur-containing amino-acids and with particular reference to Marfan's syndrome. Images PMID:14195630

  12. Mobious syndrome: MR findings

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Maskal Revanna; Vaishali, Dhulappa Mudabasappagol; Vedaraju, Kadaba Shamachar; Nagaraj, Bangalore Rangaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Möbius syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder. We report a case of Möbius syndrome in a 2-year-old girl with bilateral convergent squint and left-sided facial weakness. The characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Möbius syndrome, which include absent bilateral abducens nerves and absent left facial nerve, were noted. In addition, there was absence of left anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) and absence of bilateral facial colliculi. Clinical features, etiology, and imaging findings are discussed. PMID:28104946

  13. Instant Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveland, Elaina

    2017-01-01

    Generation Z students (born between 1995-2010) have replaced millennials on college campuses. Generation Z students are entrepreneurial, desire practical skills with their education, and are concerned about the cost of college. This article presents what need to be known about this new generation of students.

  14. Finding the Common Ground.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Dawn

    1980-01-01

    Describes an attempt to combine secondary English instruction emphasizing United States literature with science and history by finding "common ground" between these disciplines in (1) the separation of truth from falsehood and (2) logical thinking. Biographies combined history and literature, and science fiction combined science and English;…

  15. Tooth Tutoring: The Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Richard; And Others

    Findings are reported on a three year cross-age tutoring program in which undergraduate dental hygiene students and college students from other disciplines trained upper elementary students to tutor younger students in the techniques of dental hygiene. Data includes pre-post scores on the Oral Hygiene Index of plaque for both experimental and…

  16. Tooth Tutoring: The Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Richard; And Others

    Findings are reported on a three year cross-age tutoring program in which undergraduate dental hygiene students and college students from other disciplines trained upper elementary students to tutor younger students in the techniques of dental hygiene. Data includes pre-post scores on the Oral Hygiene Index of plaque for both experimental and…

  17. Finding Health Care Services

    Cancer.gov

    If you have been diagnosed with cancer, finding a doctor and treatment hospital for your cancer care is an important step to getting the best treatment possible. Learn tips for choosing a doctor and treatment facility to manage your cancer care.

  18. Implementing Institutional Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Although many agree that institutional research in higher education has come of age and is accepted as a part of institutional management, great variations exist in the extent to which institutional research findings are synthesized and utilized in management decision-making. A number of reasons can be identified as accounting for this phenomenon,…

  19. Finding Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    Every time Dr. Larry Shinagawa teaches his "Introduction to Asian American Studies" course at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, he finds that 10 to 20 percent of his students are adoptees. Among other things, they hunger to better comprehend the social and political circumstances overseas leading to their adoption. In…

  20. Finding Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    Every time Dr. Larry Shinagawa teaches his "Introduction to Asian American Studies" course at the University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, he finds that 10 to 20 percent of his students are adoptees. Among other things, they hunger to better comprehend the social and political circumstances overseas leading to their adoption. In…

  1. Finding Those Missing Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Holly

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author stresses not to give up on a site when a URL returns an error message. Many web sites can be found by using strategies such as URL trimming, searching cached sites, site searching and searching the WayBack Machine. Methods and tips for finding web sites are contained within this article.

  2. Peak-Finding Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-03-01

    Microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have greatly expedited the discovery of genomic DNA that can be enriched using various biochemical methods. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a general method for enriching chromatin fragments that are specifically recognized by an antibody. The resulting DNA fragments can be assayed by microarray (ChIP-chip) or sequencing (ChIP-seq). This introduction focuses on ChIP-seq data analysis. The first step of analyzing ChIP-seq data is identifying regions in the genome that are enriched in a ChIP sample; these regions are called peaks.

  3. CT findings in leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1984-12-01

    Review of 84 computed tomographic (CT) scans in leukemic patients demonstrate a wide spectrum of abnormalities. Findings caused by leukemia were lymphadenopathy, visceral enlargement, focal defects, and tissue infiltration. Hemorrhage was by far the most common complication and could usually be characterized on the noncontrast CT scan. The distinction between old hematomas, foci of infection, and leukemia infiltration could not be made with certainty without CT-guided aspiration. Unusual instances of sepsis, such as microabscesses of the liver and typhlitis, were seen.

  4. Finding voices through writing.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, P

    1994-01-01

    Assisting students to find their writing "voices" is another way to emphasize writing as a professional tool for nursing. The author discusses a teaching strategy that required students to write using a variety of styles. Students wrote fables, poetry, and letters, and used other creative writing styles to illustrate their views and feelings on professional nursing issues. Creation of a class book empowered students to see versatility with writing styles can be a powerful communication tool to use with peers, clients, and society.

  5. Wind Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    When Enerpro, Inc. president, Frank J. Bourbeau, attempted to file a patent on a system for synchronizing a wind generator to the electric utility grid, he discovered Marshall Space Flight Center's Frank Nola's power factor controller. Bourbeau advanced the technology and received a NASA license and a patent for his Auto Synchronous Controller (ASC). The ASC reduces generator "inrush current," which occurs when large generators are abruptly brought on line. It controls voltage so the generator is smoothly connected to the utility grid when it reaches its synchronous speed, protecting the components from inrush current damage. Generator efficiency is also increased in light winds by applying lower than rated voltage. Wind energy is utilized to drive turbines to generate electricity for utility companies.

  6. Rainfall generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashish; Mehrotra, Raj

    This chapter presents an overview of methods for stochastic generation of rainfall at annual to subdaily time scales, at single- to multiple-point locations, and in a changing climatic regime. Stochastic rainfall generators are used to provide inputs for risk assessment of natural or engineering systems that can undergo failure under sustained (high or low) extremes. As a result, generation of rainfall has evolved to provide options that adequately represent such conditions, leading to sequences that exhibit low-frequency variability of a nature similar to the observed rainfall. The chapter consists of three key sections: the first two outlining approaches for rainfall generation using endogenous predictor variables and the third highlighting approaches for generation using exogenous predictors often simulated to represent future climatic conditions. The first section presents approaches for generation of annual and seasonal rainfall and daily rainfall, both at single-point locations and multiple sites, with an emphasis on alternatives that ensure appropriate representation of low-frequency variability in the generated rainfall sequences. The second section highlights advancements in the subdaily rainfall generation procedures including commonly used approaches for daily to subdaily rainfall generation. The final section (generation using exogenous predictors) presents a range of alternatives for stochastic downscaling of rainfall for climate change impact assessments of natural and engineering systems. We conclude the chapter by outlining some of the key challenges that remain to be addressed, especially in generation under climate change conditions, with an emphasis on the importance of incorporating uncertainty present in both measurements and models, in the rainfall sequences that are generated.

  7. Generation X

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    service or government agency. STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT GENERATION X BY LIEUTENANT COLONEL NEIL YAMASHIRO United States Army National Guard CVI...WAR COLLEGE, CARLISLE BARRACKS, PA 17013-5050 ■"""" mimmm n USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT Generation X by LTC Neil Yamashiro COL Paul...is unlimited. 11 ABSTRACT AUTHOR: LTC Neil Yamashiro TITLE: Generation X FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 7 April 1998 PAGES: 26

  8. Mineral find highlights cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Heavy minerals with potential commercial value were discovered last month by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in seafloor deposits off the coasts of Virginia and Georgia. The USGS sent the research vessel J. W. Powell on a 25-day cruise along the East Coast to assess the concentrations of commercially important minerals in that segment of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ).Assistant Secretary of the Interior Robert Broadbent called the findings of the Powell “promising” and said they served as a “reminder of just how little we do know about the seafloor resources just a few miles offshore.”

  9. [Ultrasound findings in rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Galván-Talamantes, Yazmin; Meza-Ayala, Cynthia Margarita; Cruz-Santana, Julio Alberto; Bonilla-Reséndiz, Luis Ignacio

    Rhabdomyolysis is defined as skeletal muscle necrosis. Ultrasound assessment has recently become a useful tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of muscle diseases, including rhabdomyolysis. A case is presented on the ultrasound findings in a patient with rhabdomyolysis. To highlight the importance of ultrasound as an essential part in the diagnosis in rhabdomyolysis, to describe the ultrasound findings, and review the literature. A 30 year-old with post-traumatic rhabdomyolysis of both thighs. Ultrasound was performed using a Philips Sparq model with a high-frequency linear transducer (5-10MHz), in low-dimensional scanning mode (2D), in longitudinal and transverse sections at the level of both thighs. The images obtained showed disorganisation of the orientation of the muscle fibres, ground glass image, thickening of the muscular fascia, and the presence of anechoic areas. Ultrasound is a useful tool in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Generative Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagha, Karim Nazari

    2011-01-01

    Generative semantics is (or perhaps was) a research program within linguistics, initiated by the work of George Lakoff, John R. Ross, Paul Postal and later McCawley. The approach developed out of transformational generative grammar in the mid 1960s, but stood largely in opposition to work by Noam Chomsky and his students. The nature and genesis of…

  11. Generative Semantics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Margaret

    The first section of this paper deals with the attempts within the framework of transformational grammar to make semantics a systematic part of linguistic description, and outlines the characteristics of the generative semantics position. The second section takes a critical look at generative semantics in its later manifestations, and makes a case…

  12. Radionuclide Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, F.; Knapp, F. F. (Russ)

    Radionuclide generator systems continue to play a key role in providing both diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for various applications in nuclear medicine, oncology, and interventional cardiology. Although many parent/daughter pairs have been evaluated as radionuclide generator systems, there are a relatively small number of generators, which are currently in routine clinical and research use. Essentially every conceivable approach has been used for parent/separation strategies, including sublimation, thermochromatographic separation, solvent extraction, and adsorptive column chromatography. The most widely used radionuclide generator for clinical applications is the 99Mo/99mTc generator system, but recent years have seen an enormous increase in the use of generators to provide therapeutic radionuclides, which has paralleled the development of complementary technologies for targeting agents for therapy and in the general increased interest in the use of unsealed therapeutic radioactive sources. More recently, use of the 68Ge/68Ga generator is showing great potential as a source of positron-emitting 68Ga for positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging. Key advantages for the use of radionuclide generators include reasonable costs, the convenience of obtaining the desired daughter radionuclide on demand, and availability of the daughter radionuclide in high specific activity, no-carrier added form.

  13. Subdural empyema: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.D.; Leeds, N.E.; Danziger, A.

    1984-02-01

    CT scans in 49 patients with surgically proven subdural empyema were evaluated. The empyemas were crescentic or lentiform extra-axial hypodense collections (density approximating that of cerebrospinal fluid) with prominent, sharply etched medial rim enhancement. Enhancement of the adjacent cerebral cortex was identified in many cases. Mass effect was always present and in 10 cases so extensive that it overshadowed a small extra-axial collection. CT allowed for precise localization of the lesion, including contiguous or isolated involvement of the interhemispheric subdural space. Mortality was 12% (6/49 cases), a marked improvement when compared with mortality figures obtained prior to the advent of CT (40%). CT findings indicative of involvement of the adjacent parenchyma via retrograde thrombophlebitis with resultant infarction and/or abscess formation were associated with poor prognosis. Improvement in prognosis since the advent of CT is the direct result of early accurate diagnosis and timely intervention.

  14. Energy generator

    SciTech Connect

    Krisko, P.

    1989-08-01

    The patent describes a power booster. It comprises: at least one pendulum means suspended at one end to oscillate about the point of suspension; power generating means; mass means connected to one end of the pendulum means; spring means disposed in operative cooperation with the mass means to impart energy into the pendulum means and assist the pendulum means in oscillating about the point of suspension; and energy transfer linkage means between the pendulum means and the power generating means for transferring energy between the pendulum means and the power generating means.

  15. Finding the Next Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalha, Natalie M.; Kepler Team

    2013-01-01

    Twenty years ago, we knew of no planets orbiting other Sun-like stars, yet today, the roll call is nearly 1,000 strong. Statistical studies of exoplanet populations are possible, and words like "habitable zone" are heard around the dinner table. Theorists are scrambling to explain not only the observed physical characteristics but also the orbital and dynamical properties of planetary systems. The taxonomy is diverse but still reflects the observational biases that dominate the detection surveys. We've yet to find another planet that looks anything like home. The scene changed dramatically with the launch of the Kepler spacecraft in 2009 to determine, via transit photometry, the fraction of stars harboring earth-size planets in or near the Habitable Zone of their parent star. Early catalog releases hint that nature makes small planets efficiently: over half of the sample of 2,300 planet candidates discovered in the first two years are smaller than 2.5 times the Earth's radius. I will describe Kepler's milestone discoveries and progress toward an exo-Earth census. Humankind's speculation about the existence of other worlds like our own has become a veritable quest.

  16. Generation Wrecked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Noshua

    2002-01-01

    Young adults in Generation X are facing financial problems. Because of their college and credit card debt, many in worse financial shape than anyone since the Depression and have little or no retirement savings. (JOW)

  17. Generation Wrecked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Noshua

    2002-01-01

    Young adults in Generation X are facing financial problems. Because of their college and credit card debt, many in worse financial shape than anyone since the Depression and have little or no retirement savings. (JOW)

  18. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  19. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  20. Methane generator

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.H.

    1984-03-27

    A biogas generator is disclosed which includes a medium conducive to the growing of plants that are floating and of the family that includes water hyacinths, lily pads, and elodea; a conveyor for transferring the free floating plants from the growing area to a decomposition area including a canopy adapted to entrain therewithin biogas given off by decomposing plants constrained thereunder, and an instrumentality for scavenging the biogas generated therein to a remote area for subsequent use and or compression.

  1. The New Second Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portes, Alejandro, Ed.

    This book compiles findings on the children of recent immigrants to the United States. The dearth of accessible census data and the tendency for school records and scholarly surveys to compress second-generation youth into a classificatory scheme that obliterates their history have obscured a major phenomenon in U.S. society--a rapidly growing…

  2. Window generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William K.; May, Roger A.

    1989-03-01

    The present invention relates generally to video target recognition systems and more specifically to a window generator which receives a field of video data and applies an identification code to rectangular subregions to identify distinct target areas within a given background area. The present invention comprises a window generator which provides a 6 bit target identification number for up to 63 target areas and one background area in a frame of serially scanned data. The window generator receives a field of video data from an image data source. This video data consists of digitized frames of serially scanned data similar to a conventional television screen image, which is divided horizontally in pixels, and vertically in lines. The window generator permits any given frame to be subdivided into specific rectangular subregions, which may be located anywhere on the video picture. By allowing statistics to be collected on the individual subregions (or target areas) the window generator permits local processing of video data within the specified target areas as opposed to processing of video data over the entire video field. One embodiment of the window generator is composed of: a microprocessor, a random access memory (RAM), a comparator, a line memory, two counters, an OR gate, a frame initialization circuit, and a buffer. These elements function as described below.

  3. Experimental design, preprocessing, normalization and differential expression analysis of small RNA sequencing experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the advent of new, deep sequencing methods, small RNA (sRNA) discovery was dependent on Sanger sequencing, which was time-consuming and limited knowledge to only the most abundant sRNA. The innovation of large-scale, next-generation sequencing has exponentially increased knowledge of the biology, diversity and abundance of sRNA populations. In this review, we discuss issues involved in the design of sRNA sequencing experiments, including choosing a sequencing platform, inherent biases that affect sRNA measurements and replication. We outline the steps involved in preprocessing sRNA sequencing data and review both the principles behind and the current options for normalization. Finally, we discuss differential expression analysis in the absence and presence of biological replicates. While our focus is on sRNA sequencing experiments, many of the principles discussed are applicable to the sequencing of other RNA populations. PMID:21356093

  4. Pulmonary talcosis: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Zanetti, Gláucia; Mano, Cláudia Mauro; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2010-04-01

    Talc is a mineral widely used in the ceramic, paper, plastics, rubber, paint, and cosmetic industries. Four distinct forms of pulmonary disease caused by talc have been defined. Three of them (talcosilicosis, talcoasbestosis, and pure talcosis) are associated with aspiration and differ in the composition of the inhaled substance. The fourth form, a result of intravenous administration of talc, is seen in drug users who inject medications intended for oral use. The disease most commonly affects men, with a mean age in the fourth decade of life. Presentation of patients with talc granulomatosis can range from asymptomatic to fulminant disease. Symptomatic patients typically present with nonspecific complaints, including progressive exertional dyspnea, and cough. Late complications include chronic respiratory failure, emphysema, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cor pulmonale. History of occupational exposure or of drug addiction is the major clue to the diagnosis. The high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) finding of small centrilobular nodules associated with heterogeneous conglomerate masses containing high-density amorphous areas, with or without panlobular emphysema in the lower lobes, is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis. The characteristic histopathologic feature in talc pneumoconiosis is the striking appearance of birefringent, needle-shaped particles of talc seen within the giant cells and in the areas of pulmonary fibrosis with the use of polarized light. In conclusion, computed tomography can play an important role in the diagnosis of pulmonary talcosis, since suggestive patterns may be observed. The presence of these patterns in drug abusers or in patients with an occupational history of exposure to talc is highly suggestive of pulmonary talcosis.

  5. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Gláucia; Araujo, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Pereira e Silva, Jorge Luiz; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). CONCLUSIONS: It is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. PMID:25410842

  6. Immunological findings in autism.

    PubMed

    Cohly, Hari Har Parshad; Panja, Asit

    2005-01-01

    elevated in autistic brains. In measles virus infection, it has been postulated that there is immune suppression by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and maturation and downregulation MHC class II expression. Cytokine alteration of TNF-alpha is increased in autistic populations. Toll-like-receptors are also involved in autistic development. High NO levels are associated with autism. Maternal antibodies may trigger autism as a mechanism of autoimmunity. MMR vaccination may increase risk for autism via an autoimmune mechanism in autism. MMR antibodies are significantly higher in autistic children as compared to normal children, supporting a role of MMR in autism. Autoantibodies (IgG isotype) to neuron-axon filament protein (NAFP) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) are significantly increased in autistic patients (Singh et al., 1997). Increase in Th2 may explain the increased autoimmunity, such as the findings of antibodies to MBP and neuronal axonal filaments in the brain. There is further evidence that there are other participants in the autoimmune phenomenon. (Kozlovskaia et al., 2000). The possibility of its involvement in autism cannot be ruled out. Further investigations at immunological, cellular, molecular, and genetic levels will allow researchers to continue to unravel the immunopathogenic mechanisms' associated with autistic processes in the developing brain. This may open up new avenues for prevention and/or cure of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder.

  7. Microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  8. PULSE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  9. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Another spinoff from spacecraft fuel cell technology is the portable hydrogen generator shown. Developed by General Electric Company, it is an aid to safer operation of systems that use hydrogen-for example, gas chromatographs, used in laboratory analysis of gases. or flame ionization detectors used as $ollution monitors. The generator eliminates the need for high-pressure hydrogen storage bottles, which can be a safety hazard, in laboratories, hospitals and industrial plants. The unit supplies high-purity hydrogen by means of an electrochemical process which separates the hydrogen and oxygen in distilled water. The oxygen is vented away and the hydrogen gas is stored within the unit for use as needed. GE's Aircraft Equipment Division is producing about 1,000 of the generators annually.

  10. Generational mentoring.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Della W

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare organizations struggle with the best way to integrate new staff members, including novice and experienced nurses returning to practice, into the organization. One way of accomplishing this integration is mentoring. Mentoring is a process of guiding the development of another person. The methods used to mentor staff members can be influenced by the generation to which they belong. Each generation typically experiences different events that shape their expectations and responses. Consideration of the influence of these events can improve the effectiveness of the mentoring process.

  11. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.R.

    1984-06-19

    A hydrogen generator decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, and includes an induction coil which is electrically heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose water passing therethrough. A generator coil is connected in communicating relation to the induction coil, and is positioned in a fire resistant crucible containing ferrous oxide pellets. Oxygen and hydrogen produced by decomposition of water pass through the ferrous oxide pellets where the oxygen reacts with the ferrous oxide and the hydrogen is burned to produce heat for heating a building, such as a conventional home.

  12. Solar Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Vanguard I dish-Stirling module program, initiated in 1982, produced the Vanguard I module, a commercial prototype erected by the Advanco Corporation. The module, which automatically tracks the sun, combines JPL mirrored concentrator technology, an advanced Stirling Solar II engine/generator, a low cost microprocessor-controlled parabolic dish. Vanguard I has a 28% sunlight to electricity conversion efficiency. If tests continue to prove the system effective, Advanco will construct a generating plant to sell electricity to local utilities. An agreement has also been signed with McDonnell Douglas to manufacture a similar module.

  13. Generation Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of accounting professors with Ph.D.s who can prepare the next generation. To help reverse the faculty deficit, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) has created the new Accounting Doctoral Scholars program by pooling more than $17 million and soliciting commitments from more than 70 of the nation's…

  14. Generation Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, B. Denise

    2010-01-01

    There is a shortage of accounting professors with Ph.D.s who can prepare the next generation. To help reverse the faculty deficit, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) has created the new Accounting Doctoral Scholars program by pooling more than $17 million and soliciting commitments from more than 70 of the nation's…

  15. Generational Myth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidhyanathan, Siva

    2008-01-01

    College students in America are not as "digital" as one might wish to pretend. And even at elite universities, many are not rich enough. All the mystical talk about a generational shift and all the claims that kids won't read books are not true. In this article, the author challenges the notion of "digital natives." The author argues that the term…

  16. Electricity Generation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Jeffrey; Marcy, Cara; McCall, James; Flores-Espino, Francisco; Bloom, Aaron; Aabakken, Jorn; Cole, Wesley; Jenkin, Thomas; Porro, Gian; Liu, Chang; Ganda, Francesco; Boardman, Richard; Tarka, Thomas; Brewer, John; Schultz, Travis

    2017-01-01

    This report was developed by a team of national laboratory analysts over the period October 2015 to May 2016 and is part of a series of studies that provide background material to inform development of the second installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER 1.2). The report focuses specifically on U.S. power sector generation. The report limits itself to the generation sector and does not address in detail parallel issues in electricity end use, transmission and distribution, markets and policy design, and other important segments. The report lists 15 key findings about energy system needs of the future.

  17. Learning Science: A Generative Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, R. J.; Wittrock, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    The generative learning model is explored and linked to recent science education research findings. The implications of the model for the teaching and learning of science, the training of science teachers, and science educational research are discussed. (JN)

  18. Stochastic Generator of Chemical Structure. 3. Reaction Network Generation

    SciTech Connect

    FAULON,JEAN-LOUP; SAULT,ALLEN G.

    2000-07-15

    A new method to generate chemical reaction network is proposed. The particularity of the method is that network generation and mechanism reduction are performed simultaneously using sampling techniques. Our method is tested for hydrocarbon thermal cracking. Results and theoretical arguments demonstrate that our method scales in polynomial time while other deterministic network generator scale in exponential time. This finding offers the possibility to investigate complex reacting systems such as those studied in petroleum refining and combustion.

  19. Splinter generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Manfred

    A splinter generator was designed, built and tested for the study of the synergistic effects in shooting at target structures with splinter-effect ammunition. The design of the generator and the test stand are described. Due to the possibility to correlate the positions of the hit encounters on the target plate, the angle of jump in elevation and azimuthal direction and hence the real paths between the detonation of the bursting charge and the X-ray flash pictures could be determined. This allows a precise determination of the velocities of the single splinters. In spite of the large scattering of the splinter penetration depths in the soft-iron target plate, a correlation between impact speed and working depth was deduced.

  20. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

    1981-06-08

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  1. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  2. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  3. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  4. Thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Pryslak, N.E.

    1974-02-26

    A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

  5. Electric generator

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  6. Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra; Coles, Adrienne D.

    1998-01-01

    Studies on race-based admissions, sports and sex, and religion and drugs suggest that: affirmative action policies were successful regarding college admissions; boys who play sports are more likely to be sexually active than their peers, with the opposite true for girls; and religion is a major factor in whether teens use cigarettes, alcohol, and…

  7. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association

  8. Lupus Nephritis: An Overview of Recent Findings

    PubMed Central

    de Zubiria Salgado, Alberto; Herrera-Diaz, Catalina

    2012-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) since it is the major predictor of poor prognosis. In susceptible individuals suffering of SLE, in situ formation and deposit of immune complexes (ICs) from apoptotic bodies occur in the kidneys as a result of an amplified epitope immunological response. IC glomerular deposits generate release of proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules causing inflammation. This leads to monocytes and polymorphonuclear cells chemotaxis. Subsequent release of proteases generates endothelial injury and mesangial proliferation. Presence of ICs promotes adaptive immune response and causes dendritic cells to release type I interferon. This induces maturation and activation of infiltrating T cells, and amplification of Th2, Th1 and Th17 lymphocytes. Each of them, amplify B cells and activates macrophages to release more proinflammatory molecules, generating effector cells that cannot be modulated promoting kidney epithelial proliferation and fibrosis. Herein immunopathological findings of LN are reviewed. PMID:22536486

  9. Hospital generator sizing, testing, and exercising.

    PubMed

    Nash, H O

    1994-02-01

    With the NFPA 99 and JCAHO requirements for minimum loads on generators during testing, hospital engineers are finding that oversized standby generators can mean operational problems. This document explains the oversized generator problem, including the code changes that gave birth to the problem. Some practical suggestions for sizing generators are then provided.

  10. Piezoelectrostatic generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piezoelectrostatic generator includes a plurality of elongated piezoelectric elements having first and second ends, with the first ends fixedly mounted in a cylindrical housing and the second extending radially inwardly toward an axis. A shaft movable along the axis is connected to the inner ends of the elements to produce bending forces in piezoelectric strips within the elements. Each element includes a pair of strips mounted in surface contact and in electrical series to produce a potential upon bending. Electrodes spaced from the strips by a solid dielectric material act as capacitor plates to collect the potential charge.

  11. Smoke generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A smoke generator is disclosed which is particularly suitable for mounting on the wing tips of an aircraft and for conducting airflow studies. The device includes a network of thermally insulated tubes for carrying a fluid which is used to produce smoke. The fluid, which need not be combustible, is heated above its vaporization temperature by electric current which is passed through the fluid conduit tubes, so that the tubes serve both as fluid conduits and resistance heating elements. Fluid supply and monitoring systems and electrical control systems are also disclosed.

  12. HEAT GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

    1963-12-01

    Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

  13. Tide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Feltenberger, B.D.

    1981-06-16

    A tidewater power system consisting of a high tide reservoir and a low tide reservoir. The high tide reservoir has an inlet adapted to be supported at high tide level and an outlet with a water wheel and generator between the outlet of the high tide reservoir and the low tide reservoir. The low tide reservoir has an outlet at the low tide level. The outlet from the high tide reservoir is adjustable to control the flow rate and the high tide reservoir can be closed at high tide to retain water for use over a period of time.

  14. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOEpatents

    Pettibone, Joseph S.; Wheeler, Paul C.

    1983-01-01

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  15. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vuyisich, Momchilo

    2012-09-11

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  16. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A; Varma, Rajeev K

    2014-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings.

  17. Radiographic findings of Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nishant Mukesh; Davalos, Eric A.; Varma, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The extremely rare Proteus Syndrome is a hamartomatous congenital syndrome with substantial variability between clinical patient presentations. The diagnostic criteria consist of a multitude of clinical findings including hemihypertrophy, macrodactyly, epidermal nevi, subcutaneous hamartomatous tumors, and bony abnormalities. These clinical findings correlate with striking radiographic findings. PMID:27186241

  18. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, J.M.; Baker, W.R.

    1963-09-17

    This invention is a magnetohydrodynamic device for generating a highly ionized ion-electron plasma at a region remote from electrodes and structural members, thus avoiding contamination of the plasma. The apparatus utilizes a closed, gas-filled, cylindrical housing in which an axially directed magnetic field is provided. At one end of the housing, a short cylindrical electrode is disposed coaxially around a short axial inner electrode. A radial electrical discharge is caused to occur between the inner and outer electrodes, creating a rotating hydromagnetic ionization wave that propagates aiong the magnetic field lines toward the opposite end of the housing. A shorting switch connected between the electrodes prevents the wave from striking the opposite end of the housing. (AEC)

  19. Triboelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhong L; Fan, Fengru; Lin, Long; Zhu, Guang; Pan, Caofeng; Zhou, Yusheng

    2015-11-03

    A generator includes a thin first contact charging layer and a thin second contact charging layer. The thin first contact charging layer includes a first material that has a first rating on a triboelectric series. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer includes a second material that has a second rating on a triboelectric series that is more negative than the first rating. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer is disposed adjacent to the first contact charging layer so that the second side of the second contact charging layer is in contact with the second side of the first contact charging layer.

  20. Simulations of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koumoutsakos, P.

    1995-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via direct numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the stream direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators at NASA Ames and Stanford University (Saddoughi, 1994, and Jacobson and Reynolds, 1993). Jacobson and Reynolds (1993) used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and he observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. Our task is to simulate the flows generated by these devices and to conduct a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. The results of the present simulations would help us assess some of the effects of three-dimensionality in experiments and investigate the role

  1. Liposome adhesion generates traction stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, Michael P.; Voituriez, Raphaël; Joanny, Jean-François; Nassoy, Pierre; Sykes, Cécile; Gardel, Margaret L.

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells modulate global shape changes required for essential life processes, such as polarization, division and spreading. Although the contribution of the cytoskeleton to cellular force generation is widely recognized, the role of the membrane is considered to be restricted to passively transmitting forces. Therefore, the mechanisms by which the membrane can directly contribute to cell tension are overlooked and poorly understood. To address this, we directly measure the stresses generated during liposome adhesion. We find that liposome spreading generates large traction stresses on compliant substrates. These stresses can be understood as the equilibration of internal, hydrostatic pressures generated by the enhanced membrane tension built up during adhesion. These results underscore the role of membranes in the generation of mechanical stresses on cellular length scales and that the modulation of hydrostatic pressure due to membrane tension and adhesion can be channelled to perform mechanical work on the environment.

  2. Find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sign In Join / Renew About Us Shopping Cart | Media Find an Expert Submit Search Submit Find an Expert Learn More About Us What an RDN Can Do for You National Nutrition Month® Popular Links Videos Recipes For Kids On eatrightPRO.org Accreditation Info CPE Opportunities Member ...

  3. Finding the object'' proceedings addendum

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, M.A.; Devaney, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to discuss finding the object -- that is, how software engineers imagine, invent, design, or recycle objects and their behaviors for object-oriented software engineering. The workshop organizers (and, as we subsequently discovered, several of the workshop participants) felt that this issue is crucial to successful object-oriented software engineering (after all, finding objects is what the projects is all about, isn't it ). Unfortunately, when previous workshops have had the opportunity to review and discuss techniques practitioners use to find objects, too often the results were heated debates on what is an object '' which becomes all consuming. We believed that, given appropriate control over the question of which kind of object'' is being discussed (which meant tell us what object you are trying to find, then tell us your method), a workshop to concentrate on techniques for finding objects would be quite appropriate. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Can Radio Telescopes Find Axions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-08-01

    In the search for dark matter, the most commonly accepted candidates are invisible, massive particles commonly referred to as WIMPs. But as time passes and we still havent detected WIMPs, alternative scenarios are becoming more and more appealing. Prime among these is the idea of axions.A Bizarre ParticleThe Italian PVLAS is an example of a laboratory experiment that attempted to confirm the existence of axions. [PVLAS]Axions are a type of particle first proposed in the late 1970s. These theorized particles arose from a new symmetry introduced to solve ongoing problems with the standard model for particle physics, and they were initially predicted to have more than a keV in mass. For this reason, their existence was expected to be quickly confirmed by particle-detector experiments yet no detections were made.Today, after many unsuccessful searches, experiments and theory tell us that if axions exist, their masses must lie between 10-610-3 eV. This is minuscule an electrons mass is around 500,000 eV, and even neutrinos are on the scale of a tenth of an eV!But enough of anything, even something very low-mass, can weigh a lot. If they are real, then axions were likely created in abundance during the Big Bang and unlike heavier particles, they cant decay into anything lighter, so we would expect them all to still be around today. Our universe could therefore be filled with invisible axions, potentially providing an explanation for dark matter in the form of many, many tiny particles.Artists impression of the central core of proposed Square Kilometer Array antennas. [SKA/Swinburne Astronomy Productions]How Do We Find Them?Axions barely interact with ordinary matter and they have no electric charge. One of the few ways we can detect them is with magnetic fields: magnetic fields can change axions to and from photons.While many studies have focused on attempting to detect axions in laboratory experiments, astronomy provides an alternative: we can search for cosmological

  5. Characterization of an extensive rainbow trout miRNA transcriptome by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Juanchich, Amelie; Bardou, Philippe; Rué, Olivier; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Gaspin, Christine; Bobe, Julien; Guiguen, Yann

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in a wide variety of physiological processes. They can control both temporal and spatial gene expression and are believed to regulate 30 to 70% of the genes. Data are however limited for fish species, with only 9 out of the 30,000 fish species present in miRBase. The aim of the current study was to discover and characterize rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) miRNAs in a large number of tissues using next-generation sequencing in order to provide an extensive repertoire of rainbow trout miRNAs. A total of 38 different samples corresponding to 16 different tissues or organs were individually sequenced and analyzed independently in order to identify a large number of miRNAs with high confidence. This led to the identification of 2946 miRNA loci in the rainbow trout genome, including 445 already known miRNAs. Differential expression analysis was performed in order to identify miRNAs exhibiting specific or preferential expression among the 16 analyzed tissues. In most cases, miRNAs exhibit a specific pattern of expression in only a few tissues. The expression data from sRNA sequencing were confirmed by RT-qPCR. In addition, novel miRNAs are described in rainbow trout that had not been previously reported in other species. This study represents the first characterization of rainbow trout miRNA transcriptome from a wide variety of tissue and sets an extensive repertoire of rainbow trout miRNAs. It provides a starting point for future studies aimed at understanding the roles of miRNAs in major physiological process such as growth, reproduction or adaptation to stress. These rainbow trout miRNAs repertoire provide a novel resource to advance genomic research in salmonid species.

  6. Solar thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The methods, the findings and the conclusions of a study for the design of a Solar Thermoelectric Generator (STG) intended for use as a power source for a spacecraft orbiting the planet Mercury are discussed. Several state-of-the-art thermoelectric technologies in the intended application were considered. The design of various STG configurations based on the thermoelectric technology selected from among the various technologies was examined in detail and a recommended STG design was derived. The performance characteristics of the selected STG technology and associated design were studied in detail as a function of the orbital characteristics of the STG in Mercury and throughout the orbit of Mercury around the sun.

  7. Ultrasound findings in trisomy 22.

    PubMed

    Schwendemann, Wade D; Contag, Stephen A; Koty, Patrick P; Miller, Richard C; Devers, Patricia; Watson, William J

    2009-02-01

    We sought to identify the characteristic sonographic findings of fetal trisomy 22 by performing a retrospective review of nine cases of fetal trisomy 22. All cases of chromosomal mosaicism were excluded, as were first-trimester losses. Indications for sonography, gestational age, and sonographically detected fetal anomalies were analyzed. The majority of patients were referred for advanced maternal age or abnormal ultrasound findings on screening exam. Oligohydramnios was the most common sonographic finding, present in 55% of affected fetuses. Intrauterine growth restriction and increased nuchal thickness were slightly less frequent.

  8. Finding curvilinear features in speckled images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samadani, Ramin; Vesecky, John F.

    1990-01-01

    A method for finding curves in digital images with speckle noise is described. The solution method differs from standard linear convolutions followed by thresholds in that it explicitly allows curvature in the features. Maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation is used, together with statistical models for the speckle noise and for the curve-generation process, to find the most probable estimate of the feature, given the image data. The estimation process is first described in general terms. Then, incorporation of the specific neighborhood system and a multiplicative noise model for speckle allows derivation of the solution, using dynamic programming, of the estimation problem. The detection of curvilinear features is considered separately. The detection results allow the determination of the minimal size of detectable feature. Finally, the estimation of linear features, followed by a detection step, is shown for computer-simulated images and for a SAR image of sea ice.

  9. [Graphic assessment of retinal findings by computer].

    PubMed

    Effert, R; Wilberts, T; Reim, M

    1989-01-01

    Despite the increasing amount of patient data in the area of words and numbers that is being stored by computer, the graphic storage of ophthalmological findings has found only limited success. However, a sketch is much more instructive than a description in words. This paper shows that by using a suitable computer with a graphic oriented disc-operating system and a purchasable graphic and data base program, it is easily possible to generate sketches of retinal detachment on a computer screen. In the graphic program, all of the necessary symbols are already available when the program is started. The user just makes a copy of the symbols he needs to "draw" the actual fundus findings. We use the system of Meyer-Schwickerath. Afterwards, the drawing on the monitor is transferred into the data base program and stored.

  10. NAOS -- finding NAOMI guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenhall, A. C.

    Observations made with the NAOMI adaptive optics system on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) usually require a guide star located close to the target object being observed. This manual describes how to find such guide stars. It documents the NAOS package whose purpose is precisely to find suitable guide stars and also describes various related items of software. Details of the potential guide stars are produced as tabular lists in text files, finding charts and tables in a format suitable for input into GAIA or CURSA. This document is aimed at astronomers who are planning to observe with the NAOMI adaptive optics system on the WHT and need to find guide stars for their target objects.

  11. A Family Finds Its Way

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury A Family Finds Its Way Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... spoke recently with NIH MedlinePlus ' Christopher Klose. At its heart, TBI, hearing loss, any health condition is ...

  12. Improved VHF direction finding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, E. R.; Neff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Direction finding device operating at very high frequencies requires a loop antenna, mechanical rotation, and large structures. The system is applicable to an unmanned configuration. Direction information is extracted in the form of a direction cosine analog.

  13. Find a NCCAOM Certified Practitioner

    MedlinePlus

    ... NCCAOM Certification Get Certified Get Recertified PDA Search Engine Find A Practitioner State Licensing Helpful NCCAOM Links ... My Status State Licensure Diplomates Recertification PDA Search Engine State Licensure Consumers Diplomate of Acupuncture Diplomate of ...

  14. Visual direction finding by fishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    The use of visual orientation, in the absence of landmarks, for underwater direction finding exercises by fishes is reviewed. Celestial directional clues observed directly near the water surface or indirectly at an asymptatic depth are suggested as possible orientation aids.

  15. Oral tuberculosis: unusual radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sansare, K; Gupta, A; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-05-01

    Oral tuberculosis and its radiographic findings are not commonly encountered in an oral and maxillofacial radiology practice. Literature has occasional mention of the radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis, which are still ambiguous. When affected, it is manifested majorly in the oral mucosa and rarely in the jaw bones. Here, we report certain unusual radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis which have been rarely mentioned in the literature. Four illustrative cases describe bony resorption, condylar resorption, resorption of the inferior border of the mandible and rarefaction of the alveolar bone as radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis. Follow up of the first case demonstrated regeneration of the condylar head after anti-Kochs therapy was completed, a hitherto unreported phenomenon. The importance of including tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of some of the unusual radiographic manifestations is emphasized.

  16. Generation of extreme ultraviolet vortex beams using computer generated holograms.

    PubMed

    Terhalle, Bernd; Langner, Andreas; Päivänranta, Birgit; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; David, Christian; Ekinci, Yasin

    2011-11-01

    We fabricate computer generated holograms for the generation of phase singularities at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths using electron beam lithography and demonstrate their ability to generate optical vortices in the nonzero diffraction orders. To this end, we observe the characteristic intensity distribution of the vortex beam and verify the helical phase structure interferometrically. The presented method forms the basis for further studies on singular light fields in the EUV frequency range, i.e., in EUV interference lithography. Since the method is purely achromatic, it may also find applications in various fields of x ray optics.

  17. Radiographic findings in liveborn triploidy.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K G; Houston, C S; Newman, D E; Wood, B J

    1989-01-01

    The detailed radiographic features of triploidy, a fatal congenital disorder with 69 chromosomes, have not previously been reported. Radiographs of ten liveborn infants with chromosomally confirmed triploidy showed six findings highly suggestive of this diagnosis: harlequin orbits, small anterior fontanelle, gracile ribs, diaphyseal overtubulation of long bones, upswept clavicles and antimongoloid pelvis. Sixteen other less specific findings showed many similarities to those found in trisomy 18.

  18. Ophthalmologic findings in biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Salbert, B A; Astruc, J; Wolf, B

    1993-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by neurological and cutaneous manifestations and metabolic abnormalities. We studied 78 symptomatic children and found that 51% had ophthalmologic abnormalities. These include infections (30%), optic neuropathies and visual disturbances (13%), motility disturbances (13%), retinal pigment changes (4%) and pupillary findings (1%). The most commonly reported findings are optic atrophy and keratoconjunctivities. Although the disorder can be effectively treated with biotin therapy, untreated children are at risk of developing permanent neuro-ophthalmic damage.

  19. Why Do First-Generation Students Fail?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Sanjay S.; Newbold, John J.; O'Rourke, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have determined factors contributing to first-generation student success. This study finds that first-generation students are less involved, have less social and financial support, and do not show a preference for active coping strategies. First-generation students report less social and academic satisfaction as well as lower…

  20. Why Do First-Generation Students Fail?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Sanjay S.; Newbold, John J.; O'Rourke, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have determined factors contributing to first-generation student success. This study finds that first-generation students are less involved, have less social and financial support, and do not show a preference for active coping strategies. First-generation students report less social and academic satisfaction as well as lower…

  1. Finding the Future That Fits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alison

    In 2000, a government-supported foundation called Careers the Next Generation (CNG) in Alberta, Canada, began coordinating summer internships for high school students in information and computer technology (ICT). The participating firms represented a mix of large and small private and public organizations in high-tech and other industries in the…

  2. Finding Nested Common Intervals Efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, Guillaume; Stoye, Jens

    In this paper, we study the problem of efficiently finding gene clusters formalized by nested common intervals between two genomes represented either as permutations or as sequences. Considering permutations, we give several algorithms whose running time depends on the size of the actual output rather than the output in the worst case. Indeed, we first provide a straightforward O(n 3) time algorithm for finding all nested common intervals. We reduce this complexity by providing an O(n 2) time algorithm computing an irredundant output. Finally, we show, by providing a third algorithm, that finding only the maximal nested common intervals can be done in linear time. Considering sequences, we provide solutions (modifications of previously defined algorithms and a new algorithm) for different variants of the problem, depending on the treatment one wants to apply to duplicated genes.

  3. Inductively generating Euler diagrams.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Gem; Rodgers, Peter; Howse, John; Zhang, Leishi

    2011-01-01

    Euler diagrams have a wide variety of uses, from information visualization to logical reasoning. In all of their application areas, the ability to automatically layout Euler diagrams brings considerable benefits. In this paper, we present a novel approach to Euler diagram generation. We develop certain graphs associated with Euler diagrams in order to allow curves to be added by finding cycles in these graphs. This permits us to build Euler diagrams inductively, adding one curve at a time. Our technique is adaptable, allowing the easy specification, and enforcement, of sets of well-formedness conditions; we present a series of results that identify properties of cycles that correspond to the well-formedness conditions. This improves upon other contributions toward the automated generation of Euler diagrams which implicitly assume some fixed set of well-formedness conditions must hold. In addition, unlike most of these other generation methods, our technique allows any abstract description to be drawn as an Euler diagram. To establish the utility of the approach, a prototype implementation has been developed.

  4. Acid corrosive esophagitis: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Muhletaler, C A; Gerlock, A J; de Soto, L; Halter, S A

    1980-06-01

    Thirty-nine esophagograms of 24 patients after ingestion of muriatic acid (27% HCI) in suicide attempts were reviewed. All esophagograms were obtained in the acute, subacute, and chronic phases. In the acute and subacute phases, the radiographic findings consisted of mucosal edema, submucosal edema or hemorrhage, ulcerations, sloughing of the mucosa, atony, and dilatation. Strictures of the esophagus were present in the chronic phase. These radiographic findings were not different from those found in alkaline corrosive esophagitis. The severity of the corrosive esophagitis is considered related to the concentration, amount, viscosity, and duration of contact between the caustic agent and the esophageal mucosa.

  5. Scintigraphic findings in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Russell, A S; Percy, J S; Jackson, F I

    1977-06-01

    A prospective study of bone scintigraphic findings has been carried out in 63 patients, firmly diagnosed as having ankylosing spondylitis. In addition to abnormal uptake of the radiotracer at the sacroiliac joints, a peripheral arthropathy has been a common finding, particularly in the proximal joints, occurring in up to 50% of patients. Increased uptake of radiotracer in the spine has also been found both diffusely and focally. Focal increases have been noted at the apophyseal joints in 40% of patients and in three patients with a sterile intervertebral diskitis, an unusual complication of this disease only diagnosed in two patients after bone scintigraphy.

  6. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  7. Finding Diamonds in the Rough

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    HighTower Software, Inc. has developed a commercial software application originally designed at JPL that helps users identify deviations from norms out of massive quantities of data. The commercial product is known as CyberGrid and the same software is still supporting NASA's Voyager, Galileo and Cassini missions. CyberGrid generates 3-D graphs of data and has been used in AIDS research as well as e-commerce applications.

  8. International Behavior Analysis: Preliminary Findings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-30

    Project. The Project’s basic goal is to provide a means for producing comparative, empirical generalizations about how, when, and why nations are...sources of behavior have been identified. These cpoens (or collections of source factors) include: (1) psychological; (2) political ; (3) societal; (4...nation initiate an external action? Thatis, after one or more conditions generate a decision occasion, how does the nation respond? Similar in nature is

  9. Going Local to Find Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities, such as exercise? Can I drive my car? What drugs should I take or stop taking? May I drink alcohol? If so, how much? What other problems could this injury cause? Will I need any special treatment or therapy? Finding local health and social services for survivors ...

  10. Writing audit findings: Be reasonable!

    SciTech Connect

    Girvin, N.W.

    1992-05-01

    A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address ``root cause`` as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a ``root problems`` approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee`s part. This in itself, is its own reward.

  11. Writing audit findings: Be reasonable

    SciTech Connect

    Girvin, N.W.

    1992-05-01

    A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address root cause'' as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a root problems'' approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee's part. This in itself, is its own reward.

  12. MEMS AO for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Mike; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Levine, B. Martin; Samuele, Rocco; Lane, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; hide

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for planet finding using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Adaptive Optics (AO). The use of a deformable mirror (DM) is described as a part of the instrument that was designed with a nulling interferometer. The strategy that is used is described in detail.

  13. Finding a Voice through Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Jose; Vizcaino, Alida

    2006-01-01

    One question guided this experimental study: What impact does the change from teacher training to educational research have on university teachers' methodology and attitudes to teaching? To find answers to this question, the researchers selected five teachers of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at the language centre of a private university on…

  14. Imaging findings of Pott's disease.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Garcia, Antonio; Sarria-Estrada, Silvana; Torrents-Odin, Carme; Casas-Gomila, Lourdes; Franquet, Elisa

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be an important public health problem in developed countries especially in deprived socioeconomic groups, older people, immunocompromised patients, drug-therapy resistant cases and the immigrant population. The spine is the most frequent location of musculoskeletal TB. The wide range of clinical presentations results in difficulties and delays in diagnosis. Advanced disease mimics other infections and malignancy. The diagnosis of spinal infections relies on three main factors: clinical symptoms, imaging and bacteriological culture. Advanced imaging such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) and Fluor18-Deoxiglucose Positron Emission Tomography combined with CT (F-18 FDG PET-CT) demonstrate lesion extent, serve as guide for biopsy with aspiration for culture, assist surgery planning and contribute to follow-up. Diagnosis of TB cannot be established solely on the basis of clinical tests or imaging findings and biopsy may be required. Differential diagnosis between tuberculous and pyogenic spondylitis is of clinical importance, but may be difficult on the basis of radiological findings alone. Findings not pathognomonic but favoring tuberculous etiology include: slow progression of lesions with late preservation of disk space, involvement of several contiguous segments, large intraosseous and paraspinal abscesses containing calcifications, and body collapse with kyphotic deformity. In this essay the highlights of TB imaging are reviewed through published literature. In addition, we review retrospectively the radiological findings of 48 patients with tuberculous spondylitis treated from 1993 to 2010. There were 23 male and 25 female patients with a mean age of 53 years.

  15. MR imaging findings of endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Cornelius, Rebecca; Cunnane, Mary Beth; Golnik, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is a sight-threatening ophthalmologic emergency. The clinical diagnosis is often challenging, and delayed diagnosis may exacerbate the poor visual prognosis. B-scan ultrasonography or spectral domain optical coherence tomography are imaging aids at the clinician’s office. Cross-sectional imaging such as CT and particularly MRI can also help in the assessment of disease extent or complications. MR imaging findings are rarely described in the literature. Here, we discuss the spectrum of imaging findings of endophthalmitis and correlate them with key anatomic and pathophysiologic details of the globe. Early disease is often subtle on MR imaging with thick uveal enhancement, while advanced disease demonstrates retinal/choroidal detachment, vitreal exudates and peribulbar inflammation. Other noninfectious inflammatory diseases of the globe can show similar findings; however, MR diffusion-weighted images help identify infectious exudates and evaluate response to therapy. Knowledge of the spectrum of imaging findings of this disease is important for radiologists and help in the management decision process. PMID:26915896

  16. Finding Geography Using Found Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Ellen J.

    2012-01-01

    Functional literacy is important in both English/language arts and geography. Using the "found poetry" strategy, students will summarize a piece of text, identify main ideas and find geographic connections. While using young adult literature is a great way to incorporate geography into English/language arts classroom, understanding of geography…

  17. Multi-Criteria Path Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, E.; Hunter, A.

    2012-07-01

    Path finding solutions are becoming a major part of many GIS applications including location based services and web-based GIS services. Most traditional path finding solutions are based on shortest path algorithms that tend to minimize the cost of travel from one point to another. These algorithms make use of some cost criteria that is usually an attribute of the edges in the graph network. Providing one shortest path limits user's flexibility when choosing a possible route, especially when more than one parameter is utilized to calculate cost (e.g., when length, number of traffic lights, and number of turns are used to calculate network cost.) K shortest path solutions tend to overcome this problem by providing second, third, and Kth shortest paths. These algorithms are efficient as long as the graphs edge weight does not change dynamically and no other parameters affect edge weights. In this paper we try to go beyond finding shortest paths based on some cost value, and provide all possible paths disregarding any parameter that may affect total cost. After finding all possible paths, we can rank the results by any parameter or combination of parameters, without a substantial increase in time complexity.

  18. Organizing pneumonia: chest HRCT findings*

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Igor Murad; Zanetti, Gláucia; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Araujo-Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza, Arthur Soares; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Mançano, Alexandre Dias; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of HRCT findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma of patients with organizing pneumonia. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of the HRCT scans of 36 adult patients (26 females and 10 males) with biopsy-proven organizing pneumonia. The patients were between 19 and 82 years of age (mean age, 56.2 years). The HRCT images were evaluated by two independent observers, discordant interpretations being resolved by consensus. RESULTS: The most common HRCT finding was that of ground-glass opacities, which were seen in 88.9% of the cases. The second most common finding was consolidation (in 83.3% of cases), followed by peribronchovascular opacities (in 52.8%), reticulation (in 38.9%), bronchiectasis (in 33.3%), interstitial nodules (in 27.8%), interlobular septal thickening (in 27.8%), perilobular pattern (in 22.2%), the reversed halo sign (in 16.7%), airspace nodules (in 11.1%), and the halo sign (in 8.3%). The lesions were predominantly bilateral, the middle and lower lung fields being the areas most commonly affected. CONCLUSIONS: Ground-glass opacities and consolidation were the most common findings, with a predominantly random distribution, although they were more common in the middle and lower thirds of the lungs. PMID:26176521

  19. Electroencephalographic findings in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Marcele Regine de; Velasques, Bruna Brandao; Cagy, Mauricio; Marques, Juliana Bittencourt; Teixeira, Silmar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2013-12-01

    Some studies have reported the importance of electroencephalography (EEG) as a method for investigating abnormal parameters in psychiatric disorders. Different findings in time and frequency domain analysis with regard to central nervous system arousal during acute panic states have already been obtained. This study aimed to systematically review the EEG findings in panic disorder (PD), discuss them having a currently accepted neuroanatomical hypothesis for this pathology as a basis, and identify limitations in the selected studies. Literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, using the keywords electroencephalography and panic disorder; 16 articles were selected. Despite the inconsistency of EEG findings in PD, the major conclusions about the absolute power of alpha and beta bands point to a decreased alpha power, while beta power tends to increase. Different asymmetry patterns were found between studies. Coherence studies pointed to a lower degree of inter-hemispheric functional connectivity at the frontal region and intra-hemispheric at the bilateral temporal region. Studies on possible related events showed changes in memory processing in PD patients when exposed to aversive stimuli. It was noticed that most findings reflect the current neurobiological hypothesis of PD, where inhibitory deficits of the prefrontal cortex related to the modulation of amygdala activity, and the subsequent activation of subcortical regions, may be responsible to trigger anxiety responses. We approached some important issues that need to be considered in further researches, especially the use of different methods for analyzing EEG signals.

  20. Findings from ATSDR's Health Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susten, Allan S.

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes findings from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry concerning the evaluation of data about hazardous substance release into the environment. Identifies the hazardous substances, exposure, health effects, and public health impact from 951 facilities identified on the National Priorities List (NPL) by the Environmental…

  1. Finding Cryptography in Object Code

    SciTech Connect

    Jason L. Wright

    2008-10-01

    Finding and identifying Cryptography is a growing concern in the malware analysis community. In this paper, a heuristic method for determining the likelihood that a given function contains a cryptographic algorithm is discussed and the results of applying this method in various environments is shown. The algorithm is based on frequency analysis of opcodes that make up each function within a binary.

  2. 1980-1981 Evaluation Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    This volume summarizes the results of evaluation and testing activities carried out in the Austin, Texas, Independent School District (AISD) during the 1980-81 school year. The text consists of five parts: Section one highlights important findings in the areas of Title I Schoolwide Projects, compensatory programs, early childhood programs,…

  3. A Typology for Generating Needs Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossett, Allison

    1982-01-01

    Reviews needs assessment history and extant techniques and offers a model for generating needs assessments based upon five general purposes of front-end analysis and their corresponding types of items--problem finding; problem selecting; knowledge/skill proving; finding feelings; and cause finding. Thirty-three sources are appended. (EJS)

  4. A Generation Immersed in Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Amy M.

    2006-01-01

    This article briefly reports the findings of "Generation M: Media in the Lives of 8-18 Year-Olds," a study conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Stanford University researchers. The report studied media use a nationally representative sample of more than 2,000 3rd through 12th graders in the United States. The study found that although the…

  5. How to find RNA thermometers

    PubMed Central

    Righetti, Francesco; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is one of the decisive signals that a mammalian pathogen has entered its warm-blooded host. Among the many ways to register temperature changes, bacteria often use temperature-modulated structures in the untranslated region of mRNAs. In this article, we describe how such RNA thermometers (RNATs) have been discovered one by one upstream of heat shock and virulence genes in the past, and how next-generation sequencing approaches are able to reveal novel temperature-responsive RNA structures on a global scale. PMID:25279353

  6. [Typical findings of maltreated children].

    PubMed

    Rauch, E; Zinka, B; Schneider, K; Penning, R; Eisenmenger, W

    2006-06-15

    Childhood maltreatment manifests in a variety of forms and the underlying causes are manifold. In contrast to other offences involving physical injury, reporting behavior has, statistically speaking, remained unchanged. Patterns of injury must first be established and documented, and this involves a complete examination of the child's body. Depending on the constellation of findings, a radiological diagnosis is usually necessary. When all the findings have been collected, the further steps to be taken--where indicated a report to the police--must be discussed. All the evidence must be recorded, and photos obtained of all externally visible injuries before they fade. It is not the task of the physician to develop criminalistic ambitions, for example, by grilling (a parent) on the cause of the injuries. However, he/she has a duty to do everything necessary to protect the well-being of the child.

  7. Incidental findings on brain and spine imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Maher, Cormac O; Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the utilization of diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine in children has increased dramatically, leading to a corresponding increase in the detection of incidental findings of the central nervous system. Patients with unexpected findings on imaging are often referred for subspecialty evaluation. Even with rational use of diagnostic imaging and subspecialty consultation, the diagnostic process will always generate unexpected findings that must be explained and managed. Familiarity with the most common findings that are discovered incidentally on diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine will assist the pediatrician in providing counseling to families and in making recommendations in conjunction with a neurosurgeon, when needed, regarding additional treatments and prognosis.

  8. Angiographic findings in tumoral calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Neeman, Ziv; Wood, Bradford J

    2003-01-01

    Tumor calcinosis is uncommon, typically manifesting as paraarticular, extracapsular soft tissue deposits containing amorphous calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate, with associated hydroxyapatite crystal. CT and MRI are the primary diagnostic radiological tools evaluating these lesions. Primary treatment is early surgical excision with wide margins, as there is a high recurrence rate. We describe the angiographic findings in tumoral calcinosis, demonstrating hypervascularity beyond the calcified mass periphery. Exact margin definition with angiography may influence management and surgical approach.

  9. Radiological Findings of Michel Aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Umul, Ayse; Demirtas, Hakan; Celik, Ahmet Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital abnormalities of the inner ear is the most common cause of neurosensory hearing loss. Michel inner ear deformity is a rare developmental anomaly refers to the total aplasia of the inner ear. It is caused by developmental arrest of otic placode early during the third week of gestational age. Case report: We have discussed here that three year old girl diagnosed Michel aplasia with temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and temporal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. PMID:27482139

  10. Breast Ultrasound: Indications and Findings.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Kathleen R

    2016-06-01

    Breast ultrasound is a widely used adjuvant to mammography for the detection of breast cancer. This chapter will review some of the basic ultrasound technical factors and techniques, describe findings on ultrasound with an emphasis on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System terminology, and present the indications for breast ultrasound. New innovations in breast ultrasound, such as elastography, ultrasound contrast, 3-dimensional, and automated whole-breast ultrasound, will be reviewed. Ultrasound-guided breast procedures are also presented.

  11. Electroencephalographic Findings in Posthypoxic Myoclonus.

    PubMed

    van Zijl, J C; Beudel, M; vd Hoeven, H J; Lange, F; Tijssen, M A J; Elting, J W J

    2016-05-01

    The physical examination findings of early posthypoxic myoclonus (PHM) are associated with poor prognosis. Recent findings indicate that patients with multifocal PHM, assumed to have a cortical origin, have a comparable outcome to resuscitated patients without PHM. Generalized PHM, assumed to have a subcortical myoclonus origin, is still associated with a bad clinical outcome. It is not known whether the electroencephalographic (EEG) findings differ between the multifocal and generalized myoclonus groups nor is the clinical significance clearly defined. Forty-three patients with PHM were retrospectively derived from an EEG database. Patients were categorized as having multifocal (i), generalized (ii), or undetermined (iii) PHM. Outcome was expressed in cerebral performance category scores. The EEG background was categorized into isoelectric (I), low voltage (II), burst suppression (III), status epilepticus (SE; IV), diffuse slowing (V), and mild encephalopathic or normal (VI). 17 patients had generalized PHM and 23 had multifocal PHM (3 undetermined). The EEG showed more SE in generalized compared to multifocal PHM (64% vs 13%, P< .001). Diffuse slowing was more often present in multifocal PHM (52% vs 17%, P < .05). Early-onset myoclonus occurred significantly more often in generalized PHM, and early generalized PHM was invariantly associated with poor outcome. In conclusion, patients with generalized PHM showed more SE. These EEG findings might be either subcortical corollaries or primarily cortical phenomena. Our retrospective results conflict with currently used clinical criteria for myoclonus classification, and we suggest that more refined difference may be needed for accurate assessment of PHM. To better understand PHM, prospective research with standardized clinical assessment and quantitative EEG analysis is needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Painful heel: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Narváez, J; Ortega, R; Aguilera, C; Sánchez, A; Andía, E

    2000-01-01

    Heel pain is a common and frequently disabling clinical complaint that may be caused by a broad spectrum of osseous or soft-tissue disorders. These disorders are classified on the basis of anatomic origin and predominant location of heel pain to foster a better understanding of this complaint. The disorders include plantar fascial lesions (fasciitis, rupture, fibromatosis, xanthoma), tendinous lesions (tendinitis, tenosynovitis), osseous lesions (fractures, bone bruises, osteomyelitis, tumors), bursal lesions (retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilleal bursitis), tarsal tunnel syndrome, and heel plantar fat pad abnormalities. With its superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar capability, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can help determine the cause of heel pain and help assess the extent and severity of the disease in ambiguous or clinically equivocal cases. Careful analysis of MR imaging findings and correlation of these findings with patient history and findings at physical examination can suggest a specific diagnosis in most cases. The majority of patients with heel pain can be successfully treated conservatively, but in cases requiring surgery (eg, plantar fascia rupture in competitive athletes, deeply infiltrating plantar fibromatosis, masses causing tarsal tunnel syndrome), MR imaging is especially useful in planning surgical treatment by showing the exact location and extent of the lesion.

  13. BAEP and autopsy findings in Wallenberg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amantini, A; Arnetoli, G; Rossi, L; Fenzi; Salviati, A; Rizzuto, N; Zappoli, R

    1982-10-01

    BAEPs were recorded in a 70-year-old man who had developed symptoms indicative of Wallenberg syndrome. He died, of extracerebral causes, shortly after hospitalization and an autopsy study was done on the brainstem lesions. Right ear stimulation disclosed BAEP abnormalities, but gave no indication of the level of the ischemic disorder. Histopathological examination showed a typical right dorsolateral medullary infarct. A detailed study of the acoustic pathways demonstrated their anatomical integrity. These findings confirm the uncertainty that still exists as to the exact location and type of generators of BAEP components. They suggest, moreover, that BAEPs can give objective evidence of functional impairment of brainstem acoustic structures even in the absence of persistent anatomical damage.

  14. A compilation of jet finding algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, B.; Meier, K.

    1992-12-31

    Technical descriptions of jet finding algorithms currently in use in p{anti p} collider experiments (CDF, UA1, UA2), e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments and Monte-Carlo event generators (LUND programs, ISAJET) have been collected. For the hadron collider experiments, the clustering methods fall into two categories: cone algorithms and nearest-neighbor algorithms. In addition, UA2 has employed a combination of both methods for some analysis. While there are clearly differences between the cone and nearest-neighbor algorithms, the authors have found that there are also differences among the cone algorithms in the details of how the centroid of a cone cluster is located and how the E{sub T} and P{sub T} of the jet are defined. The most commonly used jet algorithm in electron-positron experiments is the JADE-type cluster algorithm. Five various incarnations of this approach have been described.

  15. Finding Direction in the Search for Selection.

    PubMed

    Thiltgen, Grant; Dos Reis, Mario; Goldstein, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Tests for positive selection have mostly been developed to look for diversifying selection where change away from the current amino acid is often favorable. However, in many cases we are interested in directional selection where there is a shift toward specific amino acids, resulting in increased fitness in the species. Recently, a few methods have been developed to detect and characterize directional selection on a molecular level. Using the results of evolutionary simulations as well as HIV drug resistance data as models of directional selection, we compare two such methods with each other, as well as against a standard method for detecting diversifying selection. We find that the method to detect diversifying selection also detects directional selection under certain conditions. One method developed for detecting directional selection is powerful and accurate for a wide range of conditions, while the other can generate an excessive number of false positives.

  16. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  17. [The chest CT findings and pathologic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideo

    2009-08-01

    The past research of the radiologic manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis in Japan was based on morphological pathology of the untreated patient autopsy. I would like to show the chest CT scan of tuberculosis diseases with caseous granuloma at its exudative reaction, proliferative reaction, productive reaction, cirrhotic reaction until self cure. This progress reflects the normal cell mediated immunological responses. Also I would like to show the cavitation of granuloma, which results from liquefaction of caseous materials during the course and results in the formation of the source of infection. And finally I would like to show the morphological differences of acinous lesion, acino-nodular lesion and caseous lobular pneumonia. These differences reflect the amount of bacilli disseminated in the peripheral parts under the lobules. In this study, I do not show old age cases and HIV positive cases, who do not form typical granuloma due to the decreased cell mediated immnunity and whose X ray findings are atypical.

  18. Endoscopic findings in uninvestigated dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to know the causes of dyspepsia to establish the therapeutic approach. Dyspepsia is a frequent syndrome in our country, where there are restrictions to endoscopy and high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This study aimed to assess the endoscopic findings of the syndrome, in an outpatient screening clinic of a tertiary hospital in São Paulo. Methods Outpatients with uninvestigated dyspepsia, according to Rome III criteria, answered a dyspepsia questionnaire and underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The Rapid Urease Test was applied to fragments of the antral mucosa and epidemiological data were collected from the studied population. Organic dyspepsia findings were analyzed with different variables to verify statistically significant associations. Results Three hundred and six patients were included and 282 were analyzed in the study. The mean age was 44 years and women comprised 65% of the sample. Forty-five percent of the patients reported alarm symptoms. Functional dyspepsia was found in 66% of the patients (20% with normal endoscopy results and 46% with gastritis), 18% had GERD and 13% had ulcers (duodenal in 9% and gastric in 4%). Four cases of gastric adenocarcinoma were identified (1.4%), one without alarm characteristics, 1 case of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and 1 case of gastric lymphoma. The prevalence of H. pylori was 54% and infection, age and smoking status were associated with organic dyspepsia. The age of 48 years was indicative of alarm signs. Conclusions The endoscopic diagnosis of uninvestigated dyspepsia in our setting showed a predominance of functional disease, whereas cancer was an uncommon finding, despite the high prevalence of H. pylori. Organic dyspepsia was associated with infection, age and smoking status. PMID:24499444

  19. MRI findings in Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Raval, Monali; Kumari, Rima; Dung, Aldrin Anthony Dung; Guglani, Bhuvnesh; Gupta, Nitij; Gupta, Rohit

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7), abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  20. Lithium nephropathy: unique sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Donald N; Park, Joseph; Laing, Faye C

    2012-04-01

    This case series describes a unique sonographic appearance consisting of numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci seen on renal sonograms of 10 adult patients receiving chronic lithium therapy. Clinically, chronic renal insufficiency was present in 6 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2. Sonography showed numerous microcysts and punctate echogenic foci. Computed tomography in 5 patients confirmed microcysts and microcalcifications, which were fewer in number than on sonography. Magnetic resonance imaging in 2 patients confirmed microcysts in each case. Renal biopsy in 1 patient showed chronic interstitial nephritis, microcysts, and tubular dilatation. The diagnosis of lithium nephropathy should be considered when sonography shows these findings.

  1. Radiologic findings in primary hyperoxaluria

    SciTech Connect

    Martijn, A.; Thijn, C.J.P.

    1982-03-01

    Six out of seven patients with primary hyperoxaluria showed various degrees of oxalosis. The radiographic manifestations differ between patients younger than 15 years and those older than 45 years. The mild manifestations in children, only urolithiasis, can be explained by the, as yet, unimpaired renal function. The renal function in the older patients, with extensive pathologic changes like nephrocalcinosis, urolithiasis, soft-tissue calcification, and osseous changes, is very poor. The findings of extensive softtissue calcification and the bony changes are not in complete agreement with those in the literature.

  2. Finding the right academic job.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, Irene M; Laubach, Jacob P; Soiffer, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    The career path in academic medicine is full of exciting opportunities as well as great achievements and discoveries. In this review, we discuss various obstacles that fellows face as they explore career opportunities in academic hematology/oncology. We also share thoughts on what might be considered steps for success in maneuvering through a search for the "right" position. We discuss several aims including how to define career goals early on, keys to success in an academic career, how to look for an academic job, successful points for the interview process, and how to negotiate a job offer. Finally, we discuss some roadblocks and limitations of academic careers and promotions. These limitations, frustrations and roadblocks should not be a deterrent from pursuing such a great role in the scientific field. This is a new generation of scientific discovery, improvement in healthcare and great advances in research.

  3. Finding translation in stress research.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Ahmad R; Holmes, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    In our ongoing efforts to advance understanding of human diseases, translational research across rodents and humans on stress-related mental disorders stands out as a field that is producing discoveries that illuminate mechanisms of risk and pathophysiology at a brisk rate. Here we offer a Perspective on how a productive translational research dialog between preclinical models and clinical studies of these disorders is being powered by an ever-developing appreciation of the shared neural circuits and genetic architecture that moderate the response to stress across species. Working from these deep foundations, we discuss the approaches, both traditional and innovative, that have the potential to deliver a new generation of risk biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for stress-related disorders.

  4. Electrical power generating system. [for windpowered generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An alternating current power generation system adopted to inject power in an already powered power line is discussed. The power generating system solves to adjustably coup an induction motor, as a generator, to an ac power line wherein the motor and power line are connected through a triac. The triac is regulated to normally turn on at a relatively late point in each half cycle of its operation, whereby at less than operating speed, and thus when the induction motor functions as a motor rather than as a generator, power consumption from the line is substantially reduced. The principal application will be for windmill powered generation.

  5. Net Generation or Digital Natives: Is There a Distinct New Generation Entering University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Chris; Ramanau, Ruslan; Cross, Simon; Healing, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article reports key findings from the first phase of a research project investigating Net generation age students as they encounter e-learning at five universities in England. We take a critical view of the idea of a distinct generation which has been described using various terms including Net generation and Digital Natives and explore age…

  6. Net Generation or Digital Natives: Is There a Distinct New Generation Entering University?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Chris; Ramanau, Ruslan; Cross, Simon; Healing, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article reports key findings from the first phase of a research project investigating Net generation age students as they encounter e-learning at five universities in England. We take a critical view of the idea of a distinct generation which has been described using various terms including Net generation and Digital Natives and explore age…

  7. Audiologic findings in Pfeiffer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Urmen; Rosen, Heather; Mulliken, John B; Gopen, Quinton; Meara, John G; Rogers, Gary F

    2010-09-01

    Hearing loss has been described in patients with certain craniosynostotic syndromes but is poorly defined in Pfeiffer syndrome (PS). Our objective was to characterize the otologic and audiologic findings in PS. The records of PS patients evaluated at our craniofacial center over a 30-year period were culled. Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis and formal audiologic examination were included. Diagnostic criteria were characteristic mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 or 2 (FGFR1, FGFR2) or, in the absence of genetic testing, typical clinical findings of PS as determined by a clinical geneticist or the most senior author. Twenty patients met the inclusion criteria, and all had hearing loss. Twenty patients had traditional audiologic testing: 14 (70%) had pure conductive loss (minor to severe), and 3 (15%) had a mixed conductive/sensorineural loss (minor to severe). Two additional patients had hearing loss by Behavioral Observational Audiometry (sound fields method). One patient with early conductive hearing loss was subsequently determined to have a pure sensorineural deficit. Nine patients (45%) had permanent hearing loss significant enough to require audiologic amplification. All patients with PS demonstrated hearing loss, although the severity and the anatomic basis (ie., neural vs conductive) were variable. Conductive hearing loss, possibly caused by structural abnormalities, was most common. Sensorineural hearing loss was less common and may be related to the effect of FGFR mutations on cranial nerve and/or inner-ear development.

  8. Atelosteogenesis type I: autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Annasu; Wainwright, Helen C; Beighton, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We have documented the clinical, radiologic, and autopsy findings of 2 fetuses with atelosteogenesis type I, aged 22 and 17 weeks. This rare autosomal dominant lethal skeletal dysplasia is caused by mutation in the FNLB gene. The 17-week-old fetus had some features of atelosteogenesis type II, notably "hitchhiker thumbs," a cleft palate, and midfacial flattening. The histologic demonstration of giant cells in the growth plate cartilage confirmed the diagnosis of atelosteogenesis type I in both fetuses, thereby facilitating accurate prediction of recurrence risks for the parents of the affected fetuses. Autopsy findings included tracheal narrowing and stenosis with pulmonary hypoplasia in both fetuses. Renal microcysts and abnormal branching of the pancreatic duct were also present in 1 of the fetuses, and malrotation of the caecum and retinal dysplasia involving the optic nerve were identified in the other. Postmortem and histologic investigations play an important role in the elucidation of the genetic micromelic skeletal disorders that are lethal in the fetus and neonate.

  9. Immunological findings in hemp workers.

    PubMed

    Zuskin, E; Kanceljak, B; Schachter, E N; Witek, T J; Maayani, S; Goswami, S; Marom, Z; Rienzi, N

    1992-12-01

    Immunological status and its relation to respiratory findings were studied in 42 female textile workers occupationally exposed to hemp dust and in 49 female control workers. Skin prick tests with hemp or flax dust extracts from different parts of the mill in hemp workers demonstrated the following frequencies of positive tests to antigens: a mixture of hemp and flax extracts (64%), followed by flax extracts (48%), hemp from combing machines (41%), hemp from carding machines (38%), hemp from spinning and weaving machines (33%), and hemp from softening machines (20%). The prevalence of positive skin tests to hemp or flax allergens in control workers was consistently lower, ranging from 21 to 5%. Increased total serum IgE was recorded in 35.7% of hemp workers compared to only 5.0% of control workers (P < 0.05). Hemp workers with positive skin tests had significantly higher prevalences of chronic respiratory symptoms than those with negative skin tests. There were, however, no differences for acute symptoms between workers with positive and negative skin tests. Across-shift changes and baseline lung function were not different when compared by immunologic status. We showed additionally that a water-soluble extract of hemp dust causes a dose-related contraction of nonsensitized guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle when studied in vitro. Our results suggest that frequent immunologic abnormalities can be documented in hemp workers but, with the exception of chronic respiratory symptoms, in general, these do not correlate with respiratory findings.

  10. Using Qualitative Metasummary to Synthesize Qualitative and Quantitative Descriptive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Barroso, Julie; Voils, Corrine I.

    2008-01-01

    The new imperative in the health disciplines to be more methodologically inclusive has generated a growing interest in mixed research synthesis, or the integration of qualitative and quantitative research findings. Qualitative metasummary is a quantitatively oriented aggregation of qualitative findings originally developed to accommodate the distinctive features of qualitative surveys. Yet these findings are similar in form and mode of production to the descriptive findings researchers often present in addition to the results of bivariate and multivariable analyses. Qualitative metasummary, which includes the extraction, grouping, and formatting of findings, and the calculation of frequency and intensity effect sizes, can be used to produce mixed research syntheses and to conduct a posteriori analyses of the relationship between reports and findings. PMID:17243111

  11. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  12. Magellan: Principal Venus science findings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    This is a brief summary of the science findings of the Magellan mission, principally based on data from the radar system. Future plans for Magellan include acquisition of high resolution gravity data from a nearly circular orbit and atmospheric drag and occultation experiments. The Magellan science results represent the combined effort of more than 100 Magellan investigators and their students and colleagues. More extensive discussions can be found in the August and October, 1992 issues of the Journal of Geophysical Research, Planets. The Magellan mission's scientific objectives were to provide a global characterization of landforms and tectonic features; to distinguish and understand impact processes; to define and explain erosion, deposition, and chemical processes; and to model the interior density distribution. All but the last objective, which requires new global gravity data, have been accomplished, or we have acquired the data that are required to accomplish them.

  13. Imaging findings in pulmonary vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Castañer, Eva; Alguersuari, Anna; Andreu, Marta; Gallardo, Xavier; Spinu, Cristina; Mata, Josep M

    2012-12-01

    Vasculitis is a destructive inflammatory process affecting blood vessels. Pulmonary vasculitis may develop secondary to other conditions or constitute a primary idiopathic disorder. Thoracic involvement is most common in primary idiopathic large-vessel vasculitides (Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Behçet disease) and primary antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitides (Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Primary pulmonary vasculitides are rare, and their signs and symptoms are nonspecific, overlapping with those of infections, connective tissue diseases, and malignancies. The radiologic findings in primary pulmonary vasculitis vary widely and can include vessel wall thickening, nodular or cavitary lesions, ground-glass opacities, and consolidations, among others. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage usually results from primary small-vessel vasculitis in the lungs. To diagnose vasculitis, medical teams must recognize characteristic combinations of clinical, radiologic, laboratory, and histopathologic features.

  14. Dental findings in Lowe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M; Odell, E W; Sheehy, E C

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the dental findings of a child with the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe. The genetic abnormality in this condition results in an inborn error of inositol phosphate metabolism. Renal tubular dysfunction leads to metabolic acidosis and phosphaturia. At 4 years, generalised mobility of all primary teeth was noted. It is postulated that a defective inositol phosphate metabolism was responsible for the periodontal pathology found in this case. This is in direct contrast with previous reports of prolonged retention of primary teeth in children with this condition. Histology of extracted primary incisors demonstrated enlarged pulp chambers and mildly dysplastic dentin formation. This is consistent with a chronic subrachitic state, a known feature of Lowe syndrome, but no prominent interglobular dentin was present.

  15. Finding reliable information about vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Diego; Myers, Martin G

    2011-05-01

    Misinformation about vaccines confuses parents who may delay or refuse vaccines for their children, which places them and others at risk of vaccine-preventable diseases. Many parents do not understand the risks and severity of these diseases but also are unaware that they are uninformed. There are a number of favorable factors available for educating parents about these diseases, their prevention, and how to counter misinformation: most parents are seeking a trusting health care relationship; they want more information; they appreciate guidance; and they are looking for means to validate the information that they find. These factors represent opportunities to enhance confidence in immunization programs by providing parents with the tools that they need.

  16. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  17. MHD Power Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Arthur; Rosa, Richard J.

    1975-01-01

    Explains the operation of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator and advantages of the system over coal, oil or nuclear powered generators. Details the development of MHD generators in the United States and Soviet Union. (CP)

  18. Finding and Not Finding Rat Perirhinal Neuronal Responses to Novelty

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Robert U.; Brown, Malcolm W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is much evidence that the perirhinal cortex of both rats and monkeys is important for judging the relative familiarity of visual stimuli. In monkeys many studies have found that a proportion of perirhinal neurons respond more to novel than familiar stimuli. There are fewer studies of perirhinal neuronal responses in rats, and those studies based on exploration of objects, have raised into question the encoding of stimulus familiarity by rat perirhinal neurons. For this reason, recordings of single neuronal activity were made from the perirhinal cortex of rats so as to compare responsiveness to novel and familiar stimuli in two different behavioral situations. The first situation was based upon that used in “paired viewing” experiments that have established rat perirhinal differences in immediate early gene expression for novel and familiar visual stimuli displayed on computer monitors. The second situation was similar to that used in the spontaneous object recognition test that has been widely used to establish the involvement of rat perirhinal cortex in familiarity discrimination. In the first condition 30 (25%) of 120 perirhinal neurons were visually responsive; of these responsive neurons 19 (63%) responded significantly differently to novel and familiar stimuli. In the second condition eight (53%) of 15 perirhinal neurons changed activity significantly in the vicinity of objects (had “object fields”); however, for none (0%) of these was there a significant activity change related to the familiarity of an object, an incidence significantly lower than for the first condition. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed. It is argued that the failure to find recognition‐related neuronal responses while exploring objects is related to its detectability by the measures used, rather than the absence of all such signals in perirhinal cortex. Indeed, as shown by the results, such signals are found when a different methodology is used.

  19. Power Generation for River and Tidal Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, Eduard; Wright, Alan; Gevorgian, Vahan; Donegan, James; Marnagh, Cian; McEntee, Jarlath

    2016-06-01

    Renewable energy sources are the second largest contributor to global electricity production, after fossil fuels. The integration of renewable energy continued to grow in 2014 against a backdrop of increasing global energy consumption and a dramatic decline in oil prices during the second half of the year. As renewable generation has become less expensive during recent decades, and it becomes more accepted by the global population, the focus on renewable generation has expanded from primarily wind and solar to include new types with promising future applications, such as hydropower generation, including river and tidal generation. Today, hydropower is considered one of the most important renewable energy sources. In river and tidal generation, the input resource flow is slower but also steadier than it is in wind or solar generation, yet the level of water turbulent flow may vary from one place to another. This report focuses on hydrokinetic power conversion.

  20. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRIC GOVERNORS, CIRCUITS, VACUUM SEALS, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, VACUUM, ELECTRODES, FINISHES, SURFACE...FINISHING, SURFACE PROPERTIES, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, FIELD EMISSION.

  1. ELECTROSTATIC POWER GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROSTATIC GENERATORS , POWER EQUIPMENT, ELECTRICAL INSULATION, FIELD EMISSION, ELECTRODES, VACUUM, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ANODES, CATHODES, POLISHES...DIELECTRICS, COATINGS, PRESSURE, HARDNESS, PULSE GENERATORS , TRANSFORMERS, VACUUM SEALS, EQUATIONS.

  2. Mental Findings in Trauma Victims

    PubMed Central

    CAN, İsmail Özgür; DEMİROĞLU UYANIKER, Zehra; ULAŞ, Halis; KARABAĞ, Gökmen; CİMİLLİ, Can; SALAÇİN, Serpil

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In medico-legal evaluation of trauma patients, the bio-psychological effects of the trauma and the severity of the injuries require to be evaluated. In this study, assuming the fact that psychiatric assessment is not taken into consideration in physical trauma cases, we planned to show the presence of psychological trauma in our medico-legally evaluated patients who presented with different types of traumas and to review the mental findings and diagnoses in trauma victims. Method We retrospectively analyzed the hospital records of 1975 patients aged 18 years or older who presented to the Department of Forensic Medicine at Dokuz Eylül University School of Medicine for medico-legal evaluation between 1999 and 2009. Psychiatric assessment was performed in 142 patients by the Department of Psychiatry. The data contained in medico-legal reports and patient records were then examined with respect to patients’ age, gender, nature of traumatic events, psychiatric diagnoses, descriptive characteristics of the patients, severity of trauma and past history of mental disorder and trauma experience. Results of the medicolegal evaluations were also analyzed. Result Of the 142 patients, 80 (56.3%) were female and their average age was 40.30±17.17 years. The most frequent traumatic events were traffic accidents (29.6%) and violence-related blunt force trauma (28.9%). When the distribution of the most common psychiatric diagnoses was examined, it was found that anxiety disorders were found in 69 cases (48.6%), adjustment disorders were found in 16 cases (11.3%) and mood disorders were found in 12 cases (8.5%). Among anxiety disorders, acute stress disorder (n=39) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n=27) were the most common ones. In 27 cases of the 142, it was determined that, psychiatric symptoms and findings did not meet the diagnostic criteria of any psychiatric disorder. Diagnosis of psychiatric disorder was not significantly related with traumatic

  3. Knowledge translation of research findings.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Eccles, Martin P; Lavis, John N; Hill, Sophie J; Squires, Janet E

    2012-05-31

    One of the most consistent findings from clinical and health services research is the failure to translate research into practice and policy. As a result of these evidence-practice and policy gaps, patients fail to benefit optimally from advances in healthcare and are exposed to unnecessary risks of iatrogenic harms, and healthcare systems are exposed to unnecessary expenditure resulting in significant opportunity costs. Over the last decade, there has been increasing international policy and research attention on how to reduce the evidence-practice and policy gap. In this paper, we summarise the current concepts and evidence to guide knowledge translation activities, defined as T2 research (the translation of new clinical knowledge into improved health). We structure the article around five key questions: what should be transferred; to whom should research knowledge be transferred; by whom should research knowledge be transferred; how should research knowledge be transferred; and, with what effect should research knowledge be transferred? We suggest that the basic unit of knowledge translation should usually be up-to-date systematic reviews or other syntheses of research findings. Knowledge translators need to identify the key messages for different target audiences and to fashion these in language and knowledge translation products that are easily assimilated by different audiences. The relative importance of knowledge translation to different target audiences will vary by the type of research and appropriate endpoints of knowledge translation may vary across different stakeholder groups. There are a large number of planned knowledge translation models, derived from different disciplinary, contextual (i.e., setting), and target audience viewpoints. Most of these suggest that planned knowledge translation for healthcare professionals and consumers is more likely to be successful if the choice of knowledge translation strategy is informed by an assessment of the

  4. Knowledge translation of research findings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the most consistent findings from clinical and health services research is the failure to translate research into practice and policy. As a result of these evidence-practice and policy gaps, patients fail to benefit optimally from advances in healthcare and are exposed to unnecessary risks of iatrogenic harms, and healthcare systems are exposed to unnecessary expenditure resulting in significant opportunity costs. Over the last decade, there has been increasing international policy and research attention on how to reduce the evidence-practice and policy gap. In this paper, we summarise the current concepts and evidence to guide knowledge translation activities, defined as T2 research (the translation of new clinical knowledge into improved health). We structure the article around five key questions: what should be transferred; to whom should research knowledge be transferred; by whom should research knowledge be transferred; how should research knowledge be transferred; and, with what effect should research knowledge be transferred? Discussion We suggest that the basic unit of knowledge translation should usually be up-to-date systematic reviews or other syntheses of research findings. Knowledge translators need to identify the key messages for different target audiences and to fashion these in language and knowledge translation products that are easily assimilated by different audiences. The relative importance of knowledge translation to different target audiences will vary by the type of research and appropriate endpoints of knowledge translation may vary across different stakeholder groups. There are a large number of planned knowledge translation models, derived from different disciplinary, contextual (i.e., setting), and target audience viewpoints. Most of these suggest that planned knowledge translation for healthcare professionals and consumers is more likely to be successful if the choice of knowledge translation strategy is informed by

  5. Neuroimaging findings in primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, J N; Berman Rosa, M; Gouin, J-P; Dang-Vu, T T

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques have accelerated progress in the study and understanding of sleep in humans. Neuroimaging studies in primary insomnia remain relatively few, considering the important prevalence of this disorder in the general population. This review examines the contribution of functional and structural neuroimaging to our current understanding of primary insomnia. Functional studies during sleep provided support for the hyperarousal theory of insomnia. Functional neuroimaging also revealed abnormalities in cognitive and emotional processing in primary insomnia. Results from structural studies suggest neuroanatomical alterations in primary insomnia, mostly in the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. However, these results are not well replicated across studies. A few magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies revealed abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and bioenergetics in primary insomnia. The inconsistencies among neuroimaging findings on insomnia are likely due to clinical heterogeneity, differences in imaging and overall diversity of techniques and designs employed. Larger samples, replication, as well as innovative methodologies are necessary for the progression of this perplexing, yet promising area of research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. MR findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Uhl, M; Pawlik, H; Laubenberger, J; Darge, K; Baborie, A; Korinthenberg, R; Langer, M

    1998-07-01

    We present four cases with combined hypoplasia of the cerebellum and the ventral pons-pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). PCH represents an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with fetal onset. The disease is rare, with less than 20 cases having been reported. The main findings of PCH and the inclusion criteria for our cases can be summarised as progressive microcephaly from birth, pontocerebellar hypoplasia documented by MRI and marked chorea, which may change, later in childhood, to more dystonic patterns. The cerebral cortex becomes progressively atrophic. Motor and mental development are delayed, and epilepsy, mainly tonic-clonic seizures, is frequent. The MRI features in all of our cases were: (1) Hypoplastic cerebellum situated close to the tentorium. The hypoplastic cerebellum has a reduced number of folia, in contrast to the normal number of thin folia in simple cerebellar atrophy. (2) The cerebellar hemispheres are reduced to bean-like or wing-like structures. The cerebellar hemispheres appear to 'float' in the posterior fossa. (3) Markedly hypoplastic ventral pons. (4) Slight atrophy of the supratentorial gyral pattern. (5) Dilated cerebromedullary cistern and fourth ventricle. (6) Delayed myelination of the white matter. (7) No significant disorganisation of brain architecture and no severe corpus callosum defect.

  7. Hodgkin's disease: update of findings.

    PubMed

    Pileri, S; Sabattini, E; Tazzari, P L; Gherlinzoni, F; Zucchini, L; Bigerna, B; Leoncini, L; Rosso, R; Stein, H; Falini, B

    1991-01-01

    The authors critically review the problem of Hodgkin's disease (HD) in the light of new morphological, immunohistochemical, kinetic, genotypic, and virological findings. These support the lymphoid origin of neoplastic Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells, because of regular expression of the CD30 lymphoid activation antigen and frequent detection of B- or T-cell phenotypic and/or genotypic markers. It is possible to hypothesize the release of cytokines by tumoral elements as well as the presence of specific cytokine receptors on their surface. This might explain some clinical and pathological features, such as fever, loss of weight, eosinophilia and attraction of reactive elements that make up the composite cellular milieu of typical HD. Integration of monoclonal EBV in the genoma of neoplastic elements has repeatedly been shown, and this might play an essential role in the pathogenesis of the disease. On the basis of present concepts, the borderlines between HD and some categories of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas--especially the anaplastic large cell forms--have become somewhat blurred. Additional research work in the field of HD is desirable and might pave the way for new and more effective therapeutic approaches, designed on the basis of the natural history of the neoplasm.

  8. Somatosensory findings in postherpetic neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Nurmikko, T; Bowsher, D

    1990-01-01

    Somatic sensory perception thresholds (warm, cold, hot pain, touch, pinprick, vibration, two-point discrimination), allodynia and skin temperature were assessed in the affected area of 42 patients with unilateral postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and 20 patients who had had unilateral shingles not followed by PHN (NoPHN), and in the mirror-image area on the other side. There was no difference between the two groups for age or length of time after the acute herpes zoster infection. The PHN group showed significant changes in all sensory threshold measurements when the affected area was compared with the mirror-image area on the unaffected side, while the NoPHN group exhibited no threshold changes. Mechanical allodynia was present in 87% of the PHN group; half of the 12 patients with ophthalmic PHN showed extension of allodynia to the maxillary distribution. No differences in skin temperature were recorded between affected and unaffected regions in either group. Our findings show a deficit of sensory functions mediated by both large and small primary afferent fibres and also suggest major central involvement in the pathophysiology of the condition. If PHN does not occur following acute herpes zoster, recovery of neural functions appears to be good. PMID:2313300

  9. Leveraging Rigorous Local Evaluations to Understand Contradictory Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulay, Beth; Martin, Carlos; Zief, Susan; Granger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Contradictory findings from "well-implemented" rigorous evaluations invite researchers to identify the differences that might explain the contradictions, helping to generate testable hypotheses for new research. This panel will examine efforts to ensure that the large number of local evaluations being conducted as part of four…

  10. Empowerment: Finding Voices and Strategies To Combat Globalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Te Momo, Fiona; Prihantinah, Tri Lisiani; Marinova, Dora; Stocker, Laura; Muchira, Lydiah Mumbi

    2002-01-01

    Three practice-based articles highlight common experiences and challenges in dealing with the impact of globalization: "Maori Volunteers: Finding a Voice for the Voiceless" (Te Momo); "Empowering Women through Income-generating Projects: Evidence from Indonesia" (Prihantinah, Marinova, Stocker); and "Empowering Kenyan…

  11. Empowerment: Finding Voices and Strategies To Combat Globalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Te Momo, Fiona; Prihantinah, Tri Lisiani; Marinova, Dora; Stocker, Laura; Muchira, Lydiah Mumbi

    2002-01-01

    Three practice-based articles highlight common experiences and challenges in dealing with the impact of globalization: "Maori Volunteers: Finding a Voice for the Voiceless" (Te Momo); "Empowering Women through Income-generating Projects: Evidence from Indonesia" (Prihantinah, Marinova, Stocker); and "Empowering Kenyan…

  12. INTER-GENERATION OCCUPATIONAL MOBILITY IN BRITAIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The aim in the paper is to bring together, review and, as far as possible, to synthesize the research findings on inter-generation occupational ...empirical studies and other relevant work, the pattern and rates of inter-generation occupational mobility in Britain are described. They are then

  13. Pollution! Find a STEM solution!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takač, Danijela; Moćan, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Primary and secondary school Pantovčak is an innovative school in downtown Zagreb, Croatia. The school is involved in many projects concerning STEM education. Pollution! Find a STEM solution! is a two year long cross-curricular project that grew out of identified need to develop STEM and ICT skills more. Pisa results make evident that students' knowledge is poor and motivation for math and similar subjects is low. Implying priorities of European Commission, like e-learning, raises motivation and also develops basic skills and improves knowledge in science, math, physic, ICT. Main objectives are to increase students' interest in STEM education and careers and introduce them to all available new trends in technology, engineering and science in their region by visiting clean technology industries and strengthening links with them, to introduce some future digital jobs and prepare students for rapid technological changes by integrating ICT into classroom practice more, to highlight the importance of global environmental issues and improve the knowledge in the areas of sustainable development and renewable energy, to develop collaborative partnership between schools and the wider community in formal, non-formal and informal learning, to support multilingualism by publishing Open Educational Resources in 8 different languages and to strengthen the professional profile of the teaching profession. The project brings together 231 teachers and 2729 students from five different European countries in learning to think globally and work on activities that contribute to the community's well-being. There are altogether 33 activities, divided in 4 categories. STEM activities are focused on students building the devices for measuring air, light and noise pollution in their school and homes. They use the scientific method to analyze the data and compare the results with their peers to find a solution. Eskills, digital literacy and digital jobs are focused on introducing career

  14. Skin findings in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; Danback, Joshua R; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-09-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the skin and vascular elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%), and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity), and E (Young's modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. MEMS direction finding acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunasiri, Gamani; Alves, Fabio; Swan, William

    2017-06-01

    Conventional directional sound sensing systems employ an array of spatially separated microphones to achieve directivity. However, there are insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly that can determine the direction of sound using a miniature hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are coupled mechanically with a separation of only 0.5 mm and yet have a remarkable sensitivity to the direction of sound. The MEMS based sensor mimicking the fly's hearing system was fabricated using an SOI substrate with a 25 μm device layer. The sensor consists of two 1.5 mm x1.6 mm wings connected in the middle by a 2.7 mm x 30 μm bridge. The entire structure is connected to the substrate by two torsional legs at the center. The frequency response of the sensor showed two resonance frequencies at approximately 1.1 kHz (rocking) and 1.5 kHz (bending). The resonance at 1.1 kHz is due to rocking of the wings by twisting the legs and the other at 1.5 kHz is due to bending of the bridge. The response of the sensor was probed electronically using comb finger capacitors integrated to the edges of the wings and with the help of an MS3110 chip. A peak output voltage of about 9V/Pa was measured for sound incident normal to the device at the resonance frequency of the bending mode. The bearing of the incident sound under these conditions could be determined to within a few degrees. These findings indicate the potential use of the MEMS sensor to locate sound sources with high accuracy.

  16. Skin Findings in Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Beth A.; Bayliss, Susan J.; Berk, David R.; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H.; Danback, Joshua R.; Pober, Barbara R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the Skin and Vascular Elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%) and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity) and E (Young’s modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. PMID:24920525

  17. Work Values across Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Leuty, Melanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Mainstream publication discussions of differences in generational cohorts in the workplace suggest that individuals of more recent generations, such as Generation X and Y, have different work values than do individuals of the Silent and Baby Boom generations. Although extant research suggests that age may influence work values, few of the…

  18. Work Values across Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Leuty, Melanie E.

    2012-01-01

    Mainstream publication discussions of differences in generational cohorts in the workplace suggest that individuals of more recent generations, such as Generation X and Y, have different work values than do individuals of the Silent and Baby Boom generations. Although extant research suggests that age may influence work values, few of the…

  19. Talkin' 'bout My Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickes, Persis C.

    2010-01-01

    The monikers are many: (1) "Generation Y"; (2) "Echo Boomers"; (3) "GenMe"; (4) the "Net Generation"; (5) "RenGen"; and (6) "Generation Next". One name that appears to be gaining currency is "Millennials," perhaps as a way to better differentiate the current generation from its…

  20. Talkin' 'bout My Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickes, Persis C.

    2010-01-01

    The monikers are many: (1) "Generation Y"; (2) "Echo Boomers"; (3) "GenMe"; (4) the "Net Generation"; (5) "RenGen"; and (6) "Generation Next". One name that appears to be gaining currency is "Millennials," perhaps as a way to better differentiate the current generation from its…

  1. Minding the Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2011-01-01

    Generational conflict is back. After years of relative silence, and mutual ignorance, the young and old are once more at war. With youth unemployment high on the political agenda, the fortunes of the "jobless generation" are being contrasted with those of the "golden generation" of baby boomers, but is one generation really…

  2. The fourth generation in supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Zwirner, F.

    1985-12-01

    We consider model-independent constraints on the fourth-generation fermion masses and the magnitude of the D-term contribution to the scalar masses. We find that the ratio of vacuum expectation values is limited to the range 1/5 <~ ν2/ν 1 <~ 4.5. We compute the mass spectrum in the class of models where the only source of soft supersymmetry breaking is the gaugino mass m1/2. The lightest charged scalar turns out to be the fourth-generation slepton, which may be ligth enough to be pair-produced at LEP. The present PETRA bound on new charged particles implies that m1/2 >~ 150 GeV. A general feature of the four-generation models is thus a heavy spectrum of sparticles. On leave from International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua, Italy.

  3. Gamma ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  4. Genetics and intelligence differences: five special findings.

    PubMed

    Plomin, R; Deary, I J

    2015-02-01

    Intelligence is a core construct in differential psychology and behavioural genetics, and should be so in cognitive neuroscience. It is one of the best predictors of important life outcomes such as education, occupation, mental and physical health and illness, and mortality. Intelligence is one of the most heritable behavioural traits. Here, we highlight five genetic findings that are special to intelligence differences and that have important implications for its genetic architecture and for gene-hunting expeditions. (i) The heritability of intelligence increases from about 20% in infancy to perhaps 80% in later adulthood. (ii) Intelligence captures genetic effects on diverse cognitive and learning abilities, which correlate phenotypically about 0.30 on average but correlate genetically about 0.60 or higher. (iii) Assortative mating is greater for intelligence (spouse correlations ~0.40) than for other behavioural traits such as personality and psychopathology (~0.10) or physical traits such as height and weight (~0.20). Assortative mating pumps additive genetic variance into the population every generation, contributing to the high narrow heritability (additive genetic variance) of intelligence. (iv) Unlike psychiatric disorders, intelligence is normally distributed with a positive end of exceptional performance that is a model for 'positive genetics'. (v) Intelligence is associated with education and social class and broadens the causal perspectives on how these three inter-correlated variables contribute to social mobility, and health, illness and mortality differences. These five findings arose primarily from twin studies. They are being confirmed by the first new quantitative genetic technique in a century-Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA)-which estimates genetic influence using genome-wide genotypes in large samples of unrelated individuals. Comparing GCTA results to the results of twin studies reveals important insights into the genetic architecture

  5. Genetics and intelligence differences: five special findings

    PubMed Central

    Plomin, R; Deary, I J

    2015-01-01

    Intelligence is a core construct in differential psychology and behavioural genetics, and should be so in cognitive neuroscience. It is one of the best predictors of important life outcomes such as education, occupation, mental and physical health and illness, and mortality. Intelligence is one of the most heritable behavioural traits. Here, we highlight five genetic findings that are special to intelligence differences and that have important implications for its genetic architecture and for gene-hunting expeditions. (i) The heritability of intelligence increases from about 20% in infancy to perhaps 80% in later adulthood. (ii) Intelligence captures genetic effects on diverse cognitive and learning abilities, which correlate phenotypically about 0.30 on average but correlate genetically about 0.60 or higher. (iii) Assortative mating is greater for intelligence (spouse correlations ~0.40) than for other behavioural traits such as personality and psychopathology (~0.10) or physical traits such as height and weight (~0.20). Assortative mating pumps additive genetic variance into the population every generation, contributing to the high narrow heritability (additive genetic variance) of intelligence. (iv) Unlike psychiatric disorders, intelligence is normally distributed with a positive end of exceptional performance that is a model for ‘positive genetics'. (v) Intelligence is associated with education and social class and broadens the causal perspectives on how these three inter-correlated variables contribute to social mobility, and health, illness and mortality differences. These five findings arose primarily from twin studies. They are being confirmed by the first new quantitative genetic technique in a century—Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA)—which estimates genetic influence using genome-wide genotypes in large samples of unrelated individuals. Comparing GCTA results to the results of twin studies reveals important insights into the genetic

  6. Finding time, stopping the frenzy.

    PubMed

    Perlow, L A

    1998-08-01

    While the deleterious consequences of long hours of work for individuals, families and communities have previously been documented, the assumption that long hours are necessary to get the work done, especially in a world where speed is becoming increasingly critical to corporate success, has prompted little challenge. So Leslie Perlow, an assistant professor of business at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, set out to explore the necessity for the seemingly endless workdays that so many postindustrial settings require. Her study of a group of software engineers at a Fortune 500 company--identified only as the Ditto Corp--is detailed in her book, Finding Time: How Corporations, Individuals, and Families Can Benefit from New Work Practices (Cornell University Press, 1997). Perlow's research reveals a "sad and all too common tale" of workers harried by competing demands, frequent interruptions and shifting deadlines. To meet the firm's expectations, the engineers she studied sacrificed home life, focused on individual tasks to the detriment of group goals and, in many cases, eventually lost any enthusiasm they'd had for working for the company. There has been some recognition that stress and burnout may be bad for a corporation as employees become less committed, decide to leave or get fired and that this kind of turnover can hurt the firm in the longer term. But Perlow documented the additional, and quite significant, shorter-term costs to the corporation of the current way of using time at work. What she found was a "vicious time cycle:" Time pressures led to a crisis mentality, which led to "individual heroics." That is, I'll do whatever it takes to do my job--even if it means interrupting you while you try to do yours. For the engineers Perlow studied, the lack of helping, the constant interruptions and the perpetual crises--clearly illustrated by the daily log that appears on page 34--made it harder to develop products. Ultimately, they worked long hours to

  7. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  8. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo [Hercules, CA

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  9. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  10. Supersonic MHD generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, M.A.

    1983-11-29

    An improved MHD electrical power generating system of the type having a MHD topping cycle and a steam generating bottoming cycle is disclosed. The system typically includes a combustion system, a conventional MHD generator and a first diffuser radiant boiler. The improvement comprises a first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration operatively connected in series with each other and with the conventional MHD generator. The first supersonic MHD generator and ramjet engine configuration increase the power output and improve the operating efficiency of the electrical generating system. A diffuser system is also disclosed which is in fluid communication with the supersonic MHD generator and the ramjet engine for collecting bypass plasma gas to be used for heating a second radiant boiler adapted for powering a steam turbine generator.

  11. Find a Diabetes Prevention Program Near You

    MedlinePlus

    ... throughout the country. Find an In-person Class Select From List Find a class near you by ... are available in Spanish at some locations. Location: Select State on Map Find an Online Program Online ...

  12. Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Biwer, B.M.; Schauer, M.W.; Frye, J.M.; Gruen, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are increasingly being used as in situ surface probes. These techniques are coherent and inherently surface sensitive by the nature of the mediums response to intense laser light. Here we will review these two techniques using aqueous corrosion as an example problem. Aqueous corrosion of technologically important materials such as Fe, Ni and Cr proceeds from a reduced metal surface with layer by layer growth of oxide films mitigated by compositional changes in the chemical makeup of the growing film. Passivation of the metal surface is achieved after growth of only a few tens of atomic layers of metal oxide. Surface Second Harmonic Generation and a related nonlinear laser technique, Sum Frequency Generation have demonstrated an ability to probe the surface composition of growing films even in the presence of aqueous solutions. 96 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Schooling and Inequality from Generation to Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Samuel

    1972-01-01

    Shows that substantial inequality of economic opportunity exists in the U.S. and that the educational system is a major vehicle for the transmission of economic status from one generation to the next. (RJ)

  14. Refrigeration generation using expander-generator units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, A. V.; Agababov, V. S.; Koryagin, A. V.; Baidakova, Yu. O.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of using the expander-generator unit (EGU) to generate refrigeration, along with electricity were considered. It is shown that, on the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows using the EGU, one can provide the refrigeration supply of the different consumers: ventilation and air conditioning plants and industrial refrigerators and freezers. The analysis of influence of process parameters on the cooling power of the EGU, which depends on the parameters of the gas expansion process in the expander and temperatures of cooled environment, was carried out. The schematic diagram of refrigeration generation plant based on EGU is presented. The features and advantages of EGU to generate refrigeration compared with thermotransformer of steam compressive and absorption types were shown, namely: there is no need to use the energy generated by burning fuel to operate the EGU; beneficial use of the heat delivered to gas from the flow being cooled in equipment operating on gas; energy production along with refrigeration generation, which makes it possible to create, using EGU, the trigeneration plants without using the energy power equipment. It is shown that the level of the temperatures of refrigeration flows, which can be obtained by using the EGU on existing technological decompression stations of the transported gas, allows providing the refrigeration supply of various consumers. The information that the refrigeration capacity of an expander-generator unit not only depends on the parameters of the process of expansion of gas flowing in the expander (flow rate, temperatures and pressures at the inlet and outlet) but it is also determined by the temperature needed for a consumer and the initial temperature of the flow of the refrigeration-carrier being cooled. The conclusion was made that the expander-generator units can be used to create trigeneration plants both at major power plants and at small energy.

  15. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  16. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. We consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise voracity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations c Implement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University. Jacobson and Reynolds used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds. More recently, Lachowiez and Wlezien are investigating the flow generated by an electro-mechanically driven lid to be used for assertion control in aerodynamic applications. We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin. The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands ol'particle's allow for high resolution simulations

  17. Meet the Millennial Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Brian

    2000-01-01

    The "Millennial Generation" has grown up with prosperity, working parents, the Internet, divorce, and Columbine. They are fundamentally different in outlook and ambition from preceding generations and have their own ideas about how they want to live and work. (JOW)

  18. Quantum random number generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  19. Generating Customized Verifiers for Automatically Generated Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Fischer, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Program verification using Hoare-style techniques requires many logical annotations. We have previously developed a generic annotation inference algorithm that weaves in all annotations required to certify safety properties for automatically generated code. It uses patterns to capture generator- and property-specific code idioms and property-specific meta-program fragments to construct the annotations. The algorithm is customized by specifying the code patterns and integrating them with the meta-program fragments for annotation construction. However, this is difficult since it involves tedious and error-prone low-level term manipulations. Here, we describe an annotation schema compiler that largely automates this customization task using generative techniques. It takes a collection of high-level declarative annotation schemas tailored towards a specific code generator and safety property, and generates all customized analysis functions and glue code required for interfacing with the generic algorithm core, thus effectively creating a customized annotation inference algorithm. The compiler raises the level of abstraction and simplifies schema development and maintenance. It also takes care of some more routine aspects of formulating patterns and schemas, in particular handling of irrelevant program fragments and irrelevant variance in the program structure, which reduces the size, complexity, and number of different patterns and annotation schemas that are required. The improvements described here make it easier and faster to customize the system to a new safety property or a new generator, and we demonstrate this by customizing it to certify frame safety of space flight navigation code that was automatically generated from Simulink models by MathWorks' Real-Time Workshop.

  20. Starter/generator testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anon

    1994-10-01

    Sundstrand Aerospace and GE Aircraft Engines have studied the switched reluctance machine for use as an integral starter/generator for future aircraft engines. They have conducted an initial, low-power testing of the starter/generator, which is based on power inverters using IGBT-technology semiconductors, to verify its feasibility in the externally mounted version of the integral starter/generator. This preliminary testing of the 250-kW starter/generator reveals favorable results.

  1. Examining Alternatives to Wavelet Denoising for Astronomical Source Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurek, R.; Brown, S.

    2012-08-01

    The Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders ASKAP and MeerKAT will produce prodigious amounts of data that necessitate automated source finding. The performance of automated source finders can be improved by pre-processing a dataset. In preparation for the WALLABY and DINGO surveys, we have used a test HI datacube constructed from actual Westerbork Telescope noise and WHISP HI galaxies to test the real world improvement of linear smoothing, the Duchamp source finder's wavelet denoising, iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction, on intensity threshold source finding of spectral line datasets. To compare these pre-processing methods we have generated completeness-reliability performance curves for each method and a range of input parameters. We find that iterative median smoothing produces the best source finding results for ASKAP HI spectral line observations, but wavelet denoising is a safer pre-processing technique. In this paper we also present our implementations of iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction.

  2. Generativity Theory and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes generativity theory based on the probabilities of many behaviors that are in competition and considers its effect on creativity. Topics discussed include previous and current generativity research, including behavior charts and frequency profiles; computer simulations; skills that improve generative processes; and creativity training in…

  3. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a...

  4. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a...

  5. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  6. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  7. Universal portfolios generated by Vandermonde generating matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Choon Peng; Yong, Say Loong

    2017-04-01

    A universal portfolio generated by the one-parameter symmetric positive definite Vandermonde matrix is studied. It is obtained by maximizing the scaled growth rate of the estimated daily wealth return and minimizing the Mahalanobis squared divergence of two portfolio vectors associated with the Vandermonde matrix. The parameter of the Vandermonde matrix is chosen so that the matrix is positive definite. The companion matrices of the three and five-dimensional generating matrices are evaluated to determine the portfolios. Three and five stock-data sets are selected from the local stock exchange in Malaysia and the empirical performance of the portfolios is presented. There is empirical evidence that the use of an appropriate generating Vandermonde matrix may increase the wealth of investors.

  8. Motor/generator

    DOEpatents

    Hickam, Christopher Dale [Glasford, IL

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  9. Small Regulatory RNA-Induced Growth Rate Heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Ruben A. T.; Nicolas, Pierre; Ciccolini, Mariano; Reilman, Ewoud; Reder, Alexander; Schaffer, Marc; Mäder, Ulrike; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions. PMID:25790031

  10. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Nicolas, Pierre; Ciccolini, Mariano; Reilman, Ewoud; Reder, Alexander; Schaffer, Marc; Mäder, Ulrike; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L

    2015-03-01

    Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions.

  11. Cue generation and memory construction in direct and generative autobiographical memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Harris, Celia B; O'Connor, Akira R; Sutton, John

    2015-05-01

    Theories of autobiographical memory emphasise effortful, generative search processes in memory retrieval. However recent research suggests that memories are often retrieved directly, without effortful search. We investigated whether direct and generative retrieval differed in the characteristics of memories recalled, or only in terms of retrieval latency. Participants recalled autobiographical memories in response to cue words. For each memory, they reported whether it was retrieved directly or generatively, rated its visuo-spatial perspective, and judged its accompanying recollective experience. Our results indicated that direct retrieval was commonly reported and was faster than generative retrieval, replicating recent findings. The characteristics of directly retrieved memories differed from generatively retrieved memories: directly retrieved memories had higher field perspective ratings and lower observer perspective ratings. However, retrieval mode did not influence recollective experience. We discuss our findings in terms of cue generation and content construction, and the implication for reconstructive models of autobiographical memory.

  12. EC Toolbox Project: General Findings and Some Particular Proposals--The Next Generation of Performance Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumsion, John; Ward, Suzanne

    This study shows how performance measurement can be developed to take advantage of the most advanced computer software and hardware now available. The "Toolbox" study was commissioned by the European Commission (EC) and undertaken by De Montfort University in partnership with Essex County Libraries and the Library and Information…

  13. mHealth in pediatrics-finding healthcare solutions for the next generation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have begun to transform the way clinicians deliver healthcare, with goals of greater patient engagement and improved health outcomes. However, the unique needs of pediatric populations are commonly neglected when novel technologies are designed. Constantly changing size and evolving developmental capabilities present a challenge for development of effective mHealth solutions for children. Parents and the greater healthcare community have a greater role in child health, placing demands on new technology to provide connected models of care. This summary provides the landscape of challenges and opportunities presented by the growing population of children who could be optimal candidates for properly tailored mHealth solutions. PMID:28293567

  14. 75 FR 61225 - Energy Northwest; Columbia Generating Station Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ...-11). The 618-11 site is an 8-acre parcel located on DOE property that is directly adjacent to land... from 1962 through 1967 and contains low- to high-activity waste, fission products, some plutonium...). The Need for the Proposed Action The 618-11 site is an 8-acre parcel located on DOE property that...

  15. Toward Reducing Poverty across Generations: Early Findings from New York City's Conditional Cash Transfer Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Cynthia; Riccio, James

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at low-income families in six of New York City's highest-poverty communities, Family Rewards ties cash rewards to a pre-specified set of activities and outcomes thought to be critical to families' short- and long-term success in the areas of children's education, family preventive health care, and parents' employment. The purpose of this…

  16. The American Reincarnation of the Superfluous Experience: Finding Meaning in Generation Y

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Madelyn Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The superfluous man became a prominent literary figure in Russia during the 19th century. This article makes a comparison of the superfluous experience to the "celebutante" phenomenon, as reflected in the media. It also includes a discussion on the impact that the celebutante influence may have on the dreams, values and meaning-making…

  17. A rural virtual health sciences library project: research findings with implications for next generation library services.

    PubMed

    Richwine, M P; McGowan, J J

    2001-01-01

    The Shared Hospital Electronic Library of Southern Indiana (SHELSI) research project was designed to determine whether access to a virtual health sciences library and training in its use would support medical decision making in rural southern Indiana and achieve the same level of impact seen by targeted information services provided by health sciences librarians in urban hospitals. Based on the results of a needs assessment, a virtual medical library was created; various levels of training were provided. Virtual library users were asked to complete a Likert-type survey, which included questions on intent of use and impact of use. At the conclusion of the project period, structured interviews were conducted. Impact of the virtual health sciences library showed a strong correlation with the impact of information provided by health sciences librarians. Both interventions resulted in avoidance of adverse health events. Data collected from the structured interviews confirmed the perceived value of the virtual library. While librarians continue to hold a strong position in supporting information access for health care providers, their roles in the information age must begin to move away from providing information toward selecting and organizing knowledge resources and instruction in their use.

  18. The American Reincarnation of the Superfluous Experience: Finding Meaning in Generation Y

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffey, Madelyn Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The superfluous man became a prominent literary figure in Russia during the 19th century. This article makes a comparison of the superfluous experience to the "celebutante" phenomenon, as reflected in the media. It also includes a discussion on the impact that the celebutante influence may have on the dreams, values and meaning-making…

  19. A rural virtual health sciences library project: research findings with implications for next generation library services*

    PubMed Central

    Richwine, Margaret (Peggy); McGowan, Julie J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The Shared Hospital Electronic Library of Southern Indiana (SHELSI) research project was designed to determine whether access to a virtual health sciences library and training in its use would support medical decision making in rural southern Indiana and achieve the same level of impact seen by targeted information services provided by health sciences librarians in urban hospitals. Methods: Based on the results of a needs assessment, a virtual medical library was created; various levels of training were provided. Virtual library users were asked to complete a Likert-type survey, which included questions on intent of use and impact of use. At the conclusion of the project period, structured interviews were conducted. Results: Impact of the virtual health sciences library showed a strong correlation with the impact of information provided by health sciences librarians. Both interventions resulted in avoidance of adverse health events. Data collected from the structured interviews confirmed the perceived value of the virtual library. Conclusion: While librarians continue to hold a strong position in supporting information access for health care providers, their roles in the information age must begin to move away from providing information toward selecting and organizing knowledge resources and instruction in their use. PMID:11209799

  20. Next Generation UAV Based Spectral Systems for Environmental Monitoring: project developments, preliminary outcome and findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. K. E.; Townsend, P. A.; Mandl, D.; Ly, V. T.; Kingdon, C.; Sohlberg, R. A.; Corp, L. A.; Ong, L.; Nagol, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    This investigation contributes for bridging the gap in Earth observation between field and airborne measurements. We will reduce the risk of operating science grade instruments from Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), by developing robust methods to make well-characterized spectral measurements for integration, calibration and validation with NASAs science quality satellite and airborne data. Because of the potential for rapid deployment, spatially explicit data from UASs can be acquired irrespective of many of the cost, scheduling and logistic limitations to satellite or piloted aircraft missions. Provided that the measurements are suitably calibrated and well characterized, this opens up opportunities for calibration/validation activities not currently available. There is considerable interest in UASs from the agricultural and forestry industries but there is a need to identify a workflow that yields calibrated comparisons through space and time. The goal of our effort is to ensure that optical high spectral resolution measurements from UAV's are collected and processed in a fashion that allows ready integration with or comparison to NASA satellite and airborne data and derived products. We target the consistent retrieval of calibrated surface reflectance, as well as biological parameters including nutrient and chlorophyll content, chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic capacity. We will test our technology and protocols first using spatially-resolved discrete point measurements characterizing canopy VNIR reflectance and solar-induced fluorescence, followed by imaging spectroscopy. A Rapid Data Assimilation and delivery system will be developed, based on SensorWeb Intelligent Payload Module for high speed onboard processing. The deployment of UAS sensors at sites such as flux towers will facilitate measrurement validation and parameter retrieval, than is possible by foot, from sensors fixed to a tower, or irregular aircraft missions. We will report preliminary results and outcomes in the project development regarding the accurate measurement of spectral reflectance at high temporal frequencies and stability to depict diurnal/seasonal cycles in vegetation function.

  1. Do different data analytic approaches generate discrepant findings when measuring mother-infant HPA axis attunement?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Nicola K; Kashy, Deborah A; Levendosky, Alytia A; Bogat, G Anne; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2017-03-01

    Attunement between mothers and infants in their hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness to acute stressors is thought to benefit the child's emerging physiological and behavioral self-regulation, as well as their socioemotional development. However, there is no universally accepted definition of attunement in the literature, which appears to have resulted in inconsistent statistical analyses for determining its presence or absence, and contributed to discrepant results. We used a series of data analytic approaches, some previously used in the attunement literature and others not, to evaluate the attunement between 182 women and their 1-year-old infants in their HPA axis responsivity to acute stress. Cortisol was measured in saliva samples taken from mothers and infants before and twice after a naturalistic laboratory stressor (infant arm restraint). The results of the data analytic approaches were mixed, with some analyses suggesting attunement while others did not. The strengths and weaknesses of each statistical approach are discussed, and an analysis using a cross-lagged model that considered both time and interactions between mother and infant appeared the most appropriate. Greater consensus in the field about the conceptualization and analysis of physiological attunement would be valuable in order to advance our understanding of this phenomenon. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. MLA Panel Finds No "Lost Generation of Scholars" from the Tenure Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Academic departments should beware of "the tyranny of the monograph," and consider projects like translations and electronic publications in making hiring and tenure decisions, a Modern Language Association panel said in a much-anticipated report. The report gives a thorough historical analysis of "the shifting nature of academic work over the…

  3. mHealth in pediatrics-finding healthcare solutions for the next generation.

    PubMed

    Niksch, Alisa L

    2015-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have begun to transform the way clinicians deliver healthcare, with goals of greater patient engagement and improved health outcomes. However, the unique needs of pediatric populations are commonly neglected when novel technologies are designed. Constantly changing size and evolving developmental capabilities present a challenge for development of effective mHealth solutions for children. Parents and the greater healthcare community have a greater role in child health, placing demands on new technology to provide connected models of care. This summary provides the landscape of challenges and opportunities presented by the growing population of children who could be optimal candidates for properly tailored mHealth solutions.

  4. 75 FR 10834 - Energy Northwest; Columbia Generating Station; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... part 73, does not involve any physical changes to the reactor, fuel, plant structures, support...,'' from the implementation date for one new requirement of 10 CFR part 73, ``Physical protection of plants... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926). There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation...

  5. 75 FR 42790 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Clinton Power Station; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... result of the proposed action. The proposed action does not result in changes to land use or water use... National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit are needed. No effects on the aquatic or terrestrial...

  6. Solar thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Toberer, Eric S.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-05-03

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from concentrated sunlight. A novel detailed balance model for STEGs is provided and applied to both state-of-the-art and idealized materials. STEGs can produce electricity by using sunlight to heat one side of a thermoelectric generator. While concentrated sunlight can be used to achieve extremely high temperatures (and thus improved generator efficiency), the solar absorber also emits a significant amount of black body radiation. This emitted light is the dominant loss mechanism in these generators. In this invention, we propose a solution to this problem that eliminates virtually all of the emitted black body radiation. This enables solar thermoelectric generators to operate at higher efficiency and achieve said efficient with lower levels of optical concentration. The solution is suitable for both single and dual axis solar thermoelectric generators.

  7. Simulations of Active Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, N. N.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We are interested in the study, via numerical simulations, of active vortex generators. Vortex generators may be used to modify the inner part of the boundary layer or to control separation thus enhancing the performance and maneuverability of aerodynamic configurations. we consider generators that consist of a surface cavity elongated in the streamwise direction and partially covered with a moving lid that at rest lies flush with the boundary. Streamwise vorticity is generated and ejected due to the oscillatory motion of the lid. The present simulations complement relevant experimental investigations of active vortex generators that have been conducted at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University used a piezoelectric device in water, allowing for small amplitude high frequency oscillations. They placed the lid asymmetrically on the cavity and observed a strong outward velocity at the small gap of the cavity. Saddoughi used a larger mechanically driven device in air to investigate this flow and observed a jet emerging from the wide gap of the configuration, contrary to the findings of Jacobson and Reynolds We are simulating the flows generated by these devices and we are conducting a parametric study that would help us elucidate the physical mechanisms present in the flow. Conventional computational schemes encounter difficulties when simulating flows around complex configurations undergoing arbitrary motions. Here we present a formulation that achieves this task on a purely Lagrangian frame by extending the formulation presented by Koumoutsakos, Leonard and Pepin (1994). The viscous effects are taken into account by modifying the strength Of the particles, whereas fast multipole schemes employing hundreds of thousands of particles allow for high resolution simulations. We shall present simulation results of an oscillating plate at various Reynolds numbers and Strouhal frequencies.

  8. Where will we find tomorrow's leaders?

    PubMed

    Hill, Linda A

    2008-01-01

    Unless we challenge long-held assumptions about how business leaders are supposed to act and where they're supposed to come from, many people who could become effective global leaders will remain invisible, warns Harvard Business School professor Hill. Instead of assuming that leaders must exhibit take-charge behavior, broaden the definition of leadership to include creating a context in which other people are willing and able to guide the organization. And instead of looking for the next generation of global leaders in huge Western corporations and elite business schools, expand the search to developing countries. In this conversation with HBR senior editor Paul Hemp, Hill describes the changing nature of leadership and what we can learn from parts of the world where people have not, until recently, had opportunities to become globally savvy executives. In South Africa, for instance, the African National Congress has provided rigorous leadership preparation for many black executives. Hill has also observed two approaches--in developed and developing economies alike--that she believes will be necessary in an increasingly complex business environment. The first, leading from behind, involves letting people hand off the reins to one another, depending on their strengths, as situations change. The second, leadership as collective genius, calls for both unleashing and harnessing individuals' collective talents, particularly to spur innovation. Through her descriptions of these approaches in such companies as Sekunjalo Investments, HCL Technologies, and IBM, Hill highlights the challenges of finding and preparing people who can lead by stepping back and letting others come forward to make their own judgments and take risks.

  9. Computer-generated speech

    SciTech Connect

    Aimthikul, Y.

    1981-12-01

    This thesis reviews the essential aspects of speech synthesis and distinguishes between the two prevailing techniques: compressed digital speech and phonemic synthesis. It then presents the hardware details of the five speech modules evaluated. FORTRAN programs were written to facilitate message creation and retrieval with four of the modules driven by a PDP-11 minicomputer. The fifth module was driven directly by a computer terminal. The compressed digital speech modules (T.I. 990/306, T.S.I. Series 3D and N.S. Digitalker) each contain a limited vocabulary produced by the manufacturers while both the phonemic synthesizers made by Votrax permit an almost unlimited set of sounds and words. A text-to-phoneme rules program was adapted for the PDP-11 (running under the RSX-11M operating system) to drive the Votrax Speech Pac module. However, the Votrax Type'N Talk unit has its own built-in translator. Comparison of these modules revealed that the compressed digital speech modules were superior in pronouncing words on an individual basis but lacked the inflection capability that permitted the phonemic synthesizers to generate more coherent phrases. These findings were necessarily highly subjective and dependent on the specific words and phrases studied. In addition, the rapid introduction of new modules by manufacturers will necessitate new comparisons. However, the results of this research verified that all of the modules studied do possess reasonable quality of speech that is suitable for man-machine applications. Furthermore, the development tools are now in place to permit the addition of computer speech output in such applications.

  10. Privileged scaffolds in lead generation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyu; Dietrich, Justin

    2015-07-01

    The term "privileged scaffold" was coined in 1988 and the strategy was to construct high-affinity ligands from core structures that can bind more than one receptor. Since then, the privileged scaffold-based design has evolved from a stand-alone technology to an integral component of various lead generation platforms. In this review, the authors discuss the applications of the privileged scaffold concept in current lead generation. Specifically, the authors cover the role that privileged scaffolds have played in the mass production of compounds to feed high-throughput screening (HTS) and its role in the design of ligands targeting protein-protein interactions, multiple ligands and warhead-based ligands. It is not the intention of the authors to review all privileged scaffolds known to date. Rather, the aim of this review is to highlight the strategic value of the concept of privileged scaffolds in various contemporary lead generation platforms. The privileged scaffolds as described by the original definition proved abundant in the available chemical space. HTS and other screening methods, in addition to greatly enhanced compound collections, make privileged scaffold-based design less relevant in finding high-affinity ligands than originally envisioned. However, the principle of privileged scaffolds has greatly enhanced and empowered current lead generation technologies.

  11. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  12. Quantum random number generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  13. Quantum random number generation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; ...

    2016-06-28

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a highmore » speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  14. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

  15. Steam generator support system

    DOEpatents

    Moldenhauer, J.E.

    1987-08-25

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

  16. Quantum random number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Qi, Bing; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which have important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness—coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. On the basis of the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at a high speed by properly modelling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, in which verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category that provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.

  17. Method of grid generation

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Daniel W.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  18. Solar fuels generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.

    2016-10-25

    The solar fuels generator includes an ionically conductive separator between a gaseous first phase and a second phase. A photoanode uses one or more components of the first phase to generate cations during operation of the solar fuels generator. A cation conduit is positioned provides a pathway along which the cations travel from the photoanode to the separator. The separator conducts the cations. A second solid cation conduit conducts the cations from the separator to a photocathode.

  19. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Mason, Lee S.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    High-efficiency radioisotope power generators will play an important role in future NASA space exploration missions. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs) have been identified as a candidate generator technology capable of providing mission designers with an efficient, high-specific-power electrical generator. SRGs high conversion efficiency has the potential to extend the limited Pu-238 supply when compared with current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Due to budgetary constraints, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) was canceled in the fall of 2013. Over the past year a joint study by NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) called the Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) recommended that Stirling technologies continue to be explored. During the mission studies of the NPAS, spare SRGs were sometimes required to meet mission power system reliability requirements. This led to an additional mass penalty and increased isotope consumption levied on certain SRG-based missions. In an attempt to remove the spare power system, a new generator architecture is considered, which could increase the reliability of a Stirling generator and provide a more fault-tolerant power system. This new generator called the Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator (MSRG) employs multiple parallel Stirling convertor/controller strings, all of which share the heat from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. For this design, generators utilizing one to eight GPHS modules were analyzed, which provided about 50 to 450 W of direct current (DC) to the spacecraft, respectively. Four Stirling convertors are arranged around each GPHS module resulting in from 4 to 32 Stirling/controller strings. The convertors are balanced either individually or in pairs, and are radiatively coupled to the GPHS modules. Heat is rejected through the housing/radiator, which is similar in construction to the ASRG. Mass and power analysis for these systems indicate that specific

  20. Electrical power generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A power generating system for adjusting coupling an induction motor, as a generator, to an A.C. power line wherein the motor and power line are connected through a triac is described. The triac is regulated to normally turn on at a relatively late point in each half cycle of its operation, whereby at less than operating speed, and thus when the induction motor functions as a motor rather than as a generator, power consumption from the line is substantially reduced.

  1. Parallel unstructured grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, Rainald; Camberos, Jose; Merriam, Marshal

    1991-01-01

    A parallel unstructured grid generation algorithm is presented and implemented on the Hypercube. Different processor hierarchies are discussed, and the appropraite hierarchies for mesh generation and mesh smoothing are selected. A domain-splitting algorithm for unstructured grids which tries to minimize the surface-to-volume ratio of each subdomain is described. This splitting algorithm is employed both for grid generation and grid smoothing. Results obtained on the Hypercube demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithms developed.

  2. Distributed generation systems model

    SciTech Connect

    Barklund, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    A slide presentation is given on a distributed generation systems model developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and its application to a situation within the Idaho Power Company`s service territory. The objectives of the work were to develop a screening model for distributed generation alternatives, to develop a better understanding of distributed generation as a utility resource, and to further INEL`s understanding of utility concerns in implementing technological change.

  3. 7 CFR 1794.43 - Agency finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... finding. If RUS finds, based on an EA that the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment, RUS will prepare a FONSI. Upon authorization of RUS, the applicant shall...

  4. 7 CFR 1794.43 - Agency finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... finding. If RUS finds, based on an EA that the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment, RUS will prepare a FONSI. Upon authorization of RUS, the applicant shall...

  5. 7 CFR 1794.43 - Agency finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... finding. If RUS finds, based on an EA that the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment, RUS will prepare a FONSI. Upon authorization of RUS, the applicant shall...

  6. Thermophotovoltaic energy generation

    DOEpatents

    Celanovic, Ivan; Chan, Walker; Bermel, Peter; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Marton, Christopher; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Araghchini, Mohammad; Jensen, Klavs F.; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert; Fisher, Peter

    2015-08-25

    Inventive systems and methods for the generation of energy using thermophotovoltaic cells are described. Also described are systems and methods for selectively emitting electromagnetic radiation from an emitter for use in thermophotovoltaic energy generation systems. In at least some of the inventive energy generation systems and methods, a voltage applied to the thermophotovoltaic cell (e.g., to enhance the power produced by the cell) can be adjusted to enhance system performance. Certain embodiments of the systems and methods described herein can be used to generate energy relatively efficiently.

  7. NEGATIVE GATE GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jones, C.S.; Eaton, T.E.

    1958-02-01

    This patent relates to pulse generating circuits and more particularly to rectangular pulse generators. The pulse generator of the present invention incorporates thyratrons as switching elements to discharge a first capacitor through a load resistor to initiate and provide the body of a Pulse, and subsequently dlscharge a second capacitor to impress the potential of its charge, with opposite potential polarity across the load resistor to terminate the pulse. Accurate rectangular pulses in the millimicrosecond range are produced across a low impedance by this generator.

  8. STEAM GENERATOR GROUP PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. A.; Lewis, M

    1985-09-01

    This report is a summary of progress in the Surry Steam Generator Group Project for 1984. Information is presented on the analysis of two baseline eddy current inspections of the generator. Round robin series of tests using standard in-service inspection techniques are described along with some preliminary results. Observations are reported of degradation found on tubing specimens removed from the generator, and on support plates characterized in-situ. Residual stresses measured on a tubing specimen are reported. Two steam generator repair demonstrations are described; one for antivibration bar replacement, and one on tube repair methods. Chemical analyses are shown for sludge samples removed from above the tube sheet.

  9. 100 WATT THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GENERATORS , *ENERGY CONVERSION, HEAT EXCHANGERS, THERMOELECTRICITY, THERMOCOUPLES, BLOWERS, MODULES(ELECTRONICS), SILICON ALLOYS, GERMANIUM ALLOYS, COMBUSTION, GASOLINE, VAPORIZATION, FUELS, LEAD COMPOUNDS.

  10. 100 WATT THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    GENERATORS , THERMOELECTRICITY, THERMOCOUPLES, HEATERS, HEAT TRANSFER, ENERGY CONVERSION, GASOLINE, VOLTAGE REGULATORS, HEAT EXCHANGERS, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), STARTING, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING).

  11. Explosive MHD Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, E. F.; Ostashev, V. E.; Fortov, V. E.

    2004-11-01

    Explosive driven MHD generators (EMHD) occupy an intermediate position between destroyed Explosive Flux Compression Generators and solid-propellant- pulsed MHD generators. Studies revealed the negative consequences of destroying a plasma liner through Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The real efficiency of conversion of condensed HE charge chemical energy reaches ~10% if the magnetic field in a MHD channel is approximately 8-10 T. Accommodation of 20-30 linear MHD channels into a toroidal magnet seems to be optimal for EMHD generator design. This device may operate repeatedly with a frequency of up to 6.5×103pps.

  12. Unstructured surface grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on unstructured surface grid generation are presented. Topics covered include: requirements for curves, surfaces, solids, and text; surface approximation; triangulation; advancing; projection; mapping; and parametric curves.

  13. Multiblock grid generation for jet engine configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    1992-01-01

    The goal was to create methods for generating grids with minimal human intervention that are applicable to a wide range of problems and compatible with existing numerical methods and with existing and proposed computers. The following topics that are related to multiblock grid generation are briefly covered in viewgraph form: finding a domain decomposition, dimensioning grids, grid smoothing, manipulating grids and decompositions, and some specializations for jet engine configurations.

  14. Second generation PFB for advanced power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Van Hook, J.

    1995-11-01

    Research is being conducted under a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) contract to develop a new type of coal-fueled plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant-called an advanced or second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (APFBC) plant-offers the promise of 45-percent efficiency (HHV), with emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. This paper summarizes the pilot plant R&D work being conducted to develop this new type of plant. Although pilot plant testing is still underway, preliminary estimates indicate the commercial plant Will perform better than originally envisioned. Efficiencies greater than 46 percent are now being predicted.

  15. Pulsed Corona Discharge Generated By Marx Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sretenovic, G. B.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kovacevic, V. V.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric J.

    2010-07-01

    The pulsed plasma has a significant role in new environmental protection technologies. As a part of a pulsed corona system for pollution control applications, Marx type repetitive pulse generator was constructed and tested in arrangement with wire-plate corona reactor. We performed electrical measurements, and obtained voltage and current signals, and also power and energy delivered per pulse. Ozone formation by streamer plasma in air was chosen to monitor chemical activity of the pulsed corona discharge.

  16. Trailblazing: Exploring First-Generation College Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Academic Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Diane Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between academic self-efficacy beliefs and the academic adjustment of first-generation and non-first-generation students. Findings supported the presence of a differential relationship that was generally weaker for first-generation students. However, findings also suggested first-generation students experienced…

  17. Trailblazing: Exploring First-Generation College Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Academic Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Diane Cárdenas

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between academic self-efficacy beliefs and the academic adjustment of first-generation and non-first-generation students. Findings supported the presence of a differential relationship that was generally weaker for first-generation students. However, findings also suggested first-generation students experienced…

  18. For a Dialogue on Relations between the Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisovskii, Vladimir Timofeevich

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study examining how young people in Russia rate themselves and their parents' generation. The sociological survey was carried out in 1999 and 2001 in a number of big and small towns of Russia. The focus of the study was on three generations: the "generation of the 1960s" (children of the thaw);…

  19. Finding Ancient Supernovae at 5 < z < 12 with Frontier Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Supernovae are important probes of the properties of stars at high redshifts because they can be detected at early epochs and their masses can be inferred from their light curves. Finding the first cosmic explosions in the universe will only be possible with JWST, the WFIRST and the next generation of extremely large telescopes. But strong gravitational lensing by massive clusters, like those in the Frontier Fields, could reveal supernovae at slightly lower redshifts now by magnifying their flux by factors of 10 or more. We find that Frontier Fields will likely discover dozens of core-collapse supernovae at 5 < z < 12. Future surveys of cluster lenses similar in scope to Frontier Fields by JWST might find hundreds of these events out to z ~ 15 - 17. Besides revealing the masses of early stars, these ancient supernovae could also constrain cosmic star formation rates in the era of first galaxy formation.

  20. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Mason, Lee S.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    High efficiency radioisotope power generators will play an important role in future NASA space exploration missions. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRG) have been identified as a candidate generator technology capable of providing mission designers with an efficient, high specific power electrical generator. SRGs high conversion efficiency has the potential to extend the limited Pu-238 supply when compared with current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). Due to budgetary constraints, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) was canceled in the fall of 2013. Over the past year a joint study by NASA and DOE called the Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) recommended that Stirling technologies continue to be explored. During the mission studies of the NPAS, spare SRGs were sometimes required to meet mission power system reliability requirements. This led to an additional mass penalty and increased isotope consumption levied on certain SRG-based missions. In an attempt to remove the spare power system, a new generator architecture is considered which could increase the reliability of a Stirling generator and provide a more fault-tolerant power system. This new generator called the Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator (MSRG) employs multiple parallel Stirling convertor/controller strings, all of which share the heat from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. For this design, generators utilizing one to eight GPHS modules were analyzed, which provide about 50 to 450 watts DC to the spacecraft, respectively. Four Stirling convertors are arranged around each GPHS module resulting in from 4 to 32 Stirling/controller strings. The convertors are balanced either individually or in pairs, and are radiatively coupled to the GPHS modules. Heat is rejected through the housing/radiator which is similar in construction to the ASRG. Mass and power analysis for these systems indicate that specific power may be slightly lower than the ASRG and

  1. Electromechanically generating electricity with a gapped-graphene electric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressen, Donald; Golovchenko, Jene

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and operation of a gapped-graphene electric generator (G-GEG) device. The G-GEG generates electricity from the mechanical oscillation of droplets of electrolytes and ionic liquids. The spontaneous adsorption of ionic species on graphene charges opposing electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) on each half of the device. Modulating the area of contact between the droplet and graphene leads to adsorption/desorption of ions, effectively charging/discharging each EDLC and generating a current. The flow of current supports a potential difference across the G-GEG due to the device's internal impedance. Both the magnitude and polarity of the induced current and voltage show a strong dependence on the type of ionic species used, suggesting that certain ions interact more strongly with graphene than others. We find that a simple model circuit consisting of an AC current source in series with a resistor and a time-varying capacitor accurately predicts the device's dynamic behavior. Additionally, we discuss the effect of graphene's intrinsic quantum capacitance on the G-GEG's performance and speculate on the utility of the device in the context of energy harvesting.

  2. NASA's Chandra Finds Black Holes Are "Green"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-04-01

    Black holes are the most fuel efficient engines in the Universe, according to a new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. By making the first direct estimate of how efficient or "green" black holes are, this work gives insight into how black holes generate energy and affect their environment. The new Chandra finding shows that most of the energy released by matter falling toward a supermassive black hole is in the form of high-energy jets traveling at near the speed of light away from the black hole. This is an important step in understanding how such jets can be launched from magnetized disks of gas near the event horizon of a black hole. Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine Illustration of Fuel for a Black Hole Engine "Just as with cars, it's critical to know the fuel efficiency of black holes," said lead author Steve Allen of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. "Without this information, we cannot figure out what is going on under the hood, so to speak, or what the engine can do." Allen and his team used Chandra to study nine supermassive black holes at the centers of elliptical galaxies. These black holes are relatively old and generate much less radiation than quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes seen in the early Universe. The surprise came when the Chandra results showed that these "quiet" black holes are all producing much more energy in jets of high-energy particles than in visible light or X-rays. These jets create huge bubbles, or cavities, in the hot gas in the galaxies. Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy Animation of Black Hole in Elliptical Galaxy The efficiency of the black hole energy-production was calculated in two steps: first Chandra images of the inner regions of the galaxies were used to estimate how much fuel is available for the black hole; then Chandra images were used to estimate the power required to produce

  3. Cosmic Shell-Seekers Find a Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    Two scientists have discovered a distinctive shell of hot gas around the site of a distant supernova explosion by combining 150 hours of archived data collected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This discovery is a significant step forward in solving a decades-old puzzle as to why some stellar explosions display shells and others do not. "The likely answer is that the explosion of every massive star sends a sonic boom rumbling through interstellar space," said Samar Safi-Harb of the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, who is a coauthor with Heather Matheson on a paper describing the research that appears in the journal Advances in Space Research. "It's just that, some of the shells are harder to find than others because of the environment where the explosion occurs." The shell marks a sonic boom, or shock wave, generated by the supernova. Gas is heated to millions of degrees by the shock wave and produces X-rays, but little visible light. By examining the properties of the shell with an X-ray telescope, astronomers can work back to deduce the age (a few thousand years), and energy of the explosion, as well as information about the state of the star a million years before it exploded. Animation of a Supernova Explosion Animation of a Supernova Explosion It is likely that the star that produced the supernova remnant and shell was about 10 times as massive as the Sun. The absence of a detectable shell around this and similar supernova remnants had led astronomers to speculate that another, weaker type of explosion had occurred there. Now this hypothesis seems unlikely. Although many supernovas leave behind bright shells, others do not. This supernova remnant, identified as G21.5-0.9 by radio astronomers 30 years ago, was considered to be one that had no shell. A diffuse cloud of X-rays around the source was detected about 5 years ago by another group of astronomers and independently by Safi-Harb and colleagues using Chandra, but it took the careful

  4. The fifth generation computer

    SciTech Connect

    Moto-Oka, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The leader of Japan's Fifth Generation computer project, known as the 'Apollo' project, and a young computer scientist elucidate in this book the process of how the idea came about, international reactions, the basic technology, prospects for realization, and the abilities of the Fifth Generation computer. Topics considered included forecasting, research programs, planning, and technology impacts.

  5. When Generations Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2009-01-01

    As members of Generations X and Y face a workplace dominated by boomers, they are all starting to chafe. Some colleges are having trouble attracting, managing, and sometimes retaining people younger than 35. Members of the younger generations grew up watching their parents sacrifice for their careers, and they want something different: balance and…

  6. Generativity and Flourishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The psychological construct of "generativity" was introduced by Erik Erikson in "Childhood and Society" in 1950. This rich and complex notion encompasses the constellation of desires, concerns and commitments that motivate individuals and societies to pass on legacies to future generations. "Flourishing," which means,…

  7. Managing Generational Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donovan, Eamonn

    2009-01-01

    Many school leaders have explored the issue of diversity when it comes to students, teachers and staff. Their focus typically has been on gender and ethnicity. However, generational diversity, an area of diversity that warrants serious consideration, has received less attention. Generational intelligence is important today for two reasons. First…

  8. Solar Fuel Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  9. Generation Y Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skytland, Nicholas; Painting, Kristen; Barrera, Aaron; Fitzpatrick, Garret

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the perception of NASA and the importance of engaging those people born between 1977 and 2000, also known as Generation Y. It examines some of the differences in attitudes and experiences, and how it reflects on how they view NASA. It also discusses use of the internet in connecting to the people from that generation.

  10. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  11. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  12. Superconducting AC generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, D.; Bogner, G.

    1984-06-01

    Investigations into the development of superconducting generators are presented. Theoretical and experimental aspects of basic investigations, design and construction, technological and manufacturing developments, and functional tests on models are discussed. Information on the joint KWU/Siemens long term development program, the status of corresponding development work in other countries, and the special features of superconducting generators are given.

  13. Cross-Generational Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy; Thurston, Judy Kay

    2007-01-01

    What happens when you combine senior citizens, pre-service art teachers, and elementary students? Cross-generational connections based on sharing memories, ideas, skills, laughter, tears, and creativity. The authors describe the cross-generational book exchange project. This project was initiated when a group of Central Michigan University (CMU)…

  14. Solar fuel generator

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; West, William C.

    2017-01-17

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  15. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  16. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  17. Using Online Tone Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, James

    2017-01-01

    Online tone generators are free, user friendly, and can make for engaging and meaningful study of many topics in the areas of interference, waves, and the physics of music. By using a website such as OnlineToneGenerator.com, and through opening multiple windows simultaneously, students can immediately perform several experiments. In this article,…

  18. Reconfigurable Image Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archdeacon, John L. (Inventor); Iwai, Nelson H. (Inventor); Kato, Kenji H. (Inventor); Sweet, Barbara T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A RiG may simulate visual conditions of a real world environment, and generate the necessary amount of pixels in a visual simulation at rates up to 120 frames per second. RiG may also include a database generation system capable of producing visual databases suitable to drive the visual fidelity required by the RiG.

  19. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  20. Generative Processes: Thick Drawing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallick, Karl

    2012-01-01

    This article presents techniques and theories of generative drawing as a means for developing complex content in architecture design studios. Appending the word "generative" to drawing adds specificity to the most common representation tool and clarifies that such drawings are not singularly about communication or documentation but are…

  1. Chip Generators Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    automatically generate test vectors for a design in order to stress it or search for error cases. Software tools such as Klee [5] and EXE [6] symbolically...Dunbar, Dawson Engler, “ Klee : Unassisted and Automatic Generation of High-Coverage Tests for Complex Systems Programs,” Operating System Design and

  2. Cross-Generational Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy; Thurston, Judy Kay

    2007-01-01

    What happens when you combine senior citizens, pre-service art teachers, and elementary students? Cross-generational connections based on sharing memories, ideas, skills, laughter, tears, and creativity. The authors describe the cross-generational book exchange project. This project was initiated when a group of Central Michigan University (CMU)…

  3. When Generations Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2009-01-01

    As members of Generations X and Y face a workplace dominated by boomers, they are all starting to chafe. Some colleges are having trouble attracting, managing, and sometimes retaining people younger than 35. Members of the younger generations grew up watching their parents sacrifice for their careers, and they want something different: balance and…

  4. When Generations Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    When four generations converge in the academic workplace, it can create serious culture clashes. It is happening across college campuses--in offices as diverse as admissions, student affairs, legal affairs, and technology. It is especially striking in the faculty ranks, where generational challenges have extra significance amid recruiting efforts,…

  5. Internal split field generator

    DOEpatents

    Thundat,; George, Thomas [Knoxville, TN; Van Neste, Charles W [Kingston, TN; Vass, Arpad Alexander [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  6. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Duncan, David B.

    1994-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  7. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Bruce E.; Duncan, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  8. Energetics and Power Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    propellants, nanostructured pyrotechnics (thermites) and organic nanocomposites (propellants) will discussed. For thermites, a method will be...Nanoenergetics 2nd Generation (current efforts) - Metal oxide / Al sol-gel nanocomposites - Pyrotechnics (thermites) - High heat and light release...Nanoenergetics 2nd Generation (current efforts) - Metal oxide / Al sol-gel nanocomposites - Pyrotechnics (thermites) - High heat and light release - Organic sol

  9. Passive hydrogel fuel generator

    SciTech Connect

    Neefe, Ch. W.

    1985-04-16

    A passive hydrogen oxygen generator in which the long wavelength infrared portion of the sun's spectrum heats water to provide circulation of the water within the generator. The shorter wavelength portion of the spectrum to which water is transparent is used in splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen by photoelectrolysis.

  10. The Next Great Generation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownstein, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Discusses ideas from a new book, "Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation," (by Neil Howe and William Strauss) suggesting that youth culture is on the cusp of a radical shift with the generation beginning with this year's college freshmen who are typically team oriented, optimistic, and poised for greatness on a global scale. Includes a…

  11. Generativity and Flourishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The psychological construct of "generativity" was introduced by Erik Erikson in "Childhood and Society" in 1950. This rich and complex notion encompasses the constellation of desires, concerns and commitments that motivate individuals and societies to pass on legacies to future generations. "Flourishing," which means,…

  12. Next generation space robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwata, Tsutomu; Oda, Mitsushige; Imai, Ryoichi

    1989-01-01

    The recent research effort on the next generation space robots is presented. The goals of this research are to develop the fundamental technologies and to acquire the design parameters of the next generation space robot. Visual sensing and perception, dexterous manipulation, man machine interface and artificial intelligence techniques such as task planning are identified as the key technologies.

  13. Event generator overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Due to their ability to provide detailed and quantitative predictions, the event generators have become an important part of studying relativistic heavy ion physics and of designing future experiments. In this talk, the author will briefly summarize recent progress in developing event generators for the relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  14. When Generations Collide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    When four generations converge in the academic workplace, it can create serious culture clashes. It is happening across college campuses--in offices as diverse as admissions, student affairs, legal affairs, and technology. It is especially striking in the faculty ranks, where generational challenges have extra significance amid recruiting efforts,…

  15. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  16. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  17. Geometric grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, David

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a highly automated hexahedral grid generator based on extensive geometrical and solid modeling operations developed in response to a vision of a designer-driven one day turnaround CFD process which implies a designer-driven one hour grid generation process.

  18. Fastrac Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Dennis, Jay

    2001-01-01

    A rocket engine gas generator component development test was recently conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This gas generator is intended to power a rocket engine turbopump by the combustion of Lox and RP-1. The testing demonstrated design requirements for start sequence, wall compatibility, performance, and stable combustion. During testing the gas generator injector was modified to improve distribution of outer wall coolant and the igniter boss was modified to investigate the use of a pyrotechnic igniter. Expected chamber pressure oscillations at longitudinal acoustic mode were measured for three different chamber lengths tested. High amplitude discrete oscillations resulted in the chamber-alone configurations when chamber acoustic modes coupled with feed-system acoustics modes. For the full gas generator configuration, which included a turbine inlet manifold, high amplitude oscillations occurred only at off-design very low power levels. This testing led to a successful gas generator design for the Fastrac 60,000 lb thrust engine.

  19. Quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  20. Generating functions for tensor product decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuksa, Jan; Pošta, Severin

    2013-11-01

    The paper deals with the tensor product decomposition problem. Tensor product decompositions are of great importance in the quantum physics. A short outline of the state of the art for the of semisimple Lie groups is mentioned. The generality of generating functions is used to solve tensor products. The corresponding generating function is rational. The feature of this technique lies in the fact that the decompositions of all tensor products of all irreducible representations are solved simultaneously. Obtaining the generating function is a difficult task in general. We propose some changes to an algorithm using Patera-Sharp character generators to find this generating function, which simplifies the whole problem to simple operations over rational functions.

  1. Breast findings incidentally detected on body MRI.

    PubMed

    Bignotti, Bianca; Succio, Giulia; Nosenzo, Francesca; Perinetti, Michela; Gristina, Licia; Barbagallo, Stella; Secondini, Lucia; Calabrese, Massimo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate breast findings incidentally detected on body MRI. A retrospective review of the institutional database identified 1752 body MRI performed between January 2015 and September 2015. MRI of women with breast tissue visible in the field-of-view were reviewed for breast findings. Breast findings were classified with the breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon. The standard statistic, costs of additional work-up, and the clinical relevance were used to describe breast findings, and we calculated 95 % exact confidence intervals (CIs). 440 body MRI of 440 women (mean age: 57 ± 20 years) included breast tissue in the field-of-view. A total of 41 breast findings were identified in 41 patients. Breast findings were classified BI-RADS 2 N = 25, BI-RADS 3 N = 13, BI-RADS 4 N = 3. A total of 3.6 % [95 % CI 1.6 %, 5.6 %] women with breast tissue visible on MRI had a recommendation for further imaging work-up for a breast finding. The 18.7 % (3 of 16) of these patients had a clinically important finding (breast cancer). Further imaging evaluation increased costs of €108.3 per patient with a breast finding. Clinically important breast findings could be detected on body MRI in up to 0.7 % (3 of 440) of women.

  2. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  3. Arbitrary waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Maurice; Sugawara, Glen

    1995-02-01

    A system for storing an arbitrary waveform on nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) device and generating an analog signal using the NVRAM device is described. A central processing unit is used to synthesize an arbitrary waveform and create a digital representation of the waveform and transfer the digital representation to a microprocessor which, in turn, writes the digital data into an NVRAM device which has been mapped into a portion of the microprocessor address space. The NVRAM device is removed from address space and placed into an independent waveform generation unit. In the waveform generation unit, an address clock provides an address timing signal and a cycle clock provides a transmit signal. Both signals are applied to an address generator. When both signals are present, the address generator generates and transmits to the NVRAM device a new address for each cycle of the address timing signal. In response to each new address generated, the NVRAM devices provides a digital output which is applied to a digital to analog converter. The converter produces a continuous analog output which is smoothed by a filter to produce the arbitrary waveform.

  4. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  5. Hybrid texture generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazunori; Nakajima, Masayuki

    1995-04-01

    A method is given for synthesizing a texture by using the interface of a conventional drawing tool. The majority of conventional texture generation methods are based on the procedural approach, and can generate a variety of textures that are adequate for generating a realistic image. But it is hard for a user to imagine what kind of texture will be generated simply by looking at its parameters. Furthermore, it is difficult to design a new texture freely without a knowledge of all the procedures for texture generation. Our method offers a solution to these problems, and has the following four merits: First, a variety of textures can be obtained by combining a set of feature lines and attribute functions. Second, data definitions are flexible. Third, the user can preview a texture together with its feature lines. Fourth, people can design their own textures interactively and freely by using the interface of a conventional drawing tool. For users who want to build this texture generation method into their own programs, we also give the language specifications for generating a texture. This method can interactively provide a variety of textures, and can also be used for typographic design.

  6. Writing usable qualitative health research findings.

    PubMed

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Leeman, Jennifer

    2012-10-01

    Scholars in diverse health-related disciplines and specialty fields of practice routinely promote qualitative research as an essential component of intervention and implementation programs of research and of a comprehensive evidence base for practice. Remarkably little attention, however, has been paid to the most important element of qualitative studies--the findings in reports of those studies--and specifically to enhancing the accessibility and utilization value of these findings for diverse audiences of users. The findings in reports of qualitative health research are too often difficult to understand and even to find owing to the way they are presented. A basic strategy for enhancing the presentation of these findings is to translate them into thematic statements, which can then in turn be translated into the language of intervention and implementation. Writers of qualitative health research reports might consider these strategies better to showcase the significance and actionability of findings to a wider audience.

  7. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  8. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  9. Pulmonary diseases with imaging findings mimicking aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Fernando Ferreira; Severo, Luiz Carlos; Marchiori, Edson; Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Garcia, Tiago Severo; Irion, Klaus L; Camargo, José Jesus; Felicetti, José Carlos; de Mattos Oliveira, Flavio; Hochhegger, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Patients with preexisting lung cavities are at risk of developing intracavitary fungal colonization. Because Aspergillus spp. are the most commonly implicated fungi, these fungal masses are called aspergillomas. Their characteristic "ball-in-hole" appearance, however, may be found in a variety of other conditions that can produce radiologic findings mimicking aspergilloma. In this paper, we review the main diseases that may mimic the radiographic findings of aspergilloma, with brief descriptions of clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings.

  10. Escitalopram-induced word finding difficulty.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao-Ming; Lee, Wen-Kuei; Chang, Shang-Wen; Chiu, Nien-Mu; Huang, Jen-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Escitalopram is the most selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor used for treatment of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. No available report indicating escitalopram may induce word finding difficulty. Here we are presenting a 50-year-old patient who suffered from escitalopram-induced word finding difficulty and the symptom resolved after replacing with bupropion. Carefully monitoring word finding difficulty and speech fluency during antidepressant treatment is important in clinical practice when using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, especially escitalopram.

  11. Incidental findings: a common law approach.

    PubMed

    Tovino, Stacey A

    2008-01-01

    Federal regulations governing human subjects research do not address key questions raised by incidental neuroimaging findings, including the scope of a researcher's disclosure with respect to the possibility of incidental findings and the question whether a researcher has an affirmative legal cuty to seek, detect, and report incidental findings. The scope of researcher duties may, however, be mapped with reference to common law doctrine, including fiduciary, tort, contract, and bailment theories of liability.

  12. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2004-03-09

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  13. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  14. Long Pulse Homopolar Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    AD-A205 452 AFWAL-TR-88-2045 LONG PULSE HOMOPOLAR GENERATOR Edward A. Knoth David P. Bauer lAP Research, Inc. 2763 Culver Avenue Dayton OH 45429-3723...TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO ACCESSION NO. 61101F ILIR P3 01 11. TITLE (include Security Classiflcation) Long Pulse Homopolar Generator 12. PERSONAL...FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP C6 6; y .- o- , -, ’, - 20 07 homopolar , high current, high power, high speed, generator, 19. ABIT!CT (Contkwe on rer if =ray and

  15. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  16. PULSE SYNTHESIZING GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1963-08-01

    >An electronlc circuit for synthesizing electrical current pulses having very fast rise times includes several sinewave generators tuned to progressively higher harmonic frequencies with signal amplitudes and phases selectable according to the Fourier series of the waveform that is to be synthesized. Phase control is provided by periodically triggering the generators at precisely controlled times. The outputs of the generators are combined in a coaxial transmission line. Any frequency-dependent delays that occur in the transmission line can be readily compensated for so that the desired signal wave shape is obtained at the output of the line. (AEC)

  17. Owl: electronic datasheet generator.

    PubMed

    Appleton, Evan; Tao, Jenhan; Wheatley, F Carter; Desai, Devina H; Lozanoski, Thomas M; Shah, Pooja D; Awtry, Jake A; Jin, Shawn S; Haddock, Traci L; Densmore, Douglas M

    2014-12-19

    Owl ( www.owlcad.org ) is a biodesign automation tool that generates electronic datasheets for synthetic biological parts using common formatting. Data can be retrieved automatically from existing repositories and modified in the Owl user interface (UI). Owl uses the data to generate an HTML page with standard typesetting that can be saved as a PDF file. Here we present the Owl software tool in its alpha version, its current UI, its description of input data for generating a datasheet, its example datasheets, and the vision of the tool's role in biodesign automation.

  18. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  19. How induction generators work

    SciTech Connect

    Nailen, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    The operating principles of the induction generator, which is a standard squirrel cage motor in which the shaft is coupled to and driven by an engine or turbine at a rate above its synchronous speed and which, under these conditions, produces electrical power, are described. The advantages of induction generators, e.g., low cost, simplicity, frequency and voltage controlled by the utility system, no synchronizing controls needed, and the advantages of using small induction generators run by wind turbines, small gas turbines and in low head hydro plants are discussed. (LCL)

  20. Cryogenic generator cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckels, P. W.; Fagan, T. J.; Parker, J. H., Jr.; Long, L. J.; Shestak, E. J.; Calfo, R. M.; Hannon, W. F.; Brown, D. B.; Barkell, J. W.; Patterson, A.

    The concept for a hydrogen cooled aluminum cryogenic generator was presented by Schlicher and Oberly in 1985. Following their lead, this paper describes the thermal design of a high voltage dc, multimegawatt generator of high power density. The rotor and stator are cooled by saturated liquid and supercritical hydrogen, respectively. The brushless exciter on the same shaft is also cooled by liquid hydrogen. Component development testing is well under way and some of the test results concerning the thermohydraulic performance of the conductors are reported. The aluminum cryogenic generator's characteristics are attractive for hydrogen economy applications.

  1. Reliability model generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMann, Catherine M. (Inventor); Cohen, Gerald C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for automatically generating reliability models for use with a reliability evaluation tool is described. The reliability model generator of the present invention includes means for storing a plurality of low level reliability models which represent the reliability characteristics for low level system components. In addition, the present invention includes means for defining the interconnection of the low level reliability models via a system architecture description. In accordance with the principles of the present invention, a reliability model for the entire system is automatically generated by aggregating the low level reliability models based on the system architecture description.

  2. Solid expellant plasma generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Nobie H. (Inventor); Poe, Garrett D. (Inventor); Rood, Robert (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved solid expellant plasma generator has been developed. The plasma generator includes a support housing, an electrode rod located in the central portion of the housing, and a mass of solid expellant material that surrounds the electrode rod within the support housing. The electrode rod and the solid expellant material are made of separate materials that are selected so that the electrode and the solid expellant material decompose at the same rate when the plasma generator is ignited. This maintains a point of discharge of the plasma at the interface between the electrode and the solid expellant material.

  3. Automated knowledge generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, Harley R.; Gonzalez, Avelino J.

    1988-01-01

    The general objectives of the NASA/UCF Automated Knowledge Generation Project were the development of an intelligent software system that could access CAD design data bases, interpret them, and generate a diagnostic knowledge base in the form of a system model. The initial area of concentration is in the diagnosis of the process control system using the Knowledge-based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) diagnostic system. A secondary objective was the study of general problems of automated knowledge generation. A prototype was developed, based on object-oriented language (Flavors).

  4. Microwave Comb Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    Stable reference tones aid testing and calibration of microwave receivers. Signal generator puts out stable tones in frequency range of 2 to 10 GHz at all multiples of reference input frequency, at any frequency up to 1 MHz. Called "comb generator" because spectral plot resembles comb. DC reverse-bias current switched on and off at 1 MHz to generate sharp pulses in step-recovery diode. Microwave components mounted on back of special connector containing built-in attenuator. Used in testing microwave and spread-spectrum wide-band receivers.

  5. Top 10 Replicated Findings from Behavioral Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Plomin, Robert; DeFries, John C.; Knopik, Valerie S.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of current concerns about replication in psychological science, we describe 10 findings from behavioral genetic research that have robustly replicated. These are ‘big’ findings, both in terms of effect size and potential impact on psychological science, such as linearly increasing heritability of intelligence from infancy (20%) through adulthood (60%). Four of our top-10 findings involve the environment, discoveries that could only have been found using genetically sensitive research designs. We also consider reasons specific to behavioral genetics that might explain why these findings replicate. PMID:26817721

  6. ELECTRONIC OBSERVERS FOR RADIO DIRECTION FINDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RADIO EQUIPMENT, DIRECTION FINDING , RADIO SIGNALS, AMPLITUDE MODULATION, MONITORS, DISPLAY SYSTEMS, INFORMATION THEORY, STATISTICAL ANALYSIS, COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, NAVIGATIONAL AIDS, DETECTION, DATA PROCESSING.

  7. Curiosity Finds Iron Meteorite on Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-15

    This rock encountered by NASA Curiosity Mars rover is an iron meteorite called Lebanon, similar in shape and luster to iron meteorites found on Mars by the previous generation of rovers, Spirit and Opportunity.

  8. Next-Generation Tools For Next-Generation Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S. G.

    2017-04-01

    The next generation of large-scale galaxy surveys, across the electromagnetic spectrum, loom on the horizon as explosively game-changing datasets, in terms of our understanding of cosmology and structure formation. We are on the brink of a torrent of data that is set to both confirm and constrain current theories to an unprecedented level, and potentially overturn many of our conceptions. One of the great challenges of this forthcoming deluge is to extract maximal scientific content from the vast array of raw data. This challenge requires not only well-understood and robust physical models, but a commensurate network of software implementations with which to efficiently apply them. The halo model, a semi-analytic treatment of cosmological spatial statistics down to nonlinear scales, provides an excellent mathematical framework for exploring the nature of dark matter. This thesis presents a next-generation toolkit based on the halo model formalism, intended to fulfil the requirements of next-generation surveys. Our toolkit comprises three tools: (i) hmf, a comprehensive and flexible calculator for halo mass functions (HMFs) within extended Press-Schechter theory, (ii) the MRP distribution for extremely efficient analytic characterisation of HMFs, and (iii) halomod, an extension of hmf which provides support for the full range of halo model components. In addition to the development and technical presentation of these tools, we apply each to the task of physical modelling. With hmf, we determine the precision of our knowledge of the HMF, due to uncertainty in our knowledge of the cosmological parameters, over the past decade of cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We place rule-of-thumb uncertainties on the predicted HMF for the Planck cosmology, and find that current limits on the precision are driven by modeling uncertainties rather than those from cosmological parameters. With the MRP, we create and test a method for robustly fitting the HMF to observed

  9. Article: Next Generation Compliance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The article Next Generation Compliance by Cynthia Giles, Assistant Administrator for OECA was published in The Environmental Forum, Sept-Oct 2013 explains EPA's strategy on using new technologies to improve compliance with environmental laws.

  10. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOEpatents

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  11. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  12. Aerodynamics of vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Robert E., Jr.; Russell, David A.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was undertaken of the separation delay and dramatic boundary-layer thinning that can occur in vortex-generator installations. Wind tunnel measurements of the dynamic-pressure profile downstream of a vortex generator were found to compare under certain conditions with that downstream of a suction slit, while water-tunnel visualization studies of vortex-generator height and geometry suggested optimum configurations, and only a minor effect of base porosity. A series of progressively more complex inviscid flow models was developed to be applied to a 3-D integral boundary-layer code. This code predicted layer thinning downstream of the suction site of the vortex models, and other observed features. Thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are now being used with the ultimate goal of clarifying the physical processes involved in vortex generator performance and developing calculational procedures capable of predicting it.

  13. Next Generation Internet Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    desJardins, R.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with next generation Internet are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Internet architecture; 2) NASA's advanced networking; 3) Internet capability, capacity and applications; and 4) Systems engineering.

  14. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  15. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  16. Hazardous Waste Generators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many industries generate hazardous waste. EPA regulates hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to ensure these wastes are managed in ways that are protective of human health and the environment.

  17. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; Simms, R.

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  18. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; Simms, Richard

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  19. Generator circuit breaker retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    This paper will discuss the economic considerations, the development from concept to installation, benefits realized and the operational history of the generator circuit breaker retrofit project at Wanapum and Priest Rapids Dams, Grant County Public Utility District, Washington.

  20. Hazardous Waste Generators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Many industries generate hazardous waste. EPA regulates hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to ensure these wastes are managed in ways that are protective of human health and the environment.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Power Generation is a concise summary of MHD theory, history, and future trends. Results of the major international MHD research projects are discussed. Data from MHD research is included. Economics of initial and operating costs are considered.

  2. Hydroacoustic pulsating jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrau, A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1987-04-01

    A high pressure turbulent jet generator connected to a low pressure hydraulic tube is studied to investigate water hammer in tubes with fast flow variations, generating high pressure pulsating water jets. The pulsating jet generator consists of a tube, a hydraulic valve, a spring, and a water container. The jet is the effect of the combination of turbulent pipe flow with a valve for flow nozzle. The jet pressure depends on specific oscillation impedance and flow velocity variations. For inlet pressure of 0.5 to 2 bar the pressure rises to 40 bar. The described pulsating jet generator is more effective than the earlier model. A piezoelectric pressure controller is used to register pressure signals and high speed photos are made of the jet. Test results are consistent with theoretical calculation.

  3. Biomass for Electricity Generation

    EIA Publications

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

  4. Next generation initiation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Tom; Derber, John; Zupanski, Milija; Cohn, Steve; Verlinde, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Four-dimensional data assimilation strategies can generally be classified as either current or next generation, depending upon whether they are used operationally or not. Current-generation data-assimilation techniques are those that are presently used routinely in operational-forecasting or research applications. They can be classified into the following categories: intermittent assimilation, Newtonian relaxation, and physical initialization. It should be noted that these techniques are the subject of continued research, and their improvement will parallel the development of next generation techniques described by the other speakers. Next generation assimilation techniques are those that are under development but are not yet used operationally. Most of these procedures are derived from control theory or variational methods and primarily represent continuous assimilation approaches, in which the data and model dynamics are 'fitted' to each other in an optimal way. Another 'next generation' category is the initialization of convective-scale models. Intermittent assimilation systems use an objective analysis to combine all observations within a time window that is centered on the analysis time. Continuous first-generation assimilation systems are usually based on the Newtonian-relaxation or 'nudging' techniques. Physical initialization procedures generally involve the use of standard or nonstandard data to force some physical process in the model during an assimilation period. Under the topic of next-generation assimilation techniques, variational approaches are currently being actively developed. Variational approaches seek to minimize a cost or penalty function which measures a model's fit to observations, background fields and other imposed constraints. Alternatively, the Kalman filter technique, which is also under investigation as a data assimilation procedure for numerical weather prediction, can yield acceptable initial conditions for mesoscale models. The

  5. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  6. Explosive Line Wave Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    curvature produced by each line wave generator. Piezoelectric pins were used for an additional assessment of the explosive lens design...to a visual assessment of the wave curvature from the high speed camera images, the explosive lens design was also evaluated using piezoelectric pins...High Explosive Firing Complex (HEFC). The various explosive line wave generators were taped vertically on a supporting board and the detonation wave

  7. Using online tone generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-04-01

    Online tone generators are free, user friendly, and can make for engaging and meaningful study of many topics in the areas of interference, waves, and the physics of music. By using a website such as OnlineToneGenerator.com, and through opening multiple windows simultaneously, students can immediately perform several experiments. In this article, I highlight five lesson ideas that come naturally from these types of websites.

  8. Interactive DIF Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preheim, Larry E.; Amy, Laraine; Young, Jimmie D.

    1993-01-01

    Interactive DIF Generator (IDG) computer program serves as utility to generate and manipulate directory interchange format (DIF) files. Creates and updates DIF files, sent to NASA's Master Directory, also referred to as International Global Change Directory at Goddard Space Flight Center. Many government and university data systems use Master Directory to advertise availability of research data. IDG is interactive software tool and requires mouse or trackball to operate. Written in C language.

  9. [The central pattern generators].

    PubMed

    Balaban, P M; Vorontsov, D D; Dyakonova, V E; Dyakonova, T L; Zakharov, I S; Korshunova, T A; Orlov, O Yu; Pavlova, G A; Panchin, Yi V; Sakharov, D A; Falikman, M V

    2013-01-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) is defined as a set of neurons involved in joint production of patterned motor output. The roundtable discussion on the CPG was a part of the 5th All-Russian Conference on Animal Behavior (Moscow, Nov. 21, 2012). The discussion centred on three core themes: 1) the mechanisms of the organization and reconfiguration of pattern generating neuronal ensembles, 2) extrapolations that extend the CPG concept beyond the motor systems, and 3) evolutionary and developmental aspects of CPG.

  10. Resonant megavolt pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltov, K.A.; Malygin, A.V.; Petrenko, A.N.; Shalimanov, V.F.

    1987-09-01

    A compact pulse generator with a capacitive load is described that employs resonant voltage multiplication at the load. A 60-pF capacitor is charged to 1.1 MV in a pulse with a rise time of 0.25 ..mu..sec. The dimensions of the resonant generator are considerably smaller than those of known Tesla-coil voltage sources (by a factor of approx. 30 in volume).

  11. Compact Mesh Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Benjamin T.; Nissen, III, Walter I.

    2007-02-02

    The CMG is a small, lightweight, structured mesh generation code. It features a simple text input parser that allows setup of various meshes via a small set of text commands. Mesh generation data can be output to text, the silo file format, or the API can be directly queried by applications. It can run serially or in parallel via MPI. The CMG includes the ability to specify varius initial conditions on a mesh via mesh tags.

  12. Liquid propellant gas generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design of gas generators intended to provide hot gases for turbine drive is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the design and operation of bipropellant gas generators because of their wider use. Problems and limitations involved in turbine operation due to temperature effects are analyzed. Methods of temperature control of gas turbines and combustion products are examined. Drawings of critical sections of gas turbines to show their operation and areas of stress are included.

  13. Generating English Discourse from Semantic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, R. F.; Slocum, Jonathan

    The system described in this report is designed for use as a computational tool that allows a linguist to develop and study methods for generating surface strings from an underlying semantic structure. Initial findings with regard to form-determiners (such as voice, form, tense, and mood), some rules for embedding sentences, and some attention to…

  14. Generational Attitudes and Teacher ICT Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pegler, Karen; Kollewyn, Joan; Crichton, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of generational attitudes on teachers' ICT use. Findings from the preliminary research suggest that when applications have a use or purpose that extends beyond the classroom and into their social or personal sphere, younger teachers demonstrate noticeable confidence and a higher potential for technology integration…

  15. Ethnic Attachment among Second Generation Korean Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Joann; Min, Pyong Gap

    1999-01-01

    Describes the levels of second-generation Korean-American adolescents' (n=approximately 237) cultural, social, and psychological dimensions of attachment and examines the major factors highly correlated with two of the dimensions of ethnic attachment: use of the Korean language and Korean friendships. Findings support the view that high levels of…

  16. A New Generation of Russian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisauskene, M.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study examining the values, life stereotypes, and models of behavior of the so-called "next generation" of the Russian youth. The study was titled "From Secondary School Graduate to College Student to Graduate" and was carried out in seven higher educational institutions and two secondary specialized…

  17. Generativity: Lived Experience as Curricular Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallin, Jason; Graham, Tanya

    2002-01-01

    Modern educational practice, inspired by the scientific rationalism of the 17th and 18th centuries, focuses on control, certainty, and order, thus rendering students' experiences superficial. Generativity "finds" the curriculum in students' life experiences, giving them relevance and the opportunity to be explored. Where life is not the…

  18. Generational Attitudes and Teacher ICT Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pegler, Karen; Kollewyn, Joan; Crichton, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of generational attitudes on teachers' ICT use. Findings from the preliminary research suggest that when applications have a use or purpose that extends beyond the classroom and into their social or personal sphere, younger teachers demonstrate noticeable confidence and a higher potential for technology integration…

  19. Generation of artificial helioseismic time-series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schou, J.; Brown, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    We present an outline of an algorithm to generate artificial helioseismic time-series, taking into account as much as possible of the knowledge we have on solar oscillations. The hope is that it will be possible to find the causes of some of the systematic errors in analysis algorithms by testing them with such artificial time-series.

  20. Critical litter moisture maximizes ammonia generation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The natural breakdown of litter (bedding material mixed with deposits of feces, feathers, spilled feed and water) generates ammonia in poultry houses. Good management practices can reduce ammonia concentrations in poultry houses. Findings from a recent publication indicate there is a critical litt...