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Sample records for fine chemicals basel

  1. [Ecotoxicology exemplified by an analysis of the chemical spill into the caused Rhine by Sandoz in Basel].

    PubMed

    Güttinger, H; Stumm, W

    1990-06-01

    A fire at a chemical manufacturing plant at Schweizerhalle (near Basel) in November 1986 and the subsequent release of toxic agrochemicals into the Rhine river is taken as a basis to discuss some problems and needs in ecotoxicological research. Especially serious is the lack of knowledge about chronic effects of mixtures of chemicals to individuals and whole ecosystems. There is an urgent need for generally applicable principles and concepts. A discussion of the relationship between toxic effects to fish, exposure time, and concentration provides some hints about the direction towards which research should proceed. Finally, eight theses pertaining to ecotoxicology summarize what can be learned from the analysis of a chemical spill.

  2. Chemical composition of Martian fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.; Baird, A. K.; Weldon, R. J.; Tsusaki, D. M.; Schnabel, L.; Candelaria, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Of the 21 samples acquired for the Viking X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, 17 were analyzed to high precision. Compared to typical terrestrial continental soils and lunar mare fines, the Martian fines are lower in Al, higher in Fe, and much higher in S and Cl concentrations. Protected fines at the two lander sites are almost indistinguishable, but concentration of the element S is somewhat higher at Utopia. Duricrust fragments, successfully acquired only at the Chryse site, invariably contained about 50% higher S than fines. No elements correlate positively with S, except Cl and possibly Mg. A sympathetic variation is found among the triad Si, Al, Ca; positive correlation occurs between Ti and Fe. Sample variabilities are as great within a few meters as between lander locations (4500 km apart), implying the existence of a universal Martian regolith component of constant average composition. The nature of the source materials for the regolith fines must be mafic to ultramafic.

  3. The production of fine chemicals by biotransformations.

    PubMed

    Straathof, Adrie J J; Panke, Sven; Schmid, Andreas

    2002-12-01

    Today, biocatalysis is a standard technology for the production of chemicals. An analysis of 134 industrial biotransformations reveals that hydrolases (44%) and redox biocatalysts (30%) are the most prominent categories. Most products are chiral (89%) and are used as fine chemicals. In the chemical industry, successful product developments involve on average a yield of 78%, a volumetric productivity of 15.5 g/(L.h) and a final product concentration of 108 g/L. By contrast, the pharmaceutical industry focuses on time-to-market. The implications of this for future research and development on biocatalysis are discussed.

  4. [Starting with camphor--the progress of Nippon Fine Chemical].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    In 1918, Nippon Fine Chemical Co., Ltd. (NFC) was founded under the name, Nippon Camphor Co., Ltd. for the purpose of unifying the camphor business throughout Japan. The company manufactured purified camphor as a government-monopolized good. Camphor was used as a plasticizer for nitrocellulose, as a moth repellent, as an antimicrobial substance, as a rust inhibitor, and as an active ingredient in medicine. It was also a very important good exported in order to obtain foreign currency. Later on, after World War II and the abolition of the camphor monopoly, the company started manufacturing products related to oils and fats, including higher fatty acids, and expanded its business by developing a new field of chemical industry. In 1971 the company changed its name to Nippon Fine Chemical Co., Ltd., and made a new start as a diversified fine chemicals company. Recently, the fine chemicals division of NFC has concentrated on rather complex molecules, such as active pharmaceutical ingredients, and other chemicals. Since 2000, NFC have started to supply "Presome", precursors of liposome DDS drugs. NFC is strengthening marketing strategies in foreign countries with unique technologies and products.

  5. Catalytic upgrading of butyric acid towards fine chemicals and biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Sjöblom, Magnus; Matsakas, Leonidas; Christakopoulos, Paul; Rova, Ulrika

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation-based production of butyric acid is robust and efficient. Modern catalytic technologies make it possible to convert butyric acid to important fine chemicals and biofuels. Here, current chemocatalytic and biocatalytic conversion methods are reviewed with a focus on upgrading butyric acid to 1-butanol or butyl-butyrate. Supported Ruthenium- and Platinum-based catalyst and lipase exhibit important activities which can pave the way for more sustainable process concepts for the production of green fuels and chemicals. PMID:26994015

  6. New trends in (heterogeneous) catalysis for the fine chemicals industry.

    PubMed

    Bonrath, Werner

    2014-01-01

    New catalytic methods and modern trends for the synthesis of fine chemicals, especially vitamins, carotenoids, flavoring and fragrance compounds are presented. In particular the application of heterogeneous catalysis in the formation and production on industrial scale of these classes of organic compounds will be highlighted and its use in the replacement of former stoichiometric processes.

  7. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ.

    PubMed

    Eatough, Delbert J; Cui, Wenxuan; Hull, Jeffery; Farber, Robert J

    2006-12-01

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr day-night samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was +/- 0.6 microg/m3 organic material, +/- 0.3 microg/m3 ammonium sulfate, and +/- 0.07 microg/m3 ammonium nitrate. Data were also available on fine particulate crustal material, fine and coarse particulate mass from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments sampling system, and relative humidity (RH), light absorption, particle scattering, and light extinction measurements from Project MOHAVE. An extinction budget was obtained using mass scattering coefficients estimated from particle size distribution data. Literature data were used to estimate the change in the mass scattering coefficients for the measured species as a function of RH and for the absorption of light by elemental carbon. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. During periods of highest light extinction, contributions from fine particulate organic material, sulfate, and light-absorbing carbon dominated the extinction of light by particles. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides

  8. Fine particulate chemical composition and light extinction at Meadview, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Delbert J. Eatough; Wenxuan Cui; Jeffery Hull; Robert J. Farber

    2006-12-15

    The concentration of fine particulate nitrate, sulfate, and carbonaceous material was measured for 12-hr daynight samples using diffusion denuder samplers during the Project Measurement of Haze and Visibility Effects (MOHAVE) July to August 1992 Summer Intensive study at Meadview, AZ, just west of Grand Canyon National Park. Organic material was measured by several techniques. Only the diffusion denuder method measured the semivolatile organic material. Fine particulate sulfate and nitrate (using denuder technology) determined by various groups agreed. Based on the various collocated measurements obtained during the Project MOHAVE study, the precision of the major fine particulate species was {+-} 0.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3} organic material, {+-} 0.3 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium sulfate, and {+-} 0.07 {mu}g/m{sup 3} ammonium nitrate. Fine particulate organic material was the principal particulate contributor to light extinction during the study period, with fine particulate sulfate as the second most important contributor. Particle light extinction was dominated by sulfate and organic material during periods of lowest light extinction. Combination of the extinction data and chemical mass balance analysis of sulfur oxides sources in the region indicate that the major anthropogenic contributors to light extinction were from the Los Angeles, CA, and Las Vegas, NV, urban areas. Mohave Power Project associated secondary sulfate was a negligible contributor to light extinction. 49 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. 78 FR 5500 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Ampac Fine Chemicals, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... FR 60145, AMPAC Fine Chemicals, LLC, Highway 50 and Hazel Avenue, Building 05001, Rancho Cordova... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Ampac Fine Chemicals...), and determined that the registration of AMPAC Fine Chemicals, LLC to manufacture the listed...

  10. Calcium, Strontium and Barium Homogeneous Catalysts for Fine Chemicals Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Yann; Carpentier, Jean-François

    2016-12-01

    The large alkaline earths (Ae), calcium, strontium and barium, have in the past 15 years yielded a brand new generation of heteroleptic molecular catalysts for the production of fine chemicals. However, the integrity of these complexes is often plagued by ligand redistribution equilibria in solution. This personal account retraces the paths followed in our research group towards the design of stable heteroleptic alkalino-earth complexes, including the use of intramolecular noncovalent Ae···H-Si and Ae···F-C interactions. Their implementation as homogenous precatalysts for reactions such as the intramolecular and intermolecular hydroamination and hydrophosphination of activated alkenes, the hydrophosphonylation of ketones, and the dehydrogenative coupling of amines and hydrosilanes that enable the efficient and controlled formations of CP, CN, or SiN σ-bonds, is presented in a synthetic perspective that highlights their overall outstanding catalytic performance.

  11. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  12. 77 FR 24988 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Chemicals By Notice dated October 8, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2010, 75 FR 64746, ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals, 238 South Main Street, Assonet, Massachusetts 02702, made...) and determined that the registration of ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals, to manufacture the listed...

  13. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Chemicals By Notice dated October 8, 2010, and published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2010, 75 FR 64743, ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals, 238 South Main Street, Assonet, Massachusetts 02702, made... Freetown Fine Chemicals to import the basic class of controlled substance is consistent with the...

  14. A 'Fine' chemical industry for life science products: green solutions to chemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Bruggink, A; Straathof, A J J; van der Wielen, L A M

    2003-01-01

    Modern biotechnology, in combination with chemistry and process technology, is crucial for the development of new clean and cost effective manufacturing concepts for fine-chemical, food specialty and pharmaceutical products. The impact of biocatalysis on the fine-chemicals industry is presented, where reduction of process development time, the number of reaction steps and the amount of waste generated per kg of end product are the main targets. Integration of biosynthesis and organic chemistry is seen as a key development. The advances in bioseparation technology need to keep pace with the rate of development of novel bio- or chemocatalytic process routes with revised demands on process technology. The need for novel integrated reactors is also presented. The necessary acceleration of process development and reduction of the time-to-market seem well possible, particularly by integrating high-speed experimental techniques and predictive modelling tools. This is crucial for the development of a more sustainable fine-chemicals industry. The evolution of novel 'green' production routes for semi-synthetic antibiotics (SSAs) that are replacing existing chemical processes serves as a recent and relevant case study of this ongoing integration of disciplines. We will also show some challenges in this specific field.

  15. Combined Chemical Activation and Fenton Degradation to Convert Waste Polyethylene into High-Value Fine Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai; Wong, Wing-Leung; Ho, Keith Yat-Fung; Chan, Chung-Sum; Gong, Cheng-Bin

    2016-07-04

    Plastic waste is a valuable organic resource. However, proper technologies to recover usable materials from plastic are still very rare. Although the conversion/cracking/degradation of certain plastics into chemicals has drawn much attention, effective and selective cracking of the major waste plastic polyethylene is extremely difficult, with degradation of C-C/C-H bonds identified as the bottleneck. Pyrolysis, for example, is a nonselective degradation method used to crack plastics, but it requires a very high energy input. To solve the current plastic pollution crisis, more effective technologies are needed for converting plastic waste into useful substances that can be fed into the energy cycle or used to produce fine chemicals for industry. In this study, we demonstrate a new and effective chemical approach by using the Fenton reaction to convert polyethylene plastic waste into carboxylic acids under ambient conditions. Understanding the fundamentals of this new chemical process provides a possible protocol to solve global plastic-waste problems.

  16. 78 FR 69134 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration: AMPAC Fine Chemicals, LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration: AMPAC Fine Chemicals, LLC. By Notice dated July 23, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on July 31, 2013, 78 FR 46372, AMPAC Fine Chemicals, LLC., Highway 50 and Hazel Avenue, Building 05001, Rancho...

  17. The Basel Problem as a Telescoping Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benko, David

    2012-01-01

    The celebrated Basel Problem, that of finding the infinite sum 1 + 1/ 4 + 1/9 + 1/16 + ..., was open for 91 years. In 1735 Euler showed that the sum is pi[superscript 2]/6. Dozens of other solutions have been found. We give one that is short and elementary.

  18. [Historical development of anthropology in Basel].

    PubMed

    Bay, R

    1986-12-01

    The author reports on the history of physical anthropology in Basel (Switzerland). The anthropological research activities of Carl Gustav Jung (1794-1864), Wilhelm His-Vischer (1831-1904), Ludwig Rütimeyer (1825-1895), Julius Kollmann (1834-1918), Paul and Fritz Sarasin (P.: 1856-1924; F.: 1859-1942), Felix Speiser (1880-1949) and the author himself (b. 1909) are described in detail.

  19. Development of bio-based fine chemical production through synthetic bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Araki, Michihiro; Okai, Naoko; Wakai, Satoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-12-14

    Fine chemicals that are physiologically active, such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, flavoring agents as well as additives for foods, feed, and fertilizer are produced by enzymatically or through microbial fermentation. The identification of enzymes that catalyze the target reaction makes possible the enzymatic synthesis of the desired fine chemical. The genes encoding these enzymes are then introduced into suitable microbial hosts that are cultured with inexpensive, naturally abundant carbon sources, and other nutrients. Metabolic engineering create efficient microbial cell factories for producing chemicals at higher yields. Molecular genetic techniques are then used to optimize metabolic pathways of genetically and metabolically well-characterized hosts. Synthetic bioengineering represents a novel approach to employ a combination of computer simulation and metabolic analysis to design artificial metabolic pathways suitable for mass production of target chemicals in host strains. In the present review, we summarize recent studies on bio-based fine chemical production and assess the potential of synthetic bioengineering for further improving their productivity.

  20. [Applications of nitrile converting enzymes in the production of fine chemicals].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuguo; Xue, Yaping; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Renchao; Shen, Yinchu

    2009-12-01

    Nitriles are an important type of synthetic intermediates in the production of fine chemicals because of their easy preparations and versatile transformations. The traditional chemical conversion of nitriles to carboxylic acids and amides is feasible but it requires relatively harsh conditions of heat, acid or alkali. Nitrile converting enzymes (nitrilase, nitrile hydratase and amidase) which are used as biocatalyst for the production of fine chemicals have attracted substantial interest because of their ability to convert readily available nitriles into the corresponding higher value amides or acids under mild conditions with excellent chemo-, regio- and stereo-selectivities. Many nitrile converting enzymes have been explored and widely used for the production of fine chemicals. In this paper, various examples of biocatalytic synthesis of pharmaceuticals and their intermediates, agrochemicals and their intermediates, food and feed additives, and other fine chemicals are presented. In the near future, an increasing number of novel nitrile converting enzymes will be screened and their potential in the production of useful fine chemicals will be further exploited.

  1. Towards novel processes for the fine-chemical and pharmaceutical industries.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Gjalt W; Gray, David

    2002-08-01

    In response to the need in the pharmaceutical industry for more complex, chiral molecules, fine-chemical companies are embracing new manufacturing technologies to produce compounds of these specifications. In particular, recent developments in biocatalysis combined with novel process engineering are providing improved methods for the production of valuable chemical intermediates.

  2. Trends and innovations in industrial biocatalysis for the production of fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Panke, Sven; Held, Martin; Wubbolts, Marcel

    2004-08-01

    Biocatalysis has become an established technology for the industrial manufacture of fine chemicals. In recent years, a multitude of chemical companies have embraced biocatalysis for the manufacture of desired stereoisomers, and new or improved methods for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure alpha- and beta-amino acids, amines, amides, peptides, nitriles, alcohols, organic acids and epoxides have emerged. Furthermore, the selectivity and mild operational conditions of biocatalysts are increasingly applied in industry to modify complex target molecules. These recent innovations in the manufacture of industrial fine chemicals using biocatalysis are discussed from an industrial perspective.

  3. Creating pathways towards aromatic building blocks and fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brian; Machas, Michael; Nielsen, David R

    2015-12-01

    Aromatic compounds represent a broad class of chemicals with a range of industrial applications, all of which are conventionally derived from petroleum feedstocks. However, owing to a diversity of available pathway precursors along with natural and engineered enzyme 'parts', microbial cell factories can be engineered to create alternative, renewable routes to many of the same aromatic products. Drawing from the latest tools and strategies in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology, such efforts are becoming an increasingly systematic practice, while continued efforts promise to open new doors to an ever-expanding range and diversity of renewable chemical and material products. This short review will highlight recent and notable achievements related for the microbial production of aromatic chemicals.

  4. Catalytic Conversion of Renewable Resources into Bulk and Fine Chemicals.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Johannes G

    2016-12-01

    Several strategies can be chosen to convert renewable resources into chemicals. In this account, I exemplify the route that starts with so-called platform chemicals; these are relatively simple chemicals that can be produced in high yield, directly from renewable resources, either via fermentation or via chemical routes. They can be converted into the existing bulk chemicals in a very efficient manner using multistep catalytic conversions. Two examples are given of the conversion of sugars into nylon intermediates. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) can be prepared in good yield from fructose. Two hydrogenation steps convert HMF into 1,6-hexanediol. Oppenauer oxidation converts this product into caprolactone, which in the past, has been converted into caprolactam in a large-scale industrial process by reaction with ammonia. An even more interesting platform chemical is levulinic acid (LA), which can be obtained directly from lignocellulose in good yield by treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 200°C. Hydrogenation converts LA into gamma-valerolactone, which is ring-opened and esterified in a gas-phase process to a mixture of isomeric methyl pentenoates in excellent selectivity. In a remarkable selective palladium-catalysed isomerising methoxycarbonylation, this mixture is converted in to dimethyl adipate, which is finally hydrolysed to adipic acid. Overall selectivities of both processes are extremely high. The conversion of lignin into chemicals is a much more complicated task in view of the complex nature of lignin. It was discovered that breakage of the most prevalent β-O-4 bond in lignin occurs not only via the well-documented C3 pathway, but also via a C2 pathway, leading to the formation of highly reactive phenylacetaldehydes. These compounds went largely unnoticed as they immediately recondense on lignin. We have now found that it is possible to prevent this by converting these aldehydes in a tandem reaction, as they are formed. For this purpose, we have used

  5. Synthesis of renewable fine-chemical building blocks by reductive coupling between furfural derivatives and terpenes.

    PubMed

    Nicklaus, Céline M; Minnaard, Adriaan J; Feringa, Ben L; de Vries, Johannes G

    2013-09-01

    Sugar and Spice…: The use of renewable resources to produce fine chemicals is an underdeveloped area. A waste-free technology will be necessary to further convert platform chemicals, readily available from biomass. We show that furfurals, which can be obtained from C5 sugars, can be coupled with terpenes in up to 95% yield through ruthenium-catalyzed reductive couplings developed by Krische et al.

  6. 77 FR 60145 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; AMPAC Fine Chemicals, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; AMPAC Fine Chemicals..., California 95670, made application by letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered...

  7. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF WORLD TRADE CENTER FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FOR USE IN TOXICOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Analysis of World Trade Center Fine Particulate Matter for Use in Toxicological Assessment
    John K. McGee1, Lung Chi Chen2, Mitchell D. Cohen2, Glen R. Chee2, Colette M. Prophete2, Najwa Haykal-Coates1, Shirley J. Wasson3, Teri L. Conner4, Daniel L. Costa1, and Steph...

  8. Impact of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering on industrial production of fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Jullesson, David; David, Florian; Pfleger, Brian; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-11-15

    Industrial bio-processes for fine chemical production are increasingly relying on cell factories developed through metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. The use of high throughput techniques and automation for the design of cell factories, and especially platform strains, has played an important role in the transition from laboratory research to industrial production. Model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli remain widely used host strains for industrial production due to their robust and desirable traits. This review describes some of the bio-based fine chemicals that have reached the market, key metabolic engineering tools that have allowed this to happen and some of the companies that are currently utilizing these technologies for developing industrial production processes.

  9. Tailor-made biocatalysts enzymes for the fine chemical industry in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Tao, Rongsheng; Yang, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    The Center of Industrial Biotechnology (CIBT) was established in Huzhou for fine chemicals in 2006 and CIBT Shanghai was founded for bulk chemicals in 2008. CIBT is a non-profit organization under auspices of the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Shanghai Branch of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Huzhou Municipal Government. CIBT is affiliated with the CAS, which enables it to take advantage of the rich R&D resources and support from CAS; yet CIBT operates as an independent legal entity. The goal of CIBT is to incubate industrial biotechnologies and accelerate the commercialization of these technologies with corporate partners in China.

  10. Chemical speciation and source apportionment of fine particulate matter in Santiago, Chile, 2013.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Ana M; Barraza, Francisco; Jorquera, Héctor; Schauer, James J

    2015-04-15

    Santiago is one of the largest cities in South America and has experienced high fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations in fall and winter months for decades. To better understand the sources of fall and wintertime pollution in Santiago, PM2.5 samples were collected for 24 h every weekday from March to October 2013 for chemical analysis. Samples were analyzed for mass, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water soluble nitrogen (WSTN), secondary inorganic ions, and particle-phase organic tracers for source apportionment. Selected samples were analyzed as monthly composites for organic tracers. PM2.5 concentrations were considerably higher in the coldest months (June-July), averaging (mean ± standard deviation) 62±15 μg/m(3) in these two months. Average fine particle mass concentration during the study period was 40±20 μg/m(3). Organic matter during the peak winter months was the major component of fine particles comprising around 70% of the particle mass. Source contributions to OC were calculated using organic molecular markers and a chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model. The four combustion sources identified were wood smoke, diesel engine emission, gasoline vehicles, and natural gas. Wood smoke was the predominant source of OC, accounting for 58±42% of OC in fall and winter. Wood smoke and nitrate were the major contributors to PM2.5. In fall and winter, wood smoke accounted for 9.8±7.1 μg/m(3) (21±15%) and nitrate accounted for 9.1±4.8 μg/m(3) (20±10%) of fine PM. The sum of secondary inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) represented about 30% of PM2.5 mass. Secondary organic aerosols contributed only in warm months, accounting for about 30% of fine PM during this time.

  11. Seasonal trends, chemical speciation and source apportionment of fine PM in Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhami, Mohammad; Hosseini, Vahid; Zare Shahne, Maryam; Bigdeli, Mostafa; Lai, Alexandra; Schauer, James J.

    2017-03-01

    Frequent air pollution episodes have been reported for Tehran, Iran, mainly because of critically high levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5). The composition and sources of these particles are poorly known, so this study aims to identify the major components and heavy metals in PM2.5 along with their seasonal trends and associated sources. 24-hour PM2.5 samples were collected at a main residential station every 6 days for a full year from February 2014 to February 2015. The samples were analyzed for ions, organic carbon (including water-soluble and insoluble portions), elemental carbon (EC), and all detectable elements. The dominant mass components, which were determined by means of chemical mass closure, were organic matter (35%), dust (25%), non-sea salt sulfate (11%), EC (9%), ammonium (5%), and nitrate (2%). Organic matter and EC together comprised 44% of fine PM on average (increased to >70% in the colder season), which reflects the significance of anthropogenic urban sources (i.e. vehicles). The contributions of different components varied considerably throughout the year, particularly the dust component that varied from 7% in the cold season to 56% in the hot and dry season. Principal component analyses were applied, resulting in 5 major source factors that explained 85% of the variance in fine PM. Factor 1, representing soil dust, explained 53%; Factor 2 denotes heavy metals mainly found in industrial sources and accounted for 18%; and rest of factors, mainly representing combustion sources, explained 14% of the variation. The levels of major heavy metals were further evaluated, and their trends showed considerable increases during cold seasons. The results of this study provide useful insight to fine PM in Tehran, which could help in identifying their health effects and sources, and also adopting effective control strategies.

  12. Metabolism of fluoroorganic compounds in microorganisms: impacts for the environment and the production of fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Cormac D; Clark, Benjamin R; Amadio, Jessica

    2009-09-01

    Incorporation of fluorine into an organic compound can favourably alter its physicochemical properties with respect to biological activity, stability and lipophilicity. Accordingly, this element is found in many pharmaceutical and industrial chemicals. Organofluorine compounds are accepted as substrates by many enzymes, and the interactions of microorganisms with these compounds are of relevance to the environment and the fine chemicals industry. On the one hand, the microbial transformation of organofluorines can lead to the generation of toxic compounds that are of environmental concern, yet similar biotransformations can yield difficult-to-synthesise products and intermediates, in particular derivatives of biologically active secondary metabolites. In this paper, we review the historical and recent developments of organofluorine biotransformation in microorganisms and highlight the possibility of using microbes as models of fluorinated drug metabolism in mammals.

  13. Chromium Extraction via Chemical Processing of Fe-Cr Alloys Fine Powder with High Carbon Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. M.; Navarro, R. C. S.; Souza, R. F. M.; Brocchi, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    Ferrous alloys are important raw materials for special steel production. In this context, alloys from the Fe-Cr system, with typical Cr weight fraction ranging from 0.45 to 0.95, are prominent, particularly for the stainless steel industry. During the process in which these alloys are obtained, there is considerable production of fine powder, which could be reused after suitable chemical treatment, for example, through coupling pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical processes. In the present study, the extraction of chromium from fine powder generated during the production of a Fe-Cr alloy with high C content was investigated. Roasting reactions were performed at 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C) with 300 pct (w/w) excess NaOH in an oxidizing atmosphere (air), followed by solubilization in deionized water, selective precipitation, and subsequent calcination at 1173 K (900 °C) in order to convert the obtained chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3. The maximum achieved Cr recovery was around 86 pct, suggesting that the proposed chemical route was satisfactory regarding the extraction of the chromium initially present. Moreover, after X-ray diffraction analysis, the final produced oxide has proven to be pure Cr2O3 with a mean crystallite size of 200 nm.

  14. Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter and Associations between Particulate Chemical Constituents and Mortality in Seoul, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Son, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jung, Kweon

    2012-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have linked fine particles [≤ 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] and health. Most studies focused on the total mass of the particles, although the chemical composition of the particles varies substantially. Which chemical components of fine particles that are the most harmful is not well understood, and research on the chemical composition of PM2.5 and the components that are the most harmful is particularly limited in Asia. Objectives: We characterized PM2.5 chemical composition and estimated the effects of cause-specific mortality of PM2.5 mass and constituents in Seoul, Korea. We compared the chemical composition of particles to those of the eastern and western United States. Methods: We examined temporal variability of PM2.5 mass and its composition using hourly data. We applied an overdispersed Poisson generalized linear model, adjusting for time, day of week, temperature, and relative humidity to investigate the association between risk of mortality and PM2.5 mass and its constituents in Seoul, Korea, for August 2008 through October 2009. Results: PM2.5 and chemical components exhibited temporal patterns by time of day and season. The chemical characteristics of Seoul’s PM2.5 were more similar to PM2.5 found in the western United States than in the eastern United States. Seoul’s PM2.5 had lower sulfate (SO4) contributions and higher nitrate (NO3) contributions than that of the eastern United States, although overall PM2.5 levels in Seoul were higher than in the United States. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in magnesium (Mg) (0.05 μg/m3) was associated with a 1.4% increase (95% confidence interval: 0.2%, 2.6%) in total mortality on the following day. Several components that were among the largest contributors to PM2.5 total mass—NO3, SO4, and ammonium (NH4)—were moderately associated with same-day cardiovascular mortality at the p < 0.10 level. Other components with smaller mass contributions [Mg and

  15. Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004–2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m3), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m3), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m3). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m3 over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m3) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m3). These estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5. PMID:25343705

  16. Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Philip, Sajeev; Martin, Randall V.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; ...

    2014-10-24

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004–2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrationsmore » were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m3), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m3), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m3). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m3 over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m3) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m3). In conclusion, these estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5.« less

  17. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS AND MINERAL FINES ON CRUDE OIL DISPERSION IN A WAVE TANK UNDER BREAKING WAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the ...

  18. SYNBIOCHEM-a SynBio foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Currin, Andrew; Dunstan, Mark; Fellows, Donal; Jervis, Adrian; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Robinson, Christopher J; Swainston, Neil; Vinaixa, Maria; Williams, Alan; Yan, Cunyu; Barran, Perdita; Breitling, Rainer; Chen, George Guo-Qiang; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Goble, Carole; Goodacre, Royston; Kell, Douglas B; Feuvre, Rosalind Le; Micklefield, Jason; Scrutton, Nigel S; Shapira, Philip; Takano, Eriko; Turner, Nicholas J

    2016-06-15

    The Manchester Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SYNBIOCHEM) is a foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals. The Centre's integrated technology platforms provide a unique capability to facilitate predictable engineering of microbial bio-factories for chemicals production. An overview of these capabilities is described.

  19. SYNBIOCHEM–a SynBio foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Pablo; Currin, Andrew; Dunstan, Mark; Fellows, Donal; Jervis, Adrian; Rattray, Nicholas J.W.; Robinson, Christopher J.; Swainston, Neil; Vinaixa, Maria; Williams, Alan; Yan, Cunyu; Barran, Perdita; Breitling, Rainer; Chen, George Guo-Qiang; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Goble, Carole; Goodacre, Royston; Kell, Douglas B.; Feuvre, Rosalind Le; Micklefield, Jason; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Shapira, Philip; Takano, Eriko; Turner, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The Manchester Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SYNBIOCHEM) is a foundry for the biosynthesis and sustainable production of fine and speciality chemicals. The Centre's integrated technology platforms provide a unique capability to facilitate predictable engineering of microbial bio-factories for chemicals production. An overview of these capabilities is described. PMID:27284023

  20. Chemical characteristics of fine particles emitted from different gas cooking methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Siao Wei; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    Gas cooking is an important indoor source of fine particles (PM 2.5). The chemical characteristics of PM 2.5 emitted from different cooking methods, namely, steaming, boiling, stir-frying, pan-frying and deep-frying were investigated in a domestic kitchen. Controlled experiments were conducted to measure the mass concentration of PM 2.5 and its chemical constituents (elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals and ions) arising from these five cooking methods. To investigate the difference in particle properties of different cooking emissions, the amount and type of food, and the heat setting on the gas stove were kept constant during the entire course of the experiments. Results showed that deep-frying gave rise to the largest amount of PM 2.5 and most chemical components, followed by pan-frying, stir-frying, boiling, and steaming. Oil-based cooking methods released more organic pollutants (OC, PAHs, and organic ions) and metals, while water-based cooking methods accounted for more water-soluble (WS) ions. Their source profiles are also presented and discussed.

  1. The Basel Problem as a Rearrangement of Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benko, David; Molokach, John

    2013-01-01

    We give an elementary solution to the famous Basel Problem, originally solved by Euler in 1735. We square the well-known series for arctan(1) due to Leibniz, and use a surprising relation among the re-arranged terms of this squared series.

  2. Global Chemical Composition of Ambient Fine Particulate Matter for Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Sajeev; Martin, Randall V.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Lo, Jason Wai-Ho; Wang, Yuxuan; Chen, Dan; Zhang, Lin; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Wang, Siwen; Zhang, Qiang; Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G.; Bittman, Shabtai; Macdonald, Douglas J.

    2014-10-24

    Epidemiologic and health impact studies are inhibited by the paucity of global, long-term measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter. We inferred PM2.5 chemical composition at 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution for 2004–2008 by combining aerosol optical depth retrieved from the MODIS and MISR satellite instruments, with coincident profile and composition information from the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model. Evaluation of the satellite-model PM2.5 composition data set with North American in situ measurements indicated significant spatial agreement for secondary inorganic aerosol, particulate organic mass, black carbon, mineral dust, and sea salt. We found that global population-weighted PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by particulate organic mass (11.9 ± 7.3 μg/m3), secondary inorganic aerosol (11.1 ± 5.0 μg/m3), and mineral dust (11.1 ± 7.9 μg/m3). Secondary inorganic PM2.5 concentrations exceeded 30 μg/m3 over East China. Sensitivity simulations suggested that population-weighted ambient PM2.5 from biofuel burning (11 μg/m3) could be almost as large as from fossil fuel combustion sources (17 μg/m3). In conclusion, these estimates offer information about global population exposure to the chemical components and sources of PM2.5.

  3. CHARACTERIZING THE SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC CHEMICALS IN AIRBORNE FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal and ambient exposures to airborne fine particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and genotoxic activity has been studied in populations in the US, Japan, China, and the Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors used to collect fine particles were extracted f...

  4. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of fine and coarse particulate matter in Lahore, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Elizabeth; Schauer, James; Quraishi, Tauseef A.; Mahmood, Abid

    2010-03-01

    Lahore, Pakistan is an emerging megacity that is heavily polluted with high levels of particle air pollution. In this study, respirable particulate matter (PM 2.5 and PM 10) were collected every sixth day in Lahore from 12 January 2007 to 19 January 2008. Ambient aerosol was characterized using well-established chemical methods for mass, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), ionic species (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, calcium, and potassium), and organic species. The annual average concentration (±one standard deviation) of PM 2.5 was 194 ± 94 μg m -3 and PM 10 was 336 ± 135 μg m -3. Coarse aerosol (PM 10-2.5) was dominated by crustal sources like dust (74 ± 16%, annual average ± one standard deviation), whereas fine particles were dominated by carbonaceous aerosol (organic matter and elemental carbon, 61 ± 17%). Organic tracer species were used to identify sources of PM 2.5 OC and chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling was used to estimate relative source contributions. On an annual basis, non-catalyzed motor vehicles accounted for more than half of primary OC (53 ± 19%). Lesser sources included biomass burning (10 ± 5%) and the combined source of diesel engines and residual fuel oil combustion (6 ± 2%). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was an important contributor to ambient OC, particularly during the winter when secondary processing of aerosol species during fog episodes was expected. Coal combustion alone contributed a small percentage of organic aerosol (1.9 ± 0.3%), but showed strong linear correlation with unidentified sources of OC that contributed more significantly (27 ± 16%). Brick kilns, where coal and other low quality fuels are burned together, are suggested as the most probable origins of unapportioned OC. The chemical profiling of emissions from brick kilns and other sources unique to Lahore would contribute to a better understanding of OC sources in this megacity.

  5. Fine particulate matter source apportionment using a hybrid chemical transport and receptor model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Balachandran, S.; Pachon, J. E.; Baek, J.; Ivey, C.; Holmes, H.; Odman, M. T.; Mulholland, J. A.; Russell, A. G.

    2013-10-01

    A hybrid fine particulate matter (PM2.5) source apportionment approach based on a receptor-model (RM) species balance and species specific source impacts from a chemical transport model (CTM) equipped with a sensitivity analysis tool is developed to provide physically- and chemically-consistent relationships between source emissions and receptor impacts. This hybrid approach enhances RM results by providing initial estimates of source impacts from a much larger number of sources than are typically used in RMs, and provides source-receptor relationships for secondary species. Further, the method addresses issues of source collinearities, and accounts for emissions uncertainties. Hybrid method results also provide information on the resulting source impact uncertainties. We apply this hybrid approach to conduct PM2.5 source apportionment at Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sites across the US. Ambient PM2.5 concentrations at these receptor sites were apportioned to 33 separate sources. Hybrid method results led to large changes of impacts from CTM estimates for sources such as dust, woodstove, and other biomass burning sources, but limited changes to others. The refinements reduced the differences between CTM-simulated and observed concentrations of individual PM2.5 species by over 98% when using a weighted least squared error minimization. The rankings of source impacts changed from the initial estimates, revealing that CTM-only results should be evaluated with observations. Assessment with RM results at six US locations showed that the hybrid results differ somewhat from commonly resolved sources. The hybrid method also resolved sources that typical RM methods do not capture without extra measurement information on unique tracers. The method can be readily applied to large domains and long (such as multi-annual) time periods to provide source impact estimates for management- and health-related studies.

  6. Fine particulate matter source apportionment using a hybrid chemical transport and receptor model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Balachandran, S.; Pachon, J. E.; Baek, J.; Ivey, C.; Holmes, H.; Odman, M. T.; Mulholland, J. A.; Russell, A. G.

    2014-06-01

    A hybrid fine particulate matter (PM2.5) source apportionment approach based on a receptor model (RM) species balance and species specific source impacts from a chemical transport model (CTM) equipped with a sensitivity analysis tool is developed to provide physically and chemically consistent relationships between source emissions and receptor impacts. This hybrid approach enhances RM results by providing initial estimates of source impacts from a much larger number of sources than are typically used in RMs, and provides source-receptor relationships for secondary species. Further, the method addresses issues of source collinearities and accounts for emissions uncertainties. We apply this hybrid approach to conduct PM2.5 source apportionment at Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) sites across the US. Ambient PM2.5 concentrations at these receptor sites were apportioned to 33 separate sources. Hybrid method results led to large changes of impacts from CTM estimates for sources such as dust, woodstoves, and other biomass-burning sources, but limited changes to others. The refinements reduced the differences between CTM-simulated and observed concentrations of individual PM2.5 species by over 98% when using a weighted least-squares error minimization. The rankings of source impacts changed from the initial estimates, further demonstrating that CTM-only results should be evaluated with observations. Assessment with RM results at six US locations showed that the hybrid results differ somewhat from commonly resolved sources. The hybrid method also resolved sources that typical RM methods do not capture without extra measurement information for unique tracers. The method can be readily applied to large domains and long (such as multi-annual) time periods to provide source impact estimates for management- and health-related studies.

  7. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  8. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  9. Chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol for source apportionment at Monterrey, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancilla, Y.; Mendoza, A.; Fraser, M. P.; Herckes, P.

    2015-07-01

    , source attribution results obtained using the CMB model indicate that emissions from motor vehicle exhausts are the most important, accounting for the 64 % of the PM2.5. The vegetative detritus and biomass burning had the smallest contribution (2.2 % of the PM2.5). To our knowledge, this is the second study to explore the broad chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol in Mexico and the first for the MMA.

  10. Enhancing of chemical compound and drug name recognition using representative tag scheme and fine-grained tokenization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The functions of chemical compounds and drugs that affect biological processes and their particular effect on the onset and treatment of diseases have attracted increasing interest with the advancement of research in the life sciences. To extract knowledge from the extensive literatures on such compounds and drugs, the organizers of BioCreative IV administered the CHEMical Compound and Drug Named Entity Recognition (CHEMDNER) task to establish a standard dataset for evaluating state-of-the-art chemical entity recognition methods. Methods This study introduces the approach of our CHEMDNER system. Instead of emphasizing the development of novel feature sets for machine learning, this study investigates the effect of various tag schemes on the recognition of the names of chemicals and drugs by using conditional random fields. Experiments were conducted using combinations of different tokenization strategies and tag schemes to investigate the effects of tag set selection and tokenization method on the CHEMDNER task. Results This study presents the performance of CHEMDNER of three more representative tag schemes-IOBE, IOBES, and IOB12E-when applied to a widely utilized IOB tag set and combined with the coarse-/fine-grained tokenization methods. The experimental results thus reveal that the fine-grained tokenization strategy performance best in terms of precision, recall and F-scores when the IOBES tag set was utilized. The IOBES model with fine-grained tokenization yielded the best-F-scores in the six chemical entity categories other than the "Multiple" entity category. Nonetheless, no significant improvement was observed when a more representative tag schemes was used with the coarse or fine-grained tokenization rules. The best F-scores that were achieved using the developed system on the test dataset of the CHEMDNER task were 0.833 and 0.815 for the chemical documents indexing and the chemical entity mention recognition tasks, respectively. Conclusions The

  11. Fine particulate matter and visibility in the Lake Tahoe Basin: chemical characterization, trends, and source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Green, Mark C; Chen, L W Antony; DuBois, David W; Molenar, John V

    2012-08-01

    Speciated PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameterFine mass at SOLA is 2.5 times that at BLIS, mainly due to enhanced organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC). SOLA experiences a winter peak in PM25 mainly due to OC and EC from residential wood combustion, whereas BLIS experiences a summer peak in PM2.5 mainly due to OC and ECfrom wildfires. Carbonaceous aerosol dominates visibility impairment, causing about 1/2 the reconstructed aerosol light extinction at BLIS and 70% at SOLA. Trend analysis (1990-2009) showed statistically significant decreases in aerosol extinction at BLIS on 20% best and 60% middle visibility days and statistically insignificant upward trends on 20% worst days. SOLA (1990-2003) showed statistically significant decreases in aerosol extinction for all day categories, driven by decreasing OC and EC. From the regional haze rule baseline period of 2000-2004 until 2005-2009, BLIS saw 20% best days improving and 20% worst days getting worse due to increased wildfire effects. Receptor modeling was performed using positive matrix factorization (PMF) and chemical mass balance (CMB). It confirmed that (1) biomass burning dominanted PM25 sources at both sites with increasing importance over time; (2) low combustion efficiency burning accounts for most of the biomass burning contribution; (3) road dust and traffic contributions were much higher at SOLA than at BLIS; and (4) industrial combustion and salting were minor sources.

  12. Effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on crude oil dispersion in a wave tank under breaking waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengkai; Kepkay, Paul; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2007-07-01

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the formation of oil-mineral-aggregates (OMAs) in natural seawater. Results of ultraviolet spectrofluorometry and gas chromatography flame ionized detection analysis indicated that dispersants and mineral fines, alone and in combination, enhanced the dispersion of oil into the water column. Measurements taken with a laser in situ scattering and transmissometer (LISST-100X) showed that the presence of mineral fines increased the total concentration of the suspended particles from 4 to 10microl l(-1), whereas the presence of dispersants decreased the particle size (mass mean diameter) of OMAs from 50 to 10microm. Observation with an epifluorescence microscope indicated that the presence of dispersants, mineral fines, or both in combination significantly increased the number of particles dispersed into the water.

  13. Permeability Enhancement in Fine-Grained Sediments by Chemically Induced Clay Fabric Shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, A M; Kansa, E J; Viani, B E; Blake, R G; Roberts, J J; Huber, R D

    2004-02-26

    The National Research Council [1] identified the entrapment of contaminants in fine-grained clay-bearing soils as a major impediment to the timely and cost-effective remediation of groundwater to regulatory standards. Contaminants trapped in low-permeability, low-diffusivity, high-sorptivity clays are not accessible to advective flushing by treatment fluids from permeable zones, and slowly diffuse out to recontaminate previously cleaned permeable strata. We propose to overcome this barrier to effective remediation by exploiting the ability of certain nontoxic EPA-approved chemicals (e.g., ethanol) to shrink and alter the fabric of clays, and thereby create macro-porosity and crack networks in fine-grained sediments. This would significantly reduce the distance and time scales of diffusive mass transport to advectively flushed boundaries, to yield orders of magnitude reduction in the time required to complete remediation. Given that effective solutions to this central problem of subsurface remediation do not yet exist, the cost and time benefits of successful deployment of this novel concept, both as a stand-alone technology and as an enabling pre-treatment for other remedial technologies that rely on advective delivery, is likely to be very large. This project, funded as a 1-year feasibility study by LLNL's LDRD Program, is a multi-directorate, multi-disciplinary effort that leverages expertise from the Energy & Environment Directorate, the Environmental Restoration Division, and the Manufacturing & Materials Evaluation Division of Mechanical Engineering. In this feasibility study, a ''proof-of-principle'' experiment was performed to answer the central question: ''Can clay shrinkage induced by ethanol in clay-bearing sediments overcome realistic confining stresses, crack clay, and increase its effective permeability by orders of magnitude within a time that is much smaller than the time required for diffusive mass transport of ethanol in the unaltered sediment

  14. Chemical analysis of World Trade Center fine particulate matter for use in toxicologic assessment.

    PubMed

    McGee, John K; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Chee, Glen R; Prophete, Colette M; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wasson, Shirley J; Conner, Teri L; Costa, Daniel L; Gavett, Stephen H

    2003-06-01

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 caused the release of high levels of airborne pollutants into the local environment. To assess the toxicity of fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)], which may adversely affect the health of workers and residents in the area, we collected fallen dust samples on 12 and 13 September 2001 from sites within a half-mile of Ground Zero. Samples of WTC dust were sieved, aerosolized, and size-separated, and the PM2.5 fraction was isolated on filters. Here we report the chemical and physical properties of PM2.5 derived from these samples and compare them with PM2.5 fractions of three reference materials that range in toxicity from relatively inert to acutely toxic (Mt. St. Helens PM; Washington, DC, ambient air PM; and residual oil fly ash). X-ray diffraction of very coarse sieved WTC PM (< 53 microm) identified calcium sulfate (gypsum) and calcium carbonate (calcite) as major components. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that calcium-sulfur and calcium-carbon particles were also present in the WTC PM2.5 fraction. Analysis of WTC PM2.5 using X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry showed high levels of calcium (range, 22-33%) and sulfur (37-43% as sulfate) and much lower levels of transition metals and other elements. Aqueous extracts of WTC PM2.5 were basic (pH range, 8.9-10.0) and had no evidence of significant bacterial contamination. Levels of carbon were relatively low, suggesting that combustion-derived particles did not form a significant fraction of these samples recovered in the immediate aftermath of the destruction of the towers. Because gypsum and calcite are known to cause irritation of the mucus membranes of the eyes and respiratory tract, inhalation of high doses of WTC PM2.5 could potentially cause toxic respiratory effects.

  15. Chemical analysis of World Trade Center fine particulate matter for use in toxicologic assessment.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, John K; Chen, Lung Chi; Cohen, Mitchell D; Chee, Glen R; Prophete, Colette M; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Wasson, Shirley J; Conner, Teri L; Costa, Daniel L; Gavett, Stephen H

    2003-01-01

    The catastrophic destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 caused the release of high levels of airborne pollutants into the local environment. To assess the toxicity of fine particulate matter [particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microm (PM2.5)], which may adversely affect the health of workers and residents in the area, we collected fallen dust samples on 12 and 13 September 2001 from sites within a half-mile of Ground Zero. Samples of WTC dust were sieved, aerosolized, and size-separated, and the PM2.5 fraction was isolated on filters. Here we report the chemical and physical properties of PM2.5 derived from these samples and compare them with PM2.5 fractions of three reference materials that range in toxicity from relatively inert to acutely toxic (Mt. St. Helens PM; Washington, DC, ambient air PM; and residual oil fly ash). X-ray diffraction of very coarse sieved WTC PM (< 53 microm) identified calcium sulfate (gypsum) and calcium carbonate (calcite) as major components. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that calcium-sulfur and calcium-carbon particles were also present in the WTC PM2.5 fraction. Analysis of WTC PM2.5 using X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry showed high levels of calcium (range, 22-33%) and sulfur (37-43% as sulfate) and much lower levels of transition metals and other elements. Aqueous extracts of WTC PM2.5 were basic (pH range, 8.9-10.0) and had no evidence of significant bacterial contamination. Levels of carbon were relatively low, suggesting that combustion-derived particles did not form a significant fraction of these samples recovered in the immediate aftermath of the destruction of the towers. Because gypsum and calcite are known to cause irritation of the mucus membranes of the eyes and respiratory tract, inhalation of high doses of WTC PM2.5 could potentially cause toxic respiratory effects. PMID:12782501

  16. Chemical weathering trends in fine-grained ephemeral stream sediments of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Elwood Madden, Megan E.; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Hall, Brenda L.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated chemical weathering trends within the fine-grained (< 63 μm; silt and clay) fraction of sediments collected from meltwater streams emanating from glaciers in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV; Wright and Taylor Valleys) by integrating grain size, BET surface area, and whole-rock geochemistry. While both valleys currently host cold-based glaciers, the sediment underlying the ephemeral glacial streams was deposited under differing glacial conditions. In Wright Valley (Clark Glacier stream), Brownworth and Trilogy drifts were deposited via cold-based glaciation, whereas the Ross Sea drift that underlies Delta Stream in Taylor Valley likely reflects contributions from wet-based ice. Wright Valley stream sediments are typically coarser grained and have a higher silt content as compared to Taylor Valley sediments. These sediments consist primarily of pyroxenes, quartz, and feldspars, with the percentages of pyroxenes and quartz systematically increasing downstream. The percentage of phyllosilicates ranges from 4 to 18% and decreases with downstream distance. In contrast, Taylor Valley sediments (Delta Stream) are finer-grained and exhibit lower percentages of both pyroxene and quartz and a significantly higher percentage of phyllosilicates (30-43%). Concentrations of all mineral phases remain relatively consistent in abundance with downstream transport in the Delta Stream transect as compared to Clark Glacier stream sediments. Standard chemical weathering indices, such as the Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA), indicate that chemical weathering is occurring within the silt and clay fractions of Antarctic stream sediments and is particularly pronounced in Delta Stream sediments that have BET surface area measurements > 40 m2/g. Utilization of MFW (mafic-felsic-weathered) and A-CN-K (Al2O3-CaO + Na2O-K2O) plots, however, are more effective in discerning the extent and nature of chemical weathering in these stream systems. Ca and Na depletion observed within the

  17. Chemical composition of emissions from urban sources of fine organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Hildemann, L.M.; Markowski, G.R.; Cass, G.R. )

    1991-04-01

    A dilution source sampling system was used to collect primary fine aerosol emissions from important sources of urban organic aerosol, including a boiler burning No. 2 fuel oil, a home fireplace, a fleet of catalyst-equipped and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternative dilution sampling techniques were used to collect emissions from cigarette smoking and a roofing tar pot, and grab sample techniques were employed to characterize paved road dust, brake lining wear, and vegetative detritus. Organic aerosol constituted the majority of the fine aerosol mass emitted from many of the sources tested. Fine primary organic aerosol emissions within the heavily urbanized western portion of the Los Angeles Basin were determined to total 29.8 metric ton/day. Over 40% of these organic aerosol emissions are from anthropogenic pollution sources that are expected to emit contemporary (nonfossil) aerosol carbon, in good agreement with the available ambient monitoring data.

  18. 77 FR 64142 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, ISP Freetown Fine Chemicals

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Registration, ISP Freetown Fine... (8501), a basic class of controlled substance listed in schedule II. The company plans to import the controlled substance to manufacture amphetamine. No comments or objections have been received. DEA...

  19. Using the Photolysis of Chemically Modified Gel Films Preparing ITO Fine Patterned Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Zhao, Gaoyang; Zhang, Weihua; Chen, Yuanqing

    2006-06-01

    A novel technique for the fabrication of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) fine patterning in sol-gel technology is presented in this paper. The fabricated ITO fine patterning could be obtained through a process which combines film fabrication with film etching. ITO films have good comprehensive property of visible transmittance and electrical conductivity, consequently they have been extensively used as coating electrodes. Indium nitrate (In(NO3)3.4.5H2O) and stannic chloride (SnCl4.5H2O) were used as starting materials which were modified with benzytone (BzAcH). The chelate complexes containing indium ions were produced during the process which of forming photosensitive ITO/BzAcH gel films through sol-gel technique. It was found that the gel films are sensitive to both the ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation and their solubility on solvents as well. For example, ethanol was reduced remarkably while the UV absorption peak disappeared with the dissociation of the chelate complexes correspondingly by means of UV-vis and IR spectrophotometers. Utilizing these characteristics, a fine pattern was obtained by irradiation of UV light on the ITO/BzAcH gel films through a pattern mask. of the fine patterned ITO films were heat treated at 500 °C for 15 min, the optical, electrical properties and the surface element components were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in this work.

  20. Chemical mass balance source apportionment of fine and PM10 in the Desert Southwest, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Desert Southwest Coarse Particulate Matter Study was undertaken in Pinal County, Arizona, to better understand the origin and impact of sources of fine and coarse particulate matter (PM) in rural, arid regions of the U.S. southwestern desert. The desert southwest experiences ...

  1. Chemical dispersion of oil with mineral fines in a low temperature environment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhi; Zheng, Ying; Lee, Kenneth

    2013-07-15

    The increasing risks of potential oil spills in the arctic regions, which are characterized by low temperatures, are a big challenge. The traditional dispersant method has shown limited effectiveness in oil cleanup. This work studied the role of mineral fines in the formation of oil-mineral aggregates (OMAs) at low temperature (0-4 °C) environment. The loading amount of minerals and dispersant with different dispersant and oil types were investigated under a full factorial design. The shapes and sizes of OMAs were analyzed. Results showed that the behavior of OMA formation differs when dispersant and mineral fines are used individually or together. Both the experimental and microscopic results also showed the existence of optimal dispersant to oil ratios and mineral to oil ratios. In general, poor oil removal performance was observed for more viscous oil. Corexit 9500 performed better than Corexit 9527 with various oils, in terms of oil dispersion and OMA formation.

  2. Chemical diversity among fine-grained soils at Gale (Mars): a chemical transition as the rover is approaching the Bagnold Dunes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Agnès; Forni, Olivier; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Schroeder, Susanne; Gasnault, Olivier; Bridges, Nathan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Maurice, Sylvestre; Wiens, Roger

    2016-04-01

    The ChemCam instrument has the capability to study the chemical composition of soils at a sub-millimeter scale, thus providing an unpreceedented spatial resolution for their study. More than 300 soils have been sampled so far with ChemCam and these targets are analyzed frequently in order to monitor any change in composition along the traverse. Detailed chemical analysis as a function of grain size is of great importance in order to better constrain soils formation. Curiosity is approaching the Bagnold Dunes, the first active dune field accessible for in-situ analyses. One of the main goals is to determine or constrain the dune material chemistry as well as its provenance. This study is focusing on recent soils analyzed when ap-proaching the dunes, for a comparison with previous soil targets, and with dunes specifically. Chemical composition of fine-grained soils as we approach the Bagnold Dunes has been compared with previous fine-grained soils analyzed along the traverse. These new soils have an average sum of oxides that is significantly higher than what has been previously analyzed. This would suggest that these soils are less hydrated and probably less altered than previous ones.An enrichment in SiO2, FeO and alkali is also observed in these new fine-grained soils, which could be related to a contamination by local rocks due to erosion. Some coarser grains could correspond to an olivine component. This analysis is on-going and will be detailed as the dedicated Bagnold Dunes campaign starts. We will also report in the hydratation level of the dunes.

  3. Boron carbide: Consistency of components, lattice parameters, fine structure and chemical composition makes the complex structure reasonable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    The complex, highly distorted structure of boron carbide is composed of B12 and B11C icosahedra and CBC, CBB and B□B linear elements, whose concentration depends on the chemical composition each. These concentrations are shown to be consistent with lattice parameters, fine structure data and chemical composition. The respective impacts on lattice parameters are estimated and discussed. Considering the contributions of the different structural components to the energy of the overall structure makes the structure and its variation within the homogeneity range reasonable; in particular that of B4.3C representing the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range. Replacing in B4.3C virtually the B□B components by CBC yields the hypothetical moderately distorted B4.0C (structure formula (B11C)CBC). The reduction of lattice parameters related is compatible with recently reported uncommonly prepared single crystals, whose compositions deviate from B4.3C.

  4. ESCA studies of the surface chemistry of lunar fines. [Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Grant, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents an ESCA analysis based on the use of a synthetic lunar-glass standard that allows determination of the surface composition of lunar samples with an accuracy that appears to be better than 10% of the amount present for all major elements except Ti. It is found that, on the average, grain surfaces in the lunar fines samples 10084 and 15301 are strongly enriched in Si, moderately enriched in Fe, moderately depleted in Al and Ca, and strongly depleted in Mg. This pattern could not be produced by the deposition of any expected meteoritic vapor. Neither could it be produced by simple inverse-mass-dependent element loss during sputtering. It is suggested that at least part of the pattern may be a simple consequence of agglutinate glass formation in the fines since there is some evidence that Si can become enriched on the surface of silicate melts. These results do not support the strong enrichments in Fe on grain surfaces reported from Auger studies.

  5. Development of Agriculture Left-Overs: Fine Organic Chemicals from Wheat Hemicellulose-Derived Pentoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Frédéric; Estrine, Boris; Plantier-Royon, Richard; Hoffmann, Norbert; Portella, Charles

    This review is dedicated to wheat hemicelluloses and its main components d-xylose and l-arabinose as raw materials for fine organic chemistry. The context of the wheat agro-industry, its by-products, and extraction and hydrolysis of hemicelluloses to produce the pentoses are considered. The straightforward preparation of pentose-based surfactants, their properties, and their situation in the field of carbohydrate-based surfactants are addressed. Multistep transformations of pentoses are also described, first from a methodology point of view, with the aim of producing multifunctional enantiopure building-blocks, then considering targeted natural and/or bioactive products. Selected reactions of furfural, an important dehydration product of pentoses, are also presented.

  6. 78 FR 9915 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Basel II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Regulatory Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Minimum Regulatory Capital Ratios..., and (4) make certain public disclosures regarding their capital ratios, their components, and..., Minimum Regulatory Capital Ratios, Capital Adequacy, Transition Provisions, and Prompt Corrective...

  7. Comparison of Liver Cell Models Using the Basel Phenotyping Cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Benjamin; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Maseneni, Swarna; Boess, Franziska; Roth, Adrian; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Haschke, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Currently used hepatocyte cell systems for in vitro assessment of drug metabolism include hepatoma cell lines and primary human hepatocyte (PHH) cultures. We investigated the suitability of the validated in vivo Basel phenotyping cocktail (caffeine [CYP1A2], efavirenz [CYP2B6], losartan [CYP2C9], omeprazole [CYP2C19], metoprolol [CYP2D6], midazolam [CYP3A4]) in vitro and characterized four hepatocyte cell systems (HepG2 cells, HepaRG cells, and primary cryopreserved human hepatocytes in 2-dimensional [2D] culture or in 3D-spheroid co-culture) regarding basal metabolism and CYP inducibility. Under non-induced conditions, all CYP activities could be determined in 3D-PHH, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 in 2D-PHH and HepaRG, and CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells. The highest non-induced CYP activities were observed in 3D-PHH and HepaRG cells. mRNA expression was at least four-fold higher for all CYPs in 3D-PHH compared to the other cell systems. After treatment with 20 μM rifampicin, mRNA increased 3- to 50-fold for all CYPs except CYP1A2 and 2D6 for HepaRG and 3D-PHH, 4-fold (CYP2B6) and 17-fold (CYP3A4) for 2D-PHH and four-fold (CYP3A4) for HepG2. In 3D-PHH at least a two-fold increase in CYP activity was observed for all inducible CYP isoforms while CYP1A2 and CYP2C9 activity did not increase in 2D-PHH and HepaRG. CYP inducibility assessed in vivo using the same phenotyping probes was also best reflected by the 3D-PHH model. Our studies show that 3D-PHH and (with some limitations) HepaRG are suitable cell systems for assessing drug metabolism and CYP induction in vitro. HepG2 cells are less suited to assess CYP induction of the 2C and 3A family. The Basel phenotyping cocktail is suitable for the assessment of CYP activity and induction also in vitro. PMID:27917125

  8. Toxicity of chemical components of fine particles inhaled by aged rats: effects of concentration.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Michael T; Hyde, Dallas M; Bufalino, Charles; Basbaum, Carol; Bhalla, Deepak K; Mautz, William J

    2003-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that exposure to mixtures containing fine particles and ozone (O3) would cause pulmonary injury and decrements in functions of immunological cells in exposed rats (22-24 months old) in a dose-dependent manner. Rats were exposed to high and low concentrations of ammonium bisulfate and elemental carbon and to 0.2 ppm O3. Control groups were exposed to purified air or O3 alone. The biological end points measured included histopathological markers of lung injury, bronchoalveolar lung fluid proteins, and measures of the function of the lung's innate immunological defenses (macrophage antigen-directed phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity). Exposure to O3 alone at 0.2 ppm did not result in significant changes in any of the measured end points. Exposures to the particle mixtures plus O3 produced statistically significant changes consistent with adverse effects. The low-concentration mixture produced effects that were statistically significant compared to purified air but, with the exception of macrophage Fc receptor binding, exposure to the high-concentration mixture did not. The effects of the low- and high-concentration mixtures were not significantly different. The study supports previous work that indicated that particle + O3 mixtures were more toxic than O3 alone.

  9. Chemical compositions and sources of organic matter in fine particles of soils and sands from the vicinity of Kuwait city.

    PubMed

    Rushdi, Ahmed I; Al-Zarban, Sheikha; Simoneit, Bernd R T

    2006-09-01

    Fine particles in the atmosphere from soil and sand resuspension contain a variety of organic compounds from natural biogenic and anthropogenic matter. Soil and sand samples from various sites near Kuwait city were collected, sieved to retain the fine particles, and extracted with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol. The extracts were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to characterize the chemical compositions and sources of the organic components. The major inputs of organic compounds were from both natural biogenic and anthropogenic sources in these samples. Vegetation was the major natural source of organic compounds and included n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkanes, sterols and triterpenoids. Saccharides had high concentrations (31-43%) in the sand dune and seafront samples, indicating sources from decomposed vegation materials and/or the presence of viable microbiota such as bacteria and fungi. Vehicular emission products, leakage of lubricating oils, discarded plastics and emissions from cooking operations were the major anthropogenic inputs in the samples from the urban areas. This input was mainly UCM, n-alkanes, hopanes, plasticizers and cholesterol, respectively.

  10. Chemical composition of crystalline rock fragments from Luna 16 and Luna 20 fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimbalnikova, A.; Palivcova, M.; Frana, J.; Mastalka, A.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical composition (bulk, rare earth, and trace elements) of the Luna 16 mare regolith and luna 20 highland regolith is discussed. The rock samples considered are 14 basaltic rock fragments (Luna 16) and 13 rock fragments of the ANT suite (Luna 20). On the basis of bulk composition, two types of basaltic rocks have been differentiated and defined in the Luna 16 regolith: mare basalts (fundamental crystalline rocks of Mare Fecunditatis) and high-alumina basalts. The bulk analyses of rock fragments of the ANT suite also enabled distinction of two rock types: anorthositic norites and troctolites and/or spinal-troctolites (the most abundant crystalline rocks of the highland region, the landing site of luna 20), and anorthosites. The chemical compositions of Luna 16 and Luna 20 regolith samples are compared. Differences in the chemistry of the Luna 16 mare regolith and that of mare basalts are discussed. The chemical affinity between the Luna 20 highland regolith and (a) anorthositic norites and (b) troctolites and/or spinel-troctolites has been ascertained.

  11. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  12. Sources and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Fine Particles in Rabigh, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayebare, S. R.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Hussain, M. M.; Zeb, J.; Khwaja, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution research in Saudi Arabia and the whole of Middle East is at its inception, making air pollution in the region a significant problem. This study presents the first detailed data on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations of Black Carbon (BC), ions, and trace metals at Rabigh, Saudi Arabia, and assesses their sources. Results showed several characteristic aspects of air pollution at Rabigh. Daily levels of PM2.5 and BC showed significant temporal variability ranging from 12.2 - 75.9 µg/m3 and 0.39 - 1.31 µg/m3, respectively. More than 90% of the time, the daily PM2.5 exceeded the 24 h WHO guideline of 20 µg/m3. Sulfate, NO3-, and NH4+ dominated the identifiable components. Trace metals with significantly higher concentrations included Si, S, Ca, Al, Fe, Na, Cl, Mg, K, and Ti, with average concentrations of 3.1, 2.2, 1.6, 1.2, 1.1, 0.7, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4 and 0.1 µg/m3, respectively. Based on the Air Quality Index (AQI), there were 44% days of moderate air quality, 33% days of unhealthy air quality for sensitive groups, and 23% days of unhealthy air quality throughout the study period. Two categories of aerosol trace metal sources were defined: anthropogenic (S, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Cd, Sb, and Pb) and naturally derived elements (Si, Al, and Fe). The extent of anthropogenic contribution was estimated by the degree of enrichment of these elements compared to the crustal composition. Soil resuspension and/or mobilization is an important source of "natural" elements, while "anthropogenic" elements originate primarily from fossil fuel combustion and industries. Ni and V correlated strongly pointing to combustion of heavy fuel oil as the likely source. A positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to obtain information about possible sources. Our study highlights the need for stringent laws on PM2.5 emission control to protect human health and the environment.

  13. Clarifying the chemical state of additives in membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Toshihiro; Itoh, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    Cerium and manganese compounds are used in the membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) as radical scavengers to mitigate chemical degradation of the membrane. The chemical states of cerium and manganese in the membrane were investigated using a fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to open circuit voltage (OCV) condition, under which hydroxyl radicals attack the membrane; a shift in absorption energy in X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra was compared between Ce- and Mn-containing membranes before and after OCV testing. In the case of the Ce-containing MEA, there was no significant difference in XANES spectra before and after OCV testing, whereas in the case of the Mn-containing MEA, there was an obvious shift in XANES absorption energy after OCV testing, indicating that Mn atoms with higher valence state than 2+ exist in the membrane after OCV testing. This can be attributed to the difference in the rate of reduction; the reaction of Ce4+ with ·OOH is much faster than that of Mn3+ with ·OOH, leaving some of the Mn atoms with higher valence state. It was confirmed that cerium and manganese redox couples reduced the attack from radicals, mitigating membrane degradation.

  14. Mercury Speciation by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Sequential Chemical Extractions: A Comparison of Speciation Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Bloom, N.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the chemical speciation of mercury in contaminated mining and industrial environments is essential for predicting its solubility, transport behavior, and potential bioavailability as well as for designing effective remediation strategies. In this study, two techniques for determining Hg speciation-X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and sequential chemical extractions (SCE)-are independently applied to a set of samples with Hg concentrations ranging from 132 to 7539 mg/kg to determine if the two techniques provide comparable Hg speciation results. Generally, the proportions of insoluble HgS (cinnabar, metacinnabar) and HgSe identified by XAFS correlate well with the proportion of Hg removed in the aqua regia extraction demonstrated to remove HgS and HgSe. Statistically significant (> 10%) differences are observed however in samples containing more soluble Hg-containing phases (HgCl2, HgO, Hg3S2O 4). Such differences may be related to matrix, particle size, or crystallinity effects, which could affect the apparent solubility of Hg phases present. In more highly concentrated samples, microscopy techniques can help characterize the Hg-bearing species in complex multiphase natural samples.

  15. Integrated operation of continuous chromatography and biotransformations for the generic high yield production of fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Matthias; Makart, Stefan; Heinemann, Matthias; Panke, Sven

    2006-06-25

    The rapid progress in biocatalysis in the identification and development of enzymes over the last decade has enormously enlarged the chemical reaction space that can be addressed not only in research applications, but also on industrial scale. This enables us to consider even those groups of reactions that are very promising from a synthetic point of view, but suffer from drawbacks on process level, such as an unfavourable position of the reaction equilibrium. Prominent examples stem from the aldolase-catalyzed enantioselective carbon-carbon bond forming reactions, reactions catalyzed by isomerising enzymes, and reactions that are kinetically controlled. On the other hand, continuous chromatography concepts such as the simulating moving bed technology have matured and are increasingly realized on industrial scale for the efficient separation of difficult compound mixtures - including enantiomers - with unprecedented efficiency. We propose that coupling of enzyme reactor and continuous chromatography is a very suitable and potentially generic process concept to address the thermodynamic limitations of a host of promising biotransformations. This way, it should be possible to establish novel in situ product recovery processes of unprecedented efficiency and selectivity that represent a feasible way to recruit novel biocatalysts to the industrial portfolio.

  16. Chemical compositions of fine particulate organic matter emitted from Chinese cooking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Hu, Min; Slanina, Sjaak; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2007-01-01

    Food cooking can be a significant source of atmospheric particulate organic matter. In this study, the chemical composition of particulate organic matter (POM) in PM2.5 emitted from four different Chinese cooking styles were examined by gas chromotography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identified species are consistent in the emissions from different Chinese cooking styles and the quantified compounds account for 5-10% of total POM in PM2.5. The dominant homologue is fatty acids, constituting 73-85% of the quantified compounds. The pattern of n-alkanes and the presence of beta-sitosterol and levoglucosan indicate that vegetables are consumed during Chinese cooking operations. Furthermore, the emissions of different compounds are impacted significantly by the cooking ingredients. The candidates of organic tracers used to describe and distinguish emissions from Chinese cooking in Guangzhou are tetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, octadecanoic acid, oleic acid, levoglucosan, mannosan, galactosan, nonanal, and lactones. During the sampling period, the relative contribution of Chinese cooking to the mass concentration of atmospheric hexadecanoic acid should be less than 1.3% in Guangzhou.

  17. Chemical Composition and Emission Sources of the Fine Particulate Matters in a Southeast Asian Mega City (Dhaka, Bangladesh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution has significant impact on human health, climate change, agriculture, visibility reduction, and also on the atmospheric chemistry. There are many studies already reported about the direct relation of the human mortality and morbidity with the increase of the atmospheric particulate matters. Especially, fine particulate matters can easily enter into the human respiratory system and causes many diseases. Particulate matters have the properties to absorb the solar radiation and impact on the climate. Dhaka, Bangladesh is a densely populated mega-city in the world. About 16 million inhabitants are living within an area of 360 square kilometers. Air quality situation has been degrading due to unplanned growth, increasing vehicles, severe traffic jams, brick kilns, industries, construction, and also transboundary air pollution. A rapidly growing number of vehicles has worsen the air quality in spite of major policy interventions, e.g., ban of two-stroke and three-wheeled vehicles, phase out of 20 years old vehicles, conversion to compressed natural gas (CNGs), etc. Introduction of CNGs to reduce air pollution was not the solution for fine particles at all, as evidence shows that CNGs and diesel engines are the major sources of fine particles. High concentration of the air pollutants in Dhaka city such as PM, carbonaceous species (black and organic carbon), CO, etc. has already been reported. PM2.5 mass, chemical composition (e.g., BC, OC, SO42-, NO3-, trace elements, etc.), aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and emission sources of our recent measurements at the highly polluted south East Asian Mega city (Dhaka) Bangladesh will be presented in the conference. PM2.5 samples were collected on filters with Digital PM2.5 sampler (Switzerland) and Air photon, USA. BC was measured from filters (with thermal and optical method) and also real time with an Aethalometer AE42 (Magee Scitific., USA). Water soluble ions were determined from filters with ion chromatogram. AOD

  18. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of nine engine models were sampled during the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (AP...

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Fine Particulate Matter Mass and Chemical Composition: The Middle East Consortium for Aerosol Research Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdeen, Ziad; Heo, Jongbae; Wu, Bo; Shpund, Jacob; Vanger, Arye; Sharf, Geula; Moise, Tamar; Brenner, Shmuel; Nassar, Khaled; Saleh, Rami; Al-Mahasneh, Qusai M.; Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Schauer, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were collected from January to December 2007 to investigate the sources and chemical speciation in Palestine, Jordan, and Israel. The 24-h PM2.5 samples were collected on 6-day intervals at eleven urban and rural sites simultaneously. Major chemical components including metals, ions, and organic and elemental carbon were analyzed. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 across the 11 sites varied from 20.6 to 40.3 μg/m3, with an average of 28.7 μg/m3. Seasonal variation of PM2.5 concentrations was substantial, with higher average concentrations (37.3 μg/m3) in the summer (April–June) months compared to winter (October–December) months (26.0 μg/m3) due mainly to high contributions of sulfate and crustal components. PM2.5 concentrations in the spring were greatly impacted by regional dust storms. Carbonaceous mass was the most abundant component, contributing 40% to the total PM2.5 mass averaged across the eleven sites. Crustal components averaged 19.1% of the PM2.5 mass and sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate accounted for 16.2%, 6.4%, and 3.7%, respectively, of the total PM2.5 mass. The results of this study demonstrate the need to better protect the health and welfare of the residents on both sides of the Jordan River in the Middle East. PMID:25045751

  20. Chemical composition of fine particles in fresh smoke plumes from boreal wild-land fires in Europe.

    PubMed

    Saarnio, Karri; Aurela, Minna; Timonen, Hilkka; Saarikoski, Sanna; Teinilä, Kimmo; Mäkelä, Timo; Sofiev, Mikhail; Koskinen, Jarkko; Aalto, Pasi P; Kulmala, Markku; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Hillamo, Risto

    2010-05-15

    A series of smoke plumes was detected in Helsinki, Finland, during a one-month-lasting period in August 2006. The smoke plumes originated from wildfires close to Finland, and they were short-term and had a high particulate matter (PM) concentration. Physical and chemical properties of fine particles in those smokes were characterised by a wide range of real-time measurements that enabled the examination of individual plume events. Concurrently PM(1) filter samples were collected and analysed off-line. Satellite observations employing MODIS sensor on board of NASA EOS Terra satellite with the dispersion model SILAM and the Fire Assimilation System were used for evaluation of the emission fluxes from wildfires. The model predicted well the timing of the plumes but the predicted PM concentrations differed from the observed. The measurements showed that the major growth in PM concentration was caused by submicrometer particles consisting mainly of particulate organic matter (POM). POM had not totally oxidised during the transport based on the low WSOC-to-OC ratio. The fresh plumes were compared to another major smoke episode that was observed in Helsinki during April-May 2006. The duration and the source areas of the two episode periods differed. The episode in April-May was a period of nearly constantly upraised level of long-range transported PM and it was composed of aged particles when arriving in Helsinki. The two episodes had differences also in the chemical composition of PM. The mass concentrations of biomass burning tracers (levoglucosan, potassium, and oxalate) increased during both the episodes but different concentration levels of elemental carbon and potassium indicated that the episodes differed in the form of burning as well as in the burning material. In spring dry crop residue and hay from the previous season were burnt whereas in August smokes from smouldering and incomplete burning of fresh vegetation were detected.

  1. Direct micellar systems as a tool to improve the efficiency of aromatic substrate conversion for fine chemicals production.

    PubMed

    Berti, D; Randazzo, D; Briganti, F; Baglioni, P; Scozzafava, A; Di Gennaro, P; Galli, E; Bestetti, G

    2000-04-01

    Whole-cell bioconversion of naphthalene to (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene by Escherichia coli JM109(pPS1778) recombinant strain, carrying naphthalene dioxygenase and regulatory genes cloned from Pseudomonas fluorescens N3, in direct micellar systems is optimized as an example of fine chemicals bioproduction from scarcely water-soluble substrates. The oxygen insertion into the aromatic substrate, which stops at the enantiomerically pure cis dihydroxylated product, is performed in direct microemulsion systems, where a non-ionic surfactant stabilizes naphthalene containing oil droplets in an aqueous medium. These media provide an increased substrate solubility so that a homogeneous reaction can be carried out, while not affecting bacteria viability and performances. The influence of the chemical nature of the oil is investigated. The phase behavior of the direct microemulsion system was monitored for three different oils as a function their volume fraction and characterized through light scattering. The addition of isopropyl palmitate, oleic acid, or glyceryl trioleate, 0.6-1.2% v/v to the micellar systems, led to an increase of the substrate concentration in the solution and particularly its bioavailability, allowing faster catalytic conversions. All these systems resulted in being suitable for catalytic conversions of aromatic compounds. Although the nature of the oil does have a deep effect on the phase behavior of the micellar systems, in the present investigation no differences in the yields and in the rates of product formation of the enzymatic system were observed on changing the oil, thus showing that in this case the substrate concentration or bioavailability is not the rate-limiting step.

  2. Enhanced benzaldehyde tolerance in Zymomonas mobilis biofilms and the potential of biofilm applications in fine-chemical production.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan Zhong; Webb, Jeremy S; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Rosche, Bettina

    2006-02-01

    Biotransformation plays an increasingly important role in the industrial production of fine chemicals due to its high product specificity and low energy requirement. One challenge in biotransformation is the toxicity of substrates and/or products to biocatalytic microorganisms and enzymes. Biofilms are known for their enhanced tolerance of hostile environments compared to planktonic free-living cells. Zymomonas mobilis was used in this study as a model organism to examine the potential of surface-associated biofilms for biotransformation of chemicals into value-added products. Z. mobilis formed a biofilm with a complex three-dimensional architecture comprised of microcolonies with an average thickness of 20 microm, interspersed with water channels. Microscopic analysis and metabolic activity studies revealed that Z. mobilis biofilm cells were more tolerant to the toxic substrate benzaldehyde than planktonic cells were. When exposed to 50 mM benzaldehyde for 1 h, biofilm cells exhibited an average of 45% residual metabolic activity, while planktonic cells were completely inactivated. Three hours of exposure to 30 mM benzaldehyde resulted in sixfold-higher residual metabolic activity in biofilm cells than in planktonic cells. Cells inactivated by benzaldehyde were evenly distributed throughout the biofilm, indicating that the resistance mechanism was different from mass transfer limitation. We also found that enhanced tolerance to benzaldehyde was not due to the conversion of benzaldehyde into less toxic compounds. In the presence of glucose, Z. mobilis biofilms in continuous cultures transformed 10 mM benzaldehyde into benzyl alcohol at a steady rate of 8.11 g (g dry weight)(-1) day(-1) with a 90% molar yield over a 45-h production period.

  3. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  4. Spatial and temporal variation in fine particulate matter mass and chemical composition: the Middle East Consortium for Aerosol Research Study.

    PubMed

    Abdeen, Ziad; Qasrawi, Radwan; Heo, Jongbae; Wu, Bo; Shpund, Jacob; Vanger, Arye; Sharf, Geula; Moise, Tamar; Brenner, Shmuel; Nassar, Khaled; Saleh, Rami; Al-Mahasneh, Qusai M; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Schauer, James J

    2014-01-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples were collected from January to December 2007 to investigate the sources and chemical speciation in Palestine, Jordan, and Israel. The 24-h PM2.5 samples were collected on 6-day intervals at eleven urban and rural sites simultaneously. Major chemical components including metals, ions, and organic and elemental carbon were analyzed. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 across the 11 sites varied from 20.6 to 40.3 μg/m(3), with an average of 28.7 μg/m(3). Seasonal variation of PM2.5 concentrations was substantial, with higher average concentrations (37.3 μg/m(3)) in the summer (April-June) months compared to winter (October-December) months (26.0 μg/m(3)) due mainly to high contributions of sulfate and crustal components. PM2.5 concentrations in the spring were greatly impacted by regional dust storms. Carbonaceous mass was the most abundant component, contributing 40% to the total PM2.5 mass averaged across the eleven sites. Crustal components averaged 19.1% of the PM2.5 mass and sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate accounted for 16.2%, 6.4%, and 3.7%, respectively, of the total PM2.5 mass. The results of this study demonstrate the need to better protect the health and welfare of the residents on both sides of the Jordan River in the Middle East.

  5. Characterization of chemical components and bioreactivity of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during incense burning.

    PubMed

    Lui, K H; Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cao, Jun-Ji; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Lee, S C; Hu, Di; Ho, K F

    2016-06-01

    The chemical and bioreactivity properties of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emitted during controlled burning of different brands of incense were characterized. Incenses marketed as being environmentally friendly emitted lower mass of PM2.5 particulates than did traditional incenses. However, the environmentally friendly incenses produced higher total concentrations of non-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and some oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs). Human alveolar epithelial A549 cells were exposed to the collected PM2.5, followed by determining oxidative stress and inflammation. There was moderate to strong positive correlation (R > 0.60, p < 0.05) between selected PAHs and OPAHs against oxidative-inflammatory responses. Strong positive correlation was observed between interleukin 6 (IL-6) and summation of total Group B2 PAHs/OPAHs (∑7PAHs/ΣOPAHs). The experimental data indicate that emissions from the environmentally friendly incenses contained higher concentrations of several PAH and OPAH compounds than did traditional incense. Moreover, these PAHs and OPAHs were strongly correlated with inflammatory responses. The findings suggest a need to revise existing regulation of such products.

  6. Fine and coarse particulate matter chemical characterization in a heavily industrialized city in central Mexico during Winter 2003.

    PubMed

    Vega, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Hugo; Martínez-Villa, Gerardo; Sosa, Gustavo; González-Avalos, Eugenio; Reyes, Elizabeth; García, José

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the first reported study on fine particulate matter (PM) chemical composition at Salamanca, a highly industrialized urban area of Central Mexico. Samples were collected at six sites within the urban area during February and March 2003. Several trace elements, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), and six ions were analyzed to characterize aerosols. Average concentrations of PM with aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 microm (PM10) and fine PM with aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5) ranged from 32.2 to 76.6 [g m(-3) and 11.1 to 23.7 microg m(-3), respectively. OC (34%), SO4= (25.1%), EC (12.9%), and geological material (12.5%) were the major components of PM2.5. For PM10 geological material (57.9%), OC (17.3%), and SO4= (9.7%) were the major components. Coarse fraction (PM,, -PM2.5), geological material (81.7%), and OC (8.6%) were the dominant species, which amounted to 90.4%. Correlation analysis showed that sulfate in PM2.5 was present as ammonium sulfate. Sulfate showed a significant spatial variation with higher concentrations to the north resulting from predominantly southwesterly winds above the surface layer and by major SO2 sources that include a power plant and refinery. At the urban site of Cruz Roja it was observed that PM2.5 mass concentrations were similar to the submicron fraction concentrations. Furthermore, the correlation between EC in PM2.5 and EC measured from an aethalometer was r(2) = 0.710. Temporal variations of SO2 and nitrogen oxide were observed during a day when the maximum concentration of PM2.5 was measured, which was associated with emissions from the nearby refinery and power plant. From cascade impactor measurements, the three measured modes of airborne particles corresponded with diameters of 0.32, 1.8, and 5.6 microm.

  7. Fine particulate matter source apportionment for the Chemical speciation Trends Network site at Birmingham, Alabama, using Positive Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Karsten; Jayanty, R K M; Flanagan, James B

    2008-01-01

    The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model version 1.1 was used with data from the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) Chemical Speciation Trends Network (STN) to estimate source contributions to ambient PM2.5 in a highly industrialized urban setting in the southeastern United States. Model results consistently resolved 10 factors that are interpreted as two secondary, five industrial, one motor vehicle, one road dust, and one biomass burning sources. The STN dataset is generally not corrected for field blank levels, which are significant in the case of organic carbon (OC). Estimation of primary OC using the elemental carbon (EC) tracer method applied on a seasonal basis significantly improved the model's performance. Uniform increase of input data uncertainty and exclusion of a few outlier samples (associated with high potassium) further improved the model results. However, it was found that most PMF factors did not cleanly represent single source types and instead are "contaminated" by other sources, a situation that might be improved by controlling rotational ambiguity within the model. Secondary particulate matter formed by atmospheric processes, such as sulfate and secondary OC, contribute the majority of ambient PM2.5 and exhibit strong seasonality (37 +/- 10% winter vs. 55 +/- 16% summer average). Motor vehicle emissions constitute the biggest primary PM2.5 mass contribution with almost 25 +/- 2% long-term average and winter maximum of 29 +/- 11%. PM2.5 contributions from the five identified industrial sources vary little with season and average 14 +/- 1.3%. In summary, this study demonstrates the utility of the EC tracer method to effectively blank-correct the OC concentrations in the STN dataset. In addition, examination of the effect of input uncertainty estimates on model results indicates that the estimated uncertainties currently being provided with the STN data may be somewhat lower than the levels needed for optimum modeling results.

  8. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  9. 77 FR 52791 - Regulatory Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Minimum Regulatory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... incorporating aspects of the BCBS's Basel II standardized framework in the ``International Convergence of... references to credit ratings. \\5\\ See BCBS, ``International Convergence of Capital Measurement and Capital...'' of common equity tier 1 capital in excess of the new minimum capital requirements. \\11\\...

  10. 78 FR 55339 - Regulatory Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Capital Adequacy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... buffer could be implemented if the agencies determined that credit growth in the economy became excessive... retained earnings. Owing to slow economic growth and relatively low earnings among community banking... growth and high employment. Another commenter favored application of the Basel III NPR to all...

  11. 78 FR 62017 - Regulatory Capital Rules: Regulatory Capital, Implementation of Basel III, Capital Adequacy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-11

    ... countercyclical capital buffer could be implemented if the agencies and the FDIC determined that credit growth in... increase capital only by accumulating retained earnings. Owing to slow economic growth and relatively low... sustained growth and high employment. Another commenter favored application of the Basel III NPR to...

  12. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, Edward J.; Wijesinghe, Ananda M.; Viani, Brian E.

    1997-01-01

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

  13. Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments

    DOEpatents

    Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1997-01-14

    The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculants and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude. 8 figs.

  14. Chemical characterization of fine particulate matter in Changzhou, China, and source apportionment with offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhaolian; Liu, Jiashu; Gu, Aijun; Feng, Feifei; Liu, Yuhai; Bi, Chenglu; Xu, Jianzhong; Li, Ling; Chen, Hui; Chen, Yanfang; Dai, Liang; Zhou, Quanfa; Ge, Xinlei

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of aerosol chemistry in densely populated regions is critical for effective reduction of air pollution, while such studies have not been conducted in Changzhou, an important manufacturing base and populated city in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), China. This work, for the first time, performed a thorough chemical characterization on the fine particulate matter (PM2.5) samples, collected during July 2015 to April 2016 across four seasons in this city. A suite of analytical techniques was employed to measure the organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), water-soluble inorganic ions (WSIIs), trace elements, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM2.5; in particular, an Aerodyne soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) was deployed to probe the chemical properties of water-soluble organic aerosol (WSOA). The average PM2.5 concentration was found to be 108.3 µg m-3, and all identified species were able to reconstruct ˜ 80 % of the PM2.5 mass. The WSIIs occupied about half of the PM2.5 mass (˜ 52.1 %), with SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ as the major ions. On average, nitrate concentrations dominated over sulfate (mass ratio of 1.21), indicating that traffic emissions were more important than stationary sources. OC and EC correlated well with each other and the highest OC / EC ratio (5.16) occurred in winter, suggesting complex OC sources likely including both secondary and primary ones. Concentrations of eight trace elements (Mn, Zn, Al, B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb) can contribute up to ˜ 5.0 % of PM2.5 during winter. PAH concentrations were also high in winter (140.25 ng m-3), which were predominated by median/high molecular weight PAHs with five and six rings. The organic matter including both water-soluble and water-insoluble species occupied ˜ 21.5 % of the PM2.5 mass. SP-AMS determined that the WSOA had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C), and organic

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A HIGH-VOLUME DICHOTOMOUS SAMPLER FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF COARSE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the development and field evaluation of a compact high-volume dichotomous sampler (HVDS) that collects coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter. In its primary configuration as tested, the sampler size-fractionates PM10 into...

  16. Organo- and nano-catalyst in greener reaction medium: Microwave-assisted expedient synthesis of fine chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of emerging microwave (MW) -assisted chemistry techniques is dramatically reducing chemical waste and reaction times in several organic syntheses and chemical transformations. A brief account of our experiences in developing MW-assisted organic transformations, which invo...

  17. Use of the International Pharmaceutical Federation’s Basel Statements to Assess and Advance Hospital Pharmacy Practice: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Penm, Jonathan; Chaar, Betty; Moles, Rebekah J

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Basel statements of the International Pharmaceutical Federation, which provide the first global, unified vision for the hospital pharmacy profession, have recently been revised. Originally released in 2008, the Basel statements have since been made available in 21 languages, and thus have the potential for great impact around the world. Objective: To conduct a scoping review to examine the extent and nature of research activity related to the Basel statements. Methods: Google Scholar, PubMed, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts were searched using the key term “Basel statements” for relevant research articles. From each included study, data were extracted on geographic location, study design, study outcomes, and use of the Basel statements. Results: The search strategy generated 113 results. Further refinement resulted in 14 English-language articles that met the inclusion criteria. Four of these articles focused on adapting the Basel statements to European practice, an initiative of the European Association of Hospital Pharmacists that led to development of the European statements of Hospital Pharmacy. Six studies focused on monitoring hospital pharmacy practice in Uganda, the Pacific island countries, and the Western Pacific Region. These studies provide valuable baseline data to measure and track the development of hospital pharmacy practices in their respective countries and regions. The remaining 4 studies used qualitative methods to explore the barriers to and facilitators of implementation of the Basel statements in South Africa, China, and Australia. Conclusion: The Basel statements have led to multiple initiatives around the world, involving more than 70 countries. The European and Western Pacific regions have been the most active. Current initiatives should be continued to ensure identification and resolution of issues related to sustaining their use over time. PMID:27168634

  18. Update on the Chemical Composition Of Crystalline, Smectite, and Amorphous Components for Rocknest Soil and John Klein and Cumberland Mudstone Drill Fines at Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Rampe, E. B.; Treiman, A. H.; Yen, A. S.; Achilles, C. N.; Archer, P. D.; Bristow, T. F.; Cavanaugh, P.; Fenrdrich, K.; Crisp, J. A.; Des Marais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; McAdam, A. C.; Morookian, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously calculated the chemical compositions of the X-ray-diffraction (XRD) amorphous component of three solid samples (Rocknest (RN) soil, John Klein (JK) drill fines, and Cumberland (CB) drill fines) using major-element chemistry (APXS), volatile-element chemistry (SAM), and crystalline- phase mineralogy (CheMin) obtained by the Curiosity rover as a part of the ongoing Mars Science Laboratory mission in Gale Crater. According to CheMin analysis, the RN and the JK and CB samples are mineralogically distinct in that RN has no detectable clay minerals and both JK and CB have significant concentrations of high-Fe saponite. The chemical composition of the XRD amorphous component is the composition remaining after mathematical removal of the compositions of crystalline components, including phyllosilicates if present. Subsequent to, we have improved the unit cell parameters for Fe-forsterite, augite, and pigeonite, resulting in revised chemical compositions for the XRD-derived crystalline component (excluding clay minerals). We update here the calculated compositions of amorphous components using these revised mineral compositions.

  19. The longitudinal curriculum "social and communicative competencies" within Bologna-reformed undergraduate medical education in Basel.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Claudia; Langewitz, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Hintergrund: Mit der Umstellung auf die Bachelor-/Masterstruktur wurde in Basel (Schweiz) ein longitudinales Curriculum „soziale und Kommunikative Kompetenzen“ (SOKO) in das Medizinstudium implementiert. Projektbeschreibung: Ziel ist es, den Studierenden grundlegende Techniken einer patientenzentrierten Kommunikation in dem Sinne zu vermitteln, dass die Studierenden in der Lage sind, Informationen zu erheben und Informationen an Patientinnen und Patienten weiterzugeben, um sie als gut informierte Partner am Entscheidungsprozess zu beteiligen. Das SOKO Curriculum umfasst aus Sicht der Studierenden 57 Unterrichtsstunden. In Vorlesungen und kleinen Gruppen kommen vom 1. bis 3. Bachelor- und im 1. Masterstudienjahr Rollenspiele, Videofeedback, Simulationspatienten und der Kontakt mit realen Patienten als didaktische Methoden zum Einsatz. Die Lernziele werden in den summativen klinisch-praktischen OSCE-Prüfungen abgeprüft.Schlussfolgerungen: In Basel konnte mit der Umstellung auf die Bologna-Struktur ein longitudinales SOKO-Curriculum implementiert werden, das kumulatives Lernen erlaubt, auf die Inhalte des sonstigen Studiums Bezug nimmt und regelmäßig in den OSCEs abgeprüft wird. Zurzeit wird ein Großteil der Lehre durch die Psychosomatik des Unispital Basels geleistet. Für die Zukunft wird entscheidend sein, nachhaltige Strukturen in der gesamten Fakultät und im gesamten Unispital zu verankern, um dauerhaft eine hohe Qualität des Unterrichts und der Prüfungen sicherzustellen.

  20. Inter-comparison of Seasonal Variation, Chemical Characteristics, and Source Identification of Atmospheric Fine Particles on Both Sides of the Taiwan Strait

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tsung-Chang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Huang, Hu-Ching; Lee, Chon-Lin; Wu, Shui-Ping; Tong, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal distribution and chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles in areas around the Taiwan Strait were firstly investigated. Fine particles (PM2.5) were simultaneously collected at two sites on the west-side, one site at an offshore island, and three sites on the east-side of the Taiwan Strait in 2013–2014. Field sampling results indicated that the average PM2.5 concentrations at the west-side sampling sites were generally higher than those at the east-side sampling sites. In terms of chemical composition, the most abundant water-soluble ionic species of PM2.5 were SO42−, NO3−, and NH4+, while natural crustal elements dominated the metallic content of PM2.5, and the most abundant anthropogenic metals of PM2.5 were Pb, Ni and Zn. Moreover, high OC/EC ratios of PM2.5 were commonly observed at the west-side sampling sites, which are located at the downwind of major stationary sources. Results from CMB receptor modeling showed that the major sources of PM2.5 were anthropogenic sources and secondary aerosols at the both sides, and natural sources dominated PM2.5 at the offshore site. A consistent decrease of secondary sulfate and nitrate contribution to PM2.5 suggested the transportation of aged particles from the west-side to the east-side of the Taiwan Strait. PMID:26973085

  1. Size distribution, chemical composition, and hygroscopicity of fine particles emitted from an oil-fired heating plant.

    PubMed

    Happonen, Matti; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Frey, Anna; Saarikoski, Sanna; Carbone, Samara; Hillamo, Risto; Pirjola, Liisa; Häyrinen, Anna; Kytömäki, Jorma; Niemi, Jarkko V; Keskinen, Jorma; Rönkkö, Topi

    2013-12-17

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) is a commonly used fuel in industrial heating and power generation and for large marine vessels. In this study, the fine particle emissions of a 47 MW oil-fired boiler were studied at 30 MW power and with three different fuels. The studied fuels were HFO, water emulsion of HFO, and water emulsion of HFO mixed with light fuel oil (LFO). With all the fuels, the boiler emitted considerable amounts of particles smaller than 200 nm in diameter. Further, these small particles were quite hygroscopic even as fresh and, in the case of HFO+LFO emulsion, the hygroscopic growth of the particles was dependent on particle size. The use of emulsions and the addition of LFO to the fuel had a reducing effect on the hygroscopic growth of particles. The use of emulsions lowered the sulfate content of the smallest particles but did not affect significantly the sulfate content of particles larger than 42 nm and, further, the addition of LFO considerably increased the black carbon content of particulate matter. The results indicate that even the fine particles emitted from HFO based combustion can have a significant effect on cloud formation, visibility, and air quality.

  2. Fine particle emissions in three different combustion conditions of a wood chip-fired appliance - Particulate physico-chemical properties and induced cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskinen, J.; Tissari, J.; Uski, O.; Virén, A.; Torvela, T.; Kaivosoja, T.; Lamberg, H.; Nuutinen, I.; Kettunen, T.; Joutsensaari, J.; Jalava, P. I.; Sippula, O.; Hirvonen, M.-R.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2014-04-01

    A biomass combustion reactor with a moving grate was utilised as a model system to produce three different combustion conditions corresponding to efficient, intermediate, and smouldering combustion. The efficient conditions (based on a CO level of approximately 7 mg MJ-1) corresponded to a modern pellet boiler. The intermediate conditions (CO level of approximately 300 mg MJ-1) corresponded to non-optimal settings in a continuously fired biomass combustion appliance. The smouldering conditions (CO level of approximately 2200 mg MJ-1) approached a batch combustion situation. The gaseous and particle emissions were characterised under each condition. Moreover, the ability of fine particles to cause cell death was determined using the particle emissions samples. The physico-chemical properties of the emitted particles and their toxicity were considerably different between the studied combustion conditions. In the efficient combustion, the emitted particles were small in size and large in number. The PM1 emission was low, and it was composed of ash species. In the intermediate and smouldering combustion, the PM1 emission was higher, and the particles were larger in size and smaller in number. In both of these conditions, there were high-emission peaks that produced a significant fraction of the emissions. The PAH emissions were the lowest in the efficient combustion. The smouldering combustion conditions produced the largest PAH emissions. In efficient combustion conditions, the emitted fine particles had the highest potential to cause cell death. This finding was most likely observed because these fine particles were mainly composed of inorganic ash species, and their relative contents of Zn were high. Thus, even the PM1 from optimal biomass combustion might cause health effects, but in these conditions, the particle emissions per energy unit produced were considerably lower.

  3. Chemical characteristics and source apportionment of fine particulate organic carbon in Hong Kong during high particulate matter episodes in winter 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Chun; Yu, Jian Zhen; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Schauer, James J.; Yuan, Zibing; Lau, Alexis K. H.; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2013-02-01

    PM2.5 samples were collected at six general stations and one roadside station in Hong Kong in two periods of high particulate matter (PM) in 2003 (27 October-4 November and 30 November-13 December). The highest PM2.5 reached 216 μg m- 3 during the first high PM period and 113 μg m- 3 during the second high PM period. Analysis of synoptic weather conditions identified individual sampling days under dominant influence of one of three types of air masses, that is, local, regional and long-range transported (LRT) air masses. Roadside samples were discussed separately due to heavy influences from vehicular emissions. This research examines source apportionment of fine organic carbon (OC) and contribution of secondary organic aerosol on high PM days under different synoptic conditions. Six primary OC (POC) sources (vehicle exhaust, biomass burning, cooking, cigarette smoke, vegetative detritus, and coal combustion) were identified on the basis of characteristic organic tracers. Individual POC source contributions were estimated using chemical mass balance model. In the roadside and the local samples, OC was dominated by the primary sources, accounting for more than 74% of OC. In the samples influenced by regional and LRT air masses, secondary OC (SOC), which was approximated to be the difference between the total measured OC and the apportioned POC, contributed more than 54% of fine OC. SOC was highly correlated with water-soluble organic carbon and sulfate, consistent with its secondary nature.

  4. Source apportionment of ambient fine particulate matter in Dearborn, Michigan, using hourly resolved PM chemical composition data.

    PubMed

    Pancras, Joseph Patrick; Landis, Matthew S; Norris, Gary A; Vedantham, Ram; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2013-03-15

    High time-resolution aerosol sampling was conducted for one month during July-August 2007 in Dearborn, MI, a non-attainment area for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Measurements of more than 30 PM2.5 species were made using a suite of semi-continuous sampling and monitoring instruments. Dynamic variations in the sub-hourly concentrations of source 'marker' elements were observed when discrete plumes from local sources impacted the sampling site. Hourly averaged PM2.5 composition data for 639 samples were used to identify and apportion PM2.5 emission sources using the multivariate receptor modeling techniques EPA Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) v4.2 and EPA Unmix v6.0. Source contribution estimates from PMF and Unmix were then evaluated using the Sustained Wind Instance Method (SWIM), which identified plausible source origins. Ten sources were identified by both PMF and Unmix: (1) secondary sulfate, (2) secondary nitrate characterized by a significant diurnal trend, (3) iron and steel production, (4) a potassium-rich factor attributable to iron/steel slag waste processing, (5) a cadmium-rich factor attributable to incineration, (6) an oil refinery characterized by La/Ce>1 specific to south wind, (7) oil combustion, (8) coal combustion, (9) motor vehicles, and (10) road dust enriched with organic carbon. While both models apportioned secondary sulfate, oil refinery, and oil combustion PM2.5 masses closely, the mobile and industrial source apportionments differed. Analyses were also carried out to help infer time-of-day variations in the contributions of local sources.

  5. [Effect of linguistic competence on speech audiometry results using the Basel Sentence Test].

    PubMed

    von Werra, P; Tschopp, K; Schneider, R

    1995-02-01

    Linguistic competence, such as a mental lexicon knowledge of syntactic rules of the language and the use of semantic constraints, may impact central speech processing and play an important role in speech recognition. The influence of linguistic ability on speech understanding was investigated using the Basel Sentence Understanding Test. The subject's linguistic ability was determined based upon educational background (elementary school, high school and or university) and intelligence quotients (IQ) based on the reduced version of the Hamburg-Wechsler Intelligence Test. Forty normally-hearing subjects listened to five test forms of the Basel Sentence Understanding Test. Each test form comprised a fraction of 15 low-predictable (LP) test items and 15 high-predictable (HP) test items based on the amount of contextual information in the phrases. No effect of educational background and IQ-value could be demonstrated on the scores of LP sentences. However, there was a small but significant influence of educational background and IQ-value on the scores of HP sentences. The implications of these findings on clinical speech audiometry are discussed.

  6. The longitudinal curriculum "social and communicative competencies" within Bologna-reformed undergraduate medical education in Basel

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Claudia; Langewitz, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Background: Within the Bologna reform, a longitudinal curriculum of “social and communicative competencies” (SOKO) was implemented into the new Bachelor-Master structure of undergraduate medical education in Basel (Switzerland). Project description: The aim of the SOKO curriculum is to enable students to use techniques of patient-centred communication to elicit and provide information to patients in order to involve them as informed partners in decision making processes. The SOKO curriculum consists of 57 lessons for the individual student from the first bachelor year to the first master year. Teaching encompasses lectures and small group learning. Didactic methods include role play, video feedback, and consultations with simulated and real patients. Summative assessment takes place in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE). Conclusion: In Basel, a longitudinal SOKO curriculum based on students’ cumulative learning was successfully implemented. Goals and contents were coordinated with the remaining curriculum and are regularly assessed in OSCEs. At present, most of the workload rests on the shoulders of the department of psychosomatic medicine at the university hospital. For the curriculum to be successful in the long-term, sustainable structures need to be instituted at the medical faculty and the university hospital to guarantee high quality teaching and assessment. PMID:24062811

  7. Modeling of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter: Development and performance assessment of EASYWRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, M.; Lebègue, P.; Visez, N.; Fèvre-Nollet, V.; Crenn, V.; Riffault, V.; Petitprez, D.

    2016-03-01

    The European emission Adaptation SYstem for the WRF-Chem model (EASYWRF-Chem) has been developed to generate chemical information supporting the WRF-Chem requirements from any emission inventory based on the CORINAIR methodology. Using RADM2 and RACM2 mechanisms, "emission species" are converted into "model species" thanks to the SAPRC methodology for gas phase pollutant and the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions. Furthermore, by adapting US EPA PM2.5 profiles, the processing of aerosol chemical speciation profiles separates the unspeciated PM2.5 emission into five chemical families: sulfates, nitrates, elemental carbon, organic aerosol and unspeciated aerosol. The evaluation of the model has been performed by separately comparing model outcomes with (i) meteorological measurements; (ii) NO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5 mass concentrations from the regional air quality monitoring network; (iii) hourly-resolved data from four field campaign measurements, in winter and in summer, on two sites in the French northern region. In the latter, a High Resolution - Time of Flight - Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) provided non-refractory PM1 concentrations of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium ions as well as organic matter (OM), while an aethalometer provided black carbon (BC) concentrations in the PM2.5 fraction. Meteorological data (temperature, wind, relative humidity) are well simulated for all the time series data except for specific events as wind direction changes or rainfall. For particulate matter, results are presented by considering firstly the total mass concentration of PM2.5 and PM10. EASYWRF-Chem simulations overestimated the PM10 mass concentrations by + 22% and + 4% for summer and winter periods respectively, whereas for the finer PM2.5 fraction, mass concentrations were overestimated by + 20% in summer and underestimated by - 13% in winter. Simulated sulfate concentrations were underestimated and nitrate concentrations were overestimated but hourly variations were well

  8. Chemical characterization of the fine particle emissions from commercial aircraft engines during the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX) 1 to 3.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, J S; Hays, M D; Dong, Y; Williams, D C; Logan, R

    2011-04-15

    This paper addresses the need for detailed chemical information on the fine particulate matter (PM) generated by commercial aviation engines. The exhaust plumes of seven turbofan engine models were sampled as part of the three test campaigns of the Aircraft Particle Emissions eXperiment (APEX). In these experiments, continuous measurements of black carbon (BC) and particle surface-bound polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs) were conducted. In addition, time-integrated sampling was performed for bulk elemental composition, water-soluble ions, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), and trace semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs). The continuous BC and PAH monitoring showed a characteristic U-shaped curve of the emission index (EI or mass of pollutant/mass of fuel burned) vs fuel flow for the turbofan engines tested. The time-integrated EIs for both elemental composition and water-soluble ions were heavily dominated by sulfur and SO(4)(2-), respectively, with a ∼2.4% median conversion of fuel S(IV) to particle S(VI). The corrected OC and EC emission indices obtained in this study ranged from 37 to 83 mg/kg and 21 to 275 mg/kg, respectively, with the EC/OC ratio ranging from ∼0.3 to 7 depending on engine type and test conditions. Finally, the particle SVOC EIs varied by as much as 2 orders of magnitude with distinct variations in chemical composition observed for different engine types and operating conditions.

  9. Comparison between simulated and observed chemical composition of fine aerosols in Paris (France) during springtime: contribution of regional versus continental emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, J.; D'Argouges, O.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Gaimoz, C.; Gros, V.; Zhang, Q. J.; Beekmann, M.; Sanchez, O.

    2010-07-01

    Hourly concentrations of inorganic salts (ions) and carbonaceous material in fine aerosols (aerodynamic diameter, A.D.<2.5 μm) have been determined experimentally from fast measurements performed for a 3-week period in spring 2007 in Paris (France). The sum of these two chemical components (ions and carbonaceous aerosols) has shown to account for most of the fine aerosol mass (PM2.5). This time-resolved dataset allowed investigating the factors controlling the levels of PM2.5 in Paris and showed that polluted periods with PM2.5<15 μg/m3 were characterized by air masses of continental (North-Western Europe) origin and chemical composition made by 75% of ions. By contrast, periods with clean marine air masses have shown the lowest PM2.5 concentrations (typically of about 10 μg/m3); carbonaceous aerosols contributing for most of this mass (typically 75%). In order to better discriminate between regional and continental contributions to the observed chemical composition and concentrations of PM2.5 over Paris, a comparative study was performed between this time-resolved dataset and the outputs of a chemistry transport model (CHIMERE), showing a relatively good capability of the model to reproduce the time-limited intense maxima observed in the field for PM2.5 and ion species. Different model scenarios were then investigated switching off regional and European (North-Western and Central) emissions. Results of these scenarios have clearly shown that most of the ions observed over Paris during polluted periods, were either transported or formed in-situ from gas precursors transported from Northern Europe. By opposite, long-range transport from Europe appeared to poorly contribute to the levels of carbonaceous aerosols observed over Paris. The model failed to properly account for the concentration levels and variability of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) determined experimentally by the EC-tracer method. The abundance of SOA (relatively to organic aerosol, OA) was as

  10. Comparison between simulated and observed chemical composition of fine aerosols in Paris (France) during springtime: contribution of regional versus continental emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciare, J.; D'Argouges, O.; Zhang, Q. J.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Gaimoz, C.; Gros, V.; Beekmann, M.; Sanchez, O.

    2010-12-01

    Hourly concentrations of inorganic salts (ions) and carbonaceous material in fine aerosols (aerodynamic diameter, A.D. <2.5 μm) have been determined experimentally from fast measurements performed for a 3-week period in spring 2007 in Paris (France). The sum of these two chemical components (ions and carbonaceous aerosols) has shown to account for most of the fine aerosol mass (PM2.5). This time-resolved dataset allowed investigating the factors controlling the levels of PM2.5 in Paris and showed that polluted periods with PM2.5 > 15 μg m-3 were characterized by air masses of continental (North-Western Europe) origin and chemical composition made by 75% of ions. By contrast, periods with clean marine air masses have shown the lowest PM2.5 concentrations (typically of about 10 μg m-3); carbonaceous aerosols contributing for most of this mass (typically 75%). In order to better discriminate between local and continental contributions to the observed chemical composition and concentrations of PM2.5 over Paris, a comparative study was performed between this time-resolved dataset and the outputs of a chemistry transport model (CHIMERE), showing a relatively good capability of the model to reproduce the time-limited intense maxima observed in the field for PM2.5 and ion species. Different model scenarios were then investigated switching off local and European (North-Western and Central) emissions. Results of these scenarios have clearly shown that most of the ions observed over Paris during polluted periods, were either transported or formed in-situ from gas precursors transported from Northern Europe. On the opposite, long-range transport from Europe appeared to weakly contribute to the levels of carbonaceous aerosols observed over Paris. The model failed to properly account for the concentration levels and variability of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) determined experimentally by the EC-tracer method. The abundance of SOA (relatively to organic aerosol, OA) was as

  11. Fine Particle Sources and Cardiorespiratory Morbidity: An Application of Chemical Mass Balance and Factor Analytical Source-Apportionment Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Marmur, Amit; Klein, Mitchel; Kim, Eugene; Russell, Armistead G.; Sarnat, Stefanie E.; Mulholland, James A.; Hopke, Philip K.; Tolbert, Paige E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Interest in the health effects of particulate matter (PM) has focused on identifying sources of PM, including biomass burning, power plants, and gasoline and diesel emissions that may be associated with adverse health risks. Few epidemiologic studies, however, have included source-apportionment estimates in their examinations of PM health effects. We analyzed a time-series of chemically speciated PM measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, and conducted an epidemiologic analysis using data from three distinct source-apportionment methods. Objective The key objective of this analysis was to compare epidemiologic findings generated using both factor analysis and mass balance source-apportionment methods. Methods We analyzed data collected between November 1998 and December 2002 using positive-matrix factorization (PMF), modified chemical mass balance (CMB-LGO), and a tracer approach. Emergency department (ED) visits for a combined cardiovascular (CVD) and respiratory disease (RD) group were assessed as end points. We estimated the risk ratio (RR) associated with same day PM concentrations using Poisson generalized linear models. Results There were significant, positive associations between same-day PM2.5 (PM with aero-dynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) concentrations attributed to mobile sources (RR range, 1.018–1.025) and biomass combustion, primarily prescribed forest burning and residential wood combustion, (RR range, 1.024–1.033) source categories and CVD-related ED visits. Associations between the source categories and RD visits were not significant for all models except sulfate-rich secondary PM2.5 (RR range, 1.012–1.020). Generally, the epidemiologic results were robust to the selection of source-apportionment method, with strong agreement between the RR estimates from the PMF and CMB-LGO models, as well as with results from models using single-species tracers as surrogates of the source-apportioned PM2.5 values. Conclusions Despite differences among the

  12. A one-year comprehensive chemical characterisation of fine aerosol (PM2.5) at urban, suburban and rural background sites in the region of Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Bonnaire, N.; Nicolas, J. B.; Petit, J.-E.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Féron, A.

    2012-11-01

    Studies describing the chemical composition of fine aerosol (PM2.5) in urban areas are often conducted during few weeks only, and at one sole site, giving thus a narrow view of their temporal and spatial characteristics. This paper presents a one-year (11 September 2009-10 September 2010) survey of the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 in the region of Paris, which is the second most populated "Larger Urban Zone" in Europe. Five sampling sites representative of suburban (SUB), urban (URB), northeast (NER), northwest (NWR) and south (SOR) rural backgrounds were implemented. The major chemical components of PM2.5 were determined including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and the major ions. OC was converted to organic matter (OM) using the chemical mass closure methodology, which leads to conversion factors of 1.95 for the SUB and URB sites, and 2.05 for the three rural ones. On average, gravimetrically determined PM2.5 annual mass concentrations are 15.2, 14.8, 12.6, 11.7 and 10.8 μg m-3 for SUB, URB, NER, NWR and SOR sites, respectively. The chemical composition of fine aerosol is very homogeneous at the five sites and is composed of OM (38-47%), nitrate (17-22%), non-sea-salt sulfate (13-16%), ammonium (10-12%), EC (4-10%), mineral dust (2-5%) and sea salt (3-4%). This chemical composition is in agreement with those reported in the literature for most European environments. On the annual scale, Paris (URB and SUB sites) exhibits its highest PM2.5 concentrations during late autumn, winter and early spring (higher than 15 μg m-3 on average, from December to April), intermediates during late spring and early autumn (between 10 and 15 μg m-3 during May, June, September, October, and November) and the lowest during summer (below 10 μg m-3 during July and August). PM levels are mostly homogeneous at the regional scale, on the whole duration of the project (e.g. for URB plotted against NER sites: slope = 1.06, r2 = 0.84, n = 330), suggesting the

  13. A one-year comprehensive chemical characterisation of fine aerosol (PM2.5) at urban, suburban and rural background sites in the region of Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Bonnaire, N.; Nicolas, J. B.; Petit, J.-E.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Féron, A.

    2013-08-01

    Studies describing the chemical composition of fine aerosol (PM2.5) in urban areas are often conducted for a few weeks only and at one sole site, giving thus a narrow view of their temporal and spatial characteristics. This paper presents a one-year (11 September 2009-10 September 2010) survey of the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 in the region of Paris, which is the second most populated "Larger Urban Zone" in Europe. Five sampling sites representative of suburban (SUB), urban (URB), northeast (NER), northwest (NWR) and south (SOR) rural backgrounds were implemented. The major chemical components of PM2.5 were determined including elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and the major ions. OC was converted to organic matter (OM) using the chemical mass closure methodology, which leads to conversion factors of 1.95 for the SUB and URB sites, and 2.05 for the three rural ones. On average, gravimetrically determined PM2.5 annual mass concentrations are 15.2, 14.8, 12.6, 11.7 and 10.8 μg m-3 for SUB, URB, NER, NWR and SOR sites, respectively. The chemical composition of fine aerosol is very homogeneous at the five sites and is composed of OM (38-47%), nitrate (17-22%), non-sea-salt sulfate (13-16%), ammonium (10-12%), EC (4-10%), mineral dust (2-5%) and sea salt (3-4%). This chemical composition is in agreement with those reported in the literature for most European environments. On an annual scale, Paris (URB and SUB sites) exhibits its highest PM2.5 concentrations during late autumn, winter and early spring (higher than 15 μg m-3 on average, from December to April), intermediates during late spring and early autumn (between 10 and 15 μg m-3 during May, June, September, October, and November) and the lowest during summer (below 10 μg m-3 during July and August). PM levels are mostly homogeneous on a regional scale, during the whole project (e.g. for URB plotted against NER sites: slope = 1.06, r2=0.84, n=330), suggesting the importance of mid- or long

  14. S-wave velocity measurements applied to the seismic microzonation of Basel, Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, Hans-Balder; Fäh, Donat; Polom, Ulrich; Roullé, Agathe

    2007-07-01

    An extensive S-wave velocity survey had been carried out in the frame of a recent seismic microzonation study of Basel and the border areas between Switzerland, France and Germany. The aim was to better constrain the seismic amplification potential of the surface layers. The survey included single station (H/V spectral ratios) and ambient vibration array measurements carried out by the Swiss team, as well as active S-wave velocity measurements performed by the German and French partners. This paper is focused on the application of the array technique, which consists in recording ambient vibrations with a number of seismological stations. Several practical aspects related to the field measurements are outlined. The signal processing aims to determine the dispersion curves of surface waves contained in the ambient vibrations. The inversion of the dispersion curve provides a 1-D S-wave velocity model for the investigated site down to a depth related to the size of the array. Since the size of arrays is theoretically not limited, arrays are known to be well adapted for investigations in deep sediment basins, such as the Upper Rhine Graben including the area of the city of Basel. In this region, 27 array measurements with varying station configurations have been carried out to determine the S-wave velocity properties of the geological layers down to a depth of 100-250 m. For eight sites, the outputs of the array measurements have been compared with the results of the other investigations using active sources, the spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) and S-wave reflection seismics. Borehole information available for a few sites could be used to calibrate the geophysical measurements. By this comparison, the advantages and disadvantages of the array method and the other techniques are outlined with regard to the effectiveness of the methods and the required investigation depth. The dispersion curves measured with the arrays and the SASW technique were also combined

  15. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of indoor and outdoor fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) in retirement communities of the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M; Schauer, James J; Delfino, Ralph J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-08-15

    Concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were conducted at three retirement homes in the Los Angeles Basin during two separate phases (cold and warm) between 2005 and 2006. Indoor-to-outdoor relationships of PM2.5 chemical constituents were determined and sources of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 were evaluated using a molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model. Indoor levels of elemental carbon (EC) along with metals and trace elements were found to be significantly affected by outdoor sources. EC, in particular, displayed very high indoor-to-outdoor (I/O) mass ratios accompanied by strong I/O correlations, illustrating the significant impact of outdoor sources on indoor levels of EC. Similarly, indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes were strongly correlated with their outdoor components and displayed I/O ratios close to unity. On the other hand, concentrations of n-alkanes and organic acids inside the retirement communities were dominated by indoor sources (e.g. food cooking and consumer products), as indicated by their I/O ratios, which exceeded unity. Source apportionment results revealed that vehicular emissions were the major contributor to both indoor and outdoor PM2.5, accounting for 39 and 46% of total mass, respectively. Moreover, the contribution of vehicular sources to indoor levels was generally comparable to its corresponding outdoor estimate. Other water-insoluble organic matter (other WIOM), which accounts for emissions from uncharacterized primary biogenic sources, displayed a wider range of contributions, varying from 2 to 73% of PM2.5, across all sites and phases of the study. Lastly, higher indoor than outdoor contribution of other water-soluble organic matter (other WSOM) was evident at some of the sites, suggesting the production of secondary aerosols as well as direct emissions from primary sources (including cleaning or other consumer products) at the

  16. Chemical partitioning of fine particle-bound metals on haze-fog and non-haze-fog days in Nanjing, China and its contribution to human health risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiming; Wu, Hongfei; Wang, Qin'geng; Yang, Meng; Li, Fengying; Sun, Yixuan; Qian, Xin; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Information on chemical partitioning and associated risk of airborne metals, particularly during a haze-fog episode, is limited. Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was collected during a severe haze-fog event in winter and non-haze-fog periods in summer and fall from an urban region of a typical Chinese mega-city, Nanjing. The particulate-bound metals (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn) were chemically fractionated in a four-step sequential extraction procedure and human health risk was assessed. During the haze-fog episode, PM2.5 was extremely elevated with a mean concentration of 281 μg/m3 (range: 77-431 μg/m3), whereas the mean PM2.5 concentrations in summer and fall periods were 86 μg/m3 (range: 66-111 μg/m3) and 77 μg/m3 (range: 42-131 μg/m3), respectively. All elements had significantly higher concentrations and many metals exceeded relevant limits on haze-fog days. K, Na, Sr, Zn, Mo, Ca, Cd, Mg, Mn, Cu, Ba, Cr and As all showed relatively high proportions of the soluble and exchangeable fraction and strong bio-accessible potential. High temperature and humidity may increase the bio-accessible fraction of many airborne metals. The hazard index for potential toxic metals was 0.115, which was lower than the safe limit (1). However, the combined carcinogenic risk was 1.32 × 10- 6 for children and 5.29 × 10- 6 for adults, with both values being higher than the precautionary criterion (10- 6). Results of this study provide information for the behavior and risk mitigation of airborne metals.

  17. Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Indoor and Outdoor Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) in Retirement Communities of the Los Angeles Basin

    PubMed Central

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Delfino, Ralph J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were conducted at three retirement homes in the Los Angeles Basin during two separate phases (cold and warm) between 2005 and 2006. Indoor-to-outdoor relationships of PM2.5 chemical constituents were determined and sources of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 were evaluated using a molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model. Indoor levels of elemental carbon (EC) along with metals and trace elements were found to be significantly affected by outdoor sources. EC, in particular, displayed very high indoor-to-outdoor (I/O) mass ratios accompanied by strong I/O correlations, illustrating the significant impact of outdoor sources on indoor levels of EC. Similarly, indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes were strongly correlated with their outdoor components and displayed I/O ratios close to unity. On the other hand, concentrations of n-alkanes and organic acids inside the retirement communities were dominated by indoor sources (e.g. food cooking and consumer products), as indicated by their I/O ratios, which exceeded unity. Source apportionment results revealed that vehicular emissions were the major contributor to both indoor and outdoor PM2.5, accounting for 39 and 46% of total mass, respectively. Moreover, the contribution of vehicular sources to indoor levels was generally comparable to its corresponding outdoor estimate. Other water-insoluble organic matter (other WIOM), which accounts for emissions from uncharacterized primary biogenic sources, displayed a wider range of contributions, varying from 2 to 73% of PM2.5, across all sites and phases of the study. Lastly, higher indoor than outdoor contribution of other water-soluble organic matter (other WSOM) was evident at some of the sites, suggesting the production of secondary aerosols as well as direct emissions from primary sources (including cleaning or other consumer products) at the

  18. Fine Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.; Newman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of fine arts as sources to enrich the study of history. Suggests that such works will serve as barometers of change, examples of cross-cultural influences, and political messages. Includes suggestions of works and artists from different historic periods. (DK)

  19. Chemical compositions responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in the mouse lung by coarse and fine particulate samples from contrasting air pollution in Europe.

    PubMed

    Happo, Mikko S; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Halinen, Arja I; Jalava, Pasi I; Pennanen, Arto S; Sillanpaa, Markus; Hillamo, Risto; Salonen, Raimo O

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation is regarded as an important mechanism in mortality and morbidity associated with exposures of cardiorespiratory patients to urban air particulate matter. We investigated the association of the chemical composition and sources of urban air fine (PM(2.5-0.2)) and coarse (PM(10-2.5)) particulate samples with the inflammatory activity in the mouse lung. The particulate samples were collected during selected seasons in six European cities using a high-volume cascade impactor. Healthy C57BL/6J mice were intratracheally instilled with a single dose (10 mg/kg) of the particulate samples. At 4, 12, and 24 h after the exposure, the lungs were lavaged and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was assayed for indicators of inflammation and tissue damage: cell number, total protein, and cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-alpha, interleukin [IL]-6, and KC). Dicarboxylic acids and transition metals, especially Ni and V, in PM(2.5-0.2) correlated positively and some secondary inorganic ions (NO3(-), NH4(+)) negatively with the inflammatory activity. Total organic matter and SO4(2-) had no consistent correlations. In addition, the soil-derived constituents (Ca2+, Al, Fe, Si) showed positive correlations with the PM(2.5-0.2)-induced inflammatory activity, but their role in PM(10-2.5) remained obscure, possibly due to largely undefined biogenic material. Markers of poor biomass and coal combustion, i.e., monosaccharide anhydrides and As, were associated with elevated PAH contents in PM(2.5-0.2) and a consistent immunosuppressive effect. Overall, our results support epidemiological findings that the local sources of incomplete combustion and resuspended road dust are important in urban air particulate pollution-related health effects.

  20. Engineering the substrate specificity of cytochrome P450 CYP102A2 by directed evolution: production of an efficient enzyme for bioconversion of fine chemicals.

    PubMed

    Axarli, Irene; Prigipaki, Ariadne; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2005-06-01

    The P450 cytochromes constitute a large family of hemoproteins that catalyze the monooxygenation of a diversity of hydrophobic substrates. CYP102A2 is a catalytically self-sufficient cytoplasmic enzyme from Bacillus subtilis, containing both a monooxygenase domain and a reductase domain on a single polypeptide chain. CYP102A2 was subjected to error-prone PCR to generate mutants with enhanced activity with fatty acids and other aromatic substrates. The library of CYP102A2 mutants was expressed in BL21(DE3) Escherichia coli cells and screened for their ability to oxidize different substrates by means of an activity assay. After a single round of error-prone PCR, the variant Pro15Ser exhibiting modified substrate specificity was generated. This variant showed approximately 6- to 9-fold increased activity with SDS, lauric acid and 1,4-naphthoquinone, and enhanced activity for other substrates such as ethacrynic acid and epsilon-amino-n-caproic acid. Molecular modeling of the CYP102A2 monooxygenase domain suggested that Pro15 is located in a short helical segment and is involved in extensive interactions between the N-terminal domain and the beta2 sheet, which contribute to the formation of the substrate binding site. Thus, Pro15 appears to affect substrate binding and catalysis indirectly. These results clearly demonstrate the importance of remote residues, not readily predicted by rational design, for the determination of substrate specificity. In addition, we report here that the Pro15Ser variant of CYP102A2 can be efficiently immobilized on epoxy-activated Sepharose at pH 8.5 and 4 degrees C. The immobilized variant of CYP102A2 retains most of its activity (81%) and shows improved stability at 37 degrees C. The approach offers the possibility of designing a P450 bioreactor that can be operated over a long period of time with high efficiency and which can be used in fine chemical synthesis.

  1. Chemical fractionation of arsenic and heavy metals in fine particle matter and its implications for risk assessment: A case study in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiming; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Qin'geng; Qian, Xin; Qian, Yu; Yang, Meng; Li, Fengying; Lu, Hao; Wang, Cheng

    2015-02-01

    A four-step sequential extraction procedure was used to study the chemical fractionation of As and heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected from Nanjing, China. The mass concentrations of most PM2.5 samples exceeded the 24 h standard (75 μg/m3) recommended by the new national ambient air quality standard of China. The most abundant elements were Fe, Zn and Pb, while As and Cd were present at the lowest concentrations. As, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn were mostly present in the two mobile fractions, including the soluble and exchangeable fraction (F1), and carbonates, oxides and reducible fraction (F2). Fe had the highest proportion present in the residual fraction (F4). Relatively high proportions of the metals Ni and Cr were present in the oxidizable and sulfidic fraction (F3). High proportions of Zn, As and Cu and lower proportions of Cd, Cr and Fe were present in the potentially mobile phases. The enrichment factor, contamination factor and risk assessment code were calculated to analyze the main sources and assess the environmental risks of the metals in PM2.5. The carcinogenic risks of As, Cd, Ni and Pb were all lower than the accepted criterion of 10-6, whereas the carcinogenic risks of Cr for children and As and Cr for adults were higher than 10-6. The non-carcinogenic health risk of As and heavy metals because of PM2.5 exposure for children and adults were lower than but close to the safe level of 1.

  2. Chemical and magnetic properties of rapidly cooled metastable ferri-ilmenite solid solutions - IV: the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Peter; McEnroe, S. A.; Fabian, K.; Harrison, R. J.; Thomas, C. I.; Mukai, H.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic experiments, a Monte Carlo simulation and transmission electron microscopy observations combine to confirm variable chemical phase separation during quench and annealing of metastable ferri-ilmenite compositions, caused by inhomogeneous Fe-Ti ordering and anti-ordering. Separation begins near interfaces between growing ordered and anti-ordered domains, the latter becoming progressively enriched in ilmenite component, moving the Ti-impoverished hematite component into Fe-enriched diffusion waves near the interfaces. Even when disordered regions are eliminated, Fe-enriched waves persist and enlarge on anti-phase boundaries between growing and shrinking ordered and anti-ordered domains. Magnetic results and conceptual models show that magnetic ordering with falling T initiates in the Fe-enriched wave crests. Although representing only a tiny fraction of material, identified at highest Ts on a field-cooling curve, they control the `pre-destiny' of progressive magnetization at lower T. They can provide a positive magnetic moment in a minority of ordered ferrimagnetic material, which, by exchange coupling, then creates a self-reversed negative moment in the remaining majority. Four Ts or T ranges are recognized on typical field-cooling curves: TPD is the T range of `pre-destination'; TC is the predominant Curie T where major positive magnetization increases sharply; TMAX is where magnetization reaches a positive maximum, beyond which it is outweighed by self-reversed magnetization and TZM is the T where total magnetization passes zero. Disposition of these Ts on cooling curves indicate the fine structure of self-reversed thermoremanent magnetization. These results confirm much earlier suspicions that the `x-phase' responsible for self-reversed magnetization resides in Fe-enriched phase boundaries.

  3. Chemical Characterisation of the Coarse and Fine Particulate Matter in the Environment of an Underground Railway System: Cytotoxic Effects and Oxidative Stress—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Ottria, Gianluca; Perdelli, Fernanda; Cristina, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the particulate matter produced in underground railway systems is arousing increasing scientific interest because of its health effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the airborne concentrations of PM10 and three sub-fractions of PM2.5 in an underground railway system environment in proximity to platforms and in underground commercial areas within the system, and to compare these with the outdoor airborne concentrations. We also evaluated the metal components, the cytotoxic properties of the various fractions of particulate matter (PM) and their capacity to induce oxidative stress. Method: We collected the coarse fraction (5–10 µm) and the fine fractions (1–2.5 µm; 0.5–1 µm; 0.25–0.5 µm). Chemical characterisation was determined by means of spectrometry. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) assessment. Results: The concentrations of both PM10 and PM2.5 proved to be similar at the three sampling sites. Iron and other transition metals displayed a greater concentration at the subway platform than at the other two sites. The 2.5–10 µm and 1–2.5 µm fractions of PM from all three sampling sites determined a greater increase in ROS; the intensity of oxidative stress progressively declined as particle diameter diminished. Moreover, ROS concentrations were correlated with the concentrations of some transition metals, namely Mn, Cr, Ti, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ni and Mo. All particulate matter fractions displayed lower or similar ROS values between platform level and the outdoor air. Conclusions: The present study revealed that the underground railway environment at platform level, although containing higher concentrations of some particularly reactive metallic species, did not display higher cytotoxicity and oxidative stress levels than the outdoor air. PMID:25872016

  4. Physical and chemical properties of feedlot pen surfaces located on moderately coarse- and moderately fine-textured soils in southern Alberta.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jim J; Curtis, Tony; Larney, Francis J; McAllister, Tim A; Olson, Barry M

    2008-01-01

    Southern Alberta has the highest density of feedlot cattle in Canada, and there is a concern that leaching of water and contaminants may be greater for feedlots located on coarser-textured than finer-textured soils. Our objective was to determine if infiltration and leaching were greater for a 4-yr-old feedlot located on a moderately coarse-textured (MC) soil compared with two feedlots located on moderately fine-textured (MF) soils (5- and 52-yr-old pens). Various soil physical properties of feedlot pen surfaces were measured, including field-saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(fs)) and near-saturated hydraulic conductivity at -0.9 and -3.9 cm water potential. Selected chemical properties of feedlot soil layers were measured, as well as the chloride content of the soil profile (0-100 cm). Mean K(fs), K(-0.9), and K(-3.9) values were not significantly (P > 0.10) greater at the MC site than the two MF sites, indicating no evidence of greater infiltration on coarser-textured soils. In addition, mean K(fs), K(-0.9), and K(-3.9) values of soils within feedlot pens at all three sites were significantly (P < or = 0.10) reduced by 46 to 78% compared with soil outside the pens. Depth of chloride accumulation was greatest at the 52-yr-old feedlot on MF soil (60-70 cm), followed by 4-yr-old feedlot on MC soil (40-50 cm) and 5-yr-old feedlot on MF soil (30-40 cm). Visual inspection determined that the black interface layer formed within 2 mo of cattle stocking at all three sites.

  5. Long-term decay and possible reactivation of induced seismicity at the Basel EGS site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Toni; Herrmann, Marcus; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Tormann, Thessa; Deichmann, Nicolas; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In December 2006, an extensive fluid injection was carried out below the city of Basel, Switzerland, to stimulate a reservoir for an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). After six days of gradual increase of flow rate (and thus seismicity), a strongly felt ML3.4 earthquakes led to the immediate termination of the project. The well was opened subsequently and seismicity declined rapidly. The Basel EGS project might be an unsuccessful attempt in terms of energy supply, but a chance to advance the physical understanding of EGSs. The well-monitored and well-studied induced sequence allowed many new insights in terms of reservoir creation. A special observation in the nine years of monitoring is the revive of seismic activity six years after prolonged seismic decay. This renewed activity increase might relate to a gradual pressure increase due to the ultimate shut-in (closure) of the borehole about one year before. Until now, a detailed analysis of the long-term behaviour remained unexplored since a consistent catalogue did not exist. In the current study, we took advantage of the high waveform similarity within a seismic sequence and applied a multi-trace template-matching (i.e. cross-correlation) procedure to detect seismic events about one order of magnitude below the detection threshold. We detected about 100,000 events within the six-day long stimulation alone - previously, only 13,000 microearthquakes were detected. We only scanned the recordings of the deepest borehole station (2.7km). This station is very close to the 5km-deep reservoir and has the highest signal-to-noise ratio among all (borehole-)stations. Our newly obtained catalogue spans over more than nine years and features a uniform (and low) detection threshold and a uniform magnitude determination. The improved resolution of the long-term behaviour and the later seismicity increase will help to understand involved mechanisms better. More induced or natural sequences can be investigated with our procedure.

  6. E-waste issues in Sri Lanka and the Basel Convention.

    PubMed

    Suraweera, Inoka

    2016-03-01

    E-waste is hazardous, complex and expensive to treat in an environmentally sound manner. The management of e-waste is considered a serious challenge in both developed and developing countries and Sri Lanka is no exception. Due to significant growth in the economy and investments and other reasons the consumption of electronic and electrical equipment in Sri Lanka has increased over the years resulting in significant generation of e-waste. Several initiatives such as introduction of hazardous waste management rules, ratification of the Basel Convention in 1992 and the introduction of a National Corporate E-waste Management Program have been undertaken in Sri Lanka to manage e-waste. Strengthening policy and legislation, introducing methods for upstream reduction of e-waste, building capacity of relevant officers, awareness raising among school children and the general public and development of an e-waste information system are vital. Research on e-waste needs to be developed in Sri Lanka. The health sector could play a leading role in the provision of occupational health and safety for e-waste workers, advocacy, capacity building of relevant staff and raising awareness among the general public about e-waste. Improper e-waste management practices carried out by informal sector workers need to be addressed urgently in Sri Lanka.

  7. Consensus Paper-ICIS Expert Meeting Basel 2009 treatment milestones in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Tamary, Hannah; Roganovic, Jelena; Chitlur, Meera; Nugent, Diane J

    2010-07-01

    The rarity of severe complications of this disease in children makes randomized clinical trials in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) unfeasible. Therefore, the current management recommendations for ITP are largely dependent on clinical expertise and observations. As part of its discussions during the Intercontinental Cooperative ITP Study Group Expert Meeting in Basel, the Management working group recommended that the decision to treat an ITP patient be individualized and based mainly on bleeding symptoms and not on the actual platelet count number and should be supported by bleeding scores using a validated assessment tool. The group stressed the need to develop a uniform validated bleeding score system and to explore new measures to evaluate bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic patients-the role of rituximab as a splenectomy-sparing agent in resistant disease was also discussed. Given the apparently high recurrence rate to rituximab therapy in children and the drug's possible toxicity, the group felt that until more data are available, a conservative approach may be considered, reserving rituximab for patients who failed splenectomy. More studies of the effectiveness and side effects of drugs to treat refractory patients, such as TPO mimetics, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cytotoxic agents are required, as are long-term data on post-splenectomy complications. In the patient with either acute or chronic ITP, using a more personalized approach to treatment based on bleeding symptoms rather than platelet count should result in less toxicity and empower both physicians and families to focus on quality-of-life.

  8. Characteristics and Influence of Biosmoke on the Fine-Particle Ionic Composition Measured in Asian Outflow during the Transport and Chemical Evolution Over the Pacific (TRACE-P) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Y.; Weber, R. J.; Lee, Y.-N.; Orsini, D. A.; Maxwell-Meier, K.; Thornton, D. C.; Bandy, A. R.; Clarke, A. D.; Blake, D. R.; Sachse, G. W.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the sources, prevalence, and fine-particle inorganic composition of biosmoke over the western Pacific Ocean between 24 February and 10 April 2001. The analysis is based on highly time-resolved airborne measurements of gaseous and fine- particle inorganic chemical composition made during the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment. At latitudes below approximately 25 deg. N, relatively pure biomass burning plumes of enhanced fine-particle potassium, nitrate, ammonium, light-absorbing aerosols, and CO concentrations were observed in plumes that back trajectories and satellite fire map data suggest originated from biomass burning in southeast Asia. Fine-particle water-soluble potassium (K+) is confirmed to be a unique biosmoke tracer, and its prevalence throughout the experiment indicates that approximately 20% of the TRACE-P Asian outflow plumes were influenced, to some extent, by biomass or biofuel burning emissions. At latitudes above 25 deg. N, highly mixed urban/industrial and biosmoke plumes, indicated by SO(sup 2, sub 4) and K+, were observed in 5 out of 53 plumes. Most plumes were found in the Yellow Sea and generally were associated with much higher fine-particle loadings than plumes lacking a biosmoke influence. The air mass back trajectories of these mixed plumes generally pass through the latitude range of between 34 deg. and 40 deg. N on the eastern China coast, a region that includes the large urban centers of Beijing and Tianjin. A lack of biomass burning emissions based on fire maps and high correlations between K+ and pollution tracers (e.g., S(sup 2, sub 4) suggest biofuel sources. Ratios of fine-particle potassium to sulfate are used to provide an estimate of relative contributions of biosmoke emissions to the mixed Asian plumes. The ratio is highly correlated with fine-particle volume (r(sup 2) = 0.85) and predicts that for the most polluted plume encounter in TRACE-P, approximately 60% of the

  9. Enhanced Geothermal Systems in Urban Areas - Lessons Learned from the 2006 Basel ML3.4 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, T.; Mai, P. M.; Wiemer, S.; Deichmann, N.; Ripperger, J.; Kästli, P.; Bachmann, C. E.; Fäh, D.; Woessner, J.; Giardini, D.

    2009-12-01

    We report on a recent deep-heat mining experiment carried out in 2006/2007 in the city of Basel (Switzerland). This pilot project was designed to produce renewable geothermal energy using the Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) methodology. For developing the geothermal reservoir, a deep borehole was brought down to 5 km depth. Then, in December 2006, the deep-heat-mining project entered the first critical phase when the water injections started for generating micro-fracturing of the rock. These fractures increase the permeability of the host rock, needed for efficient heat exchange between the rock and the cold water; however, these fracture are also source of micro-seismicity - small earthquakes that are continuously recorded and monitored by dedicated local seismic networks. In this stimulation phase, the seismic activity increased rapidly above the usual background seismicity, and culminated in a widely felt ML 3.4 earthquake, which caused some damage in the city of Basel. Due to the higher-than-expected seismic activity, and the reaction of the population, the media, and the politicians, the experiment was stalled only 6 days after the stimulations began. Although the injected water was allowed to escape immediately after the mainshock and pressure at the wellhead dropped rapidly, the seismic activity declined only slowly, with three ML > 3 events occurring one to two months later. Although the EGS technology has been applied and studied at various sites since the 1970s, the physical processes and parameters that control injection-induced seismicity - in terms of earthquake rate, size distribution and maximum magnitude - are still poorly understood. Consequently, the seismic hazard and risk associated with the creation and operation of EGS are difficult to estimate. The very well monitored Basel seismic sequence provides an excellent opportunity to advance the understanding of the physics of EGS. The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) is investigating the Basel

  10. Seismic monitoring and analysis of deep geothermal projects in St Gallen and Basel, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Kraft, Toni; Cauzzi, Carlo; Kästli, Philipp; Wiemer, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    from a minimum source-station distance of 20 km down to 1 km. Based on this we could determine the component of the previously derived station specific ML corrections due to local amplification. We analysed ground-motion and detailed macroseismic reports resulting from the 2013 July 20 St Gallen ML = 3.5 ± 0.1 (Mw = 3.3-3.5 ± 0.1) `main shock' and compared it to a similar ML = 3.4 ± 0.1 event (Mw = 3.2 ± 0.1) that occurred in 2006 at another deep geothermal project in Basel, Switzerland. Differences in ground motion amplitudes between the Basel and St Gallen events and to an extent, the associated macroseismic observations, were investigated in terms of the different source terms: Mw for long-period motions and the source-corner frequency (related to the source rupture velocity and stress-drop) for short periods.

  11. Observation of fine particle concentration and its chemical characteristics in central region of Korea during KORUS-AQ pre-campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Y.; Lee, M.; Hwang, T.; Hong, Y.; Hong, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Central Region super site is one of the 6 super sites operated in Korean peninsula by Ministry of Environment Korea and monitor air quality of central district of Korea continuously and intensively. Located 160km south of Seoul, this site represents an urban site surrounded by residential, commercial area and an 8-lane road cross section which is one of the most crowed main roads in this area. This site also plays a significant role especially in tracing air pollutants flowing through the West Sea from China. During Korus-AQ(Korea-US Air Quality Study) pre-campaign conducted from 18th May to 12th June, PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentration using BAM1020 (MetOne), PM2.5bounded ion concentration using AIM (URG), metal concentrations using XRF (Cooper), organic and elemental carbon contents using SOCEC (Sunset), light scattering coefficient using Nephelometer (TSI) and meteorological parameters were continuously measured at this super site. PM2.5 and PM10 average concentrations were 31 and 49 ug/m3 with 0.63 fine to course ratio, which were relatively lower than those of annual average concentration of 2014 (39 and 58 ug/m3, respectively). The chemical composition of PM2.5 were determined as ion(46%), TC(37%), CM(2%), TM(0.1%) and unknown(15%). The average concentration of organic and elemental carbon were 5.6 and 1.8 ug/m3 which were similar lever to average of 2014 (5.9 ug/m3, 1.71 ug/m3, respectively). And the metal concentration including Pb(12.5 ng/m3), Fe(151.7 ng/m3), Ca(26.2 ng/m3), Ti(5.2 ng/m3), Cd(4.1 ng/m3) were significantly lower than those of 2014(31.4 ng/m3, 242.1 ng/m3, 167.9 ng/m3, 13.0 ng/m3, 8.3 ng/m3, respectively). However, the average concentration of sulfate was 6.3 ug/m3 which was 43% higher than that of 2014 (4.4 ug/m3). Overall aerosol and its component's concentrations except for secondary sulfate have been decreased since it was late spring and early summer in Korea during pre-campaign and usually in this season aerosol level is

  12. Socio-psychological airplane noise investigation in the districts of three Swiss airports: Zurich, Geneva and Basel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, R.; Mueller, R.; Meier, H. P.

    1980-01-01

    The results of noise measurements and calculations are available in the form of noise maps for each of the three areas. To measure the stress due to airplane noise the Noise and Number Index (NNI) was applied. In the vicinities of the airports, 400 households were randomly selected in each of the three noise zones (of 10 NNI intervals each). A total of 3939 questionnaires could be evaluated, one quarter of which came from areas without airplane noise. Concurrently, traffic noise was measured in areas of Basel and expressed in sum total levels L sub 50 and the reaction of 944 persons was elicited by interrogation.

  13. The Basel longitudinal study on aging (1955-1978). Ophthalmo-gerontological research results.

    PubMed

    Brückner, R; Batschelet, E; Hugenschmidt, F

    1986-01-01

    In the prospective Basel longitudinal study on aging (1955-1978) 123 men (age at entry from 6-61 years) were investigated in 2 year (average) intervals. Complete case histories are available on 67 subjects over the entire period (19.6 +/- 0.85 years). Part I of the study was to confirm the hypothesis of Bernstein and of Steinhaus, according to which life expectancy can be estimated from the speed of development of presbyopia. Parallel to the measurement of accommodation range (after preliminary determination of refraction and visual acuity), the development of height, body weight, vital capacity, expiratory volume, chest circumference, abdominal circumference, blood pressure, ECG and pulse wave velocity were measured. Invasive investigations were not undertaken. Only when hypertension was combined with obesity was the diminution of accommodation range striking (Fig. 10c; however there were only 3 subjects in this risk group). Taking everything into consideration there was a concomitance between decrease of accommodation range and changes of medical parameters (Table 6). Intercurrent illness did not influence the accommodation range. Longitudinal measurements and cross-sectional comparisons (data averaged to the same point as of the same age) were carried out. The results did not always coincide. We could not confirm the hypothesis of Bernstein and of Steinhaus. In Part II the results of the objective measurements are given. Apparently growth of the skull does not stop entirely. The increase of interpupillary distance can be complete at 17 years of age, but also can continue to the 30th year. The palpebral fissure increases an average of 3 mm more horizontally between the 6th and the 20th year of life. The corneal diameter remains constant in all age classes, that is, the growth of the cornea should be complete before the 6th year of life. Early arcus senilis changes are found already in the 20-year-old. The increase in the course of time of arcus senilis is obvious

  14. A method for the concentration of fine-grained rutile (TiO2) from sediment and sedimentary rocks by chemical leaching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Commeau, Judith A.; Valentine, Page C.

    1991-01-01

    Most of the sample analyzed by the method described were marine muds collected from the Gulf of Maine (Valentine and Commeau, 1990). The silt and clay fraction (up to 99 wt% of the sediment) is composed of clay minerals (chiefly illite-mica and chlorite), silt-size quartz and feldspar, and small crystals (2-12 um) of rutile and hematite. The bulk sediment samples contained an average of 2 to 3 wt percent CaCO3. Tiher samples analyzed include red and gray Carboniferous and Triassic sandstones and siltstones exposed around the Bay of Fundy region and Paleozoic sandstones, siltstones, and shales from northern Maine and New Brunswick. These rocks are probable sources for the fine-grained rutile found in the Gulf of Maine.

  15. Effect of aluminum on fine structure and distribution of chemical elements in high-entropy alloys Al x FeNiCoCuCr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadutov, V. M.; Makarenko, S. Yu.; Volosevich, P. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    Electron-microscopic and X-ray diffraction methods have been used to study the fine structure of cast high-entropy alloys (HEAs) Al x FeNiCoCuCr ( x = 1, 1.5, 1.8). Disperse precipitates with dimensions of 130-400 and 10-20 nm have been revealed, the character of distribution of which, as well as the amounts, dimensions, and shapes, change with increasing aluminum content. In the equiatomic HEA, copper-containing particles with an fcc structure have been found; in the alloy with x = 1.8, particles of bcc Al4Cu9 dominate. It has been shown that the most uniform distribution over the matrix is characteristic of Co, unlike other elements, among which Cu and Cr are distributed in the alloy extremely nonuniformly and predominantly enter into the precipitated particles and into clusters in the interparticle spaces, respectively.

  16. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  17. Quantitative chemical imaging of element diffusion into heterogeneous media using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, H A O; Grolimund, D; Van Loon, L R; Barmettler, K; Borca, C N; Aeschlimann, B; Günther, D

    2011-08-15

    Quantitative chemical imaging of trace elements in heterogeneous media is important for the fundamental understanding of a broad range of chemical and physical processes. The primary aim of this study was to develop an analytical methodology for quantitative high spatial resolution chemical imaging based on the complementary use of independent microanalytical techniques. The selected scientific case study is focused on high spatially resolved quantitative imaging of major elements, minor elements, and a trace element (Cs) in Opalinus clay, which has been proposed as the host rock for high-level radioactive waste repositories. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), providing quantitative chemical information, and synchrotron radiation based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-microXRF), providing high spatial resolution images, were applied to study Cs migration into Opalinus clay rock. The results indicate that combining the outputs achievable by the two independent techniques enhances the imaging capabilities significantly. The qualitative high resolution image of SR-microXRF is in good agreement with the quantitative image recorded with lower spatial resolution by LA-ICPMS. Combining both techniques, it was possible to determine that the Opalinus clay sample contains two distinct domains: (i) a clay mineral rich domain and (ii) a calcium carbonate dominated domain. The two domains are separated by sharp boundaries. The spatial Cs distribution is highly correlated to the distribution of the clay. Furthermore, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates that the trace element Cs preferentially migrates into clay interlayers rather than into the calcite domain, which complements the results acquired by LA-ICPMS and SR-microXRF. By using complementary techniques, the quantification robustness was improved to quantitative micrometer spatial resolution. Such quantitative, microscale chemical images allow a more detailed

  18. Pt3Ti nanoparticles: fine dispersion on SiO2 supports, enhanced catalytic CO oxidation, and chemical stability at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Govindachetty; Abe, Hideki; Xu, Ya; Sekido, Nobuaki; Hirata, Hirohito; Matsumoto, Shin-ichi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko

    2010-07-06

    A platinum-based intermetallic phase with an early d-metal, Pt(3)Ti, has been synthesized in the form of nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on silica (SiO(2)) supports. The organometallic Pt and Ti precursors, Pt(1,5-cyclooctadiene)Cl(2) and TiCl(4)(tetrahydrofuran)(2), were mixed with SiO(2) and reduced by sodium naphthalide in tetrahydrofuran. Stoichiometric Pt(3)Ti NPs with an average particle size of 2.5 nm were formed on SiO(2) (particle size: 20-200 nm) with an atomically disordered FCC-type structure (Fm3m; a = 0.39 nm). A high dispersivity of Pt(3)Ti NPs was achieved by adding excessive amounts of SiO(2) relative to the Pt precursor. A 50-fold excess of SiO(2) resulted in finely dispersed, SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs that contained 0.5 wt % Pt. The SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs showed a lower onset temperature of catalysis by 75 degrees C toward the oxidation reaction of CO than did SiO(2)-supported pure Pt NPs with the same particle size and Pt fraction, 0.5 wt %. The SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs also showed higher CO conversion than SiO(2)-supported pure Pt NPs even containing a 2-fold higher weight fraction of Pt. The SiO(2)-supported Pt(3)Ti NPs retained their stoichiometric composition after catalytic oxidation of CO at elevated temperatures, 325 degrees C. Pt(3)Ti NPs show promise as a catalytic center of purification catalysts for automobile exhaust due to their high catalytic activity toward CO oxidation with a low content of precious metals.

  19. Surface Structure and Chemical Switching of Thioctic Acid Adsorbed on Au(111) as Observed Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R W; van Buuren, T; Vance, A L; Terminello, L J; Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; Fadley, C S

    2004-01-06

    Thioctic acid (alpha-lipoic acid) is a molecule with a large disulfide-containing base, a short alkyl-chain with four CH{sub 2} units, and a carboxyl termination. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of thioctic acid adsorbed on Au(111) have been investigated with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine film quality, bonding and morphology. Using standard preparation protocols for SAMs, that is, dissolving thioctic acid in ethanol and exposing gold to the solution, results in poor films. These films are highly disordered, contain a mixture of carboxyl and carboxylate terminations, have more than monolayer coverage, and exhibit unbound disulfide. Conversely, forming films by dissolving 1 mmol thioctic acid into 5% acetic acid in ethanol (as previously reported with carboxyl-terminated alkyl-thiols) forms ordered monolayers with small amounts of unbound sulfur. NEXAFS indicates tilted over endgroups with the carboxyl group normal on average 38{sup o} from the surface normal. Slight dichroism in other features indicates alkyl chains statistically more upright than prostrate on the surface. Reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared (RA-FTIR) spectra indicate hydrogen bonding between neighboring molecules. In such well-formed monolayers, a stark reorientation occurs upon deprotonation of the endgroup by rinsing in a KOH solution. The carboxylate plane normal is now about 66{sup o} from sample normal, a much more upright orientation. Data indicate this reorientation may also cause a more upright orientation to the alkyl portion of the molecules.

  20. Comparative chemical mass closure of fine and coarse aerosols at two sites in south and west Europe: Implications for EU air pollution policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Maenhaut, W.; Chi, X.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

    The chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 was studied during summer and winter sampling campaigns in South and West Europe (Barcelona, Spain, and Ghent, Belgium). The chemical composition of the PM10 aerosol was markedly different in the two regions, even at similar PM10 levels. The chemical composition of PM2.5 showed more similarities. The contribution of mineral matter was higher in Barcelona (on average 12% of the PM2.5 mass), whereas the contribution from sea salt was higher in Ghent (4% of PM2.5). Volatilisation of NH 4+ from the filters (negative artefact) was observed in both regions, although the extent of this artefact showed regional differences (0-4% and 22-38% of the NH 4+ mass in Ghent and Barcelona, respectively) and had no impact on the compliance with EU limit values. The number of exceedances of the PM10 limit value and an arbitrary PM2.5 limit of 25 μg m -3 was calculated by subtracting the mineral fraction (natural or anthropogenic in origin) from the bulk PM load, and this resulted in the elimination of the PM10 exceedances in Barcelona, and a reduction of one out of three exceedances in Ghent. The subtraction of sea-salt aerosol had no effect in Barcelona, and it removed one exceedance in each size fraction in Ghent. Exceedances of the PM10 daily limit value in Ghent coincided with back-trajectories originating from Eastern and Southern European regions. The origin of the exceedances in Barcelona during the campaigns was mostly local.

  1. The associations between birth weight and exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and its chemical constituents during pregnancy: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Luo, Xiping; Zhao, Chunmei; Zhang, Bo; Tao, Jun; Yang, Zuyao; Ma, Wenjun; Liu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    We performed this meta-analysis to estimate the associations of maternal exposure to PM2.5 and its chemical constituents with birth weight and to explore the sources of heterogeneity in regard to the findings of these associations. A total of 32 studies were identified by searching the MEDLINE, PUBMED, Embase, China Biological Medicine and Wanfang electronic databases before April 2015. We estimated the statistically significant associations of reduced birth weight (β = -15.9 g, 95% CI: -26.8, -5.0) and LBW (OR = 1.090, 95% CI: 1.032, 1.150) with PM2.5 exposure (per 10 μg/m(3) increment) during the entire pregnancy. Trimester-specific analyses showed negative associations between birth weight and PM2.5 exposure during the second (β = -12.6 g) and third (β = -10.0 g) trimesters. Other subgroup analyses indicated significantly different pooled-effect estimates of PM2.5 exposure on birth weight in studies with different exposure assessment methods, study designs and study settings. We further observed large differences in the pooled effect estimates of the PM2.5 chemical constituents for birth weight decrease and LBW. We concluded that PM2.5 exposure during pregnancy was associated with lower birth weight, and late pregnancy might be the critical window. Some specific PM2.5 constituents may have larger toxic effects on fetal weight. Exposure assessment methods, study designs and study settings might be important sources of the heterogeneity among the included studies.

  2. Waste electrical and electronic equipment management and Basel Convention compliance in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) nations.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sadhan Kumar; Debnath, Biswajit; Baidya, Rahul; De, Debashree; Li, Jinhui; Ghosh, Sannidhya Kumar; Zheng, Lixia; Awasthi, Abhishek Kumar; Liubarskaia, Maria A; Ogola, Jason S; Tavares, André Neiva

    2016-08-01

    Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) nations account for one-quarter of the world's land area, having more than 40% of the world's population, and only one-quarter of the world gross national income. Hence the study and review of waste electrical and electronic equipment management systems in BRICS nations is of relevance. It has been observed from the literature that there are studies available comparing two or three country's waste electrical and electronic equipment status, while the study encompassing the BRICS nations considering in a single framework is scant. The purpose of this study is to analyse the existing waste electrical and electronic equipment management systems and status of compliance to Basel convention in the BRICS nations, noting possible lessons from matured systems, such as those in the European Union EU) and USA. The study introduced a novel framework for a waste electrical and electronic equipment management system that may be adopted in BRICS nations and revealed that BRICS countries have many similar types of challenges. The study also identified some significant gaps with respect to the management systems and trans-boundary movement of waste electrical and electronic equipment, which may attract researchers for further research.

  3. Pore pressure behavior at the shut-in phase and causality of large induced seismicity at Basel, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuhira, Y.; Dinske, C.; Asanuma, H.; Ito, T.; Häring, M. O.

    2017-01-01

    Induced seismicity with unexpectedly large magnitude often occurs after shut-in or end of stimulation, generating concerns at the end of stimulation. We investigated the physical mechanism of large-magnitude induced seismicity during shut-in following the hydraulic stimulation at Basel, Switzerland. Larger postinjection events occurred at the periphery of the seismic cloud. We estimated the pore pressure required to cause shear slip using Coulomb failure criteria from stress information, geometry of the fault planes of microseismic events, and a constant coefficient of friction. Time series analysis of pore pressure distribution indicated that pore pressure migrated to the far field even after shut-in. Redistribution of pore pressure at shut-in brought sufficient pore pressure increase to induce seismicity in the peripheral region. After shut-in, the pore pressure gradient away from the well lessened and eventually pressure became uniform. These observations suggest that the higher pore pressure, which remained in the vicinity of the injection point, shifted to the farthest field. Shut-in pressure migration caused uniform pore pressure distribution at the edge of the seismic zone. Shut-in pressure destabilized a large part of the fault located at the edge of the seismic cloud, resulting in the shear slip of a large section of the fault. Meanwhile, during stimulation, only some parts of the fault entered the critical state because of the pressure gradient. The resulting shear slip on that specific part causes moderate magnitude events at most.

  4. Fluidized-Bed Particles Scavenge Silicon Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Rohatgi, N.; Lutwack, R.; Hogle, R.

    1985-01-01

    Waste reduced, and silicon production rate improved. In new process silicon formed by thermal decomposition of SiH4. Part of silicon formed on silicon seed particles as result of surface chemical reaction. However, silicon formed by homogeneous reaction in gas phase tends to form aggregates of silicon atoms, which appear as fine particles (like dust). Believed that scavenging action of seed particles enables large fraction fines to be incorporated onto seed surface. This mode of growth confirmed by electron microscopy photographs.

  5. Association of chemical constituents and pollution sources of ambient fine particulate air pollution and biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with atherosclerosis: A panel study among young adults in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Yang, Di; Wei, Hongying; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jing; Li, Hongyu; Shima, Masayuki; Deng, Furong; Guo, Xinbiao

    2015-09-01

    Ambient particulate air pollution has been associated with increased oxidative stress and atherosclerosis, but the chemical constituents and pollution sources behind the association are unclear. We investigated the associations of various chemical constituents and pollution sources of ambient fine particles (PM2.5) with biomarkers of oxidative stress in a panel of 40 healthy university students. Study participants underwent repeated blood collections for 12 times before and after relocating from a suburban campus to an urban campus with high air pollution levels in Beijing, China. Air pollution data were obtained from central air-monitoring stations, and plasma levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) and soluble CD36 (sCD36) were determined in the laboratory (n=464). Linear mixed-effects models were used to estimate the changes in biomarkers in association with exposure variables. PM2.5 iron and nickel were positively associated with Ox-LDL (p<0.05). For each interquartile range increase in iron (1-day, 0.51 μg/m(3)) and nickel (2-day, 2.5 ng/m(3)), there were a 1.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2%, 3.7%] increase and a 1.8% (95% CI: 0.2%, 3.4%) increase in Ox-LDL, respectively. We also found that each interquartile range increase in calcium (1-day, 0.7 μg/m(3)) was associated with a 4.8% (95% CI: 0.7%, 9.1%) increase in sCD36. Among the pollution sources, PM2.5 from traffic emissions and coal combustion were suggestively and positively associated with Ox-LDL. Our findings suggest that a subset of metals in airborne particles may be the major air pollution components that contribute to the increased oxidative stress associated with atherosclerosis.

  6. Production of fine chemicals using biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Liese, A; Filho, M V

    1999-12-01

    Presently, a large number of biotransformations are carried out on an industrial scale and are discussed in a fast increasing number of reviews. Besides this, a significant number of biotransformations have been investigated over the past year, from degrading to transforming and synthetic reactions. The development of more specific and stable biocatalysts, either isolated enzymes or whole cells, generated by the new methods of genetic engineering and improved by reaction engineering have led to new industrial biotransformations.

  7. Moment Tensor Inversions of the M1.7+ Earthquakes in Basel. Switzerland Reveal Predominant Shear Dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilhem, A.; Walter, F. T.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate moment tensor solutions of nearly 30 magnitude (M) 1.7+ earthquakes that occurred in Basel, Switzerland during and after the simulation of the geothermal enhanced system between December 2nd and 8th 2006. In 2009, Deichmann and Ernst determined the focal mechanisms for these events using P-wave first-motions. They found clear evidence for double-couple mechanisms with no indications for substantial volumetric changes. This differs from evidences of composite type ruptures (i.e., shearing with isotropic motion) observed in other geothermal environments. Here, we use a similar approach for the computation of the moment tensor inversions to the one used by Guilhem et al. (2012) for M3 earthquakes in Geysers. We use a dataset from strong-motion stations located within 7 km from the epicenters, with data filtered between 0.5 and 3 Hz and integrated twice to displacement. The waveforms are inverted for both deviatoric and full moment tensor solutions. In addition, we perform a network sensitivity test (NSS) by computing 100 million random moment tensors for each event thus testing the sensitivity of the moment tensor solutions. Finally, because the injection of fluids in the ground can promote crack growth generating seismic events, we also compute a crack + double-couple inversion (Minson et al., 2007) for each of the studied earthquakes between December 2006 and May 2007. From this extensive search we find that the results of our different techniques converge. Moment tensor solutions are very similar to the first-motion focal mechanisms of Deichmann and Ernst (2009) and accordingly do not exhibit dominant volumetric changes except for a subset of events, which we discuss in some detail. References: Deichmann, N. and Ernst, J. (2009), Swiss J. Geosc. Guilhem, A., Dreger, D.S., Hutchings, L. J., and Johnson, L. (2012), AGU Fall meeting Minson, S. E., Dreger, D. S., Bürgmann, R., Kanamori, H., Larson, K. M. (2007), J. Geophys. Res.

  8. Evidence for Holocene palaeoseismicity along the Basel-Reinach active normal fault (Switzerland): a seismic source for the 1356 earthquake in the Upper Rhine graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, Matthieu; Meghraoui, Mustapha; Delouis, Bertrand; Giardini, Domenico

    2005-02-01

    We conducted a palaeoseismic study with geomorphologic mapping, geophysical prospecting and trenching along an 8-km-long NNE-SSW trending fault scarp south of Basel. The city as well as 40 castles within a 20-km radius were destroyed or heavily damaged by the earthquake of 1356 October 18 (Io = IX-X), the largest historical seismic event in central Europe. Active river incisions as well as late Quaternary alluvial terraces are uplifted along the linear Basel-Reinach (BR) fault scarp. The active normal fault is comprised of at least two main branches reaching the surface as evident by resistivity profiles, reflection seismic data and direct observations in six trenches. In trenches, the normal fault rupture affects three colluvial wedge deposits up to the base of the modern soil. Radiocarbon as well as thermoluminescence (TL) age determinations from other trenches helped to reconstruct the Holocene event chronology. We identified three seismic events with an average coseismic movement of 0.5-0.8 m and a total vertical displacement of 1.8 m in the last 7800 yr and five events in the last 13 200 yr. The most recent event occurred in the interval AD 500-1450 (2σ) and may correspond to the 1356 earthquake. Furthermore, the morphology suggests both a southern and northern fault extensions that may reach 20 km across the Jura mountains and across the Rhine valley. Taking this fault length and a 10-km-thick seismogenic layer suggests a Mw 6.5 or greater event as a possible scenario for the seismic hazard assessment of the Basel region.

  9. Evidence for Holocene paleoseismicity along the Basel-Reinach Active Normal Fault (Switzerland): A Seismic Source for the 1356 Earthquake in the Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Meghraoui, M.; Delouis, B.; Giardini, D.

    2003-04-01

    We conducted a paleoseismic study with geomorphologic mapping, geophysical prospecting and trenching along an 8-km-long NNE-SSW trending fault scarp south of Basel. The city as well as 40 castles within a 20-km radius were destroyed or heavily damaged by the earthquake of 18th October 1356 (Io = IX-X MKS), the largest historical seismic event in central Europe. Active river incisions as well as late Quaternary alluvial terraces are uplifted along the linear Basel-Reinach fault scarp. The active normal fault shows at least two main branches reaching the surface as attested by resistivity profiles, reflection seismic data, and direct observations in six trenches. In trenches, the normal fault rupture affects three colluvial wedge deposits up to the base of the present day soil. Radiocarbon as well as thermoluminescence age determinations from other trenches helped reconstruct the Holocene events chronology. We identified three seismic events with an average coseismic movement of 0.5 - 0.8 m and a total vertical displacement of 1.8 m in the last 7800 years and five events in the last 13200 years. The most recent event occurred in the interval 610 - 1475 A.D. (2sigma) and may likely correspond to the 1356 earthquake. Furthermore, the morphology suggests both a southern and northern fault extensions that may reach 20 km across the Jura Mountains and across the Rhine Valley. Taking this fault length and a 10 km-thick seismogenic layer suggests a M 6.5 or greater event as a possible scenario for the seismic hazard assessment of the Basel region.

  10. A "Fine" Relationship: OSHA and Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Steve

    2001-01-01

    To avoid California schools' experience with Occupational Safety and Health Administration fines, principals should comply with safety regulations, establish quick-response procedures, take care of chemicals, prepare site personnel for state OSHA visits, inform safety personnel about procedures for appealing citations, keep good records, and work…

  11. Double-couple and Moment Tensor Solutions of the Induced Seismicity related to the Stimulation Phase of the Enhanced Geothermal Site in Basel, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Oye, V.; Kuehn, D. K.; Cesca, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of moment tensor (MT) inversion of 19 microseismic events with ML > 2, associated with the enhanced geothermal reservoir stimulation operation at Basel, Switzerland (starting 2 December, 2006). We use the software package 'Kiwi' from University of Hamburg, Germany, and adopt a three-step procedure to retrieve point solution parameters based on the waveform fit. The inversion is performed to displacement spectra and time series seismograms in the first and second step, respectively. After the first two steps, we obtain focal solutions of these 19 events assuming a double couple (DC) source model. Our results agree with the focal mechanisms from a previous study, based on the projections of first-motion polarities. Compared to the previous study using first-motion polarities, our solutions are achieved with the data from less than 10 stations. In the last step, MT components of each event are solved using the best DC solution as the initial model input. The isotropic components of MT solutions of some events are not negligible, which might be due to volume changes (crack open and close) caused by the fluid injection. The tempo-spatial patterns of isotropic components of MT solutions can be used for the inference of the co- and post-simulation process in the Basel site. We also plan to systematically analyze the amplitude ratio of P and S waves to verify the existence of 'tensile earthquake' during the stimulation.

  12. Pelletization of fine coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.S.

    1995-12-31

    Coal is one of the most abundant energy resources in the US with nearly 800 million tons of it being mined annually. Process and environmental demands for low-ash, low-sulfur coals and economic constraints for high productivity are leading the coal industry to use such modern mining methods as longwall mining and such newer coal processing techniques as froth flotation, oil agglomeration, chemical cleaning and synthetic fuel production. All these processes are faced with one common problem area--fine coals. Dealing effectively with these fine coals during handling, storage, transportation, and/or processing continues to be a challenge facing the industry. Agglomeration by the unit operation of pelletization consists of tumbling moist fines in drums or discs. Past experimental work and limited commercial practice have shown that pelletization can alleviate the problems associated with fine coals. However, it was recognized that there exists a serious need for delineating the fundamental principles of fine coal pelletization. Accordingly, a research program has been carried involving four specific topics: (i) experimental investigation of coal pelletization kinetics, (ii) understanding the surface principles of coal pelletization, (iii) modeling of coal pelletization processes, and (iv) simulation of fine coal pelletization circuits. This report summarizes the major findings and provides relevant details of the research effort.

  13. Statistical analysis of the induced Basel 2006 earthquake sequence: introducing a probability-based monitoring approach for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, C. E.; Wiemer, S.; Woessner, J.; Hainzl, S.

    2011-08-01

    Geothermal energy is becoming an important clean energy source, however, the stimulation of a reservoir for an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) is associated with seismic risk due to induced seismicity. Seismicity occurring due to the water injection at depth have to be well recorded and monitored. To mitigate the seismic risk of a damaging event, an appropriate alarm system needs to be in place for each individual experiment. In recent experiments, the so-called traffic-light alarm system, based on public response, local magnitude and peak ground velocity, was used. We aim to improve the pre-defined alarm system by introducing a probability-based approach; we retrospectively model the ongoing seismicity in real time with multiple statistical forecast models and then translate the forecast to seismic hazard in terms of probabilities of exceeding a ground motion intensity level. One class of models accounts for the water injection rate, the main parameter that can be controlled by the operators during an experiment. By translating the models into time-varying probabilities of exceeding various intensity levels, we provide tools which are well understood by the decision makers and can be used to determine thresholds non-exceedance during a reservoir stimulation; this, however, remains an entrepreneurial or political decision of the responsible project coordinators. We introduce forecast models based on the data set of an EGS experiment in the city of Basel. Between 2006 December 2 and 8, approximately 11 500 m3 of water was injected into a 5-km-deep well at high pressures. A six-sensor borehole array, was installed by the company Geothermal Explorers Limited (GEL) at depths between 300 and 2700 m around the well to monitor the induced seismicity. The network recorded approximately 11 200 events during the injection phase, more than 3500 of which were located. With the traffic-light system, actions where implemented after an ML 2.7 event, the water injection was

  14. New methods and standards for fine dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielvogel, Jürgen; Hartstock, Stefan; Grimm, Hans

    2009-05-01

    There seems to be common agreement that PM10 is a suboptimal quantity for the quantification of potential dangers from fine dust due to a number of reasons, notably because the chemical composition of the particles is not considered, because the size distribution is disregarded, and because of sampling artefacts. In a first step for improving the particle measurements, the European Community has published new directives for ambient air in June 2008 (EU 2008), which as a main part included new regulations for PM2.5 measurements, in addition to the further on valid regulations for PM10. The comparison of PM2.5 and PM10 may allow a source apportionment and a better assessment of the influence of fine dust on human health. The source apportionment may allow more effective fine dust reduction strategies.

  15. Impact on air quality of measures to reduce CO2 emissions from road traffic in Basel, Rotterdam, Xi'an and Suzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Jonkers, S.; Verhagen, H. L. M.; Perez, L.; Trüeb, S.; Okkerse, W.-J.; Liu, J.; Pan, X. C.; Zheng, L.; Wang, H.; Xu, R.; Sabel, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Two traffic scenarios to reduce CO2 emissions from road traffic in two European cities (Basel and Rotterdam) and two Chinese cities (Xi'an and Suzhou) were evaluated in terms of their impact on air quality. The two scenarios, one modelling a reduction of private vehicle kilometres driven by 10% on urban streets and the other modelling the introduction of 50% electric-powered private vehicle kilometres on urban streets, were both compared to a scenario following “business-as-usual”: 2020-BAU. The annual average concentrations of NO2, PM2.5, PM10 and elemental carbon (EC) were modelled separately in busy street canyons, near urban motorways and in the remainder of the urban area. It was concluded that traffic-related CO2 emissions in 2020-BAU could be expected to remain at the levels of 2010 in Basel and Rotterdam, while in Xi'an and Suzhou to increase 30-50% due to growth in the traffic volume. Traffic-related CO2 emissions may be reduced by up to 5% and 25%, respectively using the first and second scenarios. Air pollution in the Chinese cities is a factor 3 to 5 higher than in the European cities in 2010 and 2020-BAU. The impact of both CO2 reduction scenarios on air quality in 2020-BAU is limited. In Europe, due to implementation of stringent emission standards in all sectors, air quality is expected to improve at both the urban background and near busy road traffic. In China, the regional background is expected to improve for EC, stabilize for PM2.5 and PM10, and decrease for NO2. The urban background follows this regional trend, while near busy road traffic, air pollution will remain elevated due to the considerable growth in traffic volume. A major constraint for modelling air quality in China is access to the input data required and lack of measurements at ground level for validation.

  16. Fine Grain Aluminum Superplasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    time at elevated temperature for 7475 aluminum alloy 5 2 Optical micrographs of 7075 aluminum alloy after exposure to 5160C (960oF) for times...applied to Al-Zn-Mg-Cu ( 7075 Al) alloy. Subsequent developments by Waldman et al. (refs. 8-11) resulted in the demonstration that 7000 series alloys...a number of aluminum alloys. With such a fine grain structure, high temperature deformation character- istics approaching superplastic behavior

  17. Washability of fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the theoretical beneficiation potential of US coals when pulverized down to 44 microns, (2) to determine the effects of fine grinding on the liberation of ash, pyritic sulfur, and other impurities, and (3) to assess the impact of their removal on oil and gas replacement, environmental regulations, and specification feedstocks for emerging coal utilization technologies. With the emphasis on fine coal cleaning, we have developed a centrifugal float-sink technique for coals crushed down to 44 microns. Employing this technique will provide a complete fine coal gravimetric evaluation of US coals crushed down to 44 microns. Parallel research is being conducted through in-house studies by PETC, and contracts with the University of Alaska, the University of North Dakota, and Commercial Testing and Engineering, Inc. Results thus far have been encouraging for selected Northern Appalachian Region Coals (NAR), which have shown pyritic sulfur, SO/sub 2/ emission, and ash reductions of 94, 60, and 82%, respectively, for the float 1.30 specific gravity product. However, the data evaluated for several samples indicate a possible problem in the yield/ash relationship for the float 1.30 specific gravity products for samples crushed to 75 and 44 microns top size. Thus, testing was begun to try to resolve these anomalies in the data. Test results using surface active agents, a reverse order of float-sink, and sample pre-heat techniques have been promising. These modifications to the standard technique resulted in an increase in weight recovery of float 1.30 specific gravity material and a decrease in ash content for each of the other specific gravity fractions, thus showing an improvement in the yield/ash relationship.

  18. Very fine Twilights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boico, Vladimir

    1992-04-01

    The author is describing a very fine twilight on 3 January 1992 at 17 h25 m LT (The Sunset was at 16h48m LT) of red - terracotta color. The author is relating this twilight with the volcanic erruption of Pinatubo on the Philipines islands from June 1991. The author is describing the following phenomena related with Volcanic erruption: twilights, the greenish of the Moon's surface, a change in the color of Day Sky to white, Haloes around the Sun. The author is pointing out, that the phenomena mentioned could prolonge in time 2 or 3 years.

  19. Fine needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed Central

    Lever, J V; Trott, P A; Webb, A J

    1985-01-01

    Fine needle aspiration cytology is an inexpensive, atraumatic technique for the diagnosis of disease sites. This paper describes the technique and illustrates how it may be applied to the management of tumours throughout the body. The limitations of the method, the dangers of false positive reports, and the inevitability of false negative diagnoses are emphasised. In a clinical context the method has much to offer by saving patients from inappropriate operations and investigations and allowing surgeons to plan quickly and more rationally. It is an economically valuable technique and deserves greater recognition. Images PMID:2578481

  20. Fine Channel Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A color image of fine channel networks on Mars; north toward top. The scene shows heavily cratered highlands dissected by dendritic open channel networks that dissect steep slopes of impact crater walls. This image is a composite of Viking high-resolution images in black and white and low-resolution images in color. The image extends from latitude 9 degrees S. to 5 degrees S. and from longitude 312 degrees to 320 degrees; Mercator projection. The dendritic pattern of the fine channels and their location on steep slopes leads to the interpretation that these are runoff channels. The restriction of these types of channels to ancient highland rocks suggests that these channels are old and date from a time on Mars when conditions existed for precipitation to actively erode rocks. After the channels reach a low plain, they appear to end. Termination may have resulted from burial by younger deposits or perhaps the flows percolated into the surface materials and continued underground.

  1. Injection with ultra-fine cement into fine sand layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Masahito; Goto, Toshiyoshi; Ogino, Takuya; Shimizu, Kazunari

    1994-12-31

    In-situ injection test was carried out in fine sand layer with ordinary portland, colloid and ultra-fine cement. Permeability of the sand layer was 10{sup {minus}3} cm/sec. Suspension grout with ordinary portland and colloid cement was impossible to permeate into the sand. However with ultra fine cement small solidified sand was obtained and with ultra-fine cement-waterglass grout, water cement ratio of 0.8 and waterglass concentration of 75%, solidified sand with expected volume can be obtained.

  2. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  3. Effect of oral beta-blocker on short and long-term mortality in patients with acute respiratory failure: results from the BASEL-II-ICU study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is responsible for about one-third of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and is associated with adverse outcomes. Predictors of short- and long-term outcomes in unselected ICU-patients with ARF are ill-defined. The purpose of this analysis was to determine predictors of in-hospital and one-year mortality and assess the effects of oral beta-blockers in unselected ICU patients with ARF included in the BASEL-II-ICU study. Methods The BASEL II-ICU study was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial of 314 (mean age 70 (62 to 79) years) ICU patients with ARF evaluating impact of a B-type natriuretic peptide- (BNP) guided management strategy on short-term outcomes. Results In-hospital mortality was 16% (51 patients) and one-year mortality 41% (128 patients). Multivariate analysis assessed that oral beta-blockers at admission were associated with a lower risk of both in-hospital (HR 0.33 (0.14 to 0.74) P = 0.007) and one-year mortality (HR 0.29 (0.16 to 0.51) P = 0.0003). Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed the lower mortality in ARF patients when admitted with oral beta-blocker and further shows that the beneficial effect of oral beta-blockers at admission holds true in the two subgroups of patients with ARF related to cardiac or non-cardiac causes. Kaplan-Meier analysis also shows that administration of oral beta-blockers before hospital discharge gives striking additional beneficial effects on one-year mortality. Conclusions Established beta-blocker therapy appears to be associated with a reduced mortality in ICU patients with acute respiratory failure. Cessation of established therapy appears to be hazardous. Initiation of therapy prior to discharge appears to confer benefit. This finding was seen regardless of the cardiac or non-cardiac etiology of respiratory failure. Trial registration clinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00130559 PMID:21047406

  4. Fine sediments suppress detritivory on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Tebbett, Sterling B; Goatley, Christopher H R; Bellwood, David R

    2017-01-30

    Increasing sediment inputs are recognised as an important factor leading to coral reef degradation. However, the role of sediments in ecological processes is poorly understood. This study used paired-choice trials to quantify the effects of sediment grain size and chemical composition on feeding by the abundant detritivorous reef fish, Ctenochaetus striatus. The size of sediments from algal turfs were also compared to those ingested by reef-dwelling C. striatus. Algal turfs containing coarser sediments were preferred by C. striatus, while sediment composition (reefal carbonates vs. riverine silicates) had little effect. On the reef, C. striatus ingested finer sediments than those present in algal turfs. C. striatus appears to prefer algal turfs with coarser sediments as this facilitates ingestion of fine detrital particles, while finer sediments prevent selective feeding on detritus. These findings suggest that fine sediments from terrestrial runoff or dredging may be detrimental to feeding by detritivorous species.

  5. The relationship between aerosol particles chemical composition and optical properties to identify the biomass burning contribution to fine particles concentration: a case study for São Paulo city, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Miranda, Regina Maura; Lopes, Fabio; do Rosário, Nilton Évora; Yamasoe, Marcia Akemi; Landulfo, Eduardo; de Fatima Andrade, Maria

    2016-12-01

    The air quality in the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP) is primarily determined by the local pollution source contribution, mainly the vehicular fleet, but there is a concern about the role of remote sources to the fine mode particles (PM2.5) concentration and composition. One of the most important remote sources of atmospheric aerosol is the biomass burning emissions from São Paulo state's inland and from the central and north portions of Brazil. This study presents a synergy of different measurements of atmospheric aerosol chemistry and optical properties in the MASP in order to show how they can be used as a tool to identify particles from local and remote sources. For the clear identification of the local and remote source contribution, aerosol properties measurements at surface level were combined with vertical profiles information. Over 15 days in the austral winter of 2012, particulate matter (PM) was collected using a cascade impactor and a Partisol sampler in São Paulo City. Mass concentrations were determined by gravimetry, black carbon concentrations by reflectance, and trace element concentrations by X-ray fluorescence. Aerosol optical properties were studied using a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), a Lidar system and satellite data. Optical properties, concentrations, size distributions, and elemental composition of atmospheric particles were strongly related and varied according to meteorological conditions. During the sampling period, PM mean mass concentrations were 17.4 ± 10.1 and 15.3 ± 6.9 μg/m(3) for the fine and coarse fractions, respectively. The mean aerosol optical depths at 415 nm and Ångström exponent (AE) over the whole period were 0.29 ± 0.14 and 1.35 ± 0.11, respectively. Lidar ratios reached values of 75 sr. The analyses of the impacts of an event of biomass burning smoke transport to the São Paulo city revealed significant changing on local aerosol concentrations and optical parameters

  6. Automated Camera Array Fine Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis; Ansar, Adnan; Cheng, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Using aerial imagery, the JPL FineCalibration (JPL FineCal) software automatically tunes a set of existing CAHVOR camera models for an array of cameras. The software finds matching features in the overlap region between images from adjacent cameras, and uses these features to refine the camera models. It is not necessary to take special imagery of a known target and no surveying is required. JPL FineCal was developed for use with an aerial, persistent surveillance platform.

  7. Requirements for, and benefits of, environmentally sound and economically viable management of battery recycling in the Philippines in the wake of Basel Convention trade restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, U.; Wilson, B.

    The ban on the export of used lead-acid batteries (ULAB) from Annex VII to non-Annex VII countries pursuant to decision III/1 of the Basel Convention reduced the availability of imported scrap feedstock for battery recycling in the Philippines. As ULAB supply from other developing countries becomes scarcer, the ban is likely to encourage and enhance collection and recuperation for domestically generated scrap. From a short-term perspective, this study explores the technological and managerial opportunities for improving the environmental and occupational health performance of the formal battery recycling sector and unregulated reconditioning. From a medium- and long-term point of view, the study investigates restructuring the informal ULAB's collection and recycling sector. The objective has been to make the smaller battery recyclers and reconditioners in the informal sector part of an effective and efficient collection infrastructure that supports an environmentally sound secondary lead sector. This approach gradually phases out uncontrolled, inefficient and environmentally unacceptable methods of secondary lead recovery. Due attention has also been paid to the logistical peculiarities of an archipelago, in particular the regional spread of collection infrastructure, collection and shipment costs as well as the assurance of environmentally safe transport.

  8. Manufacture of finely divided carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.G.

    1980-01-22

    Finely divided carbon is manufactured by a process producing a gaseous stream containing carbon monoxide by reacting coal and air in a slagging ash gasifier, separating carbon monoxide from the gaseous mixture, and disproportionating the carbon monoxide to produce finely divided carbon and carbon dioxide, the latter of which is recycled to the gasifier.

  9. Dewatering studies of fine clean coal

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    The main objective of the present research program is to study and understand dewatering characteristics of ultrafine clean coal obtained using the advanced column flotation technique from the Kerr-McGee's Galatia preparation plant fine coal waste stream. It is also the objective of the research program to utilize the basic study results, i.e., surface chemical, particle shape particle size distribution, etc., in developing a cost-effective dewatering method. The ultimate objective is to develop process criteria to obtain a dewatered clean coal product containing less that 20 percent moisture, using the conventional vacuum dewatering equipment. (VC)

  10. Ground-water data for the alluvial, buried channel, Basel Pleistocene and Dakota aquifer in West-Central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Pamela K.B.; Runkle, Donna L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the availability, quantity and quality of groundwater from three principal aquifers in West-Central Iowa, the alluvial, buried channel, Basal Pleistocene and the Dakota aquifers. Specific objectives were to: (1) determine the location, extent and the nature of these aquifers; (2) evaluate the occurrence and movement of groundwater, including the sources of recharge and discharge; (3) estimate the quantities of water stored in the aquifers; (4) estimate the potential yields of wells tapping the aquifers; (5) estimate the water use; and (6) describe the chemical quality of the groundwater. This report is the compilation of the data collected during the investigation and has the purpose of providing a reference for an interpretive report describing groundwater resources and a bedrock topography map of the study area.

  11. Chemical Characterization of Outdoor and Subway Fine (PM2.5–1.0) and Coarse (PM10–2.5) Particulate Matter in Seoul (Korea) by Computer-Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM)

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Sang-Hoon; Willis, Robert; Peters, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor (subway) samples were collected by passive sampling in urban Seoul (Korea) and analyzed with computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX). Soil/road dust particles accounted for 42%–60% (by weight) of fine particulate matter larger than 1 µm (PM2.5–1.0) in outdoor samples and 18% of PM2.5–1.0 in subway samples. Iron-containing particles accounted for only 3%–6% in outdoor samples but 69% in subway samples. Qualitatively similar results were found for coarse particulate matter (PM10–2.5) with soil/road dust particles dominating outdoor samples (66%–83%) and iron-containing particles contributing most to subway PM10–2.5 (44%). As expected, soil/road dust particles comprised a greater mass fraction of PM10–2.5 than PM2.5–1.0. Also as expected, the mass fraction of iron-containing particles was substantially less in PM10–2.5 than in PM2.5–1.0. Results of this study are consistent with known emission sources in the area and with previous studies, which showed high concentrations of iron-containing particles in the subway compared to outdoor sites. Thus, passive sampling with CCSEM-EDX offers an inexpensive means to assess PM2.5–1.0 and PM10-2.5 simultaneously and by composition at multiple locations. PMID:25689348

  12. 'RAT' Leaves a Fine Mess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph shows the light signatures, or spectra, of two sides of the rock dubbed 'Bounce,' located at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The spectra were taken by the miniature thermal emission spectrometer on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The left side of this rock is covered by fine dust created when the rover drilled into the rock with its rock abrasion tool. These 'fines' produce a layer of pyroxene dust that can be detected here in the top spectrum. The right side of the rock has fewer fines and was used to investigate the composition of this basaltic rock.

  13. Uprated fine guidance sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future orbital observatories will require star trackers of extremely high precision. These sensors must maintain high pointing accuracy and pointing stability simultaneously with a low light level signal from a guide star. To establish the fine guidance sensing requirements and to evaluate candidate fine guidance sensing concepts, the Space Telescope Optical Telescope Assembly was used as the reference optical system. The requirements review was separated into three areas: Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA), Fine Guidance Sensing and astrometry. The results show that the detectors should be installed directly onto the focal surface presented by the optics. This would maximize throughput and minimize point stability error by not incoporating any additional optical elements.

  14. Transcultural adaptation and initial validation of Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Basel assessment of adherence to immunosuppressive medications scale (BAASIS) in kidney transplants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transplant recipients are expected to adhere to a lifelong immunosuppressant therapeutic regimen. However, nonadherence to treatment is an underestimated problem for which no properly validated measurement tool is available for Portuguese-speaking patients. We aimed to initially validate the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale (BAASIS®) to accurately estimate immunosuppressant nonadherence in Brazilian transplant patients. Methods The BAASIS® (English version) was transculturally adapted and its psychometric properties were assessed. The transcultural adaptation was performed using the Guillemin protocol. Psychometric testing included reliability (intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility, agreement, Kappa coefficient, and the Cronbach’s alpha) and validity (content, criterion, and construct validities). Results The final version of the transculturally adapted BAASIS® was pretested, and no difficulties in understanding its content were found. The intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility variances (0.007 and 0.003, respectively), the Cronbach’s alpha (0.7), Kappa coefficient (0.88) and the agreement (95.2%) suggest accuracy, preciseness and reliability. For construct validity, exploratory factorial analysis demonstrated unidimensionality of the first three questions (r = 0.76, r = 0.80, and r = 0.68). For criterion validity, the adapted BAASIS® was correlated with another self-report instrument, the Measure of Adherence to Treatment, and showed good congruence (r = 0.65). Conclusions The BAASIS® has adequate psychometric properties and may be employed in advance to measure adherence to posttransplant immunosuppressant treatments. This instrument will be the first one validated to use in this specific transplant population and in the Portuguese language. PMID:23692889

  15. Beginning of grain harvest in the tri-border region Basel as a proxy for mean April - May temperatures; creation of a long Swiss series c. 1455 AD - 1950 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, Oliver; Pfister, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Beginning of grain harvest in the tri-border region Basel as a proxy for mean April-July temperatures; creation of a long Swiss series c. 1454 AD - 1950 AD O. Wetter and C. Pfister Section of Economic, Social and Environmental History, Institute of History, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland (oliver.wetter@hist.unibe.ch) Before agricultural harvesting machines replaced manual labour the date of the grain harvest was largely dependent on mean temperatures from spring to early summer. It thus constitutes a very valuable source of information to reconstruct these temperatures. The later the harvest began, the cooler spring and early summer must have been and vice versa. For this reconstruction a new data series of grain harvests in the tri-border region Basel (representative for north-west Switzerland, the Alsace (France) and south-west Germany) was used as a temperature proxy. The harvesting dates have been extracted from the account books of the hospital of Basel which cover the period from c.1454 AD to 1705 AD. This series could be completed with several series of grain tithe dates originating from the Swiss Midland, covering the period between 1557 and 1825 and several grain harvest dates series covering the time between 1825 and 1950. Thus a series of almost 500 years could be compiled. Since the method of harvesting remained unchanged until the 1950's when manual labour was replaced by machines, the harvest dates of the modern series, lying within the temperature measurement series, could be used for calibrating the medieval dates.

  16. Comparison of gene expression profiles induced by coarse, fine, and ultrafile particulate matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coarse, fine, and ultrafine particulate matter (PM) fractions possess different physical properties and chemical compositions and may produce different adverse health effects. Studies were undertaken to determine whether or not gene expression patterns may be used to discriminate...

  17. Development of concepts for the management of shallow geothermal resources in urban areas - Experience gained from the Basel and Zaragoza case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Epting, Jannis; Mueller, Matthias H.; Huggenberger, Peter; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric

    2015-04-01

    In urban areas the shallow subsurface often is used as a heat resource (shallow geothermal energy), i.e. for the installation and operation of a broad variety of geothermal systems. Increasingly, groundwater is used as a low-cost heat sink, e.g. for building acclimatization. Together with other shallow geothermal exploitation systems significantly increased groundwater temperatures have been observed in many urban areas (urban heat island effect). The experience obtained from two selected case study cities in Basel (CH) and Zaragoza (ES) has allowed developing concepts and methods for the management of thermal resources in urban areas. Both case study cities already have a comprehensive monitoring network operating (hydraulics and temperature) as well as calibrated high-resolution numerical groundwater flow and heat-transport models. The existing datasets and models have allowed to compile and compare the different hydraulic and thermal boundary conditions for both groundwater bodies, including: (1) River boundaries (River Rhine and Ebro), (2) Regional hydraulic and thermal settings, (3) Interaction with the atmosphere under consideration of urbanization and (4) Anthropogenic quantitative and thermal groundwater use. The potential natural states of the considered groundwater bodies also have been investigated for different urban settings and varying processes concerning groundwater flow and thermal regimes. Moreover, concepts for the management of thermal resources in urban areas and the transferability of the applied methods to other urban areas are discussed. The methods used provide an appropriate selection of parameters (spatiotemporal resolution) that have to be measured for representative interpretations of groundwater flow and thermal regimes of specific groundwater bodies. From the experience acquired from the case studies it is shown that understanding the variable influences of the specific geological and hydrogeological as well as hydraulic and thermal

  18. Beginning of grain harvest in the tri-border region Basel as a proxy for mean April-July temperatures; creation of a long Swiss series c. 1454 AD - 1950 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetter, O.; Pfister, C.

    2010-09-01

    Before agricultural harvesting machines replaced manual labour the date of the grain harvest was largely dependent on mean temperatures from spring to early summer. It thus constitutes a very valuable source of information to reconstruct these temperatures. The later the harvest began, the cooler spring and early summer must have been and vice versa. For this reconstruction a new data series of grain harvests in the tri-border region Basel(representative for north-west Switzerland, the Alsace (France) and south-west Germany)was used as a temperature proxy. The harvesting dates have been extracted from the account books of the hospital of Basel which cover the period from c.1454 AD to 1705 AD. This series could be completed with several series of grain tithe dates originating from the Swiss Midland, covering the period between 1557 and 1825 and several grain harvest dates series covering the time between 1825 and 1950. Thus a series of almost 500 years could be compiled. Since the method of harvesting remained unchanged until the 1950's when manual labour was replaced by machines, the harvest dates of the modern series, lying within the temperature measurement series, could be used for calibrating the medieval dates.

  19. Fine-grained aggregates in L3 chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Kitamura, M.; Morimoto, N.

    1987-12-01

    The textures and chemical compositions of the constituent minerals of the fine-grained aggregates (FGAs) of L3 chondrites were studied by the backscattered electron image technique, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Plagioclase and glass in the interstices between fine grains of olivine and pyroxene indicate that the FGAs once partly melted. Compositional zoning and decomposition texture of pyroxenes are similar to those observed in chondrules, indicating a common cooling history of the FGAs and chondrules. Therefore, the mechanism that caused melting of the FGAs is considered to be the same as for chondrules. Bulk compositions of the FGAs are within the range of those of chondrules, so some chondrules probably were produced by complete melting of the same precursor materials as those of the FGAs. The precursor materials must have included fine olivine and other grains that probably are condensates.

  20. Fine structure in krypton excimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hemici, M.; Saoudi, R.; Descroix, E.; Audouard, E.; Laporte, P. ); Spiegelmann, F. )

    1995-04-01

    By using laser reduced fluorescence techniques, molecular absorption from the first relaxed excited excimer states of krypton is obtained in the 960--990-nm wavelength range. Five bands are observed and analyzed by comparison with an [ital ab] [ital initio] calculated spectrum. The fine structure is thus evidenced.

  1. Fine Arts. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, Bernard, Ed.

    This document contains two papers on fine arts from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference. "Expanding the Boundaries of the Music Education of the Elementary Teacher Classroom with Information Technology" (Cheryl Jackson) reports on how information technology is used in a music methods…

  2. Fine Particle Scrubbing: A Proceedings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association, 1974

    1974-01-01

    These articles deal with the proceedings of a 1974 symposium on the use of wet scrubbers for the control of fine particle air pollutants. Various wet scrubbers, their engineering, performance, efficiency, and future are discussed. Tables, formulas, and models are included. (TK)

  3. Nietzsche in Basel: Writing Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, J. Hillis

    1993-01-01

    Explores the tight relationship between reading and writing, and discusses the implications of this central relationship for departments of English. Discusses Friedrich Nietzsche's early writings on rhetoric as challenging Western metaphysical tradition and providing a new model of writing. (HB)

  4. Chemicals from Cradle to Grave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    About two years ago, an urban school district had planned for the disposal of some hazardous chemicals. It contracted with a chemical recycling company that was considered to be reputable. The school district, along with several other companies, was charged and fined by the Environmental Protection Agency for improperly releasing hazardous…

  5. Process for cleaning fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, R.E.

    1981-08-04

    A process for the wet concentration and cleaning of fine coal is provided which comprises the steps of desliming and thickening a dilute slurry of fine coal and contaminant particles having a size of less than about 10 mm by introducing the same to a hydrocyclone separator to retain a slurry of particles having a size greater than about 0.1 mm, wet concentrating the last-named slurry and removing the heavier contaminant particles by introducing it to an autogenous dense medium separation vessel having a manifold for injecting water at an intermediate level and controlling the underflow of heavier than coal particles to maintain a fluidized bed of heavier particles and causing a slurry of the lighter coal particles to overflow, and concentrating and dewatering the overflow by means of a static or vibratory sizing screen.

  6. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bradley E.; Kabir, Md. E.; Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  7. Wetter for fine dry powder

    DOEpatents

    Hall, James E.; Williams, Everett H.

    1977-01-01

    A system for wetting fine dry powders such as bentonite clay with water or other liquids is described. The system includes a wetting tank for receiving water and a continuous flow of fine powder feed. The wetting tank has a generally square horizontal cross section with a bottom end closure in the shape of an inverted pyramid. Positioned centrally within the wetting tank is a flow control cylinder which is supported from the walls of the wetting tank by means of radially extending inclined baffles. A variable speed motor drives a first larger propeller positioned immediately below the flow control cylinder in a direction which forces liquid filling the tank to flow downward through the flow control cylinder and a second smaller propeller positioned below the larger propeller having a reverse pitch to oppose the flow of liquid being driven downward by the larger propeller.

  8. SOUTHERN FINE PARTICULATE MONITORING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley D. Williamson

    2001-07-01

    This is the third quarterly progress report of the ''Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-00NT40770 to Southern Research Institute (SRI). In this two year project SRI will conduct detailed studies of ambient fine particulate matter in the Birmingham, AL metropolitan area. Project objectives include: Augment existing measurements of primary and secondary aerosols at an established urban southeastern monitoring site; Make a detailed database of near-continuous measurements of the time variation of fine particulate mass, composition, and key properties (including particle size distribution); Apply the measurements to source attribution, time/transport properties of fine PM, and implications for management strategies for PM{sub 2.5}; and Validate and compare key measurement methods used in this study for applicability within other PM{sub 2.5} research by DOE-FE, EPA, NARSTO, and others. During the third project quarter, the new SRI air monitoring shelter and additional instruments were installed at the site. Details include: Installation of Radiance Research M903 Nephelometer; Installation of SRI air monitoring shelter at North Birmingham Site; Relocation of instruments from SEARCH shelter to SRI shelter; Installation of Rupprecht & Patashnick 8400 Sulfate Monitor; Assembly and initial laboratory testing for particulate sulfate monitor of Harvard design; Efficiency testing of particle sizing instrument package at SRI lab; Preparation for the Eastern Supersite July measurement intensive program; and Continued monitoring with TEOM and particle sizing instruments.

  9. The composition of fine fragrances is changing.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Suresh C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2003-03-01

    High frequencies of contact allergy to fragrance ingredients have been reported in recent years. Developments in analytical chemistry have made it possible to measure exposure to well-known fragrance contact allergens. It has been shown that exposure is widespread in different types of products. The products with the highest concentrations of allergens have been shown to be prestige perfumes intended for women. This investigation explores the possible development in formulation of prestige perfumes, with regard to their content of the chemically defined ingredients of the diagnostic patch test material, the fragrance mix (FM). 10 fine fragrances were subjected to chemical analysis: 5 of these had been launched years ago (1921-1990) and 5 were the latest launches by the same companies, introduced 2 months to 4 years before purchase. The analysis revealed that the 5 old perfumes contained a mean of 5 of the 7 target allergens of the FM, while the new perfumes contained a mean of 2.8 of the allergens. The mean concentrations of the target allergens were 2.6 times higher in the old perfumes than in the new perfumes, range 2.2-337. It is concluded that the old perfumes, which are still popular products on the market, have a different composition from the new perfumes. This may be due to change in fashion or to an effort by the fragrance industry to focus on fragrance contact allergy, especially that to the FM ingredients.

  10. Considering Fine Art and Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2015-01-01

    There has been a close association between picturebook illustrations and works of fine art since the picturebook was first conceived, and many ways these associations among works of fine art and picturebook illustrations and design play out. To make sense of all the various ways picturebook illustrations are associated with works of fine art,…

  11. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  12. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  13. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  14. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  15. 36 CFR 910.35 - Fine arts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fine arts. 910.35 Section 910... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.35 Fine arts. Fine arts... of art which are appropriate for the development. For information and guidance, a...

  16. Anaerobic digestion of fines from recovered paper processing - Influence of fiber source, lignin and ash content on biogas potential.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Friedrich; Requejo, Ana; Ewald, Christian; Janzon, Ron; Saake, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    Fines concentration harms paper machine runability and output quality in recovered paper processing, hence, their extraction would be fundamentally beneficial. In this study, separated fines from an industrial recycled fiber pulp (RFP) were characterized and evaluated for their potential biogas yields with a focus on understanding the role of varying lignin and ash contents. Further, these results were compared with biogas yields from conventional chemical and mechanical pulps. Overall, methane yields of fines from mechanical pulps (21-28mL/gVS) and RFP (127mL/gVS) are relatively low compared to the high methane yields of 375mL/gVS from the chemical pulp fines. However, it was shown that the high ash content in RFP fines (up to 50%) did not negatively influence overall yield, rather, it was the presence of slowly biodegrading lignin-rich fiber fines.

  17. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  18. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions (10-1000 nm aerodynamic diameter), physical and chemical properties of fine particle matter (PM2.5) with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 micrometers, and gas-phase emissions from controlled open burning of assorted taxa were measured. Chemical speciation of ...

  19. Picobubble enhanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.J.; Liu, J.T.; Yu, S.; Tao, D.

    2006-07-01

    Froth flotation is widely used in the coal industry to clean -28 mesh fine coal. A successful recovery of particles by flotation depends on efficient particle-bubble collision and attachment with minimal subsequent particle detachment from bubble. Flotation is effective in a narrow size range beyond which the flotation efficiency drops drastically. It is now known that the low flotation recovery of particles in the finest size fractions is mainly due to a low probability of bubble-particle collision while the main reason for poor coarse particle flotation recovery is the high probability of detachment. A fundamental analysis has shown that use of picobubbles can significantly improve the flotation recovery of particles in a wide range of size by increasing the probability of collision and attachment and reducing the probability of detachment. A specially designed column with a picobubble generator has been developed for enhanced recovery of fine coal particles. Picobubbles were produced based on the hydrodynamic cavitation principle. They are characterized by a size distribution that is mostly below 1 {mu}m and adhere preferentially to the hydrophobic surfaces. The presence of picobubbles increases the probability of collision and attachment and decreases the probability of detachment, thus enhancing flotation recovery. Experimental results with the Coalberg seam coal in West Virginia, U.S.A. have shown that the use of picobubbles in a 2 in. column flotation increased fine coal recovery by 10-30%, depending on the feed rate, collector dosage, and other flotation conditions. Picobubbles also acted as a secondary collector and reduced the collector dosage by one third to one half.

  20. Luna 24 regolith breccias: A possible source of the fine size material of the Luna 24 regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rode, O. D.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The regolith breccias from the Luna 24 core were analyzed. The Luna 24 regolith is a mixture of fine and coarse grain materials. The comparable analysis of the grain size distributions, the modal and chemical compositions of the breccias, and the regolith from the same levels show that the friable slightly litificated breccia with a friable fine grain matrix may be a source of fine grain material of the Luna 24 present day regolith.

  1. Method for cleaning fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Smit, F.J.

    1985-07-16

    A method for cleaning fine coal is provided which includes: mixing the coal with a fluid of such a specific gravity that clean coal particles would float while refuse particles would sink therein, pretreating the coalfluid slurry by adding a surfactant, subjecting the mixture to ultrasonic dispersion, and separating the entire mixture into higher and lower specific gravity fluid streams by means of centrifugal separation. The fluid of the chosen specific gravity and the surfactant may be recovered from the fluid streams and recycled if desired.

  2. Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley Williamson

    2003-05-31

    This final project report presents experimental details, results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham sampling site during the October, 2001-September, 2002 study period.The host site for these measurement activities is the North Birmingham PM monitoring station by the Jefferson County Health Department in Birmingham, AL.The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. During the course of the project, measurement intercomparison data were developed for these instruments and several complementary measurements at the site. The report details the instrument set and operating procedures and describes the resulting data. Report subsections present an overview summary of the data, followed by detailed description of the systematic time behavior of PM{sub 2.5} and other specific particulate size fractions. Specific subsections are included for particle size distribution, light scattering, and particle sulfate data. The final subsection addresses application of the measurements to the practical questions of fine PM generation and transport, source attribution, and PM{sub 2.5} management strategies.

  3. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  4. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  5. Fine Collimator Grids Using Silicon Metering Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Carol

    1998-01-01

    The project Fine Collimator Grids Using Silicon Metering Structure was managed by Dr. Carol Eberhard of the Electromagnetic Systems & Technology Department (Space & Technology Division) of TRW who also wrote this final report. The KOH chemical etching of the silicon wafers was primarily done by Dr. Simon Prussin of the Electrical Engineering Department of UCLA at the laboratory on campus. Moshe Sergant of the Superconductor Electronics Technology Department (Electronics Systems & Technology Division) of TRW and Dr. Prussin were instrumental in developing the low temperature silicon etching processes. Moshe Sergant and George G. Pinneo of the Microelectronics Production Department (Electronics Systems & Technology Division) of TRW were instrumental in developing the processes for filling the slots etched in the silicon wafers with metal-filled materials. Their work was carried out in the laboratories at the Space Park facility. Moshe Sergant is also responsible for the impressive array of Scanning Electron Microscope images with which the various processes were monitored. Many others also contributed their time and expertise to the project. I wish to thank them all.

  6. Developing a biomonitoring tool for fine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, Matt; Bilotta, Gary; Brazier, Richard; Extence, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Sediment is an essential component of freshwater ecosystems; however anthropogenic activities can lead to elevated sediment delivery which can impact on the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of these ecosystems. Ultimately, this can result in a loss of ecosystem services worth more than 1.7 trillion per annum. As such it is important that sediment, which is one of the most commonly attributed causes of water quality impairment globally, is managed in order to minimise these impacts. The current EU environmental quality standard for sediment (monitored in the form of suspended solids) is 25 mg L-1 for all environments. It is widely recognised that this standard is unsuitable and not ecologically relevant. Furthermore, it requires a substantial resource investment to monitor sediment in this form as part of national and international water resource legislation. In recognition of this the development of sediment-specific biomonitoring tools is receiving increasing attention. The Proportion of Sediment-Sensitive Invertebrates (PSI) index is one such tool that is designed to indicate levels of fine sediment (

  7. The Apollo 15 coarse fines (4-10 mm)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Sherman, Sarah Bean

    1989-01-01

    A new catalog of the Apollo 15 coarse fines particles is presented. Powell's macroscopic descriptions, resulting from his 1972 particle by particle binocular examination of all of the Apollo 15 4 to 10 mm fines samples, are retained. His groupings are also retained, but petrographic, chemical, and other data from later analyses are incorporated into this catalog to better characterize individual particles and describe the groups. A large number of particles have no characterization beyond that done by Powell. Complete descriptions of the particles and all known references are provided. The catalog is intended for anyone interested in the rock types collected by Dave Scott and Jim Irwin in the Hadley-Appenine region, and particularly for researchers requiring sample allocations.

  8. Advanced Fine Particulate Characterization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Benson; Lingbu Kong; Alexander Azenkeng; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Edwin Olson; Jill MacKenzie; A.M. Rokanuzzaman

    2007-01-31

    The characterization and control of emissions from combustion sources are of significant importance in improving local and regional air quality. Such emissions include fine particulate matter, organic carbon compounds, and NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} gases, along with mercury and other toxic metals. This project involved four activities including Further Development of Analytical Techniques for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} Characterization and Source Apportionment and Management, Organic Carbonaceous Particulate and Metal Speciation for Source Apportionment Studies, Quantum Modeling, and High-Potassium Carbon Production with Biomass-Coal Blending. The key accomplishments included the development of improved automated methods to characterize the inorganic and organic components particulate matter. The methods involved the use of scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis for the inorganic fraction and a combination of extractive methods combined with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure to characterize the organic fraction. These methods have direction application for source apportionment studies of PM because they provide detailed inorganic analysis along with total organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) quantification. Quantum modeling using density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to further elucidate a recently developed mechanistic model for mercury speciation in coal combustion systems and interactions on activated carbon. Reaction energies, enthalpies, free energies and binding energies of Hg species to the prototype molecules were derived from the data obtained in these calculations. Bimolecular rate constants for the various elementary steps in the mechanism have been estimated using the hard-sphere collision theory approximation, and the results seem to indicate that extremely fast kinetics could be involved in these surface reactions. Activated carbon was produced from a blend of lignite coal from the Center Mine in North Dakota and

  9. Modeling of Fine-Particle Formation in Turbulent Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Venkat; Fox, Rodney O.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of nanostructured particles in high-temperature flames is important both for the control of emissions from combustion devices and for the synthesis of high-value chemicals for a variety of applications. The physiochemical processes that lead to the production of fine particles in turbulent flames are highly sensitive to the flow physics and, in particular, the history of thermochemical compositions and turbulent features they encounter. Consequently, it is possible to change the characteristic size, structure, composition, and yield of the fine particles by altering the flow configuration. This review describes the complex multiscale interactions among turbulent fluid flow, gas-phase chemical reactions, and solid-phase particle evolution. The focus is on modeling the generation of soot particles, an unwanted pollutant from automobile and aircraft engines, as well as metal oxides, a class of high-value chemicals sought for specialized applications, including emissions control. Issues arising due to the numerical methods used to approximate the particle number density function, the modeling of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and model validation are also discussed.

  10. Fine Structure of Plasmaspheric Hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, D.; Omura, Y.; Nakamura, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays a key role in controlling the structure and dynamics of Earth's radiation belts.The quiet time slot region between the inner and outer belts can be explained as a steady-state balance between earthward radial diffusion and pitch-angle scattering loss of energetic electrons to the atmosphere induced by plasmaspheric hiss. Plasmaspheric hiss can also induce gradual precipitation loss of MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband,structureless,incoherent emission. Here, by examining burst-mode vector waveform data from the EMFISIS instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission,we show that plasmaspheric hiss is a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Specifically, plasmaspheric hiss appears as discrete rising tone and falling tone elements. By means of waveform analysis we identify typical amplitudes,phase profiles,and sweep rates of the rising and falling tone elements. The new observations reported here can be expected to fuel a re-examination of the properties of plasmaspheric hiss, including a further re-analysis of the generation mechanism for hiss.

  11. SOUTHERN FINE PARTICULATE MONITORING PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    This quarterly report presents results and analysis of continuous onsite ambient fine particulate data at the North Birmingham sampling site during the January-March, 2002 study period. The continuous data include PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations measured by TEOM, particle sulfate using the R&P 8400S monitor, particle size distributions measured by SMPS and APS monitors, and PM{sub 2.5} light scattering extinction coefficient as measured by nephelometer. Some instrumental issues were noted with the upgrade of the APS model 3320 are described in the report, as well as preliminary performance indications for the upgraded instrument. During the quarter preliminary data analysis and modeling studies were conducted to test the potential of the North Birmingham site data for source attribution analyses. Our initial assessment has continued to be optimistic in this regard due to the location of the site relative to several important classes of local and midrange emission sources. We anticipate that these analyses will provide good separations of the effects of major source classes and spatial source clusters, and will provide useful information relevant to PM{sub 2.5} implementation strategies.

  12. Get out of Fines Free: Recruiting Student Usability Testers via Fine Waivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockenberry, Benjamin; Blackburn, Kourtney

    2016-01-01

    St. John Fisher College's Lavery Library's Access Services and Systems departments began a pilot project in which students with overdue fines tested usability of library Web sites in exchange for fine waivers. Circulation staff promoted the program and redeemed fine waiver vouchers at the Checkout Desk, while Systems staff administered testing and…

  13. 47 CFR 76.943 - Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.943 Fines. (a) A franchising authority may impose fines or monetary forfeitures on a cable operator that does not comply with a rate decision or refund order directed specifically at the cable operator, provided the franchising authority has such power under state or local...

  14. Legal Rights of the Fine Artist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millinger, Donald M.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the current status and changing patterns of copyrights, resale royalty rights, and moral rights that have the potential of according the fine artist greater protection and economic security. Discusses an existing California law as a model for protection of the fine artists' moral rights. (JMF)

  15. Fine-Sediment Loadings to Lake Tahoe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past 35 years, a trend of decreasing water clarity has been documented in Lake Tahoe, attributable in part to the delivery of fine-grained sediments emanating from upland and channel sources. The overall objective of the research reported here was to determine the amount of fine sediment de...

  16. ADVANCING FINE ROOT RESEARCH WITH MINIRHIZOTRONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Minirhizotrons provide a nondestructive, in situ method for directly viewing and studying fine roots. Although many insights into fine roots have been gained using minirhizotrons, it is clear from the literature that there is still wide variation in how minirhizotrons and minirhi...

  17. Mass, nutrient pool, and mineralization of litter and fine roots in a tropical mountain cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Campos C, Adolfo; Cruz H, Lourdes; Rocha O, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    We used fine root and litter mass from a tropical mountain cloud forest to assess their relative contribution to nutrient content and to examine mineralization processes during a laboratory incubation experiment. Our results showed that average fine root mass density ranged from 2.86kgm(-3) to 11.59kgm(-3), while litter mass density ranged from 72.5kgm(-3) to 177.3kgm(-3). On average, fine root mass density represented 4.7% of the mass density of the O horizon. Fine root mass density followed an exponentially declining trend with soil depth. On average, 83% of fine root mass density within the soil profile was concentrated in the O horizon. Mean element pools in litter decreased from 44.08mgcm(-3) to 0.49μgcm(-3) in the following sequence: C>N>Fe>S>Ca>P>K>Mg>Na>Mn>Zn>Cu. For fine roots, a different mean element pool sequence (C>N>Ca>K>Fe>S>Mg>Na>P>Mn>Zn>Cu) in decreasing abundance (from 2.88mgcm(-3) to 0.13μgcm(-3)) was observed with respect to litter. Regarding C, litter mineralized faster than fine roots, with a mean k value of 0.25d(-1) for litter and 0.13d(-1) for fine roots. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with stepwise regression analysis revealed that the main mass density predictors were N, S, Zn, and Mn for litter (p<0.0001, R(2)=0.92), and S and C/N ratio for fine roots (p<0.0001, R(2)=0.82). These results demonstrate the potential of chemical composition to influence the mineralization of fine root and litter mass and therefore the nutrient availability and C sequestration.

  18. Paste mechanics for fine extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurysz, Kevin Michael

    compositional range; (5) Shear zone behavior, and the influence and limitations the shear layer places on fine extrusion.

  19. Magnetofluidization of fine magnetite powder.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J M; Espin, M J; Quintanilla, M A S; Castellanos, A

    2009-03-01

    The behavior of a fluidized bed of fine magnetite particles as affected by a cross-flow magnetic field is investigated. A distinct feature of this naturally cohesive powder, as compared to noncohesive magnetic grains usually employed in magnetofluidized beds, is that the fluidized bed displays a range of stable fluidization even in the absence of an external magnetic field. Upon application of the magnetic field, the interval of stable fluidization is extended to higher gas velocities and bed expansion is enhanced. We have measured the tensile strength as affected by application of the external magnetic field according to two different operation modes. In the H off-on operation mode, the bed is driven to bubbling in the absence of external magnetic field. Once the gas velocity is decreased below the bubbling onset and the bed has returned to stable fluidization due to natural cohesive forces, the field is applied. In the H on-on mode, the field is maintained during the whole process of bubbling and return to stable fluidization. It is found that the tensile strength of the naturally stabilized bed is not essentially changed by application of the field ( H off-on) since the magnetic field cannot alter the bed structure once the particles are jammed in the stable fluidization state. Magnetic forces within the bulk of the jammed bed are partially canceled as a result of the anisotropic nature of the dipole-dipole interaction between the particles, which gives rise to just a small increment of the tensile strength. On the other hand, when the field is held on during bubbling and transition to stable fluidization ( H on-on mode), the tensile strength is appreciably increased. This suggests the formation of particle chains when the particles are not constrained due to the dipole-dipole attractive interaction which affects the mechanical strength of the stably fluidized bed. Experimental data are analyzed in the light of theoretical models on magnetic surface stresses.

  20. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  1. Oil sands fine tailings - a resource material for potentially marketable products

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, A.; Sparks, B.D.; Coleman, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Oil sands fine tailings is a complex mixture of components each having specific physical or chemical characteristics. Studies on the fundamental properties of fine tailings have resulted in the development of methods to fractionate the tailings into products with market potential. These include: bitumen, for production of synthetic crude oil or as an ancillary fuel; clean kaolin for fine paper coating; a gelling agent for drilling mud formulation; emulsifying solids, for surfactant replacement; and a mineral fraction, for heavy metal recovery. In this investigation we have attempted to evaluate the economic potential of fine tailings as a resource material by determining the amount and value of these products; the prime objective was to determine the economic feasibility of a tailings treatment scheme.

  2. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  3. ChemCam analysis of Martian fine dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Mangold, Nicolas; Cousin, Agnes; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wiens, Roger; Gasnault, Olivier; Rapin, William; Schroder, Susanne; Ollila, Ann; Fabre, Cécile; Berger, Gilles; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Dehouck, Erwin; Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Anderson, Ryan; Bridges, Nathan; Clark, Benton; Clegg, Samuel; d'Uston, Claude; Goetz, Walter; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lanza, Nina; Madsen, Morten; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton; Sautter, Violaine; Martin-Torres, Javier; Zorzano, Maria-Paz; MSL Science Team

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we examine the chemical composition of dust observed by the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover at Gale Crater. The Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy technique analyses samples without preparation, which allows detection of the elemental composition of surface deposits. Mars aeolian fine dust (<2-3 microns) composition is analyzed on the first shot of each Mars target. It is reproducible over time and present a composition characteristic of the global martian fine dust, which covers the entire planet and contributes to the local geology analyzed by MSL. Its composition can also be retrieved on the ChemCam Calibration Targets (CCCT) by subtraction of the well characterized CCCT spectra. The CCCT include eight glasses and ceramics that have been generated to simulate Martian rocks of interest and two targets of a single element (graphite for carbon and an alloy of titanium). ChemCam passive spectroscopy also indicates varying deposition of the dust cover on the CCCT.Major elements are quantified and shown to be very similar to the fine soils encountered at Gale crater. The composition is also similar to the soils and fine dust measured by APXS for the elements common to both instruments. The minor elements quantified by ChemCam (Ba, Sr, Rb, Li, Mn, Cr) are within the range of soil surveys, but we see a higher concentration of Li than in other types of remotely characterized targets. Sulfur is possibly detected at the ChemCam limit of detection. Hydrogen is clearly identified, indicating that this fine dust is a contributor to the H content of the martian soils, as also detected by the SAM and CheMin instruments, and provides constraints as to which fraction of the Martian surface is hydrated and altered. In conclusion, the finest fraction of dust particles on the surface of Mars contains hydrated components mixed intimately within the fine aeolian dust fraction, suggesting that this dust likely

  4. Fine Guidance Sensing for Coronagraphic Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James W.; Trauger, John T.; Moody, Dwight C.

    2011-01-01

    Three options have been developed for Fine Guidance Sensing (FGS) for coronagraphic observatories using a Fine Guidance Camera within a coronagraphic instrument. Coronagraphic observatories require very fine precision pointing in order to image faint objects at very small distances from a target star. The Fine Guidance Camera measures the direction to the target star. The first option, referred to as Spot, was to collect all of the light reflected from a coronagraph occulter onto a focal plane, producing an Airy-type point spread function (PSF). This would allow almost all of the starlight from the central star to be used for centroiding. The second approach, referred to as Punctured Disk, collects the light that bypasses a central obscuration, producing a PSF with a punctured central disk. The final approach, referred to as Lyot, collects light after passing through the occulter at the Lyot stop. The study includes generation of representative images for each option by the science team, followed by an engineering evaluation of a centroiding or a photometric algorithm for each option. After the alignment of the coronagraph to the fine guidance system, a "nulling" point on the FGS focal point is determined by calibration. This alignment is implemented by a fine alignment mechanism that is part of the fine guidance camera selection mirror. If the star images meet the modeling assumptions, and the star "centroid" can be driven to that nulling point, the contrast for the coronagraph will be maximized.

  5. High energy collimating fine grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Victor M.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Laferla, Raffaele

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the fabrication of extremely tight tolerance collimating grids using a high-Z material, specifically tungsten. The approach taken was to fabricate grids by a replication method involving the coating of a silicon grid substrate with tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A negative of the desired grid structure was fabricated in silicon using highly wafering techniques developed for the semiconductor industry and capable of producing the required tolerances. Using diamond wafering blades, a network of accurately spaced slots was machined into a single-crystal silicon surface. These slots were then filled with tungsten by CVD, via the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Following tungsten deposition, the silicon negative was etched away to leave the tungsten collimating grid structure. The project was divided into five tasks: (1) identify materials of construction for the replica and final collimating grid structures; (2) identify and implement a micromachining technique for manufacturing the negative collimator replicas (performed by NASA/JPL); (3) develop a CVD technique and processing parameters suitable for the complete tungsten densification of the collimator replicas; (4) develop a chemical etching technique for the removal of the collimator replicas after the tungsten deposition process; and (5) fabricate and deliver tungsten collimating grid specimens.

  6. High energy collimating fine grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrieta, Victor M.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Laferla, Raffaele

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the fabrication of extremely tight tolerance collimating grids using a high-Z material, specifically tungsten. The approach taken was to fabricate grids by a replication method involving the coating of a silicon grid substrate with tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A negative of the desired grid structure was fabricated in silicon using highly wafering techniques developed for the semiconductor industry and capable of producing the required tolerances. Using diamond wafering blades, a network of accurately spaced slots was machined into a single-crystal silicon surface. These slots were then filled with tungsten by CVD, via the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Following tungsten deposition, the silicon negative was etched away to leave the tungsten collimating grid structure. The project was divided into five tasks: (1) identify materials of construction for the replica and final collimating grid structures; (2) identify and implement a micromachining technique for manufacturing the negative collimator replicas (performed by NASA/JPL); (3) develop a CVD technique and processing parameters suitable for the complete tungsten densification of the collimator replicas; (4) develop a chemical etching technique for the removal of the collimator replicas after the tungsten deposition process; and (5) fabricate and deliver tungsten collimating grid specimens.

  7. A dynamics model for fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Youjun, T.; Maixi, L.

    1999-07-01

    Through a large amount of experiments, this article studied the effect of the entrapment of water flow on the fine coal flotation during the flotation, and also investigated the relation between the constant of water flotation rate and different operation variables, and resulted in its equation. The water-recycling model is determined, and finally, the dynamics model on relation between the recovery of fine particle and the water recovery in concentration is established. The equation about ash of fine clean coal in any flotation time is derived by introduction of de-ashed coefficient.

  8. Human fine body hair enhances ectoparasite detection.

    PubMed

    Dean, Isabelle; Siva-Jothy, Michael T

    2012-06-23

    Although we are relatively naked in comparison with other primates, the human body is covered in a layer of fine hair (vellus and terminal hair) at a relatively high follicular density. There are relatively few explanations for the evolutionary maintenance of this type of human hair. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that human fine body hair plays a defensive function against ectoparasites (bed bugs). Our results show that fine body hair enhances the detection of ectoparasites through the combined effects of (i) increasing the parasite's search time and (ii) enhancing its detection.

  9. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  10. Chemical Properties of Combustion Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of pyrogenic and anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. ...

  11. An EBSD study of texture development and hybrid deformation mechanisms in fine grained calcite aggregates deformed in direct shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, X.; Trullenque, G.; Drury, M. R.; de Bresser, J.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding of texture development and its relation to grain size sensitive (GSS) deformation mechanism is of great importance since the rheological behavior of rocks varies substantially depending on which deformation mechanisms are controlling. Recent studies on naturally and experimentally deformed calcite and olivine aggregates have demonstrated that even fine grained materials that are expected to deform by grain size sensitive (GSS) mechanisms, develop a weak but distinct LPO (texture) at high strain. To investigate this behavior we conducted new deformation experiments on Solnhofen limestone in direct shear. This study is part of a wider investigation on large strain deformation in different deformation modes from G. Trullenque, in collaboration with D.L. Kohlstedt (Minneapolis, USA), R. Heilbronner and H. Stuenitz (Basel, Switzerland) and the Utrecht group. The samples have been deformed to high strain both in the conditions of the transition between the GSS and GSI creep regime and in the GSS creep regime. We used Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) to determine the texture strength of the samples, the distribution of misorientation axes and the grain size distributions. The results show an oblique shape preferred orientation at 35° to 40° to the shear plane and a moderate LPO. The c-axis preferred orientation shows a girdle with one main maximum at a high angle to the shear plane, displaced towards the shortening direction of the imposed shear. The a-axes present a weak girdle perpendicular to the c-axis. Grain growth occurred during high deformation. The misorientation angle distribution has a main peak at low angle. This is due to the progressive subgrain formation and rotation which occurred mainly in the larger grains. Subgrain rotation with misorientations up to 10° occured but most boundaries are low angle (< 5°). This shows the formation of new high angle boundaries and grain size reduction. The formation of subgrains and subgrain

  12. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  13. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  14. Site-specific ionisation edge fine-structure of Rutile in the electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hetaba, Walid; Löffler, Stefan; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Schlögl, Robert; Schattschneider, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Combined Bloch-wave and density functional theory simulations are performed to investigate the effects of different channelling conditions on the fine-structure of electron energy-loss spectra. The simulated spectra compare well with experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that using this technique, the site-specific investigation of atomic orbitals is possible. This opens new possibilities for chemical analyses.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF FINE PARTICLE ASSOCIATED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON AND DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic chemicals adsorbed to fine particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air account for a major component of the mass and include source tracers as well as toxic compounds that may contribute to adverse human health effects. The US EPA has established a PM 2.5 research progr...

  16. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy ... Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration ...

  17. Interaction of fine sediment with alluvial streambeds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, H.E.; Carey, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    An alluvial streambed can have a large capacity to store fine sediments that are extracted from the flow when instream concentrations are high and it can gradually release fine sediment to the flow when the instream concentrations are low. Several types of storage mechanisms are available depending on the relative size distribution of the suspended load and bed material, as well as the flow hydraulics. -from Authors

  18. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  19. Effervescent Liquid Fine Mist Apparatus and Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-05

    SUBTITLE Effervescent Liquid Fine Mist Apparatus and Method 6. AUTHOR(S) Joseph E. Wolfe 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...chamber connected to the container; and at least one convergent/divergent nozzle connected to the mixing chamber. A method of forming an effervescent fine...mist, effervescent liquid mist 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: unclassified a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE

  20. Experimental Study of the Possibility to Make a Mortar with Ternary Sand (Natural and Artificial Fine Aggregates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baali, L.; Naceri, A.; Rahmouni, Z.; Mehidi, M. W. Noui

    This experimental study investigates the possibility to make a mortar with a ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggregates). This method is utilized to correct the particle size distribution of various sands used in mortar. For this investigation, three sands have been used: a dune sand (DS), a slag sand (SS), and brick sand (BS) at different proportions in mortar. After crushing, the artificial fine aggregate (blast furnace slag and waste brick fine aggregate) was sifted in order to use it as fine aggregate. The effect of the quality and grain size distribution of natural fine aggregate (i.e., DS) and artificial fine aggregates (i.e., SS and BS) on the physical properties of ternary sand confected (density, porosity, fineness modulus, equivalent sand, particle size distribution, water absorption) and properties of fresh and hardened mortar were analysed. In the same way for this study, the physical properties and chemical compositions of DS, SS, BS and cement were investigated. The results obtained show that the mechanical strength on mortar depends of the nature and particle size distribution of sand studied. The reuse of this recycled material (slag blast furnace and waste brick) in the industry would contribute to the protection of the environment. This study shows the potential of this method to make mortar with ternary sand (natural and artificial fine aggreagates) in order to improve the physical properties of sand. Utilising natural and artificial fine aggregates to produce quality mortar should yield significant environmental benefits.

  1. Methyl ricinoleate as platform chemical for simultaneous production of fine chemicals and polymer precursors.

    PubMed

    Dupé, Antoine; Achard, Mathieu; Fischmeister, Cédric; Bruneau, Christian

    2012-11-01

    The modification of methyl ricinoleate by etherification of the hydroxyl group was accomplished by using a nonclassical ruthenium-catalyzed allylation reaction and also by esterification. Methyl ricinoleate derivatives were engaged in ring-closing metathesis (RCM) reactions leading to biosourced 3,6-dihydropyran and α,β-unsaturated lactone derivatives with concomitant production of polymer precursors. Sequential RCM/hydrogenation and RCM/cross-metathesis were also implemented as a straightforward method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyran and lactone derivatives as well as valuable monomers (i.e., polyamide precursors).

  2. Analysis of Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Julie Olmsted

    This thesis presents a systematic study of the application of DAFS to determine site-specific local structural and chemical information in complex materials, and the first application of state-of-the-art theoretical XAFS calculations using the computer program scFEFF to model DAFS data. In addition, the iterative dispersion analysis method, first suggested by Pickering, et al., has been generalized to accommodate the off-resonance anomalous scattering from heavy atoms in the unit cell. The generalized algorithm scKKFIT was applied to DAFS data from eight (00 l) reflections of the high-T _{c} superconductor YBa _2Cu_3O_ {6.8} to obtain the weighted complex resonant scattering amplitudes Delta f_{ rm w}(Q, E). The fine-structure functions chi_{rm w}(Q, E) isolated from the Delta f_{ rm w}(Q, E) are linear combinations of the individual site fine structure functions chi _{rm w}(Q, E) = Sigma_{i}W_{i,{ bf Q}}chi_{i}(E) from the two inequivalent Cu sites, added together according to the structure factor for the Cu sublattice. The chi_{rm w}(Q, E) were fit en masse using the XAFS analysis program scFEFFIT under a set of constraints on the coefficients W _{i,{bf Q}} based on the structure factor for kinematic scattering. The W_{i,{bf Q}} determined by scFEFFIT were used to obtain the fully separated complex resonant scattering amplitudes Delta f(E) for the two Cu sites. The theoretical connection between DAFS and XAFS is used to justify the application of state-of-the-art theoretical XAFS calculations to DAFS analysis. The polarization dependence of DAFS is described in terms of individual virtual photoelectron scattering paths in the Rehr-Albers separable curved-wave formalism. Polarization is shown to be an important factor in all DAFS experiments. Three experimental constraints are found necessary for obtaining site-separated Delta f(E) from DAFS data by linear inversion of the W_{i, {bf Q}} matrix and scKKFIT isolated Delta f_{rm w }(Q, E): (1) The diffraction must be

  3. Lunar regolith fines - A source of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The theoretical evaluation of the lunar regolith fines as a primary source of hydrogen reveals that a minimum order of magnitude increase in hydrogen content is possible in beneficiated fines because both particle size and particle shape play a significant role in the relationship of volume percent of surface coating to grain size. The lunar regolith fines meet the basic requirement for beneficiation because a major portion (minimum two-thirds) of the hydrogen occurs in the less than 20-micron-size fraction, a relatively small part of the fines. Beneficiation should be accomplished by a combination of vibratory screening followed by cyclone and/or possibly electrostatic separation. Early exploitation of the lunar regolith fines for hydrogen probably will be limited to hydrogen obtained as a by-product or co-product from the mining and processing for other elements or materials because a minimum of about 13,600 tons to about 19,600 tons of 100 ppm hydrogen-bearing lunar regolith fines will have to be processed with about 3,100 tons to about 4,500 tons, respectively, of concentrate heated to supply 1 ton of hydrogen, yielding a recovery of about 74 percent to about 51 percent respectively, of the hydrogen.

  4. Revisiting fine-tuning in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Graham G.; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai; Staub, Florian

    2017-03-01

    We evaluate the amount of fine-tuning in constrained versions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), with different boundary conditions at the GUT scale. Specifically we study the fully constrained version as well as the cases of non-universal Higgs and gaugino masses. We allow for the presence of additional non-holomorphic soft-terms which we show further relax the fine-tuning. Of particular importance is the possibility of a Higgsino mass term and we discuss possible origins for such a term in UV complete models. We point out that loop corrections typically lead to a reduction in the fine-tuning by a factor of about two compared to the estimate at tree-level, which has been overlooked in many recent works. Taking these loop corrections into account, we discuss the impact of current limits from SUSY searches and dark matter on the fine-tuning. Contrary to common lore, we find that the MSSM fine-tuning can be as small as 10 while remaining consistent with all experimental constraints. If, in addition, the dark matter abundance is fully explained by the neutralino LSP, the fine-tuning can still be as low as ˜ 20 in the presence of additional non-holomorphic soft-terms. We also discuss future prospects of these models and find that the MSSM will remain natural even in the case of a non-discovery in the foreseeable future.

  5. Process for recovering fine coal particles from slurry of finely divided coal

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Ogino, E.; Yoshii, N.

    1982-08-24

    Fine coal particles are recovered from a slurry of finely divided coal by mixing coarsely divided coal and a binder together to cause the binder to adhere to the surfaces of the coarsely divided coal pieces, mixing the slurry with the coal pieces having the binder adhered thereto to cause fine coal particles to adhere to the binder over the surfaces of the coal pieces serving as nuclei and thereby form agglomerates, and separating the agglomerates from the remaining slurry portion to recover the fine coal particles along with the coarsely divided coal and the binder.

  6. A Global Perspective of Fine Particulate Matter Pollution and Its Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arideep; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2017-03-31

    Fine particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air is implicated in a variety of human health issues throughout the globe. Regulation of fine PM in the atmosphere requires information on the dimension of the problem with respect to variations in concentrations and sources. To understand the current status of fine particles in the atmosphere and their potential harmful health effects in different regions of the world this review article was prepared based on peer-reviewed scientific papers, scientific reports, and database from government organizations published after the year 2000 to evaluate the global scenario of the PM2.5 (particles <2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter), its exceedance of national and international standards, sources, mechanism of toxicity, and harmful health effects of PM2.5 and its components. PM2.5 levels and exceedances of national and international standards were several times higher in Asian countries, while levels in Europe and USA were mostly well below the respective standards. Vehicular traffic has a significant influence on PM2.5 levels in urban areas; followed by combustion activities (biomass, industrial, and waste burning) and road dust. In urban atmosphere, fine particles are mostly associated with different health effects with old aged people, pregnant women, and more so children being the most susceptible ones. Fine PM chemical constituents severely effect health due to their carcinogenic or mutagenic nature. Most of the research indicated an exceedance of fine PM level of the standards with a diverse array of health effects based on PM2.5 chemical constituents. Emission reduction policies with epidemiological studies are needed to understand the benefits of sustainable control measures for fine PM mitigation.

  7. Water transfer between rock fragments and fine earth in remoulded soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetegan, Marion; Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Bouthier, Alain; Cousin, Isabelle

    2010-05-01

    Stony soils cover about 30% of the surface soils of Western Europe, and 60% in Mediterranean areas. Rock fragments may alter the physical, chemical and agricultural properties of soils. They are also a potential reservoir of water and nutrients for plants, suggesting that the stony phase of soil can participate in water supply to crops and affect the storage capacity of soil water. This implies the existence of water transfer between rock fragments and fine earth. To better understand the interaction between the fine earth and rock fragments, we studied the water transfer between pebbles and fine earth on remoulded soils in presence and absence of plants. Experiments were conducted on remoulded soils in containers (3 L), under controlled conditions. Pebbles and fine earth were collected separately from the Ap horizon of a calcareous lacustrine limestone silty soil located in the central region of France. Pebbles were mixed with fine earth to reach a bulk density of the fine earth of 1.1 g/cm3. Four modalities with different percentage in volume of pebbles were created: 0%p: 0 % pebbles + 100 % fine earth + plant 20%p: 20 % pebbles + 80% fine earth + plant 40%p: 40 % pebbles + 60% fine earth + plant 40%: 40 % pebbles + 60% fine earth Fifteen containers were created for each modality and cuttings of Populus robusta were planted in the three first modalities. All containers were saturated, then irrigated by capillarity and controlled to maintain a moderate water stress continuously. After three months, the containers were saturated again and then allowed to dry. At that time, plants were from 27 to 43 cm height depending on the modality. Soil samples were collected at 5 dates following this second saturation: D0 = soil water content equal to the Available Water Content, Day 2 = D0 + 2 days, Day 4 = D0 + 4 days, Day 7 = D0 + 7 days, Day 11= D0 + 11 days. At each sampling date, three containers for each modality were used to measure the gravimetric water content

  8. Chemical Analysis: An Indispensable Means for Uncovering Severe Cases of Fraud with Cosmetics and Tattoo Inks.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Christopher; Hauri, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Three cases of fraud with commodities containing illegal stealth compounds are presented, which were uncovered by the State Laboratory Basel-City, Switzerland. All three commodities, grapefruit seed extracts, a phytocosmetical skin cream, and tattoo inks, were produced abroad, had forged declarations of ingredients and, in the case of the extracts and the cream, were marketed with far-reaching health claims. While inspections will identify suspicious products and would be able to eliminate health claims to some extent, only chemical analysis can uncover the illegal agents used and give law enforcement bodies the necessary evidence to immediately clamp down on those brands, where the stealth agent presents a serious health hazard to consumers.

  9. Effects of basaltic mineral fines on composting.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Lawrence J

    2004-01-01

    A by-product of the construction aggregate industry is fines or dust that contain trace elements such as zinc and copper and significant amounts of iron, aluminum, silica and potassium. Beneficial uses for these materials have been proposed such as replenishing depleted soils and amendment in mixtures of organic byproducts prior to composting. To evaluate the beneficial uses in composting, outdoor bin studies were conducted using a beef cattle manure, straw and wood chip mixture amended with and without basaltic mineral fines. Temperature differences in composting mixtures of equal volumes, equal moisture and relatively equal material content are considered an indication of differing biological activities [Haug, Compost Engineering Principles and Practice. Ann Arbor Science, Ann Arbor, MI. (1980)]. Temperatures were lower in the mineral fine-treated manure mixture initially. After turning the piles at six weeks, temperatures tended to be higher in the mineral fine amended mixture. Overall, temperatures were not significantly different suggesting that mineral fines amendment does not significantly increase temperature and activity in composting mixtures.

  10. Charge neutrality of fine particle (dusty) plasmas and fine particle cloud under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totsuji, Hiroo

    2017-03-01

    The enhancement of the charge neutrality due to the existence of fine particles is shown to occur generally under microgravity and in one-dimensional structures under gravity. As an application of the latter, the size and position of fine particle clouds relative to surrounding plasmas are determined under gravity.

  11. Analysis of vegetable seedlings grown in contact with Apollo 14 lunar surface fines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkinshaw, C. H.; Johnson, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of plant seedlings treated with lunar material, grown for 14 to 21 days, and then subjected to chemical analyses and other measurements. The purpose of the study was to determine whether plants growing in contact with lunar-surface fines contained a different elemental composition compared with untreated seedlings. The results indicate a direct interaction between germfree plants and lunar material. Treated plants dissolved and absorbed significant quantities of Al, Fe, and Ti from the lunar fines. Cabbage and Brussel sprouts were particularly efficient in the dissolution and absorption of Mn.

  12. Chemical Peel

    MedlinePlus

    ... be done at different depths — light, medium or deep — depending on your desired results. Each type of ... chemical peel after 12 months to maintain results. Deep chemical peel. A deep chemical peel removes skin ...

  13. Sources and geographical origins of fine aerosols in Paris (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressi, M.; Sciare, J.; Ghersi, V.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Petit, J.-E.; Nicolas, J. B.; Moukhtar, S.; Rosso, A.; Féron, A.; Bonnaire, N.; Poulakis, E.; Theodosi, C.

    2014-08-01

    The present study aims at identifying and apportioning fine aerosols to their major sources in Paris (France) - the second most populated "larger urban zone" in Europe - and determining their geographical origins. It is based on the daily chemical composition of PM2.5 examined over 1 year at an urban background site of Paris (Bressi et al., 2013). Positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF3.0) was used to identify and apportion fine aerosols to their sources; bootstrapping was performed to determine the adequate number of PMF factors, and statistics (root mean square error, coefficient of determination, etc.) were examined to better model PM2.5 mass and chemical components. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) and conditional probability function (CPF) allowed the geographical origins of the sources to be assessed; special attention was paid to implement suitable weighting functions. Seven factors, namely ammonium sulfate (A.S.)-rich factor, ammonium nitrate (A.N.)-rich factor, heavy oil combustion, road traffic, biomass burning, marine aerosols and metal industry, were identified; a detailed discussion of their chemical characteristics is reported. They contribute 27, 24, 17, 14, 12, 6 and 1% of PM2.5 mass (14.7 μg m-3) respectively on the annual average; their seasonal variability is discussed. The A.S.- and A.N.-rich factors have undergone mid- or long-range transport from continental Europe; heavy oil combustion mainly stems from northern France and the English Channel, whereas road traffic and biomass burning are primarily locally emitted. Therefore, on average more than half of PM2.5 mass measured in the city of Paris is due to mid- or long-range transport of secondary aerosols stemming from continental Europe, whereas local sources only contribute a quarter of the annual averaged mass. These results imply that fine-aerosol abatement policies conducted at the local scale may not be sufficient to notably reduce PM2.5 levels at urban background sites in

  14. 76 FR 31307 - Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting The next meeting of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts is scheduled... oral statements should be addressed to Thomas Luebke, Secretary, U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, at...

  15. Fine-Water-Mist Multiple-Orientation-Discharge Fire Extinguisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butz, James R.; Turchi, Craig S.; Kimball, Amanda; McKinnon, Thomas; Riedel, Edward

    2010-01-01

    A fine-water-mist fire-suppression device has been designed so that it can be discharged uniformly in any orientation via a high-pressure gas propellant. Standard fire extinguishers used while slightly tilted or on their side will not discharge all of their contents. Thanks to the new design, this extinguisher can be used in multiple environments such as aboard low-gravity spacecraft, airplanes, and aboard vehicles that may become overturned prior to or during a fire emergency. Research in recent years has shown that fine water mist can be an effective alternative to Halons now banned from manufacture. Currently, NASA uses carbon dioxide for fire suppression on the International Space Station (ISS) and Halon chemical extinguishers on the space shuttle. While each of these agents is effective, they have drawbacks. The toxicity of carbon dioxide requires that the crew don breathing apparatus when the extinguishers are deployed on the ISS, and Halon use in future spacecraft has been eliminated because of international protocols on substances that destroy atmospheric ozone. A major advantage to the new system on occupied spacecraft is that the discharged system is locally rechargeable. Since the only fluids used are water and nitrogen, the system can be recharged from stores of both carried aboard the ISS or spacecraft. The only support requirement would be a pump to fill the water and a compressor to pressurize the nitrogen propellant gas. This system uses a gaseous agent to pressurize the storage container as well as to assist in the generation of the fine water mist. The portable fire extinguisher hardware works like a standard fire extinguisher with a single storage container for the agents (water and nitrogen), a control valve assembly for manual actuation, and a discharge nozzle. The design implemented in the proof-of-concept experiment successfully extinguished both open fires and fires in baffled enclosures.

  16. Method for preparation of fine TATB (2-5 microm) and its evaluation in plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations.

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Agarwal, A P; Anniyappan, M; Gore, G M; Asthana, S N; Venugopalan, S

    2006-10-11

    There is a need of fine 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) (2-5 microm) for various high explosive formulations to achieve desired mechanical strength, ease in processing and finally, provide better performance of end product. The reprecipitation method for TATB has been developed using concentrated sulfuric acid as a solvent. The reprecipitation parameters of TATB were optimized to achieve required fine TATB of particle size approximately 2-5 microm. The characteristic properties of fine TATB thus obtained have been confirmed by FTIR, DSC and TG-FTIR. The spectroscopic and thermal data obtained for fine TATB were compared with standard coarse TATB and found chemically unchanged during particle size reduction. In the present study, the preparation of fine TATB was also attempted using ultrasonication method. The fine (2-5 microm) TATB has been introduced to study in the bimodal high explosive formulations. High explosive formulations based on coarse (55 microm) and fine TATB ( approximately 2-5 microm) with 10% polyurethane were studied. It was observed that properties like bulk density (1.70 g/cm(3)), mechanical strength/compressed strength (115.9 mg/cm(2)), %elongation (6.36) were improved for fine TATB in comparison with coarse TATB ( approximately 55 microm) alone in high explosive formulations.

  17. A fine resolution multifrequency polarimetric FM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bredow, J.; Gogineni, S.; Leung, T.; Moore, R. K.

    1988-01-01

    A fine resolution polarimetric FM SAR was developed for optimization of polarimetric SARs and interpretation of SAR data via controlled experiments with surface-base sensors. The system is designed for collecting polarimetric data at 5.3 and 10 GHz over incidence angles from 0 to 60 deg. Features of the system include broad bandwidth to obtain fine range resolution, phase stabilization and linearization loop circuitry, and digital signal processing capability. The system is used in a research program to collect polarimetric backscatter data from artificial sea ice research and design trade-offs, laboratory and field evaluation, as well as results from experiments on artificial sea ice are presented.

  18. Fine resolution chronology based on initial Sr-87/Sr-86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, B. W.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Capo, R. C.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    It has been recognized that small variations in initial Sr-87/Sr-86 (Sr(sub I)), can provide a fine scale relative chronology for the chemical fractionation of materials with low Rb/Sr from parent reservoirs with high Rb/Sr. Similarly, Sr(sub I), as determined for low Rb/Sr phases in meteorites, may permit a fine resolution chronology of the recrystallization or metamorphism of planetary materials. For the establishment of a primitive Sr-87/Sr-86 chronology, it is important to search for samples with extremely low Rb/Sr for which the measured Sr-87/Sr-86 is below BABI, in which case the primitive nature of the Sr can be directly established. Using the measured Rb/Sr to calculate an initial Sr-87/Sr-86 can introduce substantial uncertainty if the Rb-Sr are disturbed. We report Sr-87/Sr-86 in plagioclase from silicate pebbles from the Vaca Muerta mesosiderite on which we have reported Sm-147-Nd-143 and Ne-142 correlations. For the purpose of cross-calibration with our previous work we have performed extensive new measurements on Angra dos Reis and on anorthite from Moore County, which have very low Rb/Sr and primitive Sr-87/Sr-86.

  19. Effective flocculation of fine mineral suspensions using Moringa oleifera seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using Moringa oleifera seeds, or the active components of the seeds, in the clarification of waters containing suspended mineral fines. In comparative testing using a hematite suspension, the flocculating activity of Moringa oleifera seeds was better than alum. Twenty milligrams of seed powder was sufficient to clarify the hematite to near zero turbidity, while the same amount of alum had a minimal effect on turbidity. Extracts were prepared from the seeds in an attempt to separate the proteins. A crude protein extract was enriched by lowering the pH to 6.0. Only 0.08 mg/L of the enriched extract was required to flocculate a minusil suspension. Environmentally friendly protein flocculants could theoretically be produced and enhanced with recombinant DNA techniques as an alternative to chemical flocculants currently used in water treatment.

  20. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of bimetallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Electronic and magnetic properties strongly depend on the structure of the material, especially on the crystal symmetry and chemical environment. In nanoparticles, the break of symmetry at the surface may yield different physical properties with respect to the corresponding bulk material. A useful tool to investigate the electronic structure, magnetic behaviour and local crystallographic structure is X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this review, recent developments in the field of extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements and in the analysis methods for structural investigations of bimetallic nanoparticles are highlighted. The standard analysis based on Fourier transforms is compared to the relatively new field of wavelet transforms that have the potential to outperform traditional analysis, especially in bimetallic alloys. As an example, the lattice expansion and inhomogeneous alloying found in FePt nanoparticles is presented, and this is discussed below in terms of the influence of employed density functional theory calculations on the magnetic properties. PMID:21977436

  1. The influence of clay fineness upon sludge recycling in a ceramic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőke, A. M.; Muntean, M.; Sándor, M.; Brotea, L.

    2016-04-01

    The feasibility of sludge recycling in the ceramic manufacture was evaluated through laboratory testing. Such residues have similar chemical and mineralogical composition with the raw mixture of the green ceramic body used in construction. Several ceramic masses with clay and various proportion of sludge have been synthesized and then characterized by their physical-mechanical properties. The fineness of the clay, the main component of the green ceramic body, has been considered for every raw mixture. The proportion of the sludge waste addition depends on the clay fineness and the sintering capacity also, increases with the clay fineness. The ceramic properties, particularly, the open porosity, and mechanical properties, in presence of small sludge proportion (7, 20%) shows small modification. The introduction of such waste into building ceramic matrix (bricks, tiles, and plates) has a very good perspective.

  2. The chemical peel.

    PubMed

    Peters, W

    1991-06-01

    Chemical peeling of facial skin has become a valuable adjunct in the armamentarium of the facial aesthetic surgeon. Among the various techniques available, phenol solutions are the most commonly used. Peeling produces a controlled, partial-thickness chemical burn of the epidermis and the outer dermis. Several techniques are available to "fine tune" the depth of the peel. Regeneration of peeled skin results in a fresh, orderly, organized epidermis. In the dermis, a new 2- to 3-mm band of dense, compact, orderly collagen is formed between the epidermis and the underlying damaged dermis, which results in effective ablation of the fine wrinkles in the skin and a reduction of pigmentation. These clinical and histological changes are long lasting (15-20 years) and may be permanent in some patients. Because of the metabolism and systemic complications of phenol, patient selection should involve systemic evaluation of liver, renal, and cardiac function, as well as an evaluation of the skin quality and medication status of the patient. Because of potential cardiac arrhythmias, peeling must be performed in a medically supervised environment, with continuous cardiac monitoring. The local complications of peeling include pigmentation changes, scarring, milia, ectropion, infection, activation of herpes simplex, and toxic shock syndrome.

  3. System for utilizing oil shale fines

    DOEpatents

    Harak, Arnold E.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

  4. Fine-Grained Auditory Discrimination: Factor Structures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Lois L.; Hammer, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    This study, with 161 children with and without language learning problems, tested the hypothesis that as children's language development matures, factor-analytic structural changes occur that are associated with measurements of fine-grained auditory discrimination, receptive vocabulary, receptive language, speech production, and 3 performance…

  5. 34 CFR 668.84 - Fine proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to $27,500 1 per violation on a participating institution or third-party servicer that— 1 As adjusted... program, its financial charges, or the employability of its graduates; or (B) In the case of a third-party... against a third-party servicer, the Secretary also may begin a fine, limitation, suspension,...

  6. SPATIAL PREDICTION OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new national monitoring network for the measurement of fine particular matter (PM2.5) is currently under development. A primary goal of this network is to collect monitoring data in residential communities for the evaluation of compliance with particulate air quality standards...

  7. Understanding the Fine Tuning in Our Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bernard L.

    2008-01-01

    It is often stated that the physical properties of our universe are "fine tuned"--that is, they must be almost exactly as they are to make the development of intelligent life possible. The implications of this statement, called the "anthropic principle," have been widely discussed in a philosophical context, but the scientific basis for the…

  8. FINE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS FROM CANDLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives reulst of testing five types of candles, purchased from local stores, for fine particulate matter (PM) emissions under close-to-realistic conditions in a research house. The test method allows for determination of both the emission and deposition rates. Most tes...

  9. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF DIPLOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    PubMed Central

    Tomasz, Alexander; Jamieson, James D.; Ottolenghi, Elena

    1964-01-01

    The fine structure of an unencapsulated strain of Diplococcus pneumoniae is described. A striking feature of these bacteria is an intracytoplasmic membrane system which appears to be an extension of septa of dividing bacteria. The possible function of these structures and their relationship to the plasma membrane and other types of intracytoplasmic membranes found in pneumococcus is discussed. PMID:14203390

  10. Krypton and xenon in lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basford, J. R.; Dragon, J. C.; Pepin, R. O.; Coscio, M. R., Jr.; Murthy, V. R.

    1973-01-01

    Data from grain-size separates, stepwise-heated fractions, and bulk analyses of 20 samples of fines and breccias from five lunar sites are used to define three-isotope and ordinate intercept correlations in an attempt to resolve the lunar heavy rare gas system in a statistically valid approach. Tables of concentrations and isotope compositions are given.

  11. Deposition of fine sediment in turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capapé, Sergi; Martín-Vide, Juan Pedro; Colombo, Ferran

    2015-04-01

    Sediment transport is the responsible for reshaping the stream bed. There are multiple studies on the bedform formation, but data is scarce when the bed originates from a sediment-laden flow and the sediment is in the very fine range. The aim of this work is to evaluate the suspended sediment concentration at which deposition starts to occur. Specifically, non-cohesive fine sediment made of silica particles (D50 = 0.004 mm, σg = 2.45) is used to assess the transport of sediment in the wash-load size range. The second objective arises as a consequence of studying the first one: to analyse the relation between the flow properties and a developed bed composed of very fine sediment. The experiments are performed in a 15 m-long 0.37 m-wide flume (SIMGEO UB-CSIC, Faculty of Geology, University of Barcelona). Water and sediment are recirculated. The clean smooth metal surface of the flume is set to be the initial condition in each run. Hydraulic conditions in the flume are quasi-uniform. Flow parameters are controlled by the use of an ADV Vectrino, a current meter, a thermometer and siphons to collect samples of the suspension. Preliminary results show that very fine sediment transported in suspension settles on the bed as function of the elapsed time and the suspended sediment concentration. Bedform development may show the typical stages unless for the first partial-covered bed stage in which solitary lunate ripples migrate downstream.

  12. Facilities Guidelines for Fine Arts Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This manual of facility guidelines examines the planning process and design features and considerations for public school fine arts programs in Maryland. Planning concepts and trends are highlighted followed by planning guidelines for dance, music, theater, visual arts, general education, and performance spaces. General design considerations…

  13. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE RAT CEREBELLUM

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    This paper describes the fine structure of the granule cells, stellate neurons, astrocytes, Bergmann glia, oligodendrocytes, and microglia of the rat cerebellum after fixation by perfusion with buffered 1 per cent osmium tetroxide. Criteria are given for differentiating the various cell types, and the findings are correlated with previous light microscope and electron microscope studies of the cerebellum. PMID:14222815

  14. BIOREMEDIATION OF OIL-CONTAMINATED FINE SEDIMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of oil contamination has been shown to be effective for cobble and sandy shorelines. To assess the operational limitations of this technology, this project studied its potential to treat buried oil in fine sediments. The effectiveness of bioremediation by nutrient ...

  15. Transition metals in coarse, fine, very fine and ultra-fine particles from an interstate highway transect near Detroit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Thomas A.; Barnes, David E.; Lawton, Jonathan A.; Miller, Roger; Spada, Nicholas; Willis, Robert D.; Kimbrough, Sue

    2016-11-01

    As one component of a study investigating the impact of vehicle emissions on near-road air quality, human exposures, and potential health effects, particles were measured from September 21 to October 30, 2010 on both sides of a major roadway (Interstate-96) in Detroit. Traffic moved freely on this 12 lane freeway with a mean velocity of 69 mi/hr. with little braking and acceleration. The UC Davis DELTA Group rotating drum (DRUM) impactors were used to collect particles in 8 size ranges at sites nominally 100 m south, 10 m north, 100 m north, and 300 m north of the highway. Ultra-fine particles were continuously collected at the 10 m north and 100 m north sites. Samples were analyzed every 3 h for mass (soft beta ray transmission), 42 elements (synchrotron-induced x-ray fluorescence) and optical attenuation (350-800 nm spectroscopy). A three day period of steady southerly winds along the array allowed direct measurement of freeway emission rates for coarse (10 > Dp > 1.0 μm), PM2.5, very fine (0.26 > Dp > 0.09 μm), and ultra-fine (Dp < 0.09 μm) particles. The PM2.5 mass concentrations were modeled using literature emission rates during the south to north wind periods, and averaged 1.6 ± 0.5 μg/m3, versus the measured value of 2.0 ± 0.7 μg/m3. Using European freeway emission rates from 2010, and modeling them at the I-96 site, we would predict roughly 3.1 μg/m3 of PM2.5 particles, corrected from the 4.9 PM10 value by their measured road dust contributions. Using California car and truck emission rates of 1973, this value would have been about 16 μg/m3, corrected down from the 19 μg/m3 PM5.0 using measured roadway dust contributions. This would have included 2.7 μg/m3 of lead, versus the 0.0033 μg/m3 measured. Very fine particles were distributed across the array with a relatively weak falloff versus distance. For the ultra-fine particles, emissions of soot and metals seen in vehicular braking studies correlated with traffic at the 10 m site, but only the

  16. Matrix and fine-grained rims in the unequilibrated CO3 chondrite, ALHA77307 - Origins and evidence for diverse, primitive nebular dust components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brearley, A. J.

    1993-04-01

    SEM, TEM, and electron microprobe analysis were used to investigate in detail the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of dark matrix and fine-grained rims in the unequilibrated CO3 chondrite ALHA77307. Data obtained revealed that there was a remarkable diversity of distinct mineralogical components, which can be identified using their chemical and textural characteristics. The matrix and rim components in ALHA77307 formed by disequilibrium condensation process as fine-grained amorphous dust that is represented by the abundant amorphous component in the matrix. Subsequent thermal processing of this condensate material, in a variety of environments in the nebula, caused partial or complete recrystallization of the fine-grained dust.

  17. Mineralogy of fine-grained material in the Krymka (LL3.1) chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, V. P.; Bischoff, A.; Weber, I.; Perron, C.; Girich, A. L.

    2001-08-01

    Two dark lithic fragments and matrix of the Krymka LL3.1 chondrite were mineralogically and chemically studied in detail. These objects are characterised by the following chemical and mineralogical characteristics, which distinguish them from the host chondrite Krymka: (1) bulk chemical analyses revealed low totals (systematically lower than 94 wt%) due to high porosity; (2) enrichment in FeO and depletion in S, MgO and SiO2 due to a high abundance of Fe-rich silicates and low sulfide abundance; (3) fine-grained, almost chondrule-free texture with predominance of a porous, cryptocrystalline groundmass and fine grains; (4) occurrence of a small amount of once-molten material (microchondrules) enclosed in fine-grained materials; (5) occurrence of accretionary features, especially unique accretionary spherules; (6) high abundance of small calcium- aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs) in one of the fine-grained fragments. It is suggested that the abundance of CAIs in this fragment is one of the highest ever found in an ordinary chondrite. Accretionary, fine-grained spherules within one of the fragments bear fundamental information about the initial stages of accretion as well as on the evolution of the clast, its incorporation, and history within the bulk rock of Krymka. The differences in porosity, bulk composition, and mineralogy of cores and rims of the fine-grained spherulitic objects allow us to speculate on the following processes: (1) Low velocity accretion of tiny silicate grains onto the surface of coarse metal or silicate grains in a dusty region of the nebula is the beginning of the formation of accretionary, porous (fluffy) silicate spherules. (2) Within a dusty environment with decreasing silicate/(metal + sulfide) ratio the porous spherules collected abundant metal and sulfide particles together with silicate dust, which formed an accretionary rim. Variations of the silicate/(sulfide + metal) ratio in the dusty nebular environment result in the formation of

  18. Hydrocyclone separation of coal refuse fines

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, H.B.

    1983-12-01

    The following conclusions are drawn from the research reported herein: (1) The experimental hydrocyclone apparatus, designed to allow control of the vortex finder length, overflow diameter, underflow diameter, cone angle, and inlet flow rate, is a suitable system for determining the effect of each variable stated on the washing of coal refuse fines. (2) Color-coded spheres of different diameters and specific gravities correlate well as a model of coal refuse fines in the range of 0.0937 inches and larger, insofar as their size and density responding to hydrocyclone separation. (3) Data taken on two experimental systems, using coal refuse fines samples from a gob pile, verify the dimensional analysis by their good correlation. The data collected can be assumed as a guide to geometrically similar hydrocyclones of different sizes. (4) The concentration of solids used during this work was not investigated but is considered a variable of importance in application. (5) Using the experimental hydrocyclone system and spheres along with the concepts of dimensional analysis and similitude, design curves can be generated showing the effect of each parameter on specific gravity separation. (6) Based on the guidance of the design curves, and confirmed by experimentation, a hydrocyclone configuration is recommended for separation of coal refuse fines. (7) Small changes in the vortex finder length causes significant changes in the specific gravity of solids reporting to the overflow. (8) Gob should be pre-screened to remove clay. At that time the undersize material should be sent to a settling pond to be handled as settling pond fines if handled any more at all. 22 references, 44 figures, 16 tables.

  19. Characterisation of excavated fine fraction and waste composition from a Swedish landfill.

    PubMed

    Jani, Yahya; Kaczala, Fabio; Marchand, Charlotte; Hogland, Marika; Kriipsalu, Mait; Hogland, William; Kihl, Anders

    2016-12-01

    The present research studies the characterisation and the physico-chemical properties of an excavated fine fraction (<10 mm) from a Swedish landfill, the Högbytorp. The results showed that the fine fraction represents 38% by mass of the total excavated wastes and it contains mainly soil-type materials and minerals. Higher concentrations of zinc, copper, barium and chromium were found with concentrations higher than the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for contaminated soil. The found moisture and organic contents of the fine fraction were 23.5% and 16.6%, respectively. The analysed calorific value (1.7 MJ kg(-1)), the potential of CH4 (4.74 m(3) t(-1) dry matter) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) (5.6%) were low and offer low potential of energy. Sieving the fine fraction further showed that 80% was smaller than 2 mm. The fine represents a major fraction at any landfill (40%-70%), therefore, characterising the properties of this fraction is essential to find the potential of reusing/recycling or safely redisposing.

  20. POC-SCALE TESTING OF OIL AGGLOMERATION TECHNIQUES AND EQUIPMENT FOR FINE COAL PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the technical progress achieved from October 1, 1997 to December 31, 1997 on the POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing project. Experimental test procedures and the results related to the processing of coal fines originating from process streams generated at the Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant, owned and operated by the Drummond Company Inc. of Alabama, are described. Two samples of coal fines, namely Cyclone Overflow and Pond Fines were investigated. The batch test results showed that by applying the Aglofloat technology a significant ash removal might be achieved at a very high combustible matter recovery: · for the Cyclone Overflow sample the ash reduction was in the range 50 to 55% at combustible matter recovery about 98% · for the Pond Fines sample the ash reduction was up to 48% at combustible matter recovery up to 85%. Additional tests were carried out with the Alberta origin Luscar Mine coal, which will be used for the parametric studies of agglomeration equipment at the 250 kg/h pilot plant. The Luscar coal is very similar to the Mary Lee Coal Group (processed at Shoal Creek Mine preparation plant) in terms of rank and chemical composition.

  1. Customizing digital printing for fine art practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna E.; Thirkell, Paul; Hoskins, Steve; Wang, Hong Qiang; Laidler, Paul

    2004-12-01

    The presentation will demonstrate how through alternative methods of digital print production the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) is developing methodologies for digital printing that attempt to move beyond standard reproductive print methods. Profiling is used for input and output hardware, along with bespoke profiling for fine art printmaking papers. Examples of artist's work, and examples from the Perpetual Portfolio are included - an artist in residence scheme for selected artists wanting to work at the Centre and to make a large-format digital print. Colour is an important issue: colour fidelity, colour density on paper, colour that can be achieved through multiple-pass printing. Research is also underway to test colour shortfalls in the current inkjet ink range, and to extend colour through the use of traditional printing inks.

  2. Customizing digital printing for fine art practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraman, Carinna E.; Thirkell, Paul; Hoskins, Steve; Wang, Hong Qiang; Laidler, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The presentation will demonstrate how through alternative methods of digital print production the Centre for Fine Print Research (CFPR) is developing methodologies for digital printing that attempt to move beyond standard reproductive print methods. Profiling is used for input and output hardware, along with bespoke profiling for fine art printmaking papers. Examples of artist's work, and examples from the Perpetual Portfolio are included - an artist in residence scheme for selected artists wanting to work at the Centre and to make a large-format digital print. Colour is an important issue: colour fidelity, colour density on paper, colour that can be achieved through multiple-pass printing. Research is also underway to test colour shortfalls in the current inkjet ink range, and to extend colour through the use of traditional printing inks.

  3. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  4. Synthesis of fine-grained TATB

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Kien-Yin; Kennedy, James E.

    2003-04-15

    A method for producing fine-grained triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) powders having improved detonation-spreading performance and hence increased shock sensitivity when compared with that for ultrafine TATB is described. A single-step, sonochemical amination of trichloro-trinitrobenzene using ammonium hydroxide solution in a sealed vessel yields TATB having approximately 6 .mu.m median particle diameter and increased shock sensitivity.

  5. Resistive Fine Tuning of Resonant Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Simple fixed-inductance/fixed-capacitance tank circuit modified for fine adjustment of resonant frequency by addition of small inductance with potentiometer across it. Additional winding built into full winding as integral part or added externally. Technique provides quick way of tuning reactance out of power-transformer circuit to maximize power transfer or to adjust frequency of oscillator. Applications include rotary transformers, servo amplifiers, and analog computer modules.

  6. Alternate Methods for Disposal of Nitrocellulose Fines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-22

    edition$ are obsolete. UNLSSFE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIPICATION OP THIS PAGE recycled; and, being ubituitous in nature , are not considered...Matrix xomparison of technologies ................. 22 3.4 Ranking and seleccion of technologies ............. 26 4. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 4.1...ubiquitous in nature , are not considered pollutants anyway. There are several "ready technologies" that appear to be capable of removing NC fines more

  7. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures.

  8. Corrosion of surface defects in fine wires.

    PubMed

    Rentler, R M; Greene, N D

    1975-11-01

    Defects were observed on the surfaces of various fine diameter wires commonly used in biomedical applications. These surface irregularities were viewed at high magnifications using a scanning electron microscope which has a much greater depth of field than normal light microscopy. Defects include scratches, pits, and crevices, which are the result of commercial wire drawing practices. Corrosion test results show that imperfections can serve as sites for localized corrosion attack which could lead to premature failures.

  9. Proton-beam technique dates fine wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2008-10-01

    Nuclear physicists in France have invented a way to authenticate the vintage of rare wine without needing a sommelier's keen nose or even a corkscrew. The technique, which involves firing high-energy protons at wine bottles, can determine how old the bottles are and even where they come from. The new method could help unmask counterfeit wines - a growing problem in the fine-wine industry, where a bottle can sell for thousands of Euros.

  10. Process for treating moisture laden coal fines

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Burl E.; Henry, Raymond M.; Trivett, Gordon S.; Albaugh, Edgar W.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

  11. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE PURKINJE CELL

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, Robert M.

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes the fine structure of the Purkinje cell of the rat cerebellum after fixation by perfusion with 1 per cent buffered osmium tetroxide. Structures described include a large Golgi apparatus, abundant Nissl substance, mitochondria, multivesicular bodies, osmiophilic granules, axodendritic and axosomatic synapses, the nucleus, the nucleolus, and the nucleolar body. A new and possibly unique relationship between mitochondria and subsurface cisterns is described. Possible functional correlations are discussed. PMID:13953993

  12. Fine granularity adaptive multireceiver video streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eide, Viktor S. Wold; Eliassen, Frank; Michaelsen, Jørgen Andreas; Jensen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Effcient delivery of video data over computer networks has been studied extensively for decades. Still, multi-receiver video delivery is challenging, due to heterogeneity and variability in network availability, end node capabilities, and receiver preferences. Our earlier work has shown that content-based networking is a viable technology for fine granularity multireceiver video streaming. By exploiting this technology, we have demonstrated that each video receiver is provided with fine grained and independent selectivity along the different video quality dimensions region of interest, signal to noise ratio for the luminance and the chrominance planes, and temporal resolution. Here we propose a novel adaptation scheme combining such video streaming with state-of-the-art techniques from the field of adaptation to provide receiver-driven multi-dimensional adaptive video streaming. The scheme allows each client to individually adapt the quality of the received video according to its currently available resources and own preferences. The proposed adaptation scheme is validated experimentally. The results demonstrate adaptation to variations in available bandwidth and CPU resources roughly over two orders of magnitude and that fine grained adaptation is feasible given radically different user preferences.

  13. Computer games and fine motor skills.

    PubMed

    Borecki, Lukasz; Tolstych, Katarzyna; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2013-01-01

    The study seeks to determine the influence of computer games on fine motor skills in young adults, an area of incomplete understanding and verification. We hypothesized that computer gaming could have a positive influence on basic motor skills, such as precision, aiming, speed, dexterity, or tremor. We examined 30 habitual game users (F/M - 3/27; age range 20-25 years) of the highly interactive game Counter Strike, in which players impersonate soldiers on a battlefield, and 30 age- and gender-matched subjects who declared never to play games. Selected tests from the Vienna Test System were used to assess fine motor skills and tremor. The results demonstrate that the game users scored appreciably better than the control subjects in all tests employed. In particular, the players did significantly better in the precision of arm-hand movements, as expressed by a lower time of errors, 1.6 ± 0.6 vs. 2.8 ± 0.6 s, a lower error rate, 13.6 ± 0.3 vs. 20.4 ± 2.2, and a shorter total time of performing a task, 14.6 ± 2.9 vs. 32.1 ± 4.5 s in non-players, respectively; p < 0.001 all. The findings demonstrate a positive influence of computer games on psychomotor functioning. We submit that playing computer games may be a useful training tool to increase fine motor skills and movement coordination.

  14. Internal Fine Structure of Ellerman Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ishii, Takako T.; Hagino, Masaoki; Komori, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Nakamura, Tahei; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We conducted coordinated observations of Ellerman bombs (EBs) between Hinode Satellite and Hida Observatory (HOP12). CaII H broad-band filter images of NOAA 10966 on 2007 August 9 and 10 were obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode Satellite, and many bright points were observed. We identified a total of 4 bright points as EBs, and studied the temporal variation of their morphological fine structures and spectroscopic characteristics. With high-resolution CaII H images of SOT, we found that the EBs, thus far thought of as single bright features, are composed of a few of fine subcomponents. Also, by using Stokes I/V filtergrams with Hinode/SOT, and CaII H spectroheliograms with Hida/Domeless Solar Telescope (DST), our observation showed: (1) The mean duration, the mean width, the mean length, and the mean aspect ratio of the subcomponents were 390 s, 170 km, 450 km, and 2.7, respectively. (2) Subcomponents started to appear on the magnetic neutral lines, and extended their lengths from the original locations. (3) When the CaII H line of EBs showed the characteristic blue asymmetry, they are associated with the appearance or re-brightening of subcomponents. Summarizing our results, we obtained an observational view that elementary magnetic reconnections take place one by one successively and intermittently in EBs, and that their manifestation is the fine subcomponents of the EB phenomena.

  15. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  16. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  17. Annular gel reactor for chemical pattern formation

    DOEpatents

    Nosticzius, Zoltan; Horsthemke, Werner; McCormick, William D.; Swinney, Harry L.; Tam, Wing Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an annular gel reactor suitable for the production and observation of spatiotemporal patterns created during a chemical reaction. The apparatus comprises a vessel having at least a first and second chamber separated one from the other by an annular polymer gel layer (or other fine porous medium) which is inert to the materials to be reacted but capable of allowing diffusion of the chemicals into it.

  18. Evaporation of nebular fines during chondrule formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.

    2008-06-01

    Studies of matrix in primitive chondrites provide our only detailed information about the fine fraction (diameter <2 μm) of solids in the solar nebula. A minor fraction of the fines, the presolar grains, offers information about the kinds of materials present in the molecular cloud that spawned the Solar System. Although some researchers have argued that chondritic matrix is relatively unaltered presolar matter, meteoritic chondrules bear witness to multiple high-temperature events each of which would have evaporated those fines that were inside the high-temperature fluid. Because heat is mainly transferred into the interior of chondrules by conduction, the surface temperatures of chondrules were probably at or above 2000 K. In contrast, the evaporation of mafic silicates in a canonical solar nebula occurs at around 1300 K and FeO-rich, amorphous, fine matrix evaporates at still lower temperatures, perhaps near 1200 K. Thus, during chondrule formation, the temperature of the placental bath was probably >700 K higher than the evaporation temperatures of nebular fines. The scale of chondrule forming events is not known. The currently popular shock models have typical scales of about 10 km. The scale of nebular lightning is less well defined, but is certainly much smaller, perhaps in the range 1 to 1000 m. In both cases the temperature pulses were long enough to evaporate submicrometer nebular fines. This interpretation disagrees with common views that meteoritic matrix is largely presolar in character and CI-chondrite-like in composition. It is inevitable that presolar grains (both those recognized by their anomalous isotopic compositions and those having solar-like compositions) that were within the hot fluid would also have evaporated. Chondrule formation appears to have continued down to the temperatures at which planetesimals formed, possibly around 250 K. At temperatures >600 K, the main form of C is gaseous CO. Although the conversion of CO to CH 4 at lower

  19. 16. Coke 'fines' bin at Furnace D. After delivery to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Coke 'fines' bin at Furnace D. After delivery to the trestle bins, the coke was screened and the coke 'fines' or breeze, were transported by conveyor to the coke fines bins where it was collected and leaded into dump trucks. The coke fines were then sold for fuel to a sinter plant in Lorain, Ohio. - Central Furnaces, 2650 Broadway, east bank of Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Fine root dynamics for forests on contrasting soils in the Colombian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, E. M.; Moreno, F. H.; Peñuela, M. C.; Patiño, S.; Lloyd, J.

    2009-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that as soil fertility increases, the amount of carbon allocated to below-ground production (fine roots) should decrease. To evaluate this hypothesis, we measured the standing crop fine root mass and the production of fine roots (<2 mm) by two methods: (1) ingrowth cores and, (2) sequential soil coring, during 2.2 years in two lowland forests growing on different soils types in the Colombian Amazon. Differences of soil resources were defined by the type and physical and chemical properties of soil: a forest on clay loam soil (Endostagnic Plinthosol) at the Amacayacu National Natural Park and, the other on white sand (Ortseinc Podzol) at the Zafire Biological Station, located in the Forest Reservation of the Calderón River. We found that the standing crop fine root mass and the production was significantly different between soil depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm) and also between forests. The loamy sand forest allocated more carbon to fine roots than the clay loam forest with the production in loamy sand forest twice (mean±standard error=2.98±0.36 and 3.33±0.69 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, method 1 and 2, respectively) as much as for the more fertile loamy soil forest (1.51±0.14, method 1, and from 1.03±0.31 to 1.36±0.23 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, method 2). Similarly, the average of standing crop fine root mass was higher in the white-sands forest (10.94±0.33 Mg C ha-1) as compared to the forest on the more fertile soil (from 3.04±0.15 to 3.64±0.18 Mg C ha-1). The standing crop fine root mass also showed a temporal pattern related to rainfall, with the production of fine roots decreasing substantially in the dry period of the year 2005. These results suggest that soil resources may play an important role in patterns of carbon allocation to the production of fine roots in these forests as the proportion of carbon allocated to above- and below-ground organs is different between forest types. Thus, a trade-off between above- and below-ground growth seems to exist

  1. Motivating Adolescents to Reduce Their Fines in a Token Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Subjected adolescents on 16-bed token economy ward of state hospital to 4 interventions in 7-phase experiment to reduce number of fines they received each day. No significant differences in average fines per day, number of residents meeting criteria, or mean number of zero-fine days per week were found across phases. (Author/NB)

  2. Fine sediment affects on survival to emergence of robust redhorse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, C.A.; Dilts, E.W.; Shelton, J.L.; Peterson, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Robust redhorse (Moxostoma robustum) is a rare riverine sucker for which life history information is scarce. Spawning occurs over loose gravel substrate and eggs and larvae may be adversely affected by fine sediments among the gravel. A 2-year study was conducted to determine the threshold at which fine sediments are detrimental to successful egg incubation and larval emergence. Year 1 gravel treatments contained 0, 25, 50, and 75% fine sediments. Mean survival during Year 1 ranged from 63.5% in the 0% fine sediment treatment to 0% in the 75% fine sediment treatment. The results also indicated an adverse affect threshold between 0 and 25% fine sediment. Year 2 gravel treatments contained 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% fine sediments. Mean survival during Year 2 ranged from 69.8% in the 0% treatment to 9.1% in the 25% treatment. Year 2 results also identified the 15% fine sediment treatment as the threshold at which survival began to decline. Substrates at one known spawning area used by robust redhorse typically contain 25 to 50% fine sediment, but the spawning act cleans some fines from the egg pocket. Whether the "cleaning" that results from the spawning act reduces the fines sufficiently to avoid adverse effects is unknown. According to our results, survival rates of robust redhorse eggs and larvae are predicted to be about 8.0% or less when fine sediment is >25%. ?? US Government 2009.

  3. Zebrafish Locomotor Responses Demonstrate Irritant Effects of Fine Particulate Matter Sources and a Role for TRPA1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a complex mixture of chemicals, the composition of which is determined by contributing sources, and has been linked to cardiopulmonary dysfunction. These effects stem in part from the irritating properties of PM constituents, which ...

  4. Speciation and Trends of Organic Nitrogen in Southeastern U.S. Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved free amino acids (FAA; amino acids present in a dissolvable state) and combined AA (CAA; amino acids present in peptides, proteins, or humic complexes) in fine aerosols (PM) are investigated at a semi-urban site in the southeastern US. Detection of native (chemically un...

  5. Technical Note: Fast two-dimensional GC-MS with thermal extraction for anhydro-sugars in fine aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fast two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC-MS) method that uses heart-cutting and thermal extraction (TE) and requires no chemical derivatization is developed for the determination of anhydro-sugars in fine aerosols. Evaluation of the TE-GC-GC-MS method shows high average rela...

  6. The short-term association of selected components of fine particulate matter and mortality in the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Associations of short-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with daily mortality may be due to specific PM2.5 chemical components. Objectives: Daily concentrations of PM2.5 chemical species were measured over five consecutive years in Denver, CO to investigate whethe...

  7. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  8. Dustiness of Fine and Nanoscale Powders

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Baron, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Dustiness may be defined as the propensity of a powder to form airborne dust by a prescribed mechanical stimulus; dustiness testing is typically intended to replicate mechanisms of dust generation encountered in workplaces. A novel dustiness testing device, developed for pharmaceutical application, was evaluated in the dustiness investigation of 27 fine and nanoscale powders. The device efficiently dispersed small (mg) quantities of a wide variety of fine and nanoscale powders, into a small sampling chamber. Measurements consisted of gravimetrically determined total and respirable dustiness. The following materials were studied: single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and carbon blacks; fumed oxides of titanium, aluminum, silicon, and cerium; metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, manganese, and silver) silicon carbide, Arizona road dust; nanoclays; and lithium titanate. Both the total and respirable dustiness spanned two orders of magnitude (0.3–37.9% and 0.1–31.8% of the predispersed test powders, respectively). For many powders, a significant respirable dustiness was observed. For most powders studied, the respirable dustiness accounted for approximately one-third of the total dustiness. It is believed that this relationship holds for many fine and nanoscale test powders (i.e. those primarily selected for this study), but may not hold for coarse powders. Neither total nor respirable dustiness was found to be correlated with BET surface area, therefore dustiness is not determined by primary particle size. For a subset of test powders, aerodynamic particle size distributions by number were measured (with an electrical low-pressure impactor and an aerodynamic particle sizer). Particle size modes ranged from approximately 300nm to several micrometers, but no modes below 100nm, were observed. It is therefore unlikely that these materials would exhibit a substantial sub-100nm particle contribution in a workplace. PMID:23065675

  9. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  10. Computer Models Simulate Fine Particle Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through a NASA Seed Fund partnership with DEM Solutions Inc., of Lebanon, New Hampshire, scientists at Kennedy Space Center refined existing software to study the electrostatic phenomena of granular and bulk materials as they apply to planetary surfaces. The software, EDEM, allows users to import particles and obtain accurate representations of their shapes for modeling purposes, such as simulating bulk solids behavior, and was enhanced to be able to more accurately model fine, abrasive, cohesive particles. These new EDEM capabilities can be applied in many industries unrelated to space exploration and have been adopted by several prominent U.S. companies, including John Deere, Pfizer, and Procter & Gamble.

  11. Processing of Goethitic Iron Ore Fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Sharma, T.; Mandre, N. R.

    2015-10-01

    In the present investigation an attempt has been made to beneficiate goethitic iron ore containing 59.02 % Iron, 6.51 % Alumina, 4.79 % Silica, 0.089 % Phosphorus with 7.11 % loss on ignition. For this purpose, different beneficiation techniques such as gravity and magnetic separation processes have been employed. During the process two conceptual flow sheets were also developed for the beneficiation of goethite iron ore fines. In the prsent work it was possible to enhance grade of iron to 63.35, 63.18, and 65.35 % from Jigging, Multi Gravity Separation (MGS) and Wet High Intensity Magnetic Separator (WHIMS) respectively.

  12. Removing Undesired Fine Powder From Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flagella, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Fluidized-bed reactor produces highly pure polycrystalline silicon particles with diameters approximately greater than 400 micrometers. Operates by pyrolysis of silane in reaction zone, which is bed of silicon seed particles fluidized by flow of silane and carrier gas. Above reaction zone, gas mixture flows rapidly enough to entrain silicon powders, but not larger seed and product particles. Entrained particles swept out of reactor. Applicable to other processes such as production of fine metal and ceramic powders where control of sizes of product needed.

  13. Glass fining experiments in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ground based experiments were conducted to demonstrate that thermal migration actually operated in glass melts. Thermal migration consistent with the theory was found in one experiment on a borax melt, i.e., there was an approximately linear relation between the bubble diameter and bubble velocity for a given temperature and temperature gradient. It also appeared that nearby bubbles were attracted to one another, which could greatly aid fining. Interpretation of these results was not possible because of complications arising from gravity, i.e., floating of the bubbles, circulation currents due to buoyancy-driven natural connection, and flow of the melt out from the cell.

  14. Universal fine structure of nematic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2001-02-01

    We study in a Landau-de Gennes approach the biaxial structure of a nematic point defect with topological charge M = + 1. We aim to illuminate the role of the confining boundaries in determining the fine structure of the defect. We show that there are different regimes associated with different values of the ratio between the typical size R of the region in space occupied by the material and the biaxial correlation length ξb. For R/ξb>20 the core structure is already qualitatively universal, that is, independent of the confining geometry, while also for R/ξb>200 any quantitative difference is unlikely to be detected.

  15. Recovering the fine structures in solar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Margarita; Habbal, S. R.; Golub, L.; Deluca, E.; Hudson, Hugh S.

    1994-01-01

    Several examples of the capability of the blind iterative deconvolution (BID) technique to recover the real point spread function, when limited a priori information is available about its characteristics. To demonstrate the potential of image post-processing for probing the fine scale and temporal variability of the solar atmosphere, the BID technique is applied to different samples of solar observations from space. The BID technique was originally proposed for correction of the effects of atmospheric turbulence on optical images. The processed images provide a detailed view of the spatial structure of the solar atmosphere at different heights in regions with different large-scale magnetic field structures.

  16. Fine-tuning in DBI inflationary mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang

    2008-12-15

    We show a model-independent fine-tuning issue in the DBI inflationary mechanism. DBI inflation requires a warp factor h small enough to sufficiently slow down the inflation. On the other hand, the Einstein equation in extra dimensions under the inflationary background deforms the warp space on the IR side. Generically these two locations coincide with each other, spoiling the DBI inflation. The origin and tuning of this 'h problem' is closely related, through the AdS/CFT duality, to those of the well-known '{eta} problem' in the slow-roll inflationary mechanism.

  17. Electrical charge measurements on fine airborne particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tardos, G.I.; Dietz, P.W.; Snaddon, R.W.L.

    1984-11-01

    A small parallel-plate precipitator and a theoretical collection model have been used to determine the distribution of charges acquired by monodisperse airborne polystyrene latex particles in a corona charger. The mean charge based on the total number of particles was found to be slightly higher than half the predicted saturation charge, and it agreed well with independent measurements made in a Faraday cage particle separator. The importance of careful measurements of particle charge in fine particle transport studies is highlighted by a discussion of the effect of charge (particle mobility) distribution width on observed transport characteristics.

  18. Pre - big bang inflation requires fine tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Michael S.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1997-10-01

    The pre-big-bang cosmology inspired by superstring theories has been suggested as an alternative to slow-roll inflation. We analyze, in both the Jordan and Einstein frames, the effect of spatial curvature on this scenario and show that too much curvature --- of either sign --- reduces the duration of the inflationary era to such an extent that the flatness and horizon problems are not solved. Hence, a fine-tuning of initial conditions is required to obtain enough inflation to solve the cosmological problems.

  19. Chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  20. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can c...

  1. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOEpatents

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  2. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and the solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will be performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing.

  3. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  4. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficient production of environmentally acceptable distillate fuels requires catalysts for hydrogenation and cleavage of the coal macromolecules and removal of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur heteroatoms. The goal of the proposed research is to develop new catalysts for the direct liquefaction of coal. This type of catalyst consists of fine clay particles that have been treated with reagents which form pillaring structures between the aluminosilicate layers of the clay. The pillars not only hold the layers apart but also constitute the active catalytic sites for hydrogenation of the coal and solvent used in the liquefaction. The pillaring catalytic sites are composed of pyrrhotite, which has been previously demonstrated to be active for coal liquefaction. The pyrrhotite sites are generated in situ by sulfiding the corresponding oxyiron species. The size of the catalyst will be less than 40 nm in order to promote intimate contact with the coal material. Since the clays and reagents for pillaring and activating the clays are inexpensive, the catalysts can be discarded after use, rather than regenerated by a costly process. The proposed work will evaluate methods for preparing the fine particle iron-pillared clay dispersions and for activating the particles to generate the catalysts. Characterization studies of the pillared clays and activated catalysts will performed. The effectiveness of the pillared clay dispersion for hydrogenation and coal liquefaction will be determined in several types of testing. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Communication Optimizations for Fine-Grained UPCApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Iancu, Costin; Yelick, Katherine

    2005-07-08

    Global address space languages like UPC exhibit high performance and portability on a broad class of shared and distributed memory parallel architectures. The most scalable applications use bulk memory copies rather than individual reads and writes to the shared space, but finer-grained sharing can be useful for scenarios such as dynamic load balancing, event signaling, and distributed hash tables. In this paper we present three optimization techniques for global address space programs with fine-grained communication: redundancy elimination, use of split-phase communication, and communication coalescing. Parallel UPC programs are analyzed using static single assignment form and a data flow graph, which are extended to handle the various shared and private pointer types that are available in UPC. The optimizations also take advantage of UPC's relaxed memory consistency model, which reduces the need for cross thread analysis. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the analysis and optimizations using several benchmarks, which were chosen to reflect the kinds of fine-grained, communication-intensive phases that exist in some larger applications. The optimizations show speedups of up to 70 percent on three parallel systems, which represent three different types of cluster network technologies.

  6. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Blake, D.; Vaniman, D.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S.; Downs, R.; Morrison, S.; Gellert, R.; Campbell, I.; Treiman, A. H.; Achilles, C.; Bristow, T.; Crisp, J. A.; McAdam, A.; Archer, P. D.; Sutter, B.; Rampe, E. B.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyrox-ene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was cal-culated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiome-try (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (~71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical compositon are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be~0 wt.% in the amporphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because the position

  7. The XRD Amorphous Component in John Klein Drill Fines at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Ming,, Douglas W.; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Bish, David L; Chipera, Steve; Downs, Robert; Morrison, Shaunna; Gellert, Ralf; Campbell, Iain; Treiman, Alan H.; Achilles, Cherie; Bristow, Thomas; Crisp, Joy A.; McAdam, Amy; Archer, Paul Douglas; Sutter, Brad; Rampe, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Drill fines of mudstone (targets John Klein and Cumberland) from the Sheepbed unit at Yel-lowknife Bay were analyzed by MSL payload elements including the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin), APXS (Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer), and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments. CheMin XRD results show a variety of crystalline phases including feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, oxides, oxyhydroxides, sulfates, sulfides, a tri-octahedral smectite, and XRD amorphous material. The drill fines are distinctly different from corresponding analyses of the global soil (target Rocknest) in that the mudstone samples contained detectable phyllosilicate. Here we focus on John Klein and combine CheMin and APXS data to calculate the chemical composition and concentration of the amorphous component. The chemical composition of the amorphous plus smectite component for John Klein was calculated by subtracting the abundance-weighted chemical composition of the individual XRD crystalline components from the bulk composition of John Kline as measured by APXS. The chemical composition of individual crystalline components was determined either by stoichiometry (e.g., hematite and magnetite) or from their unit cell parameters (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene). The chemical composition of the amorphous + smectite component (approx 71 wt.% of bulk sample) and bulk chemical composition are similar. In order to calculate the chemical composition of the amorphous component, a chemical composition for the tri-octahedral smectite must be assumed. We selected two tri-octahedral smectites with very different MgO/(FeO + Fe2O3) ratios (34 and 1.3 for SapCa1 and Griffithite, respectively). Relative to bulk sample, the concentration of amorphous and smectite components are 40 and 29 wt.% for SapCa1 and 33 and 36 wt.% for Griffithite. The amount of smectite was calculated by requiring the MgO concentration to be approx 0 wt.% in the amorphous component. Griffithite is the preferred smectite because

  8. An analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensor fine lock mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    There are two guiding modes of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) used for the acquisition of astronomical data by one of its six scientific instruments. The more precise one is called Fine Lock. Command and control problems in the onboard electronics has limited Fine Lock to brighter stars, V less than 13.0 mag, instead of fulfilling its goal of V = 14.5 mag. Consequently, the less precise guiding mode of Coarse Track (approximately 40 milli-arc seconds) has to be used fairly frequently. Indeed, almost half of the scientific observations to have been made with the HST will be compromised. The only realistic or extensive simulations of the Fine Lock guidance mode are reported. The theoretical analysis underlying the Monte Carlo experiments and the numerical computations clearly show both that the control electronics are severely under-engineered and how to adjust the various control parameters to successfully extend Fine Lock guiding performance back to V = 14.0 mag and sometimes beyond.

  9. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  10. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  11. Chemical pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Alternative Names Aspiration pneumonia - chemical Images Lungs Respiratory system References Blanc PD. Acute responses to toxic exposures. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  12. The aggregation efficiency of very fine volcanic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.

    2013-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions can discharge large amounts of very small sized pyroclasts (under 0.090 mm) into the atmosphere that may cause problems to people, infrastructures and environment. The transport and deposition of fine ash are ruled by aggregation that causes premature settling of fine ash and, as consequence, significantly reduces the concentration of airborne material over long distances. Parameterizing the aggregation potential of fine ash is then needed to provide accurate modelling of ash transport and deposition from volcanic plumes. Here we present the first results of laboratory experiments investigating the aggregation efficiency of very fine volcanic particles. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that collision kinetic and relative humidity provide the strongest effect on aggregation behaviour but were only limited to particles with size > 0.125 mm. In our work, we focus on natural volcanic ash at ambient humidity with particles size < 0.090 mm, by taking into account the effect of grain size distribution on aggregation potential. Two types of ash were used in our experiments: fresh ash, collected during fall-out from a recent plume-forming eruption at Sakurajima (Japan -July 2013) and old ash, collected from fall-out tephra deposits at Campi Flegrei (Italy, ca. 10 ka), to account for the different chemical composition and morphoscopic effects of altered ash on aggregation efficiency. Total samples were hand sieved to obtain three classes with unimodal grain size distributions (<0.090 mm, <0.063 mm, <0.032 mm). Bimodal grain size distributions were also obtained by mixing the three classes in different proportions. During each experiments, particles were sieved from the top of a transparent tank where a fan, placed at the bottom, allows turbulent dispersion of particles. Collision and sticking of particles on a vertical glass slide were filmed with a high speed cameras at 6000 fps. Our lenses arrangement provide high image resolution

  13. Dispersal of fine sediment in nearshore coastal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Fine sediment (silt and clay) plays an important role in the physical, ecological, and environmental conditions of coastal systems, yet little is known about the dispersal and fate of fine sediment across coastal margin settings outside of river mouths. Here I provide simple physical scaling and detailed monitoring of a beach nourishment project near Imperial Beach, California, with a high portion of fines (40% silt and clay by weight). These results provide insights into the pathways and residence times of fine sediment transport across a wave-dominated coastal margin. Monitoring of the project used physical, optical, acoustic, and remote sensing techniques to track the fine portion of the nourishment sediment. The initial transport of fine sediment from the beach was influenced strongly by longshore currents of the surf zone that were established in response to the approach angles of the waves. The mean residence time of fine sediment in the surf zone—once it was suspended—was approximately 1 hour, and rapid decreases in surf zone fine sediment concentrations along the beach resulted from mixing and offshore transport in turbid rip heads. For example, during a day with oblique wave directions and surf zone longshore currents of approximately 25 cm/s, the offshore losses of fine sediment in rips resulted in a 95% reduction in alongshore surf zone fine sediment flux within 1 km of the nourishment site. However, because of the direct placement of nourishment sediment on the beach, fine suspended-sediment concentrations in the swash zone remained elevated for several days after nourishment, while fine sediment was winnowed from the beach. Once offshore of the surf zone, fine sediment settled downward in the water column and was observed to transport along and across the inner shelf. Vertically sheared currents influenced the directions and rates of fine sediment transport on the shelf. Sedimentation of fine sediment was greatest on the seafloor directly offshore

  14. Managing Fine Sediment in Regulated Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    A paradigm useful in managing dams and diversions is that the combined effects of changing flow regime and sediment supply perturb regulated rivers into sediment deficit or sediment surplus. In the U.S. Southwest, large dams constructed on interregional rivers typically create sediment deficit segments >100 km long. Further downstream, sediment surplus may occur if desert tributaries deliver sufficient amounts of fine sediment, such as parts of the Rio Grande, lower Green River, and Colorado River delta. Sediment surplus also occurs on most smaller regional rivers. The protocols for managing rivers perturbed into sediment deficit have been refined for the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam but are nonetheless challenged by externally determined water-supply agreements that require annual water deliveries that sometimes occur when there has been little tributary resupply. Virtually all of the naturally supplied sand to the depleted, 100-km long Marble Canyon comes from the Paria River. The sand delivery rate since 2012 was sufficiently large to trigger short-duration controlled floods under the High Flow Experiment (HFE) Protocol. The sand mass balance of Marble Canyon since 2012 when the HFE Protocol was adopted was positive due to the combination of relatively large sand delivery from the Paria River and average total annual flows. Large total annual flows have the potential to export large amounts of sand and create a negative sand mass balance. Despite the challenge of managing a scarce and highly variable sand supply and occasional years of large reservoir releases, the long-term (2006-2015) sand mass balance for the upstream half of Marble Canyon is indeterminant and is positive for the downstream half of Marble Canyon. The apparent success of managing sand in Grand Canyon under deficit conditions suggests that fine sediment management protocols might be developed for other regulated rivers. Implementation would require establishment of networks of

  15. Apollo rocks, fines and soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allton, J.; Bevill, T.

    Apollo rocks and soils not only established basic lunar properties and ground truth for global remote sensing, they also provided important lessons for planetary protection (Adv. Space Res ., 1998, v. 22, no. 3 pp. 373-382). The six Apollo missions returned 2196 samples weighing 381.7 kg, comprised of rocks, fines, soil cores and 2 gas samples. By examining which samples were allocated for scientific investigations, information was obtained on usefulness of sampling strategy, sampling devices and containers, sample types and diversity, and on size of sample needed by various disciplines. Diversity was increased by using rakes to gather small rocks on the Moon and by removing fragments >1 mm from soils by sieving in the laboratory. Breccias and soil cores are diverse internally. Per unit weight these samples were more often allocated for research. Apollo investigators became adept at wringing information from very small sample sizes. By pushing the analytical limits, the main concern was adequate size for representative sampling. Typical allocations for trace element analyses were 750 mg for rocks, 300 mg for fines and 70 mg for core subsamples. Age-dating and isotope systematics allocations were typically 1 g for rocks and fines, but only 10% of that amount for core depth subsamples. Historically, allocations for organics and microbiology were 4 g (10% for cores). Modern allocations for biomarker detection are 100mg. Other disciplines supported have been cosmogenic nuclides, rock and soil petrology, sedimentary volatiles, reflectance, magnetics, and biohazard studies . Highly applicable to future sample return missions was the Apollo experience with organic contamination, estimated to be from 1 to 5 ng/g sample for Apollo 11 (Simonheit &Flory, 1970; Apollo 11, 12 &13 Organic contamination Monitoring History, U.C. Berkeley; Burlingame et al., 1970, Apollo 11 LSC , pp. 1779-1792). Eleven sources of contaminants, of which 7 are applicable to robotic missions, were

  16. Do ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal temperate tree species systematically differ in root order-related fine root morphology and biomass?

    PubMed Central

    Kubisch, Petra; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While most temperate broad-leaved tree species form ectomycorrhizal (EM) symbioses, a few species have arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM). It is not known whether EM and AM tree species differ systematically with respect to fine root morphology, fine root system size and root functioning. In a species-rich temperate mixed forest, we studied the fine root morphology and biomass of three EM and three AM tree species from the genera Acer, Carpinus, Fagus, Fraxinus, and Tilia searching for principal differences between EM and AM trees. We further assessed the evidence of convergence or divergence in root traits among the six co-occurring species. Eight fine root morphological and chemical traits were investigated in root segments of the first to fourth root order in three different soil depths and the relative importance of the factors root order, tree species and soil depth for root morphology was determined. Root order was more influential than tree species while soil depth had only a small effect on root morphology All six species showed similar decreases in specific root length and specific root area from the 1st to the 4th root order, while the species patterns differed considerably in root tissue density, root N concentration, and particularly with respect to root tip abundance. Most root morphological traits were not significantly different between EM and AM species (except for specific root area that was larger in AM species), indicating that mycorrhiza type is not a key factor influencing fine root morphology in these species. The order-based root analysis detected species differences more clearly than the simple analysis of bulked fine root mass. Despite convergence in important root traits among AM and EM species, even congeneric species may differ in certain fine root morphological traits. This suggests that, in general, species identity has a larger influence on fine root morphology than mycorrhiza type. PMID:25717334

  17. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Div. of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation; frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness; the two types of transducers; and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  18. Infrared spectral behavior of fine particulate solids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Transmission and emission spectra of clouds and layers of fine particulate samples of quartz, magnesium oxide, and aluminum oxide in the 6.5-35-??m wavelength range are presented. They demonstrate that the behavior of layers of particles constitutes a good analogue for a cloud of particles; that individual micrometer-sized particles emit most where they absorb most; that as the size of the particle is increased, the emission features reverse polarity and the spectrum approaches that of one obtained from a polished plate; and that as the particle layer-thickness increases, radiative interaction becomes increasingly important so that the emission maximum shifts from the strongest to weaker features, or produces a maximum at the Christiansen wavelength.

  19. Physics of compaction of fine cohesive particles.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, A; Valverde, J M; Quintanilla, M A S

    2005-02-25

    Fluidized fractal clusters of fine particles display critical-like dynamics at the jamming transition, characterized by a power law relating consolidation stress with volume fraction increment [sigma--(c) proportional, variant(Deltaphi)(beta)]. At a critical stress clusters are disrupted and there is a crossover to a logarithmic law (Deltaphi = nu logsigma--(c)) resembling the phenomenology of soils. We measure lambda identical with- partial differentialDelta(1/phi)/ partial log(sigma--(c) proportional, variant Bo(0.2)(g), where Bo(g) is the ratio of interparticle attractive force (in the fluidlike regime) to particle weight. This law suggests that compaction is ruled by the internal packing structure of the jammed clusters at nearly zero consolidation.

  20. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Fine needle aspiration cytology in fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Pranay; Gupta, Nalini; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Gurpreet

    2012-01-01

    Fibromatosis form a spectrum of clinicopathologic entities characterized by the infiltrative proliferation of fibroblasts that lack malignant cytologic features. The fibromatosis can be localized or infiltrative and multicentric and can involve internal tissues and organs as the mesentery, retroperitoneum, breast, and almost every organ and region of the body, including the bones, the meninges and the central nervous system. We report a case of 37-year-old male who presented with a right supraclavicular mass with superficial infiltrative type of fibromatosis and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was performed. We report this case because of limited literature of FNAC in fibromatosis and quick role of FNAC in the diagnosis of fibromatosis. PMID:22438623

  3. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  4. Contextual Effects in Fine Spatial Discriminations

    PubMed Central

    Olzak, Lynn A.; Laurinen, Pentti I.

    2006-01-01

    The context in which a pattern is viewed can greatly affect its apparent contrast, a phenomenon commonly attributed to pooled contrast gain control processes. A low-contrast surround may slightly enhance apparent contrast, whereas increasing the contrast of the surround leads to a monotonic decline in contrast appearance. We ask here how the presence of a patterned surround affects the ability to perform fine, suprathreshold orientation, contrast, and spatial frequency discriminations as a function of surround contrast and phase. Our results revealed an unexpected dip in performance when center and surround were in-phase and similar in contrast. These results suggest that additional processes, perhaps those involved in scene segregation, play a role in contextual effects on discrimination. PMID:16277291

  5. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1995-03-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation, frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness, the two types of transducers, and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  6. Nonsingular multidimensional cosmologies without fine tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, Kirill A.; Fabris, Julio C.

    2002-09-01

    Exact cosmological solutions for effective actions in D dimensions inspired by the tree-level superstring action are studied. For a certain range of free parameters existing in the model, nonsingular bouncing solutions are found. Among them, of particular interest can be open hyperbolic models, in which, without any fine tuning, the internal scale factor and the dilaton field (connected with string coupling in string theories) tend to constant values at late times. A cosmological singularity is avoided due to nonminimal dilaton-gravity coupling and, for D>11, due to pure imaginary nature of the dilaton, which conforms to currently discussed unification models. The existence of such and similar solutions supports the opinion that the Universe had never undergone a stage driven by full-scale quantum gravity.

  7. Method of making fine-grained triaminotrinitrobenzene

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, Theodore M.

    1984-01-01

    A method of forming a fine-grained species of the insensitive high explosive sym-triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) without grinding. In accordance with the method, 1,3,5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TCTNB) is aminated by reaction with gaseous ammonia in an emulsion of toluene in water. The ratio of water to toluene in the emulsion is selected so that toluene is the dispersed phase in the emulsion. The size of the dispersed TCTNB-containing toluene droplets determines the particle size of the resulting TATB. The emulsion is preferably formed with an emulsifier such as ammonium oleate, which may be generated in situ from oleic acid, and stabilized with a protective colloid such as polyvinyl alcohol.

  8. Method of making fine-grained triaminotrinitrobenzene

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, T.M.

    1983-07-26

    A method is given for forming a fine-grained species of the insensitive high explosive sym-triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) without grinding. In accordance with the method, 1,3,5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TCTNB) is aminated by reaction with gaseous ammonia in an emulsion of toluene in water. The ratio of water to toluene in the emulsion is selected so that toluene is the dispersed phase in the emulsion. The size of the dispersed TCTNB-containing toluene droplets determines the particle size of the resulting TATB. The emulsion is preferably formed with an emulsifier such as ammonium oleate, which may be generated in situ from oleic acid, and stabilized with a protective colloid such as polyvinyl alcohol.

  9. Fine-scale characteristics of interplanetary sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Neubauer, F. M.; Barnstoff, H.

    1980-01-01

    The structure of the interplanetary sector boundaries observed by Helios 1 within sector transition regions was studied. Such regions consist of intermediate (nonspiral) average field orientations in some cases, as well as a number of large angle directional discontinuities (DD's) on the fine scale (time scales 1 hour). Such DD's are found to be more similar to tangential than rotational discontinuities, to be oriented on average more nearly perpendicular than parallel to the ecliptic plane to be accompanied usually by a large dip ( 80%) in B and, with a most probable thickness of 3 x 10 to the 4th power km, significantly thicker previously studied. It is hypothesized that the observed structures represent multiple traversals of the global heliospheric current sheet due to local fluctuations in the position of the sheet. There is evidence that such fluctuations are sometimes produced by wavelike motions or surface corrugations of scale length 0.05 - 0.1 AU superimposed on the large scale structure.

  10. Revisit to diffraction anomalous fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Tokuda, K.; Shimada, K.; Ichitsubo, T.; Oishi, M.; Mizuki, J.; Matsubara, E.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) method that is a spectroscopic analysis combined with resonant X-ray diffraction enables the determination of the valence state and local structure of a selected element at a specific crystalline site and/or phase. This method has been improved by using a polycrystalline sample, channel-cut monochromator optics with an undulator synchrotron radiation source, an area detector and direct determination of resonant terms with a logarithmic dispersion relation. This study makes the DAFS method more convenient and saves a large amount of measurement time in comparison with the conventional DAFS method with a single crystal. The improved DAFS method has been applied to some model samples, Ni foil and Fe3O4 powder, to demonstrate the validity of the measurement and the analysis of the present DAFS method. PMID:25343791

  11. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation, frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness, the two types of transducers, and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  12. Impact of ozonation on particle aggregation in mature fine tailings.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiaming; Tumpa, Fahmida; Pérez Estrada, Leonidas; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Liu, Yang

    2014-12-15

    The extraction of bitumen from the oil sands in Canada generates tonnes of mature fine tailings (MFT), consisting of a mineral matrix of sand, clay, and water, which without treatment requires thousands of years to fully consolidate. We assessed the performance of a novel ozonation method designed to enhance the settling of MFT and explored the mechanisms involved. The solid content of MFT obtained from oil sands tailings was adjusted to 1, 3, 5 wt % with water before applying 15, 30, and 60 min of ozonation. MFT settled after a short (15 min) ozonation treatment, resulting in a sample with clear released water on the top and condensed sludge at the bottom. The water chemistry characteristics, particles' surface charge and chemical bonding were measured. Ozonation led to the increased organic acids concentrations in MFT suspension through converting of organic matter from high to low molecular weight, and detaching organic coating on MFT particles. The pH and the concentrations of ions in the MFT suspension were changed significantly, an association of metal ions with MFT particles was promoted, and the surface charges of MFT particles were neutralized. Consequently, the MFT suspension was destabilized and MFT particle precipitation was observed.

  13. Near-road enhancement and solubility of fine and coarse ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Communities near major roadways are disproportionately affected by traffic-related air pollution which can contribute to adverse health outcomes. The specific role of particulate matter (PM) from traffic sources is not fully understood due to complex emissions processes and physical/chemical properties of PM in the near-road environment. To investigate the spatial profile and water solubility of elemental PM species near a major roadway, filter-based measurements of fine (PM2.5) and coarse (PM10-2.5) PM were simultaneously collected at multiple distances (10 m, 100 m, and 300 m) from Interstate I-96 in Detroit, Michigan during September–November 2010. Filters were extracted in water, followed by a hot acid extraction, and analyzed by magnetic sector field high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICPMS) to quantify water-soluble and acid-soluble trace elements for each PM size fraction. PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 species measured in the near-road samples included elements associated with traffic activity, local industrial sources, and regional pollution. Metals indicative of brake wear (Ba, Cu) were dramatically enriched near the roadway during downwind conditions (factor of 5 concentration increase), with the largest increase within 100 m of the roadway. Moderate near-roadway increases were observed for crustal elements and other traffic-related PM (Fe, Ca), and the lowest increases observed for regional PM species (S). Water solubility varied

  14. Unnecessary Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  15. A practice of ultra-fine tailings disposal as filling material in a gold mine.

    PubMed

    Deng, D Q; Liu, L; Yao, Z L; Song, K I-I L; Lao, D Z

    2017-03-08

    A practice of cemented backfill technology with ultra-fine tailings in a gold mine was comprehensively presented, and a series of tests were conducted in accordance with the peculiar properties of ultra-fine tailings and the mining technology conditions. The test results show that, the tailings from Shuiyindong Gold Mine have a great grinding fineness, with the average particle diameter 22.03 μm, in which the ultra-fine particles with the diameter below 20 μm occupying 66.13%. The analysis results of chemical components of tailings indicate that the content of SiO2 is relatively low, i.e., 33.08%, but the total content of CaO, MgO and Al2O3 is relatively high i.e., 36.5%. After the settlement of 4-6 h, the tailing slurry with the initial concentration of 40% has the maximum settling concentration of 54.692%, and the corresponding maximum settling unit weight is 1.497 g/cm(3). During the field application, the ultra-fine tailings and PC32.5 cement were mixed with the cement-tailings ratios of 1:3-1:8, and the slurry concentration of 50 wt% was prepared. Using the slurry pump, the prepared cemented backfill slurries flowed into the goaf, and then the strength of the cemented backfill body met the mining technique requirements in Shuiyindong Gold Mine, where the ore body has a smooth occurrence, with the average thickness of approximately 2 m and the inclination angle ranging from 5 to 10°.

  16. Chemical constituents of fugitive dust.

    PubMed

    Van Pelt, R Scott; Zobeck, Ted M

    2007-07-01

    Wind erosion selectively winnows the fine, most chemically concentrated portions of surface soils and results in the inter-regional transport of fugitive dust containing plant nutrients, trace elements and other soil-borne contaminants. We sampled and analyzed surface soils, sediments in transport over eroding fields, and attic dust from a small area of the Southern High Plains of Texas to characterize the physical nature and chemical constituents of these materials and to investigate techniques that would allow relatively rapid, low cost techniques for estimating the chemical constituents of fugitive dust from an eroding field. From chemical analyses of actively eroding sediments, it would appear that Ca is the only chemical species that is enriched more than others during the process of fugitive dust production. We found surface soil sieved to produce a sub-sample with particle diameters in the range of 53-74 microm to be a reasonably good surrogate for fugitive dust very near the source field, that sieved sub-samples with particle diameters <10 microm have a crustal enrichment factor of approximately 6, and that this factor, multiplied by the chemical contents of source soils, may be a reasonable estimator of fugitive PM(10) chemistry from the soils of interest. We also found that dust from tractor air cleaners provided a good surrogate for dust entrained by tillage and harvesting operations if the chemical species resulting from engine wear and exhaust were removed from the data set or scaled back to the average of enrichment factors noted for chemical species with no known anthropogenic sources. Chemical analyses of dust samples collected from attics approximately 4 km from the nearest source fields indicated that anthropogenic sources of several environmentally important nutrient and trace element species are much larger contributors, by up to nearly two orders of magnitude, to atmospheric loading and subsequent deposition than fugitive dust from eroding

  17. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  18. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  19. Generation of pulsed discharge plasma in water with fine bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yui; Takada, Noriharu; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu; Goto laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    Recently, some researchers have proposed electric discharge methods with bubbles in water because the discharge plasma inside bubble was easy to be generated compared to that in water. Almost all of these methods introduced bubbles in the order of millimeter size from a nozzle placed in water. In these methods, bubbles rose one after another owing to high rising speed of millibubble, leading to inefficient gas consumption. We proposed fine bubbles introduction at the discharge area in water. A fine bubble is determined a bubble with less than 100 μm in a diameter. Fine bubbles exhibit extremely slow rising speed. Fine bubbles decrease in size during bubble rising and subsequently collapse in water with OH radical generation. Therefore, combining the discharge plasma with fine bubbles is expected to generate more active species with small amount of gas consumption. In this work, fine bubbles were introduced in water and pulsed discharge plasma was generated between two cylindrical electrodes which placed in water. We examined effects of fine bubbles on electric discharge in water when argon or oxygen gas was utilized as feed gas. Fine bubbles enhanced optical emission of hydrogen and oxygen atoms from H2O molecules, but that of feed gas was not observed. The formation mechanism of H2O2 by electric discharge was supposed to be different from that with no bubbling. Dissolved oxygen in water played a role in H2O2 formation by the discharge with fine bubbles.

  20. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF FINE CRUSHER BUILDING (LEFT) AND CONCENTRATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF FINE CRUSHER BUILDING (LEFT) AND CONCENTRATOR BUILDING (RIGHT), LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM INTERMEDIATE LEVEL - Mesabi Iron Company, Magnetic Concentration Plant, Babbitt, St. Louis County, MN

  1. Chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Paula A; Colaço, Aura; Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; De-La-Cruz P, Luis F; Lopes, Carlos

    2007-12-01

    The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair--i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.

  2. Acclimation of fine root respiration to soil warming involves starch deposition in very fine and fine roots: a case study in Fagus sylvatica saplings.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Antonino; Giacomuzzi, Valentino; Chiatante, Donato

    2016-03-01

    Root activities in terms of respiration and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) storage and mobilization have been suggested as major physiological roles in fine root lifespan. As more frequent heat waves and drought periods within the next decades are expected, to what extent does thermal acclimation in fine roots represent a mechanism to cope with such upcoming climatic conditions? In this study, the possible changes in very fine (diameter < 0.5 mm) and fine (0.5-1 mm) root morphology and physiology in terms of respiration rate and NSC [soluble sugars (SS) and starch] concentrations, were investigated on 2-year-old Fagus sylvatica saplings subjected to a simulated long-lasting heat wave event and to co-occurring soil drying. For both very fine and fine roots, soil temperature (ST) resulted inversely correlated with specific root length, respiration rates and SSs concentration, but directly correlated with root mass, root tissue density and starch concentration. In particular, starch concentration increased under 28 °C for successively decreasing under 21 °C ST. These findings showed that thermal acclimation in very fine and fine roots due to 24 days exposure to high ST (∼ 28 °C), induced starch accumulation. Such 'carbon-savings strategy' should bear the maintenance costs associated to the recovery process in case of restored favorable environmental conditions, such as those occurring at the end of a heat wave event. Drought condition seems to affect the fine root vitality much more under moderate than high temperature condition, making the temporary exposure to high ST less threatening to root vitality than expected.

  3. Fine root dynamics for forests on contrasting soils in the colombian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, E. M.; Moreno, F. H.; Lloyd, J.; Peñuela, M. C.; Patiño, S.

    2009-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that in a gradient of increase of soil resources carbon allocated to belowground production (fine roots) decreases. To evaluate this hypothesis, we measured the mass and production of fine roots (<2 mm) by two methods: 1) ingrowth cores and, 2) sequential soil coring, during 2.2 years in two lowland forests with different soils in the colombian Amazon. Differences of soil resources were determined by the type and physical and chemical properties of soil: a forest on loamy soil (Ultisol) at the Amacayacu National Natural Park and, the other on white sands (Spodosol) at the Zafire Biological Station, located in the Forest Reservation of the Calderón River. We found that mass and production of fine roots was significantly different between soil depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm) and also between forests. White-sand forest allocated more carbon to fine roots than the clayey forest; the production in white-sand forest was twice (2.98 and 3.33 Mg C ha-1 year-1, method 1 and 2, respectively) as much as in clayey forest (1.51 and 1.36-1.03 Mg C ha-1 year-1, method 1 and 2, respectively); similarly, the average of fine root mass was higher in the white-sand forest (10.94 Mg C ha-1) than in the forest on clay soils (3.04-3.64 Mg C ha-1). The mass of fine roots also showed a temporal variation related to rainfall, such that production of fine roots decreased substantially in the dry period of the year 2005. Our results suggest that soil resources play an important role in patterns of carbon allocation in these forests; carbon allocated to above-and belowground organs is different between forest types, in such a way that a trade-off above/belowground seems to exist; as a result, it is probable that there are not differences in total net primary productivity between these two forests: does belowground offset lower aboveground production in poorer soils?

  4. Interaction of gases with lunar materials. [surface properties of lunar fines, especially on exposure to water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, H. F.; Gammage, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The surface properties of lunar fines were investigated. Results indicate that, for the most part, these properties are independent of the chemical composition and location of the samples on the lunar surface. The leaching of channels and pores by adsorbed water vapor is a distinguishing feature of their surface chemistry. The elements of air, if adsorbed in conjunction with water vapor or liquid water, severely impedes the leaching process. In the absence of air, liquid water is more effective than water vapor in attacking the grains. The characteristics of Apollo 17 orange fines were evaluated and compared with those of other samples. The interconnecting channels produced by water vapor adsorption were found to be wider than usual for other types of fines. Damage tracks caused by heavy cosmic ray nuclei and an unusually high halogen content might provide for stronger etching conditions upon exposure to water vapor.

  5. Sintering Characteristics of Indian Chrome Ore Fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Bikash; Chaudhury, Manoj Kumar; Paul, Jagannath; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2009-10-01

    Chrome ore concentrate consists of high-temperature melting oxides such as Cr2O3, MgO, and Al2O3. The presence of these refractory constituents makes the ore a very high melting mineral. Hence, it is difficult to produce sinter from chrome ore by a pyrometallurgical route. Currently, chrome ore is ground to below 75 μm, pelletized, heat hardened through carbothermic reaction at 1300 °C to 1400 °C, and then charged into a submerged electric arc furnace (EAF), along with lumpy ore for ferrochrome/charge-chrome production. Electricity is a major cost element in this extraction process. This work explores the sinterability of chrome ore. The objective of this study was to: (1) determine whether chrome ore is sinterable and, if so, (2) ascertain ways of achieving satisfactory properties at a low temperature of sintering. Sintering of the raw material feed could be a way to reduce electricity consumption, because during sintering a partial reduction of minerals is expected along with agglomeration. Studies carried out by the authors show that it is possible to agglomerate chrome ore fines through sintering. The chrome ore sinter thus produced was found to be inferior in strength, comparable to that of an iron ore sinter, but strength requirements may not be the same for both. Because the heat generation during chrome ore sintering is high owing to some exothermic reactions, compared with iron ore, and because chrome ore contains a high amount of fines, shallow-bed-depth sinter cake production was attempted in the laboratory-scale pot-sintering machine. The sintered product was found to be a good conductor of electricity because of the presence of phases such as magnetite and maghemite. This characteristic of the chrome ore sinter will subsequently have a favorable impact in terms of power consumption during the production of ferrochrome in a submerged EAF. The sinter made was melted in the arc furnace and it was found that the specific melting energy is comparable to

  6. Size and composition distribution of fine particulate matter emitted from wood burning, meat charbroiling, and cigarettes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeman, M.J.; Schauer, J.J.; Cass, G.R.

    1999-10-15

    A dilution source sampling system is augmented to measure the size-distributed chemical composition of fine particle emissions from air pollution sources. Measurements are made using a laser optical particle counter (OPC), a differential mobility analyzer/condensation nucleus counter (DMA/CNC) combination, and a pair of microorifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDIs). The sources tested with this system include wood smoke (pine, oak, eucalyptus), meat charbroiling, and cigarettes. The particle mass distributions from all wood smoke sources have a single mode that peaks at approximately 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter. The smoke from meat charbroiling shows a major peak in the particle mass distribution at 0.1--0.2 {micro}m particle diameter, with some material present at larger particle sizes. Particle mass distributions from cigarettes peak between 0.3 and 0.4 {micro}m particle diameter. Chemical composition analysis reveals that particles emitted from the sources tested here are largely composed of organic compounds. Noticeable concentrations of elemental carbon are found in the particles emitted from wood burning. The size distributions of the trace species emissions from these sources also are presented, including data for Na, K, Ti, Fe, Br, Ru, Cl, Al, Zn, Ba, Sr, V, Mn, Sb, La, Ce, as well as sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ion when present in statistically significant amounts. These data are intended for use with air quality models that seek to predict the size distribution of the chemical composition of atmospheric fine particles.

  7. Measurements of Ultra-fine and Fine Aerosol Particles over Siberia: Large-scale Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Stohl, Andreas; Belan, Boris; Ciais, Philippe; Nédélec, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of in-situ measurements of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles carried out in the troposphere from 500 to 7000 m in the framework of several International and Russian State Projects. Number concentrations of ultra-fine and fine aerosol particles measured during intensive airborne campaigns are presented. Measurements carried over a great part of Siberia were focused on particles with diameters from 3 to 21 nm to study new particle formation in the free/upper troposphere over middle and high latitudes of Asia, which is the most unexplored region of the Northern Hemisphere. Joint International airborne surveys were performed along the following routes: Novosibirsk-Salekhard-Khatanga-Chokurdakh-Pevek-Yakutsk-Mirny-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB/PLARCAT2008 Project) and Novosibirsk-Mirny-Yakutsk-Lensk-Bratsk-Novosibirsk (YAK-AEROSIB Project). The flights over Lake Baikal was conducted under Russian State contract. Concentrations of ultra-fine and fine particles were measured with automated diffusion battery (ADB, designed by ICKC SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia) modified for airborne applications. The airborne ADB coupled with CPC has an additional aspiration unit to compensate ambient pressure and changing flow rate. It enabled to classify nanoparticles in three size ranges: 3-6 nm, 6-21 nm, and 21-200 nm. To identify new particle formation events we used similar specific criteria as Young et al. (2007): (1) N3-6nm >10 cm-3, (2) R1=N3-6/N621 >1 and R2=N321/N21200 >0.5. So when one of the ratios R1 or R2 tends to decrease to the above limits the new particle formation is weakened. It is very important to notice that space scale where new particle formation was observed is rather large. All the events revealed in the FT occurred under clean air conditions (low CO mixing ratios). Measurements carried out in the atmospheric boundary layer over Baikal Lake did not reveal any event of new particle formation. Concentrations of ultra-fine

  8. Plant practices in fine coal column flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, V.L. Jr.; Bethell, P.J.; Stanley, F.L.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1995-10-01

    Five 3 m (10 ft) diameter Microcel{trademark} flotation columns were installed at Clinchfield Coal Company`s Middle Fork preparation facility in order to reduce product ash and increase recovery and plant capacity. The Middle Fork facility is utilized for the recovery of fine coal from a feed stream that consists primarily of 1.5 mm x 0 material. The columns replaced conventional flotation cells for the treatment of the minus 150 {micro}m fraction while spirals are used to upgrade the plus 150 {micro}m material in the plant feed. The addition of the column flotation circuit resulted in an increase in plant capacity in excess of 20 percent while reducing the flotation product ash content by approximately 7 percentage points. Flotation circuit combustible recovery wa increased by 17 percentage points. This paper discusses circuit design, commissioning, and sparging system design. Circuit instrumentation, level control, reagent system control, performance comparisons with conventional flotation, and general operating procedures are also discussed.

  9. The fine structure of developing elastic cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R W; Peacock, M A

    1977-01-01

    The fine structure of the elastic cartilage of the pinna has been examined in young rabbits aged from 1 day to 1108 days. Changes associated with growth and development are related not only to age but also to the actual situation in the pinna. In the midline, progressive changes are seen from the tip to the base. The changes in the chondroblasts with time are compared with those described in hyaline cartilage. Structures occur that, except for the presence of crystals, are apparently morphologically identical with the matrix vesicles of calcifying cartilage. These matrix vesicles, however, become very prominent with age, and aggregations of them appear to be released into the intercellular tissue from vacuoles at the periphery of the chondroblasts. There is no obvious association with calcification. Occasional single cilia, desmosomes and giant mitochondria are seen. Elastica is present at birth, and eventually every cell is separated from its neighbours by a partial investment of elastica. The quantity of matrix seems to increase with time, and with distance from the tip of the ear. This is accompanied by a marked increase in cell size with time. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:870470

  10. Geomedia: Mapping Colorado at a fine scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orndorff, R.

    2003-01-01

    Currently, only 24 percent of Colorado's spectacular geology has been mapped at the fine scale of 1:24,000. At the same time, the state hosts many geologic hazards. Most maps of Colorado are at much broader scales, failing to show detail of basic geology crucial to safe engineering and building practices in a state that had the third-fastest-growing population during the 1990s. And the 2000 Census showed that the state, despite some economic woes, remains one of the fastest growing. Detailed geologic maps also aid the mineral industries that help fuel such growth. Since 1992, the Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) has mapped 1:24,000-scale quadrangles in high-impact areas under the STATEMAP component of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program. In 2002, CGS completed its 43rd geologic quadrangle map. The long-range plan for the state is to complete 116 high-priority quadrangles in the next 15 years. The survey's approach is to select rapidly growing areas with relatively high potential for hazards and map contiguous quadrangles. In addition to mapping bedrock, CGS geologists have mapped the Quaternary deposits at the surface. Understanding these deposits is extremely important for implementing sound engineering practices because of potential for subsidence and landslides. The CGS mapping has not only yielded information about potential hazards, but also advanced scientific understanding of the state.

  11. Beta environmental fine structure characterization of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, G.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Milani, P.; Monfardini, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Prandoni, M. L.; Sancrotti, M.

    1999-04-01

    The fine structure of beta emission (BEFS) due to the interference with the scattered waves from neighboring atoms, analogous to EXAFS, is known to produce oscillations in the Kurie plot. Here we suggest the use of BEFS for characterizing the lattice environment of β-emitting defects located at a distance from the crystal surface not exceeding the mean free path of β-electrons. Examples of defective structures in semiconductors whose atomic arrangement could be conveniently studied with BEFS are tritium-passivated dangling bonds, β-radioactive ions implanted in the crystal lattice or segregated at extended defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries or radiation damage. Also 14C-doped diamond-like materials and other exotic carbon forms, as well as the atomic environment of ions in metal alloys could be good candidate for BEFS. In this work we have calculated the fractional BEFS modulation for 187Re in its ordinary hcp crystal lattice for which experimental data by Cosulich et al. are available. The good correspondence between theory and experiment permits to conclude that BEFS experiments at low temperature are accessible to the present bolometric detection techniques and can provide an expedient method, as compared to EXAFS, for an accurate structural assessment of extended defects in solids.

  12. Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor Bearing Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S.; Esper, J.; Pan, J.; Decker, J.

    1996-01-01

    Early in 1993, a servo motor within one of three Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) reached stall torque levels on several occasions. Little time was left to plan replacement during the first servicing mission, scheduled at the end of '93. Accelerated bearing life tests confirmed that a small angle rocking motion, known as Coarse Track (CT), accelerated bearing degradation. Saturation torque levels were reached after approximately 20 million test cycles, similar to the flight bearings. Reduction in CT operation, implemented in flight software, extended FGS life well beyond the first servicing mission. However in recent years, bearing torques have resumed upward trends and together with a second, recent bearing torque anomaly has necessitated a scheduled FGS replacement during the upcoming second servicing mission in '97. The results from two series of life tests to quantify FGS bearing remaining life, discussion of bearing on-orbit performance, and future plans to service the FGS servos are presented in this paper.

  13. Advanced physical fine coal cleaning: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The contract objective was to demonstrate Advanced Energy Dynamics, Inc., (AED) Ultrafine Coal (UFC) electrostatic physical fine coal cleaning process as capable of: producing clean coal products of no greater than 2% ash; significantly reducing the pyritic sulfur content below that achievable with state-of-the-art coal cleaning; recovering over 80% of the available energy content in the run-of-mine coal; producing product and refuse with surface moisture below 30%. Originally the demonstration was to be of a Charger/Disc System at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Coal Quality Development Center (CQDC) at Homer City, Pennsylvania. As a result of the combination of Charger/Disc System scale-up problems and parallel development of an improved Vertical-Belt Separator, DOE issued a contract modification to perform additional laboratory testing and optimization of the UFC Vertical-Belt Separator System at AED. These comparative test results, safety analyses and an economic analysis are discussed in this report. 29 refs., 25 figs., 41 tabs.

  14. Bandwidth requirements for fine resolution squinted SAR

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.

    2000-03-01

    The conventional rule-of-thumb for Synthetic Aperture Radar is that an RF bandwidth of c/(2{rho}{sub r}) is required to image a scene at the desired slant-range resolution {rho}{sub r}, and perhaps a little more to account for window functions and sidelobe control. This formulation is based on the notion that the total bandwidth required is the same bandwidth that is required for a single pulse. What is neglected is that efficient processing of an entire synthetic aperture of pulses will often require different frequency content for each of the different pulses that makeup a synthetic aperture. Consequently, the total RF bandwidth required of a Synthetic Aperture Radar may then be substantially wider than the bandwidth of any single pulse. The actual RF bandwidth required depends strongly on flight geometry, owing to the desire for a radar to maintain a constant projection of the Fourier space collection surface onto the {omega}{sub y} axis. Long apertures required for fine azimuth resolution, and severe squint angles with steep depression angles may require total RF bandwidths well beyond the minimum bandwidth required of any single transmitted pulse, perhaps even by a factor of two or more. Accounting for this is crucial to designing efficient versatile high-performance imaging radars. This paper addresses how a data set conducive to efficient processing might increase the total RF bandwidth, and presents examples of how a fixed RF bandwidth might then limit SAR geometries.

  15. Approaching {lambda} without fine-tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Matarrese, Sabino; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Perrotta, Francesca

    2004-09-15

    We address the fine-tuning problem of dark energy cosmologies which arises when the dark energy density needs to initially lie in a narrow range in order for its present value to be consistent with observations. As recently noticed, this problem becomes particularly severe in canonical quintessence scenarios, when trying to reproduce the behavior of a cosmological constant, i.e., when the dark energy equation of state w{sub Q} approaches -1: these models may be reconciled with a large basin of attraction only by requiring a rapid evolution of w{sub Q} at low redshifts, which is in conflict with the most recent estimates from type Ia Supernovae discovered by Hubble space telescope. Next, we focus on scalar-tensor theories of gravity, discussing the implications of a coupling between the quintessence scalar field and the Ricci scalar ('extended quintessence'). We show that, even if the equation of state today is very close to -1, by virtue of the scalar-tensor coupling the quintessence trajectories still possess the attractive feature which allows to reach the present level of cosmic acceleration starting by a set of initial conditions which covers tens of orders of magnitude; this effect, entirely of gravitational origin, represents a new important consequence of the possible coupling between dark energy and gravity. We illustrate this effect in typical extended quintessence scenarios.

  16. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α ^{-6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δ α /α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10^{-5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing "dark energy" and "warm dark matter", but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter.

  17. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-12-31

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  18. Probing fine magnetic particles with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1991-01-01

    Because thermal neutrons are scattered both by nuclei and by unpaired electrons, they provide an ideal probe for studying the atomic and magnetic structures of fine-grained magnetic materials, including nanocrystalline solids, thin epitaxial layers, and colloidal suspensions of magnetic particles, known as ferrofluids. Diffraction, surface reflection, and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) are the techniques used. With the exception of surface reflection, these methods are described in this article. The combination of SANS with refractive-index matching and neutron polarisation analysis is particularly powerful because it allows the magnetic and atomic structures to be determined independently. This technique has been used to study both dilute and concentrated ferrofluid suspensions of relatively monodisperse cobalt particles, subjected to a series of applied magnetic fields. The size of the cobalt particle core and the surrounding surfactant layer were determined. The measured interparticle structure factor agrees well with a recent theory that allows correlations in binary mixtures of magnetic particles to be calculated in the case of complete magnetic alignment. When one of the species in such a binary mixture is a nonmagnetic, cyclindrical macromolecule, application of a magnetic field leads to some degree of alignment of the nonmagnetic species. This result has been demonstrated with tobacco mosaic virus suspended in a water-based ferrofluid.

  19. Compaction by impact of unconsolidated lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    New Hugoniot and release adiabat data for 1.8 g/cu cm lunar fines in the approximately 2 to 70 kbar range demonstrate that upon shock compression intrinsic crystal density (approximately 3.1 g/cu cm) is achieved under shock stress of 15 to 20 kbar. Release adiabat determinations indicate that measurable irreversible compaction occurs upon achieving shock pressures above approximately 4 kbar. For shocks in the approximately 7 to 15 kbar range, the inferred post-shock specific volumes observed decrease nearly linearly with increasing peak shock pressures. Upon shocking to approximately 15 kbar the post-shock density is approximately that of the intrinsic minerals. If the present data are taken to be representative of the response to impact of unconsolidated regolith material on the moon, it is inferred that the formation of appreciable quantities of soil breccia can be associated with the impact of meteoroids or ejecta at speeds as low as approximately 1 km/sec.

  20. Mathematical modeling of atmospheric fine particle-associated primary organic compound concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogge, Wolfgang F.; Hildemann, Lynn M.; Mazurek, Monica A.; Cass, Glen R.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric transport model has been used to explore the relationship between source emissions and ambient air quality for individual particle phase organic compounds present in primary aerosol source emissions. An inventory of fine particulate organic compound emissions was assembled for the Los Angeles area in the year 1982. Sources characterized included noncatalyst- and catalyst-equipped autos, diesel trucks, paved road dust, tire wear, brake lining dust, meat cooking operations, industrial oil-fired boilers, roofing tar pots, natural gas combustion in residential homes, cigarette smoke, fireplaces burning oak and pine wood, and plant leaf abrasion products. These primary fine particle source emissions were supplied to a computer-based model that simulates atmospheric transport, dispersion, and dry deposition based on the time series of hourly wind observations and mixing depths. Monthly average fine particle organic compound concentrations that would prevail if the primary organic aerosol were transported without chemical reaction were computed for more than 100 organic compounds within an 80 km × 80 km modeling area centered over Los Angeles. The monthly average compound concentrations predicted by the transport model were compared to atmospheric measurements made at monitoring sites within the study area during 1982. The predicted seasonal variation and absolute values of the concentrations of the more stable compounds are found to be in reasonable agreement with the ambient observations. While model predictions for the higher molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are in agreement with ambient observations, lower molecular weight PAH show much higher predicted than measured atmospheric concentrations in the particle phase, indicating atmospheric decay by chemical reactions or evaporation from the particle phase. The atmospheric concentrations of dicarboxylic acids and aromatic polycarboxylic acids greatly exceed the contributions that

  1. FINE PORE DIFFUSER FOULING: THE LOS ANGELES STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes five fine pore diffuser evaluations conducted at three different wastewater treatment plants located in the greater Los Angeles area. The overall goal of the study was to evaluate the performance of fine pore diffusers using selected cleaning methods for ex...

  2. Early Childhood Stunting and Later Fine Motor Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Susan M.; Walker, Susan P.; Grantham-McGregor, Sally; Powell, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of early childhood stunting (height for age 2SD or more below reference values) and interventions on fine motor abilities at 11 to 12 years, and the relationship between fine motor abilities and school achievement and intelligence. Method: A cohort of stunted children who had participated in…

  3. MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL OF FOULING IN FINE PORE DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: First, to define the efficiency of various methods of cleaning fine pore diffusers and, second, to develop a methodology that could be used to evaluate the efficiency of the cleaning techniques. Dirty fine pore domes from the North Texas Mu...

  4. FOULING OF FINE PORE DIFFUSED AERATORS: AN INTER- PLANT COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been increasing interest in fine pore aeration systems, along with concerned about diffuser fouling and the subsequent loss of aeration efficiency. The objective of this study was to assess the relative fouling tendency of fine bubble diffusers t nine activated sludge ...

  5. FINE AND COARSE PARTICLES: CONCENTRATION RELATIONSHIPS RELEVANT TO EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine particles and coarse particles are defined in terms of the modal structure of particle size distributions typically observed in the atmosphere. Differences among the various modes are discussed. The fractions of fine and coarse particles collected in specific size ranges, ...

  6. NASAL FILTERING OF FINE PARTICLES IN CHILDREN VS. ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nasal efficiency for removing fine particles may be affected by developmental changes in nasal structure associated with age. In healthy Caucasian children (age 6-13, n=17) and adults (age 18-28, n=11) we measured the fractional deposition (DF) of fine particles (1 and 2um MMAD)...

  7. 10 CFR 490.604 - Penalties and Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Penalties and Fines. 490.604 Section 490.604 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.604 Penalties and Fines. (a) Civil Penalties. Whoever violates § 490.603 of this part...

  8. 10 CFR 490.604 - Penalties and Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Penalties and Fines. 490.604 Section 490.604 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.604 Penalties and Fines. Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 66032, Dec. 14, 2009....

  9. 10 CFR 490.604 - Penalties and Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Penalties and Fines. 490.604 Section 490.604 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.604 Penalties and Fines. (a) Civil Penalties. Whoever violates § 490.603 of this part...

  10. 10 CFR 490.604 - Penalties and Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Penalties and Fines. 490.604 Section 490.604 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.604 Penalties and Fines. (a) Civil Penalties. Whoever violates § 490.603 of this part...

  11. 10 CFR 490.604 - Penalties and Fines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Penalties and Fines. 490.604 Section 490.604 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.604 Penalties and Fines. (a) Civil Penalties. Whoever violates § 490.603 of this part...

  12. 28 CFR 2.7 - Committed fines and restitution orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....7 Section 2.7 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND... on parole or mandatory release until payment of the fine, or until the fine commitment order is... the United States. (b) Restitution orders. Where a prisoner applying for parole is under an order...

  13. 28 CFR 2.7 - Committed fines and restitution orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....7 Section 2.7 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND... on parole or mandatory release until payment of the fine, or until the fine commitment order is... the United States. (b) Restitution orders. Where a prisoner applying for parole is under an order...

  14. 28 CFR 2.7 - Committed fines and restitution orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....7 Section 2.7 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND... on parole or mandatory release until payment of the fine, or until the fine commitment order is... the United States. (b) Restitution orders. Where a prisoner applying for parole is under an order...

  15. 28 CFR 2.7 - Committed fines and restitution orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....7 Section 2.7 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND... on parole or mandatory release until payment of the fine, or until the fine commitment order is... the United States. (b) Restitution orders. Where a prisoner applying for parole is under an order...

  16. Whole Brain Learning: The Fine Arts with Students at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Respress, Trinetia; Lutfi, Ghazwan

    2006-01-01

    Schools are searching for more effective strategies that will enable all students to thrive and succeed. Evidence indicates that the fine arts can provide a unique avenue for reaching challenging students with principles of brain-based learning. This article describes HEARTS, an after-school fine arts program which taps and develops the talents of…

  17. Development of fine motor skills in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Bos, Arend F; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N J A; Hitzert, Marrit M; Tanis, Jozien C; Roze, Elise

    2013-11-01

    Fine motor skills are related to functioning in daily life and at school. We reviewed the status of knowledge, in preterm children, on the development of fine motor skills, the relation with gross motor skills, and risk factors for impaired fine motor skills. We searched the past 15 years in PubMed, using ['motor skills' or 'fine motor function' and 'preterm infant'] as the search string. Impaired gross and fine motor skills are among the most frequently occurring problems encountered by preterm children who do not develop cerebral palsy. The prevalence is around 40% for mild to moderate impairment and 20% for moderate impairment. Fine motor skill scores on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children are about 0.62 of a standard deviation lower compared with term children. Risk factors for fine motor impairments include moderately preterm birth (odds ratio [OR] 2.0) and, among very preterm children (<32 wk gestation), intra-uterine growth restriction (ORs 2-3), inflammatory conditions (late-onset sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis, ORs 3-5), and dexamethasone therapy for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR 2.7). A better understanding of factors that play a role in the development of and recovery from brain injury could guide future intervention attempts aimed at improving fine motor skills of preterm children.

  18. Helping Preschoolers Prepare for Writing: Developing Fine Motor Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, J. Michelle; Fortenberry, Callie

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood is the most intensive period for the development of physical skills. Writing progress depends largely on the development of fine motor skills involving small muscle movements of the hand. Young children need to participate in a variety of developmentally appropriate activities intentionally designed to promote fine motor control.…

  19. Development of fine diameter mullite fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of a program to develop and evaluate mullite fiber with a mean diameter under two microns. The two micron fiber is produced by a blowing process at room temperature from a low viscosity (10-25 poise) solution. The blown fiber was evaluated for dimensional stability in thermal cycling to 1371 C, and was equivalent to the 5 micron spun B and W mullite fiber. An additive study was conducted to evaluate substitutes for the boron. Three levels of chromium, lithium fluoride, and magnesium were added to the standard composition in place of boron and the fiber produced was evaluated for chemical and dimensional stability in thermal cycling to 1371 C. The magnesium was the most chemically stable, but the chrome additive imparted the best dimensional stability.

  20. Engineered enzymes for chemical production.

    PubMed

    Luetz, Stephan; Giver, Lori; Lalonde, James

    2008-11-01

    In order to enable competitive manufacturing routes, most biocatalysts must be tailor-made for their processes. Enzymes from nature rarely have the combined properties necessary for industrial chemical production such as high activity and selectivity on non-natural substrates and toleration of high concentrations of organic media over the wide range of conditions (decreasing substrate, increasing product concentrations, solvents, etc.,) that will be present over the course of a manufacturing process. With the advances in protein engineering technologies, a variety of enzyme properties can be altered simultaneously, if the appropriate screening parameters are employed. Here we discuss the process of directed evolution for the generation of commercially viable biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals, and how novel approaches have helped to overcome some of the challenges.

  1. Microchannel systems for fine organic synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarshin, L. L.; Pai, Z. P.; Parmon, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    Characteristic features of application of microchannel systems in organic synthesis are analyzed. The advantages of such systems over conventional chemical engineering equipment, especially for small-scale processes that require fast implementation in industry to obtain small quantities of the product, are shown. Particular examples of successful use of microchannel reactors for various types of organic synthesis are given, primary attention being devoted to the design features of microchannel reactors. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  2. Dewatering studies of fine clean coal. Annual technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.

    1991-12-31

    The main objective of the present research program is to study and understand dewatering characteristics of ultrafine clean coal obtained using the advanced column flotation technique from the Kerr-McGee`s Galatia preparation plant fine coal waste stream. It is also the objective of the research program to utilize the basic study results, i.e., surface chemical, particle shape particle size distribution, etc., in developing a cost-effective dewatering method. The ultimate objective is to develop process criteria to obtain a dewatered clean coal product containing less that 20 percent moisture, using the conventional vacuum dewatering equipment. (VC)

  3. Very low isotope ratio of iron in fine aerosols related to its contribution to the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurisu, Minako; Takahashi, Yoshio; Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2016-09-01

    Seven size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected from Hiroshima, Japan, and were analyzed in terms of chemical composition, soluble fraction of iron (Fe), Fe species, and Fe isotope ratios. The results suggested that Fe in fine particles contained a larger fraction of anthropogenic aerosols than coarse particles did. Iron in the fine particles was more soluble in simulated seawater (up to 25%) than that in the coarse particles and was in the form of Fe (hydr)oxide species, such as ferrihydrite or hematite. The Fe isotope ratios (δ56Fe) of the coarse particles (+0.04‰ to +0.30‰) were close to the crustal mean value (0.0‰). By contrast, the δ56Fe values of fine particles were much lower and ranged from -2.01‰ to -0.56‰. δ56Fe values of the soluble Fe fraction in the fine particles were remarkably low (-3.91 to -1.87‰), suggesting that anthropogenic aerosols yield soluble Fe with low δ56Fe values. Such low values could be explained by kinetic isotope fractionation during evaporation of Fe at high temperatures, coupled with the refractory characteristics of Fe. Marine aerosols from the Northwest Pacific were also analyzed. The δ56Fe values in the fine particles were also lower than those in the coarse particles. These results may be important to quantitatively estimate the contribution of anthropogenic Fe deposited on the surface ocean on the basis of the Fe isotopes.

  4. Fines classification based on sensitivity to pore-fluid chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jang, Junbong; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The 75-μm particle size is used to discriminate between fine and coarse grains. Further analysis of fine grains is typically based on the plasticity chart. Whereas pore-fluid-chemistry-dependent soil response is a salient and distinguishing characteristic of fine grains, pore-fluid chemistry is not addressed in current classification systems. Liquid limits obtained with electrically contrasting pore fluids (deionized water, 2-M NaCl brine, and kerosene) are combined to define the soil “electrical sensitivity.” Liquid limit and electrical sensitivity can be effectively used to classify fine grains according to their fluid-soil response into no-, low-, intermediate-, or high-plasticity fine grains of low, intermediate, or high electrical sensitivity. The proposed methodology benefits from the accumulated experience with liquid limit in the field and addresses the needs of a broader range of geotechnical engineering problems.

  5. Source appointment of fine particle number and volume concentration during severe haze pollution in Beijing in January 2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yuesi; Hu, Bo; Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; Wu, Fangkun; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-04-01

    Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012-2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, particle number size distribution (PNSD) and particle chemical composition (PCC) data collected in an intensive winter campaign in an urban site of Beijing were used to investigate the sources of ambient fine particles. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis resolved a total of eight factors: two traffic factors, combustion factors, secondary aerosol, two accumulation mode aerosol factors, road dust, and long-range transported (LRT) dust. Traffic emissions (54%) and combustion aerosol (27%) were found to be the most important sources for particle number concentration, whereas combustion aerosol (33%) and accumulation mode aerosol (37%) dominated particle volume concentrations. Chemical compositions and sources of fine particles changed dynamically in the haze episodes. An enhanced role of secondary inorganic species was observed in the formation of haze pollution. Regional transport played an important role for high particles, contribution of which was on average up to 24-49% during the haze episodes. Secondary aerosols from urban background presented the largest contributions (45%) for the rapid increase of fine particles in the severest haze episode. In addition, the invasion of LRT dust aerosols further elevated the fine particles during the extreme haze episode. Our results showed a clear impact of regional transport on the local air pollution, suggesting the importance of regional-scale emission control measures in the local air quality management of Beijing.

  6. Delicious Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This paper presents an approach to chemistry and nutrition that focuses on food items that people consider delicious. Information is organized according to three categories of food chemicals that provide energy to the human body: (1) fats and oils; (2) carbohydrates; and (3) proteins. Minerals, vitamins, and additives are also discussed along with…

  7. Chemical Mahjong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  8. Fine velocity structures collisional dissipation in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    In a weakly collisional plasma, such as the solar wind, collisions are usually considered far too weak to produce any significant effect on the plasma dynamics [1]. However, the estimation of collisionality is often based on the restrictive assumption that the particle velocity distribution function (VDF) shape is close to Maxwellian [2]. On the other hand, in situ spacecraft measurements in the solar wind [3], as well as kinetic numerical experiments [4], indicate that marked non-Maxwellian features develop in the three-dimensional VDFs, (temperature anisotropies, generation of particle beams, ring-like modulations etc.) as a result of the kinetic turbulent cascade of energy towards short spatial scales. Therefore, since collisional effects are proportional to the velocity gradients of the VDF, the collisionless hypothesis may fail locally in velocity space. Here, the existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can increase locally due to the velocity space deformation of the particle velocity distribution. In particular, by means of Eulerian simulations of collisional relaxation of a spatially homogeneous force-free plasma, in which collisions among particles of the same species are modeled through the complete Landau operator, we show that the system entropy growth occurs over several time scales, inversely proportional to the steepness of the velocity gradients in the VDF. We report clear evidences that fine velocity structures are dissipated by collisions in a time much shorter than global non-Maxwellian features, like, for example, temperature anisotropies. Moreover we indicate that, if small-scale structures

  9. Stored carbon partly fuels fine-root respiration but is not used for production of new fine roots

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Douglas J; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser; Iversen, Colleen M; Norby, Richard J; Gonzalez-Meler, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    The relative use of new photosynthate compared to stored C for the production and maintenance of fine roots, and the rate of C turnover in heterogeneous fine-root populations, are poorly understood. We followed the relaxation of a 13C tracer in fine roots in a Liquidambar styraciflua plantation at the conclusion of a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment. Goals included quantifying the relative fractions of new photosynthate versus stored C used in root growth and root respiration, as well as the turnover rate of fine-root C fixed during [CO2] fumigation. New fine-root growth was largely from recent photosynthate, while nearly one-quarter of respired C was from a storage pool. Changes in the isotopic composition of the fine-root population over two full growing seasons indicated heterogeneous C pools; less than 10% of root C had a residence time < 3 months, while a majority of root C had a residence time > 2 years. Compared to a 1-pool model, a 2-pool model for C turnover in fine roots (with 5 and 0.37 yr-1 turnover times) doubles the fine-root contribution to forest NPP (9-13%) and supports the 50% root-to-soil transfer rate often used in models.

  10. Fine Structure and Function in Stentor polymorphus

    PubMed Central

    Randall, J. T.; Jackson, Sylvia Fitton

    1958-01-01

    The fine structure of the ciliate Stentor has been studied by means of the electron microscope and the results have been correlated with observations made on the living organism by means of light microscopy; special reference has been made to structural features which may be responsible for contraction and extension in Stentor. Descriptions have been given of the structure of the macronucleus, the vacuolated cytoplasm, mitochondria and the pellicle; a detailed study has also been made of the adoral membranelles. About 250 membranelles encircle the peristomal cap and each is composed of 3 rows of cilia, with 20 to 25 cilia in each row; a fibrillar root system connected with the membranelles depends into the endoplasm for about 20 µ and each is essentially in the shape of a fan, the terminal ends of each root bifurcating to connect to neighbouring roots. The membranelles thus form a cohesive unit and this morphological arrangement may have a bearing on the motion and coordination of the whole system. Two structural features extending throughout the length of the animal have been identified per cortical stripe in the body wall of Stentor; first, km fibres lying just beneath the pellicle are composed of stacks of fibrillar sheets and are identical with the birefringent fibres observed in the living animal. The individual fibrils of the sheets are in turn connected to the kinetosomes of the body cilia; thus the km fibres are homologous to kinetodesmata. Secondly, M bands lie beneath the km fibres and form an interconnected system in contact with the surrounding vacuolated cytoplasm; the thickness of the M bands is greatest at the base of a contracted animal. The contractile and extensile properties of these organelles have been discussed in the light of experimental results and theoretical considerations. PMID:13610947

  11. Fine structure and function in Stentor polymorphous.

    PubMed

    RANDALL, J T; JACKSON, S F

    1958-11-25

    The fine structure of the ciliate Stentor has been studied by means of the electron microscope and the results have been correlated with observations made on the living organism by means of light microscopy; special reference has been made to structural features which may be responsible for contraction and extension in Stentor. Descriptions have been given of the structure of the macronucleus, the vacuolated cytoplasm, mitochondria and the pellicle; a detailed study has also been made of the adoral membranelles. About 250 membranelles encircle the peristomal cap and each is composed of 3 rows of cilia, with 20 to 25 cilia in each row; a fibrillar root system connected with the membranelles depends into the endoplasm for about 20 micro and each is essentially in the shape of a fan, the terminal ends of each root bifurcating to connect to neighbouring roots. The membranelles thus form a cohesive unit and this morphological arrangement may have a bearing on the motion and coordination of the whole system. Two structural features extending throughout the length of the animal have been identified per cortical stripe in the body wall of Stentor; first, km fibres lying just beneath the pellicle are composed of stacks of fibrillar sheets and are identical with the birefringent fibres observed in the living animal. The individual fibrils of the sheets are in turn connected to the kinetosomes of the body cilia; thus the km fibres are homologous to kinetodesmata. Secondly, M bands lie beneath the km fibres and form an interconnected system in contact with the surrounding vacuolated cytoplasm; the thickness of the M bands is greatest at the base of a contracted animal. The contractile and extensile properties of these organelles have been discussed in the light of experimental results and theoretical considerations.

  12. Characterization of fine fraction mined from two Finnish landfills.

    PubMed

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2016-01-01

    A fine fraction (FF) was mined from two Finnish municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in Kuopio (1- to 10-year-old, referred as new landfill) and Lohja (24- to 40-year-old, referred as old landfill) in order to characterize FF. In Kuopio the FF (<20mm) was on average 45±7% of the content of landfill and in Lohja 58±11%. Sieving showed that 86.5±5.7% of the FF was smaller than 11.2mm and the fraction resembled soil. The total solids (TS) content was 46-82%, being lower in the bottom layers compared to the middle layers. The organic matter content (measured as volatile solids, VS) and the biochemical methane potential (BMP) of FF were lower in the old landfill (VS/TS 12.8±7.1% and BMP 5.8±3.4 m(3)CH4/t TS) than in the new landfill (VS/TS 21.3±4.3% and BMP 14.4±9.9 m(3)CH4/t TS), and both were lower compared with fresh MSW. In the Kuopio landfill materials were also mechanically sieved in the full scale plant in two size fraction <30 mm (VS/TS 31.1% and 32.9 m(3)CH4/t TS) and 30-70 mm (VS/TS 50.8% and BMP 78.5m(3)CH4/t TS). The nitrogen (3.5±2.0 g/kg TS), phosphorus (<1.0-1.5 g/kg TS) and soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) (2.77±1.77 kg/t TS) contents were low in all samples. Since FF is major fraction of the content of landfill, the characterization of FF is important to find possible methods for using or disposing FF mined from landfills.

  13. Fine particle receptor modeling in the atmosphere of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Vega, Elizabeth; Lowenthal, Douglas; Ruiz, Hugo; Reyes, Elizabeth; Watson, John G; Chow, Judith C; Viana, Mar; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés

    2009-12-01

    Source apportionment analyses were carried out by means of receptor modeling techniques to determine the contribution of major fine particulate matter (PM2.5) sources found at six sites in Mexico City. Thirty-six source profiles were determined within Mexico City to establish the fingerprints of particulate matter sources. Additionally, the profiles under the same source category were averaged using cluster analysis and the fingerprints of 10 sources were included. Before application of the chemical mass balance (CMB), several tests were carried out to determine the best combination of source profiles and species used for the fitting. CMB results showed significant spatial variations in source contributions among the six sites that are influenced by local soil types and land use. On average, 24-hr PM2.5 concentrations were dominated by mobile source emissions (45%), followed by secondary inorganic aerosols (16%) and geological material (17%). Industrial emissions representing oil combustion and incineration contributed less than 5%, and their contribution was higher at the industrial areas of Tlalnepantla (11%) and Xalostoc (8%). Other sources such as cooking, biomass burning, and oil fuel combustion were identified at lower levels. A second receptor model (principal component analysis, [PCA]) was subsequently applied to three of the monitoring sites for comparison purposes. Although differences were obtained between source contributions, results evidence the advantages of the combined use of different receptor modeling techniques for source apportionment, given the complementary nature of their results. Further research is needed in this direction to reach a better agreement between the estimated source contributions to the particulate matter mass.

  14. Investigation of fine nanoparticles syngas catalyst (POM) considering their various morphology.

    PubMed

    Fakhroueian, Z; Shafiekhani, A; Yousefi, M; Langroudi, N Afroukhteh; Karami, M; Varmazyar, H; Hemmati, M; Satari, S

    2010-02-01

    Ni/SiO2 fine nanoparticles were prepared by coprecipitation method using various nonionic surfactants as templates with Tylose as a binder dispersant. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) have been used to study the templates influence on the morphology of the produced samples. Although the phase structure remained as a tetrahedron amorphous cristobalite-sin-SiO2 (101,100), rhombohedron and cubic NiO, but samples with different morphology (homogeneous nano spherical, nano rose flower and nano cubic shapes) have been achieved. These fine nanoparticles as syngas catalysts in Partial Oxidation of Methane to Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide (POM) have been studied. Because of high Hydrogen production, it is a candidate to be a green fuel. A fixed-bed reactor at P = 1 atm, T = 800 degrees C, H2/CO = 1.8, GHSV (CH4) = 6000/hr and BET = 25, 63.5 and 87.1 m2/gr have been used as POM catalyst. From other hand these fine compounds could be converted to metallic nanotube (nanofiber) at above 850 degrees C and also bamboo shape tip mode carbon nanotube by thermal chemical vapor deposition at 800 degrees C. Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the metallic nanotube or single nano crystal growth. The Raman spectroscopy of all samples has been studied to confirm the different formation of Ni-Si. Choosing different templates for production of these nanoparticles could create width range of medical and industrial applications.

  15. Magnetic separation studies on ferruginous chromite fine to enhance Cr:Fe ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Sunil Kumar; Banerjee, P. K.; Suresh, Nikkam

    2015-03-01

    The Cr:Fe ratio (chromium-to-iron mass ratio) of chromite affects the production of chrome-based ferroalloys. Although the literature contains numerous reports related to the magnetic separation of different minerals, limited work concerning the application of magnetic separation to fine chromite from the Sukinda region of India to enhance its Cr:Fe ratio has been reported. In the present investigation, magnetic separation and mineralogical characterization studies of chromite fines were conducted to enhance the Cr:Fe ratio. Characterization studies included particle size and chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction analysis, automated mineral analysis, sink-and-float studies, and magnetic susceptibility measurements, whereas magnetic separation was investigated using a rare earth drum magnetic separator, a rare earth roll magnetic separator, an induced roll magnetic separator, and a wet high-intensity magnetic separator. The fine chromite was observed to be upgraded to a Cr:Fe ratio of 2.2 with a yield of 55.7% through the use of an induced roll magnetic separator and a feed material with a Cr:Fe ratio of 1.6.

  16. Extrinsic lactose fines improve dry powder inhaler formulation performance of a cohesive batch of budesonide via agglomerate formation and consequential co-deposition.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Hanne; Hebbink, Gerald; Peters, Harry; Huck, Deborah; Makein, Lisa; Price, Robert

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate how the fine particle content of lactose carriers prepared with different types of lactose fines regulates dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation performance of a cohesive batch of micronised budesonide. Budesonide formulations (0.8 wt%) were prepared with three different lactose carriers (Lactohale (LH) LH100, 20 wt% LH210 in LH100 and 20 wt% LH300 in LH100). Fine particle fraction of emitted dose (FPFED) and mean mass aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of budesonide was assessed with a Next Generation Impactor (NGI) using a Cyclohaler at 90 l/min. Morphological and chemical characteristics of particles deposited on Stage 2 were determined using a Malvern Morphologi G3-ID. The results indicate that increasing concentration of lactose fines (<4.5 μm) not only increased the FPFED but also the MMAD of budesonide, suggesting drug deposition in agglomerates. Presence of agglomerates on Stage 2 was confirmed by morphological analysis of particles. Raman analysis of material collected on Stage 2 indicated that the more fine lactose particles were available the more agglomerates of budesonide and lactose were delivered to Stage 2. These results suggest drug-fines agglomerate formation is an important mechanism for how lactose fines improve and regulate DPI formulation performance.

  17. Fundamental hair follicle biology and fine fibre production in animals.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, H

    2010-09-01

    Hair 'fine' fibre is an important commercial product of farmed and certain wild animal species. The fibre is produced in follicles embedded in skin. These have properties in common with other tissues of the integument and have importance in determining yield and quality of fibre. Means of understanding and improving these characteristics are informed by knowledge of integumental and follicle biology. This paper reviews contemporary information that identifies the major fibre-producing species and their production characteristic. It surveys knowledge describing fundamental biology of the integument and considers information derived for the hair follicle from studies on a number of species including genetically modified mice. It identifies the composition of the follicle and describes components and interrelationships between epidermal hair-fibre producing epidermis and fibroblast- and connective tissue-containing dermis. The structure of different primary and secondary follicle types, and associated structures, are described. Focus is given to the alterations in anatomy and in behaviour from active to inactive state, which occurs during the hair follicle cycle. Information is provided on the anatomical substructures (hair medulla, cortex, cuticles and supporting sheaths and dermal papilla), cellular and extracellular composition, and adhesion and chemical signalling systems, which regulate development from the early embryo to post-natal state and subsequent cycling. Such signalling involves the dermis and its specialist fibroblasts, which secrete signalling molecules, which along with those from local epidermis and systemic sources, largely determine structure and function of epidermal cells. Such chemical signalling typically includes endocrine-, paracrine-, autocrine- and juxtacrine-acting molecules and interactions with their receptors located on cell membranes or intracellularly with transduction of message mediated by transcription factors at gene level

  18. A nanobuffer reporter library for fine-scale imaging and perturbation of endocytic organelles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Endosomes, lysosomes and related catabolic organelles are a dynamic continuum of vacuolar structures that impact a number of cell physiological processes such as protein/lipid metabolism, nutrient sensing and cell survival. Here we develop a library of ultra-pH-sensitive fluorescent nanoparticles with chemical properties that allow fine-scale, multiplexed, spatio-temporal perturbation and quantification of catabolic organelle maturation at single organelle resolution to support quantitative investigation of these processes in living cells.

  19. Fine-grained representation learning in convolutional autoencoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chang; Wang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Convolutional autoencoders (CAEs) have been widely used as unsupervised feature extractors for high-resolution images. As a key component in CAEs, pooling is a biologically inspired operation to achieve scale and shift invariances, and the pooled representation directly affects the CAEs' performance. Fine-grained pooling, which uses small and dense pooling regions, encodes fine-grained visual cues and enhances local characteristics. However, it tends to be sensitive to spatial rearrangements. In most previous works, pooled features were obtained by empirically modulating parameters in CAEs. We see the CAE as a whole and propose a fine-grained representation learning law to extract better fine-grained features. This representation learning law suggests two directions for improvement. First, we probabilistically evaluate the discrimination-invariance tradeoff with fine-grained granularity in the pooled feature maps, and suggest the proper filter scale in the convolutional layer and appropriate whitening parameters in preprocessing step. Second, pooling approaches are combined with the sparsity degree in pooling regions, and we propose the preferable pooling approach. Experimental results on two independent benchmark datasets demonstrate that our representation learning law could guide CAEs to extract better fine-grained features and performs better in multiclass classification task. This paper also provides guidance for selecting appropriate parameters to obtain better fine-grained representation in other convolutional neural networks.

  20. Hydrophobic flocculation flotation for beneficiating fine coal and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.; Valdivieso, A.L.

    1998-06-01

    It is shown that hydrophobic flocculation flotation (HFF) is an effective process to treat finely ground ores and slimes so as to concentrate coal and mineral values at a fine size range. The process is based on first dispersing the fine particles suspension, followed by flocculation of fine mineral values or coal in the form of hydrophobic surfaces either induced by specifically adsorbed surfactants or from nature at the conditioning of the slurry with the shear field of sufficient magnitude. The flocculation is intensified by the addition of a small amount of nonpolar oil. finely ground coals, ilmenite slimes, and gold finely disseminated in a slag have been treated by this process. Results are presented indicating that cleaned coal with low ash and sulfur remaining and high Btu recovery can be obtained, and the refractory ores of ilmenite slimes and fine gold-bearing slag can be reasonably concentrated, leading to better beneficiation results than other separation techniques. In addition, the main operating parameters affecting the HFF process are discussed.

  1. Motivating adolescents to reduce their fines in a token economy.

    PubMed

    Miller, R P; Cosgrove, J M; Doke, L

    1990-01-01

    Adolescents on a 16-bed token economy ward of a state hospital were subjected to four interventions in a seven-phase experiment to reduce the number of fines they received each day. Phase I was a four-week baseline period. Phases II and III were four- and five-week periods, respectively, in which residents were awarded tickets for a weekly $10 lottery each day they were at or below a changing criterion of daily fines. In Phase IV, residents received coupons, exchangeable for money, for days with zero fines. Phase V was a return to baseline. Phase VI was a one-week period in which daily lotteries for $1 were held, with the criterion for receiving a ticket being zero fines on the previous day. Phase VII was a one-week return to baseline. No significant differences in average fines per day, number of residents meeting criteria, or mean number of zero-fine days per week were found across phases. Results are discussed in terms of amount and immediacy of reinforcement, other opportunities to gain money, possible rebelliousness of the residents against the increased aversiveness of fines, and implications for further research.

  2. Chemical warfare

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Richard Ian; Mattoso, Thalles Cardoso; Moreira, Denise D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-cutting ants are well known for their highly complex social organization, which provides them with a strong defense against parasites invading their colonies. Besides this attribute, these insects have morphological, physiological and structural characteristics further reinforcing the defense of their colonies. With the discovery of symbiotic bacteria present on the integument of leaf-cutting ants, a new line of defense was proposed and considered to be specific for the control of a specialized fungal parasite of the ants’ fungus gardens (Escovopsis). However, recent studies have questioned the specificity of the integumental bacteria, as they were also found to inhibit a range of fungi, including entomopathogens. The microbiota associated with the leaf-cutting ant gardens has also been proposed as another level of chemical defense, protecting the garden from parasite invasion. Here we review the chemical defense weaponry deployed by leaf-cutting ants against parasites of their fungus gardens and of the ants themselves. PMID:23795235

  3. Chemically Prepared Lead Magnesium Niobate Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Olson, W.R.; Goy, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    A chemical solution powder synthesis technique has been developed that produces fine uniform powders of lead magnesium niobate (PMN) with 60 to 80 nm crystallite size. The synthesis technique was based on the dissolution of lead acetate and alkoxide precursors in acetic acid followed by precipitation with oxalic acid/propanol solutions. Lead magnesium niobate ceramics fabricated from these chemically derived powders had smaller, more uniform grain size and higher dielectric constants than ceramics fabricated from mixed oxide powders that were processed under similar thermal conditions.

  4. Testing the MODIS Satellite Retrieval of Aerosol Fine-Mode Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Theodore L.; Wu, Yonghua; Chu, D. Allen; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dubovik, Oleg

    2005-01-01

    Satellite retrievals of the fine-mode fraction (FMF) of midvisible aerosol optical depth, tau, are potentially valuable for constraining chemical transport models and for assessing the global distribution of anthropogenic aerosols. Here we compare satellite retrievals of FMF from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to suborbital data on the submicrometer fraction (SMF) of tau. SMF is a closely related parameter that is directly measurable by in situ techniques. The primary suborbital method uses in situ profiling of SMF combined with airborne Sun photometry both to validate the in situ estimate of ambient extinction and to take into account the aerosol above the highest flight level. This method is independent of the satellite retrieval and has well-known accuracy but entails considerable logistical and technical difficulties. An alternate method uses Sun photometer measurements near the surface and an empirical relation between SMF and the Angstrom exponent, A, a measure of the wavelength dependence of optical depth or extinction. Eleven primary and fifteen alternate comparisons are examined involving varying mixtures of dust, sea salt, and pollution in the vicinity of Korea and Japan. MODIS ocean retrievals of FMF are shown to be systematically higher than suborbital estimates of SMF by about 0.2. The most significant cause of this discrepancy involves the relationship between 5 and fine-mode partitioning; in situ measurements indicate a systematically different relationship from what is assumed in the satellite retrievals. Based on these findings, we recommend: (1) satellite programs should concentrate on retrieving and validating since an excellent validation program is in place for doing this, and (2) suborbital measurements should be used to derive relationships between A and fine-mode partitioning to allow interpretation of the satellite data in terms of fine-mode aerosol optical depth.

  5. Dewatering studies of fine clean coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, B.K.

    1992-12-31

    Physical cleaning of ultra-fine coal using advanced froth flotation technique provides a low ash product; however, the amount of water associated with clean coal is high. Economic removal of water from the froth will be important for commercial applicability of the advanced flotation processes. The main objective of the present research program is to study and understand dewatering characteristics of ultra-fine clean coal and to develop process parameters to effectively reduce the moisture to less than 20 percent in the clean coal product. The research approach utilized synergistic effect of metal ions and surfactant addition to lower the moisture of clean coal using the conventional vacuum dewatering technique. The studies have identified a combinations of metal ions and surfactants in providing a 22 percent moisture filter cake. Surface chemical study indicated a direct correlation between the point-of-zero charge (PZC) of metal ion/fine coal system and lowering of moisture in the filter cake. Adsorption of either metal ions or surfactants alone did not provide a significant reduction of moisture in the filter cake. However, a combination of the two provided a filter cake containing about 22 percent moisture. Filtration tests conducted using a laboratory vacuum drum filter indicated that the results obtained in batch filtration could be reproduced on a continuous filtration unit. FT-IR studies indicated that anionic surfactant and metal ions form complex species which adsorbs on the fine coal and results in improved moisture reduction during filtration. Recommendations are offered for testing this novel dewatering process on a pilot scale at a coal preparation plant in Illinois.

  6. Fine tuning of social integration by two myrmecophiles of the ponerine army ant, Leptogenys distinguenda.

    PubMed

    Witte, Volker; Foitzik, Susanne; Hashim, Rosli; Maschwitz, Ulrich; Schulz, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    Myrmecophiles are animals that live in close association with ants and that frequently develop elaborate mechanisms to infiltrate their well-defended host societies. We compare the social integration strategies of two myrmecophilic species, the spider, Gamasomorpha maschwitzi, and the newly described silverfish, Malayatelura ponerophila gen. n. sp. n., into colonies of the ponerine army ant, Leptogenys distinguenda (Emery) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Both symbionts use chemical mimicry through adoption of host cuticular hydrocarbons. Exchange experiments between L. distinguenda and an undetermined Leptogenys species demonstrate that reduced aggression toward alien ants and increased social acceptance occurred with individuals of higher chemical similarity in their cuticular hydrocarbon profiles. We found striking differences in chemical and behavioral strategies between the two myrmecophiles. Spider cuticular hydrocarbon profiles were chemically less similar to the host than silverfish profiles were. Nevertheless, spiders received significantly fewer attacks from host ants and survived longer in laboratory colonies, whereas silverfish were treated with high aggression and were killed more frequently. When discovered and confronted by the host, silverfish tended to escape and were chased aggressively, whereas spiders remained in contact with the confronting host ant until aggression ceased. Thus, spiders relied less on chemical mimicry but were nevertheless accepted more frequently by the host on the basis of behavioral mechanisms. These findings give insights into the fine tuning of social integration mechanisms and show the significance of qualitative differences among strategies.

  7. HST's Fine Guidance Sensors: Better Than Ever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, D.; Nelan, E.; Makidon, R.

    2000-12-01

    The Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) support the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and its myriad of instruments by providing highly accurate guiding. However, the FGS are themselves capable of very impressive science through observations in two modes, POSITION and TRANSFER, for wide angle and narrow angle astrometry, respectively. In POSITION mode, a star's interferometric fringes are tracked to precisely determine its location in the detector's field of view. Using this method, parallax and proper and reflex (if the star has a massive companion) motions can be measured to a per-observation accuracy of about 1mas. Over multiple epochs, the accuracy approaches 0.2mas. TRANSFER mode observations are executed by repeatedly scanning an object's fringe pattern to obtain the necessary S/N, resulting in an interferogram with sub-mas sampling. Post-observation, these scans are analyzed and compared to point source calibration fringes to identify binary systems and to measure the angular separation, position angle and relative brightness of their components. Close binary systems can be detected down to about 7mas, for V < 12, and 12mas for V=15. Observations taken in the two modes can be combined for deriving the total and fractional masses of binary systems, and subsequently the mass-luminosity relationship of the binary components. The FGS are also capable of non-point source observations. In the past, they have been used to determine the angular diameter of a stellar disc, and have also observed asteroids and planetary moons, measuring their angular sizes down to about 8mas. Furthermore, the FGS are also an excellent 40 Hz photometer, offering milli-magnitude accuracy for relative photometry at 1 second intervals (V=10). This technique was used to study the thermal structure of the Neptunian moon Triton when it occulted a star. During SM2 (1997), FGS1 was replaced with a refurbished sensor, FGS1r. Its improvements include an internal mechanism capable of tip/tilt articulation, to

  8. Fine tuning of activity for nanoscale catalysts.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; van derVliet, D.; Lucas, C.; Karapetrov, G.; Markovic, N.; Stamenkovic, V.; Materials Science Division

    2008-01-01

    similar levels of catalytic enhancement have been established for corresponding nanoscale materials. In addition to electronic properties we have found how catalytic activity could be affected by the arrangement of surface defects on nanoscale surfaces. Ability to control surface and near surface catalyst properties enables fine tuning of catalytic activity and stability of nanoscale surfaces.

  9. Search for magnetite in lunar rocks and fines.

    PubMed

    Jedwab, J; Herbosch, A; Wollast, R; Naessens, G; Van Geen-Peers, N

    1970-01-30

    Magnetite crystals larger than 2 micrometers are absent from rocks and fines. Smaller opaque spheres in the fines can tentatively be identified as magnetite. Their concentration is not higher than 1 x 10(-6) particle per particle smaller than 1 millimeter. In the fines from the sampling site, the contribution of material similar to type 1 carbonaceous meteorites is insignificant, either because it never existed, or because it was evaporated or comminuted by impact or was diluted by indigenous material. Other magnetite habits typical of carbonaceous meteorites or possibly of cosmic dust or comets were also sought without success-such as rods, platelets, framboids, spherulites, and idiomorphic crystals.

  10. A Place for Fine Arts: A Study of Illinois Administrators' Attitudes, Participation in and Support of the Fine Arts in K-12 Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Debbra Louise

    2012-01-01

    llinois K-12 public education administrators' attitudes about, participation in and support of the fine arts were investigated to determine what impact those experiences might have on the inclusion of fine arts in the schools they lead. A secondary consideration was if attitudes toward the fine arts played a role in the inclusion of the fine arts…

  11. Porphyrinoids for Chemical Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Paolesse, Roberto; Nardis, Sara; Monti, Donato; Stefanelli, Manuela; Di Natale, Corrado

    2017-02-22

    Porphyrins and related macrocycles have been intensively exploited as sensing materials in chemical sensors, since in these devices they mimic most of their biological functions, such as reversible binding, catalytic activation, and optical changes. Such a magnificent bouquet of properties allows applying porphyrin derivatives to different transducers, ranging from nanogravimetric to optical devices, also enabling the realization of multifunctional chemical sensors, in which multiple transduction mechanisms are applied to the same sensing layer. Potential applications are further expanded through sensor arrays, where cross-selective sensing layers can be applied for the analysis of complex chemical matrices. The possibility of finely tuning the macrocycle properties by synthetic modification of the different components of the porphyrin ring, such as peripheral substituents, molecular skeleton, coordinated metal, allows creating a vast library of porphyrinoid-based sensing layers. From among these, one can select optimal arrays for a particular application. This feature is particularly suitable for sensor array applications, where cross-selective receptors are required. This Review briefly describes chemical sensor principles. The main part of the Review is divided into two sections, describing the porphyrin-based devices devoted to the detection of gaseous or liquid samples, according to the corresponding transduction mechanism. Although most devices are based on porphyrin derivatives, seminal examples of the application of corroles or other porphyrin analogues are evidenced in dedicated sections.

  12. 77 FR 55505 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; AMPAC Fine Chemicals LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the...

  13. 78 FR 46372 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Ampac Fine Chemicals, LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Methylphenidate (1724) II Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II Tapentadol (9780) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will...

  14. 77 FR 30026 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Notice of Application, Ampac Fine Chemicals LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Thebaine (9333) II Poppy Straw Concentrate (9670) II The company is a contract manufacturer. In reference to Poppy Straw Concentrate the company will manufacture Thebaine intermediates for sale to...

  15. Processing of waste material of radix physochlainae for preparation of fine chemicals after extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, A.; Yohannes, A.; Feng, X. T.; Yao, S.

    2017-02-01

    Waste residues of Chinese traditional medicine radix physochlainae (Huashanshen) contain a large amount of hemicelluloses after extraction. After the removal of the cellulose and lignin, main components of the solution are different degree of hydrolysis products of hemicelluloses. In the degradation process, hemicelluloses firstly become pentose, and then pentose loses 3 molecules of water and turns into furfural. This study explored a series of conditions of the method; finally the yield of furfural can reach 8.5% (calculated with the weight of raw residues) under the condition of pH of 0.2-0.3, temperature of 104-106°C, hydrolysis duration for 10 minutes. Furfural can be further processed to be resin materials.

  16. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Bio-Active Heterocycles and Fine Chemicals in Aqueous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human health, especially in the aging population, mostly depends on various medicines, and researchers are combating against emerging diseases by new drug discovery. Heterocyclic compounds hold a special place among pharmaceutically active natural products as well as synthetic co...

  17. Influences of fireworks on chemical characteristics of atmospheric fine and coarse particles during Taiwan's Lantern Festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Hung; Chien, Li-Hsing; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Jen, Yi-Hsiu; Ie, Iau-Ren

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, the celebration activities of various folk-custom festivals have been getting more and more attention from the citizens in Taiwan. Festivities throughout the whole island are traditionally accompanied by loud and brightly colored firework displays. Among these activities, the firework displays during Taiwan's Lantern Festival in Kaohsiung harbor is one of the largest festivals in Taiwan each year. Therefore, it is of importance to investigate the influence of fireworks displays on the ambient air quality during the Taiwan's Lantern Festival. Field measurements of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) were conducted on February 9th-11th, 2009 during Taiwan's Lantern Festival in Kaohsiung City. Moreover, three kinds of fireworks powders obtained from the same manufacturing factory producing Kaohsiung Lantern Festival fireworks were burned in a self-designed combustion chamber to determine the physicochemical properties of the fireworks' particles and to establish the source profile of firework burning. Several metallic elements of PM during the firework display periods were notably higher than those during the non-firework periods. The concentrations of Mg, K, Pb, and Sr in PM2.5 during the firework periods were 10 times higher than those during the non-firework periods. Additionally, the Cl-/Na+ ratio was approximately 3 during the firework display periods as Cl- came from the chlorine content of the firework powder. Moreover, the OC/EC ratio increased up to 2.8. Results obtained from PCA and CMB receptor modeling showed that major sources of atmospheric particles during the firework display periods in Kaohsiung harbor were fireworks, vehicular exhausts, soil dusts and marine sprays. Particularly, on February 10th, the firework displays contributed approximately 25.2% and 16.6% of PM10 at two downwind sampling sites, respectively.

  18. Geochemistry of Fine-grained Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, B. B.; Lyons, T. W.

    2003-12-01

    The nature of detrital sedimentary (siliciclastic) rocks is determined by geological processes that occur in the four main Earth surface environments encountered over the sediment's history from source to final sink: (i) the site of sediment production (provenance), where interactions among bedrock geology, tectonic uplift, and climate control weathering and erosion processes; (ii) the transport path, where the medium of transport, gradient, and distance to the depositional basin may modify the texture and composition of weathered material; (iii) the site of deposition, where a suite of physical, chemical, and biological processes control the nature of sediment accumulation and early burial modification; and (iv) the conditions of later burial, where diagenetic processes may further alter the texture and composition of buried sediments. Many of these geological processes leave characteristic geochemical signatures, making detrital sedimentary rocks one of the most important archives of geochemical data available for reconstructions of ancient Earth surface environments. Although documentation of geochemical data has long been a part of the study of sedimentation (e.g., Twenhofel, 1926, 1950; Pettijohn, 1949; Trask, 1955), the development and application of geochemical methods specific to sedimentary geological problems blossomed in the period following the Second World War ( Degens, 1965; Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971) and culminated in recent years, as reflected by the publication of various texts on marine geochemistry (e.g., Chester, 1990, 2000), biogeochemistry (e.g., Schlesinger, 1991; Libes, 1992), and organic geochemistry (e.g., Tissot and Welte, 1984; Engel and Macko, 1993).Coincident with the growth of these subdisciplines a new focus has emerged in the geological sciences broadly represented under the title of "Earth System Science" (e.g., Kump et al., 1999). Geochemistry has played the central role in this revolution (e.g., Berner, 1980; Garrels and Lerman

  19. Assessing the in vitro toxicity of the lunar dust environment using respiratory cells exposed to Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) fine dust particles.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jacqueline A; Verhoff, Ashley M; Morgan, Julie E; Fischer, David G

    2009-12-01

    Prior chemical and physical analysis of lunar soil suggests a composition of dust particles that may contribute to the development of acute and chronic respiratory disorders. In this study, fine Al(2)O(3) (0.7 μm) and fine SiO(2) (mean 1.6 μm) were used to assess the cellular uptake and cellular toxicity of lunar dust particle analogs. Respiratory cells, murine alveolar macrophages (RAW 264.7) and human type II epithelial (A549), were cultured as the in vitro model system. The phagocytic activity of both cell types using ultrafine (0.1 μm) and fine (0.5 μm) fluorescent polystyrene beads was determined. Following a 6-h exposure, RAW 264.7 cells had extended pseudopods with beads localized in the cytoplasmic region of cells. After 24 h, the macrophage cells were rounded and clumped and lacked pseudopods, which suggest impairment of phagocytosis. A549 cells did not contain beads, and after 24 h, the majority of the beads appeared to primarily coat the surface of the cells. Next, we investigated the cellular response to fine SiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) (up to 5 mg/ml). RAW 264.7 cells exposed to 1.0 mg/ml of fine SiO(2) for 6 h demonstrated pseudopods, cellular damage, apoptosis, and necrosis. A549 cells showed slight toxicity when exposed to fine SiO(2) for the same time and dose. A549 cells had particles clustered on the surface of the cells. Only a higher dose (5.0 mg/ml) of fine SiO(2) resulted in a significant cytotoxicity to A549 cells. Most importantly, both cell types showed minimal cytotoxicity following exposure to fine Al(2)O(3). Overall, this study suggests differential cellular toxicity associated with exposure to fine mineral dust particles.

  20. Ordering of Fine Particles in a Planar Magnetron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Totsuji, H.; Ishihara, O.; Sato, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Adachi, S.

    2008-09-07

    Fine particles injected in a planar magnetron were pushed upward by diffusible plasma, leading to being suspended by the force balance with the gravity and forming three-dimensional structures on the two-dimensional structure formed by particle strings.

  1. Fine Structure of Solar Acoustic Oscillations Due to Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, P. R.; Dziembowski, W.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the fine structure of high order, low degree five minute period solar oscillations following from various postulated forms of spherical rotation is predicted. The first and second order effects of rotation are included.

  2. Fine Guidance System for the James Webb Space Telescope Delivered

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video has music in the background but no dialogue. The second of four main instruments to fly aboard NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) has been delivered to NASA. The Fine Guidance Sensor (F...

  3. AQUEOUS BIPHASE EXTRACTION FOR PROCESSING OF FINE COAL

    SciTech Connect

    K. Osseo-Asare; X. Zeng

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop an aqueous biphase extraction process for the treatment of fine coals. Aqueous biphase extraction is an advanced separation technology that relies on the ability of an aqueous system consisting of a water-soluble polymer and another component, e.g., another polymer, an inorganic salt, or a nonionic surfactant, to separate into two immiscible aqueous phases. The principle behind the partition of solid particles in aqueous biphase systems is the physicochemical interaction between the solid surface and the surrounding liquid solution. In order to remove sulfur and mineral matter from fine coal with aqueous biphasic extraction, it is necessary to know the partitioning behavior of coal, as well as the inorganic mineral components. Therefore, in this research emphasis was placed on the partitioning behavior of fine coal particles as well as model fine inorganic particles in aqueous biphase systems.

  4. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    Method of producing fine-grain silicon carbide powder comprises combining methyltrimethoxysilane with a solution of phenolic resin, acetone and water or sugar and water, gelling the resulting mixture, and then drying and heating the obtained gel.

  5. Moving forward with fine-root definitions and research

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, M. Luke; Iversen, Colleen M.; Eissenstat, David M.

    2016-08-30

    Here, in the letter published in this issue of New Phytologist (pp. 310-312), 'Fine roots - functional definition expanded to crop species?' Dr. Zobel emphasizes the importance of heterogeneity within crop-root systems.

  6. Moving forward with fine-root definitions and research

    DOE PAGES

    McCormack, M. Luke; Iversen, Colleen M.; Eissenstat, David M.

    2016-08-30

    Here, in the letter published in this issue of New Phytologist (pp. 310-312), 'Fine roots - functional definition expanded to crop species?' Dr. Zobel emphasizes the importance of heterogeneity within crop-root systems.

  7. Fine pointing control for free-space optical communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portillo, A. A.; Ortiz, G. G.; Racho, C.

    2000-01-01

    Free-Space Optical Communications requires precise, stable laser pointing to maintain operating conditions. This paper also describes the software and hardware implementation of Fine Pointing Control based on the Optical Communications Demonstrator architecture.

  8. 11. Photocopy of photograph by Commission of Fine Arts, Washington, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph by Commission of Fine Arts, Washington, DC. Date and photographer unknown. CLOSE UP OF ARMILLARY SPHERE - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy by Commission of Fine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy by Commission of Fine Arts Staff FIRST-SECOND- FLOOR PLAN, 1973 J. L. Sibley Jennings, Jr., Delineator - Joseph Beale House, 2301 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy by Commission of Fine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy by Commission of Fine Arts Staff Drawing from Building Permit #3327 April 23, 1907 FRONT ELEVATION - Joseph Beale House, 2301 Massachusetts Avenue, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, 1971 Photocopy of Architects' Drawing, 1906 Filed with Permit #825 FRONT ELEVATION - Clarence Moore House, 1746 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey Commission of Fine Arts Staff, ca. 1971 Photocopy of Drawings by Bruce Price & de Sibour, 1908 MARQUISE DRAWINGS: SECTION AND ELEVATION - Clarence Moore House, 1746 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. EVALUATION OF THE CMB AND PMF MODELS USING ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN FINE PARTICULATE MATTER COLLECTED DURING THE PITTSBURGH AIR QUALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research investigated different strategies for source apportionment of airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected as part of the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Two source receptor models were used, the EPA Chemical Mass Balance 8.2 (CMB) and EPA Positive Matrix Facto...

  14. The fine-structure constant before quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2003-03-01

    This paper focuses on the early history of the fine-structure constant, largely the period until 1925. Contrary to what is generally assumed, speculations concerning the interdependence of the elementary electric charge and Planck's constant predated Arnold Sommerfeld's 1916 discussion of the dimensionless constant. This paper pays particular attention to a little known work from 1914 in which G N Lewis and E Q Adams derived what is effectively a numerical expression for the fine-structure constant.

  15. Fluidized reduction of oxides on fine metal powders without sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the process of reducing extremely fine metal particles (av. particle size or = 1000 angstroms) covered with an oxide layer, the metal particles are fluidized by a gas flow contg. H, heated, and reduced. The method uniformly and easily reduces surface oxide layers of the extremely fine metal particles without causing sintering. The metal particles are useful for magnetic recording materials, conductive paste, powder metallurgy materials, chem. reagents, and catalysts.

  16. The potential of space exploration for the fine arts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, William I.

    1993-01-01

    Art provides an integrating function between the 'upper' and 'lower' centers of the human psyche. The nature of this function can be made more specific through the triune model of the brain. The evolution of the fine arts - painting, drawing, architecture, sculpture, literature, music, dance, and drama, plus cinema and mathematics-as-a-fine-art - are examined in the context of their probable stimulations by space exploration: near term and long term.

  17. Fine mode aerosol chemistry over a rural atmosphere near the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Anandamay; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Roy, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted on the chemical characterization of fine mode aerosol or PM2.5 over a rural atmosphere near the coast of Bay of Bengal in eastern India. Samples were collected and analyzed during March 2013 - February 2014. The concentration of PM2.5 was found span over a wide range from as low as 3 µg m-3 to as high as 180 µg m-3. The average concentration of PM2.5 was 62 µg m-3. Maximum accumulation of fine mode aerosol was observed during winter whereas minimum was observed during monsoon. Water soluble ionic species of fine mode aerosol were characterized over this rural atmosphere. In spite of being situated near the coast of Bay of Bengal, we observed significantly higher concentrations for anthropogenic species like ammonium and sulphate. The concentrations of these two species were much higher than the sea-salt aerosols. Ammonium and sulphate contributed around 30 % to the total fine mode aerosols. Even dust aerosol species like calcium also showed higher concentrations. Chloride to sodium ratio was found to be much less than that in standard sea-water indicating strong interaction between sea-salt and anthropogenic aerosols. Use of fertilizers in various crop fields and human and animal wastes significantly increased ammonium in fine mode aerosols. Dust aerosol species were accumulated in the atmosphere which could be due to transport of finer dust species from nearby metropolis or locally generated. Non-sea-sulphate and nitrate showed significant contributions in fine mode aerosols having both local and transported sources. Source apportionment shows prominent emission sources of anthropogenic aerosols from local anthropogenic activities and transported from nearby Kolkata metropolis as well.

  18. Identification of fine (PM1) and coarse (PM10-1) sources of particulate matter in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Lyamani, H.; Pandolfi, M.; Alastuey, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2014-06-01

    PM10 and PM1 samples were collected at an urban site in southeastern Spain during 2006-2010. The chemical composition of all samples has been determined and analyzed by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) technique for fine and coarse source identification. The PMF results have been analyzed for working and non-working days in order to evaluate the change in PM sources contribution and possible future abatement strategies. A decreasing trend in PM10 levels and in its constituents has been observed, being partly associated to a reduction in anthropogenic activities due to the economic crisis. The use of fine and coarse PM in the PMF analysis allowed us for the identification of additional sources that could not be identified using only one size fraction. The mineral dust source was identified in both fractions and comprised 36 and 22% of the total mass in the coarse and fine fractions, respectively. This high contribution of the mineral source to the fine fraction may be ascribed to contamination of the source profile. The regional re-circulation source was traced by secondary sulfate, V and Ni. It was the most important source concerning PM1 mass concentration (41% of the total mass in this fraction). Although V and Ni are commonly associated to fuel oil combustion the seasonality of this source with higher concentrations in summer compared with winter suggest that the most important part of this source can be ascribed to regional pollution episodes. A traffic exhaust source was identified but only in the fine fraction, comprising 29% of the fine mass. The celestite mines source associated with nearby open-pit mines was typified by strontium, sulfate and mineral matter. PM10-1 levels were higher in working days, whereas PM1 levels remained fairly constant throughout the whole week. As a conclusion, traffic seems to be the main source to target in Granada.

  19. Development of a sensitive ELISA for the detection of casein-containing fining agents in red and white wines.

    PubMed

    Deckwart, Marina; Carstens, Carsten; Webber-Witt, Manuella; Schäfer, Volker; Eichhorn, Lisa; Kang, Sophie; Fischer, Markus; Brockow, Knut; Christmann, Monika; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika

    2014-07-16

    Fining of wine with proteinogenic fining agents such as casein from cow's milk is a traditional and commonly used technique all over the world. Casein and other proteins from cow's milk are well-known food allergens, which pose a risk for allergic consumers. Temporary regulations exempting the labeling of milk and products thereof in wine expired. Since July 1, 2012, these fining agents have to be declared on the wine label under Regulation (EU) No. 579/2012 in conjunction to article 120g of Regulation (EU) No. 1234/2007 if exceeding the threshold of 0.25 mg/L allergenic protein. The aim of the presented study was to develop sensitive ELISA methods for the detection of casein in white and red wines and to investigate the risk of allergenic residues in fined wines. In this context it was shown that the used substance for calibration is highly relevant. Casein wine fining agents of different commercial producers were investigated by LDS-PAGE and immunoblot. In addition to casein, they contain other milk proteins, which are potentially allergic and therefore have to be incorporated in the development of antibodies for an ELISA method to be set up. An indirect ELISA for the investigation of white wine was developed. The LOD is 0.1 mg/L. For red wine the LOD is 0.2 mg/L in an indirect sandwich ELISA setup. The LOD of the indirect sandwich ELISA for white wine depends on the calibration standard. It is 0.1 mg/L for the fining agent casein and 0.01 mg/L for casein from a chemical trader. It is also shown that the use of different technological procedures during winemaking leads to no detectable amounts of casein in various wine samples.

  20. Fine sediment erosion rate in immobile gravel bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarekegn, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of fine sediment transport in immobile gravel bed is a complex process and is a common phenomenon downstream of dams during dam removal and flushing operations. Despite many developments in the field, the direct measurement of fine sediment erosion (entrainment) rates in immobile coarse beds remains challenging. We developed a new approach for measurement of fine sediment erosion rate in coarse immobile bed in laboratory experiment. The method uses single laser line, a video camera and a reflective mirror. It allows a non-intrusive, fast and accurate measurement of fine sediment erosion rate in running water and non-equilibrium transport conditions. The measurement method was conducted for flow depth that ranges from 3.0 cm to 8.0 cm. We present procedures developed to extract laser lines from series of images captured at high temporal resolution and to estimate rapid evolution of fine sediment erosion depth within the roughness layer of the immobile gravel bed. With the use of a reflective mirror the depth of erosion can be measured with sub-millimeter (350μm) resolution. The results of the measurements are used to describe vertical profile of fine sediment erosion rate in the gravel roughness layer and its spatial heterogeneity. The spatial pattern of erosion rates shows good agreement with gravel bed turbulent flow structures.

  1. Dispersion of fine phosphor particles by newly developed beads mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joni, I. Made; Panatarani, C.; Maulana, Dwindra W.

    2016-02-01

    Fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles has advanced properties compare to conventional particles applied for compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) as three band phosphor. However, suspension of fine particles easily agglomerated during preparation of spray coating of the CFL tube. Therefore, it is introduced newly developed beads mill system to disperse fine phosphor. The beads mill consist of glass beads, dispersing chamber (impellers), separator chamber, slurry pump and motors. The first important performance of beads mill is the performance of the designed on separating the beads with the suspended fine particles. We report the development of beads mill and its separation performance vary in flow rate and separator rotation speeds. The 27 kg of glass beads with 30 µm in size was poured into dispersing chamber and then water was pumped continuously through the slurry pump. The samples for the separation test was obtained every 1 hours vary in rotation speed and slurry flow rate. The results shows that the separation performance was 99.99 % obtained for the rotation speed of >1000 rpm and flow rate of 8 L/minute. The performances of the system was verified by dispersing fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+ particles with concentration 1 wt.%. From the observed size distribution of particles after beads mill, it is concluded that the current design of bead mill effectively dispersed fine phosphor Y2O3:Eu3+.

  2. Oxidizing Roasting Performances of Coke Fines Bearing Brazilian Specularite Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized pellets, consisting of Brazilian specularite fines and coke fines, were prepared by disc pelletizer using bentonite as binder. The roasting process of pellets includes preheating stage and firing stage. The compressive strength of preheated pellets and fired pellets reached the peak value at 1.5% coke fines dosage. During the initial stage of preheating, some original Fe2O3 was reduced to Fe3O4 because of partial reduction atmosphere in pellet. During the later stage of preheating and firing stage, coke fines were burnt out, and the secondary Fe2O3 (new generation Fe2O3) was generated due to the re-oxidization of Fe3O4, which improved the recrystallization of Fe2O3. Compared with the fired pellets without adding coke fines, fired pellets with 1.5% coke fines exhibited the comparable RSI (reduction swelling index) and RDI+3.15 mm (reduction degradation index), and slightly lower RI (reducibility index).

  3. Selective Convolutional Descriptor Aggregation for Fine-Grained Image Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiu-Shen; Luo, Jian-Hao; Wu, Jianxin; Zhou, Zhi-Hua

    2017-03-27

    Deep convolutional neural network models pretrained for the ImageNet classification task have been successfully adopted to tasks in other domains, such as texture description and object proposal generation, but these tasks require annotations for images in the new domain. In this paper, we focus on a novel and challenging task in the pure unsupervised setting: fine-grained image retrieval. Even with image labels, fine-grained images are difficult to classify, let alone the unsupervised retrieval task. We propose the Selective Convolutional Descriptor Aggregation (SCDA) method. SCDA firstly localizes the main object in fine-grained images, a step that discards the noisy background and keeps useful deep descriptors. The selected descriptors are then aggregated and dimensionality reduced into a short feature vector using the best practices we found. SCDA is unsupervised, using no image label or bounding box annotation. Experiments on six fine-grained datasets confirm the effectiveness of SCDA for fine-grained image retrieval. Besides, visualization of the SCDA features shows that they correspond to visual attributes (even subtle ones), which might explain SCDA's high mean average precision in fine-grained retrieval. Moreover, on general image retrieval datasets, SCDA achieves comparable retrieval results with state-of-the-art general image retrieval approaches.

  4. Chemically Modified Graphene for Sensing and Nanomechanical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    chemical vapors at parts-per-billion concentrations,5 although these sensors require somewhat sophisticated electronics to realize their full...chemically (e.g., with hydrazine , N2H4) or thermally (e.g., by annealing in H2), providing a knob with which to tune the sensor response. These devices are...and mechanical devices. CMG can be fine-tuned to its specific application and has been used to produce sensors of extraordinary sensitivity

  5. American Chemical Society: Twentieth northeast regional meeting. Program and Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings contain papers on the following topics: preparation, characterization, and applications of fine particles; multinuclear NMR spectroscopy; chemical aspects of wine making; organic electrochemistry; chemical education; laboratory information management systems; laser-based processing and diagnostics of materials; modern liquid chromatography; high-temperature superconductivity; organic chemistry; chemometrics; colloid and surface science; biological chemistry; environmental sciences; drug analysis; and organometallic chemistry. Papers within the scope of the Energy Data Base have been processed separately.

  6. The 'fine line' of heat rejection.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Phillip

    2010-09-01

    Selection of heat rejection equipment has traditionally entailed a choice between the higher energy consumption of an air-cooled solution, and the high water consumption of a water-cooled solution. This paper examines advancement in heat rejection technology and the way it can be applied to air conditioning and refrigeration plant in healthcare and other facilities. It also examines field difficulties encountered in pipework design as the knowledge and experience levels of engineers designing systems with remote condensers diminish. With plant larger than 1,000 kW, the only option previously has been water-cooled solutions using an array of cooling towers, or perhaps an evaporative condenser, since air-cooled plant involved massive volumes of chemical refrigerant, which posed a problem ecologically. An additional hurdle was problems associated with limitations on pipe lengths for refrigeration plant. The advent of adiabatically pre-cooled closed circuit coolers and air-cooled condensers has introduced an alternative to cooling towers that offers the potential for "water-cooled performance" from an air-cooled solution with no serious threat of Legionella contamination. However, each application needs to be considered on a case-by-case basis. The paper examines, in detail, the impact of adiabatic pre-cooling, with recent examples of its application in sub-tropical Brisbane providing evidence of the potential performance achievable.

  7. Chemical design of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Daishun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2013-05-27

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are one of the most versatile and safe nanomaterials used in medicine. Recent progress in nanochemistry enables fine control of the size, crystallinity, uniformity, and surface properties of iron oxide nanoparticles. In this review, the synthesis of chemically designed biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles with improved quality and reduced toxicity is discussed for use in diverse biomedical applications.

  8. Spectropolarimetry of fine magnetized structures in the upper solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas Anthony

    2013-12-01

    One of the earliest indications of magnetic fields acting in the solar atmosphere came at the beginning of the 20th century when George Hale noted a "decided definiteness of structure" in photographs within the Hydrogen Balmer-alpha line core. Fine structure both in the chromosphere and in the corona result from processes that are not well understood but accepted as a consequence of the solar magnetic field. Our knowledge of this field is lacking, and until recently, the assumed relationship between fine thermal structure and the magnetic field remained untested. Here, spectropolarimetric diagnostics of fine structures in the solar chromosphere and cool corona are advanced using the infrared He I triplet at 1083 nm. Precise calibration procedures are developed for the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), recently commissioned at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Together with high-order adaptive optics, we simultaneously map fine structures while obtaining a polarimetric sensitivity of up to 2 x 10--4 of the incoming intensity. These instrument improvements result in the first maps of the He I polarized signatures within an active region superpenumbra, where Hale first recognized fine-structuring. Selective absorption and emission processes due to non-equilibrium optical pumping are recognized. Our interpretation, using advanced inversions of the He I triplet, provides confirmation of Hale's initial suspicion---the fine structures of the solar chromosphere are visual markers for the magnetic field. Yet, the fine chromospheric thermal structure is not matched by an equivalently fine magnetic structure. Our ability to measure this field suggests the utility of the He I triplet as an inner boundary condition for the inner heliospheric magnetic field. In the corona itself, we infer the vector properties of a catastrophically-cooled coronal loop, uniting space-based and ground-based instrumentation. We determine how fine loops are anchored in the photosphere via a

  9. Texture measurements in fine grained polyphase aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, R.; Heilbronner, R.; Stünitz, H.

    2009-04-01

    When analyzing natural and experimental microstructures, we routinely use the two methods for orientation imaging and texture measurements: (a) the computer-integrated polarization microscopy (CIP, Panozzo Heilbronner & Pauli, 1993) and (b) the electron back scatter diffractometry (EBSD, e.g. Kunze et al., 1994). The CIP method yields orientation maps and pole figures of c-axes (of uni-axial materials), while the EBSD method yields complete textural data for all crystallographic orientations. In order to compare the orientation images the Euler maps (obtained from EBSD) are recalculated and presented with the more intuitive colour look-up tables (CLUTs) of the CIP method. In this contribution we compare and contrast the results achieved by these two methods using two different samples taken from a metagranodiorite (Kilian et al., 2009): (1) a coarse grained mylonitic rock with polycrystalline quartz aggregates and (2) a very fine grained ultramylonitic rock with single quartz grains dispersed in a polymineralic matrix. For the coarse grained sample (1) both methods yield the same (strong) c-axis pole figure: the geometry of the c-axis polefigure as well as the texture intensity (maximum of polefigure) are identical. The texture of sample (2) - where small quartz grains are dispersed in the polymineralic matrix - is very weak to random. The CIP and EBSD c-axis pole figures are different and - as noted previously - these differences arise from a machine specific bias of the EBSD (Schmocker 2002). In addition to texture analysis, both methods are capable of image segmentation (identification and separation of individual grains in the orientation image) as well as shape and grain size analysis. However due to the entirely different approach taken, the results may differ significantly. For example, when deriving the grain size distribution for sample (2) EBSD (combined with with the OIM® analysis software) yields a positively skewed histogram (with the mode occurring

  10. Chemical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    As a preliminary study on the effects of chemical aging of polymer materials MERL and TRI have examined two polymeric materials that are typically used for offshore umbilical applications. These two materials were Tefzel, a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene, and Coflon, polyvinylidene fluoride. The Coflon specimens were cut from pipe sections and exposed to H2S at various temperatures and pressures. One of these specimens was tested for methane permeation, and another for H2S permeation. The Tefzel specimens were cut from .05 mm sheet stock material and were exposed to methanol at elevated temperature and pressure. One of these specimens was exposed to methanol permeation for 2 days at 100 C and 2500 psi. An additional specimen was exposed to liquid methanol for 3 days at 150 C and 15 Bar. Virgin specimens of each material were similarly prepared and tested.

  11. Household Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemical Emergencies Hurricanes Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear ... containing hazardous materials or chemicals. Although the risk of a chemical accident is slight, knowing how to handle these products ...

  12. Surface-level fine particle mass concentrations: from hemispheric distributions to megacity sources.

    PubMed

    Hidy, George M

    2009-07-01

    Since 1990, basic knowledge of the "chemical climate" of fine particles, has greatly improved from Junge's compilation from the 1960s. A worldwide baseline distribution of fine particle concentrations on a synoptic scale of approximately 1000 km can be estimated at least qualitatively from measurements. A geographical distribution of fine particle characteristics is deduced from a synthesis of a variety of disparate data collected at ground level on all continents, especially in the northern hemisphere. On the average, the regional mass concentrations range from 1 to 80 microg/m3, with the highest concentrations in regions of high population density and industrialization. Fine particles by mass on a continental and hemispheric spatial scale are generally dominated by non-sea salt sulfate (0.2 to approximately 20 microg/m3, or approximately 25%) and organic carbon (0.2-> 10 microg/m3, or approximately 25%), with lesser contributions of ammonium, nitrate, elemental carbon, and elements found in sea salt or soil dust. The crustal and trace metal elements contribute a varied amount to fine particle mass depending on location, with a larger contribution in marine conditions or during certain events such as dust storms or volcanic disturbances. The average distribution of mass concentration and major components depends on the proximity to areal aggregations of sources, most of which are continental in origin, with contributions from sea salt emissions in the marine environment. The highest concentrations generally are within or near very large population and industrial centers, especially in Asia, including parts of China and India, as well as North America and Europe. Natural sources of blowing dust, sea salt, and wildfires contribute to large, intermittent spatial-scale particle loadings beyond these ranges. A sampling of 10 megacities illustrates a range of characteristic particle composition, dependent on local and regional sources. Long-range transport of pollution

  13. Improving Simulations of Fine Dust Surface Concentrations over the Western United States by Optimizing the Particle Size Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li; Kok, Jasper F.; Henze, Daven; Li, Qinbin; Zhao, Chun

    2013-06-28

    To improve estimates of remote contributions of dust to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the western United States, new dust particle size distributions (PSDs) based upon scale-invariant fragmentation theory (Kok_PSD) with constraints from in situ measurements (IMP_PSD) are implemented in a chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). Compared to initial simulations, this leads to reductions in the mass of emitted dust particles with radii <1.8 mm by 40%-60%. Consequently, the root-mean-square error in simulated fine dust concentrations compared to springtime surface observations in the western United States is reduced by 67%-81%. The ratio of simulated fine to coarse PM mass is also improved, which is not achievable by reductions in total dust emissions. The IMP_PSD best represents the PSD of dust transported from remote sources and reduces modeled PM2.5 concentrations up to 5 mg/m3 over the western United States, which is important when considering sources contributing to nonattainment of air quality standards. Citation: Zhang, L., J. F. Kok, D. K. Henze, Q. Li, and C. Zhao (2013), Improving simulations of fine dust surface concentrations over the western United States by optimizing the particle size distribution, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 3270-3275, doi:10.1002/grl.50591.

  14. Increasing the sludge energy potential of wastewater treatment plants by introducing fine mesh sieves for primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Paulsrud, Bjarne; Rusten, Bjørn; Aas, Bjørn

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare some basic characteristics of sludge from fine mesh sieves (sieve sludge) with sludge from primary clarifiers (primary sludge) regarding their energy potential with a focus on anaerobic digestion and/or incineration. Nineteen samples of sludge from fine mesh sieve plants (most of them without fine screens and grit chambers as pre-treatment) and 10 samples of primary sludge were analysed for the content of dry solids (DS), volatile solids (VS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), calorific value and methane potential. The results demonstrated that the sieve sludges have significantly higher VS content and higher methane potential than primary sludges, clearly indicating an increased sludge energy potential if fine mesh sieves are used for primary treatment instead of primary clarifiers at wastewater treatment plants with anaerobic digesters. If the sludges from primary treatment are to be incinerated or used as fuel in cement kilns, there is no significant difference in energy potential (given as calorific values) for the two types of primary treatment.

  15. Chemical markers for bacteria in extraterrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Fox, Alvin

    2002-11-01

    Interplanetary missions to collect pristine Martian surface samples for analysis of organic molecules, and to search for evidence of life, are in the planning phases. The only extraterrestrial samples currently on Earth are lunar dust and rocks, brought back by the Apollo (U.S.) and Luna (Soviet Union) missions to the moon, and meteorites. Meteorites are contaminated when they pass through the Earth's atmosphere, and during environmental exposure on Earth. Lunar fines have been stored on Earth for over 30 years under conditions designed to avoid chemical but not microbiological contamination. It has been extremely difficult to draw firm conclusions about the origin of chemicals (including amino acids) in extraterrestrial samples. Of particular concern has been the possibility of bacterial contamination. Recent work using state-of-the-art gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has dramatically lowered the chemical background, allowing a clear demonstration that lunar fines are remarkably different from terrestrial dust in that they generally lack certain chemical markers (muramic acid and 3-hydroxy fatty acids) characteristic of Earth's bacteria. Thus, lunar dust might be used as a negative control, in conjunction with GC-MS/MS analyses, in future analytical studies of lunar dust and meteorites. Such analyses may also be important in studies designed to search for the presence of life on Mars.

  16. Speciation of gas-phase and fine particle emissions from burning of foliar fuels.

    PubMed

    Hays, Michael D; Geron, Christopher D; Linna, Kara J; Smith, N Dean; Schauer, James J

    2002-06-01

    Fine particle matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 microm (PM2.5) and gas-phase emissions from open burning of six fine (foliar) fuels common to fire-prone U.S. ecosystems are investigated. PM2.5 distribution is unimodal within the 10-450 nm range, indicative of an accumulation mode. Smoldering relative to flaming combustion shows smaller particle number density per unit time and median size. Over 100 individual organic compounds in the primarily carbonaceous (>70% by mass) PM2.5 are chemically speciated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Expressed as a percent of PM2.5 mass, emission ranges by organic compound class are as follows: n-alkane (0.1-2%), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) (0.02-0.2%), n-alkanoic acid (1-3%), n-alkanedioic acid (0.06-0.3%), n-alkenoic acid (0.3-3%), resin acid (0.5-6%), triterpenoid (0.2-0.5%), methoxyphenol (0.5-3%), and phytosterol (0.2-0.6%). A molecular tracer of biomass combustion, the sugar levoglucosan is abundant and constitutes a remarkably narrow PM2.5 mass range (2.8-3.6%). Organic chemical signatures in PM2.5 from open combustion of fine fuels differ with those of residential wood combustion and other related sources, making them functional for source-receptor modeling of PM. Inorganic matter [PM2.5 - (organic compounds + elemental carbon)] on average is estimated to make up 8% of the PM2.5. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and ion chromatography identify 3% of PM2.5 as elements and water-soluble ions, respectively. Compared with residential wood burning, the PM2.5 of fine fuel combustion is nitrate enriched but shows lower potassium levels. Gas-phase C2-C13 hydrocarbon and C2-C9 carbonyl emissions are speciated by respective EPA Methods T0-15 and T0-11A. They comprise mainly low molecular weight C2-C3 compounds and hazardous air pollutants (48 wt % of total quantified volatile organic carbon).

  17. Influence of rain on the abundance of bioaerosols in fine and coarse particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnayake, Chathurika M.; Metwali, Nervana; Jayarathne, Thilina; Kettler, Josh; Huang, Yuefan; Thorne, Peter S.; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the environmental, health, and climate impacts of bioaerosols requires knowledge of their size and abundance. These two properties were assessed through daily measurements of chemical tracers for pollens (sucrose, fructose, and glucose), fungal spores (mannitol and glucans), and Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins in two particulate matter (PM) size modes: fine particles (< 2.5 µm) and coarse particles (2.5-10 µm) as determined by their aerodynamic diameter. Measurements were made during the spring tree pollen season (mid-April to early May) and late summer ragweed season (late August to early September) in the Midwestern US in 2013. Under dry conditions, pollen, and fungal spore tracers were primarily in coarse PM (> 75 %), as expected for particles greater than 2.5 µm. Rainfall on 2 May corresponded to maximum atmospheric pollen tracer levels and a redistribution of pollen tracers to the fine PM fraction (> 80 %). Both changes were attributed to the osmotic rupture of pollen grains that led to the suspension of fine-sized pollen fragments. Fungal spore tracers peaked in concentration following spring rain events and decreased in particle size, but to a lesser extent than pollens. A short, heavy thunderstorm in late summer corresponded to an increase in endotoxin and glucose levels, with a simultaneous shift to smaller particle sizes. Simultaneous increase in bioaerosol levels and decrease in their size have significant implications for population exposures to bioaerosols, particularly during rain events. Chemical mass balance (CMB) source apportionment modeling and regionally specific pollen profiles were used to apportion PM mass to pollens and fungal spores. Springtime pollen contributions to the mass of particles < 10 µm (PM10) ranged from 0.04 to 0.8 µg m-3 (0.2-38 %, averaging 4 %), with maxima occurring on rainy days. Fungal spore contributions to PM10 mass ranged from 0.1 to 1.5 µg m-3 (0.8-17 %, averaging 5 %), with maxima occurring after

  18. Quantification of Wood Smoke Markers in Fine Atmospheric PM in the New York City Airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, H. A.; Mazurek, M. A.; Li, M.

    2007-12-01

    Seasonal emissions from residential wood combustion, natural wildfires, agricultural burning and solid waste combustion are considered to be major sources of fine particles to the NYC metropolitan airshed. Wood smoke produced from the combustion of cellulosic material consists of polar organic compounds which are highly water-soluble. As alternative forms of energy production including biofuels for residential heating are developed and become more widely used, a key science question is how much of the carbonaceous PM2.5 currently is from wood smoke in urbanized areas and to what extent is this influencing atmospheric chemical properties. This project focuses on the quantitation of polar organic compounds extracted from fine particle samples (PM2.5) collected as part of the Speciation of Organics for Apportionment of PM-2.5 in the New York City Area (SOAP). The SOAP network operated from May 2002 to May 2003 at four sites: Queens, NYC (high density urban residential); Elizabeth, NJ (adjacent to the NJ Turnpike); Westport, CT (downwind NYC residential); and a regional background site in Chester, NJ (upwind NYC). A quantitative extraction and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) chemical analysis procedure was developed and evaluated. Trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives were prepared prior to GC/MS analysis and 5-point calibrations and multiple replicates were evaluated to ensure method precision. Levoglucosan was used as the primary marker for cellulose combustion; however a suite of monosaccharides and disaccharides and dehydroabietic acid, a marker indicative of soft wood combustion, also were quantified. Levoglucosan was found during each season at all four sampling locations with ambient mass concentrations ranging from 2.36 ng/m3 to 189 ng/m3. These values represent an estimated low of 0.73 percent to a high of 69 percent of organic carbon in the fine PM from wood smoke. The lowest levoglucosan concentrations were present consistently at the Chester, NJ

  19. Physical and chemical coal cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelock, T. D.; Markuszewski, R.

    1981-02-01

    Coal is cleaned industrially by freeing the occluded mineral impurities and physically separating the coal and refuse particles on the basis of differences in density, settling characteristics, or surface properties. While physical methods are very effective and low in cost when applied to the separation of coarse particles, they are much less effective when applied to the separation of fine particles. Also they can not be used to remove impurities which are bound chemically to the coal. These deficiencies may be overcome in the future by chemical cleaning. Most of the chemical cleaning methods under development are designed primarily to remove sulfur from coal, but several methods also remove various trace elements and ash-forming minerals. Generally these methods will remove most of the sulfur associated with inorganic minerals, but only a few of the methods seem to remove organically bound sulfur. A number of the methods employ oxidizing agents as air, oxygen, chlorine, nitrogen dioxide, or a ferric salt to oxidize the sulfur compounds to soluble sulfates which are then extracted with water. The sulfur in coal may also be solubilized by treatment with caustic. Also sulfur can be removed by reaction with hydrogen at high temperature. Furthermore, it is possible to transform the sulfur bearing minerals in coal to materials which are easily removed by magnetic separation.

  20. Si-bearing metal and niningerite in Almahata Sitta fine-grained ureilites and insights into the diversity of metal on the ureilite parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, Marian; Humayun, Munir; Fischer-Gödde, Mario; Bischoff, Addi; Weyrauch, Mona

    2014-10-01

    A detailed mineralogical and chemical study of Almahata Sitta fine-grained ureilites (MS-20, MS-165, MS-168) was performed to shed light on the origin of these lithologies and their sulfide and metal. The Almahata Sitta fine-grained ureilites (silicates <30 μm grain size) show textural and chemical evidence for severe impact smelting as described for other fine-grained ureilites. Highly reduced areas in Almahata Sitta fine-grained ureilites show large (up to ˜1 mm) Si-bearing metal grains (up to ˜4.5 wt% Si) and niningerite [Mg>0.5,(Mn,Fe)<0.5S] with some similarities to the mineralogy of enstatite (E) chondrites. Overall, metal grains show a large compositional variability in Ni and Si concentrations. Niningerite grains probably formed as a by-product of smelting via sulfidation. The large Si-Ni variation in fine-grained ureilite metal could be the result of variable degrees of reduction during impact smelting, inherited from coarse-grained ureilite precursors, or a combination of both. Large Si-bearing metal grains probably formed via coalescence of existing and newly formed metal during impact smelting. Bulk and in situ siderophile trace element abundances indicate three distinct populations of (1) metal crystallized from partial melts in MS-20, (2) metal resembling bulk chondritic compositions in MS-165, and (3) residual metal in MS-168. Almahata Sitta fine-grained ureilites developed their distinctive mineralogy due to severe reduction during smelting. Despite the presence of E chondrite and ureilite stones in the Almahata Sitta fall, a mixing relation of E chondrites or their constituents and ureilite material in Almahata Sitta can be ruled out based on isotopic, textural, and mineral-chemical reasons.

  1. Novel silica stabilization method for the analysis of fine nanocrystals using coherent X-ray diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Monteforte, Marianne; Estandarte, Ana K; Chen, Bo; Harder, Ross; Huang, Michael H; Robinson, Ian K

    2016-07-01

    High-energy X-ray Bragg coherent diffraction imaging (BCDI) is a well established synchrotron-based technique used to quantitatively reconstruct the three-dimensional morphology and strain distribution in nanocrystals. The BCDI technique has become a powerful analytical tool for quantitative investigations of nanocrystals, nanotubes, nanorods and more recently biological systems. BCDI has however typically failed for fine nanocrystals in sub-100 nm size regimes - a size routinely achievable by chemical synthesis - despite the spatial resolution of the BCDI technique being 20-30 nm. The limitations of this technique arise from the movement of nanocrystals under illumination by the highly coherent beam, which prevents full diffraction data sets from being acquired. A solution is provided here to overcome this problem and extend the size limit of the BCDI technique, through the design of a novel stabilization method by embedding the fine nanocrystals into a silica matrix. Chemically synthesized FePt nanocrystals of maximum dimension 20 nm and AuPd nanocrystals in the size range 60-65 nm were investigated with BCDI measurement at beamline 34-ID-C of the APS, Argonne National Laboratory. Novel experimental methodologies to elucidate the presence of strain in fine nanocrystals are a necessary pre-requisite in order to better understand strain profiles in engineered nanocrystals for novel device development.

  2. Transport of fine sediment over a coarse, immobile riverbed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grams, Paul E.; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment transport in cobble-boulder rivers consists mostly of fine sediment moving over a coarse, immobile bed. Transport rate depends on several interrelated factors: boundary shear stress, the grain size and volume of fine sediment, and the configuration of fine sediment into interstitial deposits and bed forms. Existing models do not incorporate all of these factors. Approaches that partition stress face a daunting challenge because most of the boundary shear is exerted on immobile grains. We present an alternative approach that divides the bed into sand patches and interstitial deposits and is well constrained by two clear end-member cases: full sand cover and absence of sand. Entrainment from sand patches is a function of their aerial coverage. Entrainment from interstices among immobile grains is a function of sand elevation relative to the size of the immobile grains. The bed-sand coverage function is used to predict the ratio of the rate of entrainment from a partially covered bed to the rate of entrainment from a completely sand-covered bed, which is determined using a standard sand transport model. We implement the bed-sand coverage function in a morphodynamic routing model and test it against observations of sand bed elevation and suspended sand concentration for conditions of nonuniform fine sediment transport in a large flume with steady uniform flow over immobile hemispheres. The results suggest that this approach may provide a simple and robust method for predicting the transport and migration of fine sediment through rivers with coarse, immobile beds.

  3. Fine-grained sediment dispersal along the California coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-grained sediment (silt and clay) enters coastal waters from rivers, eroding coastal bluffs, resuspension of seabed sediment, and human activities such as dredging and beach nourishment. The amount of sediment in coastal waters is an important factor in ocean ecosystem health, but little information exists on both the natural and human-driven magnitudes of fine-grained sediment delivery to the coastal zone, its residence time there, and its transport out of the system—information upon which to base environmental assessments. To help fill these information gaps, the U.S. Geological Survey has partnered with Federal, State, and local agencies to monitor fine-grained sediment dispersal patterns and fate in the coastal regions of California. Results of these studies suggest that the waves and currents of many of the nearshore coastal settings of California are adequately energetic to transport fine-grained sediment quickly through coastal systems. These findings will help with the management and regulation of fine-grained sediment along the U.S. west coast.

  4. Stabilization of Black Cotton Soil Using Micro-fine Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Rajesh Prasad; Parihar, Niraj Singh

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory tests conducted on black cotton soil mixed with micro-fine slag. Different proportions of micro-fine slag, i.e., 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 % were mixed with the black cotton soil to improve soil characteristics. The improvement in the characteristics of stabilized soil was assessed by evaluating the changes in the physical and strength parameters of the soil, namely, the Atterberg limits, free swell, the California Bearing Ratio (CBR), compaction parameters and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS). The mixing of micro-fine slag decreases the liquid limit, plasticity index and Optimum Moisture Contents (OMC) of the soil. Micro-fine slag significantly increases the plastic limit, UCS and CBR of the soil up to 6-7 % mixing, but mixing of more slag led to decrease in the UCS and CBR of the soil. The unsoaked CBR increased by a substantial amount unlike soaked CBR value. The swell potential of the soil is reduced from medium to very low. The optimum amount of micro-fine slag is found to be approximately 6-7 % by the weight of the soil.

  5. Modeling sulfur dioxide absorption by fine water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Hsiung Huang

    2005-07-01

    A novel theoretical model was developed to determine the removal efficiency of sulfur dioxide using fine water spray. The droplet pH, diameter, S(IV) concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, and liquid-to-gas ratio are found to influence the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray. The results demonstrate that the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray increases as the droplet diameter falls. The concentration gradient between the interface of the gaseous and liquid phases causes the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the droplets to increase as the initial S(IV) concentration decreases or the sulfur dioxide concentration increases. The results indicate that the performance of the fine water spray in removing sulfur dioxide is generally improved by reducing the droplet diameter or the initial S(IV) concentration, or by increasing the sulfur dioxide concentration, the droplet pH or the liquid-to-gas ratio. The proposed model reveals the parameters that should be controlled in using a fine water spray device and a method for improving its performance in removing sulfur dioxide.

  6. Fines migration from soil daily covers in Hong Kong landfills.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kelvin T W; Lo, Irene M C

    2010-11-01

    Laboratory tests using 240 mm diameter columns were conducted to study fines migration in conditions that simulate daily soil covers in Hong Kong municipal solid waste landfills. Five factors suspected to affect fines migration were examined: moisture content at soil compaction, overburden pressure, pumping rate, cover thickness, and soil-waste interface condition. The results show that moisture content at compaction, cover thickness, and soil-waste interface are the most influential parameters on fines migration in completely decomposed granite daily covers. The measured equivalent sizes of migratory fines from the soil covers were in the range of 4-140 μm. The majority of migratory fines migrated during first permeations, representing 64-86% of the total by mass. Larger particles tended to migrate from the soil mass during the saturation process. In a typical run, about 0.0018% of the total cover soil (by dry weight) was washed out during a typical 1h rainfall event. The results of the laboratory studies point to important engineering implications on the operation of local MSW landfills regarding the use of sandy daily covers.

  7. Landscape and fine scale habitat associations of the Loggerhead Shrike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michaels, H.L.; Cully, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine landscape and fine-scale vegetative variables associated with breeding Loggerhead Shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus) on Fort Riley Military Reservation, Kansas. Because Fort Riley is an Army training site, the influences of training disturbance to the vegetation, and range management practices on bird habitat patterns were also investigated. Breeding birds were surveyed in 1995 and 1996 using point counts. Survey plots were identified, a priori, at the landscape scale as either grassland, savannah, or woodland edge according to cover by woody vegetation. In 1996, fine-scale habitat at survey points and at bird use sites was measured and a principal components analysis used to characterize the fine-scale herbaceous vegetation structure. A military disturbance index was developed to quantify the severity of vehicle disturbance to the vegetation at survey and bird use sites. Shrikes were associated with savannah habitat at the landscape scale. Sites used by Loggerhead Shrikes were characterized at the fine-scale by tall, sparse, structurally heterogeneous herbaceous vegetation with high standing dead plant cover and low litter cover. At the fine-scale, tree and shrub density did not differ between sites used and not used by shrikes. Used sites did not differ from survey sites with respect to military training disturbance, hay harvest, or the number of years since a site was last burned. Our results in this study suggest that the shifting mosaic of vegetation on Fort Riley resulting from training and range management practices maintains adequate habitat for breeding shrikes.

  8. Permeability of wood pellets in the presence of fines.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, F; Sokhansanj, S; Lau, A K; Lim, C J; Bi, X; Melin, S; Afzal, M

    2010-07-01

    Broken pellets and fines are produced when pellets are handled. The resistance to air flow was measured for clean pellets and for pellets mixed with 1-20% broken pellets (fines). A pellet diameter was 6mm. The lengths ranged from 6 to 12 mm. Clean pellets were defined as particles that remained on a 4mm screen. A typical sieve analysis showed 30% of the mass of particles that passed through the 4mm screen was smaller than 1mm. The airflow rates used in the experiment ranged from 0.004 to 0.357 ms(-1). The corresponding pressure drop ranged from 1.9 to 271 Pam(-1) for clean pellets, from 4.8 to 1100 Pam(-1) for 10% fines content, and from 7.9 to 1800 Pam(-1) for 20% fines content. Coefficients of Hukill and Ives' equation were estimated for clean pellets and a multiplier was defined to calculate pressure drop for pellets mixed with fines.

  9. Experimental Study on Clogging of Fine Particles in Sand Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the methane hydrate development from the sand sediment beneath the seafloor, it is anticipated that the migrating fine particles may block the pore and consequently reduces the permeability near the production well. Although this phenomenon is known as skin formation, its microscopic mechanism is still unknown. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we carried out an experiment on the clogging of fine particles in sand sediments. A transparent core holder was newly developed to directly visualize the behavior of fine particles in the pore of frame sands and formation of skin. It was observed that there seems to be an induction time before the clogging starts to occur. Once clogging occurs, the upstream fine particles cannot move downstream anymore and the skin is formed. It was found that the rate of skin formation is related to the total volume of injected fine particles while the flow velocity has something to do with the length of the induction time.

  10. Wave Tank Studies On Formation And Transport Of OMA From The Chemically Dispersed Oil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on dispersion of oil, formation ...

  11. Use of ICS/LABA (extra-fine and non-extra-fine) in elderly asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Benfante, Alida; Basile, Marco; Battaglia, Salvatore; Spatafora, Mario; Scichilone, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Age represents an exclusion criterion in randomized clinical trials designed to test the efficacy and safety of inhaled drugs in asthma. As a consequence, data on efficacy and safety of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting β2 agonist (LABA) combinations in elderly asthmatics are scanty. Older age is associated with an increased proportion of comorbid conditions; in addition, all organ functions undergo a process of senescence, thus reducing their ability to metabolize the agents. Overall, these age-associated conditions may variably, and often unpredictably, affect the metabolism and excretion of respiratory drugs. However, pharmacological treatment of asthma does not follow specific recommendations in the elderly. In the elderly, the ICS/LABA combinations may carry an increased risk of local indesiderable effects, primarily due to the lack of coordination between activation of the device and inhalation, and systemic adverse events, mainly due to the greater amount of active drug that is available because of the age-associated changes in organ functions as well as drug-to-drug and drug-to-concomitant disease interactions. The extra-fine formulations of ICSs/LABAs, which allow for a more favorable drug deposition in the lungs at a reduced dose, may contribute to overcome this issue. This review revises the efficacy and safety of treatment with ICSs/LABAs, focusing on the main pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the drugs and highlighting the potential risks in the elderly asthmatic population. PMID:27789954

  12. Development of specialty chemicals from dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Tartamella, T.L.; Lee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Dimethyl ether (DME) may be efficiently produced from coal-bases syngas in a high pressure, mechanically agitated slurry reactor. DME synthesis occurs in the liquid phase using a dual catalyst. By operating in a dual catalyst mode, DME may be converted from in-situ produced methanol resulting in higher methyl productivities and syngas conversions over methanol conversion alone. The feasibility of utilizing DME as a building block for more valuable specialty chemicals has been examined. A wide variety of petrochemicals may be produced from DME including light olefins, gasoline range hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and glycol precursors. These chemicals represent an important part of petroleum industries inventory of fine chemicals. Carbonylation, hydrocarbonylation, and oxidative dimerization are but a few of the reactions in which DME may undergo conversion. DME provides an additional route for the production of industrially important petrochemicals.

  13. Systems metabolic engineering for chemicals and materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Wook; Kim, Tae Yong; Jang, Yu-Sin; Choi, Sol; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-08-01

    Metabolic engineering has contributed significantly to the enhanced production of various value-added and commodity chemicals and materials from renewable resources in the past two decades. Recently, metabolic engineering has been upgraded to the systems level (thus, systems metabolic engineering) by the integrated use of global technologies of systems biology, fine design capabilities of synthetic biology, and rational-random mutagenesis through evolutionary engineering. By systems metabolic engineering, production of natural and unnatural chemicals and materials can be better optimized in a multiplexed way on a genome scale, with reduced time and effort. Here, we review the recent trends in systems metabolic engineering for the production of chemicals and materials by presenting general strategies and showcasing representative examples.

  14. Preparation and characterization of fine powdered whole soybean curd

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Junghee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Efficacy and comparative characteristics of fine powdered whole soybean curd. [Methods] Ground dried soybean to a fine powder (700 mesh) containing bean components in its entirety, and then produced whole soybean curd. Analysed its nutritive components, bioactive substances, antioxidant activities and texture compared with pressed soybean curd. [Results] Compared with pressed soybean curd, the nutrients and isoflavone in whole soybean curd were slightly decreased, but antioxidant activities, dietary fibers and moisture content were increased. Also, the yield rate of the total process was improved 1.9 times. [Conclusion] Fine powdered whole bean curd has antioxidant effects, contains dietary fiber and possesses soft characteristics, hence has development potential in the diet market and as food for patients. PMID:27274462

  15. Remediation of Sucarnoochee soil by agglomeration with fine coal

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, P.S.; Arnold, D.W.; Rahnama, M.B. )

    1994-01-01

    Fine-sized Blue Creek coal was used to remove high molecular weight hydrocarbons from Sucarnoochee soil, a fine-sized high-organic soil. Fine coal in slurry form was blended with Sucarnoochee soil contaminated with 15.0% by wt of crude oil, and agglomerates were removed in a standard flotation cell. Crude oil in the remediated soil was reduced from the original 15.0% to less than a tenth of a wt% by a two-step process. Oil removal of approx. 99.3% was obtained. An added benefit was that the low-grade coal used in the process was simultaneously upgraded. The final level of cleaning was not affected by initial oil concentration. The process compared favorably with a hot water wash technique used to recovery oils from contaminated soil.

  16. Pressure flotation of nitrocellulose fines: Hydrodynamics and interfacial chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, D.; Hu, H.L.; LaFrance, P.; Kim, B.J.

    1996-11-01

    The production of nitrocellulose (NC) creates large quantities of waste NC fines in wash water streams. Current processing techniques attempt to remove these fines by cross-flow microfiltration, pressure flotation, settling, centrifugation, and lime precipitation. Pressure flotation, or dissolved air flotation (DAF), is a solid/liquid separation process first developed in the ore processing industry. DAF has since found many applications in the environmental engineering field including: drinking water clarification, sludge thickening, and the clarification of wastewater from a variety of industrial and municipal processes. The work presented herein is part of a larger effort to explore techniques to recover and reuse nitrocellulose (NC) fines resulting from propellant manufacturing processes. Previous papers investigated NC particle stability and interfacial thermodynamics and developed a flotation trajectory model. This paper builds on that work and presents a sensitivity analysis of the flotation trajectory model. The sensitivity analysis explores both operational and parameter estimation uncertainty.

  17. A Newtonian Explanation of the Hydrogen Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Paul; Espinosa, James; Woodyard, James

    2010-10-01

    The Hydrogen spectrum as seen by low dispersion spectrometers is correctly described by a classical theory founded on Ritz's magnetic model. With increasingly powerful instruments, individual lines are split into smaller groupings that are three orders of magnitude smaller. Arnold Sommerfeld was the first to develop a theory based on the mass variation of the electron to correctly describe this ``fine'' structure. A few years later, Vannevar Bush pointed out that Weber's force law could be used instead of Einstein's theory of relativity. We will utilize this line of approach to present a purely classical theory of the fine structure of the Hydrogen atom. Ritz's theory of electromagnetism replaces Weber's law; we will summarize all the other atomic physics experiments that our classical theory already describes correctly. Finally we will show how this fine structure theory logically paves the way for an explanation of the linear Stark effect.

  18. Magnetic phases in lunar fines - Metallic Fe or ferric oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, F.-D.; Manatt, S. L.; Chan, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The ferromagnetic resonance observed for the Apollo 11 and 12 lunar fines is characterized by an asymmetric lineshape with a narrower appearance on the high field side. This asymmetry together with an anisotropy energy which varies from +640 to +500 G over the temperature range of 80 to 298 K indicate that the ferromagnetic resonance arises from metallic Fe having the body-centered cubic structure and not from hematite, magnetite or other Fe(3+) ions in magnetite-like phases. The g-value, the lineshape asymmetry, and the temperature dependence of the linewidth for the Apollo 14 and 15 fines as reported by other workers are found to be essentially similar to those observed for the Apollo 11 and 12 fines.

  19. Recycling of PET bottles as fine aggregate in concrete.

    PubMed

    Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2010-06-01

    An attempt to substitute in concrete the 5% by weight of fine aggregate (natural sand) with an equal weight of PET aggregates manufactured from the waste un-washed PET bottles (WPET), is presented. The WPET particles possessed a granulometry similar to that of the substituted sand. Specimens with different cement content and water/cement ratio were manufactured. Rheological characterization on fresh concrete and mechanical tests at the ages of 28 and 365days were performed on the WPET/concretes as well as on reference concretes containing only natural fine aggregate in order to investigate the influence of the substitution of WPET to the fine aggregate in concrete. It was found that the WPET concretes display similar workability characteristics, compressive strength and splitting tensile strength slightly lower that the reference concrete and a moderately higher ductility.

  20. Seismic properties of fine rock powders in lunar conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B. W.

    1973-01-01

    Seismic properties of fine rock powders in near lunar surface conditions have been measured in the laboratory, and they correspond well with those obtained for the near lunar surface. The laboratory values of Q range from 40 to 330 with corresponding wave velocities below 100 m/sec. Many of the results obtained are shown to be understandable in terms of current theories of the elastic and plastic properties of fine rock powders in a variety of temperature and pressure conditions. This enables some estimate to be made of the changes in Q and wave velocity with depth in the moon, on the supposition that fine rock powder continues downward as an abundant constituent.