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Sample records for fine-structure constant revisited

  1. Varying Fine-Structure Constant and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    We start with a brief account of the latest analysis of the Oklo phenomenon providing the still most stringent constraint on time variability of the fine-structure constant α. Comparing this with the recent result from the measurement of distant QSO's appears to indicate a non-uniform time-dependence, which we argue to be related to another recent finding of the accelerating universe. This view is implemented in terms of the scalar-tensor theory, applied specifically to the small but nonzero cosmological constant. Our detailed calculation shows that these two phenomena can be understood in terms of a common origin, a particular behavior of the scalar field, dilaton. We also sketch how this theoretical approach makes it appropriate to revisit non-Newtonian gravity featuring small violation of Weak Equivalence Principle at medium distances.

  2. The fine structure constant and habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandora, McCullen

    2016-08-01

    We use the existence of habitable planets to impose anthropic requirements on the fine structure constant, α. To this effect, we present two considerations that restrict its value to be very near the one observed. The first, that the end product of stellar fusion is iron and not one of its neighboring elements, restricts α-1 to be 145± 50. The second, that radiogenic heat in the Earth's interior remains adequately productive for billions of years, restricts it to be 145±9. A connection with the grand unified theory window is discussed, effectively providing a route to probe ultra-high energy physics with upcoming advances in planetary science.

  3. The fine structure constant and habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandora, McCullen

    2016-08-01

    We use the existence of habitable planets to impose anthropic requirements on the fine structure constant, α. To this effect, we present two considerations that restrict its value to be very near the one observed. The first, that the end product of stellar fusion is iron and not one of its neighboring elements, restricts α‑1 to be 145± 50. The second, that radiogenic heat in the Earth's interior remains adequately productive for billions of years, restricts it to be 145±9. A connection with the grand unified theory window is discussed, effectively providing a route to probe ultra-high energy physics with upcoming advances in planetary science.

  4. The Fine-Structure Constant and Wavelength Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan

    The fine-structure constant is a fundamental constant of the universe--and widely thought to have an unchanging value. However, the past decade has witnessed a controversy unfold over the claimed detection that the fine-structure constant had a different value in the distant past. These astrophysical measurements were made with spectrographs at the world's largest optical telescopes. The spectrographs make precise measurements of the wavelength spacing of absorption lines in the metals in the gas between the quasar background source and our telescopes on Earth. The wavelength spacing gives a snapshot of the atomic physics at the time of the interaction. Whether the fine-structure constant has changed is determined by comparing the atomic physics in the distant past with the atomic physics of today. We present our contribution to the discussion by analyzing three nights data taken with the HIRES instrument (High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph) on the Keck telescope. We provide an independent measurement on the fine-structure constant from the Damped Lyman alpha system at a redshift of z =2.309 (10.8 billion years ago) quasar PHL957. We developed a new method for calibrating the wavelength scale of a quasar exposure to a much higher precision than previously achieved. In our subsequent analysis, we discovered unexpected wavelength calibration errors that has not been taken into account in the previously reported measurements. After characterizing the wavelength miscalibrations on the Keck-HIRES instrument, we obtained several nights of data from the main competing instrument, the VLT (Very Large Telescope) with UVES (Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph). We applied our new wavelength calibration method and uncovered similar in nature systematic errors as found on Keck-HIRES. Finally, we make a detailed Monte Carlo exploration of the effects that these miscalibrations have on making precision fine-structure constant measurements.

  5. A simple cosmology with a varying fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Håvard Bunes; Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2002-01-21

    We investigate the cosmological consequences of a theory in which the electric charge e can vary. In this theory the fine structure "constant," alpha, remains almost constant in the radiation era, undergoes a small increase in the matter era, but approaches a constant value when the universe starts accelerating because of a positive cosmological constant. This model satisfies geonuclear, nucleosynthesis, and cosmic microwave background constraints on time variation in alpha, while fitting the observed accelerating Universe and evidence for small alpha variations in quasar spectra. It also places specific restrictions on the nature of the dark matter. Further tests, involving stellar spectra and Eötvös experiments, are proposed.

  6. Fine structure constant and quantized optical transparency of plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Kravets, V G; Schedin, F; Grigorenko, A N

    2012-01-01

    Optics is renowned for displaying quantum phenomena. Indeed, studies of emission and absorption lines, the photoelectric effect and blackbody radiation helped to build the foundations of quantum mechanics. Nevertheless, it came as a surprise that the visible transparency of suspended graphene is determined solely by the fine structure constant, as this kind of universality had been previously reserved only for quantized resistance and flux quanta in superconductors. Here we describe a plasmonic system in which relative optical transparency is determined solely by the fine structure constant. The system consists of a regular array of gold nanoparticles fabricated on a thin metallic sublayer. We show that its relative transparency can be quantized in the near-infrared, which we attribute to the quantized contact resistance between the nanoparticles and the metallic sublayer. Our results open new possibilities in the exploration of universal dynamic conductance in plasmonic nanooptics.

  7. Variations in the fine-structure constant constraining gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Cunha, M. S.; Muniz, C. R.; Tahim, M. O.; Vieira, H. S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the fine-structure constant, α, locally varies in the presence of a static and spherically symmetric gravitational source. The procedure consists in calculating the solution and the energy eigenvalues of a massive scalar field around that source, considering the weak-field regime. From this result, we obtain expressions for a spatially variable fine-structure constant by considering suitable modifications in the involved parameters admitting some scenarios of semi-classical and quantum gravities. Constraints on free parameters of the approached theories are calculated from astrophysical observations of the emission spectra of a white dwarf. Such constraints are finally compared with those obtained in the literature.

  8. Deeper Probing of the Fine-structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-10-01

    In our earlier attempt in [1] to derive fine-structure constant, one subtle reason why the natural logarithm of the age of the universe in Planck times comes out to be slightly greater than the reciprocal of the fine structure constant is that the variable W in Boltzmann's expression should be the age of the universe in Planck times divided by the bit depth for our specific application. Since we cannot decode the nature's bit depth, we cannot come up with the expected value of ALPHA. For an assumed bit depth of 10, the reciprocal of ALPHA goes down by ln10 (2.3) without having a significant impact on the order of magnitude of the baud rate (baud rate = bits per second/bit depth = 10^43 (Planck time/second)/10 = 10^42). Use of terms and equations from informatics in both of author's interrelated abstracts this meeting is meant to engage a wider audience simply. [1] Goradia, Shantilal ``What is Fine-structure Constant?'' http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040v3.

  9. New Tests for Variations of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant, by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atomos with different atomic number Z. H- maser, Cs and Hg+ clocks have a different dependence on ia relativistic contributions of order (Z. Recent H-maser vs Hg+ clock comparison data improves laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to giveFuture laser cooled clocks (Be+, Rb, Cs, Hg+, etc.), when compared, will yield the most senstive of all tests for.

  10. Further Evidence for Cosmological Evolution of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J. K.; Murphy, M. T.; Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Barrow, J. D.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-08-01

    We describe the results of a search for time variability of the fine structure constant α using absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. Three large optical data sets and two 21 cm and mm absorption systems provide four independent samples, spanning ~23% to 87% of the age of the universe. Each sample yields a smaller α in the past and the optical sample shows a 4σ deviation: Δα/α = -0.72+/-0.18×10-5 over the redshift range 0.5

  11. Time variation of the fine structure constant driven by quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis; Goldberg, Haim

    2003-10-01

    There are indications from the study of quasar absorption spectra that the fine structure constant α may have been measurably smaller for redshifts z>2. Analyses of other data (149Sm fission rate for the Oklo natural reactor, variation of 187Re β-decay rate in meteorite studies, atomic clock measurements) which probe variations of α in the more recent past imply much smaller deviations from its present value. In this work we tie the variation of α to the evolution of the quintessence field proposed by Albrecht and Skordis, and show that agreement with all these data, as well as consistency with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, can be achieved for a range of parameters. Some definite predictions follow for upcoming space missions searching for violations of the equivalence principle.

  12. Nonlinear Electrodynamics Analysis Of The Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbelek, Jean Paul

    2010-10-01

    It has been claimed that during the late time history of our universe, the fine structure constant, α, has been increasing [1],[2]. However, other teams has claimed a discordant result [3],[4]. Also, the current precision of laboratory tests is not sufficient to either comfort or reject any of these astronomical observations. Here we suggest that a nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED) interaction of photons with the weak local background magnetic fields of a gas cloud absorber can reconcile the null result of refs.[3] and [4] with the negative variation found by refs. [2] and [1] and also to find a bridge with the positive variation found later by Levshakov et al.. [5]-[7]. Moreover, NLED photon propagation in a vacuum permeated by a background magnetic field is actually in full agreement with constraints from Oklo natural reactor data.

  13. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  14. Varying fine structure 'constant' and charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2009-12-15

    Speculation that the fine-structure constant {alpha} varies in spacetime has a long history. We derive, in 4-D general relativity and in isotropic coordinates, the solution for a charged spherical black hole according to the framework for dynamical {alpha} J. D. Bekenstein, Phys. Rev. D 25, 1527 (1982).. This solution coincides with a previously known one-parameter extension of the dilatonic black hole family. Among the notable properties of varying-{alpha} charged black holes are adherence to a 'no hair' principle, the absence of the inner (Cauchy) horizon of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, the nonexistence of precisely extremal black holes, and the appearance of naked singularities in an analytic extension of the relevant metric. The exteriors of almost extremal electrically (magnetically) charged black holes have simple structures which makes their influence on applied magnetic (electric) fields transparent. We rederive the thermodynamic functions of the modified black holes; the otherwise difficult calculation of the electric potential is done by a shortcut. We confirm that variability of {alpha} in the wake of expansion of the universe does not threaten the generalized second law.

  15. Galaxy clusters, type Ia supernovae and the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Busti, V. C.; Colaço, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Landau, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    As is well known, measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect can be combined with observations of the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters to estimate the angular diameter distance to these structures. In this paper, we show that this technique depends on the fine structure constant, α. Therefore, if α is a time-dependent quantity, e.g., α = α0phi(z), where phi is a function of redshift, we argue that current data do not provide the real angular diameter distance, DA(z), to the cluster, but instead DAdata(z) = phi(z)2 DA(z). We use this result to derive constraints on a possible variation of α for a class of dilaton runaway models considering a sample of 25 measurements of DAdata(z) in redshift range 0.023 < z < 0.784 and estimates of DA(z) from current type Ia supernovae observations. We find no significant indication of variation of α with the present data.

  16. A New Physical Meaning of Sommerfeld Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    2015-04-01

    Identifying physical space or Casimir vacuum as a compressible tachyon fluid, Planck compressible ether, leads to stochastic definitions of Planck h = mk <λk > c and Boltzmann k = mk <νk > c constants, finite photon mass mk = (hk/c3)1/2 , amu = mk c2 = (hkc)1/2 , and modified Avogadro-Loschmidt number No = 1/(hkc)1/2 = 6.03766 x1023 mole-1 . Thus, Lorentz-FitzGerald contractions now result from compressibility of physical space and become causal (Pauli) in accordance with Poincaré-Lorentz dynamic theory of relativity as opposed to Einstein kinematic theory of relativity. At thermodynamic equilibrium he = me <λe > ve = hk = mk <λk > c = h, Compton wavelength can be expressed as λc = h/me c = (ve /c)h <λe > /(me <λe > ve) = αλe . Hence, Sommerfeld fine structure constant α is identified as the ratio of electron to photon speeds α = e2/(2ɛo hc) = ve/c = 1/137.036. The mean thermal speed of electron at equilibrium with photon gas is ve = 2.187640x106 m/s and its de Broglie wavelength is λe = 3.3250x10-10 m. Also, electron kinetic energy for oscillations in two directions < x + > and < x- > or ɛe = hνe = me ve2= kTe results in electron temperature Te = 3.15690x105 K.

  17. Measurement of. cap alpha. /sub s/. [Strong fine structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Clavelli, L.

    1983-01-01

    We point out that a number of QCD tests, relatively free of obvious nonperturbative corrections and other theoretical problems, are now available in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation. By focusing on these tests, one can see the beginning of a confirmation of the running of the strong-coupling constant predicted by the renormalization group.

  18. CONSTRAINTS ON SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN THE FINE-STRUCTURE CONSTANT FROM PLANCK

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bryan, Jon; Smidt, Joseph; De Bernardis, Francesco; Cooray, Asantha

    2015-01-01

    We use the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data from Planck to constrain the spatial fluctuations of the fine-structure constant α at a redshift of 1100. We use a quadratic estimator to measure the four-point correlation function of the CMB temperature anisotropies and extract the angular power spectrum fine-structure constant spatial variations projected along the line of sight at the last scattering surface. At tens of degree angular scales and above, we constrain the fractional rms fluctuations of the fine-structure constant to be (δα/α){sub rms} < 3.4 × 10{sup –3} at the 68% confidence level. We find no evidence for a spatially varying α at a redshift of 10{sup 3}.

  19. A five dimensional model of varying effective gravitational and fine structure constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbelek, J. P.; Lachièze-Rey, M.

    2003-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the reported time variation of the fine structure constant alpha is due to a coupling between electromagnetism and gravitation. We predict such a coupling from a very simple effective theory of physical interactions, under the form of an improved version of the Kaluza-Klein theory. We show that it precisely leads to a variation of the effective fine structure constant with cosmic conditions, and thus with cosmic time. The comparison with the recent data from distant quasars absorption line spectra gives a good agreement; moreover, this may reconcile the claimed results on alpha with the upper limit from the Oklo naturel Uranium fission reactor.

  20. 21-cm radiation: a new probe of variation in the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2007-03-16

    We investigate the effect of variation in the value of the fine-structure constant (alpha) at high redshifts (recombination > z > 30) on the absorption of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 21 cm hyperfine transition of the neutral atomic hydrogen. We find that the 21 cm signal is very sensitive to the variations in alpha and it is so far the only probe of the fine-structure constant in this redshift range. A change in the value of alpha by 1% changes the mean brightness temperature decrement of the CMB due to 21 cm absorption by >5% over the redshift range z < 50. There is an effect of similar magnitude on the amplitude of the fluctuations in the brightness temperature. The redshift of maximum absorption also changes by approximately 5%.

  1. Measuring h /mCs and the Fine Structure Constant with Bragg Diffraction and Bloch Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δα / α =0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We suppress many systematic effects, e.g., Zeeman shifts and effects from Earth's gravity and vibrations, use Bloch oscillations to increase the signal and reduce the diffraction phase, simulate multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implement spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  2. Measuring the fine structure constant with Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chenghui; Estey, Brian; Parker, Richard; Dudley, Jordan; Müller, Holger

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δα / α =0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We have suppressed many systematic effects known in most atom interferometers with Raman beam splitters such as light shift, Zeeman effect shift as well as vibration. We have also simulated multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implemented spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  3. How Strongly does Dating Meteorites Constrain the Time-Dependence of the Fine-Structure Constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    We review our argument on the nature of the so-called meteorite constraint on the possible time-dependence of the fine-structure constant, emphasizing that dating meteorites at the present time is different in principle from searching directly for the traces in the past, as in the Oklo phenomenon and the QSO absorption lines. In the related literature, we still find some arguments not necessarily consistent with this difference to be taken properly into account. It does not immediately follow that any model-dependent approaches are useless in practice, though we cannot help suspecting that dating meteorites is no match for the Oklo and the QSO in probing the time-variability of the fine-structure constant, at this moment. Some of the relevance to the QSO data particularly in terms of the scalar field will be discussed.

  4. Constraints on field theoretical models for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.

    2005-02-01

    Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant α may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which α is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating α, monotonic time variation of α, and time-independent α that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and “fifth force” experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo subnuclear reactor on models with monotonic timelike variation of α. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

  5. Enhanced effect of temporal variation of the fine-structure constant in diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-03-15

    We show that the relative effect of variation of the fine-structure constant in microwave transitions between very close and narrow rotational-hyperfine levels may be enhanced 2-3 orders of magnitude in diatomic molecules with unpaired electrons like LaS, LaO, LuS, LuO, YbF, and similar molecular ions. The enhancement is result of cancellation between the hyperfine and rotational intervals.

  6. Re/Os Constraint on the Time Variability of the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    2003-12-01

    We argue that the accuracy by which the isochron parameters of the decay 187Re→187Os are determined by dating iron meteorites may constrain the possible time dependence of the decay rate and hence of the fine-structure constant α, not directly but only in a model-dependent manner. From this point of view, some of the attempts to analyze the Oklo constraint and the results of the quasistellar-object absorption lines are reexamined.

  7. Re/Os constraint on the time variability of the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    2003-12-31

    We argue that the accuracy by which the isochron parameters of the decay 187Re-->187Os are determined by dating iron meteorites may constrain the possible time dependence of the decay rate and hence of the fine-structure constant alpha, not directly but only in a model-dependent manner. From this point of view, some of the attempts to analyze the Oklo constraint and the results of the quasistellar-object absorption lines are reexamined.

  8. Strong limit on the spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    Observed spectra of quasars provide a powerful tool to test the possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/ћc over the history of the Universe. It is demonstrated that high sensitivity to the variation of α can be obtained from a comparison of the spectra of quasars and laboratories. We reported a new constraint on the variation of the fine-structure constant based on the analysis of the optical spectra of the fine-structure transitions in [NeIII], [NeV], [OIII], [OI] and [SII] multiplets from 14 Seyfert 1.5 galaxies. The weighted mean value of the α-variation derived from our analysis over the redshift range 0.035 < z < 0.281 Δα/α= (4.50 +/- 5.53) \\times 10-5. This result presents strong limit improvements on the constraint on Δα/α compared to the published in the literature

  9. Studying the Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Emission-Line Multiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk; Pradhan, Anil K.; Frank, Stephan

    2005-08-01

    As an extension of the method by Bahcall and coworkers to investigate the time dependence of the fine-structure constant, we describe an approach based on new observations of forbidden-line multiplets from different ionic species. We obtain optical spectra of fine-structure transitions in [Ne III], [Ne V], [O III], [O I], and [S II] multiplets from a sample of 14 Seyfert 1.5 galaxies in the low-z range 0.035fine-structure constant. The approach can be further extended and generalized to a ``many-multiplet emission-line method'' analogous in principle to the corresponding method using absorption lines. With that aim, we note that the theoretical limits on emission-line ratios of selected ions are precisely known and provide well-constrained selection criteria. We also discuss several other forbidden and allowed lines that may constitute the basis for a more rigorous study using high-resolution instruments on the next generation of 8 m class telescopes. Based on observations obtained at MDM Observatory, Arizona.

  10. Precision Measurements: Testing the Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Often, precision measurements from diverse fields can be used to learn new facts about the universe. The usual definition of "precision" is based on improvements over previous measurements. A review of the present state of knowledge regarding the possible time variation of the fine structure constant α will be presented; "precise" data from natural phenomena, which include an apparent shift in the red-shift-scaled fine structure in the absorption spectra of quasar light, and the isotopic abundances in the fission products of a prehistoric natural reactor in Oklo, Gabon. Prospects to improve the accuracy for the constancy of α with laboratory experiments will be discussed. Our two experimental investigations currently being developed are based on optical spectroscopy of trapped ions and on radiofrequency spectroscopy of an atomic dysprosium beam. A sensitivity of dotα/α≈ 10-18/yr is anticipated. Because this accuracy exceeds that by which the second is defined, these measurements will necessarily be differential.

  11. Enhanced Laboratory Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant using Highly Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-09-17

    We study atomic systems that are in the frequency range of optical atomic clocks and have enhanced sensitivity to potential time variation of the fine-structure constant {alpha}. The high sensitivity is due to coherent contributions from three factors: high nuclear charge Z, high ionization degree, and significant differences in the configuration composition of the states involved. Configuration crossing keeps the frequencies in the optical range despite the large ionization energies. We discuss a few promising examples that have the largest {alpha} sensitivities seen in atomic systems.

  12. On the fine-structure constant in a plasma model of the fluctuating vacuum substratum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of an intimate connection between the quivering motion of electrons and positrons (Zitterbewegung), predicted by the Dirac equation, and the zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum is suggested. The nature of the proposed connection is discussed quantitatively, and an approximate self-consistency relation is derived, supplying a purely mathematical expression that relates the dimensionless coupling strengths (fine-structure constants) alpha sub e and alpha sub g of electromagnetism and gravity. These considerations provide a tentative explanation for the heretofore puzzling number 1/alpha sub e of about 137.036 and suggest that attempts to unify gravity with the electroweak and strong interactions will ultimately prove successful.

  13. Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant in the Spacetime of a Cosmic Domain Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Tedesco, L.

    The gravitational field produced by a domain wall acts as a medium with spacetime-dependent permittivity ɛ. Therefore, the fine structure constant α=e2/4πɛ will be a time-dependent function at fixed position. The most stringent constraint on the time-variation of α comes from the natural reactor Oklo and gives |˙ α /α | < few × 10-17 yr-1. This limit constrains the tension of a cosmic domain wall to be less than σ ≲ 10-2 MeV3, and then represents the most severe limit on the energy density of a cosmic wall stretching our Universe.

  14. Time evolution of the fine structure constant in a two-field quintessence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bento, M. C.; Bertolami, O.; Santos, N. M.

    2004-11-01

    We examine the variation of the fine structure constant in the context of a two-field quintessence model. We find that, for solutions that lead to a transient late period of accelerated expansion, it is possible to fit the data arising from quasar spectra and comply with the bounds on the variation of α from the Oklo reactor, meteorite analysis, atomic clock measurements, cosmic microwave background radiation, and big bang nucleosynthesis. That is more difficult if we consider solutions corresponding to a late period of permanent accelerated expansion.

  15. Oklo Constraint on the Time-Variabilityof the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    The Oklo phenomenon, natural fission reactors which had taken place in Gabon about 2 billion years ago, provides one of the most stringent constraints on the possible time-variability of the fine-structure constant . We first review briefly what it is and how reliable it is in constraining . We then compare the result with a more recent result on the nonzero change of obtained from the observation of the QSO absorption lines. We suggest a possible way to make these results consistent with each other in terms of the behavior of a scalar field which is expected to be responsible for the acceleration of the universe.

  16. The variation of the fine-structure constant from disformal couplings

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruck, Carsten van; Mifsud, Jurgen; Nunes, Nelson J. E-mail: jmifsud1@sheffield.ac.uk

    2015-12-01

    We study a theory in which the electromagnetic field is disformally coupled to a scalar field, in addition to a usual non-minimal electromagnetic coupling. We show that disformal couplings modify the expression for the fine-structure constant, α. As a result, the theory we consider can explain the non-zero reported variation in the evolution of α by purely considering disformal couplings. We also find that if matter and photons are coupled in the same way to the scalar field, disformal couplings itself do not lead to a variation of the fine-structure constant. A number of scenarios are discussed consistent with the current astrophysical, geochemical, laboratory and the cosmic microwave background radiation constraints on the cosmological evolution of α. The models presented are also consistent with the current type Ia supernovae constraints on the effective dark energy equation of state. We find that the Oklo bound in particular puts strong constraints on the model parameters. From our numerical results, we find that the introduction of a non-minimal electromagnetic coupling enhances the cosmological variation in α. Better constrained data is expected to be reported by ALMA and with the forthcoming generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs such as PEPSI, ESPRESSO, and ELT-HIRES. Furthermore, an expected increase in the sensitivity of molecular and nuclear clocks will put a more stringent constraint on the theory.

  17. New limit on the present temporal variation of the fine structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Peik, E.; Lipphardt, B.; Schnatz, H.; Schneider, T.; Tamm, Chr.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2005-05-05

    A comparison of different atomic frequency standards over time can be used to perform a measurement of the present value of the temporal derivative of the fine structure constant {alpha} in a model-independent way without assumptions on constancy or variability of other parameters. We have measured an optical transition frequency at 688 THz in Yb+ with a cesium atomic clock at two times separated by 2.8 years and find that a variation of this frequency can be excluded within a 1{sigma} relative uncertainty of 4.4{center_dot}10-15 yr-1. Combined with recently published values for the constancy of other transition frequencies this measurement provides a limit on the present variability of {alpha} at the level of 2.0{center_dot}10-15 yr-1. Constraints are also derived for the drift rates of other fundamental constants like the electron/proton mass ratio and the proton g-factor.

  18. New determination of the fine structure constant and test of the quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bouchendira, Rym; Cladé, Pierre; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Nez, François; Biraben, François

    2011-02-25

    We report a new measurement of the ratio h/m(Rb) between the Planck constant and the mass of (87)Rb atom. A new value of the fine structure constant is deduced, α(-1)=137.035999037(91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.6×10(-10). Using this determination, we obtain a theoretical value of the electron anomaly a(e)=0.00115965218113(84), which is in agreement with the experimental measurement of Gabrielse [a(e)=0.00115965218073(28)]. The comparison of these values provides the most stringent test of the QED. Moreover, the precision is large enough to verify for the first time the muonic and hadronic contributions to this anomaly.

  19. Enhanced sensitivity to the fine-structure-constant variation in the Th IV atomic clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Porsev, S. G.

    2009-12-15

    Our calculations have shown that the 5f{sub 5/2}-7s{sub 1/2} 23 131 cm{sup -1} transition from the ground state in the ion Th{sup 3+} is very sensitive to the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant alpha=e{sup 2}/(Planck constant/2pi)c (q=-75 300 cm{sup -1}). The line is very narrow, the ion has been trapped and laser cooled, and the positive shifter line 5f{sub 5/2}-5f{sub 7/2} 4325 cm{sup -1} (q=+2900 cm{sup -1}) may be used as a reference. A comparison may also be made with a positive shifter in another atom or ion. This makes Th{sup 3+} a good candidate to search for the alpha variation.

  20. Possible evidence for a variable fine-structure constant from QSO absorption lines: systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2001-11-01

    Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption spectra with laboratory spectra allows us to probe possible variations in the fundamental constants over cosmological time-scales. In a companion paper we present an analysis of Keck/HIRES spectra and report possible evidence suggesting that the fine-structure constant, α, may have been smaller in the past: [formmu2]Δα/α=(-0.72+/-0.18)×10-5 over the redshift range [formmu3]0.5

  1. Is the possible fine-structure constant drift also a test of a time-dependent Planck constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztas, A. M.; Smith, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The recent publication of spatial and distance variation of the fine-structure constant, α, derived from astronomical data of quasar emissions (QE) is exciting. The decreasing value of α over time, derived from data obtained from the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, encourages the search for other possible running constants. We surmise that emissions from distant supernovae, type Ia (SNe Ia), which are more blue than predictions are best explained by a decreasing Planck constant with increasing lookback time. We present some results from our theoretical work and comparison to the astronomical observations and suggest that both α and h might be running constants. More data are required to answer several questions about the origin of the "drifting" α and the possible time dependence of h. Astronomical tools such as SNe and QE may be the best means to secure the exacting data needed to confirm or deny these hypotheses.

  2. WAVELENGTH ACCURACY OF THE KECK HIRES SPECTROGRAPH AND MEASURING CHANGES IN THE FINE STRUCTURE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, Kim; Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Howk, J. Christopher; Marcy, Geoffrey W. E-mail: jonathan.b.whitmore@gmail.co

    2010-01-01

    We report on an attempt to accurately wavelength calibrate four nights of data taken with the Keck HIRES spectrograph on QSO PHL957, for the purpose of determining whether the fine structure constant was different in the past. Using new software and techniques, we measured the redshifts of various Ni II, Fe II, Si II, etc. lines in a damped Lyalpha system at z = 2.309. Roughly half the data were taken through the Keck iodine cell which contains thousands of well calibrated iodine lines. Using these iodine exposures to calibrate the normal Th-Ar Keck data pipeline output, we found absolute wavelength offsets of 500 m s{sup -1} to 1000 m s{sup -1} with drifts of more than 500 m s{sup -1} over a single night, and drifts of nearly 2000 m s{sup -1} over several nights. These offsets correspond to an absolute redshift of uncertainty of about DELTAz approx 10{sup -5}(DELTAlambda approx 0.02 A), with daily drifts of around DELTAz approx 5 x 10{sup -6} (DELTAlambda approx 0.01 A), and multiday drifts of nearly DELTAz approx 2 x 10{sup -5}(approx0.04 A). The causes of the wavelength offsets are not known, but since claimed shifts in the fine structure constant would result in velocity shifts of less than 100 m s{sup -1}, this level of systematic uncertainty may make it difficult to use Keck HIRES data to constrain the change in the fine structure constant. Using our calibrated data, we applied both our own fitting software and standard fitting software to measure DELTAalpha/alpha, but discovered that we could obtain results ranging from significant detection of either sign, to strong null limits, depending upon which sets of lines and which fitting method were used. We thus speculate that the discrepant results on DELTAalpha/alpha reported in the literature may be due to random fluctuations coming from underestimated systematic errors in wavelength calibration and fitting procedure.

  3. Constraints on the Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant by the 5-Year WMAP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, M.; Nagata, R.; Yokoyama, J.

    2008-12-01

    The constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant at recombination epoch relative to its present value, Δα/α ≡ (α_{rec} - α_{now})/α_{now}, are obtained from the analysis of the 5-year WMAP cosmic microwave background data. As a result of Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo analysis, it is found that, contrary to the analysis based on the previous WMAP data, the mean value of Δα/α = -0.0009 does not change significantly whether we use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) measurement of the Hubble parameter as a prior or not. The resultant 95% confidence ranges of Δα/α are -0.028 < Δα/α < 0.026 with HST prior and -0.050 < Δα/α < 0.042 without HST prior.

  4. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions.

    PubMed

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Stocke, J T; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Conway, J; Moore, C P

    2000-12-25

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine structure constant: alpha/ alpha<3.5x10(-15) yr(-1), to a look-back time of 4.8 Gyr. In the context of string theory, the limit on the secular evolution of the scale factor of the compact dimensions, R, is &Rdot/ R<10(-15) yr(-1). Including terrestrial and other astronomical measurements places 2sigma limits on slow oscillations of R from the present to the epoch of cosmic nucleosynthesis, just seconds after the big bang, of DeltaR /R<10(-5).

  5. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions.

    PubMed

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Stocke, J T; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Conway, J; Moore, C P

    2000-12-25

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine structure constant: alpha/ alpha<3.5x10(-15) yr(-1), to a look-back time of 4.8 Gyr. In the context of string theory, the limit on the secular evolution of the scale factor of the compact dimensions, R, is &Rdot/ R<10(-15) yr(-1). Including terrestrial and other astronomical measurements places 2sigma limits on slow oscillations of R from the present to the epoch of cosmic nucleosynthesis, just seconds after the big bang, of DeltaR /R<10(-5). PMID:11136034

  6. Constraints on a possible variation of the fine structure constant from galaxy cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Landau, S. J.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Sánchez G., I. E.; Busti, V. C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new method to probe a possible time evolution of the fine structure constant α from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements of the gas mass fraction (fgas) in galaxy clusters. Taking into account a direct relation between variations of α and violations of the distance-duality relation, we discuss constraints on α for a class of dilaton runaway models. Although not yet competitive with bounds from high-z quasar absorption systems, our constraints, considering a sample of 29 measurements of fgas, in the redshift interval 0.14 < z < 0.89, provide an independent estimate of α variation at low and intermediate redshifts. Furthermore, current and planned surveys will provide a larger amount of data and thus allow to improve the limits on α variation obtained in the present analysis.

  7. Variation of the fine-structure constant from the de Sitter invariant special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Xia; Xiao, Neng-Chao; Yan, Mu-Lin

    2008-08-01

    We discuss the variation of the fine-structure constant, α. There are obvious discrepancies among the results of α-variation from recent Quasi-stellar observation experiments and from the Oklo uranium mine analysis. We use dS Sitter invariant Special Relativity (Script SScript Rc,R) and Dirac large number hypothesis to discuss this puzzle, and present a possible solution to the disagreement. By means of the observational data and the discussions presented in this paper, we estimate the radius of the Universe in Script SScript Rc,R which is about ~2√5×1011l.y. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (90403021) and PhD Program Funds of Education Ministry of China (20020358040)

  8. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf 12+ to U 34+, which have the 4 f 12 configuration of valence electrons, the Ir 17+ ion, which has a hole in almost filled 4 f subshell, the Ho 14+, Cf 15+, Es 17+ and Es 16+ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, α (α = e2/hbar c). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to α-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  9. Limit on the Temporal Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Atomic Dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Cingoez, A.; Lapierre, A.; Leefer, N.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Lamoreaux, S. K.; Torgerson, J. R.; Budker, D.

    2007-01-26

    Over 8 months, we monitored transition frequencies between nearly degenerate, opposite-parity levels in two isotopes of atomic dysprosium (Dy). These frequencies are sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant ({alpha}) due to relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. In this unique system, in contrast to atomic-clock comparisons, the difference of the electronic energies of the opposite-parity levels can be monitored directly utilizing a rf electric-dipole transition between them. Our measurements show that the frequency variation of the 3.1-MHz transition in {sup 163}Dy and the 235-MHz transition in {sup 162}Dy are 9.0{+-}6.7 Hz/yr and -0.6{+-}6.5 Hz/yr, respectively. These results provide a rate of fractional variation of {alpha} of (-2.7{+-}2.6)x10{sup -15} yr{sup -1} (1{sigma}) without assumptions on constancy of other fundamental constants, indicating absence of significant variation at the present level of sensitivity.

  10. Cosmological variation of the fine structure constant from an ultralight scalar field: The effects of mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Carl L.

    2003-08-01

    Cosmological variation of the fine structure constant α due to the evolution of a spatially homogeneous ultralight scalar field (m˜H0) during the matter and Λ dominated eras is analyzed. Agreement of Δα/α with the value suggested by recent observations of quasar absorption lines is obtained by adjusting a single parameter, the coupling of the scalar field to matter. Asymptotically α(t) in this model goes to a constant value α¯≈α0 in the early radiation and the late Λ dominated eras. The coupling of the scalar field to (nonrelativistic) matter drives α slightly away from α¯ in the epochs when the density of matter is important. Simultaneous agreement with the more restrictive bounds on the variation |Δα/α| from the Oklo natural fission reactor and from meteorite samples can be achieved if the mass of the scalar field is on the order of 0.5 0.6 HΛ, where HΛ=Ω1/2ΛH0. Depending on the scalar field mass, α may be slightly smaller or larger than α0 at the times of big bang nucleosynthesis, the emission of the cosmic microwave background, the formation of early solar system meteorites, and the Oklo reactor. The effects on the evolution of α due to nonzero mass for the scalar field are emphasized. An order of magnitude improvement in the laboratory technique could lead to a detection of (α˙/α)0.

  11. Accelerating universe and the time-dependent fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    I start with assuming a gravitational scalar field as the dark-energy supposed to be responsible for the accelerating universe. Also from the point of view of unification, a scalar field implies a time-variability of certain “constants” in Nature. In this context I once derived a relation for the time-variability of the fine-structure constant α: Δα/α =ζ Ƶ(α/π) Δσ, where ζ and Ƶ are the constants of the order one, while σ on the right-hand side is the scalar field in action in the accelerating universe. I use the reduced Planckian units with c=ℏ =MP(=(8π G)-1/2)=1. I then compared the dynamics of the accelerating universe, on one hand, and Δα/α derived from the analyses of QSO absorption lines, Oklo phenomenon, also different atomic clocks in the laboratories, on the other hand. I am here going to discuss the theoretical background of the relation, based on the scalar-tensor theory invented first by Jordan in 1955.

  12. Time variation of the fine structure constant α from realistic models of Oklo reactors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2006-11-01

    The topic of whether the fundamental constants of nature vary with time has been a subject of great interest since Dirac originally proposed the possibility that GN˜1/tuniverse. Recent observations of absorption spectra lines from distant quasars appeared to indicate a possible increase in the fine structure constant α over ten billion years. Contrarily, analyses of the time evolution of α from Oklo natural nuclear reactor data have yielded inconsistent results, some indicating a decrease over two billion years while others indicated no change. We have used known Oklo reactor epithermal spectral indices as criteria for selecting realistic reactor models. Reactors RZ2 and RZ10 were modeled with MCNP and the resulting neutron spectra were used to calculate the change in the ^149Sm capture cross section as a function of a possible shift in the energy of the 97.3-meV resonance. Our study resolves the contradictory situation with previous Oklo α-results. Our suggested 2 σ bound on a possible time variation of α over two billion years is stringent: -0.11 <=δαα <=0.24, in units of 10-7, but model dependent in that it assumes only α has varied over time.

  13. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high-resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium-argon calibration can be tracked with ˜10 m s-1 precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders (˜50-100 Å) and entire spectrographs arms (˜1000-3000 Å). Using archival spectra from the past 20 yr, we have probed the supercalibration history of the Very Large Telescope-Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (VLT-UVES) and Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically ±200 m s-1 per 1000 Å. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra that characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The spurious deviations in α produced by the model closely match important aspects of the VLT-UVES quasar results at all redshifts and partially explain the HIRES results, though not self-consistently at all redshifts. That is, the apparent ubiquity, size and general characteristics of the distortions are capable of significantly weakening the evidence for variations in α from quasar absorption lines.

  14. A new analysis of fine-structure constant measurements and modelling errors from quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczynska, Michael R.; Webb, John K.; King, Julian A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of 23 absorption systems along the lines of sight towards 18 quasars in the redshift range of 0.4 ≤ zabs ≤ 2.3 observed on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). Considering both statistical and systematic error contributions we find a robust estimate of the weighted mean deviation of the fine-structure constant from its current, laboratory value of Δα/α = (0.22 ± 0.23) × 10-5, consistent with the dipole variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al. This paper also examines modelling methodologies and systematic effects. In particular, we focus on the consequences of fitting quasar absorption systems with too few absorbing components and of selectively fitting only the stronger components in an absorption complex. We show that using insufficient continuum regions around an absorption complex causes a significant increase in the scatter of a sample of Δα/α measurements, thus unnecessarily reducing the overall precision. We further show that fitting absorption systems with too few velocity components also results in a significant increase in the scatter of Δα/α measurements, and in addition causes Δα/α error estimates to be systematically underestimated. These results thus identify some of the potential pitfalls in analysis techniques and provide a guide for future analyses.

  15. New limits on variation of the fine-structure constant using atomic dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Leefer, N; Weber, C T M; Cingöz, A; Torgerson, J R; Budker, D

    2013-08-01

    We report on the spectroscopy of radio-frequency transitions between nearly degenerate, opposite-parity excited states in atomic dysprosium (Dy). Theoretical calculations predict that these states are very sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant α owing to large relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. The near degeneracy reduces the relative precision necessary to place constraints on variation of α, competitive with results obtained from the best atomic clocks in the world. Additionally, the existence of several abundant isotopes of Dy allows isotopic comparisons that suppress common-mode systematic errors. The frequencies of the 754-MHz transition in 164Dy and 235-MHz transition in 162Dy are measured over the span of two years. The linear variation of α is α·/α=(-5.8±6.9([1σ]))×10(-17)  yr(-1), consistent with zero. The same data are used to constrain the dimensionless parameter kα characterizing a possible coupling of α to a changing gravitational potential. We find that kα=(-5.5±5.2([1σ]))×10(-7), essentially consistent with zero and the best constraint to date.

  16. New limits on variation of the fine-structure constant using atomic dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Leefer, N; Weber, C T M; Cingöz, A; Torgerson, J R; Budker, D

    2013-08-01

    We report on the spectroscopy of radio-frequency transitions between nearly degenerate, opposite-parity excited states in atomic dysprosium (Dy). Theoretical calculations predict that these states are very sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant α owing to large relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. The near degeneracy reduces the relative precision necessary to place constraints on variation of α, competitive with results obtained from the best atomic clocks in the world. Additionally, the existence of several abundant isotopes of Dy allows isotopic comparisons that suppress common-mode systematic errors. The frequencies of the 754-MHz transition in 164Dy and 235-MHz transition in 162Dy are measured over the span of two years. The linear variation of α is α·/α=(-5.8±6.9([1σ]))×10(-17)  yr(-1), consistent with zero. The same data are used to constrain the dimensionless parameter kα characterizing a possible coupling of α to a changing gravitational potential. We find that kα=(-5.5±5.2([1σ]))×10(-7), essentially consistent with zero and the best constraint to date. PMID:23971546

  17. Non-linear electrodynamics and the variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbelek, Jean Paul; Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.

    2008-09-01

    It has been claimed that during the late-time history of our Universe, the fine structure constant of electromagnetism, α, has been increasing. The conclusion is achieved after looking at the separation between lines of ions like CIV, MgII, SiII, FeII, among others in the absorption spectra of very distant quasars, and comparing them with their counterparts obtained in the laboratory. However, in the meantime, other teams have claimed either a null result or a decreasing α with respect to the cosmic time. Also, the current precision of laboratory tests does not allow one to either comfort or reject any of these astronomical observations. Here, we suggest that as photons are the sidereal messengers, a non-linear electrodynamics (NLED) description of the interaction of photons with the weak local background magnetic fields of a gas cloud absorber around the emitting quasar can reconcile the Chand et al. and Levshakov et al. findings with the negative variation found by Murphy et al. and Webb et al., and also to find a bridge with the positive variation argued more recently by Levshakov et al. We also show that NLED photon propagation in a vacuum permeated by a background magnetic field presents a full agreement with constraints from Oklo natural reactor data. Finally, we show that NLED may render a null result only in a narrow range of the local background magnetic field which should be the case of both the claims by Chand et al. and by Srianand et al.

  18. Chemistry as a function of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Rollin A.; Siddiqi, Ali; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    2010-04-01

    In standard computations in theoretical quantum chemistry the accepted values of the fundamental physical constants are assumed. Alternatively, the tools of computational quantum chemistry can be used to investigate hypothetical chemistry that would result from different values of these constants, given the same physical laws. In this work, the dependence of a variety of basic chemical quantities on the values of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio is explored. In chemistry, the accepted values of both constants may be considered small, in the sense that their increase must be substantial to seriously impact bond energies. It is found that if the fine-structure constant were larger, covalent bonds between light atoms would be weaker, and the dipole moment and hydrogen-bonding ability of water would be reduced. Conversely, an increase in the value of the electron-proton mass ratio increases dissociation energies in molecules such as H2, O2, and CO2. Specifically, a sevenfold increase in the fine-structure constant decreases the strength of the O-H bond in the water molecule by 7 kcal mol-1 while reducing its dipole moment by at least 10%, whereas a 100-fold increase in the electron-proton mass ratio increases the same bond energy by 11 kcal mol-1.

  19. Constraining the variation of the fine-structure constant with observations of narrow quasar absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10{sup –5}, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (– 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10{sup –5} in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10{sup –5}, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (– 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10{sup –5}. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (– 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10{sup –5}. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of

  20. Keck constraints on a varying fine-structure constant: wavelength calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Webb, John K.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2010-11-01

    The Keck telescope's High Resolution Spectrograph (HIRES) has previously provided evidence for a smaller fine-structure constant, α, compared to the current laboratory value, in a sample of 143 quasar absorption systems: Δα/α=(-0.57±0.11)×10-5. The analysis was based on a variety of metal-ion transitions which, if α varies, experience different relative velocity shifts. This result is yet to be robustly contradicted, or confirmed, by measurements on other telescopes and spectrographs; it remains crucial to do so. It is also important to consider new possible instrumental systematic effects which may explain the Keck/HIRES results. Griest et al. (2009) recently identified distortions in the echelle order wavelength scales of HIRES with typical amplitudes ±250 m s-1. Here we investigate the effect such distortions may have had on the Keck/HIRES varying α results. Using a simple model of these intra-order distortions, we demonstrate that they cause a random effect on Δα/α from absorber to absorber because the systems are at different redshifts, placing the relevant absorption lines at different positions in different echelle orders. The typical magnitude of the effect on Δα/α is ~0.4×10-5 for individual absorbers which, compared to the median error on Δα/α in the sample, ~1.9×10-5, is relatively small. Consequently, the weighted mean value changes by less than 0.05×10-5 if the corrections we calculate are applied. Unsurprisingly, with corrections this small, we do not find direct evidence that applying them is actually warranted. Nevertheless, we urge caution, particularly for analyses aiming to achieve high precision Δα/α measurements on individual systems or small samples, that a much more detailed understanding of such intra-order distortions and their dependence on observational parameters is important if they are to be avoided or modelled reliably.

  1. Cosmological variation of the fine-structure constant versus a new interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E.J.; Flambaum, V.V.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2004-10-01

    We show that using the modified form of the Dirac Hamiltonian as suggested by Bekenstein does not affect the analysis of QSO data pertaining to a measurement of {alpha} variation. We obtain the present time limit on Bekenstein's parameter, tan{sup 2} {chi}=(0.2{+-}0.7)x10{sup -6}, from the measurement of the hydrogen 2p fine structure using a value of {alpha} obtained from different experiments.

  2. Time-variability of the fine-structure constant expected from the Oklo constraint and the QSO absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2003-10-01

    The data from the QSO absorption lines indicating a nonzero time-variability of the fine-structure constant has been re-analyzed on the basis of a ``damped-oscillator'' fit, as motivated by the same type of behavior of a scalar field, dilaton, which mimics a cosmological constant to understand the accelerating universe. We find nearly as good fit to the latest data as the simple weighted mean. In this way, we offer a way to fit the more stringent result from the Oklo phenomenon, as well.

  3. Constraining possible variations of the fine structure constant in strong gravitational fields with the Kα iron line

    SciTech Connect

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-03-01

    In extensions of general relativity and in theories aiming at unifying gravity with the forces of the Standard Model, the value of the ''fundamental constants'' is often determined by the vacuum expectation value of new fields, which may thus change in different backgrounds. Variations of fundamental constants with respect to the values measured today in laboratories on Earth are expected to be more evident on cosmological timescales and/or in strong gravitational fields. In this paper, I show that the analysis of the Kα iron line observed in the X-ray spectrum of black holes can potentially be used to probe the fine structure constant α in gravitational potentials relative to Earth of Δφ ≈ 0.1. At present, systematic effects not fully under control prevent to get robust and stringent bounds on possible variations of the value of α with this technique, but the fact that current data can be fitted with models based on standard physics already rules out variations of the fine structure constant larger than some percent.

  4. Determination of the fine structure constant based on BLOCH oscillations of ultracold atoms in a vertical optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Cladé, Pierre; de Mirandes, Estefania; Cadoret, Malo; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Schwob, Catherine; Nez, François; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François

    2006-01-27

    We report an accurate measurement of the recoil velocity of 87Rb atoms based on Bloch oscillations in a vertical accelerated optical lattice. We transfer about 900 recoil momenta with an efficiency of 99.97% per recoil. A set of 72 measurements of the recoil velocity, each one with a relative uncertainty of about 33 ppb in 20 min integration time, leads to a determination of the fine structure constant with a statistical relative uncertainty of 4.4 ppb. The detailed analysis of the different systematic errors yields to a relative uncertainty of 6.7 ppb. The deduced value of alpha-1 is 137.035 998 78(91).

  5. Combination of BLOCH oscillations with a Ramsey-Bordé interferometer: new determination of the fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Cadoret, Malo; de Mirandes, Estefania; Cladé, Pierre; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Schwob, Catherine; Nez, François; Julien, Lucile; Biraben, François

    2008-12-01

    We report a new experimental scheme which combines atom interferometry with Bloch oscillations to provide a new measurement of the ratio h/mRb. By using Bloch oscillations, we impart to the atoms up to 1600 recoil momenta and thus we improve the accuracy on the recoil velocity measurement. The deduced value of h/mRb leads to a new determination of the fine structure constant alpha(-1) =137.03599945 (62) with a relative uncertainty of 4.6 x 10(-9). The comparison of this result with the value deduced from the measurement of the electron anomaly provides the most stringent test of QED.

  6. Optical transitions in highly charged californium ions with high sensitivity to variation of the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A

    2012-08-17

    We study electronic transitions in highly charged Cf ions that are within the frequency range of optical lasers and have very high sensitivity to potential variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The transitions are in the optical range despite the large ionization energies because they lie on the level crossing of the 5f and 6p valence orbitals in the thallium isoelectronic sequence. Cf(16+) is a particularly rich ion, having several narrow lines with properties that minimize certain systematic effects. Cf(16+) has very large nuclear charge and large ionization energy, resulting in the largest α sensitivity seen in atomic systems. The lines include positive and negative shifters.

  7. Optical Transitions in Highly Charged Californium Ions with High Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Ong, A.

    2012-08-01

    We study electronic transitions in highly charged Cf ions that are within the frequency range of optical lasers and have very high sensitivity to potential variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The transitions are in the optical range despite the large ionization energies because they lie on the level crossing of the 5f and 6p valence orbitals in the thallium isoelectronic sequence. Cf16+ is a particularly rich ion, having several narrow lines with properties that minimize certain systematic effects. Cf16+ has very large nuclear charge and large ionization energy, resulting in the largest α sensitivity seen in atomic systems. The lines include positive and negative shifters.

  8. The fine structure constant alpha: relevant for a model of a self-propelling photon and for particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl O.

    2015-09-01

    A model for a self propelling (i.e. massless) photon1 is based on oscillations of a pair of charges amounting to elementary charge divided by SQRT alpha, where alpha is the fine structure (Sommerfeld) constant. When one assumes a similar model for particles that do have rest mas (i.e. which are non- self propelling), alpha plays also a role in the rest masses of elementary particles. Indeed all fundamental elementary particle masses can be described by the alpha / beta rule2 --> m(particle) = alpha-n * betam* 27.2 eV /c2 where beta is the proton to electron mass ratio 183612 and n= 0….14, m= -1,0 or Thus, photons and particle masses are intimately related to the fine structure constant. If the latter would not have been strictly constant throughout all times, this would have had consequences for the nature of light and for all masses including those of elementary particles.

  9. Attempts at a determination of the fine-structure constant from first principles: a brief historical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Nándori, I.

    2014-12-01

    It has been a notably elusive task to find a remotely sensical ansatz for a calculation of Sommerfeld's electrodynamic fine-structure constant αQED ≈ 1 / 137.036 based on first principles. However, this has not prevented a number of researchers to invest considerable effort into the problem, despite the formidable challenges, and a number of attempts have been recorded in the literature. Here, we review a possible approach based on the quantum electrodynamic (QED) β function, and on algebraic identities relating αQED to invariant properties of "internal" symmetry groups, as well as attempts to relate the strength of the electromagnetic interaction to the natural cutoff scale for other gauge theories. Conjectures based on both classical as well as quantum-field theoretical considerations are discussed. We point out apparent strengths and weaknesses of the most prominent attempts that were recorded in the literature. This includes possible connections to scaling properties of the Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian which describes gravitational and electromagnetic interactions on curved space-times. Alternative approaches inspired by string theory are also discussed. A conceivable variation of the fine-structure constant with time would suggest a connection of αQED to global structures of the Universe, which in turn are largely determined by gravitational interactions.

  10. Limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant on gravitational potential from white-dwarf spectra.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A; Webb, J K; Barrow, John D; Barstow, M A; Preval, S P; Holberg, J B

    2013-07-01

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10(-5) and (-6.1±5.8)×10(-5) from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δφ≈5×10(-5). With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:23862989

  11. Limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant on gravitational potential from white-dwarf spectra.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A; Webb, J K; Barrow, John D; Barstow, M A; Preval, S P; Holberg, J B

    2013-07-01

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10(-5) and (-6.1±5.8)×10(-5) from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δφ≈5×10(-5). With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  12. Further constraints on variation of the fine-structure constant from alkali-doublet QSO absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Prochaska, J. X.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-11-01

    Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption-line spectra with laboratory spectra provides a precise probe for variability of the fine-structure constant, α, over cosmological time-scales. We constrain variation in α in 21 Keck/HIRES Siiv absorption systems using the alkali-doublet (AD) method in which changes in α are related to changes in the doublet spacing. The precision obtained with the AD method has been increased by a factor of 3: Δα/α=(-0.5+/-1.3)×10-5. We also analyse potential systematic errors in this result. Finally, we compare the AD method with the many-multiplet method, which has achieved an order of magnitude greater precision, and we discuss the future of the AD method.

  13. Tenth-order QED contribution to the electron g-2 and an improved value of the fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tatsumi; Hayakawa, Masashi; Kinoshita, Toichiro; Nio, Makiko

    2012-09-14

    This letter presents the complete QED contribution to the electron g-2 up to the tenth order. With the help of the automatic code generator, we evaluate all 12,672 diagrams of the tenth-order diagrams and obtain 9.16 (58)(α/π)(5). We also improve the eighth-order contribution obtaining -1.9097 (20)(α/π)(4), which includes the mass-dependent contributions. These results lead to a(e)(theory)=1,159,652,181.78(77)×10(-12). The improved value of the fine-structure constant α(-1)=137.035999173 (35) [0.25 ppb] is also derived from the theory and measurement of a(e).

  14. A Stringent Limit on Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Absorption Line Multiplets in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-06-01

    One of the key questions of modern physics concerns the possibility that physical constants have varied throughout the history of the Universe. The standard model of physics is built on these constants, but it does not provide any explanation for their values, nor does it require their constancy over space and time. Here, we set a new limit on possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/4πɛ0 ħc by comparing transitions and line multiplets in an ensemble of Fe II λ 1608, λ 2344, λ 2374, λ 2383, λ 2587, and λ 2600 observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on the optical spectrum observations of QSO HE 0515-4414, we deduce a constraint of Δα/α = (-0.157± 0.300)×10-6 at redshift z = 1.15. At present, this represents the tightest limit on Δα/α in early cosmological epochs compared to the published results in the literature.

  15. Precision atomic spectroscopy for improved limits on variation of the fine structure constant and local position invariance.

    PubMed

    Fortier, T M; Ashby, N; Bergquist, J C; Delaney, M J; Diddams, S A; Heavner, T P; Hollberg, L; Itano, W M; Jefferts, S R; Kim, K; Levi, F; Lorini, L; Oskay, W H; Parker, T E; Shirley, J; Stalnaker, J E

    2007-02-16

    We report tests of local position invariance and the variation of fundamental constants from measurements of the frequency ratio of the 282-nm 199Hg+ optical clock transition to the ground state hyperfine splitting in 133Cs. Analysis of the frequency ratio of the two clocks, extending over 6 yr at NIST, is used to place a limit on its fractional variation of <5.8x10(-6) per change in normalized solar gravitational potential. The same frequency ratio is also used to obtain 20-fold improvement over previous limits on the fractional variation of the fine structure constant of |alpha/alpha|<1.3x10(-16) yr-1, assuming invariance of other fundamental constants. Comparisons of our results with those previously reported for the absolute optical frequency measurements in H and 171Yb+ vs other 133Cs standards yield a coupled constraint of -1.5x10(-15)

  16. Possible evidence for a variable fine-structure constant from QSO absorption lines: motivations, analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.; Barrow, J. D.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental search for variation in the fundamental coupling constants is strongly motivated by modern high-energy physics theories. Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption-line spectra with laboratory spectra provides a sensitive probe for variability of the fine-structure constant, α, over cosmological time-scales. We have previously developed and applied a new method providing an order-of-magnitude gain in precision over previous optical astrophysical constraints. Here we extend that work by including new quasar spectra of damped Lyman-α absorption systems. We also reanalyse our previous lower-redshift data and confirm our initial results. The constraints on α come from simultaneous fitting of absorption lines of subsets of the following species: Mgi, Mgii, Alii, Aliii, Siii, Crii, Feii, Niii and Znii. We present a detailed description of our methods and results based on an analysis of 49 quasar absorption systems (towards 28 QSOs) covering the redshift range [formmu2]0.5

  17. Precise limits on cosmological variability of the fine-structure constant with zinc and chromium quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Malec, Adrian L.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The strongest transitions of Zn and Cr II are the most sensitive to relative variations in the fine-structure constant (Δα/α) among the transitions commonly observed in quasar absorption spectra. They also lie within just 40 Å of each other (rest frame), so they are resistant to the main systematic error affecting most previous measurements of Δα/α: long-range distortions of the wavelength calibration. While Zn and Cr II absorption is normally very weak in quasar spectra, we obtained high signal-to-noise, high-resolution echelle spectra from the Keck and Very Large Telescopes of nine rare systems where it is strong enough to constrain Δα/α from these species alone. These provide 12 independent measurements (three quasars were observed with both telescopes) at redshifts 1.0-2.4, 11 of which pass stringent reliability criteria. These 11 are all consistent with Δα/α = 0 within their individual uncertainties of 3.5-13 parts per million (ppm), with a weighted mean Δα/α = 0.4 ± 1.4stat ± 0.9sys ppm (1σ statistical and systematic uncertainties), indicating no significant cosmological variations in α. This is the first statistical sample of absorbers that is resistant to long-range calibration distortions (at the <1 ppm level), with a precision comparable to previous large samples of ˜150 (distortion-affected) absorbers. Our systematic error budget is instead dominated by much shorter range distortions repeated across echelle orders of individual spectra.

  18. A sub-ppb measurement of the mass of cesium for a new determination of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Michael Patrick

    2000-12-01

    This thesis describes a recent measurement of the mass of atomic Cesium with a relative uncertainty of 2 × 10-10. This measurement reduces the uncertainty on the mass of Cesium by a factor of 100, and removes this uncertainty as a limitation on the accuracy of a determination of the fine-structure constant alpha via a Cesium photon recoil experiment. Removal of this limit should ultimately allow this value of alpha to have a relative accuracy ~1 ppb, which would be comparable to or even better than the most accurate measurement of alpha currently available. This value of alpha will help shed light on the current ~50 ppb discrepancies between values of alpha measured via different routes. In addition to the mass measurement of Cesium, this thesis also describes related mass measurements of atomic Rubidium and Sodium which reduce the uncertainties on these masses by factors ~100, with a view to possible future photon recoil measurements using these species. The measurements were taken using a new Penning trap mass spectrometer constructed by the author and his colleagues. This new spectrometer followed the general design principles of previous MIT ICR Lab Penning trap mass spectrometers, and incorporated a DC SQUID as an ion detector for the first time. This thesis concludes with a discussion of a passive two- coil system designed for shielding magnetic field gradients. These may prove to be the key enabling technology for a future double Penning trap mass spectrometer. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  19. A New Contribution for WYP 2005: The Golden Ratio, Bohr Radius, Planck's Constant, Fine-Structure Constant and g-Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyrovska, R.; Narayan, S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, the ground state Bohr radius (aB) of hydrogen was shown to be divided into two Golden sections, aB,p = aB/ø2 and aB,e = aB/ø at the point of electrical neutrality, where ø = 1.618 is the Golden ratio (R. Heyrovska, Molecular Physics 103: 877-882, and the literature cited therein). The origin of the difference of two energy terms in the Rydberg equation was thus shown to be in the ground state energy itself, as shown below: EH = (1/2)e2/(κaB) = (1/2)(e2/κ) [(1/aB,p - (1/aB,e)] (1). This work brings some new results that 1) a unit charge in vacuum has a magnetic moment, 2) (e2/2κ) in eq. (1) is an electromagnetic condenser constant, 3) the de Broglie wavelengths of the proton and electron correspond to the Golden arcs of a circle with the Bohr radius, 4) the fine structure constant (α) is the ratio of the Planck's constants without and with the interaction of light with matter, 5) the g-factors of the electron and proton, ge/2 and gp/2 divide the Bohr radius at the magnetic center and 6) the ``mysterious'' value (137.036) of α -1 = (360/ø2) - (2/ø3), where (2/ø3) arises from the difference, (gp - ge).

  20. Absolute optical frequency measurements of the cesium D1 transitions and their effect on alpha, the fine-structured constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Keith Gordon

    The fine-structure constant or electromagnetic coupling constant, alpha e, is a dimensionless ratio which unites many physics subfields. Although known precisely via experiments in each subfield, there is disagreement within and between subfields. In particular, precise values obtained via electron ge - 2 experiments which depend heavily on QED calculations have not always been in agreement with those obtained via muon g mu - 2 experiments. Also, solid state measurements (quantum hall effect and AC Josephson effect) often disagree with neutronic hmn measurements. alphae is often said to vary with energy but the question remains as to whether or not its low energy value is stable now or has been stable over the history of the universe. Improved precision helps resolve these issues as they relate to physics, possibly beyond the standard model. The Optical Frequency Measurements group in the Time and Frequency Division at the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST, Boulder, CO) developed and maintains a femtosecond laser frequency comb which is calibrated with respect to the cesium fountain clock implementation of the second. A single frequency component of the femtosecond laser comb is used together with a solid state diode laser and cesium thermal beam to precisely measure the cesium D1 F ∈ {3,4} transition frequencies. The value of fD1centroid = 335 116 048 748.1(2.4) kHz obtained for the transition centroid is over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. A precise value for the cesium D1 hyperfine splitting fHFe = 1 167 723.6(4.7) kHz is reported as well. This value is also over fifteen times more precise than the most recent previous measurement. These new neutral 133Cs 6s 2 S½ → 6p 2 P½ transition (D1) frequencies, when combined with the 2002 CODATA values of the Rydberg, proton/electron mass ratio, cesium atomic mass, and cesium recoil frequency, provide an almost QED-free value of alpha: alphae = 1/137.036 0000

  1. Searching for space-time variation of the fine structure constant using QSO spectra: overview and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    2010-11-01

    Current theories that seek to unify gravity with the other fundamental interactions suggest that spatial and temporal variation of fundamental constants is a possibility, or even a necessity, in an expanding Universe. Several studies have tried to probe the values of constants at earlier stages in the evolution of the Universe, using tools such as big-bang nucleosynthesis, the Oklo natural nuclear reactor, quasar absorption spectra, and atomic clocks (see, e.g. Flambaum & Berengut (2009)).

  2. Weighted difference of g factors of light Li-like and H-like ions for an improved determination of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Berseneva, E.; Harman, Z.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Keitel, C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A weighted difference of the g factors of the Li- and H-like ion of the same element is studied and optimized in order to maximize the cancelation of nuclear effects. To this end, a detailed theoretical investigation is performed for the finite nuclear size correction to the one-electron g factor, the one- and two-photon exchange effects, and the QED effects. The coefficients of the Z α expansion of these corrections are determined, which allows us to set up the optimal definition of the weighted difference. It is demonstrated that, for moderately light elements, such weighted difference is nearly free from uncertainties associated with nuclear effects and can be utilized to extract the fine-structure constant from bound-electron g -factor experiments with an accuracy competitive with or better than its current literature value.

  3. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  4. Searching for variations in the fine-structure constant and the proton-to-electron mass ratio using quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Julian A.

    2012-02-01

    (abridged) Quasar absorption lines provide a precise test of the assumed constancy of the fundamental constants of physics. We have investigated potential changes in the fine-structure constant, alpha, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, mu. The many-multiplet method allows one to use optical fine-structure transitions to constrain (Delta alpha)/alpha at better than the 10^(-5) level. We present a new analysis of 154 quasar absorbers with 0.2 < z <3.7 in VLT/UVES spectra. From these absorbers we find 2.2 sigma evidence for angular variations in alpha under a dipole+monopole model. Combined with previous Keck/HIRES observations, we find 4.1 sigma evidence for angular (and therefore spatial) variations in alpha, with maximal increase of alpha occurring in the direction RA=(17.3 +/- 1.0) hr, dec=(-61 +/- 10) deg. Under a model where the observed effect is proportional to the lookback-time distance the significance increases to 4.2 sigma. Dipole models fitted to the VLT and Keck samples and models fitted to z<1.6 and z>1.6 sub-samples independently yield consistent estimates of the dipole direction, which suggests that the effect is not caused by telescope systematics. We consider a number of systematic effects and show that they are unable to explain the observed dipole effect. We have used spectra of the quasars Q0405-443, Q0347-383 and Q0528-250 from VLT/UVES to investigate the absorbers at z=2.595, 3.025 and 2.811 in these spectra respectively. We find that (Delta mu)/mu=(10.1 +/- 6.6) x 10^(-6), (8.2 +/- 7.5) x 10^(-6) and (-1.4 +/- 3.9) x 10^(-6) in these absorbers respectively. A second spectrum of Q0528-250 provides an additional constraint of (Delta mu)/mu=(0.2 +/- 3.2_stat +/- 1.9_sys) x 10^(-6). The weighted mean of these values yields (Delta mu)/mu=(1.7 +/- 2.4) x 10^(-6), the most precise constraint on evolution in mu at z>1.

  5. Relativistic calculations of radiative properties and fine structure constant varying sensitivity coefficients in the astrophysically relevant Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-03-01

    We have carried out calculations of the relativistic sensitivity coefficients, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, lifetimes and magnetic dipole hyperfine structure constants for a number of low-lying states in the Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions which are abundant in the distant quasars and various stellar plasmas. These spectroscopic data will be very useful for probing temporal variation of the fine structure constant (αe) and in the diagnostic processes of some of the astrophysical plasmas. We have employed all-order perturbative methods in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian to calculate the atomic wavefunctions of the considered ions. Reference states are constructed with the VN-1 and VN+1 potentials and then the electron-electron correlation effects are taken into account by constructing all possible singly and doubly excited configurations, involving both the core and valence electrons, from the respective reference states. We have also determined one electron affinities and ionization potentials of many excited states in these Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions. Except for a few states we have attained accuracies within 1 per cent for the energies compared with their experimental values. Our calculated sensitivity coefficients are estimated to have similar accuracies as of the calculated energies. Furthermore, combining our calculated transition matrix elements with the experimental wavelengths we evaluate transition probabilities, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of some of the excited states in these ions. These results are compared with the available data in a few cases and found to be in very good agreement among themselves. Using our reported hyperfine structure constants due to the dominant magnetic dipole interaction, it is possible to determine hyperfine splittings approximately in the above considered ions.

  6. Highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions as promising optical clock candidates for probing variations of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    Transitions among the first three low-lying states in the highly charged W+13, Ir+16, and Pt+17 ions are found to be strongly forbidden with wavelengths in the optical regime. By determining their energy levels, lifetimes, and other spectroscopic properties that are decisive quantities for estimating dominant systematics due to stray electromagnetic interactions in an experiment, we demonstrate that it can be possible to measure frequencies of the lowest forbidden transitions below a 10-19 precision level in the above ions, and hence, they seem to be suitable for frequency standards. We employ a sophisticated relativistic coupled cluster method to carry out calculations of these properties of the above states involving 4 f - and 5 s -core orbitals. We also found, by estimating their relativistic sensitivity coefficients, that these clock transitions can be highly sensitive to the tiny drift in the fine-structure constant αe. Consequently, a clock based on one of these ions, particularly Pt+17, could be used for corroborating the hypothesis of temporal and spatial variation in αe.

  7. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  8. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  9. Fine structure of cluster decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, O.

    1994-03-01

    Within the one level {ital R}-matrix approach, expressions are derived for the hindrance factors of cluster radioactive decays in which {ital y} {ital the} {ital shell} {ital model} {ital with} {ital effective} {ital residual} {ital interactions} [{ital e}.{ital g}.,{ital thelar} in the Michigan State University version for nearly spherical nuclei, or the enlarged superfluid model (ESM) recently proposed for deformed nuclei]. The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster-nucleus double-folding model potential obtained with the M3Y interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of {alpha} decay of {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Cm, {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra, and {sup 34}Si decay of {sup 243}Cm. Good agreement with the experimental data is obtained.

  10. Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Kavic, Michael; Minic, Djordje

    2007-01-01

    Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, for which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss observational consequences of such a picture of darkmore » energy and constrain the distribution function.« less

  11. Linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and the variation of constants method. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  12. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  13. Thermal stability analysis of the fine structure of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, Pascal; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Raadu, Mickael A.

    1986-01-01

    The linear thermal stability of a 2D periodic structure (alternatively hot and cold) in a uniform magnetic field is analyzed. The energy equation includes wave heating (assumed proportional to density), radiative cooling and both conduction parallel and orthogonal to magnetic lines. The equilibrium is perturbed at constant gas pressure. With parallel conduction only, it is found to be unstable when the length scale 1// is greater than 45 Mn. In that case, orthogonal conduction becomes important and stabilizes the structure when the length scale is smaller than 5 km. On the other hand, when the length scale is greater than 5 km, the thermal equilibrium is unstable, and the corresponding time scale is about 10,000 s: this result may be compared to observations showing that the lifetime of the fine structure of solar prominences is about one hour; consequently, our computations suggest that the size of the unresolved threads could be of the order of 10 km only.

  14. Magnetic fine structure of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the effect of a random photospheric flow on the magnetic structure of a coronal loop is presented. An initially uniform field embedded in a perfectly conducting plasma is assumed, extending between two flat parallel plates representing the solar photosphere at both ends of the loop. The field is perturbed by a sequence of randomly phased, sinusoidal flow patterns applied at one of the boundary plates, and the corresponding sequence of force-free fields is determined. It is found that the electric currents generated by these flows develop a fine structure on a scale significantly smaller than the wavelength of the velocity patterns. This suggests that magnetic energy is transferred to smaller scale via a cascade process.

  15. Fine structure in deformed proton emitters.

    SciTech Connect

    Sonzogni, A. A.; Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-12-07

    In a recent experiment to study the proton radioactivity of the highly deformed {sup 131}Eu nucleus, two proton lines were detected. The higher energy one was assigned to the ground-state to ground-state decay, while the lower energy, to the ground-state to the 2{sup +} state decay. This constitutes the first observation of fine structure in proton radioactivity. With these four measured quantities, proton energies, half-life and branching ratio, it is possible to determine the Nilsson configuration of the ground state of the proton emitting nucleus as well as the 2{sup +} energy and nuclear deformation of the daughter nucleus. These results will be presented and discussed.

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  18. FINE STRUCTURE OF BRUCELLA SUIS SPHEROPLASTS

    PubMed Central

    Hines, William D.; Freeman, Bob A.; Pearson, Gary R.

    1964-01-01

    Hines, William D. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.), Bob A. Freeman, and Gary R. Pearson. Fine structure of Brucella suis spheroplasts. J. Bacteriol. 87:1492–1498. 1964.—Spheroplasts of Brucella suis, prepared by treatment with penicillin and glycine, and normal cells were sectioned and studied by electron microscopy. These spheroplasts differed from the normal cell in that they were greatly expanded and coccoid in shape. The cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane were more easily demonstrated in the spheroplasts. The cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane of normal cells appeared structureless, but in the spheroplasts both were shown to consist of two dark layers sandwiching a lighter layer. The cytoplasm of the spheroplasts was more dilute than that of normal cells and, in the case of glycine-induced spheroplasts, tended to aggregate. Images PMID:14188733

  19. Magnetic tension of sunspot fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Context. The equilibrium structure of sunspots depends critically on its magnetic topology and is dominated by magnetic forces. Tension force is one component of the Lorentz force, which balances the gradient of magnetic pressure in force-free configurations. Aims: We employ the tension term of the Lorentz force to clarify the structure of sunspot features like penumbral filaments, umbral light bridges, and outer penumbral fine structures. Methods: We computed the vertical component of the tension term of Lorentz force over two active regions, NOAA AR 10933 and NOAA AR 10930 observed on 5 January 2007 and 12 December 2006, respectively. The former is a simple active region while the latter is a complex one with highly sheared polarity inversion line (PIL). We obtained the vector magnetograms from Hinode(SOT/SP). Results: We find an inhomogeneous distribution of tension with both positive and negative signs in various features of the sunspots. The existence of positive tension at locations of lower field strength and higher inclination is compatible with the uncombed model of the penumbral structure. Positive tension is also seen in umbral light bridges, which could be indication of uncombed structure of the light bridge. Likewise, the upwardly directed tension associated with bipolar regions in the penumbra could be a direct confirmation of the sea serpent model of penumbral structures. Upwardly directed tension at the PIL of AR 10930 seems to be related to flux emergence. The magnitude of the tension force is greater than the force of gravity in some places, implying a nearly force-free configuration for these sunspot features. Conclusions: From our study, magnetic tension emerges as a useful diagnostic of the local equilibrium of the sunspot fine structures. Figures A.1-A.3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Compensation of logarithmic corrections in calculating the fine structure of levels in hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Boikova, N. A. Tyukhtyaev, Yu. N.; Faustov, R. N.

    2011-01-15

    Special features of the quasipotential approach to calculating logarithmic (in the fine-structure constant) contributions to the fine splitting of energy levels in hydrogen-like atoms are analyzed. The boundaries of the region of applicability of the Fell technique are indicated, and the order of corrections beyond this region is estimated.

  1. The Br+HO 2 reaction revisited: Absolute determination of the rate constant at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdet, G.; Le Bras, G.; Mellouki, A.; Poulet, G.

    1990-09-01

    The absolute determination of the rate constant for the reaction Br+HO 2→HBr+O 2 has been done at 298 K using the discharge-flor EPR method. The value k1 = (1.5±0.2) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was obtained. Previous indirect measurements of k1 from a discharge-flow, LIF/mass spectrometric study of the Br/H 2CO/O 2 system have been reinterpreted, leading to values for k1 ranging from 1.0 × 10 -12 to 2.2 × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 at 298 K. These results are discussed and compared with other literature values.

  2. The Effect of Quantum-Mechanical Interference on Precise Measurements of the n = 2 Triplet P Fine Structure of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Marsman, A.; Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    For many decades, improvements in both theory and experiment of the fine structure of the n = 2 triplet P levels of helium have allowed for an increasingly precise determination of the fine-structure constant. Recently, it has been observed that quantum-mechanical interference between neighboring resonances can cause significant shifts, even if such neighboring resonances are separated by thousands of natural widths. The shifts depend in detail on the experimental method used for the measurement, as well as the specific experimental parameters employed. Here, we review how these shifts apply for the most precise measurements of the helium 2{sup 3}P fine-structure intervals.

  3. Sheath over a finely structured divertor plate

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R. H., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    The surface of a divertor plate typically has fine structure. Depending on the material - and the duration of exposure to the plasma, the characteristic size of the surface imperfections may vary over a broad range. In this paper, we consider the case where these structures have scale h that is much smaller than the ion gyroradius {rho}{sub i} but greater than the electron gyroradius {rho}{sub e}. The magnetic field intersects the divertor plate at a shallow angle {alpha}<

  4. Cell fine structure and function - Past and present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1970-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of nerve membrane fine structure, discussing cell membrane multienzyme and macromolecular energy and information transduction, protein synthesis and nucleic acids interrelations

  5. Internal Fine Structure of Ellerman Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ishii, Takako T.; Hagino, Masaoki; Komori, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Nakamura, Tahei; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We conducted coordinated observations of Ellerman bombs (EBs) between Hinode Satellite and Hida Observatory (HOP12). CaII H broad-band filter images of NOAA 10966 on 2007 August 9 and 10 were obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode Satellite, and many bright points were observed. We identified a total of 4 bright points as EBs, and studied the temporal variation of their morphological fine structures and spectroscopic characteristics. With high-resolution CaII H images of SOT, we found that the EBs, thus far thought of as single bright features, are composed of a few of fine subcomponents. Also, by using Stokes I/V filtergrams with Hinode/SOT, and CaII H spectroheliograms with Hida/Domeless Solar Telescope (DST), our observation showed: (1) The mean duration, the mean width, the mean length, and the mean aspect ratio of the subcomponents were 390 s, 170 km, 450 km, and 2.7, respectively. (2) Subcomponents started to appear on the magnetic neutral lines, and extended their lengths from the original locations. (3) When the CaII H line of EBs showed the characteristic blue asymmetry, they are associated with the appearance or re-brightening of subcomponents. Summarizing our results, we obtained an observational view that elementary magnetic reconnections take place one by one successively and intermittently in EBs, and that their manifestation is the fine subcomponents of the EB phenomena.

  6. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  7. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  8. Fine structures in decametric noise storms: possible mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.

    The properties and existing theories for three types of fine structure observed in solar decametric storms are reviewed. The types are stria bursts, including split pair bursts, triple bursts and type IIIb bursts, drift pair (DP) bursts and S bursts.

  9. The fine-structure intervals of (N-14)+ by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Varberg, Thomas D.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Cooksy, Andrew L.

    1994-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectra associated with both fine-structure transitions in (N-14)+ in its ground P-3 state have been recorded. This is the first laboratory observation of the J = 1 left arrow 0 transition and its frequency has been determined two orders of magnitude more accurately than previously. The remeasurement of the J = 2 left arrow 1 spectrum revealed a small error in the previous laboratory measurements. The fine-structure splittings (free of hyperfine interactions) determined in this work are (delta)E(sub 10) = 1461.13190 (61) GHz, (delta)E(sub 21) = 2459.38006 (37) GHz. Zero-field transition frequencies which include the effects of hyperfine structure have also been calculated. Refined values for the hyperfine constants and the g(sub J) factors have been obtained.

  10. Temporal Fine Structure and Applications to Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Complex broadband sounds are decomposed by the auditory filters into a series of relatively narrowband signals, each of which conveys information about the sound by time-varying features. The slow changes in the overall amplitude constitute envelope, while the more rapid events, such as zero crossings, constitute temporal fine structure (TFS).…

  11. Temporal variation of coupling constants and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhummer, H.; Csótó, A.; Fairbairn, M.; Schlattl, H.; Sharma, M. M.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the triple-alpha process and the Oklo phenomenon to obtain constraints on possible cosmological time variations of fundamental constants. Specifically we study cosmological temporal constraints for the fine structure constant and nucleon and meson masses.

  12. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  13. Relative fine-structure intensities in two-photon excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, D. R.; Bischel, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    A discrepancy is pointed out between experimental determinations of the relative intensities for different fine-structure components of the two-photon transitions 2p3P 3p3P in oxygen and 2p3 4S0 - 2p2 3p4D0 in nitrogen, which agreed well with calculations involving a single virtual intermediate level, and a two-photon selection rule dJ not equal to one, derived in a purely theoretical and erroneous treatment of these transitions. Five other experiments are also briefly examined, with the conclusion that relative fine-structure intensities in two-photon transitions are well understood as straightforward extensions of angular momentum coupling in single-photon cases, in accordance with allowed dJ = 0, + or -1, and + or -2 transitions.

  14. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  15. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  16. Efferent Modulation of Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emission Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Dewey, James B.; Boothalingam, Sriram; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2015-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions, sounds generated in the inner ear, have become a convenient non-invasive tool to examine the efferent modulation of cochlear mechanics. Activation of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents has been shown to alter the magnitude of these emissions. When the effects of efferent activation on the detailed spectral structures of these emissions have been examined, a shift of the spectral patterns toward higher frequencies has been reported for distortion product and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) have been proposed as the preferred emission type in the study of efferent modulation due to the simplicity of their production leading to the possibility of clearer interpretation of results. The effects of efferent activation on the complex spectral patterns of SFOAEs have not been examined to the best of our knowledge. We have examined the effects of activating the MOC efferents using broadband noise in normal-hearing humans. The detailed spectral structure of SFOAEs, known as fine structure, was recorded with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation. Results indicate that SFOAEs are reduced in magnitude and their fine structure pushed to higher frequencies by contralateral acoustic stimulation. These changes are similar to those observed in distortion product or spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and behavioral hearing thresholds. Taken together with observations made about magnitude and phase changes in otoacoustic emissions and hearing thresholds upon contralateral acoustic stimulation, all changes in otoacoustic emission and hearing threshold fine structure appear to be driven by a common set of mechanisms. Specifically, frequency shifts in fine structure patterns appear to be linked to changes in SFOAE phase due to contralateral acoustic stimulation. PMID:26696843

  17. Fine structure of a resonantly excited p -shell exciton in a CdTe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoleński, T.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Wojnar, P.; Kossacki, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-resolved photoluminescence excitation study of the absorption spectrum of a p -shell neutral exciton in a single CdTe/ZnTe quantum dot. We find that the fine structure of the p -shell exciton is completely analogous to the fine structure of the s -shell exciton, including the selection rules and the effects of a magnetic field applied in Faraday and Voigt configurations. The energy spectrum of the p -shell exciton is found to be well described by introducing respective isotropic and anisotropic constants of the exchange interaction between a p -shell electron and a p -shell hole. The typical values of these exchange constants averaged over several randomly selected quantum dots yield δ0p p=(0.92 ±0.16 ) meV and δ1p p=(0.58 ±0.25 ) meV. Additionally, we demonstrate that the nonresonant relaxation of the p -shell exciton conserves the exciton spin to a very high degree for both bright and dark exciton configurations.

  18. A fresh look at linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and variation of parameters. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  19. Fine structure of the solar transition region - Observations and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of recent high spatial resolution observations of the solar transition region and temperature minimum, in the form of UV spectra and spectroheliographs from both sounding rockets and the Spacelab 2 flights of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS). Attention is given to the solar atmosphere structure implications of the HRST's observational results. The inclusion of fine structure in conjectures concerning the transition region affects the plausibility of 1D average models of the solar atmosphere, as well as the determination of temperature gradients, possible nonradiative-heating mechanisms, and the comparison of transition region structures with corresponding observations of the photosphere and corona.

  20. Fine structure of coupled optical modes in photonic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Y. P.; Donegan, J. F.; Gerlach, M.; Bradley, A. L.; Connolly, T. M.; Boland, J. J.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the coherent coupling of whispering gallery modes (WGM) in a photonic molecule formed from two melamine-formaldehyde spherical microcavities with a thin shell of CdTe nanocrystals. Utilizing a microporous polymer structure to orient the photonic molecule, we have excited the photonic molecule both on and off axis. This controllable geometry has allowed the observation of an off-axis fine structure that consists of very sharp peaks resulting from the removal of the WGM degeneracy with respect to the azimuthal quantum number m . The mode splittings are in very good agreement with theory.

  1. Fine structure of coupled optical modes in photonic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovich, Y.P.; Donegan, J.F.; Gerlach, M.; Bradley, A.L.; Connolly, T.M.; Boland, J.J.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the coherent coupling of whispering gallery modes (WGM) in a photonic molecule formed from two melamine-formaldehyde spherical microcavities with a thin shell of CdTe nanocrystals. Utilizing a microporous polymer structure to orient the photonic molecule, we have excited the photonic molecule both on and off axis. This controllable geometry has allowed the observation of an off-axis fine structure that consists of very sharp peaks resulting from the removal of the WGM degeneracy with respect to the azimuthal quantum number m. The mode splittings are in very good agreement with theory.

  2. Numerical models of sunspot formation and fine structure.

    PubMed

    Rempel, Matthias

    2012-07-13

    Sunspots are central to our understanding of solar (and stellar) magnetism in many respects. On the large scale, they link the magnetic field observable in the photosphere to the dynamo processes operating in the solar interior. Properly interpreting the constraints that sunspots impose on the dynamo process requires a detailed understanding of the processes involved in their formation, dynamical evolution and decay. On the small scale, they give an insight into how convective energy transport interacts with the magnetic field over a wide range of field strengths and inclination angles, leading to sunspot fine structure observed in the form of umbral dots and penumbral filaments. Over the past decade, substantial progress has been made on both observational and theoretical sides. Advanced ground- and space-based observations have resolved, for the first time, the details of umbral dots and penumbral filaments and discovered similarities in their substructures. Numerical models have advanced to the degree that simulations of entire sunspots with sufficient resolution to resolve sunspot fine structure are feasible. A combination of improved helioseismic inversion techniques with seismic forward modelling provides new views on the subsurface structure of sunspots. In this review, we summarize recent progress, with particular focus on numerical modelling. PMID:22665895

  3. Fine structure in the cluster decays of the translead nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, O. |; Cioaca, C.

    1995-06-01

    Within the one level {ital R}-matrix approach several hindrance factors for the radioactive decays in which are emitted {sup 4}He, {sup 14}C, and {sup 20}O atomic nuclei are calculated. The interior wave functions are supposed to be given by the recently proposed enlarged superfluid model, an extension of the JINR-Dubna`s quasiparticle phonon nuclear model. The spectroscopic factors are expanded in terms of products of cluster overlaps and intrinsic overlap integrals. The cluster overlaps are equivalents of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage, while for the intrinsic overlap integrals we construct a model, which is an extension of the usual models for simple particle decay such as deuteron, triton, and {alpha} decay. The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster-nucleus double-folding model potential obtained with the {ital M}3{ital Y} interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Fm, {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 20}O decay of {sup 229}Th and {sup 255}Fm. A relatively good agreement with the experimental data is obtained especially in the case of the {alpha}-decay fine structure.

  4. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  5. Fine structure in the cluster decay of radium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.

    2010-01-01

    Half-life times for 14C cluster emission from various radium isotopes are computed taking interacting potential as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potentials. The half-life time values are compared with experimental data and with the values reported by Poenaru et al using the analytical super-asymmetric fission model (ASAFM). The lowest half-life time for 222Ra stresses the role of the doubly magic 208Pb daughter in the exotic decay process. It is found that neutron excess in the parent nucleus slows down the exotic decay process. The high hindrance factor (HF) of the 14C branch to the ground state (9/2+) and the low HF to the first excited state (11/2+) of the 209Pb daughter are in good agreement with the experimental result. The fine structure from 223Ra gives direct evidence of the presence of a spherical component in the deformed parent nucleus.

  6. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED FINE STRUCTURE WITH AUTOREGRESSIVE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Autoregressive prediction is adapted to double the resolution of Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) Fourier transforms. Even with the optimal taper (weighting function), the commonly used taper-and-transform Fourier method has limited resolution: it assumes the signal is zero beyond the limits of the measurement. By seeking the Fourier spectrum of an infinite extent oscillation consistent with the measurements but otherwise having maximum entropy, the errors caused by finite data range can be reduced. Our procedure developed to implement this concept applies autoregressive prediction to extrapolate the signal to an extent controlled by a taper width. Difficulties encountered when processing actual ARPEFS data are discussed. A key feature of this approach is the ability to convert improved measurements (signal-to-noise or point density) into improved Fourier resolution.

  7. Fine structure of Bodo curvifilus Griessmann (Kinetoplastida: Bodonidae).

    PubMed

    Burzell, L A

    1975-02-01

    Bodo curvifilus Griessmann conforms in its fine structure to the criteria proposed for the genus Bodo, including the presence of subpellicular microtubules, a single large kinetoplast-mitochondrion, emergence of the 2 heterodynamic flagella from a subapical flagellar pocket, and the presence of a paraxial rod associated with the axoneme of each flagellum. B. curvifilus possesses cytoplasmic bodies which resemble endosymbiotic bacteria. These are similar to those found in Bodo saltans. Bodo curvifilus can be distinguished ultrastructurally from Bodo caudatus and B. saltans by the presence in B. curvifilus of a hitherto unreported structure, "the microtubular prism," consisting of a bundle of 19 microtubules. In cross section, 15 of these microtubules form a cross-linked prismatic array. This microtubular bundle originates near the flagellar pocket and extends for several micrometers into the body of the organism where it follows the periphery of the cell and the long finger-like projections of the kinetoplast-mitochondrion.

  8. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  9. VLT/UVES constraints on the cosmological variability of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Centurión, M.; Molaro, P.; D'Odorico, S.

    2005-05-01

    We propose a new methodology for probing the cosmological variability of α from pairs of Fe II lines (SIDAM, single ion differential α measurement) observed in individual exposures from a high resolution spectrograph. By this we avoid the influence of the spectral shifts due to (i) ionization inhomogeneities in the absorbers; and (ii) non-zero offsets between different exposures. Applied to the Fe II lines of the metal absorption line system at z_abs = 1.839 in the spectrum of Q 1101-264 obtained by means of the UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), SIDAM provides Δα/α = (2.4±3.8_stat)×10-6. The z_abs = 1.15 Fe II system toward HE 0515-4414 has been re-analyzed by this method thus obtaining for the combined sample Δα/α = (0.4±1.5_stat)×10-6. These values are shifted with respect to the Keck/HIRES mean Δα/α = (-5.7 ± 1.1_stat)×10-6 (Murphy et al. 2004) at very high confidence level (95%). The fundamental photon noise limitation in the Δα/α measurement with the VLT/UVES is discussed to figure the prospects for future observations. It is suggested that with a spectrograph of ~10 times the UVES dispersion coupled to a 100 m class telescope the present Oklo level (Δα/α ≥ 4.5 × 10-8) can be achieved along cosmological distances with differential measurements of Δα/α.

  10. Rotational and Fine Structure of Pseudo-Jahn Molecules with C_1 Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    It has been found in our previous works that rotational and fine-structure analysis of spectra involving nearly degenerate electronic states may aid in interpretation and analysis of the vibronic structure, specifically in the case of pseudo-Jahn-Teller (pJT) molecules with C_s symmetry. The spectral analysis of pJT derivatives (isopropoxy and cyclohexoxy of a prototypical JT molecule (the methoxy radical) allowed for quantitative determination of various contributions to the energy separation between the nearly degenerate electronic states, including the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) effect, the electrostatic interaction, and their zero-point energy difference. These states are coupled by SO and Coriolis interactions, which can also be determined accurately in rotational and fine structure analysis. Most recently, the spectroscopic model for rotational analysis of pJT molecules has been extended for analysis of molecules with C_1 symmetry, i.e., no symmetry. This model includes the six independently determinable components of the spin-rotation (SR) tensor and the three components of the SO and Coriolis interactions. It has been employed to simulate and fit high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of jet-cooled alkoxy radicals with C_1 symmetry, including the 2-hexoxy and the 2-pentoxy radicals, as well as previously recorded LIF spectrum of the trans-conformer (defined by its OCCC dihedral angle) of the 2-butoxy radical. Although the LIF spectra can be reproduced by using either the SR constants or SO and Coriolis constants, the latter simulation offers results that are physically more meaningful whereas the SR constants have to be regarded as effective constants. Furthermore, we will review the SO and Coriolis constants of alkoxy radicals that have been investigated, starting from the well-studied methoxy radical (CH_3O). J. Liu, D. Melnik, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 094308 (2013) J. Liu and T. A. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11871

  11. Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2008-04-01

    The lighting of the underwater environment is constantly changing due to attenuation by water, scattering by suspended particles, as well as the refraction and reflection caused by the surface waves. These factors pose a great challenge for marine animals which communicate through visual signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks and stomatopod crustaceans utilize the polarization properties of light. While the mechanisms behind the polarization vision of these two animal groups are similar, several distinctive types of polarizers (i.e. the structure producing the signal) have been found in these animals. To gain a better knowledge of how these polarizers function, we studied the relationships between fine structures and optical properties of four types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat similar spectral range, around 450- 550 nm, the reflectance properties of the signals and the mechanisms used to produce them have dramatic differences. In cephalopods, stack-plates polarizers produce the polarization patterns found on the arms and around their eyes. In stomatopods, we have found one type of beam-splitting polarizer based on photonic structures and two absorptive polarizer types based on dichroic molecules. These stomatopod polarizers may be found on various appendages, and on the cuticle covering dorsal or lateral sides of the animal. Since the efficiencies of all these polarizer types are somewhat sensitive to the change of illumination and viewing angle, how these animals compensate with different behaviors or fine structural features of the polarizer also varies.

  12. Can Temporal Fine Structure and Temporal Envelope be Considered Independently for Pitch Perception?

    PubMed

    Grimault, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In psychoacoustics, works on pitch perception attempt to distinguish between envelope and fine structure cues that are generally viewed as independent and separated using a Hilbert transform. To empirically distinguish between envelope and fine structure cues in pitch perception experiments, a dedicated signal has been proposed. This signal is an unresolved harmonic complex tones with all harmonics shifted by the same amount of Hz. As the frequency distance between adjacent components is regular and identical than in the original harmonic complex tone, such a signal has the same envelope but a different fine structure. So, any perceptual difference between these signals is interpreted as a fine structure based percept. Here, as illustrated by very basic simulations, I suggest that this orthogonal point of view that is generally admitted could be a conceptual error. In fact, neither the fine structure nor the envelope is required to be fully encoded to explain pitch perception. Sufficient information is conveyed by the peaks in the fine structure that are located nearby a maximum of the envelope. Envelope and fine structure could then be in perpetual interaction and the pitch would be conveyed by "the fine structure under envelope". Moreover, as the temporal delay between peaks of interest is rather longer than the delay between two adjacent peaks of the fine structure, such a mechanism would be much less constrained by the phase locking limitation of the auditory system. Several data from the literature are discussed from this new conceptual point of view. PMID:27080676

  13. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements

    PubMed Central

    Boeddeker, Norbert; Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns (“saccades”) are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees’ head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves. PMID:26352836

  14. Observations on the Fine Structure of the Turtle Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Don W.; Selby, Cecily C.

    1958-01-01

    The general fine structure of the atrial musculature of the turtle heart is described, including; the nature of the sarcolemma; the cross-banded structure of the myofibrils; the character of the sarcoplasm, and the form and disposition of its organelles. An abundant granular component of the sarcoplasm in this species is tentatively identified as a particulate form of glycogen. The myocardium is composed of individual cells joined end to end at primitive intercalated discs, and side to side at sites of cohesion that resemble the desmosomes of epithelia. Transitional forms are found between desmosomes and intercalated discs. Both consist of a thickened area of the cell membrane with an accumulation of dense material in the subjacent cytoplasm. This dense amorphous component is often continuous with the Z substance of the myofibrils and may be of the same composition. The observations reported reemphasize the basic similarity between desmosomes and terminal bars of epithelia and intercalated discs of cardiac muscle. Numerous unmyelinated nerves are found beneath the endocardium. Some of these occupy recesses in the surface of Schwann cells; others are naked axons. No specialized nerve endings are found. Axons passing near the sarcolemma contain synaptic vesicles, and it is believed that this degree of proximity is sufficient to constitute a functioning myoneural junction. PMID:13502430

  15. Speech identification based on temporal fine structure cues

    PubMed Central

    Sheft, Stanley; Ardoint, Marine; Lorenzi, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of temporal fine structure (TFS) cues to consonant identification was assessed in normal-hearing listeners with two speech-processing schemes designed to remove temporal envelope (E) cues. Stimuli were processed vowel-consonant-vowel speech tokens. Derived from the analytic signal, carrier signals were extracted from the output of a bank of analysis filters. The “PM” and “FM” processing schemes estimated a phase- and frequency-modulation function, respectively, of each carrier signal and applied them to a sinusoidal carrier at the analysis-filter center frequency. In the FM scheme, processed signals were further restricted to the analysis-filter bandwidth. A third scheme retaining only E cues from each band was used for comparison. Stimuli processed with the PM and FM schemes were found to be highly intelligible (50–80% correct identification) over a variety of experimental conditions designed to affect the putative reconstruction of E cues subsequent to peripheral auditory filtering. Analysis of confusions between consonants showed that the contribution of TFS cues was greater for place than manner of articulation, whereas the converse was observed for E cues. Taken together, these results indicate that TFS cues convey important phonetic information that is not solely a consequence of E reconstruction. PMID:18646999

  16. Fine structure of seminiferous tubules in antarctic seals.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A A; Erickson, A W; Seal, U S

    1977-03-01

    The fine structure of seminiferous tubules from 5 crabeater, 2 leopard and 2 Ross seals showed that during the nonbreeding season the tubules were essentially similar in possessing spermatogenic and Sertoli cells. However, the tubules of leopard and Ross seals had more primary and secondary spermatocytes and spermatids than the crabeater seals. In general, the tubules were devoid of spermatozoa. The spermatids showed stages of maturation such as Golgi phase of acrosome formation, acrosomal cap formation and condensation of nuclei. Some spermatids degenerated in tubules. Both maturing and degenerating spermatids were closely associated with Sertoli cells. Junctional complexes with plaques of filaments were observed between Sertoli cells and the spermatogenic cells. Sertoli cells, irregular and polygonal, contained highly convoluted nuclei, strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complexes, small mitochondria, variable amounts of lipid droplets, lysosomes, lipofuscin granules and highly plicated plasma membranes. In brief, the spermatogenic activity had practically ceased in the testes and the animals probably secreted low levels of testosterone during the nonbreeding season. PMID:844074

  17. Consonant identification using temporal fine structure and recovered envelope cuesa)

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Reed, Charlotte M.; Desloge, Joseph G.; Braida, Louis D.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of recovered envelopes (RENVs) to the utilization of temporal-fine structure (TFS) speech cues was examined in normal-hearing listeners. Consonant identification experiments used speech stimuli processed to present TFS or RENV cues. Experiment 1 examined the effects of exposure and presentation order using 16-band TFS speech and 40-band RENV speech recovered from 16-band TFS speech. Prior exposure to TFS speech aided in the reception of RENV speech. Performance on the two conditions was similar (∼50%-correct) for experienced listeners as was the pattern of consonant confusions. Experiment 2 examined the effect of varying the number of RENV bands recovered from 16-band TFS speech. Mean identification scores decreased as the number of RENV bands decreased from 40 to 8 and were only slightly above chance levels for 16 and 8 bands. Experiment 3 examined the effect of varying the number of bands in the TFS speech from which 40-band RENV speech was constructed. Performance fell from 85%- to 31%-correct as the number of TFS bands increased from 1 to 32. Overall, these results suggest that the interpretation of previous studies that have used TFS speech may have been confounded with the presence of RENVs. PMID:25235005

  18. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE EYE OF A CHAETOGNATH.

    PubMed

    EAKIN, R M; WESTFALL, J A

    1964-04-01

    Electron microscopy reveals a star-like pigment cell at the center of the eye of the arrow-worm, Sagitta scrippsae. Between the arms of the pigment cell are clusters of photoreceptor cell processes, each process consisting of: (1) a tubular segment containing longitudinally arranged microtubules about 500 A in diameter and 20 micro in length; (2) a remarkable conical body, composed of cords and large granules, situated at the base of the tubular segment; and (3) a connecting piece which, like that of rods and cones, connects the process with the sensory cell proper and through which runs a fibrillar apparatus consisting of nine peripheral double tubules. Beneath the connecting piece lies a typical centriole with a striated rootlet. The receptor cell process is deeply recessed into the sensory cell which may possess a corona of microvilli at its inner surface. A nerve fiber arises from the outer end of the cell and passes into the optic nerve. Additional features are some supporting cells, an external layer of flattened epithelial cells, and an over-all investment of basement membrane and thick fibrous capsule. The fine structure and function of these elements of the eye are discussed in relation to earlier studies with the light microscope. The ciliary nature of the photoreceptor cell process in S. scrippsae points to a probable evolutionary relationship of chaetognaths to echinoderms and chordates. PMID:14154485

  19. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  20. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE EYE OF A CHAETOGNATH.

    PubMed

    EAKIN, R M; WESTFALL, J A

    1964-04-01

    Electron microscopy reveals a star-like pigment cell at the center of the eye of the arrow-worm, Sagitta scrippsae. Between the arms of the pigment cell are clusters of photoreceptor cell processes, each process consisting of: (1) a tubular segment containing longitudinally arranged microtubules about 500 A in diameter and 20 micro in length; (2) a remarkable conical body, composed of cords and large granules, situated at the base of the tubular segment; and (3) a connecting piece which, like that of rods and cones, connects the process with the sensory cell proper and through which runs a fibrillar apparatus consisting of nine peripheral double tubules. Beneath the connecting piece lies a typical centriole with a striated rootlet. The receptor cell process is deeply recessed into the sensory cell which may possess a corona of microvilli at its inner surface. A nerve fiber arises from the outer end of the cell and passes into the optic nerve. Additional features are some supporting cells, an external layer of flattened epithelial cells, and an over-all investment of basement membrane and thick fibrous capsule. The fine structure and function of these elements of the eye are discussed in relation to earlier studies with the light microscope. The ciliary nature of the photoreceptor cell process in S. scrippsae points to a probable evolutionary relationship of chaetognaths to echinoderms and chordates.

  1. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  2. fine structure of 410km discontinuity beneath the Southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, K.; Wan, X.; Ni, S.

    2005-12-01

    In the distance range of 10-14 degrees, P waves from the topside reflection off the 410km discontinuity are very sensitive to the fine structure of the discontinuity. We analyzed 49 broadband seismograms from an earthquake ( May 18, 1998) in Italy (Mw 5.8) , recorded by Orfeus and SZGRF networks. Distances between the source and the stations were from 9° to 19°, and provided a detailed look at the 410km structure. On the other hand, the azimuth of these records were in a narrow range from 334° and 356°, so the differences in azimuth may have little effects on the waveforms. From our observation, P410 phase has little change in amplitude when the distance decreases from 15° to about 11.5°. However, an abrupt termination was observed from distance 11° to 10.5°. These features cannot be explained with PREM model. We calculated several groups of models with F-K method and compared their synthetic seismograms with the observed one. These models are: 1) two-step sharp jump models, with different thickness; 2) linear models; 3) linear-sharp jump models[Tim Melbourne, Don Helmberger, Journal of Geophysical Research, 1998]; 4) models calculated from a mineralogical model[Gaherty, Wang, Geophysical research letters, 1999]; Features in the observed waveform can be well modeled with model 3 and 4 while only parts of them fitted to model 1 or 2. But when we calculated with a less detailed model, seismograms of model 4 should have more noise than model 3. In conclusion, the structure of 410km discontinuity can be considered as a linear-sharp velocity jump, which is consistent with mineralogical models.

  3. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  4. Laser Spectroscopy of the H 2 ( n = 3 Triplet Gerade) Complex: Fine Structure of the Levels in para-H 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozefowski, L.; Ottinger, C.; Rox, T.

    1994-02-01

    Doppler-free LIF spectroscopy was performed on a beam of para-H 2 (95% enriched) in the metastable c3Π -u state. Using the method of beam saturation spectroscopy, the resolution was increased to 20 MHz FWHM. Compared to the preceding paper of this series, this allowed the fine structure of the H 2( n = 3) states to be largely resolved. The total number of independently measured fine structure splittings in the levels v = 0 to 3 was 66. Theoretically the fine structure in the n = 3 compared is described by 17 coupling constants. The present study has provided for the first time a sufficient number of independent fs measurements to allow, in principle, an unambiguous determination of all 17 constants. The eigenvectors of the true, mixed wavefunctions as obtained in the preceding paper were here used as a critical prerequisite to the diagonalization of the fs Hamiltonian. In practice, in the fitting routine some of the nondiagonal constants were found to be highly statistically correlated within the experimental error. These constants have only collective significance. This is a fundamental limitation, because the experimental resolution was already close to the natural linewidth limit. The variation of the leading diagonal constants with v and, comparing with other work, with n is discussed.

  5. Fine structure of the 2003 geomagnetic jerk near China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, J.; Du, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 2003 jerk has an abrupt change in the geomagnetic secular variation (SV), and was recognized as a local phenomenon of internal origin from the satellite observations (Olsen and Mandea, 2007). Notable strength of the 2003 jerk is located near China. The temporal and spatial features at this area are important to resolve the Earth's core fluid flow dynamics at local scale (e.g. Wardinski et al., 2008). We investigate the temporal-spatial development of the 2003 jerk in more detail near China with the ground-based observations and CHAOS-3 core field model. We select the data in the international geomagnetic quiet days to calculate the monthly means. In order to reduce the influence of the external field, we adopt a function comprising the terms associated with the indices of the geomagnetic activity, and the terms of the periodic signals on the observatory monthly means data (Stewart and Whaler, 1992). We then use an empirical AR-2 model to represent the internal field signals in the observatory data. The extreme detection is applied to identify the jerk in the SV time series. The onset time and the strength of the 2003 jerk are obtained through the detection for geomagnetic field component, X, Y and Z. The maximum of the strength of the 2003 jerk is located under the Indian mainland. The onset time of this jerk propagates approximately southeastward. Two jerks in 2001 and 2003 for the Z component are further compared and they are confirmed as independent processes. We suggest the jerk in 2001 identical to the well known 1999 jerk in Europe (Mandea et al., 2000). Our results reveal the fine structures of the 2003 jerk that corroborate the conclusions in previous studies. The larger scale time-spatial structure given by the AR-2 model constructed from ground observatory data (monthly values) is consistent with the results from the CHAOS-3 model. This structure can be applied for further inversion of the local core surface fluid flow motions.

  6. Relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in lexical-tone perception (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2003-12-01

    The relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in speech and music perception was investigated by Smith et al. [Nature (London) 416, 87-90 (2002)] using ``auditory chimera'' in which the envelope from one sound was paired with the fine structure of another. Smith et al. found that, when 4 to 16 frequency bands were used, recognition of English speech was dominated by the envelope, whereas recognition of melody was dominated by the fine structure. In the present study, Mandarin Chinese monosyllables were divided into 4, 8, or 16 frequency bands and the fine structure and envelope of one tone pattern were exchanged with those of another tone pattern of the same monosyllable. Five normal-hearing native Mandarin Chinese speakers completed a four-alternative forced-choice tone-identification task. In the vast majority of trials, subjects based their identification of the monosyllables on the fine structure rather than the envelope. Thus, the relative importance of envelope and fine structure for lexical-tone perception resembled that for melody recognition rather than that for English speech recognition. Delivering fine-structure information in cochlear implant stimulation could be particularly beneficial for lexical-tone perception.

  7. Fine-structure enhancement — assessment of a simple method to resolve overlapping bands in spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2000-05-01

    A simple mathematical procedure — fine-structure enhancement — has been assessed on its ability to resolve overlapping bands in spectra. Its advantages and limitations have been explored using synthetic and experimental spectra. Fine-structure enhancement involves smoothing the original spectrum, multiplying the smoothed spectrum with a weighting factor and subtracting this spectrum from the original spectrum. As a result, the fine-structure of the original spectrum is enhanced in the processed spectrum and bands that overlap in the original spectrum appear as distinct bands in the processed spectrum. To be resolved by fine-structure enhancement, Lorentzian lines have to be separated by more than their quarter width at half maximum, Gaussian lines by more than their half width at half maximum. A comparison of fine-structure enhancement and Fourier self-deconvolution shows that Fourier self-deconvolution has in theory a higher potential to resolve overlapping bands. However, this depends crucially on the correct choice of the parameters. In practice, when parameters commonly used are chosen for Fourier self-deconvolution, fine-structure enhancement leads to similar results. This is demonstrated at the example of the infrared absorbance spectrum of the protein papain, where the amide I band components could be resolved similarly with both methods. Thus, fine-structure enhancement seems to be a simple alternative to Fourier self-deconvolution that does not require specialised software.

  8. Fine structure of the retinal epithelial regions of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Young, D L; Braekevelt, C R

    1993-06-01

    The fine structure of the retinal epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris has been studied by electron microscopy in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus). The retinal epithelium consists of a single layer of pigmented, squamous cells. The epithelial cells are joined laterally by tight junctions and throughout the retina, display numerous basal infoldings and apical processes that enclose photoreceptor outer segments. The retinal epithelial cells are rich in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Polysomes are a constant feature and the cells contain few profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane bound phagosomes of outer segment discs are frequently seen. All cells examined contain spherical to oval shaped pigment granules. We find no evidence of a tapetum either in the retinal epithelium or the choroid. Wandering phagocytes are occasionally observed at the photoreceptor-retinal epithelial junction. The presence of these cells has been reported in lower vertebrates but less frequently in mammals. Bruch's membrane displays the typical pentalaminate structure described for most vertebrates. The endothelium of the choriocapillaris is very thin and is highly fenestrated facing Bruch's membrane with a few fenestrations also present on the side bordering the choroid.

  9. Helical Motions of Fine-structure Prominence Threads Observed by Hinode and IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Liu, Wei; Tsuneta, Saku

    2016-11-01

    Fine-structure dynamics in solar prominences holds critical clues to understanding their physical nature of significant space-weather implications. We report evidence of rotational motions of horizontal helical threads in two active-region prominences observed by the Hinode and/or Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph satellites at high resolution. In the first event, we found transverse motions of brightening threads at speeds up to 55 km s‑1 seen in the plane of the sky. Such motions appeared as sinusoidal space–time trajectories with a typical period of ∼390 s, which is consistent with plane-of-sky projections of rotational motions. Phase delays at different locations suggest the propagation of twists along the threads at phase speeds of 90–270 km s‑1. At least 15 episodes of such motions occurred in two days, none associated with an eruption. For these episodes, the plane-of-sky speed is linearly correlated with the vertical travel distance, suggestive of a constant angular speed. In the second event, we found Doppler velocities of 30–40 km s‑1 in opposite directions in the top and bottom portions of the prominence, comparable to the plane-of-sky speed. The moving threads have about twice broader line widths than stationary threads. These observations, when taken together, provide strong evidence for rotations of helical prominence threads, which were likely driven by unwinding twists triggered by magnetic reconnection between twisted prominence magnetic fields and ambient coronal fields.

  10. Hall effect and fine structures in magnetic reconnection with high plasma {beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.P.; Yang, H.A.; Wang, X.G.

    2005-04-15

    Magnetic reconnection with various plasma {beta} (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) is studied numerically using a 2.5 dimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code developed from a multistep implicit scheme. The initial state of the Hall MHD simulation is an equilibrium Harris sheet with L{sub c}=0.5d{sub i} (where L{sub c} is the half-width of the equilibrium current layer and d{sub i} is the ion inertial length) and a zero guide field (i.e., B{sub y0}=0 at t=0). Driven by a constant boundary inflow a quasisteady fast reconnection occurs in the plasma with a low uniform resistivity. The out-of-plane magnetic field component B{sub y} is then spontaneously generated and its quadrupolar structure is shown around the X point. It is demonstrated by the comparing studies that the reconnection dynamics is controlled by the Hall effect and the effect of scalar electron pressure gradient is negligible in the generalized Ohm's law. It is also found that the openness of the magnetic separatrix angle and associated quadrupolar B{sub y} structure is enlarged as {beta} increases. When {beta}>2.0 fine structures of B{sub y} contours with reversed sign emerge. The numerical results indicate that the variations in electron velocity V{sub e} are greater than those in ion velocity V{sub i} and the decoupling of electron and ion occurs in larger scale lengths than d{sub i} as {beta} increases. Clearly, the reserve current, which is associated with the relative motion between electrons and ions, generates the fine structures of B{sub y} contours in the outflow region. Then the corresponding profile of B{sub y} component exhibits a static whistler wave signature. Enhanced wave activities observed during a Cluster crossing of the high-{beta} exterior cusp region [Y. Khotyaintsev, A. Vaivads, Y. Ogawa, B. Popielawska, M. Andre, S. Buchert, P. Decreau, B. Lavraud, and H. Reme, Ann. Geophys. 22, 2403 (2004)] might be related to the Hall effects of magnetic

  11. New fine structure cooling rate. [electron impact transitions in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  12. Path integral formalism for the spectral line shape in plasmas: Lyman-{alpha} with fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedida, N.; Meftah, M. T.; Boland, D.; Stamm, R.

    2008-10-22

    We examine in this work the expression of the dipolar autocorrelation function for an emitter in the plasma using the path integrals formalism. The results for Lyman alpha lines with fine structure are retrieved in a compact formula. The expression of the dipolar autocorrelation function takes into account the ions dynamics and the fine structure effects. The electron's effect is represented by the impact operator {phi}{sub e} in the final formula.

  13. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.; Hoekstra, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Versolato, O. O.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole M 1 transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260 to 780 nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semiempirical cowan calculations with adjustable wave-function parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  14. Ab initio X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, F.; Rehr, J. J.; Rossner, H. H.; Krappe, H. J.

    2006-03-01

    Theoretical calculations of vibrational effects in x-ray absorption spectra typically employ semi-phenomenological models, e.g. empirical force constants or correlated Debye or Einstein models. Instead we introduce an efficient and generally applicable ab initio approach based on electronic structure calculations of the dynamical matrix together with the Lanczos recursion algorithm [1] and relations between the cumulants. The approach yields 1) the thermal expansion coefficients (first cumulant of the vibrational distribution function); 2) correlated Debye-Waller factors (second cumulants) and 3) anharmonic contributions (third cumulants). Results are presented for crystalline (Cu, Au, Ge, GaAs) and molecular (GeCl4, C6H6) systems. Our results for the Debye-Waller factors agree well with experiment. [1]H.J. Krappe and H.H. Rossner, Phys. Rev. B70, 104102 (2004).

  15. Fundamental Constants and Tests with Simple Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    Precise measurements with simple atoms provide stringent tests of physical laws, improving the accuracy of fundamental constants--a set of which will be selected to fully define the proposed New International System of Units. This talk focuses on the atomic constants (namely, the Rydberg constant, the fine-structure constant, and the proton charge radius), discussing the impact of the proton radius obtained from the Lamb-shift measurements in muonic hydrogen. Significant discrepancies persist despite years of careful examination: the slightly smaller proton radius obtained from muonic hydrogen requires the Rydberg constant and the fine-structure constant to have values that disagree significantly with the CODATA recommendations. After giving a general overview, I will discuss our effort to produce one-electron ions in Rydberg states, to enable a different test of theory and measurement of the Rydberg constant.

  16. [Ultraviolet spectroscopic study on the fine structures in the solar polar hole].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Dong; Liu, Guo-Hong

    2014-07-01

    Fine structures in the south solar polar coronal hole were observed by N IV line of SOHO/SUMER spectrograph. The scales of the fine structures range spatially range from 1 arcsec to several arcsecs, temporally from 1 min to several minutes, and parts of them are in strip shape along the slit direction. The line-of-sight velocity of them is up to tens of km x s(-1) with red and blue shift intercrossed occasionally, which appear periodically as long as 100 minutes in some regions. Part of the fine structures can be clearly observed at the Ne V III line with higher formation temperature in the same spectral window. The time and location of some fine structures with high velocity in the Ne V III spectrum are almost the same as that in N IV spectrum, but they are extended and diffused in the Ne V III spectrum. Some fine structures have non-Gaussian profiles with the line-of-sight Doppler velocities up to 150 km x s(-1) in the N IV blue/red wings, which is similar with the explosive events in the transition region. In the past, explosive events are small-scale dynamic phenomena often observed in the quiet-sun (QS) region, while their properties in coronal holes (CHs) remain unclear. Here, we find the EE-like events with strong dynamics in the south solar polar coronal hole by N IV line of SOHO/SUMER spectrograph.

  17. Structural studies of amorphous titanium diboride thin films by extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure and extended electron-energy-loss fine-structure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Hoffman, Mark P.; Williams, Wendell S.; Greene, Alex E.; McMillan, Joyce A.

    1988-10-01

    The local atomic structure of amorphous titanium diboride thin films, prepared by electron-beam vaporization (EBV) of the crystalline compound onto liquid-nitrogen-cooled substrates, was studied using extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) and extended energy-loss fine-structure (EXELFS) techniques. From a comparison of the extended fine-structure spectra of the amorphous films with corresponding spectra of crystalline titanium diboride, accurate information was derived on the nature of the local structure, or short-range order, and on the coordination numbers, interatomic distances, and nanostructural atomic disorder in amorphous TiB2. A relaxation of the interatomic spacing and a reduction of coordination number for the nearest-neighbor atoms was inferred for the amorphous state. Local prismatic coordination with random 90° rotations about prismatic planes is proposed as a likely atomic structure consistent with the data for the amorphous form. Finally, EXAFS and EXELFS were employed to examine in detail the structural changes induced in amorphous TiB2 by variations in the EBV deposition parameters, and to determine a set of optimized parameters for the EBV deposition of a TiB2 stable amorphous phase.

  18. Time-Varying Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, Keith

    2003-04-01

    Recent data from quasar absorption systems can be interpreted as arising from a time variation in the fine-structure constant. However, there are numerous cosmological, astro-physical, and terrestrial bounds on any such variation. These includes bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (from the ^4He abundance), the Oklo reactor (from the resonant neutron capture cross-section of Sm), and from meteoretic lifetimes of heavy radioactive isotopes. The bounds on the variation of the fine-structure constant are significantly strengthened in models where all gauge and Yukawa couplings vary in a dependent manner, as would be expected in unified theories. Models which are consistent with all data are severly challenged when Equivalence Principle constraints are imposed.

  19. Constants and Variables of Nature

    SciTech Connect

    Sean Carroll

    2009-04-03

    It is conventional to imagine that the various parameters which characterize our physical theories, such as the fine structure constant or Newton’s gravitational constant, are truly “constant”, in the sense that they do not change from place to place or time to time. Recent developments in both theory and observation have led us to re-examine this assumption, and to take seriously the possibility that our supposed constants are actually gradually changing. I will discuss why we might expect these parameters to vary, and what observation and experiment have to say about the issue.

  20. Laplace defect spectroscopy for recognition of deep-level fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junyong; Zhan, Huahan; Huang, Qi/sheng

    2000-03-01

    A Laplace defect spectrometer (LDS) was investigated for use in decomposition of non-exponential transients. The system was tested by measuring known multi-exponential transients generated by RC circuits and applied to the study of non-exponential transients resulting from electron emission from Sn-related DX centers and hole emission from Fe-related deep acceptors. The non-exponential transients were investigated under different conditions and related to the alloy random effect. Their LDS spectra exhibited several well-resolved sharp peaks that were assigned to the fine structures of the two DX centers and the Fe-related deep acceptors, respectively, after comparison with DLTS observations. The activation energies of the fine structures were determined by linear fitting of the slopes of temperature dependences of electron and hole emission rates. The results show that the LDS is useful for investigation of deep-level fine structures.

  1. A simulation for gravity fine structure recovery from high-low GRAVSAT SST data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Lancaster, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Covariance error analysis techniques were applied to investigate estimation strategies for the high-low SST mission for accurate local recovery of gravitational fine structure, considering the aliasing effects of unsolved for parameters. Surface density blocks of 5 deg x 5 deg and 2 1/2 deg x 2 1/2 deg resolution were utilized to represent the high order geopotential with the drag-free GRAVSAT configured in a nearly circular polar orbit at 250 km. altitude. GEOPAUSE and geosynchronous satellites were considered as high relay spacecraft. It is demonstrated that knowledge of gravitational fine structure can be significantly improved at 5 deg x 5 deg resolution using SST data from a high-low configuration with reasonably accurate orbits for the low GRAVSAT. The gravity fine structure recoverability of the high-low SST mission is compared with the low-low configuration and shown to be superior.

  2. A note on chromospheric fine structure at active region polarity boundaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prata, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution H-alpha filtergrams from Big Bear Solar Observatory reveal that some filamentary features in active regions have fine structure and hence magnetic field transverse to the gross structure and the zero longitudinal field line. These features are distinct from the usual active region filament, in which fine structure, magnetic field, and filament are all parallel to the zero longitudinal field line. The latter occur on boundaries between regions of weaker fields, while the former occur at boundaries between regions of stronger field.

  3. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-09-15

    The fine structure observed in the {alpha} decay of deformed platinum isotopes is investigated using the recently developed five-channel formalism, based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. The internal effect of daughter states is taken into account in dealing with the interaction matrix and the {alpha}-cluster formation. The available experimental data concerning {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures are reproduced. Some predictions are made especially for the {alpha} decay of neutron-rich isotopes, which could guide future experiments.

  4. Fine structure on flat surfaces of quasicrystalline Al-Pd-Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Stoldt, C. R.; Jenks, C. J.; Lograsso, T. A.; Thiel, P. A.

    1999-12-01

    We have analyzed the fine structure revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy for a flat (within 0.8 Å) fivefold surface of i-Al-Pd-Mn. Even though features in the image appear to be arranged randomly, self-similar features are separated by distinct distances. The distribution of such distances is compatible with the separations between pseudo-Mackay icosahedra tangent to the topmost layer, and with separations between other cluster-based units. We propose that the fine structure is due to electronic structure imposed by the clusters.

  5. Progress towards a precision measurement of the n=2 triplet P fine structure of atomic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; Fitzakerley, D. W.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report progress on the measurement of the J = 1 to J = 2 23 P fine-structure interval of atomic helium. The measurement uses a liquid-nitrogen-cooled DC discharge source of metastable helium and the atomic beam is laser cooled in the transverse directions. The atoms are excited to 23 P by a 1083-nm diode laser, and the fine-structure transition is driven by microwaves using the frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique. The transition is detected by further laser excitation to a Rydberg state, followed by Stark ionization. This work is supported by NSERC, CRC.

  6. Molar absorption coefficients and stability constants of metal complexes of 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR): Revisiting common chelating probe for the study of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Kocyła, Anna; Pomorski, Adam; Krężel, Artur

    2015-11-01

    4-(2-Pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) is one of the most popular chromogenic chelator used in the determination of the concentrations of various metal ions from the d, p and f blocks and their affinities for metal ion-binding biomolecules. The most important characteristics of such a sensor are the molar absorption coefficient and the metal-ligand complex dissociation constant. However, it must be remembered that these values are dependent on the specific experimental conditions (e.g. pH, solvent components, and reactant ratios). If one uses these values to process data obtained in different conditions, the final result can be under- or overestimated. We aimed to establish the spectral properties and the stability of PAR and its complexes accurately with Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+) and Pb(2+) at a multiple pH values. The obtained results account for the presence of different species of metal-PAR complexes in the physiological pH range of 5 to 8 and have been frequently neglected in previous studies. The effective molar absorption coefficient at 492 nm for the ZnHx(PAR)2 complex at pH7.4 in buffered water solution is 71,500 M(-1) cm(-1), and the dissociation constant of the complex in these conditions is 7.08×10(-13) M(2). To confirm these values and estimate the range of the dissociation constants of zinc-binding biomolecules that can be measured using PAR, we performed several titrations of zinc finger peptides and zinc chelators. Taken together, our results provide the updated parameters that are applicable to any experiment conducted using inexpensive and commercially available PAR.

  7. Delay between the Circularly Polarized Components in Fine Structures during Solar Type IV Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Zlobec, P.

    1995-08-01

    We analyzed intermediately polarized (20 80%) fine structures (pulsations, sudden reductions, fiber bursts and zebras) that were recorded in type IV events. The mean polarization degree was practically the same for all the fine structures recorded in an interval lasting a few minutes and it was similar to the polarization of the continuum. A detailed analysis during the evolution of single structures reveals changes in polarization (in particular an ‘undulation’ at flux density minima) even stronger than 20%. They were caused by a delay, up to 0.1 s, between the two circularly polarized components. The weaker polarimetric component was delayed in 2 sets and the stronger one in 1 set. In the event of April 24, 1985 different types of fine structures were sporadically detected in more than one hour long time interval. Short delays of the stronger or of the weaker component were sometimes observed. The events characterized by fine structures are generally totally polarized in the ordinary mode. We assume that this holds also for the phenomena studied here. The observed intermediate polarization therefore requires a depolarization due to propagation effects. We discuss the mode coupling and the reflection of the original radio signal that could also generate the delay of the weaker and the stronger component respectively. The possibility of polarization variation due to the change of the angle between the direction of the propagation and the magnetic field in a quasi-transversal region and in a low intensity magnetic field in a current sheet is also given.

  8. Fine structural dependence of ultraviolet reflections in the King Penguin beak horn.

    PubMed

    Dresp, Birgitta; Langley, Keith

    2006-03-01

    The visual perception of many birds extends into the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectrum and ultraviolet is used by some to communicate. The beak horn of the King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) intensely reflects in the ultraviolet and this appears to be implicated in partner choice. In a preliminary study, we recently demonstrated that this ultraviolet reflectance has a structural basis, resulting from crystal-like photonic structures, capable of reflecting in the near-UV. The present study attempted to define the origin of the photonic elements that produce the UV reflectance and to better understand how the UV signal is optimized by their fine structure. Using light and electron microscopic analysis combined with new spectrophotometric data, we describe here in detail the fine structure of the entire King Penguin beak horn in addition to that of its photonic crystals. The data obtained reveal a one-dimensional structural periodicity within this tissue and demonstrate a direct relationship between its fine structure and its function. In addition, they suggest how the photonic structures are produced and how they are stabilized. The measured lattice dimensions of the photonic crystals, together with morphological data on its composition, permit predictions of the wavelength of reflected light. These correlate well with experimentally observed values. The way the UV signal is optimized by the fine structure of the beak tissue is discussed with regard to its putative biological role. PMID:16470837

  9. Fine structure of the subradular organ of Lepidochitona cinereus (L), (Mollusca, Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Boyle, P R

    1975-10-13

    Electron microscopy of the subradular organ of the chiton Lepidochitona cinereus (L) reveals at least three cell types, microvillous, ciliated and mucus-secreting, situated in a single epithelium. The base of the epithelium is abundantly innervated and supplied with muscle cells. The fine structure is consistent with a chemosensory function for the subradular organ.

  10. Accuracy of mapping the Earth's gravity field fine structure with a spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The spaceborne gravity gradiometer is a potential sensor for mapping the fine structure of the Earth's gravity field. Error analyses were performed to investigate the accuracy of the determination of the Earth's gravity field from a gravity field satellite mission. The orbital height of the spacecraft is the dominating parameter as far as gravity field resolution and accuracies are concerned.

  11. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  12. Revisiting NMR through-space J(FF) spin-spin coupling constants for getting insight into proximate F---F interactions.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Rubén H; Llorente, Tomás; Ducati, Lucas Colucci; Tormena, Cláudio Francisco

    2014-07-10

    At present times it is usual practice to mark biological compounds replacing an H for an F atom to study, by means of (19)F NMR spectroscopy, aspects such as binding sites and molecular folding features. This interesting methodology could nicely be improved if it is known how proximity interactions on the F atom affect its electronic structure as gauged through high-resolution (19)F NMR spectroscopy. This is the main aim of the present work and, to this end, differently substituted peri-difluoronaphthalenes are chosen as model systems. In such compounds are rationalized some interesting aspects of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts of the (19)F nuclear magnetic shielding tensor as well as the transmission mechanisms for the PSO and FC contributions to (4)JF1F8 indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constants.

  13. Study of the Local Structure of II-Vi Ternary Alloys by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Way-Faung

    Bondlengths, Debye-Waller factors, and site occupancy in the diluted magnetic semiconductors Zn_ {rm 1 - x}Mn_{ rm x}Se and Hg_{ rm 1 - x}Mn_{rm x}Te, and the narrow-gap semiconductor Hg _{rm 1 - x}Cd _{rm x}Te have been measured using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The nearest-neighbor bond lengths in all of these alloys are found to be constant as a function of alloy composition within the experimental uncertainty of 0.01A. Because the average cation-cation distance changes with Mn composition, these results necessarily imply distortion of the tetrahedral bond angles. In the case of Zn_{rm 1 - x}Mn_{rm x} Se, the anion sublattice is shown to suffer the largest distortion, but the cation sublattice also exhibits some relaxation. The repercussions of these results are discussed, in terms of the amount of cation and anion sublattice distortion at low temperature and its connection to the superexchange mechanism occurring between the Mn ^{+2} ions and mediated by the intervening anion in Zn_{rm 1 - x}Mn_{rm x} Se. From the NN bond length relaxation results shown in this study and those reported elsewhere for the III -V-based and II-VI-based ternary compounds and DMS alloys, it appears that substitution of Mn^{+2 } ions into II-VI-based compounds causes greater local distortion, in general, than otherwise observed when group II cations are substituted for one another. We believe that the tetrahedral bond weakening in DMS is due to MN 3d-orbital (t_2) and anion p-orbital hybridization in DMS, leaving fewer p-orbitals available for tetrahedral bonding. This leads to the weakening of the bond force constants alpha, beta, as well as the bond becoming more ionic as Mn^{+2} is substituted into the II-VI-based compounds. Finally, the experimentally extended electron energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) technique, with modulations in the differential inelastic electron scattering cross -section above an absorption core edge, has been used in recent years to

  14. Ab initio self-consistent x-ray absorption fine structure analysis for metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Bunker, Grant

    2006-12-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure is a powerful tool for probing the structures of metals in proteins in both crystalline and noncrystalline environments. Until recently, a fundamental problem in biological XAFS has been that ad hoc assumptions must be made concerning the vibrational properties of the amino acid residues that are coordinated to the metal to fit the data. Here, an automatic procedure for accurate structural determination of active sites of metalloproteins is presented. It is based on direct multiple-scattering simulation of experimental X-ray absorption fine structure spectra combining electron multiple scattering calculations with density functional theory calculations of vibrational modes of amino acid residues and the genetic algorithm differential evolution to determine a global minimum in the space of fitting parameters. Structure determination of the metalloprotein active site is obtained through a self-consistent iterative procedure with only minimal initial information.

  15. Magnetic fields, plasma densities, and plasma beta parameters estimated from high-frequency zebra fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jiricka, K.

    2002-10-01

    Using the recent model of the radio zebra fine structures (Ledenev et al. 2001) the magnetic fields, plasma densities, and plasma beta parameters are estimated from high-frequency zebra fine structures. It was found that in the flare radio source of high-frequency (1-2 GHz) zebras the densities and magnetic fields vary in the intervals of (1-4)×1010 cm-3 and 40-230 G, respectively. Assuming then the flare temperature as about of 107K, the plasma beta parameters in the zebra radio sources are in the 0.05-0.81 interval. Thus the plasma pressure effects in such radio sources, especially in those with many zebra lines, are not negligible.

  16. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  17. Fine structure in plasma waves and radiation near the plasma frequency in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1994-01-01

    Novel observations are presented of intrunsic fine structure in the frequency spectrum of electomagnetic (EM) radiation and plasma waves near the electron plasma frequency f(sub p) during a period of unusually high interplanetary magnetic field strength. Measured using the wideband receiver on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 spacecraft, fine-structured emissions are observed both in the solar wind and the foreshock, The fine structure is shown to correspond to emissions spaced above f(sub p) near half harmonies of the electon cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), i.e., near f(sub p) + nf(sub ce)/2. These appear to be the first space physics observations of emissions spaced by f(sub ce)/2. Indirect but strong arguments are used to discriminate between EM and electrostatic (ES) signals, to identify whether ISEE 1 is in the solar wind or the foreshock, and to determine the relative frequencies of the emissions and the local f(sub p). The data are consistent with generation of the ES and EM emissions in the foreshock, with subsequent propagation of the EM emissions into the solar wind. It remains possible that some emissions currently identified as ES have significant EM character. The ES and EM emisions often merge into one another with minimal changes in frequency, arguing that their source regions and generation mechanisms are related and imposing significant constraints on theories. The f(sub ce)/2 ES and EM fine structures observed may be intrinsic to the emission mechanisms or to superposition of two series of signals with f(sub ce) spacing that differ in starting frequency by f(sub ce)/2. Present theories for nonlinear wave coupling processes, cyclotron maser emission, and other linear instability processes are all unable to explain multiple EM and/or ES components spaced by approximately f(sub ce)/2 above f(sub p) for f(sub p)/f(sub ce) much greater than 1 and typical for shock beams parameters. Suitable avenues for further theoretical research are

  18. Fine-structured TiO2 ceramic patterns on the ceramic surface fabricated by replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. D.; Nakayama, T.; Hong, B. J.; Imaki, K.; Yoshimura, T.; Suzuki, T.; Suematsu, H.; Lee, S. W.; Fu, Z.; Niihara, K.

    2011-03-01

    The ability to fabricate high precision micro- to nanoscale structure in a wide variety of materials is of crucial importance for the advancement of microtechnology, nanotechnology and nanoscience. Also, the ability to create micrometer and sub-micrometer architecture for functional ceramics is a prerequisite of exploring the rich field of ceramic nanotechnology. In this work we fabricated three-dimensional oxide ceramic materials with fine-structure over multiple length scales by combining replication patterning technique, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), oxide ceramic material (TiO2) nano-sized particles. Our study is based on the idea that PVA can be easily detached from a mold by peeling. We confirmed that micron and sub-micron-sized fine-structured oxide ceramic patterns containing nano-sized pores could be fabricated using this procedure. The results presented demonstrate the compositional and structural diversities that are possible with a facile approach and simple method.

  19. Fine structure of alpha decay to rotational states of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Z.; Dong, J. M.; Peng, B. B.; Zhang, H. F.

    2010-06-15

    To gain a better insight into alpha-decay fine structure, we calculate the relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} rotational states in the framework of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and improved Royer's formula. The calculated relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} states are in good agreement with the experimental data. For the relative intensities of alpha decay to 4{sup +} states, a good agreement with experimental data is achieved for Th and U isotopes. The formula we obtain is useful for the analysis of experimental data of alpha-decay fine structure. In addition, some predicted relative intensities which are still not measured are provided for future experiments.

  20. Topological map of the Hofstadter butterfly: Fine structure of Chern numbers and Van Hove singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-04-01

    The Hofstadter butterfly is a quantum fractal with a highly complex nested set of gaps, where each gap represents a quantum Hall state whose quantized conductivity is characterized by topological invariants known as the Chern numbers. Here we obtain simple rules to determine the Chern numbers at all scales in the butterfly fractal and lay out a very detailed topological map of the butterfly by using a method used to describe quasicrystals: the cut and projection method. Our study reveals the existence of a set of critical points that separates orderly patterns of both positive and negative Cherns that appear as a fine structure in the butterfly. This fine structure can be understood as a small tilting of the projection subspace in the cut and projection method and by using a Chern meeting formula. Finally, we prove that the critical points are identified with the Van Hove singularities that exist at every band center in the butterfly landscape.

  1. Interpretation of the fine structure in the sup 14 C radioactive decay of sup 223 Ra

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K. ); Ragnarsson, I. )

    1991-03-01

    The experimental hindrance factors determined from the fine structure in the {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra are strikingly similar to the hindrance factors observed in the alpha decay of odd-{ital A} reflection-asymmetric deformed nuclei in spite of the deformed to spherical shape which occurs in the {sup 14}C decay. Calculations of the overlap between the reflection-asymmetric ground state of {sup 223}Ra and the spherical shell-model orbitals of {sup 209}Pb involved in the {sup 14}C decay are consistent with the experimental hindrance factors from the {sup 14}C fine structure except that the {ital j}{sub 15/2} orbital is more strongly populated experimentally than the calculations suggest.

  2. Relation Between Basophilia and Fine Structure of Cytoplasm in the Fungus Allomyces macrogynus Em

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Benigna; Turian, Gilbert

    1960-01-01

    In a fungus, Allomyces macrogynus Em., staining tests have revealed changes in the location of cytoplasmic basophilia following different phases of the developmental cycle. These variations in location were used to observe which fine structures correspond to basophile and non-basophile areas of the cytoplasm. Hyphae, gametangia, zygotes, and plants were fixed at various developmental stages in OsO4, pH 6.1, and embedded in vestopal. Sections were examined in the electron microscope. Comparison of basophile and non-basophile cytoplasms leads to the conclusion that cytoplasmic particles of 150 to 200 A in diameter are responsible for basophilia. The possibility of these particles being ribosomes is discussed and confirmed. The present paper also describes some observations on the fine structure of other cellular components of this fungus, such as nuclei, mitochondria, various granules, and flagella. PMID:13801597

  3. The 16th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwaldt, J.-D.; Hagelstein, M.; Rothe, J.

    2016-05-01

    This preface of the proceedings volume of the 16th International Conference on X- ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16) gives a glance on the five days of cutting-edge X-ray science which were held in Karlsruhe, Germany, August 23 - 28, 2015. In addition, several satellite meetings took place in Hamburg, Berlin and Stuttgart, a Sino-German workshop, three data analysis tutorials as well as special symposia on industrial catalysis and XFELs were held at the conference venue.

  4. Fine structures in the broadened line of distributed feedback lasers under high-speed direct modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikuni, Y.; Matsuoka, T.; Motosugi, G.; Yamanaka, N.

    1984-10-15

    Precise observation of the single longitudinal mode spectrum for distributed feeedback lasers revealed fine structures when the spectrum was broadened by high-speed modulation. A dynamic simulation can explain reasonably the above behavior if the model takes into account the carrier density modulation enhanced by the relaxation oscillation. In this letter, experimental results where both modulation depth and speed were varied are described along with a calculated result.

  5. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  6. Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-11-01

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental ``constants'' in expanding Universe. The spatial variation can explain a fine tuning of the fundamental constants which allows humans (and any life) to appear. We appeared in the area of the Universe where the values of the fundamental constants are consistent with our existence. We present a review of recent works devoted to the variation of the fine structure constant α, strong interaction and fundamental masses. There are some hints for the variation in quasar absorption spectra. Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. Huge enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic and molecular energy levels. A new idea is to build a ``nuclear'' clock based on the ultraviolet transition between very low excited state and ground state in Thorium nucleus. This may allow to improve sensitivity to the variation up to 10 orders of magnitude! Huge enhancement of the variation effects is also possible in cold atomic and molecular collisions near Feshbach resonance.

  7. Characterizing HII regions in High-z ULIRGs with far infrared fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbin, Drew; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Stacey, Gordon J.; Parshley, Stephen; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve; Lamarche, Cody

    2015-01-01

    The nature of star-forming ULIRGs in the early Universe remains mysterious. Is their star formation fueled predominantly through cold flow accretion, or through major mergers? What fraction of the sources have AGN, and what is the stellar mass function powering the HII regions? Of particular importance to these questions is the characterization of the ionized gas properties, and the coupling with the cooler photodissociation region (PDR) gas. To address these issues we have undertaken a mini-survey of several z~1-2 luminous galaxies observed in multiple ionized oxygen far infrared fine structure lines. These fine structure lines allow us to constrain the density and radiation field of the ionized gas and test for the presence of harder AGN powered radiation. Coupled with previous data including the [CII] and [OI] fine structure lines emanating from PDR gas, we will also test the ability to simultaneously model both PDR and HII gas components. This survey, modest in extent, offers an illustrative snapshot of the diversity of systems in the early Universe.

  8. Local Fine Structural Insight into Mechanism of Electrochemical Passivation of Titanium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yu, Hongying; Wang, Ke; Xu, Haisong; Wang, Shaoyang; Sun, Dongbai

    2016-07-20

    Electrochemically formed passive film on titanium in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution and its thickness, composition, chemical state, and local fine structure are examined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption fine structure. AES analysis reveals that the thickness and composition of oxide film are proportional to the reciprocal of current density in potentiodynamic polarization. XPS depth profiles of the chemical states of titanium exhibit the coexistence of various valences cations in the surface. Quantitative X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of the local electronic structure of the topmost surface (∼5.0 nm) shows that the ratio of [TiO2]/[Ti2O3] is consistent with that of passivation/dissolution of electrochemical activity. Theoretical calculation and analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at Ti K-edge indicate that both the structures of passivation and dissolution are distorted caused by the appearance of two different sites of Ti-O and Ti-Ti. And the bound water in the topmost surface plays a vital role in structural disorder confirmed by XPS. Overall, the increase of average Ti-O coordination causes the electrochemical passivation, and the dissolution is due to the decrease of average Ti-Ti coordination. The structural variations of passivation in coordination number and interatomic distance are in good agreement with the prediction of point defect model. PMID:27355902

  9. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  10. Effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions in Si VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2014-05-20

    The effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of fine-structure transitions in Si VII are calculated as a function of electron temperature in the range 5000-2,000,000 K. The B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method has been used to calculate collision strengths by electron impact. The target wave functions have been obtained using the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The 92 fine-structure levels belonging to the 46 LS states of 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 4}, 2s2p {sup 5}, 2p {sup 6}, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3s, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3p, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3d, and 2s2p {sup 4}3s configurations are included in our calculations of oscillator strengths and collision strengths. There are 4186 possible fine-structure allowed and forbidden transitions among the 92 levels. The present excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and collision strengths have been compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Generally, a good agreement is found with the 6 LS-state close-coupling approximation results of Butler and Zeippen and the 44 LS-state distorted wave calculation of Bhatia and Landi.

  11. Fine structure of the alloy-broadened thermal emission spectra from DX centers in GaAlAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, E.; Gomez, A.; Muñoz, E.; Cámara, P.

    1988-05-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy in Si- and Sn-doped GaAlAs reveals a fine structure of the DX center thermal emission spectra under adequate filling pulse and sampling window times. This structure is reproducible in samples with Al mode fractions near 30% but it is not detectable in samples with 85% Al content. All resolved peaks of this fine structure have the same thermal emission energy but quite different capture cross section (σ∞n). This fact indicates that the origin of the fine structure and of the nonexponential behavior of the thermal emission processes is the discrete broadening of σ∞n due to the alloy effect.

  12. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING. II. PROMINENCE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-10-20

    We use the new three-dimensional (3D) whole-prominence fine structure model to study the evolution of prominences and their fine structures in response to changes in the underlying photospheric magnetic flux distribution. The applied model combines a detailed 3D prominence magnetic field configuration with a realistic description of the prominence plasma distributed along multiple fine structures. In addition, we utilize an approximate Hα visualization technique to study the evolution of the visible cool prominence plasma both in emission (prominence) and absorption (filament). We show that the initial magnetic field configuration of the modeled prominence is significantly disturbed by the changing position of a single polarity of a magnetic bipole as the bipole is advected toward the main body of the filament. This leads to the creation of a barb, which becomes the dominant feature visible in the synthetic Hα images of both the prominence and filament views. The evolution of the bipole also creates conditions that lead to the disappearance and reappearance of large portions of the main body. We also show that an arch-like region containing a dark void (a bubble) can be naturally produced in the synthetic prominence Hα images. While not visible in terms of the magnetic field lines, it is due to a lack of Hα emission from low-pressure, low-density plasma located in shallow magnetic dips lying along the lines of sight intersecting the dark void. In addition, a quasi-vertical small-scale feature consisting of short and deep dips, piled one above the other, is produced.

  13. Global investigation of the fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Burda, O.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    Fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) in {sup 58}Ni, {sup 89}Y, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 166}Er, and {sup 208}Pb has been observed in high-energy-resolution ({delta}E{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}35-50 keV) inelastic proton scattering measurements at E{sub 0}=200 MeV at iThemba LABS. Calculations of the corresponding quadrupole excitation strength functions performed within models based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) reveal similar fine structure when the mixing of one-particle one-hole states with two-particle two-hole states is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the experimental data is made with results from the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock (ETDHF) method. For {sup 208}Pb, additional theoretical results from second RPA and the extended theory of finite Fermi systems (ETFFS) are discussed. A continuous wavelet analysis of the experimental and the calculated spectra is used to extract dominant scales characterizing the fine structure. Although the calculations agree with qualitative features of these scales, considerable differences are found between the model and experimental results and amongst different models. Within the framework of the QPM and ETDHF calculations it is possible to decompose the model spaces into subspaces approximately corresponding to different damping mechanisms. It is demonstrated that characteristic scales mainly arise from the collective coupling of the ISGQR to low-energy surface vibrations.

  14. COLLISIONAL EXCITATION OF THE [C II] FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITION IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Velusamy, T.

    2012-11-15

    We analyze the collisional excitation of the 158 {mu}m (1900.5 GHz) fine structure transition of ionized carbon in terms of line intensities produced by simple cloud models. The single C{sup +} fine structure transition is a very important coolant of the atomic interstellar medium (ISM) and of photon-dominated regions in which carbon is partially or completely in ionized form. The [C II] line is widely used as a tracer of star formation in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Excitation of the [C II] fine structure transition can be via collisions with hydrogen molecules, atoms, and electrons. Analysis of [C II] observations is complicated by the fact that it is difficult to determine the optical depth of the line. We discuss the excitation of the [C II] line, deriving analytic results for several limiting cases and carry out numerical solutions using a large velocity gradient model for a more inclusive analysis. For antenna temperatures up to 1/3 of the brightness temperature of the gas kinetic temperature, the antenna temperature is linearly proportional to the column density of C{sup +} irrespective of the optical depth of the transition. This is appropriately referred to as the effectively optically thin approximation. We review the critical densities for excitation of the [C II] line by various collision partners, briefly analyze C{sup +} absorption, and conclude with a discussion of C{sup +} cooling and how the considerations for line intensities affect the behavior of this important coolant of the ISM.

  15. Fine Structure in the Mm-Wavelength Spectra of the Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Faltan observaciones solares espectrosc6picas en la longitud de onda milimetrica. Hay sugerencias de que se puede superponer una fi na estructura en frecuencia a la componente-S de la regi6n solar activa, asi como a la componente del brote en las longitudes de onda milimetri- cas. Se ha desarrollado un receptor de alta sensibilidad de pasos de frecuencia que opera en el intervalo de 23-18 GHz con una resoluci6n de 1 GHz y resoluci6n de tiempo variable entre 1.2 y 96 sec, usando la an- tena de Itapetinga de 13.7-m para estudiar la estructura fina en frecuencia y tiempo. Discutimos el espectro en longitud de onda-mm en re- giones activas y su evoluci6n en el tiempo. El estudio de Ia evoluci6n en el tiempo de la regi6n activa en AR 5569 observada el 29 de junio de 1989, sugiere la existencia de estructuras finas como funci6n deltiempo. ABSTRACT. There is a lack of mm-wavelength spectroscopic solar observations. There are suggestions that a fine structure in frequency may be superimposed on the S-component of solar active region as well as on the burst component at inm-wavelengths. To study fine structure in frequency and time, a high sensitivity step frequency receiver operating in the frequency range 23-18 GHz with frequency resolution of 1 GHz and variable time resolution 1.2 to 96 sec, using 13.7 m diameter Itapetinga radome covered antenna, has been developed. Here, we discuss mm-wavelength spectra of active regions and their time evolution. Study of time evolution of an active region AR 5569 observed on 29th June, 1989 suggests existence of fine structures as a function of time. ( Ck : SUN-ACTIVITY - SUN-RADIO RADIATION

  16. 3D Whole-prominence Fine Structure Modeling. II. Prominence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-10-01

    We use the new three-dimensional (3D) whole-prominence fine structure model to study the evolution of prominences and their fine structures in response to changes in the underlying photospheric magnetic flux distribution. The applied model combines a detailed 3D prominence magnetic field configuration with a realistic description of the prominence plasma distributed along multiple fine structures. In addition, we utilize an approximate Hα visualization technique to study the evolution of the visible cool prominence plasma both in emission (prominence) and absorption (filament). We show that the initial magnetic field configuration of the modeled prominence is significantly disturbed by the changing position of a single polarity of a magnetic bipole as the bipole is advected toward the main body of the filament. This leads to the creation of a barb, which becomes the dominant feature visible in the synthetic Hα images of both the prominence and filament views. The evolution of the bipole also creates conditions that lead to the disappearance and reappearance of large portions of the main body. We also show that an arch-like region containing a dark void (a bubble) can be naturally produced in the synthetic prominence Hα images. While not visible in terms of the magnetic field lines, it is due to a lack of Hα emission from low-pressure, low-density plasma located in shallow magnetic dips lying along the lines of sight intersecting the dark void. In addition, a quasi-vertical small-scale feature consisting of short and deep dips, piled one above the other, is produced.

  17. Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana; Li Luhua; Chen Ying; Cowie, Bruce C. C.

    2013-05-15

    The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

  18. Silicon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of functionalized silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, A.; Cao, W.; Dasog, M.; Purkait, T. K.; Senger, C.; Hu, Y. F.; Xiao, Q. F.; Veinot, J. G. C.; Urquhart, S. G.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of silicon nanocrystals have been examined as a function of nanocrystal size (3-100 nm), varying surface functionalization (hydrogen or 1-pentyl termination), or embedded in oxide. The NEXAFS spectra are characterized as a function of nanocrystal size and surface functionalization. Clear spectroscopic evidence for long range order is observed silicon nanocrystals that are 5-8 nm in diameter or larger. Energy shifts in the silicon 1s NEXAFS spectra of covalently functionalized silicon nanocrystals with changing size are attributed to surface chemical shifts and not to quantum confinement effects.

  19. Fine structure of transient waves in a random medium: The correlation and spectral density functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    This is essentially a progress report on a theoretical investigation of the propagation of transient waves in a random medium. The emphasis in this study is on applications to sonic-boom propagation, particularly as regards the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the sonic-boom waveform. The analysis is general, however, and is applicable to other types of waves besides sonic-boom waves. The phenomenon of primary concern in this investigation is the fine structure of the wave. A figure is used to illustrate what is meant by finestructure.

  20. Origin of fine structure in si photoelectron spectra at silicon surfaces and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yazyev, Oleg V; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2006-04-21

    Using a first-principles approach, we investigate the origin of the fine structure in Si 2p photoelectron spectra at the Si(100)-(2 x 1) surface and at the Si(100)-SiO2 interface. Calculated and measured shifts show very good agreement for both systems. By using maximally localized Wannier functions, we clearly identify the shifts resulting from the electronegativity of second-neighbor atoms. The other shifts are then found to be proportional to the average bond-length variation around the Si atom. Hence, in combination with accurate modeling, photoelectron spectroscopy can provide a direct measure of the strain field at the atomic scale.

  1. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of well deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-06-15

    We formulate a theoretical model for the {alpha} decay of well-deformed even-even nuclei based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation. The {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures observed in {alpha} decay are well described by the five-channel microscopic calculations. Since the branching ratios to high-spin states are hard to understand in the traditional {alpha}-decay theories, this success could be important to interpret future observations of heavier nuclei. It is also found that the {alpha} transition to high-spin states is a powerful tool to probe the energy spectrum and deformation of daughter nuclei.

  2. The fine structure of the sperm of the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Jeffrey D.; Walker, Glenn K.; Nichols, Susan J.; Sorenson, Dorothy

    2004-01-01

    The fine structural details of the spermatozoon of the round goby are presented for the first time in this study. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic examination of testis reveals an anacrosomal spermatozoon with a slightly elongate head and uniformly compacted chromatin. The midpiece contains a single, spherical mitochondrion. Two perpendicularly oriented centrioles lie in a deep, eccentric nuclear fossa with no regularly observed connection to the nucleus. The flagellum develops bilateral fins soon after emerging from the fossa; each extends approximately 1 A?m from the axoneme and persists nearly the length of the flagellum.

  3. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  4. Thermal Expansion Behaviour of Silver Examined by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, M.; Chasse, A.; Haug, J.; Schneider, R.; Kruth, H.

    2007-02-02

    EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) investigations are reported concerning the thermal expansion behaviour of silver in an extended range of temperature from 10 K to about 950 K measured in transmission mode. Both the ratio method and an EXAFS fitting procedure were applied to reveal the temperature dependence of EXAFS parameters. Models based on quantum and classical thermodynamic perturbation theory have been used to interpret experimental data and compared to XRD (X-ray diffraction) results of bulk silver material. The description of thermodynamic data of thermal expansion of silver in the complete range of temperature by EXAFS Spectroscopy was successful by first calculations using third order quantum perturbation theory.

  5. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study of CaSO 4:Dy phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Bakshi, A. K.; Ciatto, G.; Aquilanti, G.; Pradhan, A. S.; Pascarelli, S.

    2006-03-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements have been carried out on CaSO 4:Dy phosphors at the Dy L 3 edge with synchrotron radiation. The data have been analysed to find out the Dy-S and Dy-O bond lengths in the neighborhood of the Dy atoms. Measurements have been carried out over several samples thermally annealed for different cycles at 400 °C in air for 1 h and the change in bond lengths in samples with increasing number of annealing cycles have been studied by analyzing the EXAFS data.

  6. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  7. The fine structure of the axostyle and its associations with organelles in Trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, M; Diniz, J A; Ribeiro, K

    2000-04-01

    The fine structure of the axostyle in the protists Tritrichomonas foetus and Monocercomonas sp is described using transmission electron microscopy after quick-freezing techniques and immunocytochemistry. The axostyle microtubules presents a lateral projection formed by two protofilaments in addition to the 13 protofilaments normally found in microtubules. The axostyle is associated with other cell structures such as hydrogenosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, sigmoid filaments and glycogen particles. The microtubules of the pelta-axostylar system are connected to each other by bridges regularly spaced with an interval of 9 nm. Labeling of the axostyle was observed after cell incubation with monoclonal antibodies recognizing alpha-tubulin and acetylated-tubulin.

  8. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  9. Electronic fine structure in the electron-hole plasma in SrB6

    PubMed

    Rodriguez; Weht; Pickett

    2000-04-24

    Electron-hole mixing-induced fine structure in alkaline earth hexaborides leads to lower energy (temperature) scales, and thus a stronger tendency toward an excitonic instability than in their doped counterparts (viz. Ca1-xLaxB6, x approximately 0.005), which are high-Curie-temperature, small-moment ferromagnets. Comparison of Fermi surfaces and spectral distributions with de Haas-van Alphen, optical, transport, and tunneling data indicates that SrB6 remains a fermionic semimetal down to (at least) 5 K, rather than forming an excitonic condensate. For the doped system the Curie temperature is higher than the degeneracy temperature.

  10. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social sciences as…

  11. Fine-structure splittings in high-lying {sup 2}F states of rubidium via three-step laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, J. R.; Malyshev, G. S.

    2010-03-15

    Three-step laser spectroscopy has been used to measure six additional fine-structure splittings in the n {sup 2}F states of {sup 87}Rb for 11{<=}n{<=}16. When combined with our previous measurements for 4{<=}n{<=}10, they constitute a continuous sequence of 13 measurements suitable for comparison to fine-structure calculations in heavy alkali-metal atoms where relativistic effects, core polarization, configuration mixing, and electron correlation are important.

  12. Fine structure of epithelial canal cells in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymowych, R.; Ledbetter, M.C. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1987-01-01

    Secretory canals were examined in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum (Cocklebur) grown under long day illumination to maintain vegetative growth. The fine structure of the canal and its epithelium was studied by electron microscopy of thin section cut transverse to the principal axis of petioles from leaves in an early stage of development. The canal proper is delimited by walls of epithelial cells which protrude into a scallop shaped cavity. In comparison to the surrounding parenchyma, the epithelial cells are smaller, cytoplasmically more dense, and less vacuolate. The epithelium contains pleomorphic starch-free plastids with planar thylakoids frequently stacked into grana; thus, the plastids are presumed photosynthetically active. Mitochondria are abundant and often dense. The cytoplasm is rich in free polysomes, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum predominates over the rough form. Spheroidal granules averaging about 530 nm in diameter are numerous in the epithelium and appear at lower concentration in neighboring cells. Many features of fine structure of the epithelial cells suggest that a high metabolic activity in present in this tissue during this early stage of development. A possible function of the canals is defense against insect predation and animal grazing.

  13. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  14. Electron affinity of arsenic and the fine structure of As- measured using infrared photodetachment threshold spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, C. W.; Gibson, N. D.; Field, R. L., III; Snedden, A. P.; Shapiro, J. Z.; Janczak, C. M.; Hanstorp, D.

    2009-07-01

    The binding energy and fine-structure splittings of the arsenic negative ion (As-) have been measured using infrared photodetachment threshold spectroscopy. The relative cross section for neutral atom production was measured with a crossed ion-beam-laser-beam apparatus over selected photon energy ranges between 630-810 meV. An s -wave threshold was observed due to the opening of the As-(4p4P32) to As(4p3S43/2) ground-state to ground-state transition, which yields the electron affinity of As to be 804.8(2) meV. s -wave thresholds were also observed for detachment from the J=1 and J=0 excited levels of As- , permitting accurate determination of the fine-structure splittings of 127.6(2) meV for P31-P32 and 164.3(10) meV for P30-P32 . The present values are consistent with previous measurements and substantially reduce the uncertainties.

  15. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  16. Fine structure of uterus and non-functioning paruterine organ in Orthoskrjabinia junlanae (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea).

    PubMed

    Korneva, Janetta V; Kornienko, Svetlana A; Jones, Malcolm K

    2016-06-01

    Some cyclophyllidean cestodes provide protection for their eggs in the external environment by providing them with additional protective layers around the egg membranes. In attempting to examine such adaptations, the microanatomy and fine structure of the uterus of pregravid and gravid proglottids of the cyclophyllidean cestode Orthoskrjabinia junlanae, a parasite of mammals that inhabit a terrestrial but moist environment, were studied. In the initial stages of uterine development, developing embryos locate freely in the lumen of a saccate uterus that later partitions into chambers. Each chamber that forms encloses several embryos. The chambers are surrounded by muscle cells that synthesize extracellular matrix actively. The paruterine organs consist of stacks of flattened long outgrowths of muscular cells, interspersed with small lipid droplets. In the gravid proglottids, the size of paruterine organ increases and consists of flattened basal and small rounded apical parts separated by constrictions. The fine structure of the organ wall remains the same: sparse nuclei and stacks of flattened cytoplasmic outgrowths but internal invaginations or lumen in the paruterine organ are absent. Completely developed eggs remain localized in the uterus. Based on the comparative morpho-functional analysis of uterine and paruterine organs and uterine capsules in cestodes, we conclude that these non-functioning paruterine organ in O. junlanae is an example of an atavism. We postulate that the life cycle of the parasite, which infects mammals living in wet habitats, where threats of desiccation of parasite ova is reduced, has favoured a reversion to a more ancestral form of uterine development. PMID:26997340

  17. Atmospheric fine structure during GTE TRACE A: Relationships among ozone, carbon monoxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, James E.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Sachse, Glen W.; Barrick, John D. W.; Wade, Larry O.; Burney, Lewis G.; Hill, Gerald F.

    1996-10-01

    A major focus of the Global Tropospheric Experiment/Transport and Chemistry Near the Equator-Atlantic (GTE TRACE A) experiment was to determine whether the seasonal tropospheric ozone (O3) buildup over the tropical South Atlantic, observed by both satellites and sondes, is due to photochemical production of O3 from biomass burning effluents or from transport of O3 from the stratosphere. During this expedition, fast response in situ measurements were made of O3, carbon monoxide (CO), and dew point (DP) from aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft. Numerous vertical profiles were obtained over Brazil, Africa, and the South Atlantic to determine the origin of the observed O3 enhancement. Fine structure in these data was examined by (1) investigating differences in the species concentration (5-s averages) and its 2 km vertical running mean during altitude profiles, (2) calculating Fishman-Seiler coefficients for all vertical profiles with altitude range greater than 3 km, and (3) calculating linear regressions between species across short time intervals (2.5 min) using time series data. The fine structure holds information about the recent history of an air mass and therefore can indicate the "source" of tropospheric O3 enhancement: either transport from the stratosphere (negative correlation with CO and DP) or from photochemistry in the troposphere (positive correlation with CO). All three methods indicate that within the tropical South Atlantic during the TRACE A experiment, net in situ photochemical production is significantly more important than transport from the stratosphere.

  18. Features of sound propagation in the ocean with fine-structure inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostev, V. S.; Mikryukov, A. V.; Popov, O. E.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the results of an experiment using an explosive sound source in the tropical part of the Indian Ocean. We consider the time structure of sound signals in geometric shadow zones to a distance of 270 km and the scheme of how the sound field in the shadow zone is formed by rays reflected from horizontally extended fine-structured sound velocity layers. From the results of calculation using a wave program that realizes the method of psuedodifferential parabolic equations, we analyze the influence of signal scattering by fine-structure sound velocity inhomogeneities on the sound field distribution in a waveguide. We show that the field formed by spots of light in each of the shadow zones is generated by a regular field and propagates in parallel to it, taking energy from the regular zone in the near field and in each subsequent convergence zone. This mechanism causes an additional decrease in the field in illuminated zones, which can be interpreted as additional attenuation of the regular sound field.

  19. Fine structure in sup 14 C emission from sup 223 Ra and sup 224 Ra

    SciTech Connect

    Hourani, E.; Rosier, L.; Berrier-Ronsin, G.; Elayi, A.; Mueller, A.C.; Rappenecker, G.; Rotbard, G.; Renou, G.; Liebe, A.; Stab, L. ); Ravn, H.L. )

    1991-10-01

    The measurement of the energy spectrum of {sup 14}C nuclei emitted in the spontaneous radioactivity of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 224}Ra has been carried out, using thin and intense sources (480 MBq for {sup 223}Ra and 3550 MBq for {sup 224}Ra). The sources were obtained by implanting mass-separated beams into Al and vitreous C catchers. The measurement was performed with a superconducting solenoidal spectrometer. Our discovery, previously reported, of fine structure in the energy spectrum of {sup 14}C emission from {sup 223}Ra, which is analogous to the one known for {alpha} emission, is confirmed. Only 13% of the branching ratio in {sup 14}C decay leads to the ground state of the residual nucleus, while 81% to the first excited state. For {sup 14}C emission from {sup 224}Ra, a lower limit of 2 for the hindrance factor has been measured for the transition to the first excited state in the residual nucleus. Also, a precise identification in {ital Z} with an {ital E}{times}{Delta}{ital E} telescope has been performed for the radiation from the {sup 223}Ra source. Our measurements of fine structure in {sup 14}C emissions open this field to nuclear structure studies.

  20. Perceptual weighting of individual and concurrent cues for sentence intelligibility: Frequency, envelope, and fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The speech signal may be divided into frequency bands, each containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. For maximal speech understanding, listeners must allocate their perceptual resources to the most informative acoustic properties. Understanding this perceptual weighting is essential for the design of assistive listening devices that need to preserve these important speech cues. This study measured the perceptual weighting of young normal-hearing listeners for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials. Perceptual weights were obtained under two listening contexts: (1) when each acoustic property was presented individually and (2) when multiple acoustic properties were available concurrently. The processing method was designed to vary the availability of each acoustic property independently by adding noise at different levels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener’s performance with the availability of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrated that weights were (1) equal when acoustic properties were presented individually and (2) biased toward envelope and mid-frequency information when multiple properties were available. Results suggest a complex interaction between the available acoustic properties and the listening context in determining how best to allocate perceptual resources when listening to speech in noise. PMID:21361454

  1. On the mechanisms involved in the recovery of envelope information from temporal fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Millman, Rebecca E.; Viemeister, Neal F.; Brown, Christopher A.; Bacon, Sid P.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were designed to provide psychophysical evidence for the existence of envelope information in the temporal fine structure (TFS) of stimuli that were originally amplitude modulated (AM). The original stimuli typically consisted of the sum of a sinusoidally AM tone and two unmodulated tones so that the envelope and TFS could be determined a priori. Experiment 1 showed that normal-hearing listeners not only perceive AM when presented with the Hilbert fine structure alone but AM detection thresholds are lower than those observed when presenting the original stimuli. Based on our analysis, envelope recovery resulted from the failure of the decomposition process to remove the spectral components related to the original envelope from the TFS and the introduction of spectral components related to the original envelope, suggesting that frequency- to amplitude-modulation conversion is not necessary to recover envelope information from TFS. Experiment 2 suggested that these spectral components interact in such a way that envelope fluctuations are minimized in the broadband TFS. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the modulation depth at the original carrier frequency is only slightly reduced compared to the depth of the original modulator. It also indicated that envelope recovery is not specific to the Hilbert decomposition. PMID:21786897

  2. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe‑ using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm‑1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe‑ were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm‑1 accuracy.

  3. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy. PMID:27138292

  4. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  5. AMPLITUDE FINE STRUCTURE IN THE CEPHEID P-L RELATION. I. AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION ACROSS THE RR LYRAE INSTABILITY STRIP MAPPED USING THE ACCESSIBILITY RESTRICTION IMPOSED BY THE HORIZONTAL BRANCH

    SciTech Connect

    Sandage, Allan

    2010-10-10

    The largest amplitude light curves for both RR Lyrae (RRL) variables and classical Cepheids with periods less than 10 days and greater than 20 days occur at the blue edge of the respective instability strips. It is shown that the equation for the decrease in amplitude with penetration into the strip from the blue edge, and hence the amplitude fine structure within the strip, is the same for RRL and the Cepheids despite their metallicity differences. However, the manifestation of this identity is different between the two classes of variables because the sampling of the RRL strip is restricted by the discrete strip positions of the horizontal branch, a restriction that is absent for the Cepheids in stellar aggregates with a variety of ages. To show the similarity of the strip amplitude fine structure for RRL and Cepheids, we make a grid of lines of constant amplitude in the H-R diagram of the strip using amplitude data for classical Cepheids in the Galaxy, LMC, and SMC. The model implicit in the grid, that also contains lines of constant period, is used to predict the correlations between period, amplitude, and color for the two Oosterhoff RRL groups in globular clusters. The good agreement of the predictions with the observations using the classical Cepheid amplitude fine structure also for the RRL shows one aspect of the unity of the pulsation processes between the two classes of variables.

  6. The Fine-Structure Lines of Hydrogen in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Brian; Turner, B. E.; Minter, Anthony H.

    2005-11-01

    The 2s1/2 state of hydrogen is metastable and overpopulated in H II regions. In addition, the 2p states may be pumped by ambient Lyα radiation. Fine-structure transitions between these states may be observable in H II regions at 1.1 GHz (2s1/2-2p1/2) and/or 9.9 GHz (2s1/2-2p3/2), although the details of absorption versus emission are determined by the relative populations of the 2s and 2p states. The n=2 level populations are solved with a parameterization that allows for Lyα pumping of the 2p states. The Lyα pumping rate has long been considered uncertain, as it involves solution of the difficult Lyα transfer problem. The density of Lyα photons is set by their creation rate, easily determined from the recombination rate, and their removal rate. Here we suggest that the dominant removal mechanism of Lyα radiation in H II regions is absorption by dust. This circumvents the need to solve the Lyα transfer problem and provides an upper limit to the rate at which the 2p states are populated by Lyα photons. In virtually all cases of interest, the 2p states are predominantly populated by recombination, rather than Lyα pumping. We then solve the radiative transfer problem for the fine-structure lines in the presence of free-free radiation. In the likely absence of Lyα pumping, the 2s1/2-->2p1/2 lines will appear in stimulated emission, and the 2s1/2-->2p3/2 lines in absorption. Because the final 2p states are short lived, these lines are dominated by intrinsic line width (99.8 MHz). In addition, each fine-structure line is a multiplet of three blended hyperfine transitions. Searching for the 9.9 GHz lines in high emission measure H II regions offers the best prospects for detection. The lines are predicted to be weak; in the best cases, line-to-continuum ratios of several tenths of a percent might be expected with line strengths of tens to a hundred mK with the Green Bank Telescope. Predicted line strengths, at both 1.1 and 9.9 GHz, are given for a number of H II

  7. Perception of Interaural Phase Differences With Envelope and Fine Structure Coding Strategies in Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Susan; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect a target signal masked by noise is improved in normal-hearing listeners when interaural phase differences (IPDs) between the ear signals exist either in the masker or in the signal. To improve binaural hearing in bilaterally implanted cochlear implant (BiCI) users, a coding strategy providing the best possible access to IPD is highly desirable. In this study, we compared two coding strategies in BiCI users provided with CI systems from MED-EL (Innsbruck, Austria). The CI systems were bilaterally programmed either with the fine structure processing strategy FS4 or with the constant rate strategy high definition continuous interleaved sampling (HDCIS). Familiarization periods between 6 and 12 weeks were considered. The effect of IPD was measured in two types of experiments: (a) IPD detection thresholds with tonal signals addressing mainly one apical interaural electrode pair and (b) with speech in noise in terms of binaural speech intelligibility level differences (BILD) addressing multiple electrodes bilaterally. The results in (a) showed improved IPD detection thresholds with FS4 compared with HDCIS in four out of the seven BiCI users. In contrast, 12 BiCI users in (b) showed similar BILD with FS4 (0.6 ± 1.9 dB) and HDCIS (0.5 ± 2.0 dB). However, no correlation between results in (a) and (b) both obtained with FS4 was found. In conclusion, the degree of IPD sensitivity determined on an apical interaural electrode pair was not an indicator for BILD based on bilateral multielectrode stimulation. PMID:27659487

  8. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of quasi-isentropically compressed vanadium targets on the OMEGA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Remington, B. A.; Allen, P. G.; Pollaine, S. M.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Lorenz, K. T.; Hawreliak, J. A.

    2008-06-15

    The use of in situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for characterizing nanosecond laser-shocked vanadium, titanium, and iron has recently been demonstrated. These measurements are extended to laser-driven, quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE). The radiation source (backlighter) for EXAFS in all of these experiments is obtained by imploding a spherical target on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)]. Isentropic compression (where the entropy is kept constant) enables to reach high compressions at relatively low temperatures. The absorption spectra are used to determine the temperature and compression in a vanadium sample quasi-isentropically compressed to pressures of up to {approx}0.75 Mbar. The ability to measure the temperature and compression directly is unique to EXAFS. The drive pressure is calibrated by substituting aluminum for the vanadium and interferometrically measuring the velocity of the back target surface by the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). The experimental results obtained by EXAFS and VISAR agree with each other and with the simulations of a hydrodynamic code. The role of a shield to protect the sample from impact heating is studied. It is shown that the shield produces an initial weak shock that is followed by a quasi-isentropic compression at a relatively low temperature. The role of radiation heating from the imploding target as well as from the laser-absorption region is studied. The results show that in laser-driven ICE, as compared with laser-driven shocks, comparable compressions can be achieved at lower temperatures. The EXAFS results show important details not seen in the VISAR results.

  9. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Measurements of Quasi-Isentropically Compressed Vanadium Targets on the OMEGA Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Boehly, T.R.; Sangster, T.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Remington, B.A.; Allen, P.G.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lorenzana, H.E.; Lorenz, K.T.; Hawreliak, J.A.

    2008-07-21

    The use of in situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for characterizing nanosecond laser-shocked vanadium, titanium, and iron has recently been demonstrated. These measurements are extended to laser-driven, quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE). The radiation source (backlighter) for EXAFS in all of these experiments is obtained by imploding a spherical target on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)]. Isentropic compression (where the entropy is kept constant) enables to reach high compressions at relatively low temperatures. The absorption spectra are used to determine the temperature and compression in a vanadium sample quasi-isentropically compressed to pressures of up to ~0.75 Mbar. The ability to measure the temperature and compression directly is unique to EXAFS. The drive pressure is calibrated by substituting aluminum for the vanadium and interferometrically measuring the velocity of the back target surface by the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). The experimental results obtained by EXAFS and VISAR agree with each other and with the simulations of a hydrodynamic code. The role of a shield to protect the sample from impact heating is studied. It is shown that the shield produces an initial weak shock that is followed by a quasi-isentropic compression at a relatively low temperature. The role of radiation heating from the imploding target as well as from the laser-absorption region is studied. The results show that in laser-driven ICE, as compared with laser-driven shocks, comparable compressions can be achieved at lower temperatures. The EXAFS results show important details not seen in the VISAR results.

  10. Relative contributions of temporal envelope and fine structure cues to lexical tone recognition in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xu, Li; Mannell, Robert

    2011-12-01

    It has been reported that normal-hearing Chinese speakers base their lexical tone recognition on fine structure regardless of temporal envelope cues. However, a few psychoacoustic and perceptual studies have demonstrated that listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment may have an impaired ability to use fine structure information, whereas their ability to use temporal envelope information is close to normal. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative contributions of temporal envelope and fine structure cues to lexical tone recognition in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired native Mandarin Chinese speakers. Twenty-two normal-hearing subjects and 31 subjects with various degrees of sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. Sixteen sets of Mandarin monosyllables with four tone patterns for each were processed through a "chimeric synthesizer" in which temporal envelope from a monosyllabic word of one tone was paired with fine structure from the same monosyllable of other tones. The chimeric tokens were generated in the three channel conditions (4, 8, and 16 channels). Results showed that differences in tone responses among the three channel conditions were minor. On average, 90.9%, 70.9%, 57.5%, and 38.2% of tone responses were consistent with fine structure for normal-hearing, moderate, moderate to severe, and severely hearing-impaired groups respectively, whereas 6.8%, 21.1%, 31.4%, and 44.7% of tone responses were consistent with temporal envelope cues for the above-mentioned groups. Tone responses that were consistent neither with temporal envelope nor fine structure had averages of 2.3%, 8.0%, 11.1%, and 17.1% for the above-mentioned groups of subjects. Pure-tone average thresholds were negatively correlated with tone responses that were consistent with fine structure, but were positively correlated with tone responses that were based on the temporal envelope cues. Consistent with the idea that the spectral resolvability is

  11. Negative thermal expansion in CuCl: An extended x-ray absorption fine structure study

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccari, M.; Grisenti, R.; Fornasini, P.; Rocca, F.; Sanson, A.

    2007-05-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been measured from liquid helium to ambient temperature at the Cu K edge of copper chloride (CuCl) to investigate the local origin of negative thermal expansion. A quantitative analysis of the first coordination shell, performed by the cumulant method, reveals that the nearest-neighbor Cu-Cl interatomic distance undergoes a strong positive expansion, contrasting with the much weaker negative expansion of the crystallographic distance between average atomic positions below 100 K. The anisotropy of relative thermal vibrations, monitored by the ratio {gamma} between perpendicular and parallel mean square relative displacements, is considerably high, while the diffraction thermal factors are isotropic. The relative perpendicular vibrations measured by EXAFS are related to the tension mechanism and to the transverse acoustic modes, which are considered responsible for negative thermal expansion in zinc-blende structures.

  12. Fine Structure of the Eggshell of the Blow Fly, Lucilia cuprina

    PubMed Central

    Sukontason, Kabkaew L.; Bunchu, Nophawan; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Kuntalue, Budsabong; Sukontason, Kom

    2007-01-01

    The fine structure of the eggshell of blow fly, Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), was examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Eggs, 1.09±0.07 mm in length and 0.25±0.05 mm in width, bore a relatively wide plastron that extending along almost the entire length. The polygonal pattern of chorionic sculpture was indistinct. The ultrathin section indicated a multi-layered eggshell having an exochorion, outer endochorion, pillars, an inner endochorion, innermost chorionic layer, and a wax layer. This study provides new information about the fine morphology of blow flies eggs. A key to differentiate the eggs of forensically important flies in Thailand is given. PMID:20334590

  13. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  14. Fine structures of organic photovoltaic thin films probed by frequency-shift electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kento; Ie, Yutaka; Aso, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    The localized charge and electrostatic properties of organic photovoltaic thin films are predominating factors for controlling energy conversion efficiency. The surface potential and electrostatic structures of organic photovoltaic thin films were investigated by frequency shift mode Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The KFM images of a poly[2-methoxy-5-(3‧,7‧-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene]/phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl ester (PCBM) blend thin film reveals that the PCBM domains precipitate as the topmost layer on the thin films. We find fine structures that were not observed in the topography and KFM images. The bias dependence of the EFM images suggests that the EFM contrast reflects the field-induced polarization, indicating the presence of charge trapping sites.

  15. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pysmenetska, I.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    The isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al has been investigated with high-energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at Ep=200 MeV and at scattering angles close to the maximum of Δ L =2 angular distributions with the K600 magnetic spectrometer of iThemba LABS, South Africa. Characteristic scales are extracted from the observed fine structure with a wavelet analysis and compared for 28Si with random-phase approximation and second random phase approximation calculations with an interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential by a unitary transformation. A recent extension of the method to deformed nuclei provides the best description of the data, suggesting the significance of Landau damping.

  16. Automated fine structure image analysis method for discrimination of diabetic retinopathy stage using conjunctival microvasculature images

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maziyar M; O’Neill, William; Penn, Richard; Chau, Felix; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The conjunctiva is a densely vascularized mucus membrane covering the sclera of the eye with a unique advantage of accessibility for direct visualization and non-invasive imaging. The purpose of this study is to apply an automated quantitative method for discrimination of different stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR) using conjunctival microvasculature images. Fine structural analysis of conjunctival microvasculature images was performed by ordinary least square regression and Fisher linear discriminant analysis. Conjunctival images between groups of non-diabetic and diabetic subjects at different stages of DR were discriminated. The automated method’s discriminate rates were higher than those determined by human observers. The method allowed sensitive and rapid discrimination by assessment of conjunctival microvasculature images and can be potentially useful for DR screening and monitoring. PMID:27446692

  17. Xe nanocrystals in Si studied by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, Giuseppe; Pennisi, Agata R.; Zontone, Federico

    2007-07-15

    The structural configuration of Xe clusters, obtained by ion implantation in a Si matrix, has been investigated as a function of the temperature by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. In contrast with previous results, we demonstrate that an accurate analysis of the data, using high order cumulants, gives evidence of Xe fcc nanocrystals at low temperature, even in the as-implanted Si; expansion of the Xe lattice is always found as a function of the temperature, with no appreciable overpressure. We point out that a dramatic modification of these conclusions can be induced by an incorrect analysis using standard symmetrical pair distribution function G(r); for this reason, all the results were checked by x-ray diffraction measurements.

  18. Fine structure of spermatozoa in the common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus Linnaeus, 1758) (Perciformes, Sparidae).

    PubMed

    Maricchiolo, G; Genovese, L; Laurà, R; Micale, V; Muglia, U

    2004-10-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the fine structure of the sperm of the Sparid fish Pagellus erythrinus L. The spermatozoon of pandora has a spherical head lacking an acrosome, a cone-shaped midpiece and a long tail. The midpiece houses a single mitochondrion. The centriolar complex lies inside the nuclear fossa and is composed of a proximal and a distal centriole which are arranged at right angles to each other. The flagellum is inserted medio-laterally into the head, contains the conventional 9+2 axoneme and possesses one pair of lateral fins. On the basis of its ultrastructural organization, the pandora sperm can be regarded as an evolved form of the primitive spermatozoon found in Teleosts. According to the morphological classification proposed by Mattei (1970), the sperm of pandora belongs to a "type I" designation, like that of the other Sparid fish.

  19. Fine structure of DX(Sn) centers in AlxGa1-xAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, H. H.; Kang, J. Y.; Wu, Z. Y.; Huang, Q. S.

    1998-09-01

    High resolution Laplace defect spectroscopy was used to study the fine structure of the electron emission process of DX(Sn) centers in AlxGa1-xAs (x=0.26,0.53). Two groups of peaks in the spectra of electron emission rates were found to correspond to two DX-like centers observed by deep level transient spectroscopy. The line splitting in both groups derives from the alloy disorder effect attributed to the different local configurations of Al and Ga atoms around two DX-like centers. Experimental evidence for the microscopic nature of two DX-like centers in Sn-doped AlGaAs is provided.

  20. Fine structure of inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra for MN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, A. S.; Igumenov, A. Yu; Mikhlin, Yu L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Zhigalov, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The comparative analysis of the reflection electron energy loss spectra and the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra for Mn was carried out. It is shown that inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra have certain advantages in the study of the interaction of electrons with the substance as compared to the electron energy loss spectra. The inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra fine structure was analysed by fitting the experimental spectra using the 3 parameters Lorentzian-type formula of Tougaard. This method was used for the quantitative analysis of the contributions of various loss processes in the inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra, determination of the loss peaks energies and origin.

  1. Strain-driven growth of GaAs(111) quantum dots with low fine structure splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Yerino, Christopher D.; Jung, Daehwan; Lee, Minjoo Larry; Simmonds, Paul J.; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L.; Schneider, Christian; Unsleber, Sebastian; Vo, Minh; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2014-12-22

    Symmetric quantum dots (QDs) on (111)-oriented surfaces are promising candidates for generating polarization-entangled photons due to their low excitonic fine structure splitting (FSS). However, (111) QDs are difficult to grow. The conventional use of compressive strain to drive QD self-assembly fails to form 3D nanostructures on (111) surfaces. Instead, we demonstrate that (111) QDs self-assemble under tensile strain by growing GaAs QDs on an InP(111)A substrate. Tensile GaAs self-assembly produces a low density of QDs with a symmetric triangular morphology. Coherent, tensile QDs are observed without dislocations, and the QDs luminescence at room temperature. Single QD measurements reveal low FSS with a median value of 7.6 μeV, due to the high symmetry of the (111) QDs. Tensile self-assembly thus offers a simple route to symmetric (111) QDs for entangled photon emitters.

  2. Fine structure in RF spectra of lightning return stroke wave forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    The power spectra of the wide-band (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic-field signals for a number of lightning return strokes measured during a thunderstorm which occurred in Lindau in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data are obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. Each return stroke data stream is passed through an adaptive filter designed to whiten its spectrum. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks in the spectra of many of the waveforms. A peak at f of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the power spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  3. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  4. Mechanical Behavior of Agave Americana L. Fibres: Correlation Between Fine Structure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msahli, S.; Chaabouni, Y.; Sakli, F.; Drean, J. Y.

    In this study, results of a mechanical behavior study of fibres extracted from the agave Americana L. plant, the most abundant variety in Tunisia, are presented. These results deal with the principal and mechanical characteristics of these fibres which are the elongation at break, the elasticity modulus and the rupture facture. These results permitted to situate these fibres, compared to the other textile fibres, as materials that can be used in technical applications such as reinforcing composites or geotextile. In order to understand the mechanical properties of these fibres, a correlation study between the properties already cited and the fine structure was done. The obtained results showed that the mechanical properties of agave Americana L. fibres are closely related to the individual fibers deformations and to the natural matrix (lignin and gums) that links these elementary fibres.

  5. The fine structure of pulmonary contusion and the effect of various drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J. R.; Eckert, P.; Földi-Börcsök, E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of contusion were examined by electron and light microscopy in the lungs of rats. It was found that the results here were very similar to those elsewhere in the body, with a few minor modifications due to the unique structure of the lung. Densitometry of protein concentration and visual estimation of oedema were used to quantitate the effects on the injury. The benzo-pyrone drug Venalot had a considerable effect in reducing the protein concentration in the air spaces and the interstitial tissue, and of the oedema in the latter. Neither the proteinase inhibitor Trasylol nor the pectin-based plasma expander HAS had any significant effect on the fine structural alterations of pulmonary contusion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:1087159

  6. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.R.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has led to a significant increase in activity in many areas of science dealing with the interaction of x-rays with matter. Synchrotron radiation provides intense, linearly polarized, naturally collimated, continuously tunable photon beams, which are used to determine not only the elemental composition of a complex, polyatomic, dilute material but also the chemical form of the elements with improved accuracy. Examples of the application of synchrotron radiation include experiments in synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. New synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobes for elemental analysis in the parts per billion range are under construction at several laboratories. 76 references, 24 figures.

  7. Single shot near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantouvalou, I.; Witte, K.; Martyanov, W.; Jonas, A.; Grötzsch, D.; Streeck, C.; Löchel, H.; Rudolph, I.; Erko, A.; Stiel, H.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-05-01

    With the help of adapted off-axis reflection zone plates, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at the C and N K-absorption edge have been recorded using a single 1.2 ns long soft X-ray pulse. The transmission experiments were performed with a laser-produced plasma source in the laboratory rendering time resolved measurements feasible independent on large scale facilities. A resolving power of E/ΔE ˜ 950 at the respective edges could be demonstrated. A comparison of single shot spectra with those collected with longer measuring time proves that all features of the used reference samples (silicon nitrate and polyimide) can be resolved in 1.2 ns. Hence, investigations of radiation sensitive biological specimen become possible due to the high efficiency of the optical elements enabling low dose experiments.

  8. Engineering quantum dots for electrical control of the fine structure splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, M. A.; Bennett, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied the variation in fine-structure splitting (FSS) under application of vertical electric field in a range of quantum dots grown by different methods. In each sample, we confirm that this energy splitting changes linearly over the field range we can access. We conclude that this linear tuning is a general feature of self-assembled quantum dots, observed under different growth conditions, emission wavelengths, and in different material systems. Statistical measurements of characteristic parameters such as emission energy, Stark shift, and FSS tuning are presented which may provide a guide for future attempts to increase the yield of quantum dots that can be tuned to a minimal value of FSS with vertical electric field.

  9. A simulation for gravity fine structure recovery from low-low GRAVSAT SST data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Lancaster, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Covariance error analysis techniques were applied to investigate estimation strategies for the low-low SST mission for accurate local recovery of gravitational fine structure, considering the aliasing effects of unsolved for parameters. A 5 degree by 5 degree surface density block representation of the high order geopotential was utilized with the drag-free low-low GRAVSAT configuration in a circular polar orbit at 250 km altitude. Recovery of local sets of density blocks from long data arcs was found not to be feasible due to strong aliasing effects. The error analysis for the recovery of local sets of density blocks using independent short data arcs demonstrated that the estimation strategy of simultaneously estimating a local set of blocks covered by data and two "buffer layers" of blocks not covered by data greatly reduced aliasing errors.

  10. [Spectrum characterization and fine structure of copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-lin; Zhang, Xin-yi; Zhong, Ju-hua; Zhu, Yi-hua; He, Bo; Wei, Shi-qiang

    2007-10-01

    Copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities were fabricated by chemistry method. Their spectrum characterization was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and their fine structure was analyzed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results show that there is interaction of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and TiO2 microcavities after TiO2 microcavities was doped with CuPc. For example, there is absorption at 900.76 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra, and the "red shift" of both OH vibration at 3392.75 cm(-1) and CH vibration at 2848.83 cm(-1). There exist definite peak shifts and intensity changes in infrared absorption in the C-C or C-N vibration in the planar phthalocyanine ring, the winding vibration of C-H inside and C-N outside plane of benzene ring. In Raman spectrum, there are 403.4, 592.1 and 679.1 cm(-1) characterized peaks of TiO2 in CuPc-doped TiO2 microcavities, but their wave-numbers show shifts to anatase TiO2. The vibration peaks at 1586.8 and 1525.6 cm(-1) show that there exists the composite material of CuPc and TiO2. These changes are related to the plane tropism of the molecule structure of copper phthalocyanine. XAFS showed tetrahedron TiO4 structure of Ti in TiO2 microcavities doped with copper phthalocyanine, and the changes of inner "medial distances" and the surface structure of TiO2 microcavities.

  11. Comparison of Fine Structures of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Emissions in Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labelle, J. W.; Dundek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries of emissions at four and five times the electron cyclotron frequency in aurora occuring under daylit conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-4 and 2014-5. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events revealed that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches the cyclotron harmonic, which for higher harmonics requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously showed that only rarely, about ten percent of the time, are the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions in exact integer ratio (e.g., 3:2, 4:3, or 5:4 depending on which combination of harmonics is observed). In the remaining approximately ninety percent of the cases, the higher harmonic occurred at a lower ratio than the appropriate integer ratio, as expected if the harmonics are generated independently at their separate matching conditions in the bottomside ionosphere, where the upper hybrid frequency increases with altitude while the gyroharmonics decrease with altitude. (The bottomside is the most likely source of the emissions, since from there the mode converted Z-modes have access to ground-level.) Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches each harmonic, i.e., at a separate source altitude for each harmonic. Generation of higher harmonics through coalescence of lower harmonic waves explains at most a small minority of events.

  12. Comparison of fine structures of electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBelle, J.; Dundek, M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent discoveries of higher harmonic cyclotron emissions in aurora occurring under daylight conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events reveals that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at the matching condition fuh = Nfce, which for higher N requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. This result implies that generation of higher harmonics from lower harmonics via wave-wave processes explains only a minority of events. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously shows that in almost all events the higher harmonic comes from higher altitudes, and only for a small fraction of events is it plausible that the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions are correlated and in exact integer ratio. This observation puts an upper bound of 15-20% on the fraction of emissions which can be explained by wave-wave interactions involving Z mode waves at fce and, combined with consideration of source altitudes, puts an upper bound of 75% on the fraction explained by coalescence of Z mode waves at 2fce. Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at the matching points fuh = Nfce and that the wave-wave interaction mechanisms explain a relatively small fraction of events.

  13. Morphology and fine structure of Acipenser persicus (Acipenseridae, Chondrostei) spermatozoon: Inter-species comparison in Acipenseriformes.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi; Noveiri, Shahrouz Baradaran; Poorbagher, Hadi; Alipour, Ali Reza; Pourkazemi, Mohammad; Linhart, Otomar

    2011-01-01

    This study describes morphology and fine structure of the Persian sturgeon (Acipenser persicus) (Acipenseridae, Chondrostei) spermatozoon. The results show that the spermatozoon of A. persicus is differentiated into an elongated head (length: mean±SD: 7.1±0.5μm) with an acrosome (length: 1.2±0.2μm), a cylindrical midpiece (length: 1.8±0.5μm), a flagellum (length: 50.3±5.9μm) and a total length of 59.2±6.2μm. Ten posterolateral projections (PLPs) arise from the posterior edge of the acrosome and there were 3 endonuclear canals that traversed the nucleus from the acrosomal end to the basal nuclear fossa region. Three to six mitochondria were in peripheral midpiece and the proximal and distal centrioles were located near to "implantation fossa" and basement of the flagellum. The axoneme has a typical eukaryotic structure composed of 9 peripheral microtubules and a central pair of single microtubule surrounded by the plasma membrane. Lateral fins were observed along the flagellum. The fins started and ended at 0.5-1μm from midpiece and at 4-6μm from the end of flagellum. There were significant differences in the size of almost all measured morphological parameters between males and flagellar, midpiece and nucleus characters were more isolated parameters that can be considered for detecting inter-individual variations. This study showed that sperm morphology and fine structure are similar among sturgeon species, but the dimensions of the parameters may differ. PMID:21144681

  14. Fine-structure energy levels, radiative rates and lifetimes in Si-like nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2012-07-01

    Large scale CIV3 calculations of excitation energies from ground state as well as of oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the (1s22s22p6)3s23p2, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s23p3d, 3s23p4s, 3s23p4p, 3s23p4d and 3s23p4f configurations of Ni XV, are performed using very extensive configuration-interaction wave functions. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. Our calculated excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement with the available NIST results. From our radiative decay rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. It is noted that our calculated radiative rates show significant disagreement (23-30%) with those calculated by Ishikawa and Vilkas (2002 Phys. Scr. 65 219) for the transitions involving the 3s3p3(5S2) level. For this high spin level 3s3p3(5S2) our calculated lifetime is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental value of Träbert et al (1989 Z. Phys. D 11 207). In this calculation, we also predict many additional new and accurate data for various optically allowed and intercombination transitions to complete the void in the existing data.

  15. Neutral hydrogen associated with shells and other fine structure in NGC 2865: A dynamically young elliptical?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiminovich, D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Van Der Hulst, J. M.; Malin, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    We report the discovery of neutral hydrogen in a second elliptical galaxy with shells, NGC 2865. Very Large Array (VLA) images reveal an association between the neutral hydrogen (H I) and the fine structure (shells, tails, and loops) in the galaxy. Similar to what we previously observed in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), most of the 6 x 10(exp 8)/h(exp 2) solar mass of cold gas is found in a broken ring in the outer regions of NGC 2865 (beyond 0.5D(sub 25)) and is displaced to the outside of the shells and loops. The measured velocities cover a range of 500 km/s around the systematic velocity. The velocity field of the outer H I has the same sense and magnitude (and line of nodes) as that of the stars in the elliptical body. Although NGC 2865 appears to be a relaxed elliptical galaxy, deep images, photometry, and spectroscopy suggest that the galaxy might be the recent (less than 7 Gyr) product of a major disk-disk merger -- a 'dynamically young elliptical.' Our H I data support this hypothesis. Nevertheless, the association between gas and stellar fine structure, with gas displaced outward from the stars in projected position, implies gas motions not predicted by any of the current merger scenarios. Using the H I ring and assuming nearly circular motion, we measure M/L(sub B) at large radii (4 x 0.5D(sub 25)). We find M/L(sub B) = 33 +/- 4 h, a factor of 5 greater than the value of M/L(sub B) found for the central regions, indicating the presence of a dark halo.

  16. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency f{sub p} to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both f{sub p} and 2 f{sub p} radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in f{sub p} than 2 f{sub p} emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  17. Production of Fine Structures in Type III Solar Radio Bursts Due to Turbulent Density Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency fp to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both fp and 2 fp radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in fp than 2 fp emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 fp radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 fp radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  18. Al2O3-ZrO2 Finely Structured Multilayer Architectures from Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingaud, Olivier; Montavon, Ghislain; Denoirjean, Alain; Coudert, Jean-François; Rat, Vincent; Fauchais, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is an alternative to conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) aiming at manufacturing thinner layers (i.e., 10-100 μm) due to the specific size of the feedstock particles, from a few tens of nanometers to a few micrometers. The staking of lamellae and particles, which present a diameter ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 μm and an average thickness from 20 to 300 nm, permits to manufacture finely structured layers. Moreover, it appears as a versatile process able to manufacture different coating architectures according to the operating parameters (suspension properties, injection configuration, plasma properties, spray distance, torch scan velocity, scanning step, etc.). However, the different parameters controlling the properties of the coating, and their interdependences, are not yet fully identified. Thus, the aim of this paper is, on the one hand, to better understand the influence of operating parameters on the coating manufacturing mechanisms (in particular, the plasma gas mixture effect) and, on the other hand, to produce Al2O3-ZrO2 finely structured layers with large varieties of architectures. For this purpose, a simple theoretical model was used to describe the plasma torch operating conditions at the nozzle exit, based on experimental data (mass enthalpy, arc current intensity, thermophysical properties of plasma forming gases, etc.) and the influences of the spray parameters were determined by mean of the study of sizes and shapes of spray beads. The results enabled then to reach a better understanding of involved phenomena and their interactions on the final coating architectures permitting to manufacture several types of microstructures.

  19. Reanalysis and extension of the MnH A7Π- X7Σ + (0, 0) band: Fine structure and hyperfine-induced rotational branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Gray, Jeffrey A.; Field, Robert W.; Merer, Anthony J.

    1992-12-01

    The A7Π- X7Σ + (0, 0) band of MnH at 568 nm has been recorded by laser fluorescence excitation spectroscopy. The original rotational analysis of Nevin [ Proc. R. Irish Acad.48A, 1-45 (1942); 50A, 123-137 (1945)] has been extended with some corrections at low J. Systematic internal hyperfine perturbations in the X7Σ + state, caused by the Δ N = 0, Δ J = ±1 matrix elements of the 55Mn hyperfine term in the Hamiltonian, have been observed in all seven electron spin components over the entire range of N″ studied. These perturbations destroy the "goodness" of J″ as a quantum number, giving rise to hyperfine-induced Δ J = ±2 rotational branches and to observable energy shifts of the most severely affected levels. The A7Π state, with A = 40.5 cm -1 and B = 6.35 cm -1, evolves rapidly from Hund's case ( a) to case ( b) coupling, which produces anomalous branch patterns at low J. A total of 156 rotational branches have been identified and fitted by least squares to an effective Hamiltonian, providing precise values for the rotational and fine structure constants. Values of the principal constants determined in the fit are (1σ errors in units of the last digit are listed in parentheses): The fine structures of the A7Π and X7Σ + states confirm the assignment of the A ← X transition as Mn 4 pπ ← 4 sσ in the presence of a spectator, nonbonding Mn 3 d5 ( 6S) open core.

  20. Fine Structure of the Gamow-Teller Resonance in {sup 90}Nb and Level Density of 1{sup +} States

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Wambach, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Berg, G.P.A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, H.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-01-13

    The fine structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance in a medium-heavy nucleus is observed for the first time in a high-resolution {sup 90}Zr({sup 3}He,t){sup 90}Nb experiment at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Using a novel wavelet analysis technique, it is possible to extract characteristic energy scales and to quantify their relative importance for the generation of the fine structure. This method combined with the selectivity of the reaction permits an extraction of the level density of 1{sup +} states in {sup 90}Nb.

  1. FINE STRUCTURAL OBSERVATIONS RELATING TO THE PRODUCTION OF COLOR BY THE IRIDOPHORES OF A LIZARD, ANOLIS CAROLINENSIS

    PubMed Central

    Rohrlich, Susannah T.; Porter, Keith R.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the results of light and electron microscopy done on iridophores in the dorsal skin of the lizard Anolis carolinensis. New fine-structural details are revealed, and their importance is discussed. Of some interest is the complex of filaments between crystalline sheets in the cell. It is proposed that this complex is involved in the arrangement of crystals into crystalline sheets, and that the crystal arrangement and spacing are critical for the production of the cells' blue-green color. Tyndall scattering and thin-film interference are discussed as possible explanations for iridophore color production in relation to the fine-structural data obtained. PMID:5013601

  2. Periodicity extraction in the anuran auditory nerve. II: Phase and temporal fine structure.

    PubMed

    Simmons, A M; Reese, G; Ferragamo, M

    1993-06-01

    Discharge patterns of single eighth nerve fibers in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, were analyzed in response to signals consisting of multiple harmonics of a common, low-amplitude fundamental frequency. The signals were chosen to reflect the frequency and amplitude spectrum of the bullfrog's species-specific advertisement call. The phase spectrum of the signals was manipulated to produce envelopes that varied in their shapes from impulselike (sharp) to noiselike (flattened). Peripheral responses to these signals were analyzed by computing the autocorrelation functions of the spike trains and their power spectra, as well as by constructing period histograms over the time intervals of the low-frequency harmonics. In response to a phase aligned signal with an impulsive envelope, most fibers, regardless of their characteristic frequencies or place of origin within the inner ear, synchronize to the fundamental frequency of the signal. The temporal patterns of fiber discharge to these stimuli are not typically captured by that stimulus harmonic closet to the fiber characteristic frequency, as would be expected from a spectral coding mechanism for periodicity extraction, but instead directly reflect the periodicity of the stimulus envelope. Changing the phase relations between the individual harmonics constituting the signal produces changes in temporal discharge patterns of some fibers by shifting predominant synchronization away from the fundamental frequency to the low-frequency spectral peak in the complex stimuli. The proportion of fibers whose firing is captured by the fundamental frequency decreases as the waveform envelope becomes less impulselike. Fiber characteristic frequency is not highly correlated with the harmonic number to which synchronization is strongest. The higher-harmonic spectral fine structure of the signals is not reflected in fiber temporal response, regardless of the shape of the stimulus envelope, even for those harmonics within the range of

  3. Distorted Tonotopic Coding of Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure with Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sushrut

    2016-01-01

    People with cochlear hearing loss have substantial difficulty understanding speech in real-world listening environments (e.g., restaurants), even with amplification from a modern digital hearing aid. Unfortunately, a disconnect remains between human perceptual studies implicating diminished sensitivity to fast acoustic temporal fine structure (TFS) and animal studies showing minimal changes in neural coding of TFS or slower envelope (ENV) structure. Here, we used general system-identification (Wiener kernel) analyses of chinchilla auditory nerve fiber responses to Gaussian noise to reveal pronounced distortions in tonotopic coding of TFS and ENV following permanent, noise-induced hearing loss. In basal fibers with characteristic frequencies (CFs) >1.5 kHz, hearing loss introduced robust nontonotopic coding (i.e., at the wrong cochlear place) of low-frequency TFS, while ENV responses typically remained at CF. As a consequence, the highest dominant frequency of TFS coding in response to Gaussian noise was 2.4 kHz in noise-overexposed fibers compared with 4.5 kHz in control fibers. Coding of ENV also became nontonotopic in more pronounced cases of cochlear damage. In apical fibers, more classical hearing-loss effects were observed, i.e., broadened tuning without a significant shift in best frequency. Because these distortions and dissociations of TFS/ENV disrupt tonotopicity, a fundamental principle of auditory processing necessary for robust signal coding in background noise, these results have important implications for understanding communication difficulties faced by people with hearing loss. Further, hearing aids may benefit from distinct amplification strategies for apical and basal cochlear regions to address fundamentally different coding deficits. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Speech-perception problems associated with noise overexposure are pervasive in today's society, even with modern digital hearing aids. Unfortunately, the underlying physiological deficits in

  4. Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Wealthall, Rosamund J; Brooker, Lesley R; Macey, David J; Griffin, Brendan J

    2005-08-01

    The major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata are composite structures composed of three distinct mineral zones: a posterior layer of magnetite; a thin band of lepidocrocite just anterior to this; and apatite throughout the core and anterior regions of the cusp. Biomineralization in these teeth is a matrix-mediated process, in which the minerals are deposited around fibers, with the different biominerals described as occupying architecturally discrete compartments. In this study, a range of scanning electron microscopes was utilized to undertake a detailed in situ investigation of the fine structure of the major lateral teeth. The arrangement of the organic and biomineral components of the tooth is similar throughout the three zones, having no discrete borders between them, and with crystallites of each mineral phase extending into the adjacent mineral zone. Along the posterior surface of the tooth, the organic fibers are arranged in a series of fine parallel lines, but just within the periphery their appearance takes on a "fish scale"-like pattern, reflective of the cross section of a series of units that are overlaid, and offset from each other, in adjacent rows. The units are approximately 2 microm wide and 0.6 microm thick and comprise biomineral plates separated by organic fibers. Two types of subunits make up each "fish scale": one is elongate and curved and forms a trough, in which the other, rod-like unit, is nestled. Adjacent rod and trough units are aligned into large sheets that define the fracture plane of the tooth. The alignment of the plates of rod-trough units is complex and exhibits extreme spatial variation within the tooth cusp. Close to the posterior surface the plates are essentially horizontal and lie in a lateromedial plane, while anteriorly they are almost vertical and lie in the posteroanterior plane. An understanding of the fine structure of the mineralized teeth of chitons, and of the relationship between the organic and

  5. Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Wealthall, Rosamund J; Brooker, Lesley R; Macey, David J; Griffin, Brendan J

    2005-08-01

    The major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata are composite structures composed of three distinct mineral zones: a posterior layer of magnetite; a thin band of lepidocrocite just anterior to this; and apatite throughout the core and anterior regions of the cusp. Biomineralization in these teeth is a matrix-mediated process, in which the minerals are deposited around fibers, with the different biominerals described as occupying architecturally discrete compartments. In this study, a range of scanning electron microscopes was utilized to undertake a detailed in situ investigation of the fine structure of the major lateral teeth. The arrangement of the organic and biomineral components of the tooth is similar throughout the three zones, having no discrete borders between them, and with crystallites of each mineral phase extending into the adjacent mineral zone. Along the posterior surface of the tooth, the organic fibers are arranged in a series of fine parallel lines, but just within the periphery their appearance takes on a "fish scale"-like pattern, reflective of the cross section of a series of units that are overlaid, and offset from each other, in adjacent rows. The units are approximately 2 microm wide and 0.6 microm thick and comprise biomineral plates separated by organic fibers. Two types of subunits make up each "fish scale": one is elongate and curved and forms a trough, in which the other, rod-like unit, is nestled. Adjacent rod and trough units are aligned into large sheets that define the fracture plane of the tooth. The alignment of the plates of rod-trough units is complex and exhibits extreme spatial variation within the tooth cusp. Close to the posterior surface the plates are essentially horizontal and lie in a lateromedial plane, while anteriorly they are almost vertical and lie in the posteroanterior plane. An understanding of the fine structure of the mineralized teeth of chitons, and of the relationship between the organic and

  6. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  7. Properties of the prominence magnetic field and plasma distributions as obtained from 3D whole-prominence fine structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We analyze distributions of the magnetic field strength and prominence plasma (temperature, pressure, plasma β, and mass) using the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. Methods: The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence, obtained from non-linear force-free field simulations, with a detailed semi-empirically derived description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Results: We show that in the modeled prominence, the variations of the magnetic field strength and its orientation are insignificant on scales comparable to the smallest dimensions of the observed prominence fine structures. We also show the ability of the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to reveal the distribution of the prominence plasma with respect to its temperature within the prominence volume. This provides new insights into the composition of the prominence-corona transition region. We further demonstrate that the values of the plasma β are small throughout the majority of the modeled prominences when realistic photospheric magnetic flux distributions and prominence plasma parameters are assumed. While this is generally true, we also find that in the region with the deepest magnetic dips, the plasma β may increase towards unity. Finally, we show that the mass of the modeled prominence plasma is in good agreement with the mass of observed non-eruptive prominences.

  8. Log spiral of revolution highly oriented pyrolytic graphite monochromator for fluorescence x-ray absorption edge fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, D. M.; Daniel, M.; Budnick, J. I.; Rhodes, T.; Hammes, M.; Potrepka, D. M.; Sills, K.; Nelson, C.; Heald, S. M.; Brewe, D. I.

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed an x-ray monochromator based on a log spiral of revolution covered with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Such a monochromator is used for obtaining x-ray absorption edge fine structure by the fluorescence method, and is particularly useful for measuring the fine structure of dilute element A in a concentrated matrix of element B, where B is to the left of A in the Periodic Table. Using the log spiral monochromator, we measure good Cr x-ray fine structure in an alloy of 1% Cr in a V matrix, whereas the corresponding spectrum is severely distorted by the V background if nonmonochromatized fluorescence is used. We also obtain excellent rejection of Mn fluorescence relative to Cr fluorescence in a Cr{sub 80}Mn{sub 20} alloy, and can tune the monochromator such that the entire Mn step height is significantly smaller than the Cr x-ray absorption edge fine structure oscillations for this system. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Element- and Site-Specific Oxidation State and Cation Distribution in Manganese Ferrite Films by Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,A.; Chen, Z.; Geiler, A.; Zuo, X.; Haskel, D.; Kravtsov, E.; Vittoria, C.; Harris, V.

    2008-01-01

    Epitaxial manganese ferrite thin films were studied by x-ray diffraction anomalous fine structure to obtain element-specific and site-specific information on site occupancy, local structure, and valency. These properties were introduced to molecular field theory to reproduce thermomagnetization curves and determine superexchange energy, Neel temperature, and spin canting angle.

  10. Discrimination of Speech Sounds Based upon Temporal Envelope versus Fine Structure Cues in 5- to 7-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncini, Josiane; Serniclaes, Willy; Lorenzi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the capacity of young children and adults with normal hearing to discriminate speech on the basis of either relatively slow (temporal envelope, E) or fast (temporal fine structure, TFS) auditory cues. Method: Vowel-consonant-vowel nonsense disyllables were processed to preserve either the E or the TFS information in 16…

  11. Propagation of whistler waves driven by fine structured ion beams in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burinskaya, T.; Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1994-01-01

    In a previous paper, which examined the propagation of low-frequency whistler waves generated by ion beams in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL), it was found that whistler waves driven in the PSBL are focused toward the central plasma sheet due to the global magnetotail inhomogeneities; this finding may help explain the observations of magnetic noise bursts in the tail (Burinskaya et al., 1993). In this paper the same phenomenon is examined, but this time a much more realistic model is used for the ion beam in the PSBL. While the PSBL has been modeled as a solid, homogeneous ion beams with a width of one Earth radius, observations and theoretical considerations have shown that PSBL ion beams actually have a decreasing velocity profile toward the plasma sheet and that the density of the beams within the PSBL can vary locally. We consider again the propagation and generation of electromagnetic waves but in the presence of fine structured ion beams in the PSBL. Our results show that whistler waves, generated quasi-parallel to the background magnetic field, can be trapped locally within small spatial regions where the ion beam density is enhanced compared to the density of the adjacent PSBL region. Wave spectra and nonlinear saturation mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  13. Titanium local structure in tektite probed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yoshiasa, Akira; Okube, Maki; Takeda, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    The local structure of titanium in tektites from six strewn fields was studied by Ti K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in order to provide quantitative data on Ti-O distance and Ti coordination number. The titanium in tektites possessed different coordination environment types. XANES spectra patterns revealed resemblance to high-temperature TiO(2)-SiO(2) glass and TiO(2) anatase. All samples showed that the valence of Ti is 4+. Based on the Ti-O distances, coordination numbers and radial distribution function determined by EXAFS analyses, the tektites were classified into three types: type I, Ti occupies a four-coordinated tetrahedral site with Ti-O distances of 1.84-1.79 Å; type II, Ti occupies a five-coordinated trigonal bipyramidal or tetragonal pyramidal site with Ti-O distances of 1.92-1.89 Å; type III, Ti occupies a six-coordinated octahedral site with Ti-O distances of 2.00-1.96 Å. Although Ti occupies the TiO(6) octahedral site in most titanium minerals under ambient conditions, some tektites have four- and five-coordinated Ti. This study indicated that the local structure of Ti might change in impact events and the following stages.

  14. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  15. Plasma Resonance Surfaces in the Magnetic Field Reconnection and Radio Fine Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2003-02-01

    Using a 2-D MHD model, the magnetic field reconnection in the current sheet and corresponding plasma resonance lines (surfaces in 3-D), where the upper-hybrid frequency equals one of harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency, ωUH=(ωpe2+ωBe2)1/2=sωBe (ωUH, ωpe, and ωBe are the upper hybrid, electron plasma, and cyclotron frequencies, respectively, and s is the integer harmonic number) are computed. Then at selected times and positions in the magnetic reconnection the spatial and time spectra of upper hybrid frequencies along the resonance lines are calculated. These spectra are discussed from the point of view of radio fine structures as narrowband dm-spikes, zebras, and lace bursts. It is shown that not only turbulent plasma outflows, suggested in the paper by Bárta and Karlický (2001), but also perturbed zones near the reconnection slow-mode shocks can be locations of the narrowband dm-spikes (and/or continua). Sources of the lace bursts (i.e. bursts with irregular lines) can be located in the reconnection space, too. On the other hand, the zebras (bursts with regular separations of zebra lines) need to be generated out of strongly perturbed reconnection areas.

  16. Fine-structure collision strengths and line ratios for [Ne V] in infrared and optical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, Michael; Palay, Ethan; Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2013-10-01

    New collisions' strengths for the mid-infrared (mid-IR) and optical transitions in Ne V are presented. Breit-Pauli-R-Matrix calculations for electron impact excitation are carried out with fully resolved near-threshold resonances at very low energies. In particular, the fine-structure lines at 14 and 24 μm due to transitions among the ground state levels 1s22s22p3 3P0, 1, 2, and the optical/near-ultraviolet lines at 2973, 3346 and 3426 Å transitions among the 3P0, 1, 2, 1D2, 1S0 levels are described. Maxwellian-averaged collision strengths are tabulated for all forbidden transitions within the ground configuration. While some significant differences are found for both the far infrared and the optical transitions compared to previous results, computed line emissivity ratios are in good agreement, but change rapidly in the low temperature range Te < 10 000 K. An analysis of the 14/24 μm ratio in low-energy-density (LED) plasma conditions reveals considerable variation; the effective rate coefficient may be dominated by the very low energy behaviour rather than the Maxwellian-averaged collision strengths. Computed values suggest a possible solution to the anomalous mid-IR ratios found to be lower than theoretical limits observed from planetary nebulae and Seyfert galaxies. While such LED conditions may be present in infrared sources, they might be inconsistent with photoionization equilibrium models.

  17. FINE STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF INTERPHASE NUCLEI OF LYMPHOCYTES STIMULATED TO GROWTH ACTIVITY IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyasu, K.; Madden, S. C.; Zeldis, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes fine structural changes of interphase nuclei of human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated to growth by short-term culture with phytohemagglutinin. Chromatin is found highly labile, its changes accompanying the sequential increases of RNA and DNA synthesis which are known to occur in lymphocyte cultures. In "resting" lymphocytes, abundant condensed chromatin appears as a network of large and small aggregates. Early in the response to phytohemagglutinin, small aggregates disappear during increase of diffuse chromatin regions. Small aggregates soon reappear, probably resulting from disaggregation of large masses of condensed chromatin. Loosened and highly dispersed forms then appear prior to the formation of prophase chromosomes. The loosened state is found by radioautography to be most active in DNA synthesis. Small nucleoli of resting lymphocytes have concentric agranular, fibrillar, and granular zones with small amounts of intranucleolar chromatin. Enlarging interphase nucleoli change chiefly (1) by increase in amount of intranucleolar chromatin and alteration of its state of aggregation and (2) by increase in granular components in close association with fibrillar components. PMID:5699935

  18. Fine structure of the landers fault zone: Segmentation and the rupture process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.-G.; Vidale, J.E.; Aki, K.; Marone, C.J.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1994-01-01

    Observations and modeling of 3- to 6-hertz seismic shear waves trapped within the fault zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake series allow the fine structure and continuity of the zone to be evaluated. The fault, to a depth of at least 12 kilometers, is marked by a zone 100 to 200 meters wide where shear velocity is reduced by 30 to 50 percent. This zone forms a seismic waveguide that extends along the southern 30 kilometers of the Landers rupture surface and ends at the fault bend about 18 kilometers north of the main shock epicenter. Another fault plane waveguide, disconnected from the first, exists along the northern rupture surface. These observations, in conjunction with surface slip, detailed seismicity patterns, and the progression of rupture along the fault, suggest that several simple rupture planes were involved in the Landers earthquake and that the inferred rupture front hesitated or slowed at the location where the rupture jumped from one to the next plane. Reduction in rupture velocity can tentatively be attributed to fault plane complexity, and variations in moment release can be attributed to variations in available energy.

  19. Electronic fine structure in the nickel carbide superconductor Th2NiC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Y.; Pickett, W. E.

    2013-07-01

    The recently reported nickel carbide superconductor body centered tetragonal I4/mmm Th2NiC2 with Tc=8.5 K increasing to 11.2 K upon alloying Th with Sc is found to have very fine structure in its electronic spectrum, according to density functional based first-principles calculations. The filled Ni 3d band complex is hybridized with C 2p and Th character to and through the Fermi level (EF), and a sharply structured density of states arises only when spin-orbit coupling is included, which splits a zone-center degeneracy, leaving a very flat band edge lying at the Fermi level. The flat part of the band corresponds to an effective mass mz*→∞ with large and negative mx*=my*. Although the region over which the effective mass characterization applies is less than 1% of the zone volume, it supplies on the order of half the states at (or just above) the Fermi level. The observed increase of Tc by hole doping is accounted for if the reference as-synthesized sample is minutely hole doped, which decreases the Fermi level density of states and will provide some stabilization. In this scenario, electron doping will increase the Fermi level density of states and the superconducting critical temperature. Vibrational properties are presented, and enough coupling to the C-Ni-C stretch mode at 70 meV is obtained to imply that superconductivity is electron-phonon mediated.

  20. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. PMID:27604778

  1. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  2. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-09-13

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  3. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  4. All-Optical dc Nanotesla Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancy Fine Structure in Isotopically Purified Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simin, D.; Soltamov, V. A.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Anisimov, A. N.; Babunts, R. A.; Tolmachev, D. O.; Mokhov, E. N.; Trupke, M.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Sperlich, A.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    We uncover the fine structure of a silicon vacancy in isotopically purified silicon carbide (4H-28SiC) and reveal not yet considered terms in the spin Hamiltonian, originated from the trigonal pyramidal symmetry of this spin-3 /2 color center. These terms give rise to additional spin transitions, which would be otherwise forbidden, and lead to a level anticrossing in an external magnetic field. We observe a sharp variation of the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of this level anticrossing, which can be used for a purely all-optical sensing of the magnetic field. We achieve dc magnetic field sensitivity better than 100 nT /√{Hz } within a volume of 3 ×10-7m m3 at room temperature and demonstrate that this contactless method is robust at high temperatures up to at least 500 K. As our approach does not require application of radio-frequency fields, it is scalable to much larger volumes. For an optimized light-trapping waveguide of 3 mm3 , the projection noise limit is below 100 fT /√{Hz } .

  5. Fine structure of the landers fault zone: segmentation and the rupture process.

    PubMed

    Li, Y G; Aki, K; Vidale, J E; Lee, W H; Marone, C J

    1994-07-15

    Observations and modeling of 3- to 6-hertz seismic shear waves trapped within the fault zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake series allow the fine structure and continuity of the zone to be evaluated. The fault, to a depth of at least 12 kilometers, is marked by a zone 100 to 200 meters wide where shear velocity is reduced by 30 to 50 percent. This zone forms a seismic waveguide that extends along the southern 30 kilometers of the Landers rupture surface and ends at the fault bend about 18 kilometers north of the main shock epicenter. Another fault plane waveguide, disconnected from the first, exists along the northern rupture surface. These observations, in conjunction with surface slip, detailed seismicity patterns, and the progression of rupture along the fault, suggest that several simple rupture planes were involved in the Landers earthquake and that the inferred rupture front hesitated or slowed at the location where the rupture jumped from one to the next plane. Reduction in rupture velocity can tentatively be attributed to fault plane complexity, and variations in moment release can be attributed to variations in available energy.

  6. Measurements of photon interference X-ray absorption fine structure (piXAFS).

    PubMed

    Tröger, L; Kappen, P; Nishino, Y; Haack, N; Materlik, G

    2001-03-01

    Experimental data are presented which demonstrate the existence of a fine structure in extended X-ray absorption spectra due to interference effects in the initial photon state (piXAFS). Interference occurs between the incident electromagnetic wave and its coherently scattered waves from neighboring atoms. Using fine platinum and tungsten powders as well as polycrystalline platinum foil, piXAFS was measured in high-precision absorption experiments at beamline X1 at HASYLAB/DESY over a wide energy range. piXAFS is observed below and above absorption-edge positions in both transmission and total-electron-yield detection. Based on experimental data it is shown that piXAFS is sensitive to geometric atomic structure. Fourier-transformed piXAFS data carry information, comparable with that of EXAFS, about the short-range-order structure of the sample. Sharp structures occur in piXAFS when a Bragg backscattering condition of the incident X-rays is fulfilled. They allow precise measurement of long-range-order structural information. Measured data are compared with simulations based on piXAFS theory. Although piXAFS structures are similarly observed in two detection techniques, the importance of scattering off the sample for the measurements needs to be investigated further. Disentangling piXAFS, multielectron photoexcitations and atomic XAFS in high-precision measurements close to absorption edges poses a challenge for future studies.

  7. Fine Structure ENA Sources Beyond the Termination Shock: Observational Constraints and Detection Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demajistre, R.; Janzen, P. H.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    High spatial resolution maps from the IBEX mission (McComas et al, Science, 2009) suggest the presence of "fine structure" in the signal from beyond the termination shock. That is, areas of enhanced ENA emission that span less than a degree in the IBEX sky map. If confirmed, this would suggest very concentrated areas of emission from sources with scales of a few AU embedded in the outer heliosphere (or proportionally larger if they are located beyond the heliopause). This, in turn, would require the presence of unanticipated structures (plasma or neutral) beyond the termination shock for which the physics is poorly defined. It is therefore crucial to confirm the presence of these structures through careful analysis, or to establish the detection limits if the data taken to date is not sufficient for such a confirmation. In this work, we use 5 years worth of IBEX data to examine the statistical significance of these enhancements. We examine correlations in time, ENA energy and coincidence type for evidence of these small-scale spatial structures. Then, using the known spatial response of the IBEX instrument, establish the conditions under which such structure, if present, would be detectable. This detection threshold analysis is fully applicable future measurements, such as those planned for IMAP.

  8. DISCOVERY OF FINELY STRUCTURED DYNAMIC SOLAR CORONA OBSERVED IN THE Hi-C TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Savage, Sabrina; Alexander, Caroline; Golub, Leon; DeLuca, Edward; Schuler, Timothy

    2014-05-20

    In the Summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew on board a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e., have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70% of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  9. The fine structure of the ocelli of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Insausti, T C; Lazzari, C R

    2002-12-01

    The morphology and fine structure of the ocelli of Triatoma infestans have been analyzed by means of light and electron microscopy. The two dorsal ocelli of this species are located behind the compound eyes, looking dorsally and frontally. Externally, the ocelli are marked by the corneal lenses virtually spherical in form and limited internally by a cuticular apodeme. The lens focuses the incoming rays beyond the retina. A single layer of corneagen cells lies below the cuticular lens. The corneagen cells and photoreceptors are arranged in a cup-like fashion beneath the cuticular lens. A distal retinal zone comprises the rhabdoms, which are laterally connected in an hexagonal meshwork. A middle retinal zone comprises the receptor cell segment free of rhabdom, and a proximal zone their axons. In the middle zone, the oviform nuclei and spheroids are located. Screening pigment granules are present within the retinal cell. Spherical mitochondria are homogeneously distributed in the cytoplasm of the cell body. In the axonal zone, mitochondria are found in the peripheral region. Axons from receptor cells extend into the ocellar neuropile at the base of the ocelli, to synapse with second order neurons. The large axons of second order neurons are bundled by glial cells. The ocellar plexus exhibits a high diversity of synaptic unions (i.e. axo-dendritic, axo-axonic, dendro-axonic, and dendro-dendritic).

  10. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  11. Fine structural analysis of the neuronal inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Julian R; Tang, Helen; Atherton, Joe; Cairns, Nigel J

    2008-12-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is a major component of the pathological inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy, also called FTLD with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions (FTLD-U), and motor neuron disease (MND). TDP-43 is predominantly expressed in the nucleus and regulates gene expression and splicing. In FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, neuronal inclusions present variably as cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), dystrophic neurites (DNs), and intranuclear inclusions (NIIs), leading to a fourfold neuropathological classification correlating with genotype. There have been few fine structural studies of these inclusions. Thus, we undertook an immunoelectron microscopic study of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, including sporadic and familial cases with progranulin (GRN) mutation. TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions comprised two components: granular and filamentous. Filament widths, expressed as mean (range) were: NCI, 9 nm (4-16 nm); DN, 10 nm (5-16 nm); NII, 18 nm (9-50 nm). Morphologically distinct inclusion components may reflect the process of TDP-43 aggregation and interaction with other proteins: determining these latter may contribute towards understanding the heterogeneous pathogenesis of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:18974920

  12. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. PMID:27604778

  13. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  14. Excitonic fine structure and binding energies of excitonic complexes in single InAs quantum dashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrowiński, P.; Zieliński, M.; Świderski, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Somers, A.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Höfling, S.; Sek, G.

    2016-09-01

    The fundamental electronic and optical properties of elongated InAs nanostructures embedded in quaternary InGaAlAs barrier are investigated by means of high-resolution optical spectroscopy and many-body atomistic tight-binding theory. These wire-like shaped, self-assembled nanostructures are known as quantum dashes and are typically formed during the molecular beam epitaxial growth on InP substrates. In this paper, we study properties of excitonic complexes confined in quantum dashes emitting in a broad spectral range from below 1.2 to 1.55 μm. We find peculiar trends for the biexciton and negative trion binding energies, with pronounced trion binding in smaller size quantum dashes. These experimental findings are then compared and qualitatively explained by atomistic theory. The theoretical analysis shows a fundamental role of correlation effects for the absolute values of excitonic binding energies. Eventually, we determine the bright exciton fine structure splitting (FSS), where both the experiment and theory predict a broad distribution of the splitting varying from below 50 to almost 180 μeV. We identify several key factors determining the FSS values in such nanostructures, including quantum dash size variation and composition fluctuations.

  15. Fine Structure of the Cone of Heterodera schachtii with Emphasis on Musculature and Fenestration

    PubMed Central

    Cordero C., D. A.; Baldwin, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    Fine structure of the posterior cone of monoxenically cultured Heterodera schachtii is examined. The cone is not evident at the end of the fourth molt, but as the female matures the cone elongates, vulval lips enlarge, and cuticular patterns on the lips are modified. Body wall cuticle (BW) of the cone includes layers A and B, but C is modified or replaced by a network of fibers which correspond to the semifenestrae. Vaginal lining is continuous with the BW and terminates at the cuticular underbridge near the uterus. Vaginal musculature includes 48 dilatores vaginae (DV) as well as a sphincter vaginae (SV). The DV include a contractile and noncontractile region with abundant actin and glycogen. A distinct anal depressor muscle is present. In the cyst, only bullae, the underbridge, vagina lining, and traces of the SV muscle persist. Detailed morphology of the cone of H. schachtii provides insight into characters which, when compared with other heteroderines, will be useful in phylogenetic analysis of Heteroderinae. PMID:19283101

  16. Neutron induced damage in reactor pressure vessel steel: An X-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Cammelli, S.; Degueldre, C.; Bertsch, J.; Gavillet, D.

    2009-03-01

    The radiation damage produced in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels during neutron irradiation is a long-standing problem of considerable practical interest. In this study, an extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been applied at Cu, Ni and Mn K-edges to systematically investigate neutron induced radiation damage to the metal-site bcc structure of RPV steels, irradiated with neutrons in the fluence range from 0.85 to 5.0 × 1019 cm-2. An overall similarity of Cu, Ni and Mn atomic environment in the iron matrix is observed. The radial distribution functions (RDFs), derived from EXAFS data have been found to evolve continuously as a function of neutron fluence describing the atomic-scale structural modifications in RPVs by neutron irradiations. From the pristine data, long range order beyond the first- and second-shell is apparent in the RDF spectra. In the irradiated specimens, all near-neighbour peaks are greatly reduced in magnitude, typical of damaged material. Prolonged annealing leads annihilation of point defects to give rise to an increase in the coordination numbers of near-neighbour atomic shells approaching values close to that of non-irradiated material, but does not suppress the formation of nano-sized Cu and/or Ni-rich-precipitates. Total amount of radiation damage under a given irradiation condition has been determined. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data are presented and discussed.

  17. Fine structure of low-energy H(+) in the nightside auroral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chao; Perez, J. D.; Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Low-energy H(+) data with 6-s resolution from the retarding ion mass spectrometer instrument on Dynamics Explorer (DE) 1 have been analyzed to reveal the fine structure at middle altitudes of the nightside auroral region. A new method for deconvolving the energy-integrated count rate in the spin plane of the satellite has been used to derive the two-dimensional phase space density. A detailed analysis reveals an alternating conic-beam-conic pattern with the observed conics correlated with large earthward currents in the auroral region. The strong downward current (larger than 1 microamperes per sq m (equivalent value at ionosphere)) provides a free energy source for the perpendicular ion heating, that generates the ion conics with energies from several eV to tens of eV. The bowl shape distribution of the low-energy H(+) is caused by the extended perpendicular heating. The strong correlation between conics and large downward currents suggests that the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave is an appropriate candidate for the transverse heating mechanism.

  18. Fine structure and immunocytochemistry of a new chemosensory system in the Chiton larva (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Haszprunar, Gerhard; Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard

    2002-02-01

    Combined electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of the larvae of several polyplacophoran species (Chiton olivaceus, Lepidochitona aff. corrugata, Mopalia muscosa) revealed a sensory system new to science, a so-called "ampullary system." The cells of the "ampullary system" are arranged in four symmetrically situated pairs lying dorsolaterally and ventrolaterally in the pretrochal part of the trochophore-like larva and they send axons into the cerebral commissure. They are lost at metamorphosis. The fine structure of these cells strongly resembles that of so-called "ampullary cells" known from various sensory organs of other molluscs, such as the apical complex of gastropod and bivalve larvae, osphradia of vetigastropods, and olfactory organs of cephalopods, and nuchal organs of certain polychaetes. The ampullary cells and their nerves are densely stained by anti-FMRF-amide fluorescence dyes, whereas antiserotonin staining is only weak. While cytological homology of the ampullary cells with those of other organs is probable, the ampullary system as a whole is regarded as a synapomorphy of the Polyplacophora or Chitonida.

  19. Plant growth in elevated CO2 alters mitochondrial number and chloroplast fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Kevin L.; Anderson, O. Roger; Gastrich, Mary D.; Lewis, James D.; Lin, Guanghui; Schuster, William; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Tissue, David T.; Turnbull, Matthew H.; Whitehead, David

    2001-01-01

    With increasing interest in the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on plant growth and the global carbon balance, there is a need for greater understanding of how plants respond to variations in atmospheric partial pressure of CO2. Our research shows that elevated CO2 produces significant fine structural changes in major cellular organelles that appear to be an important component of the metabolic responses of plants to this global change. Nine species (representing seven plant families) in several experimental facilities with different CO2-dosing technologies were examined. Growth in elevated CO2 increased numbers of mitochondria per unit cell area by 1.3–2.4 times the number in control plants grown in lower CO2 and produced a statistically significant increase in the amount of chloroplast stroma (nonappressed) thylakoid membranes compared with those in lower CO2 treatments. There was no observable change in size of the mitochondria. However, in contrast to the CO2 effect on mitochondrial number, elevated CO2 promoted a decrease in the rate of mass-based dark respiration. These changes may reflect a major shift in plant metabolism and energy balance that may help to explain enhanced plant productivity in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:11226263

  20. He i Vector Magnetic Field Maps of a Sunspot and Its Superpenumbral Fine-Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He i triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions because superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization, while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated, but also exhibit signatures that might be induced by symmetry-breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere and furthermore show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear to be finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests that fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux, but are instead distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also directly compare our inverted values with a current-free extrapolation of the chromospheric field. With improved measurements in the future, the average shear angle between the inferred magnetic field and the potential field may offer a means to quantify the non-potentiality of the chromospheric magnetic field to study the onset of explosive solar phenomena.

  1. Relative contribution of target and masker temporal fine structure to the unmasking of consonants in noise

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Healy, Eric W.

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed the relative contribution of the “target” and “masker” temporal fine structure (TFS) when identifying consonants. Accordingly, the TFS of the target and that of the masker were manipulated simultaneously or independently. A 30 band vocoder was used to replace the original TFS of the stimuli with tones. Four masker types were used. They included a speech-shaped noise, a speech-shaped noise modulated by a speech envelope, a sentence, or a sentence played backward. When the TFS of the target and that of the masker were disrupted simultaneously, consonant recognition dropped significantly compared to the unprocessed condition for all masker types, except the speech-shaped noise. Disruption of only the target TFS led to a significant drop in performance with all masker types. In contrast, disruption of only the masker TFS had no effect on recognition. Overall, the present data are consistent with previous work showing that TFS information plays a significant role in speech recognition in noise, especially when the noise fluctuates over time. However, the present study indicates that listeners rely primarily on TFS information in the target and that the nature of the masker TFS has a very limited influence on the outcome of the unmasking process. PMID:22225058

  2. Small scale flux emergence, small flares, and the unresolved fine structure: modeling and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraldson Hansteen, Viggo H.

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of flux through the photosphere and into the outer solar atmosphere is known to produce dynamic events in the chromosphere and corona. In this talk we will describe three-dimensional (3d) magnetohydrodynamic simulations of magnetic flux emergence in a model that spans the convection zone and into the outer solar atmosphere with the Bifrost code. We will contrast this with models in which no flux emergence occurs. These are a ``realistic'' model, in the sense that the parameters and physical effects that control the atmosphere can be used to produce diagnostics that can be directly compared with observations. Thus we will also contrast the model predictions with with SST and IRIS observations of an emerging flux region. We discuss the evolution of the model and several synthetic observables. We discuss the model's possible relevance to the so called 'unresolved fine structure' observed in the solar transition region. Finally, we will report on developments to merge `deeper' models constructed from MURaM simulations with Bifrost models of the chromosphere and corona in flare relevant simulations.

  3. Properties and Modeling of Unresolved Fine Structure Loops Observed in the Solar Transition Region by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Reep, Jeffrey W.; Warren, Harry P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have discovered a new class of numerous low-lying dynamic loop structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFSs) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. In this letter, we combine IRIS measurements of the properties of a sample of 108 UFSs (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) with one-dimensional non-equilibrium ionization simulations, using the HYDRAD hydrodynamic model to examine whether the UFSs are now truly spatially resolved in the sense of being individual structures rather than being composed of multiple magnetic threads. We find that a simulation of an impulsively heated single strand can reproduce most of the observed properties, suggesting that the UFSs may be resolved, and the distribution of UFS widths implies that they are structured on a spatial scale of 133 km on average. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, and we conjecture that this could be an important clue for understanding the coronal heating process.

  4. Fine structure and functional comments of mouthparts in Platypus cylindrus (Col., Curculionidae: Platypodinae).

    PubMed

    Belhoucine, Latifa; Bouhraoua, Rachid T; Prats, Eva; Pulade-Villar, Juli

    2013-02-01

    Oak pinhole borer, Platypus cylindrus is seen in recent years as one of the biggest enemies directly involved in the observed decline of cork oak in Mediterranean forests with all the economic implications. As an ambrosia beetle, it has developed its effective drilling mouthpart enough to make tunnels in hardwood of the tree. The fine structural aspects of the mouthpart using the field emission scanning electron microscopy are analyzed about 23 adults collected in galleries of infested cork oak trees (Quercus suber) in a littoral forest of northwest Algeria. These adults are preserved in alcohol 70%, cleaned and coated with gold. The mouthparts of this beetle consist commonly of a labrum, a pair of mandibles, a pair of maxillae and the labium but with adapted structure to excavate galleries in the hardwood. In this role is also involved the first pair of legs. The function that present the different structures related to the construction of the tunnels is discussed. Both of maxillary and labial palpi direct the food to the mouth and hold it while the mandibles chew the food. The distal ends of these palpi are flattened and have shovel-like setae. Females have larger maxillary palpi than males and this is related to the particular biology of each sex. PMID:23182681

  5. Uniform Catalytic Site in Sn-beta Zeolite Determined using X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bare,S.; Kelly, S.; Sinkler, W.; Low, J.; Modica, F.; Valencia, S.; Corma, A.; Nemeth, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Sn silicate zeolite, Sn-{beta}, has been shown to be an efficient, selective heterogeneous catalyst for Baeyer-Villiger oxidations. Using primarily a multishell fit to extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, we show that the Sn does not randomly insert into the {beta}-zeolite structure but rather occupies identical, specific, crystallographic sites. These sites are the T5/T6 sites in the six-membered rings. Moreover, the Sn is substituted in pairs on opposite sides of these six-membered rings. We believe that it is the specific, uniform crystallographic location of the Sn in the crystal structure that leads to sites with uniform catalytic activity, and consequently to the high chemical selectivity demonstrated for this catalyst. This manifests itself in the almost enzyme-like selectivity of this catalyst in Baeyer-Villiger oxidations. This uniform site distribution of the Sn suggests that there is likely a symbiotic relationship between the structure-directing agent in the zeolite synthesis and the Sn heteroatoms during the framework formation.

  6. Fine-structure energy levels and autoionizing width calculations of magnesium-like Ni XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Gao, Wenjing; Zhou, Chao; Zhang, Ling

    2013-05-01

    We have calculated highly excited fine-structure energy levels and their autoionizing width of 3 pns 3 P 1 ( n = 11-26), 3 pns 1 P 1 ( n = 10-22), 3 pnd 3 D 1 ( n = 11-26), 3 pnd 3 P 1 ( n = 10-21), 3 pnd 1 P 1( n = 10-21), 3 dnp 3 D 1 ( n = 7-30), 3 dnp 3 P 1 ( n = 7-28), 3 dnp 1 P 1 ( n = 7-28), 3 dnf 3 D 1 ( n = 7, 9-27), 3 dnf 3 P 1 ( n = 7, 9-27), and 3 dnf 1 P 1 ( n = 7, 9-27) for magnesium-like Ni XVII. The calculations are based upon the relativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix approximation combining with the QB method of Quigley-Berrington (L. Quigley, K. A. Berrington, Pelan J. Comput. Phys. Commun. 114, 225 (1998)). We have reported the many unpublished energy values and autoionizing width of the J = 1 odd states of magnesium-like Ni XVII.

  7. Dual-carrier processing to convey temporal fine structure cues: Implications for cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Youngdahl, Carla L.; Yoho, Sarah E.; Healy, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    Speech intelligibility in noise can be degraded by using vocoder processing to alter the temporal fine structure (TFS). Here it is argued that this degradation is not attributable to the loss of speech information potentially present in the TFS. Instead it is proposed that the degradation results from the loss of sound-source segregation information when two or more carriers (i.e., TFS) are substituted with only one as a consequence of vocoder processing. To demonstrate this segregation role, vocoder processing involving two carriers, one for the target and one for the background, was implemented. Because this approach does not preserve the speech TFS, it may be assumed that any improvement in intelligibility can only be a consequence of the preserved carrier duality and associated segregation cues. Three experiments were conducted using this “dual-carrier” approach. All experiments showed substantial sentence intelligibility in noise improvements compared to traditional single-carrier conditions. In several conditions, the improvement was so substantial that intelligibility approximated that for unprocessed speech in noise. A foreseeable and potentially promising implication for the dual-carrier approach involves implementation into cochlear implant speech processors, where it may provide the TFS cues necessary to segregate speech from noise. PMID:26428784

  8. Influence of dense quantum plasmas on fine-structure splitting of Lyman doublets of hydrogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    De, Madhab Ray, Debasis

    2015-05-15

    Relativistic calculations are performed to study the effects of oscillatory quantum plasma screening on the fine-structure splitting between the components of Lyman-α and β line doublets of atomic hydrogen and hydrgen-like argon ion within dense quantum plasmas, where the effective two-body (electron–nucleus) interaction is modeled by the Shukla–Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential. The numerical solutions of the radial Dirac equation for the quantum plasma-embedded atomic systems reveal that the oscillatory quantum screening effect suppresses the doublet (energy) splitting substantially and the suppression becomes more prominent at large quantum wave number k{sub q}. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, much larger amount of suppression is noticed at larger values of k{sub q}, and the corresponding results represent the screening effect of an exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction. The Z{sup 4} scaling of the Lyman doublet splitting in low-Z hydrogen isoelectronic series of ions in free space is violated in dense quantum plasma environments. The relativistic data for the doublet splitting in the zero screening (k{sub q} = 0) case are in very good agreement with the NIST reference data, with slight discrepancies (∼0.2%) arising from the neglect of the quantum electrodynamic effects.

  9. Fine structure of vesiculated nerve profiles in the human lumbar facet joint.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, F; Creemers, J; Lambrichts, I; Robberechts, W

    1995-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of vesiculated nerve profiles were examined within a perivascular plexus of unmyelinated nerve fibres around small arteries and arterioles in the posterior facet joint capsule. Such profiles were exclusively observed in the dense fibrous layer and the adjacent part of the subintimal layer. The ligamentum flavum lacked any type of innervation. The vesiculated nerve profiles were tentatively classified on the basis of the fine structural appearances of their vesicular content. Two major types of nerve profiles could readily be distinguished in the capsular tissue. Both displayed a variable number of mitochondria, neurotubules and neurofilaments. The first type, containing predominantly small vesicles with an electron-dense granule or core, was frequently encountered and considered to be adrenergic in function. Profiles similar in morphology were also observed in the synovial plical tissue. A second type of profile, found in the joint capsule, contained varying proportions of small agranular (clear) vesicles and mitochondria. Some of these profiles exhibited an accumulation of mitochondria and were considered to be sensory in function. Nerve profiles filled with predominantly small flattened vesicles were occasionally encountered. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8586567

  10. Sensitivity of bilateral cochlear implant users to fine-structure and envelope interaural time differencesa

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Victor A.; Eddington, Donald K.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant users have poor sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of high-rate pulse trains, which precludes use of these stimuli to convey fine-structure ITD cues. However, previous reports of single-neuron recordings in cats demonstrated good ITD sensitivity to 1000 pulses-per-second (pps) pulses when the pulses were sinusoidally amplitude modulated. The ability of modulation to restore ITD sensitivity to high-rate pulses in humans was tested by measuring ITD thresholds for three conditions: ITD encoded in the modulated carrier pulses alone, in the envelope alone, and in the whole waveform. Five of six subjects were not sensitive to ITD in the 1000-pps carrier, even with modulation. One subject's 1000-pps carrier ITD sensitivity did significantly improve due to modulation. Sensitivity to ITD encoded in the envelope was also measured as a function of modulation frequency, including at frequencies from 4 to 16 Hz where much of the speech envelope's energy and information resides. Sensitivity was best at the modulation frequency of 100 Hz and degraded rapidly outside of a narrow range. These results provide little evidence to support encoding ITD in the carrier of current bilateral processors, and suggest envelope ITD sensitivity is poor for an important segment of the speech modulation spectrum. PMID:23556598

  11. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Analysis of Novel High Laser Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemantha, Aranwela; Marasinghe, G. K.; Segre, Carlo; Brow, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Rare earth-doped phosphate glasses are useful for a variety of optical and optoelectronic applications including high energy/high power (~ 1015 watt) Lasers. Binary (R2 O3)x (P2 O5)1-x glasses can be prepared in the compositional range 0 <= x <= ~ 0.30 . Atomic-scale structure, especially the coordination environment of R3+ ions, play a major role in determining optical/physical characteristics. We have investigated the R3+ local environment of Praseodymium and Neodymium ultraphosphate and meta phosphate(REMP) glasses using extended X-ray absorption fine structure technique. For both Nd and Pr phosphate glasses, nearest neighbor (oxygen) coordination decreases with increasing RE concentration. For the first oxygen shell the RE-O distance ranges between 2.38-2.40 Å and 2.39-2.46 Å for Nd and Pr respectively. The second co-ordination shell around the RE ions consists of phosphorus ions, with RE-P distance about 3.4-3.5 Å and co-ordination numbers ranging from 1.5 to 3. There exists an Oxygen shell (third shell) about 4.1 Å from RE ion for both Nd and Pr phosphate glasses. Support was provided by the NSF (UND) and DoE (Argonne Natl. Lab).

  12. Fine structure of the entanglement entropy in the O(2) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yuzhi; Zou, Haiyuan; Xie, Z. Y.; Meurice, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We compare two calculations of the particle density in the superfluid phase of the O(2) model with a chemical potential μ in 1+1 dimensions. The first relies on exact blocking formulas from the Tensor Renormalization Group (TRG) formulation of the transfer matrix. The second is a worm algorithm. We show that the particle number distributions obtained with the two methods agree well. We use the TRG method to calculate the thermal entropy and the entanglement entropy. We describe the particle density, the two entropies and the topology of the world lines as we increase μ to go across the superfluid phase between the first two Mott insulating phases. For a sufficiently large temporal size, this process reveals an interesting fine structure: the average particle number and the winding number of most of the world lines in the Euclidean time direction increase by one unit at a time. At each step, the thermal entropy develops a peak and the entanglement entropy increases until we reach half-filling and then decreases in a way that approximately mirrors the ascent. This suggests an approximate fermionic picture.

  13. Fine structure of the retinal pigment epithelium of the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Braekevelt, C R; Thorlakson, I J

    1993-01-01

    The fine structure of the retinal epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaries and Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) has been studied by light and electron microscopy in the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus). The RPE consists of a single layer of cuboidal cells joined laterally in the mid to basal region by a series of tight junctions forming part of the blood-ocular barrier. Basally (sclerally) the epithelial cells show numerous deep infoldings while apically (vitreally) a wealth of microvillar processes interdigitate with the photoreceptor cells. Internally the RPE cells display a large vesicular nucleus, plentiful smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and polysomes with only small scattered profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). Numerous pleomorphic mitochondria are basally located. In the light-adapted state the melanosomes are located almost exclusively within the apical processes indicating retinomotor movements. Myeloid bodies are numerous and often show ribosomes on their outer surface. Bruch's membrane is typical of avian species in that it is pentalaminate and the lamina densa is displaced towards the choriocapillaris. The choriocapillaris itself is but minimally fenestrated facing Bruch's membrane. Most fenestrations present show a single layered diaphragm while others display a double-layered diaphragm. PMID:8443429

  14. The Effects of Instrumental Elliptical Polarization on Stellar Point Spread Function Fine Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Joseph C.; Kern, Brian D.; Breckinridge, James B.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    We present procedures and preliminary results from a study on the effects of instrumental polarization on the fine structure of the stellar point spread function (PSF). These effects are important to understand because the the aberration caused by instrumental polarization on an otherwise diffraction-limited will likely have have severe consequences for extreme high contrast imaging systems such as NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission and the proposed NASA Eclipse mission. The report here, describing our efforts to examine these effects, includes two parts: 1) a numerical analysis of the effect of metallic reflection, with some polarization-specific retardation, on a spherical wavefront; 2) an experimental approach for observing this effect, along with some preliminary laboratory results. While the experimental phase of this study requires more fine-tuning to produce meaningful results, the numerical analysis indicates that the inclusion of polarization-specific phase effects (retardation) results in a point spread function (PSF) aberration more severe than the amplitude (reflectivity) effects previously recorded in the literature.

  15. Influence of dense quantum plasmas on fine-structure splitting of Lyman doublets of hydrogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Madhab; Ray, Debasis

    2015-05-01

    Relativistic calculations are performed to study the effects of oscillatory quantum plasma screening on the fine-structure splitting between the components of Lyman-α and β line doublets of atomic hydrogen and hydrgen-like argon ion within dense quantum plasmas, where the effective two-body (electron-nucleus) interaction is modeled by the Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential. The numerical solutions of the radial Dirac equation for the quantum plasma-embedded atomic systems reveal that the oscillatory quantum screening effect suppresses the doublet (energy) splitting substantially and the suppression becomes more prominent at large quantum wave number kq. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, much larger amount of suppression is noticed at larger values of kq, and the corresponding results represent the screening effect of an exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction. The Z4 scaling of the Lyman doublet splitting in low-Z hydrogen isoelectronic series of ions in free space is violated in dense quantum plasma environments. The relativistic data for the doublet splitting in the zero screening (kq = 0) case are in very good agreement with the NIST reference data, with slight discrepancies (˜0.2%) arising from the neglect of the quantum electrodynamic effects.

  16. Titanium local structure in tektite probed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yoshiasa, Akira; Okube, Maki; Takeda, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    The local structure of titanium in tektites from six strewn fields was studied by Ti K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in order to provide quantitative data on Ti-O distance and Ti coordination number. The titanium in tektites possessed different coordination environment types. XANES spectra patterns revealed resemblance to high-temperature TiO(2)-SiO(2) glass and TiO(2) anatase. All samples showed that the valence of Ti is 4+. Based on the Ti-O distances, coordination numbers and radial distribution function determined by EXAFS analyses, the tektites were classified into three types: type I, Ti occupies a four-coordinated tetrahedral site with Ti-O distances of 1.84-1.79 Å; type II, Ti occupies a five-coordinated trigonal bipyramidal or tetragonal pyramidal site with Ti-O distances of 1.92-1.89 Å; type III, Ti occupies a six-coordinated octahedral site with Ti-O distances of 2.00-1.96 Å. Although Ti occupies the TiO(6) octahedral site in most titanium minerals under ambient conditions, some tektites have four- and five-coordinated Ti. This study indicated that the local structure of Ti might change in impact events and the following stages. PMID:21997913

  17. Dynamics of Femtosecond Laser Ablation Plume Studied With Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2010-10-08

    We investigated the dynamic process of an expanding femtosecond laser ablation plume of aluminum generated in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} with the ultrafast x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) imaging technique. The XAFS spectra of the aluminum L{sub II,III} edge of the plume revealed that the plume consists of doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid particles, and possible atomic clusters. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited ablation particles confirmed that the liquid particles corresponds to the spherical nanoparticles with a size ranging from several tens nanometers to approximately 200 nm. The spatiotemporal evolution of the XAFS image of the plume shows the sequential appearance of each ablation particle from aluminum surface according to its ejection velocity. The result suggests that the photomechanical fragmentation process, which was theoretically proposed, is dominant mechanism for the nanoparticle ejection under the irradiation intensity far from the ablation threshold of aluminum. This study clearly demonstrates the potential of our technique for measuring the ultrafast dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation process.

  18. Fine structure of Langmuir waves observed upstream of the bow shock at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Highly structured Langmuir waves, also known as electron plasma oscillations, have been observed in the foreshock of Venus using the plasma wave experiment on the Galileo spacecraft during the gravity assist flyby on February 10, 1990. The Galileo wideband sampling system provides digital electric field waveform measurements at sampling rates up to 201,600 samples per second, much higher than any previous instrument of this type. The main Langmuir wave emission band occurs near the local electron plasma frequency, which was approximately 43 kHz. The Langmuir waves are observed to shift above and below the plasma frequency, sometimes by as much as 20 kHz. The shifts in frequency are closely correlated with the downstream distance from the tangent field line, implying that the shifts are controlled by the electron beam velocity. Considerable fine structure is also evident, with timescales as short as 0.15 ms, corresponding to spatial scales of a few tens of Debye lengths. The frequency spectrum often consists of beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 7 kHz, and in a few cases, isolated wave packets. The peak electric field strengths are approximately 1 mV/m. These field strengths are too small for strongly nonlinear processes to be important. The beat-type waveforms are suggestive of a parametric decay process.

  19. The fine structure of Langmuir waves observed upstream of the bow shock at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Highly structured Langmuir waves, also known as electron plasma oscillations, have been observed in the foreshock of Venus using the plasma wave experiment on the Galileo spacecraft during the gravity assist flyby on February 10, 1990. The Galileo wideband sampling system provides digital electric field waveform measurements at sampling rates up to 201,600 samples per second, much higher than any previous instrument of this type. The main Langmuir wave emission band occurs near the local electron plasma frequency, which was approximately 43 kHz. The Langmuir waves are observed to shift above and below the plasma frequency, sometimes by as much as 20 kHz. The shifts in frequency are closely correlated with the downstream distance from the tangent field line, implying that the shifts are controlled by the electron beam velocity. Considerable fine structure is also evident, with time scales as short as 0.15 milliseconds, corresponding to spatial scales of a few tens of Debye lengths. The frequency spectrum often consists of beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 7 kHz, and in a few cases, isolated wavepackets. The peak electric field strengths are approximately 1 mV/m. These field strengths are too small for strongly nonlinear processes to be important. The beat-type waveforms are suggestive of a parametric decay process.

  20. Fine structure and functional comments of mouthparts in Platypus cylindrus (Col., Curculionidae: Platypodinae).

    PubMed

    Belhoucine, Latifa; Bouhraoua, Rachid T; Prats, Eva; Pulade-Villar, Juli

    2013-02-01

    Oak pinhole borer, Platypus cylindrus is seen in recent years as one of the biggest enemies directly involved in the observed decline of cork oak in Mediterranean forests with all the economic implications. As an ambrosia beetle, it has developed its effective drilling mouthpart enough to make tunnels in hardwood of the tree. The fine structural aspects of the mouthpart using the field emission scanning electron microscopy are analyzed about 23 adults collected in galleries of infested cork oak trees (Quercus suber) in a littoral forest of northwest Algeria. These adults are preserved in alcohol 70%, cleaned and coated with gold. The mouthparts of this beetle consist commonly of a labrum, a pair of mandibles, a pair of maxillae and the labium but with adapted structure to excavate galleries in the hardwood. In this role is also involved the first pair of legs. The function that present the different structures related to the construction of the tunnels is discussed. Both of maxillary and labial palpi direct the food to the mouth and hold it while the mandibles chew the food. The distal ends of these palpi are flattened and have shovel-like setae. Females have larger maxillary palpi than males and this is related to the particular biology of each sex.

  1. Detection of Acoustic Temporal Fine Structure by Cochlear Implant Listeners: Behavioral Results and Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Imennov, Nikita S.; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R.; Jameyson, Elyse; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2013-01-01

    A test of within-channel detection of acoustic temporal fine structure (aTFS) cues is presented. Eight cochlear implant listeners (CI) were asked to discriminate between two Schroeder-phase (SP) complexes using a two-alternative, forced-choice task. Because differences between the acoustic stimuli are primarily constrained to their aTFS, successful discrimination reflects a combination of the subjects’ perception of and the strategy’s ability to deliver aTFS cues. Subjects were mapped with single-channel Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) and Simultaneous Analog Stimulation (SAS) strategies. To compare within- and across- channel delivery of aTFS cues, a 16-channel clinical HiRes strategy was also fitted. Throughout testing, SAS consistently outperformed the CIS strategy (p ≤ 0.002). For SP stimuli with F0 =50 Hz, the highest discrimination scores were achieved with the HiRes encoding, followed by scores with the SAS and the CIS strategies, respectively. At 200 Hz, single-channel SAS performed better than HiRes (p = 0.022), demonstrating that under a more challenging testing condition, discrimination performance with a single-channel analog encoding can exceed that of a 16-channel pulsatile strategy. To better understand the intermediate steps of discrimination, a biophysical model was used to examine the neural discharges evoked by the SP stimuli. Discrimination estimates calculated from simulated neural responses successfully tracked the behavioral performance trends of single-channel CI listeners. PMID:23333260

  2. Multiply-Charged Positive Ion Polarizabilities from Rydberg Ion Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeen, Stephen R.; Wright, Laura E.; Snow, Erica L.

    2006-05-01

    Experimental methods originally developed for study of fine structure patterns in high-L Rydberg states of neutral atoms and molecules have recently been extended to allow study of similar states in Rydberg states of multiply-charged ions[1]. Initial studies, carried out in Rydberg states of Si^+ and Si^2+, led to determination of the polarizabilities of Na-like and Mg-like Silicon ions [2,3], but similar studies may be feasible in a wide range of systems. Continued studies are aimed at studying ions with higher charge, such as the closed shell ion Kr^6+, and eventually the Radon-like ions U^6+ and Th^4+. [1] S.R. Lundeen in Advances in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Vol. 52, edited by P.R. Berman and C.C. Lin, p. 161 [2] R.A. Komara, M.A. Gearba, S.R. Lundeen, C.W. Fehrenbach, Phys. Rev. A 67, 062502 (2003) [3] R.A. Komara, M.A. Gearba, C.W. Fehrenbach, and S.R. Lundeen, J. Phys. B, At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28, 2787 (2005)

  3. String theory, cosmology and varying constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damour, Thibault

    In string theory the coupling `constants' appearing in the low-energy effective Lagrangian are determined by the vacuum expectation values of some (a priori) massless scalar fields (dilaton, moduli). This naturally leads one to expect a correlated variation of all the coupling constants, and an associated violation of the equivalence principle. We review some string-inspired theoretical models which incorporate such a spacetime variation of coupling constants while remaining naturally compatible both with phenomenological constraints coming from geochemical data (Oklo; Rhenium decay) and with present equivalence principle tests. Barring a very unnatural fine-tuning of parameters, a variation of the fine-structure constant as large as that recently `observed' by Webb et al. in quasar absorption spectra appears to be incompatible with these phenomenological constraints. Independently of any model, it is emphasized that the best experimental probe of varying constants are high-precision tests of the universality of free fall, such as MICROSCOPE and STEP.

  4. Effects of Age and Hearing Loss on the Processing of Auditory Temporal Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2016-01-01

    Within the cochlea, broadband sounds like speech and music are filtered into a series of narrowband signals, each of which can be considered as a relatively slowly varying envelope (ENV) imposed on a rapidly oscillating carrier (the temporal fine structure, TFS). Information about ENV and TFS is conveyed in the timing and short-term rate of nerve spikes in the auditory nerve. There is evidence that both hearing loss and increasing age adversely affect the ability to use TFS information, but in many studies the effects of hearing loss and age have been confounded. This paper summarises evidence from studies that allow some separation of the effects of hearing loss and age. The results suggest that the monaural processing of TFS information, which is important for the perception of pitch and for segregating speech from background sounds, is adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, the former being more important. The monaural processing of ENV information is hardly affected by hearing loss or by increasing age. The binaural processing of TFS information, which is important for sound localisation and the binaural masking level difference, is also adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, but here the latter seems more important. The deterioration of binaural TFS processing with increasing age appears to start relatively early in life. The binaural processing of ENV information also deteriorates somewhat with increasing age. The reduced binaural processing abilities found for older/hearing-impaired listeners may partially account for the difficulties that such listeners experience in situations where the target speech and interfering sounds come from different directions in space, as is common in everyday life. PMID:27080640

  5. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration. PMID:23705418

  6. Using networks to identify fine structural differences between functionally distinct protein states.

    PubMed

    Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2004-08-31

    The vast increase in available data from the "-omics" revolution has enabled the fields of structural proteomics and structure prediction to make great progress in assigning realistic three-dimensional structures to each protein molecule. The challenge now lies in determining the fine structural details that endow unique functions to sequences that assume a common fold. Similar problems are encountered in understanding how distinct conformations contribute to different phases of a single protein's dynamic function. However, efforts are hampered by the complexity of these large, three-dimensional molecules. To overcome this limitation, structural data have been recast as two-dimensional networks. This analysis greatly reduces visual complexity but retains information about individual residues. Such diagrams are very useful for comparing multiple structures, including (1) homologous proteins, (2) time points throughout a dynamics simulation, and (3) functionally different conformations of a given protein. Enhanced structural examination results in new functional hypotheses to test experimentally. Here, network representations were key to discerning a difference between unliganded and inducer-bound lactose repressor protein (LacI), which were previously presumed to be identical structures. Further, the interface of unliganded LacI was surprisingly similar to that of the K84L variant and various structures generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Apo-LacI appears to be poised to adopt the conformation of either the DNA- or inducer-bound structures, and the K84L mutation appears to freeze the structure partway through the conformational transition. Additional examination of the effector binding pocket results in specific hypotheses about how inducer, anti-inducer, and neutral sugars exert their effects on repressor function. PMID:15323549

  7. Fine structural features of radio-frequency radiation of the solar flare of February 12, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Fomichev, V. V.; Gorgutsa, R. V.; Markeev, A. K.; Sobolev, D. E.; Hillaris, A.; Alissandrakis, K.

    2014-07-01

    Solar radio emission records received at the IZMIRAN spectrograph (25-270 MHz) during the solar flare event of February 12, 2010 are analyzed. Different fine structures were observed in three large groups of type III bursts against a low continuum. According to data from the Nancay radioheliograph, sources of all three groups of bursts were located in one active region, 11046, and their emissions were accompanied by soft X-ray bursts (GOES satellite): C7.9 at 0721 UT, B9.6 at 0940 UT, and M8.3 at 1125 UT. After the first group of bursts, classical fiber bursts were observed in combination with reverse-drift fiber bursts with unusual arc drift. After the third (the most powerful) group, stable second-length pulsations and slow-drift fiber bursts were observed, the instantaneous frequency bands of which were an order of magnitude larger than the frequency band of classical fiber bursts, and the frequency drift was several times lower. More complex fiber bursts were observed in the weakest group in the time range 0940:39-0942:00 UT. They were narrow-band (˜0.5 MHz) fiber bursts, periodically recurring in a narrow frequency band (5-6 MHz) during several seconds. The presence of many chaotically drifting ensembles of fibers, crossing and superimposing on one another, is a feature of this event. It is assumed that occurrence of these structures can be connected with the existence of many small shock fronts behind the leading edge of a coronal mass ejection.

  8. The collision strength of the [Ne v] infrared fine-structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoof, P. A. M.; Beintema, D. A.; Verner, D. A.; Ferland, G. J.

    2000-02-01

    The calculation of accurate collision strengths for atomic transitions has been a long standing problem in quantitative spectroscopy. Most modern calculations are based on the R-matrix method and problems pertaining to the use of this method have led to a discussion of the accuracy of these results. More in particular, based on an analysis of the spectra of NGC 3918 and NGC 6302, Clegg et al. (1987) and Oliva et al. (1996) have questioned R-matrix calculations for the infrared {Ne}{v} fine-structure transitions. Using improved flux measurements for the {Ne}{v} lines, we show that the conclusion that these collision strengths would be too high, is not correct. The discrepancies found by Clegg et al. (1987) can be explained by the inaccuracy of the {Ne}{v} 342.6 nm flux they adopted. The discrepancies found by Oliva et al. (1996) can be explained by the inaccuracy of the LRS flux for the {Ne}{v} 14.32 mu m line. Based on the data presented in this paper there is no reason to assume that there are any problems with the R-matrix calculations for \\ion{Ne}{4+} of Lennon & Burke (1994). We show that the data are accurate at the 30 % level or better. This confirms the validity of the close coupling method. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA

  9. Composite fermions and the first-Landau-level fine structure of the fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.; Haxton, Daniel J.

    2016-04-01

    A set of scalar operators, originally introduced in connection with an analytic first-Landau-level (FLL) construction of fractional quantum Hall (FQHE) wave functions for the sphere, are employed in a somewhat different way to generate explicit representations of both hierarchy states (e.g., the series of fillings ν =1 /3 , 2/5, 3/7,⋯) and their conjugates (ν =1 , 2/3, 3/5,⋯) as noninteracting quasielectrons filling fine-structure subshells within the FLL. This yields, for planar and spherical geometries, a quasielectron representation of the incompressible FLL state of filling p /(2 p +1 ) in a magnetic field of strength B that is algebraically identical to the IQHE state of filling ν =p in a magnetic field of strength B /(2 p +1 ) . The construction provides a precise definition of the quasielectron/composite fermion that differs in some respects from common descriptions: they are eigenstates of L ,Lz ; they and the FLL subshells they occupy carry a third index I that is associated with breaking of scalar pairs; they absorb in their internal wave functions one, not two, units of magnetic flux; and they share a common, simple structure as vector products of a spinor creating an electron and one creating magnetic flux. We argue that these properties are a consequence of the breaking of the degeneracy of noninteracting electrons within the FLL by the scale-invariant Coulomb potential. We discuss the sense in which the wave function construction supports basic ideas of both composite fermion and hierarchical descriptions of the FQHE. We describe symmetries of the quasielectrons in the ν =1 /2 limit, where a deep Fermi sea of quasielectrons forms, and the quasielectrons take on Majorana and pseudo-Dirac characters. Finally, we show that the wave functions can be viewed as fermionic excitations of the bosonic half-filled shell, producing at ν =1 /2 an operator that differs from but plays the same role as the Pfaffian.

  10. Radiation effects in water ice: A near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffon, C.; Lacombe, S.; Bournel, F.; Parent, Ph.

    2006-11-01

    The changes in the structure and composition of vapor-deposited ice films irradiated at 20K with soft x-ray photons (3-900eV) and their subsequent evolution with temperatures between 20 and 150K have been investigated by near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) at the oxygen K edge. We observe the hydroxyl OH, the atomic oxygen O, and the hydroperoxyl HO2 radicals, as well as the oxygen O2 and hydrogen peroxide H2O2 molecules in irradiated porous amorphous solid water (p-ASW) and crystalline (Icryst) ice films. The evolution of their concentrations with the temperature indicates that HO2, O2, and H2O2 result from a simple step reaction fuelled by OH, where O2 is a product of HO2 and HO2 a product of H2O2. The local order of ice is also modified, whatever the initial structure is. The crystalline ice Icryst becomes amorphous. The high-density amorphous phase (Iah ) of ice is observed after irradiation of the p-ASW film, whose initial structure is the normal low-density form of the amorphous ice (Ial). The phase Iah is thus peculiar to irradiated ice and does not exist in the as-deposited ice films. A new "very high density" amorphous phase—we call Iavh—is obtained after warming at 50K the irradiated p-ASW ice. This phase is stable up to 90K and partially transforms into crystalline ice at 150K.

  11. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration.

  12. A surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of tellurium adsorbed onto Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, S. R.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Wilks, S. P.; Dunstan, P. R.; Dunscombe, C. J.; Williams, R. H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of tellurium on Si(100) has been studied using surface extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (SEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW). This particular system is of interest due to its potential applicability in the surfactant aided growth of CdHgTeCdTeSi(100) based infra-red detectors. The Te/Si(100) structure was generated by depositing a thick layer (˜ 100 Å) of CdTe onto a clean Si (2 × 1) double domain surface, and annealing the sample to 350°C. This resulted is a ˜ 1 ML Te terminated surface where the (2 × 1) reconstruction was lost in favour of a (1 × 1) symmetry. X-ray absorption of the Te L 3 edge ( E = 4341 eV), with a photon energy range of 4440-4700 eV, was probed using a total yield detection scheme. The SEXAFS results indicated that the Te atoms sat in 2-fold bridge sites directly above a fourth layer Si atom. The corresponding bond length was measured to be 2.52 ± 0.05 Å. The XSW measurements of the (400) reflection gave a coherent position of 1.63 ± 0.03 Å and a coherent fraction of 0.65. This is consistent with the breaking of the SiSi dimers and thus could be an example of the phenomena of adsorbate-induced dereconstruction of the surface. These results are compared with those of Bennet et al. who examined a similar system using soft X-ray photoemission (SXPS) and the STM study of Yoshikawa et al.

  13. X-ray absorption fine structure of aged, Pu-doped glass and ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Weber, W. J.; Conradson, S. D.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies were performed on three compositionally identical, Pu-doped, borosilicate glasses prepared 15 years ago at different α-activities by varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio. The resulting α-activities ranged from 1.9×10 7 to 4.2×10 9 Bq/g and have current, accumulated doses between 8.8×10 15 to 1.9×10 18 α-decays/g. Two ceramic, polycrystalline zircon (ZrSiO 4) samples prepared 16 years ago with 10.0 wt% Pu was also investigated. Varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio in these samples resulted in α-activities of 2.5×10 8 and 5.6×10 10 Bq/g and current, accumulated doses of 1.2×10 17 and 2.8×10 19 α-decays/g. The multicomponent composition of the waste forms permitted XAS investigations at six absorption edges for the borosilicate glass and at three absorption edges for the polycrystalline zircons. For both waste forms, analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicates that the local environment around the cations exhibits different degrees of disorder as a result of the accumulated α-decay dose. In general, cations with short cation-oxygen bonds show little effect from self-radiation whereas cations with long cation-oxygen bonds show a greater degree of disorder with accumulated α-decay dose.

  14. A SCENARIO FOR THE FINE STRUCTURES OF SOLAR TYPE IIIb RADIO BURSTS BASED ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-10

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb–III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb–IIIb or III–IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  15. A Scenario for the Fine Structures of Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts Based on Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb-III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  16. Human brain detects short-time nonlinear predictability in the temporal fine structure of deterministic chaotic sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2013-04-01

    Deterministic nonlinear dynamical processes are ubiquitous in nature. Chaotic sounds generated by such processes may appear irregular and random in waveform, but these sounds are mathematically distinguished from random stochastic sounds in that they contain deterministic short-time predictability in their temporal fine structures. We show that the human brain distinguishes deterministic chaotic sounds from spectrally matched stochastic sounds in neural processing and perception. Deterministic chaotic sounds, even without being attended to, elicited greater cerebral cortical responses than the surrogate control sounds after about 150 ms in latency after sound onset. Listeners also clearly discriminated these sounds in perception. The results support the hypothesis that the human auditory system is sensitive to the subtle short-time predictability embedded in the temporal fine structure of sounds.

  17. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  18. Fine structure of the epidermal Leydig cells in the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum in relation to their function.

    PubMed

    Jarial, M S

    1989-12-01

    The fine structure of the Leydig cells in the epidermis of the strictly aquatic adult axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum resembles that of similar cells in larval salamanders. The major finding of this study is that the mucous secretion of the Leydig cells is released into the intercellular spaces from which it is discharged through pores onto the surface of the epidermis where it forms a mucous layer to protect the skin.

  19. Rocket experiments for spectral estimation of electron density fine structure in the auroral and equatorial ionosphere and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomei, B. A.; Smith, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Sounding rockets equipped to monitor electron density and its fine structure were launched into the auroral and equatorial ionosphere in 1980 and 1983, respectively. The measurement electronics are based on the Langmuir probe and are described in detail. An approach to the spectral analysis of the density irregularities is addressed and a software algorithm implementing the approach is given. Preliminary results of the analysis are presented.

  20. Fine structure analysis of biocompatible ceramic materials based hydroxyapatite and metallic biomaterials 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelina, F. V.; Ungureanu, D. N.; Bratu, V.; Popescu, I. N.; Rusanescu, C. O.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to obtain and characterize (surface morphology and fine structure) two types of materials: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 hydroxyapatite powder (HAp) as biocompatible ceramic materials and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels as metallic biomaterials, which are the components of the metal-ceramic composites used for medical implants in reconstructive surgery and prosthetic treatment. The HAp was synthesized by coprecipitation method, heat treated at 200 °C, 800 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The stainless steel 316L type was made by casting, annealing and machined with a low speed (100 mm/s) in order to obtain a smooth surface and after that has been studied from residual stresses point of view in three polishing regimes conditions: at low speed polishing (150 rpm), at high speed polishing (1500 rpm) and high speed-vibration contact polishing (1500 rpm) using wide angle X-ray diffractions (WAXD). The chemical compositions of AISI 316 steel samples were measured using a Foundry Master Spectrometer equipped with CCD detector for spectral lines and the sparking spots of AISI 316L samples were analyzed using SEM. By XRD the phases of HAp powders have been identified and also the degree of crystallinity and average size of crystallites, and with SEM, we studied the morphology of the HAp. It has been found from XRD analysis that we obtained HAp with a high degree of crystallinity at 800 °C and 1200 °C, no presence of impurity and from SEM analysis we noticed the influence of heat treatment on the ceramic particles morphology. From the study of residual stress profiles of 316L samples were observed that it differs substantially for different machining regimes and from the SEM analysis of sparking spots we revealed the rough surfaces of stainless steel rods necessary for a better adhesion of HAp on it.

  1. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  2. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16{plus_minus}2{degree} from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94{plus_minus}0.02{Angstrom}. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27{plus_minus}0.04{Angstrom}, up from 1.10{Angstrom} for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25{Angstrom} Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20{Angstrom} and 15--23{degrees}) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16{Angstrom} and 19{degrees}. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95{Angstrom} for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius {approximately} 1.5 {Angstrom} for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  3. Recovery and fine structure variability of RGII sub-domains in wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot)

    PubMed Central

    Buffetto, F.; Ropartz, D.; Zhang, X. J.; Gilbert, H. J.; Guillon, F.; Ralet, M.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhamnogalacturonan II (RGII) is a structurally complex pectic sub-domain composed of more than 12 different sugars and 20 different linkages distributed in five side chains along a homogalacturonan backbone. Although RGII has long been described as highly conserved over plant evolution, recent studies have revealed variations in the structure of the polysaccharide. This study examines the fine structure variability of RGII in wine, focusing on the side chains A and B obtained after sequential mild acid hydrolysis. Specifically, this study aims to differentiate intrinsic structural variations in these RGII side chains from structural variations due to acid hydrolysis. Methods RGII from wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot) was sequentially hydrolysed with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and the hydrolysis products were separated by anion-exchange chromatography (AEC). AEC fractions or total hydrolysates were analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Key Results The optimal conditions to recover non-degraded side chain B, side chain A and RGII backbone were 0·1 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h, 0·48 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h (or 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 8 h) and 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 16 h, respectively. Side chain B was particularly prone to acid degradation. Side chain A and the RGII GalA backbone were partly degraded by 0·1 m TFA at 80 °C for 1–4 h. AEC allowed separation of side chain B, methyl-esterified side chain A and non-methyl-esterified side chain A. The structure of side chain A and the GalA backbone were highly variable. Conclusions Several modifications to the RGII structure of wine were identified. The observed dearabinosylation and deacetylation were primarily the consequence of acidic treatment, while variation in methyl-esterification, methyl-ether linkages and oxidation reflect natural diversity. The physiological significance of this variability, however, remains to be determined. PMID:24908680

  4. FAR-INFRARED FINE-STRUCTURE LINE DIAGNOSTICS OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farrah, D.; Petty, S. M.; Harris, K.; Lebouteiller, V.; Spoon, H. W. W.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Pearson, C.; Rigopoulou, D.; Smith, H. A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Clements, D. L.; Efstathiou, A.; Cormier, D.; Afonso, J.; Hurley, P.; Borys, C.; Verma, A.; Cooray, A.; Salvatelli, V.

    2013-10-10

    We present Herschel observations of 6 fine-structure lines in 25 ultraluminous infrared galaxies at z < 0.27. The lines, [O III]52 μm, [N III]57 μm, [O I]63 μm, [N II]122 μm, [O I]145 μm, and [C II]158 μm, are mostly single Gaussians with widths <600 km s{sup –1} and luminosities of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 9} L{sub ☉}. There are deficits in the [O I]63/L{sub IR}, [N II]/L{sub IR}, [O I]145/L{sub IR}, and [C II]/L{sub IR} ratios compared to lower luminosity systems. The majority of the line deficits are consistent with dustier H II regions, but part of the [C II] deficit may arise from an additional mechanism, plausibly charged dust grains. This is consistent with some of the [C II] originating from photodissociation regions or the interstellar medium (ISM). We derive relations between far-IR line luminosities and both the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We find that [N II] and both [O I] lines are good tracers of the IR luminosity and star formation rate. In contrast, [C II] is a poor tracer of the IR luminosity and star formation rate, and does not improve as a tracer of either quantity if the [C II] deficit is accounted for. The continuum luminosity densities also correlate with the IR luminosity and star formation rate. We derive ranges for the gas density and ultraviolet radiation intensity of 10{sup 1} < n < 10{sup 2.5} and 10{sup 2.2} < G{sub 0} < 10{sup 3.6}, respectively. These ranges depend on optical type, the importance of star formation, and merger stage. We do not find relationships between far-IR line properties and several other parameters: active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, merger stage, mid-IR excitation, and SMBH mass. We conclude that these far-IR lines arise from gas heated by starlight, and that they are not strongly influenced by AGN activity.

  5. The Long-Range Model of High-L Rydberg Fine Structure: A Critical Comparison with Experimental Data..

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Erica L.; Wright, Laura E.; Lundeen, Stephen R.

    2006-05-01

    A simple view of the fine structure of non-penetrating Rydberg levels, suggested over 70 years ago [1], was refined to treat the fine structure of helium, lithium [2], and other atoms with S-state ion cores [3]. In this view the ion polarizabilities determine the fine structure pattern. Current experimental techniques provide access to highly excited high-L states in He [4], Li [5], Mg, SiIII [6], and Ba[7], and a test of the long-range model is possible with the availability of independent theoretical calculations. A critical comparison of the data treated with the long-range model will be made to the a-priori calculations of the ionic polarizabilities. [1] Joseph E. Mayer and Maria Goeppert Mayer, Phys. Rev. 43 605 (1933). [2] Richard J. Drachman and A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 51 2926 (1995). [3] C. Laughlin, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28 2787 (1995). [4] G. D. Stevens and S. R. Lundeen, Comments on At. and Mol. Phys., Comments on Mod. Phys. 1,D 207 (2000). [5] C. H. Storry, N. E. Rothery, and E. A. Hessels, Phys. Rev. A 55 128 (1997). [6] R. A. Komara et. al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 S87 (2005). [7] E.L. Snow, et. al. Phys. Rev. A 71, 022510 (2005)

  6. Fine structure of the band-edge excitons and trions in CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabaev, A.; Rodina, A. V.; Efros, Al. L.

    2012-11-01

    We present a theoretical description of excitons and positively and negatively charged trions in “giant” CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystals (NCs). The developed theory provides the parameters describing the fine structure of excitons in CdSe/CdS core/thick shell NCs as a function of the CdSe/CdS conduction band offset and the CdSe core radius. We have also developed a general theory describing the fine structure of positively charged trions created in semiconductor NCs with a degenerate valence band. The calculations take into account the complex structure of the CdSe valence band and interparticle Coulomb and exchange interaction. Presented in this paper are the CdSe core size and CdSe/CdS conduction band offset dependencies (i) of the positively charged trion fine structure, (ii) of the binding energy of the negatively charged trion, and (iii) of the radiative decay time for excitons and trions. The results of theoretical calculations are in qualitative agreement with available experimental data.

  7. Close-coupling calculations of fine-structure excitation of Ne II due to H and electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Wang, Qianxia; Loch, Stuart; Pindzola, Michael; Schultz, David R.; Buenker, Robert; McLaughlin, Brendan; Ballance, Connor

    2016-06-01

    Fine-structure transitions within the ground term of ions and neutral atoms dominate the cooling in a variety of molecular regions and also provide important density and temperature diagnostics. While fine-structure rates due to electron collisions have been studied for many systems, data are generally sparse for elements larger than oxygen, at low temperatures, and for collisions due to heavy particles. We provide rate coefficients for H collisions for the first time. The calculations were performed using the quantum molecular-orbital close-coupling approach and the elastic approximation. The heavy-particle collisions use new potential energies for the lowest-lying NeH+ states computed with the MRDCI method. The focus of the electron-impact calculations is to provide fine-structure excitation rate coefficients down to 10 K. We compare with previous calculations at higher temperatures (Griffin et al. 2001), and use a range of calculations to provide an estimate of the uncertainty on our recommended rate coefficients. A brief discussion of astrophysical applications is also provided.Griffin, D.C., et al., 2001, J. Phys. B, 34, 4401This work partially supported by NASA grant No. NNX15AE47G.

  8. A mechanism for the Fine Structures of Solar Radio Bursts Based on the Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Tong, Z.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    A scenario based on the electron cyclotron maser emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission in the present discussion. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro-frequency by ultra low frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of the maser instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation of the observed fine-structure components in the solar type IIIb burst is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of the type IIIb bursts are addressed: 1) what is the physical mechanism that results in the intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of type IIIb bursts, 2) what causes the split pair (or double stria) and the triple stria, 3) why in the events of fundamental-harmonic pair emission there is only IIIb-III, but IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb cases are very rarely observed. The application of the scenario to some other type of solar radio bursts and their fine structures are also discussed.

  9. Reconstruction of the fine structure of an acoustic scatterer against the distorting influence of its large-scale inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Grishina, I. M.; Lapshenkina, O. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Rumyantseva, O. D.; Sukhov, E. G.

    2003-11-01

    In the ultrasonic diagnostics of small-size neoplasms of biological tissues at the earliest stage of their development, an efficient way to eliminate the distorting influence of high-contrast or large inhomogeneities of the biological medium is to apply the iterative technique. A simple approach is proposed, which makes it possible with only two iteration steps to achieve an efficient focusing of the tomograph array. At the first step, the unknown distribution of the large-scale inhomogeneities of sound velocity and absorption over the scatterer is reconstructed, where the large-scale inhomogeneities are those whose size exceeds several wavelengths. At the second step, the fine structure of the scatterer is reconstructed against the large-scale background, which can be performed with a high accuracy owing to the evaluation of the background at the first step. The possibility of simultaneous reconstruction of the large-scale and fine structures by the noniterative Grinevich-Novikov algorithm is considered as an alternative. This algorithm reconstructs in an explicit form two-dimensional refractive-absorbing acoustic scatterers of almost arbitrary shape and strength. Taking into account the effects of multiple scattering, this algorithm provides resolution of the fine structure almost as good as that achieved in reconstructing the same structure against an undistorting homogeneous background. The results of numerical simulations of both algorithms are presented.

  10. Photoluminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies on cadmium telluride material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangxin

    The direct-band-gap semiconductor CdTe is an important material for fabricating high efficiency, polycrystalline thin-film solar cells in a heterojunction configuration. The outstanding physical properties of this material such as its good band-gap match to the solar spectrum, ease of fabrication of stoichiometric films, and easy grain boundary passivation make it an important candidate for large area, thin-film solar cells. However, there are several poorly understood processing steps that are commonly utilized in cell fabrication. One of these is a CdCl2 treatment near 400°C in the presence of oxygen, which can improve the cell efficiency a factor of two or more. Another factor is the role of copper in cell performance. In high performance CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells, copper is usually included in the fabrication of low-resistance back contacts to obtain heavy p-type doping of the absorber CdTe at the contact. However, most of the copper is not electrically active. For example, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) on typical CdTe cells has shown Cu concentrations of 1019 atoms/cm3 and even higher, although capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements indicate typical ionized acceptor levels on the order of 1014/cm 3. Thus, there is great interest in the location and role of this inactive copper in CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. In this thesis, I will describe results obtained on magnetron-sputtered CdTe films that were diffused with copper following the procedure used for creating a cell back contact. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements identified the chemical environment of the majority of the copper and show major differences depending on whether the CdTe film has been treated with chloride prior to the Cu diffusion. The EXAFS data indicate that the Cu chemistry is strongly affected by the chloride treatments---predominantly Cu2Te when Cu was diffused into the as-deposited CdTe film, but a Cu2O environment when Cu was diffused after

  11. Correlation between the fine structure of spin-coated PEDOT:PSS and the photovoltaic performance of organic/crystalline-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funda, Shuji; Ohki, Tatsuya; Liu, Qiming; Hossain, Jaker; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Keiji; Shirai, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the fine structure of spin-coated conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films and the photovoltaic performance of PEDOT:PSS crystalline-Si (PEDOT:PSS/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. Real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed that there were two different time constants for the formation of the PEDOT:PSS network. Upon removal of the polar solvent, the PEDOT:PSS film became optically anisotropic, indicating a conformational change in the PEDOT and PSS chain. Polarized Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements also indicated that thermal annealing promoted an in-plane π-conjugated Cα = Cβ configuration attributed to a thiophene ring in PEDOT and an out-of-plane configuration of -SO3 groups in the PSS chain with increasing composition ratio of oxidized (benzoid) to neutral (quinoid) PEDOT, Iqui/Iben. The highest power conversion efficiency for the spin-coated PEDOT:PSS/c-Si heterojunction solar cells was 13.3% for Iqui/Iben = 9-10 without employing any light harvesting methods.

  12. Variation of fundamental constants: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, Victor

    2008-05-01

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest temporal and spatial variation of the fundamental ``constants'' in expanding Universe. There are some hints for the variation of different fundamental constants in quasar absorption spectra and Big Bang nucleosynthesis data. A large number of publications (including atomic clocks) report limits on the variations. We want to study the variation of the main dimensionless parameters of the Standard Model: 1. Fine structure constant alpha (combination of speed of light, electron charge and Plank constant). 2. Ratio of the strong interaction scale (LambdaQCD) to a fundamental mass like electron mass or quark mass which are proportional to Higgs vacuum expectation value. The proton mass is propotional to LambdaQCD, therefore, the proton-to-electron mass ratio comes into this second category. We performed necessary atomic, nuclear and QCD calculations needed to study variation of the fundamental constants using the Big Bang Nucleosynthsis, quasar spectra, Oklo natural nuclear reactor and atomic clock data. The relative effects of the variation may be enhanced in transitions between narrow close levels in atoms, molecules and nuclei. If one will study an enhanced effect, the relative value of systematic effects (which are not enhanced) may be much smaller. Note also that the absolute magnitude of the variation effects in nuclei (e.g. in very narrow 7 eV transition in 229Th) may be 5 orders of magnitude larger than in atoms. A different possibility of enhancement comes from the inversion transitions in molecules where splitting between the levels is due to the quantum tunneling amplitude which has strong, exponential dependence on the electron to proton mass ratio. Our study of NH3 quasar spectra has already given the best limit on the variation of electron to proton mass ratio.

  13. Titanium dioxide fine structures by RF magnetron sputter method deposited on an electron-beam resist mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Hideomi; Miyazaki, Yuta; Matsushita, Sachiko

    2013-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been draw attention for wide range of applications from photonic crystals for visible light range by its catalytic characteristics to tera-hertz range by its high refractive index. We present an experimental study of fabrication of fine structures of TiO2 with a ZEP electron beam resist mask followed by Ti sputter deposition techniques. A TiO2 thin layer of 150 nm thick was grown on an FTO glass substrate with a fine patterned ZEP resist mask by a conventional RF magnetron sputter method with Ti target. The deposition was carried out with argon-oxygen gases at a pressure of 5.0 x 10 -1 Pa in a chamber. During the deposition, ratio of Ar-O2 gas was kept to the ratio of 2:1 and the deposition ratio was around 0.5 Å/s to ensure enough oxygen to form TiO2 and low temperature to avoid deformation of fine pattern of the ZPU resist mask. Deposited TiO2 layers are white-transparent, amorphous, and those roughnesses are around 7 nm. Fabricated TiO2 PCs have wider TiO2 slabs of 112 nm width leaving periodic 410 x 410 nm2 air gaps. We also studied transformation of TiO2 layers and TiO2 fine structures by baking at 500 °C. XRD measurement for TiO2 shows that the amorphous TiO2 transforms to rutile and anatase forms by the baking while keeping the same profile of the fine structures. Our fabrication method can be one of a promising technique to optic devices on researches and industrial area.

  14. Displacive phase-transition of cuprite Ag2O revealed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The low-temperature phase-transition of silver oxide (Ag2O) has been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. The thermal evolution of the local structure around Ag atoms has been determined. In particular, below the phase-transition temperature at ∼35 K, a progressive splitting of the Ag-Ag next-nearest-neighbor distances is observed. This definitely supports the idea that the phase-transition of Ag2O is due to displacive disorder of the Ag atoms.

  15. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  16. InGaN Selfassembled Quantum Dots Investigated By X-Ray Diffraction-Anomalous-Fine Structure Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorska, E.; Siebert, M.; Schmidt, T.; Falta, J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hommel, D.; Renevier, H.

    2007-04-10

    Local chemical composition of InGaN quantum dots grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaN virtual substrates was investigated by x-ray diffraction anomalous fine-structure method. Using this approach, we found that the In content increases from 20% at the dot base to 40-50% at the top. From the detailed numerical analysis of the data we were able to reconstruct the local neighborhood of Ga atoms in different positions in the dots, as well as the local elastic relaxation state.

  17. Correction method for the self-absorption effects in fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure on multilayer samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen Bin; Yang, Xiao Yue; Zhu, Jing Tao; Tu, Yu Chun; Mu, Bao Zhong; Yu, Hai Sheng; Wei, Xiang Jun; Huang, Yu Ying; Wang, Zhan Shan

    2014-05-01

    A novel correction method for self-absorption effects is proposed for extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) detected in the fluorescence mode on multilayer samples. The effects of refraction and multiple reflection at the interfaces are fully considered in this correction method. The correction is performed in k-space before any further data analysis, and it can be applied to single-layer or multilayer samples with flat surfaces and without thickness limit when the model parameters for the samples are known. The validity of this method is verified by the fluorescence EXAFS data collected for a Cr/C multilayer sample measured at different experimental geometries. PMID:24763646

  18. Oxygen on Ni(111): A multiple-scattering analysis of the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedio, M.; Becker, L.; Hillert, B.; D'addato, S.; Haase, J.

    1990-04-01

    Oxygen chemisorption and oxide formation on a Ni(111) surface have been monitored by using the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure technique. The adsorption site of oxygen in the p(2×2) and (√3 × √3 )R30° superstructures has been determined by a multiple-scattering analysis. In both structures the oxygen occupies a threefold-coordinated fcc site with a nearest-neighbor O-Ni bond length of 1.85+/-0.05 Å on a Ni(111) surface relaxed outwards by ~0.15 Å.

  19. Fine structure in proton radioactivity: An accurate tool to ascertain the breaking of axial symmetry in {sup 145}Tm

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, P.; Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.

    2008-10-15

    With a proper formalism for proton emission from triaxially deformed nuclei, we perform exact calculations of decay widths for the decays to ground and first excited 2{sup +} states in the daughter nucleus. Our results for rotational spectrum, decay width and fine structure in the case of the nucleus {sup 145}Tm lead for the first time to an accurate identification of triaxial deformation using proton emission. This work also puts in evidence the advantage of proton emission over the conventional probes to study nuclear structure at the proton drip-line.

  20. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15) was held on 22-28 July 2012 in Beijing, P. R. China. About 340 scientists from 34 countries attended this important international event. Main hall Figure 1. Main hall of XAFS15. The rapidly increasing application of XAFS to the study of a large variety of materials and the operation of the new SR source led to the first meeting of XAFS users in 1981 in England. Following that a further 14 International Conferences have been held. Comparing a breakdown of attendees according to their national origin, it is clear that participation is spreading to include attendees from more and more countries every year. The strategy of development in China of science and education is increasing quickly thanks to the large investment in scientific and technological research and infrastructure. There are three Synchrotron Radiation facilities in mainland China, Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSRL), Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) in the Institute of High Energy Physics, and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics. More than 10000 users and over 5000 proposals run at these facilities. Among them, many teams from the USA, Japan, German, Italy, Russia, and other countries. More than 3000 manuscript were published in SCI journals, including (incomplete) Science (7), Nature (10), Nature Series (7), PNAS (3), JACS (12), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (15), Nano Lett. (2), etc. In XAFS15, the participants contributed 18 plenary invited talks, 16 parallel invited talks, 136 oral presentations, 12 special talks, and 219 poster presentations. Wide communication was promoted in the conference halls, the classical banquet restaurant, and the Great Wall. Parallel hallCommunicationPoster room Figure 2. Parallel hallFigure 3. CommunicationFigure 4. Poster room This volume contains 136 invited and contributed papers

  1. [Correlation of fine structures of distributions of amplitudes of a photomultiplier dark current fluctuations with the Earth rotations about its axis].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, M V; Belousov, L V; Voeĭkov, V L; Zenchenko, K I; Zenchenko, T A; Konradov, A A; Shnol', S E

    2001-01-01

    The fine structures of distributions of photomultiplier dark current fluctuations measured in two laboratories 2000 km distant from other: in the international Institute of Biophysics (Neuss, Germany) and in the Moscow State University (Moscow, Russia) were compared. It is shown that similar forms of appropriate histograms are apparently more often realized at both locations at the same local time. This confirms the previous conclusion that the fine structure of distributions correlates with rotation of the Earth about its axis.

  2. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  3. Study on the Coordination Structure of Pt Sorbed on Bacterial Cells Using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Watanabe, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption has been intensively investigated as a promising technology for the recovery of precious metals from solution. However, the detailed mechanism responsible for the biosorption of Pt on a biomass is not fully understood because of a lack of spectroscopic studies. We applied X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to elucidate the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. We examined the sorption of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) species on bacterial cells of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrefaciens in NaCl solutions. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Pt-sorbed bacteria suggested that Pt(IV) was reduced to Pt(II) on the cell’s surface, even in the absence of an organic material as an exogenous electron donor. EXAFS spectra demonstrated that Pt sorbed on bacterial cells has a fourfold coordination of chlorine ions, similar to PtCl42-, which indicated that sorption on the protonated amine groups of the bacterial cells. This work clearly demonstrated the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. The findings of this study will contribute to the understanding of Pt biosorption on biomass, and facilitate the development of recovery methods for rare metals using biosorbent materials. PMID:25996945

  4. Influence of pectin fine structure on the mechanical properties of calcium-pectin and acid-pectin gels.

    PubMed

    Ström, Anna; Ribelles, Pascual; Lundin, Leif; Norton, Ian; Morris, Edwin R; Williams, Martin A K

    2007-09-01

    The in vitro and in vivo functionality of the anionic plant polysaccharide pectin depends not only on the amount of ion-binding groups attached to the polymer but also on the distribution of such groups along the backbone. It has been proposed recently that information regarding this intramolecular distribution can be quantified by defining a degree of blockiness (DB or DB(abs)), and the usefulness of such measures in discriminating qualitatively between pectins originating from different sources has been demonstrated. Despite this, the value of these parameters in predicting the pseudoequilibrium elastic modulus of gels remains untested. This study seeks to address this problem through the sourcing and in-house modification of a variety of pectins in order to produce a library of distinct representative fine structures. These were subsequently characterized in terms of their relevant properties, including the determination of the proposed DB and DB(abs), and the formation of gels of these samples was monitored using small deformation mechanical spectroscopy. In addition to ionotropic calcium gels the effect of the fine structure on acid gelation was also studied.

  5. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  6. Polarized light scattering with the Paschen-back effect, level-crossing of fine structure states, and partial frequency redistribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sowmya, K.; Nagendra, K. N.; Sampoorna, M.; Stenflo, J. O. E-mail: knn@iiap.res.in E-mail: stenflo@astro.phys.ethz.ch

    2014-10-01

    The quantum interference between the fine structure states of an atom modifies the shapes of the emergent Stokes profiles in the second solar spectrum. This phenomenon has been studied in great detail both in the presence and absence of magnetic fields. By assuming a flat-spectrum for the incident radiation, the signatures of this effect have been explored for arbitrary field strengths. Even though the theory which takes into account the frequency dependence of the incident radiation is well developed, it is restricted to the regime in which the magnetic splitting is much smaller than the fine structure splitting. In the present paper, we carry out a generalization of our scattering matrix formalism including the effects of partial frequency redistribution for arbitrary magnetic fields. We test the formalism using available benchmarks for special cases. In particular, we apply it to the Li I 6708 Å D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} line system, for which observable effects from the Paschen-Back regime are expected in the Sun's spectrum.

  7. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  8. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  9. X-ray absorption fine structure study of aging behavior of oxidized copper in CdTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiangxin; Compaan, A.D.; Terry, J.

    2005-10-19

    We have used the MR-CAT beamline of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to study the fine structure in the Cu K-edge X-ray absorption in 2 {micro}m thick polycrystalline films of CdTe on fused silica. 4 nm of evaporated Cu is diffused either with or without prior vapor CdCl{sub 2} treatments in dry air. The phase-uncorrected radial distribution function inferred from the absorption fine structure indicates predominantly Cu{sub 2}Te when Cu is diffused into the as-deposited CdTe film but indicates a Cu{sub 2}O environment when Cu is diffused after the vapor CdCl{sub 2} treatment. We believe most of the diffused Cu decorates grain boundaries as oxides, consistent with the low doping densities typically observed in CdTe solar cells. This Cu{sub 2}O likely plays a role in grain-boundary passivation. We also found that the chemical environment around Cu atoms in both CdTe and real cells can change with light soaking. This instability of Cu{sub 2}O in sputtered CdTe could contribute to cell degradation.

  10. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-13

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  11. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  12. Limits on the time variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant in the low energy limit from absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars.

    PubMed

    Srianand, R; Chand, H; Petitjean, P; Aracil, B

    2004-03-26

    We present the results of a detailed many-multiplet analysis performed on a new sample of Mg ii systems observed in high quality quasar spectra obtained using the Very Large Telescope. The weighted mean value of the variation in alpha derived from our analysis over the redshift range 0.4

  13. The fine structure of the front side magnetopause during two successive crossings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formisano, V.; Pedersen, A.; Lindqvist, P.-A.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetopause crossings of November 10, 1977, which are considered to be representative of a class of structures, are investigated, and a procedure is developed to derive approximate surface currents near the magnetopause from ISEE 1 magnetic field data by assuming a constant speed of the magnetopause along its normal for each crossing of the magnetopause layer. Changes in the magnetic field indicate that current sheets exist on each side of the magnetopause layer, which is characterized by an irregular magnetic field and a magnetosheath-like energy distribution. No boundary layer plasma is observed on the magnetospheric field lines inside the magnetopause, and electromagnetic energy is found to be dissipated at the two edges of the magnetopause layer where the current layers are observed.

  14. Effect of cellulose fine structure on kinetics of its digestion by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weimer, P J; Lopez-Guisa, J M; French, A D

    1990-08-01

    The digestion kinetics of a variety of pure celluloses were examined by using an in vitro assay employing mixed ruminal microflora and a modified detergent extraction procedure to recover residual cellulose. Digestion of all of the celluloses was described by a discontinuous first-order rate equation to yield digestion rate constants and discrete lag times. These kinetic parameters were compared with the relative crystallinity indices and estimated accessible surface areas of the celluloses. For type I celluloses having similar crystallinities and simple nonaggregating particle morphologies, the fermentation rate constants displayed a strong positive correlation (r2 = 0.978) with gross specific surface area; lag time exhibited a weaker, negative correlation (r2 = 0.930) with gross specific surface area. Crystallinity was shown to have a relatively minor effect on the digestion rate and lag time. Swelling of microcrystalline cellulose with 72 to 77% phosphoric acid yielded substrates which were fermented slightly more rapidly than the original material. However, treatment with higher concentrations of phosphoric acid resulted in a more slowly fermented substrate, despite a decrease in crystallinity and an increase in pore volume. This reduced fermentation rate was apparently due to the partial conversion of the cellulose from the type I to the type II allomorph, since mercerized (type II) cellulose was also fermented more slowly, and only after a much longer lag period. The results are consistent with earlier evidence for the cell-associated nature of cellulolytic enzymes of ruminal bacteria and suggest that ruminal microflora do not rapidly adapt to utilization of celluloses with altered unit cell structures.

  15. Effect of cellulose fine structure on kinetics of its digestion by mixed ruminal microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, P J; Lopez-Guisa, J M; French, A D

    1990-01-01

    The digestion kinetics of a variety of pure celluloses were examined by using an in vitro assay employing mixed ruminal microflora and a modified detergent extraction procedure to recover residual cellulose. Digestion of all of the celluloses was described by a discontinuous first-order rate equation to yield digestion rate constants and discrete lag times. These kinetic parameters were compared with the relative crystallinity indices and estimated accessible surface areas of the celluloses. For type I celluloses having similar crystallinities and simple nonaggregating particle morphologies, the fermentation rate constants displayed a strong positive correlation (r2 = 0.978) with gross specific surface area; lag time exhibited a weaker, negative correlation (r2 = 0.930) with gross specific surface area. Crystallinity was shown to have a relatively minor effect on the digestion rate and lag time. Swelling of microcrystalline cellulose with 72 to 77% phosphoric acid yielded substrates which were fermented slightly more rapidly than the original material. However, treatment with higher concentrations of phosphoric acid resulted in a more slowly fermented substrate, despite a decrease in crystallinity and an increase in pore volume. This reduced fermentation rate was apparently due to the partial conversion of the cellulose from the type I to the type II allomorph, since mercerized (type II) cellulose was also fermented more slowly, and only after a much longer lag period. The results are consistent with earlier evidence for the cell-associated nature of cellulolytic enzymes of ruminal bacteria and suggest that ruminal microflora do not rapidly adapt to utilization of celluloses with altered unit cell structures. PMID:2403252

  16. Early universe constraints on time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Susana J.; Mosquera, Mercedes E.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Vucetich, Hector

    2008-10-15

    We study the time variation of fundamental constants in the early Universe. Using data from primordial light nuclei abundances, cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, we put constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant {alpha} and the Higgs vacuum expectation value without assuming any theoretical framework. A variation in leads to a variation in the electron mass, among other effects. Along the same line, we study the variation of {alpha} and the electron mass m{sub e}. In a purely phenomenological fashion, we derive a relationship between both variations.

  17. Testing Theories That Predict Time Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, Susana J.; Vucetich, Hector

    2002-05-01

    We consider astronomical and local bounds on the time variation of fundamental constants to test some generic Kaluza-Klein-like models and some particular cases of Beckenstein theory. Bounds on the free parameters of the different theories are obtained. Furthermore, we find that none of the proposed models is able to explain recent results (as from Webb and coworkers in 1999 and 2001) claiming an observed variation of the fine-structure constant from quasar absorption systems at redshifts 0.5

  18. Systematic Oxidation of Polystyrene by Ultraviolet-Ozone, Characterized by Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and Contact Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Klein,R.; Fischer, D.; Lenhart, J.

    2008-01-01

    The process of implanting oxygen in polystyrene (PS) via exposure to ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O) was systematically investigated using the characterization technique of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Samples of PS exposed to UV-O for 10-300 s and washed with isopropanol were analyzed using the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS partial electron yields, using various retarding bias voltages to depth-profile the oxygen penetration into the surface. Evaluation of reference polymers provided a scale to quantify the oxygen concentration implanted by UV-O treatment. We find that ozone initially reacts with the double bonds on the phenyl rings, forming carbonyl groups, but within 1 min of exposure, the ratio of double to single oxygen bonds stabilizes at a lower value. Oxygen penetrates the film with relative ease, creating a fairly uniform distribution of oxygen within at least the first 4 nm (the effective depth probed by NEXAFS here). Before oxygen accumulates in large concentrations, however, it preferentially degrades the uppermost layer of the film by removing oxygenated low-molecular-weight oligomers. The failure to accumulate high concentrations of oxygen is seen in the nearly constant carbon edge jump, the low concentration of oxygen even at 5 min exposure (58% of that in poly(4-acetoxystyrene), the polymer with the most similarities to UV-O-treated PS), and the relatively high contact angles. At 5 min exposure the oxygen concentration contains ca. 7 atomic % oxygen. The oxygen species that are implanted consist predominantly of single O-C bonds and double OC bonds but also include a small fraction of O-H. UV-O treatment leads a plateau after 2 min exposure in the water contact angle hysteresis, at a value of 67 {+-} 2, due primarily to chemical heterogeneity. Annealing above Tg allows oxygenated species to move short distances away from the surface but not diffuse further than 1-2 nm.

  19. Characterizing xBa(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3+(1-x )Ba(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 microwave ceramics using extended x-ray absorption fine structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.-J.; Chia, C.-T.; Lin, I.-N.; Lee, J.-F.; Lin, C. M.; Wu, K. T.

    2006-06-01

    The structures of TaO6 and NbO6 oxygen octahedra in xBa(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3+(1-x )Ba(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 perovskite ceramics with x =0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.0 were investigated by the extended x-ray absorption fine structure method. The decline in the microwave dielectric constant as x increases is caused mainly by the decrease of the mean volume of the oxygen octahedra, regardless of the 1:2 ordered structure and the distortion of the oxygen octahedron. The low Qf values of the TaO6 and NbO6 mixed samples are caused by not only the degrading of the 1:2 ordered structure but also the distortion of oxygen octahedral cages.

  20. Evidence of the nature of core-level photoemission satellites using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a unique method of experimentally determining the angular momentum and intrinsic/extrinsic origin of core-level photoemission satellites by examining the satellite diffraction pattern in the Angle Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) mode. They show for the first time that satellite peaks not associated with chemically differentiated atomic species display an ARPEFS intensity oscillation. They present ARPEFS data for the carbon 1s from ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 CO/Cu(111) and p2mg(2xl)CO/Ni(110), nitrogen 1s from c(2x2) N{sub 2}/Ni(100), cobalt 1s from p(1x1)Co/Cu(100), and nickel 3p from clean nickel (111). The satellite peaks and tails of the Doniach-Sunjic line shapes in all cases exhibit ARPEFS curves which indicate an angular momentum identical to the main peak and are of an intrinsic nature.

  1. Zinc cysteine active sites of metalloproteins: a density functional theory and x-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Farooqi, Mohammed Junaid; Garza, Emily Sofia; Bunker, Grant

    2008-03-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are complementary tools for the biophysical study of active sites in metalloproteins. DFT is used to compute XAFS multiple scattering Debye Waller factors, which are then employed in genetic algorithm-based fitting process to obtain a global fit to the XAFS in the space of fitting parameters. Zn-Cys sites, which serve important functions as transcriptional switches in Zn finger proteins and matrix metalloproteinases, previously have proven intractable by this method; here these limitations are removed. In this work we evaluate optimal DFT nonlocal functionals and basis sets for determining optimal geometries and vibrational densities of states of mixed ligation Zn(His)(4-n)(Cys)(n) sites. Theoretical results are compared to experimental XAFS measurements and Raman spectra from the literature and tabulated for use.

  2. Fine-structural Observations on Siliceous Scale Production and Shell Assembly in the Testate Amoeba Paulinella chromatophora.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Mami; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    The fine structure of shell formation was observed in P. chromatophora. Scales were formed one by one in silica deposition vesicles (SDVs) that were supported by an array of microtubules, which are probably involved in determining the shape and size of scales. The timing of silicic acid transport into an SDV was shown to be at an early stage of scale production because silicon was detected within SDVs containing immature scales. During the shell construction process, vesicles containing two types of dense materials were observed. One type of vesicle contains lower-density material and is located at the front edge of the branched, thick pseudopodium, extending from the maternal shell to the newly formed shell. The other type of vesicle, which contains higher-density material, was also observed in the thick pseudopodium. It appears that microtubules are involved in the shell construction process. PMID:27348459

  3. Fine structure in α decay of even-even nuclei using a finite-range nucleon-nucleon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2015-07-01

    A systematic study on α -decay fine structure is presented for even-even nuclei in the range 78 ≤Z ≤102 . The penetration probability is obtained from the WKB approximation in combination with the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The potential barrier is numerically constructed in the well-established double-folding model for both Coulomb and nuclear potentials. A realistic M3Y interaction, based on the G -matrix elements of the Paris N N potential, has been used in the folding calculation. The local approximation for the nondiagonal one-body density matrix in the calculation of the exchange potential was included by using the harmonic oscillator representation of the nondiagonal density matrix of the α particle. The computed partial half-lives and branching ratios are compared with the recent experimental data and they are in good agreement.

  4. Fine-structural Observations on Siliceous Scale Production and Shell Assembly in the Testate Amoeba Paulinella chromatophora.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Mami; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    The fine structure of shell formation was observed in P. chromatophora. Scales were formed one by one in silica deposition vesicles (SDVs) that were supported by an array of microtubules, which are probably involved in determining the shape and size of scales. The timing of silicic acid transport into an SDV was shown to be at an early stage of scale production because silicon was detected within SDVs containing immature scales. During the shell construction process, vesicles containing two types of dense materials were observed. One type of vesicle contains lower-density material and is located at the front edge of the branched, thick pseudopodium, extending from the maternal shell to the newly formed shell. The other type of vesicle, which contains higher-density material, was also observed in the thick pseudopodium. It appears that microtubules are involved in the shell construction process.

  5. Note: Construction of x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption fine structure beamline at the Pohang Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik-Jae; Yu, Chung-Jong; Yun, Young-Duck; Lee, Chae-Soon; Seo, In Deuk; Kim, Hyo-Yun; Lee, Woul-Woo; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2010-02-15

    A new hard x-ray beamline, 10B KIST-PAL beamline (BL10B), has been designed and constructed at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. The beamline, operated by Pohang Accelerator Laboratory-Korean Institute of Science and Technology consortium, is dedicated to x-ray scattering (XRS) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. X rays with photon energies from 4.0 to 16.0 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a collimating mirror, a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, and a toroidal mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, a high resolution diffractometry, an image plate detector system, and a hot stage have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, it is observed that BL10B beamline can perform XRS and XAFS measurements successfully.

  6. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  7. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure.

    PubMed

    Rybin, Mikhail V; Samusev, Kirill B; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu; Kivshar, Yuri S; Limonov, Mikhail F

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  8. Anharmonicity in single-wall carbon nanotubes as evidenced by means of extended energy loss fine structure spectroscopy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castrucci, P.; Tombolini, F.; Scarselli, M.; Bini, S.; De Crescenzi, M.; Diociaiuti, M.; Casciardi, S.; El Khakani, M. A.; Rosei, F.

    2007-01-15

    A comparative study of the structure of free-standing parallel bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was achieved by means of transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy analyses. In particular, the carbon K (1s) extended fine structure of SWCNTs is found to be characterized by an apparent contraction of the nearest neighbors distance. This contraction is interpreted here to originate from an asymmetric pair distribution function, mostly due to the high out-of-plane vibrational motion of the C atoms, as for the case of chemisorbed atoms on clean surfaces. In contrast, the MWCNTs did not exhibit any signature of such an anharmonic effect because of their more rigid structure. This indicates that the SWCNTs pair potential is significantly broader and its effect is much weaker than that experienced by the same C-C pair embedded in a multiwall nanotube.

  9. Fine Structure of Bacteroids in Root Nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius

    PubMed Central

    Dart, P. J.; Mercer, F. V.

    1966-01-01

    Dart, P. J. (University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia), and F. V. Mercer. Fine structure of bacteroids in root nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, Viminaria juncea, and Lupinus angustifolius. J. Bacteriol. 91:1314–1319.—In nodules of Vigna sinensis, Acacia longifolia, and Viminaria juncea, membrane envelopes enclose groups of bacteroids. The bacteroids often contain inclusion granules and electron-dense bodies, expand little during development, and retain their rod form with a compact, central nucleoid area. The membrane envelope may persist around bacteroids after host cytoplasm breakdown. In nodules of Lupinus angustifolius, the membrane envelopes enclose only one or two bacteroids, which expand noticeably during development and change from their initial rod structure. Images PMID:5929757

  10. The rotational and fine-structure spectrum of FeH, studied by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Brown, John M; Körsgen, Helga; Beaton, Stuart P; Evenson, Kenneth M

    2006-06-21

    Transitions between the spin-rotational levels of the FeH radical in the upsilon=0 level of the X (4)Delta ground state have been detected by the technique of laser magnetic resonance at far-infrared wavelengths. Both pure rotational and fine-structure transitions have been observed; lambda-type doubling is resolved on all the observed transitions. The energy levels of FeH are strongly affected by the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and cannot be modeled accurately by an effective Hamiltonian. The data are therefore fitted to an empirical formula to yield term values and g factors for the various spin-rotational levels involved. Many of the resonances show a doubling that arises from the proton hyperfine structure. These splittings are analyzed in a similar manner.

  11. Precision Test of Many-Body QED in the Be+ 2p Fine Structure Doublet Using Short-Lived Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Geppert, Christopher; Krieger, Andreas; Pachucki, Krzysztof; Puchalski, Mariusz; Blaum, Klaus; Bissell, Mark L; Frömmgen, Nadja; Hammen, Michael; Kowalska, Magdalena; Krämer, Jörg; Kreim, Kim; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Yordanov, Deyan T

    2015-07-17

    Absolute transition frequencies of the 2s 2S{1/2}→2p2P{1/2,3/2} transitions in Be^{+} were measured for the isotopes ^{7,9-12}Be. The fine structure splitting of the 2p state and its isotope dependence are extracted and compared to results of ab initio calculations using explicitly correlated basis functions, including relativistic and quantum electrodynamics effects at the order of mα(6) and mα(7) ⁢ln α. Accuracy has been improved in both the theory and experiment by 2 orders of magnitude, and good agreement is observed. This represents one of the most accurate tests of quantum electrodynamics for many-electron systems, being insensitive to nuclear uncertainties. PMID:26230786

  12. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM). PMID:27250401

  13. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  14. Effect of heat treatment on the far-infrared emission spectra and fine structures of black tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun

    2014-05-01

    Mineral black tourmaline powders were heat-treated at different temperatures. Their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffractometer. Their infrared absorption and emission spectra before and after the heat treatment were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The corresponding fine structures were discussed in detail. The results showed that the powders possessed higher infrared emissivity at the band where they showed stronger infrared absorption. However, there is no certain correlation between the peak intensity of infrared absorption and emissivity values at the same frequency. Because of the crystal shrinkage of c-axis, the electronic transitions were stimulated between different energy levels, and the abilities of infrared absorption and emission were enhanced with increasing the temperature of heat treatment. PMID:24734598

  15. Boron carbide: Consistency of components, lattice parameters, fine structure and chemical composition makes the complex structure reasonable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    The complex, highly distorted structure of boron carbide is composed of B12 and B11C icosahedra and CBC, CBB and B□B linear elements, whose concentration depends on the chemical composition each. These concentrations are shown to be consistent with lattice parameters, fine structure data and chemical composition. The respective impacts on lattice parameters are estimated and discussed. Considering the contributions of the different structural components to the energy of the overall structure makes the structure and its variation within the homogeneity range reasonable; in particular that of B4.3C representing the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range. Replacing in B4.3C virtually the B□B components by CBC yields the hypothetical moderately distorted B4.0C (structure formula (B11C)CBC). The reduction of lattice parameters related is compatible with recently reported uncommonly prepared single crystals, whose compositions deviate from B4.3C.

  16. Single Cesium Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals at Low Temperature: Fast Single-Photon Emission, Reduced Blinking, and Exciton Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Metal-halide semiconductors with perovskite crystal structure are attractive due to their facile solution processability, and have recently been harnessed very successfully for high-efficiency photovoltaics and bright light sources. Here, we show that at low temperature single colloidal cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, where X = Cl/Br) nanocrystals exhibit stable, narrow-band emission with suppressed blinking and small spectral diffusion. Photon antibunching demonstrates unambiguously nonclassical single-photon emission with radiative decay on the order of 250 ps, representing a significant acceleration compared to other common quantum emitters. High-resolution spectroscopy provides insight into the complex nature of the emission process such as the fine structure and charged exciton dynamics. PMID:26771336

  17. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  18. Exploration of Heterogeneous Chemistry in Model Atmospheric Particles Using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bramante,J.; Hinrichs, R.; Brown, E.; Calvin, S.

    2007-01-01

    As models of the composition and heterogeneous chemical reactions of the troposphere undergo refinement, novel application of state-of-the-art analytical techniques will be necessary to propound realistic characterizations of mineral dust chemistry. In this study, strontium carbonate particles treated with gaseous nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide were examined with X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (EXAFS). The X-ray spectra of carbonate and nitrate standards were fitted to ab initio calculations, which were used to determine the structure and consistency of strontium nitrate formed on strontium carbonate. By examining differences in mean square radial displacement and lattice spacing values obtained for bulk Sr(NO3)2 as compared to Sr(NO3)2 formed on SrCO3, EXAFS proves effective as a tool for investigating the local structure and composition of heterogeneous aerosol particles. The implications of findings on reacted strontium carbonate for atmospheric models of calcium carbonate aerosol are discussed.

  19. Oxygen K-edge fine structures of water by x-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy under pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Huotari, Simo; Andrault, Denis; Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko

    2007-10-07

    Fine structure of the oxygen K edge was investigated for water at ambient pressure, 0.16, 0.21, 0.27, 0.47, and 0.60 GPa using x-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy (XRS). Similarity in near-edge structures at 0.16 and 0.60 GPa suggests little difference in the electronic state of oxygen in the low-pressure and high-pressure forms of water. Yet, we observed significant variation of preedge structure of the XRS spectra with compression. The intensity of the preedge peak at 535.7 eV has a minimal value at around 0.3 GPa, indicating that the number of hydrogen bonding increases first and then decreases as a function of pressure.

  20. Effect of heat treatment on the far-infrared emission spectra and fine structures of black tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun

    2014-05-01

    Mineral black tourmaline powders were heat-treated at different temperatures. Their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffractometer. Their infrared absorption and emission spectra before and after the heat treatment were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The corresponding fine structures were discussed in detail. The results showed that the powders possessed higher infrared emissivity at the band where they showed stronger infrared absorption. However, there is no certain correlation between the peak intensity of infrared absorption and emissivity values at the same frequency. Because of the crystal shrinkage of c-axis, the electronic transitions were stimulated between different energy levels, and the abilities of infrared absorption and emission were enhanced with increasing the temperature of heat treatment.

  1. Fine structure and Ca-ATPase activity of the stratum intermedium cells during odontogenesis in gars, Lepisosteus, Actinopterygii.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Ichiro; Ishiyama, Mikio

    2002-01-01

    This is the first report on the stratum intermedium in vertebrates other than mammals. The aim of this study is to elucidate the fine structure and cytochemical features of the stratum intermedium during the stages of enameloid formation in Lepisosteus. Inner dental epithelium, stratum intermedium, stellate reticulum, and outer dental epithelium are consistently present in the tooth germs of Lepisosteus. The stratum intermedium cells are oval in shape, contain elliptical nuclei, and extend many small processes. It is implied that the structure of the enamel organ is different among actinopterygians, and that constitution of the enamel organ in Lepisosteus resembles that in higher vertebrates. Marked Ca-ATPase activity is observed at the cell membrane of the stratum intermedium cells, suggesting that the cells are involved in calcium transport during the stages of enameloid formation.

  2. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-08-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters.

  3. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  4. Experimental methods of post-growth tuning of the excitonic fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic sources of polarization entangled photon pairs on demand are considered as important building blocks for quantum communication technology. It has been demonstrated that semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), which exhibit a sufficiently small excitonic fine structure splitting (FSS) can be used as triggered, on-chip sources of polarization entangled photon pairs. As-grown QDs usually do not have the required values of the FSS, making the availability of post-growth tuning techniques highly desired. This article reviews the effect of different post-growth treatments and external fields on the FSS such as thermal annealing, magnetic fields, the optical Stark effect, electric fields, and anisotropic stress. As a consequence of the tuning of the FSS, for some tuning techniques a rotation of the polarization of the emitted light is observed. The joint modification of polarization orientation and FSS can be described by an anticrossing of the bright excitonic states. PMID:22726724

  5. [Sieve-tube plastids of monocotyledons : Comparative investigations of the fine structure and distribution of specific plastids].

    PubMed

    Behnke, H D

    1968-06-01

    Fine-structural investigations of 24 monocotyledons from 21 families and all but one order succeeded in revealing a plastid with cuneate proteinaceous inclusion bodies as being typical of monocot sieve-tubes. Inclusion bodies originate in large numbers during plastid differentiation; they concentrate in the matrix and aggregate around an invisible centre, that mostly lies at one end of the elongated ameboid proplastid. The inclusion-free part of the young plastid contains countless vesicles and short membranes, presumably invaginations of the inner plastid envelope. Proteinaceous inclusion bodies show a crystal-like structure composed of 50-60 Å subunits in straight and parallel order. Besides these crystal-like inclusion bodies sieve-tube plastids of many monocotyledons also contain starch. - Sieve-tube plastids of Nuphar luteum and Nymphaea alba look like plastids in dicotyledon sieve-tubes, starch being their only inclusion.

  6. Fine structural and immunohistochemical detection of collar enamel in the teeth of Polypterus senegalus, an actinopterygian fish.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, I; Yokosuka, H; Ishiyama, M; Mikami, M; Shimokawa, H; Uchida, T

    2012-02-01

    This is the first detailed report about the collar enamel of the teeth of Polypterus senegalus. We have examined the fine structure of the collar enamel and enamel organ of Polypterus during amelogenesis by light and transmission electron microscopy. An immunohistochemical analysis with an antibody against bovine amelogenin, an antiserum against porcine amelogenin and region-specific antibodies or antiserum against the C-terminus, middle region and N-terminus of porcine amelogenin has also been performed to examine the collar enamel matrix present in these teeth. Their ameloblasts contain fully developed Golgi apparatus, rough endoplasmic reticulum and secretory granules. During collar enamel formation, an amorphous fine enamel matrix containing no collagen fibrils is found between the dentin and ameloblast layers. In non-demineralized sections, the collar enamel (500 nm to 1 μm thick) is distinguishable from dentin, because of its higher density and differences in the arrangement of its crystals. The fine structural features of collar enamel in Polypterus are similar to those of tooth enamel in Lepisosteus (gars), coelacanths, lungfish and amphibians. The enamel matrix shows intense immunoreactivity to the antibody and antiserum against mammalian amelogenins and to the middleregion- and C-terminal-specific anti-amelogenin antibodies. These findings suggest that the proteins in the enamel of Polypterus contain domains that closely resemble those of bovine and porcine amelogenins. The enamel matrix, which exhibits positive immunoreactivity to mammalian amelogenins, extends to the cap enameloid surface, implying that amelogenin-like proteins are secreted by ameloblasts as a thin matrix layer that covers the cap enameloid after enameloid maturation.

  7. Suppression of fine-structure splitting and oscillator strength of sodium D-line in a Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Joyee Ray, Debasis

    2014-01-15

    We investigate theoretically the influence of static plasma screening on relativistic spin-orbit interaction-induced fine-structure splitting of the D-line doublet arising from the transitions 3p{sub 1/2}–3s{sub 1/2} and 3p{sub 3/2}–3s{sub 1/2} of the valence electron of a sodium atom embedded in a model plasma environment. The many-electron atomic problem is formulated first as an effective one-electron problem in which the interaction between the optically active valence electron and the atomic ion core is represented by an accurate parametric model potential including core-polarization correction, and then the plasma effect on the atomic system is simulated by the Debye-screening model for the valence-core interaction. It is observed that the magnitude of spin-orbit energy shift reduces for both the upper component 3p{sub 3/2} and the lower component 3p{sub 1/2} with increasing plasma screening strength, thereby reducing the spin-orbit energy separation between these two components as the screening becomes stronger. As a consequence, the magnitude of fine-structure splitting between the D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} line energies of sodium drops significantly with stronger plasma screening. The optical (absorption) oscillator strength for 3s → 3p transition is seen to reduce with stronger screening and this leads to a screening-induced gradual suppression of the 3p → 3s spontaneous decay rate.

  8. Fine Structure of Antennal Sensilla of Paysandisia archon and Electrophysiological Responses to Volatile Compounds Associated with Host Palms

    PubMed Central

    Ruschioni, Sara; Riolo, Paola; Verdolini, Elisa; Peri, Ezio; Guarino, Salvatore; Colazza, Stefano; Romani, Roberto; Isidoro, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    Paysandisia archon (Lepidoptera: Castniidae) is a serious pest of palm trees. A comprehensive knowledge of the insect olfactory system is essential for the development of efficient semiochemical-based control methods. The olfactory sensilla are located particularly on the antennae, and these can detect plant volatiles that provide important cues for the insects in the search for their host plants. To date, the fine structure of P. archon antennal sensilla studies and their role in host-plant perception have not been investigated in great detail. Using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the antennae of both sexes of P. archon are described here in detail, according to the different types, quantities and distributions of the sensilla. Six types of sensilla were identified. The most widespread are sensilla trichoidea, sensilla basiconica and sensilla auricilica, which are associated with olfactory function. These have cuticular shafts characterised by numerous pores, and they are innervated by two or three sensory neurons. Sensilla coeloconica, sensilla chaetica and sensilla ampullacea are associated with olfactory or olfactory-thermoreception, mechano-gustatory, and thermo-hygroreception functions, respectively. Moreover, the role of P. archon antennae in locating of the host palms was evaluated using electroantennograms, to monitor responses to ester and terpene compounds previously identified as volatiles of damaged/fermenting palm tissues. P. archon showed responses to all of the synthetic chemicals tested, with greater responses in the females, providing a significant sex*dose effect. Among the compounds tested, ethyl isobutyrate elicited the strongest antenna responses. The fine structure of the cuticular and cellular components of the P. archon antenna sensory equipment is described for the first time. The results of this study form an important starting point and complement physiological and behavioural studies, to provide

  9. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  10. Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2013-03-05

    Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ε and z but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles a and g. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes.

  11. Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for sulfur-like iron, Fe XI

    SciTech Connect

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Allam, S.H.

    2014-05-15

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the 14 LS states belonging to configurations of sulfur-like iron, Fe XI, have been calculated. These states are represented by configuration interaction wavefunctions and have configurations 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}, 3s3p{sup 5}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4s, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4p, and 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4d, which give rise to 123 fine-structure energy levels. Extensive configuration interaction calculations using the CIV3 code have been performed. To assess the importance of relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling scheme by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms, such as the one-body mass correction and Darwin term, and spin–orbit, spin–other-orbit, and spin–spin corrections, are incorporated within the code. These incorporations adjusted the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to the available experimental data. Comparisons between the present calculated energy levels as well as oscillator strengths and both experimental and theoretical data have been performed. Our results show good agreement with earlier works, and they might be useful in thermonuclear fusion research and astrophysical applications. -- Highlights: •Accurate atomic data of iron ions are needed for identification of solar corona. •Extensive configuration interaction wavefunctions including 123 fine-structure levels have been calculated. •The relativistic effects by means of the Breit–Pauli Hamiltonian terms are incorporated. •This incorporation adjusts the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to experimental values.

  12. Influence of 8-Oxoguanosine on the Fine Structure of DNA Studied with Biasing-Potential Replica Exchange Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Mahmut; Zacharias, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Chemical modification or radiation can cause DNA damage, which plays a crucial role for mutagenesis of DNA, carcinogenesis, and aging. DNA damage can also alter the fine structure of DNA that may serve as a recognition signal for DNA repair enzymes. A new, advanced sampling replica-exchange method has been developed to specifically enhance the sampling of conformational substates in duplex DNA during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach employs specific biasing potentials acting on pairs of pseudodihedral angles of the nucleic acid backbone that are added in the replica simulations to promote transitions of the most common substates of the DNA backbone. The sampled states can exchange with a reference simulation under the control of the original force field. The application to 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine, one of the most common oxidative damage in DNA indicated better convergence of sampled states during 10 ns simulations compared to 20 times longer standard MD simulations. It is well suited to study systematically the fine structure and dynamics of large nucleic acids under realistic conditions, including explicit solvent and ions. The biasing potential-replica exchange MD simulations indicated significant differences in the population of nucleic acid backbone substates in the case of 7,8-dihydro-8oxo-guanosine compared to a regular guanosine in the same sequence context. This concerns both the ratio of the B-DNA substates BI and BII associated with the backbone dihedral angles ε and ζ but also coupled changes in the backbone dihedral angles α and γ. Such differences may play a crucial role in the initial recognition of damaged DNA by repair enzymes. PMID:23473492

  13. Effects of valence-valence, core-valence and core-core correlations on the fine-structure energy levels in Zn-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, F.; Jiang, G.; Yang, J. M.; Wang, C. K.; Zhao, X. F.; Hao, L. H.

    2011-01-01

    We report on large ab initio calculation for the 4s^2- 4s4p transitions in the Zinc-like sequence, using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. Results for fine-structure energy levels, the wavelengths, transition rates and lifetimes between Z = 70 (Yb) and Z= 92 (U) are presented and compared with other theories and experiments. The calculated values including core-valence correlation are found to be similar and to compare very well with other theories and experiments values. We believe that our extensive calculated values can guide experimentalists in identifying the fine-structure levels in their future work.

  14. Interatomic distances for some first row transition element dichlorides isolated in cryogenic matrices using x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Ian R.; Spicer, Mark D.; Young, Nigel A.

    1994-06-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) data for several 3d transition metal dichlorides isolated in nitrogen, argon, or methane matrices have been collected and analyzed. The bond lengths obtained are in reasonable agreement with those from vapor phase electron diffraction. The results are briefly discussed with reference to Badger's rule extended to triatomics.

  15. Fine Structure of Metric Type IV Radio Bursts Observed with the ARTEMIS-IV Radio-Spectrograph: Association with Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouratzis, C.; Hillaris, A.; Alissandrakis, C. E.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Caroubalos, C.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.

    2015-01-01

    Fine structures embedded in type IV burst continua may be used as diagnostics of the magnetic-field restructuring and the corresponding energy release associated with the low-corona development of flare or coronal mass ejection (CME) events. A catalog of 36 type IV bursts observed with the SAO receiver of the ARTEMIS-IV solar radio-spectrograph in the 450 - 270 MHz range at high cadence (0.01 sec) was compiled; the fine structures were classified into five basic classes with two or more subclasses each. The time of fine-structure emission was compared with the injection of energetic electrons as recorded by hard X-ray and microwave emission, the soft X-ray (SXR) light curves and the CME onset time. Our results indicate a very tight temporal association between energy release episodes and pulsations, spikes, narrow-band bursts of the type III family, and zebra bursts. Of the remaining categories, the featureless broadband continuum starts near the time of the first energy release, between the CME onset and the SXR peak, but extends for several tens of minutes after that, covering almost the full extent of the flare-CME event. The intermediate drift bursts, fibers in their majority, mostly follow the first energy release, but have a wider distribution than other fine structures.

  16. Extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure measurements of copper: Local dynamics, anharmonicity, and thermal expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasini, P.; Beccara, S.; Dalba, G.; Grisenti, R.; Sanson, A.; Vaccari, M.; Rocca, F.

    2004-11-01

    Extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) of copper has been measured from 4 to 500 K and analyzed by the cumulant method, to check the effectiveness of EXAFS as a probe of local dynamics and thermal expansion. The comparison between parallel mean square relative displacements (MSRD) of the first four coordination shells has allowed detecting a significant deviation from a pure Debye behavior. The first-shell EXAFS thermal expansion is larger than the crystallographic one: the difference has allowed evaluating the perpendicular MSRD, whose Debye temperature is slightly larger than the one of the parallel MSRD, due to anisotropy effects. High-order first-shell cumulants are in good agreement with quantum perturbative models. The anharmonic contribution to the first-shell parallel MSRD amounts to less than 1.5 percent. The third cumulant cannot be neglected in the analysis, if accurate values of the first cumulant are sought; it cannot however be used to directly estimate the thermal expansion. The shape of the effective pair potential is independent of temperature; a rigid shift, partially due to the relative motion perpendicular to the bond direction, is however observed.

  17. Mechanism of Pb Adsorption to Fatty Acid Langmuir Monolayers Studied by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanov, M.I.; Kmetko, J.; Shibata, T.; Datta, A.; Dutta, P.; Bunker, B.A.

    2010-09-30

    The local atomic environment of lead (Pb) adsorbed to a CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 19}COOH Langmuir monolayer was investigated in situ using grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) spectroscopy at the Pb L{sub III} edge. Measurements were performed at pH 6.5 of the 10{sup -5} M PbCl{sub 2} solution subphase, a condition under which grazing incidence diffraction (GID) revealed a large-area commensurate superstructure underneath the close-packed organic monolayer. The XAFS results indicate covalent binding of the Pb cations to the carboxyl headgroups, and the observed Pb-Pb coordination suggests that the metal is adsorbed as a hydrolysis polymer, rather than as individual Pb{sup 2+} ions. The data are consistent with a bidentate chelating mechanism and a one Pb atom to one carboxyl headgroup binding stoichiometry. We discuss how this adsorption model can explain the peculiarities observed with Pb in previous metal-Langmuir monolayer studies. A systematic study of lead perchlorate and lead acetate aqueous solutions is presented and used in the analysis. XAFS multiple scattering effects from alignment of the Pb-C-C atoms in the lead acetate solutions are reported.

  18. The olfactory apparatus of the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus): fine structure and presence of a septal olfactory organ.

    PubMed Central

    Kratzing, J E

    1978-01-01

    The structure and extent of olfactory epithelium in the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus) were examined by light and electron microscopy. Sensory epithelium covers most of the dorsal conchae, though non-sensory epithelium lines ventrally facing scrolls. The middle conchae are partly covered by olfactory epithelium, the proportion of olfactory to ciliated respiratory epithelium increasing caudally. Ventral conchae are lined by non-sensory ciliated epithelium. The nasal septum ends short of the floor of the nasal cavity in its caudal two thirds. It is covered dorsally by olfactory epithelium. The ventral margin has rounded lateral extensions which carry the isolated strips of olfactory epithelium which form the septal olfactory organ. The fine structure of the olfactory epithelium is the same in all areas. Cell types include olfactory receptors, supporting cells, two types of basal cell and rarer pale and brush cells. There is considerable morphological variation in olfactory cells, and evidence suggestive of continuing turnover in the receptor cell population. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:640961

  19. Studies on the mechanism of circus movement in dissociated embryonic cells of a teleost, Oryzias latipes: fine-structural observations.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, N

    1976-10-01

    The fine structure of lobopodia in dissociated embryonic cells of the freshwater fish, Oryzias latipes, was observed with the electron microscope in order to understand the mechanism of the circus movements which they display. Dense material (grandular or fibrillar) is present in the zone between the lobopodium and the endoplasm, as well as in the cortical layer around the cell circumference. The direction of lobopodial movement is related to the distribution of this dense material. The band between the lobopodium and the endoplasm is conspicuous and is connected to the cortical dense layer around the cell periphery at the advancing front of the lobopodium, while the dense material is usually almost absent beneath the cell membrane in the anterior region of the lobopodium. The band between lobopodium and endoplasm is blurred or disrupted near the hind end of the lobopodiu, where the peripheral dense layer is well developed. In situ localization of actin/heavy meromyosin complexes in the cell showed that the dense material has actin-like properties. Cytochalasin B(0-5 mug/ml) induced constriction of the neck of the bleb, shrinkage of the endoplasm, and herniation of the endoplasmic contents to the enlarged hemispherical bleb, and thus arrested the circus movement. On the basis of these results, an hypothesis concerning the mechanism of circus movement is proposed and discussed.

  20. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Mn Coordination in Doped Perovskite SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V; Woicik, J; Tkach, A; Vilarinho, P

    2010-01-01

    The coordination of Mn in doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics having nominal compositions SrTi{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} and Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} was analyzed using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. As expected, Mn{sup 4+} substitution for Ti{sup 4+} leads to Mn occupancy of the octahedral B-sites of ABO{sub 3} perovskite lattice with a Mn-O bond distance of 1.902 {angstrom} (compared to 1.953 {angstrom} for Ti-O) and no significant local distortions around the Mn atoms. In contrast, for the composition Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sup 0.02}TiO{sub 3}, Mn segregates to both the A-sites (as Mn{sup 2+}) and the B-sites (predominantly as Mn{sup 4+}). Extended XAFS confirms strong ({approx} 0.77 {angstrom}) displacements of Mn{sup 2+} cations off the ideal A-site positions along <001> directions with a significant distortion of several coordination shells around the dopant atoms.

  1. Determining Orientational Structure of Diamondoid Thiols Attached to Silver Using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Lee, J I; Fabbri, J D; Wang, D; Nielsen, M; Randel, J C; Schreiner, P R; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J P; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Melosh, N A; van Buuren, T

    2008-10-07

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is a powerful tool for determination of molecular orientation in self-assembled monolayers and other surface-attached molecules. A general framework for using NEXAFS to simultaneously determine molecular tilt and twist of rigid molecules attached to surfaces is presented. This framework is applied to self-assembled monolayers of higher diamondoid, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures. Diamondoid monolayers chemisorbed on metal substrates are known to exhibit interesting electronic and surface properties. This work compares molecular orientation in monolayers prepared on silver substrates using two different thiol positional isomers of [121]tetramantane, and thiols derived from two different pentamantane structural isomers, [1212]pentamantane and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane. The observed differences in monolayer structure demonstrate the utility and limitations of NEXAFS spectroscopy and the framework. The results also demonstrate the ability to control diamondoid assembly, in particular the molecular orientational structure, providing a flexible platform for the modification of surface properties with this exciting new class of nanodiamond materials.

  2. Chromium oxide as a metal diffusion barrier layer: An x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Lakshun Naidu, K.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.; Dalba, G.; Ahmed, S. I.; Rocca, F.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction at the interface between chromium and amorphous Silicon (a-Si) films in the presence of a sandwich layer of chromium oxide is investigated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The oxidized interface was created, in situ, prior to the deposition of a 400 nm tick a-Si layer over a 50 nm tick Cr layer. The entire stack of substrate/metallic Cr/Cr2O3/a-Si was then annealed at temperatures from 300 up to 700 °C. Analysis of the near edge and extended regions of each XAFS spectrum shows that only a small fraction of Cr is able to diffuse through the oxide layer up to 500 °C, while the remaining fraction is buried under the oxide layer in the form of metallic Cr. At higher temperatures, diffusion through the oxide layer is enhanced and the diffused metallic Cr reacts with a-Si to form CrSi2. At 700 °C, the film contains Cr2O3 and CrSi2 without evidence of unreacted metallic Cr. The activation energy and diffusion coefficient of Cr are quantitatively determined in the two temperature regions, one where the oxide acts as diffusion barrier and another where it is transparent to Cr diffusion. It is thus demonstrated that chromium oxide can be used as a diffusion barrier to prevent metal diffusion into a-Si.

  3. Nutritional property of endosperm starches from maize mutants: a parabolic relationship between slowly digestible starch and amylopectin fine structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genyi; Ao, Zihua; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2008-06-25

    The relationship between the slow digestion property of cooked maize starch and its molecular fine structure was investigated. Results of the in vitro Englyst assay showed a range of rapidly digestible starch (RDS) (70.1-98.9%), slowly digestible starch (SDS) (0.2-20.3%), and resistant starch (RS) (0.0-13.7%) among the tested maize mutant flour samples. Further analysis showed that amylose content was significantly correlated ( R = 0.763, P < 0.001) with RS amount but not with that of SDS, indicating that amylopectin is the starch molecule associated with SDS. Total starch debranching analysis revealed a parabolic relationship between SDS content and the weight ratio of amylopectin short chains (DP < 13, named SF) to long chains (DP >/= 13, named LF), which means amylopectin with a higher amount of either short chains or long chains can produce relatively high amounts of SDS. Furthermore, debranching analysis of the SDS materials from samples with the highest and lowest weight ratios of SF/LF (both had a high amount SDS) showed significantly different profiles, indicating there is not a uniform molecular structure for SDS. Thus, genetic mutants of maize samples have a good potential to provide raw starch materials of high nutritional quality. An additional finding showed that a simple and comparably high-throughput technique of Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) can be used to screen genetic mutants on the basis of their RVA profiles.

  4. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  5. Reexamining X-mode suppression and fine structure in artificial E region field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; McCarrick, M.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-09-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and observed using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of this ionospheric modification experiment was to measure the threshold pump power required to excite thermal parametric instabilities by O-mode heating and to investigate the suppression of the FAIs by simultaneous X-mode heating. We find that the threshold pump power for irregularity excitation was consistent with theoretical predictions and increased by approximately a factor of 2 when X-mode heating was present. A modified version of the Another Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI2) ionospheric model was used to simulate the threshold experiments and suggested that the increase was entirely due to enhanced D region absorption associated with X-mode heating. Additionally, a remarkable degree of fine structure possibly caused by natural gradient drift instability in the heater-modified volume was observed in experiments performed during geomagnetically active conditions.

  6. Fine structures and ion images on fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections by transmission electron and scanning ion microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaya, K.; Okabe, M.; Sawataishi, M.; Takashima, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2003-01-01

    Ion microscopy (IM) of air-dried or freeze-dried cryostat and semi-thin cryosections has provided ion images of elements and organic substances in wide areas of the tissue. For reproducible ion images by a shorter time of exposure to the primary ion beam, fresh frozen dried ultrathin sections were prepared by freezing the tissue in propane chilled with liquid nitrogen, cryocut at 60 nm, mounted on grids and silicon wafer pieces, and freeze-dried. Rat Cowper gland and sciatic nerve, bone marrow of the rat administered of lithium carbonate, tree frog and African toad spleen and buffy coat of atopic dermatitis patients were examined. Fine structures and ion images of the corresponding areas in the same or neighboring sections were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) followed by sector type and time-of-flight type IM. Cells in the buffy coat contained larger amounts of potassium and magnesium while plasma had larger amounts of sodium and calcium. However, in the tissues, lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium were distributed in the cell and calcium showed a granular appearance. A granular cell of the tree frog spleen contained sodium and potassium over the cell and magnesium and calcium were confined to granules.

  7. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy of naphthalene diimide-thiophene co-polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Eliot; McNeill, Christopher R.; Szumilo, Monika; Sirringhaus, Henning; Sommer, Michael; Maniam, Subashani; Langford, Steven J.; Thomsen, Lars

    2014-04-28

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is an important tool for probing the structure of conjugated polymer films used in organic electronic devices. High-performance conjugated polymers are often donor-acceptor co-polymers which feature a repeat unit with multiple functional groups. To facilitate better application of NEXAFS spectroscopy to the study of such materials, improved understanding of the observed NEXAFS spectral features is required. In order to examine how the NEXAFS spectrum of a donor-acceptor co-polymer relates to the properties of the sub-units, a series of naphthalene diimide-thiophene-based co-polymers have been studied where the nature and length of the donor co-monomer has been systematically varied. The spectra of these materials are compared with that of a thiophene homopolymer and naphthalene diimide monomer enabling peak assignment and the influence of inter-unit electronic coupling to be assessed. We find that while it is possible to attribute peaks within the π* manifold as arising primarily due to the naphthalene diimide or thiophene sub-units, very similar dichroism of these peaks is observed indicating that it may not be possible to separately probe the molecular orientation of the separate sub-units with carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectroscopy.

  8. Structural Analysis of Freshwater-Cultured Pearls with Different Lusters Using the Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monarumit, N.; Noirawee, N.; Phlayrahan, A.; Promdee, K.; Won-in, K.; Satitkune, S.

    2016-05-01

    The quality of freshwater-cultured pearls (Chamberlainia hainesiana) is determined by their luster, which is related to the content of the two CaCO3 mineral phases: aragonite and vaterite. The atomic structures of pearl samples were analyzed by the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique using synchrotron radiation to compare the atomic environment and atomic bonding around Ca atoms of high- and low-luster pearls. The Ca K-edge EXAFS spectra of the pearl samples were determined and interpreted in terms of the photoelectron wave number and the distance between Ca atoms and neighboring atoms. From the results, the wave oscillation of high-luster pearls is less than that of low-luster pearls. This indicates the presence of the aragonite phase in high-luster pearls and a combination of aragonite and vaterite phases in low-luster pearls, especially in the fi rst and second shells of Ca atoms. It can be concluded that the different lusters of freshwater-cultured pearls are related to the different CaCO3 phases in their structures.

  9. Fine Structural Aspects of Lymphoedema in Various Tissues and the Effects of Treatment with Coumarin and Troxerutin

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J. R.; Földi-Börcsök, E.; Földi, M.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structural changes produced by lymphoedema, and by its treatment by coumarin and rutin were studied in the facial skin, parotid glands, ciliary bodies and cerebral cortices of rats, after the ligation of their cervical lymphatics. Both the true initial lymphatics (in the first two sites) and the prelymphatics (in the other two) behaved similarly, as did the tissue around them. There was much protein and oedema fluid during lymphoedema, which were markedly reduced by the drugs, separately and in combination. The very dilated lymphatics in the facial skin had many open endothelial intercellular junctions: the better supported ones in the parotid did not dilate so much and had no open junctions, although they normally possess some. It is suggested that the raised intralymphatic pressures, plus the smaller amount of dilatation permitted in this site, caused the junctions to be sealed closed. Fenestrae seemed to have little effect on the amount of lymphoedema, nor did it appear to affect their numbers. ImagesFigs. 10-11Fig. 1Figs. 5-7Figs. 2-3Fig. 4Figs. 8-9 PMID:4835800

  10. Mercury Speciation by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Sequential Chemical Extractions: A Comparison of Speciation Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Bloom, N.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the chemical speciation of mercury in contaminated mining and industrial environments is essential for predicting its solubility, transport behavior, and potential bioavailability as well as for designing effective remediation strategies. In this study, two techniques for determining Hg speciation-X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and sequential chemical extractions (SCE)-are independently applied to a set of samples with Hg concentrations ranging from 132 to 7539 mg/kg to determine if the two techniques provide comparable Hg speciation results. Generally, the proportions of insoluble HgS (cinnabar, metacinnabar) and HgSe identified by XAFS correlate well with the proportion of Hg removed in the aqua regia extraction demonstrated to remove HgS and HgSe. Statistically significant (> 10%) differences are observed however in samples containing more soluble Hg-containing phases (HgCl2, HgO, Hg3S2O 4). Such differences may be related to matrix, particle size, or crystallinity effects, which could affect the apparent solubility of Hg phases present. In more highly concentrated samples, microscopy techniques can help characterize the Hg-bearing species in complex multiphase natural samples.

  11. The forms of trace metals in an Illinois basin coal by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Bruinius, J.A.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Huggins, Frank E.; Huffman, G.P.; Ho, K.K.

    1997-01-01

    Utilities burning Illinois coals currently do not consider trace elements in their flue gas emissions. After the US EPA completes an investigation on trace elements, however, this may change and flue gas emission standards may be established. The mode of occurrence of a trace element may determine its cleanability and Hue gas emission potential. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) is a spectroscopic technique that can differentiate the mode of occurrence of an element, even at the low concentrations that trace elements are found in coal. This is principally accomplished by comparing the XAFS spectra of a coal to a database of reference sample spectra. This study evaluated the technique as a potential tool to examine six trace elements in an Illinois #6 coal. For the elements As and Zn, the present database provides a definitive interpretation on their mode of occurrence. For the elements Ti, V, Cr, and Mn the database of XAFS spectra of trace elements in coal was still too limited to allow a definitive interpretation. The data obtained on these elements, however, was sufficient to rule out several of the mineralogical possibilities that have been suggested previously. The results indicate that XAFS is a promising technique for the study of trace elements in coal.

  12. Space and time variations in the fine structure of the upper atmosphere according to acoustic sounding data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulichkov, S. N.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Bush, G. A.; Mishenin, A. A.; Golikova, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    The results of studying variations in the fine layered structure of the upper atmosphere (heights of 20-140 km) according to data obtained from acoustic sounding within the range of infrasonic waves are given. The sources of infrasounds were surface explosions equivalent to 10 kg to 70 t of TNT. These explosions were set off in different seasons in different regions of Russia. Experimental data obtained in 1981-2011 have been analyzed. It has been found that the fine structure in the form of vertically distributed layered formations occurs in the upper atmosphere in all seasons. Moreover, the vertical distribution of both air-temperature and wind-velocity inhomogeneities in the upper atmosphere may be invariable over a time interval of no less than several hours. It has also been found that, throughout the entire atmospheric thickness from the stratopause to the lower thermosphere heights (up to 140 km), the instantaneous height distribution of layered air-temperature and wind-velocity inhomogeneities may remain almost unchanged during a time interval of no less than 20 min.

  13. A fine structure genomic map of the region of 12q13 containing SAS and CDK4

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, C.Y.; Elkahloun, A.G.; Su, Y.A.

    1994-09-01

    We have recently adapted a method, originally described by Rackwitz, to the rapid restriction mapping of multiple cosmid DNA samples. Linearization of the cosmids at the lambda cohesive site using lambda terminase is followed by partial digestion with selected restriction enzymes and hybridization to oligonucleotides specific for the right or left hand termini. Partial digestions are performed in a microtiter plate thus allowing up to 12 cosmid clones to be digested with one restriction enzyme. We have applied this rapid restriction mapping method to cosmids derived from a region of chromosome 12q13 that has recently been shown to be amplified in a variety of cancers including malignant fibrous histiocytoma, fibrosarcoma, liposarcoma, osteosarcoma and brain tumors. A small segment of this amplification unit containing three genes, SAS (a membrane protein), CDK4 (a cyclin dependent kinase) and OS-9 (a recently described cDNA) has been analyzed with the system described above. This fine structure genomic map will be useful for completing the expression map of this region as well as characterizing its pattern of amplification in tumor specimens.

  14. Sulfur 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of thiophenic and aromatic thioether compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behyan, Shirin; Hu, Yongfeng; Urquhart, Stephen G.

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic compounds are major constituents of fossil fuels and pose problems for fuel refinement. The quantification and speciation of these compounds is of great interest in different areas such as biology, fossil fuels studies, geology, and archaeology. Sulfur 1s Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has emerged as a qualitative and quantitative method for sulfur speciation. A firm understanding of the sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of organosulfur species is required for these analytical studies. To support this development, the sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of simple thiols and thioethers were previously examined, and are now extended to studies of thiophenic and aromatic thioether compounds, in the gas and condensed phases. High-resolution spectra have been further analyzed with the aid of Improved Virtual Orbital (IVO) and Δ(self-consistent field) ab initio calculations. Experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve the assignment of spectroscopic features important for the speciation and quantification of sulfur compounds. Systematic differences between gas and condensed phases are also explored; these differences suggest a significant role for conformational effects in the NEXAFS spectra of condensed species.

  15. Dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation studied with time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    We studied the dynamics of the femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum in an energy range well above the ablation threshold with the ultrafast time-resolved x-ray-absorption fine structure imaging technique. Analyzing the spectral structures near the L absorption edge that appeared in one-dimensional images of soft-x-ray absorbance, we successfully identified doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid nanoparticles, and possible atomic clusters in the expanding ablation plume. We also clarified that the ejected particles depend strongly on the laser irradiation intensity. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ablation particles allows us to estimate the spatial distribution of atomic density and the ejection velocity of each type of particle. In particular, we discuss the temporal sequence of the particle ejection in the early stages of plume expansion. Our experimental results strongly support the idea that photomechanical fragmentation and vaporization are dominant mechanisms for the production of liquid nanoparticles and neutral atoms, respectively, in femtosecond laser ablation induced in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}.

  16. Observations on the fine structure, enzyme histochemistry, and innervation of parathyroid gland and ultimobranchial body of Chthonerpeton indistinctum (Gymnophiona, Amphibia).

    PubMed

    Welsch, U; Schubert, C

    1975-11-26

    Fine structural and enzyme histochemical observations on ultimobranchial body and parathyroid gland of the caecilian Chthonerpeton are presented. The cell clusters and follicles of the ultimobranchial body consist mainly of granulated cells which are termed C-cells and obviously belong to the APUD cell series. In the larger follicles additional possibly exhausted degranulated cells and replacement cells occur. A rich supply of nerve fibres has been found in this gland. Frequently nerve terminals were observed to come into synaptic contact with the C-cells. Two categories of nerve fibres occur: a) fibres containing large polymorphic electron dense granules (probably purinergic fibres), b) fibres containing small electron transparent vesicles and a few electron dense granules (probably cholinergic fibres). The parathyroid gland consists of elongated cells (one cell type) poor in organelles and often containing fields of glycogen and lipid droplets. The cells are further characterized by fair amounts of lysosomal enzymes; they are interconnected by maculae adhaerentes and occludentes. No nerves and blood vessels have been found in the parathyroid gland of Chthonerpeton.

  17. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Khalid, S; Caliebe, W; Siddons, P; So, I; Clay, B; Lenhard, T; Hanson, J; Wang, Q; Frenkel, A I; Marinkovic, N; Hould, N; Ginder-Vogel, M; Landrot, G L; Sparks, D L; Ganjoo, A

    2010-01-01

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  18. Systematic oxidation of polystyrene by ultraviolet-ozone, characterized by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure and contact angle.

    PubMed

    Klein, Robert J; Fischer, Daniel A; Lenhart, Joseph L

    2008-08-01

    The process of implanting oxygen in polystyrene (PS) via exposure to ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O) was systematically investigated using the characterization technique of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Samples of PS exposed to UV-O for 10-300 s and washed with isopropanol were analyzed using the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS partial electron yields, using various retarding bias voltages to depth-profile the oxygen penetration into the surface. Evaluation of reference polymers provided a scale to quantify the oxygen concentration implanted by UV-O treatment. We find that ozone initially reacts with the double bonds on the phenyl rings, forming carbonyl groups, but within 1 min of exposure, the ratio of double to single oxygen bonds stabilizes at a lower value. Oxygen penetrates the film with relative ease, creating a fairly uniform distribution of oxygen within at least the first 4 nm (the effective depth probed by NEXAFS here). Before oxygen accumulates in large concentrations, however, it preferentially degrades the uppermost layer of the film by removing oxygenated low-molecular-weight oligomers. The failure to accumulate high concentrations of oxygen is seen in the nearly constant carbon edge jump, the low concentration of oxygen even at 5 min exposure (58% of that in poly(4-acetoxystyrene), the polymer with the most similarities to UV-O-treated PS), and the relatively high contact angles. At 5 min exposure the oxygen concentration contains ca. 7 atomic % oxygen. The oxygen species that are implanted consist predominantly of single O-C bonds and double O=C bonds but also include a small fraction of O-H. UV-O treatment leads a plateau after 2 min exposure in the water contact angle hysteresis, at a value of 67 +/- 2 degrees , due primarily to chemical heterogeneity. Annealing above T(g) allows oxygenated species to move short distances away from the surface but not diffuse further than 1-2 nm.

  19. Can we test dark energy with running fundamental constants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Michael

    2005-04-01

    We investigate a link between the running of the fine structure constant α and a time evolving scalar dark energy field. Employing a versatile parametrization for the equation of state, we exhaustively cover the space of dark energy models. Under the assumption that the change in α is to first order given by the evolution of the quintessence field, we show that current Oklo, quasi-stellar object and equivalence principle observations restrict the model parameters considerably more strongly than observations of the cosmic microwave background, large scale structure and supernovae Ia combined.

  20. The Linguistic Repertoire Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    This article argues for the relevance of poststructuralist approaches to the notion of a linguistic repertoire and introduces the notion of language portraits as a basis for empirical study of the way in which speakers conceive and represent their heteroglossic repertoires. The first part of the article revisits Gumperz's notion of a linguistic…

  1. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  2. Colloquial Hebrew Imperatives Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolozky, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    In revisiting Bolozky's [Bolozky, Shmuel, 1979. "On the new imperative in colloquial Hebrew." "Hebrew Annual Review" 3, 17-24] and Bat-El's [Bat-El, Outi, 2002. "True truncation in colloquial Hebrew imperatives." "Language" 78(4), 651-683] analyses of colloquial Hebrew imperatives, the article argues for restricting Imperative Truncation to the…

  3. Revisiting Bioaccumulation Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of workgroup 5 was to revisit the B(ioaccumulation) criteria that are currently being used to identify POPs under the Stockholm Convention and PBTs under CEPA, TSCA, REACh and other programs. Despite the lack of a recognized definition for a B substance, we defined ...

  4. Revisiting Curriculum Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the notion of curriculum potential by revisiting the ideas of Miriam Ben-Peretz and Joseph Schwab. Invoking the German "Didaktik" tradition and by way of a curriculum-making framework, the paper argues that interpreting curriculum materials for curriculum potential requires a careful analysis and unpacking of the meanings and…

  5. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  6. The vacuum UV photoabsorption spectroscopy of vinyl fluoride (C 2H 3F): The vibrational fine structure and its analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locht, R.; Leyh, B.; Dehareng, D.; Jochims, H. W.; Baumgärtel, H.

    2009-08-01

    The vacuum UV photoabsorption spectrum of C 2H 3F has been examined in detail between 6 eV and 25 eV photon energy by using synchrotron radiation. The analysis of the data is supported by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations applied to valence and Rydberg excited states of C 2H 3F. At 7.6 eV the π → π ∗ and the 2a″ → 3s transitions are observed. An analysis is proposed and applied to the mixed fine structure belonging to these transitions. For the π → π ∗ transition one single long vibrational progression is observed with hcω e = 95 ± 7 meV (766 ± 56 cm -1) and its adiabatic excitation energy is 6.892 eV (55 588 cm -1). The 2a″ → 3s transition is characterized by a single short progression with hcω e = 167 ± 10 meV (1350 ± 80 cm -1) starting at 6.974 eV (56 249 cm -1). From the present ab initio calculations these two wavenumbers best correspond to the vibrational modes v9 (CH 2 rock in-plane, FCC-bend) and v6 (CH 2 rock in-plane, CF stretch) calculated at 615 cm -1 in the π ∗ state and 1315 cm -1 in the ( 2A″)3s Rydberg state respectively. The C dbnd C stretching could not be excluded. The dense structured spectrum observed between 8.0 eV and 10.5 eV has been analyzed in terms of vibronic transitions to Rydberg states all converging to the CHF(X˜A) ionic ground state. An analysis of the associated complex fine structure of the individual Rydberg states has been attempted providing average values of the wavenumbers, e.g., for the ( 2A″)3p Rydberg state hcω9 = 60 ± 1 meV (or 484 ± 8 cm -1), hcω7 = 151 ± 7 meV (or 1218 ± 60 cm -1), hcω4 = 191 ± 3 meV (or 1540 ± 24 cm -1). The assignment of hcω = 105 ± 5 meV (or 823 ± 40 cm -1) is discussed. These experimental values are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions for C 2H 3F + [R. Locht, B. Leyh, D. Dehareng, K. Hottmann, H. Baumgärtel, Chem. Phys. (in press)]. Above 10.5 eV and up to 25 eV several broad and strong bands are tentatively assigned to

  7. Incorporation of Pertechnetate and Perrhenate into Corroded Steel Surfaces Studied by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, Steve M.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-04-01

    Batch reaction experiments and solid-phase characterization analyses were completed to examine the uptake of dissolved perrhenate [Re(VII)] or pertechnetate [Tc(VII)] by A-516 steel coupons that corroded in simulated groundwater solutions or dilute water. The goal was to identify the mechanism(s) that control the uptake of 99Tc by corrosion products on carbon steel in the presence of dilute solutions. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) was used to study the oxidation states of Re and Tc incorporated into the corroded steel coupon surfaces. X-ray fluorescence maps showed that the corroded coupons contain localized regions enriched in Re or Tc. The Re L3 near edge XAS results for the coupons reacted with Re-spiked waters were consistent with all sorbed Re being present as perrhenate and not significantly reduced to Re(IV). Linear combination fits of the EXAFS signals for the perrhenate and ReIVO2 standards indicate that Re sorbed to the steel coupons corroded in simulated J-13 (a relatively dilute Na-HCO3-CO3 groundwater) and even more dilute waters consists of a maximum of 5 and 10% Re(IV), respectively. The fluorescence results also showed that the Re concentrations increased with increasing time of exposure to the x-ray beam time, which suggests that the perrhenate ions are only weakly bonded to the matrix of the corrosion product. In contrast to the Re results, the Tc K edge XAFS results for the coupons reacted in 99Tc-spiked waters indicate that most of the sorbed Tc had been reduced to Tc(IV). The shape of the near edge and extended fine structure is similar to the Tc(IV)-hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and not the TcO2-nH2O standard. Differences were noted in the XAS results for steel coupons reacted with waters spiked with 0.001 versus 0.1 mmol/L 99Tc in that much more of the sorbed Tc from 0.001 mmol/L 99Tc experiments was in the form of pertechnetate. Comparison of the XAS results for coupons reacted with 0.001 mmol/L 99Tc-spiked dilute

  8. The Relative Contributions of Temporal Envelope and Fine Structure to Mandarin Lexical Tone Perception in Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Dong, Ruijuan; Liu, Dongxin; Zhang, Luo; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that temporal envelope (E) is sufficient for speech perception, while fine structure (FS) is important for pitch perception for normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) have an impaired ability to use FS in lexical tone perception due to the reduced frequency resolution. Listeners with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) may have deficits in temporal resolution. Little is known about how such deficits may impact their ability to use E and FS to perceive lexical tone, and whether it is the deficit in temporal resolution or frequency resolution that may lead to more detrimental effects on FS processing in pitch perception. Three experiments were conducted in the present study. Experiment I used the "auditory chimera" technique to investigate how SNHL and ANSD listeners would achieve lexical tone recognition using either the E or the FS cues. Experiment II tested their frequency resolution as measured with their psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs). Experiment III tested their temporal resolution as measured with the temporal gap detection (TGD) threshold. The results showed that the SNHL listeners had reduced frequency selectivity, but intact temporal resolution ability, while the ANSD listeners had degraded temporal resolution ability, but intact frequency selectivity. In comparison with the SNHL listeners, the ANSD listeners had severely degraded ability to process the FS cues and thus their ability to perceive lexical tone mainly depended on the ability to use the E cues. These results suggested that, in comparison with the detrimental impact of the reduced frequency selectivity, the impaired temporal resolution may lead to more degraded FS processing in pitch perception. PMID:27080664

  9. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    PubMed

    Lőcsei, Gusztáv; Pedersen, Julie H; Laugesen, Søren; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen N

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources. PMID:27601071

  10. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Julie H.; Laugesen, Søren; Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen N.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between speech perception performance in spatially complex, lateralized listening scenarios and temporal fine-structure (TFS) coding at low frequencies. Young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with mild or moderate hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear gains to the stimuli, which were presented over headphones. The target and masker streams were lateralized to the same or to opposite sides of the head by introducing 0.7-ms interaural time differences between the ears. TFS coding was assessed by measuring frequency discrimination thresholds and interaural phase difference thresholds at 250 Hz. NH listeners had clearly better SRTs than the HI listeners. However, when maskers were spatially separated from the target, the amount of SRT benefit due to binaural unmasking differed only slightly between the groups. Neither the frequency discrimination threshold nor the interaural phase difference threshold tasks showed a correlation with the SRTs or with the amount of masking release due to binaural unmasking, respectively. The results suggest that, although HI listeners with normal hearing thresholds below 1.5 kHz experienced difficulties with speech understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources. PMID:27601071

  11. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of the atomic structure of nanoparticles in different metallic matrices.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Gurman, S J; Binns, C

    2009-05-01

    It has been appreciated for some time that the novel properties of particles in the size range 1-10 nm are potentially exploitable in a range of applications. In order to ultimately produce commercial devices containing nanosized particles, it is necessary to develop controllable means of incorporating them into macroscopic samples. One way of doing this is to embed the nanoparticles in a matrix of a different material, by co-deposition for example, to form a nanocomposite film. The atomic structure of the embedded particles can be strongly influenced by the matrix. Since some of the key properties of materials, including magnetism, strongly depend on atomic structure, the ability to determine atomic structure in embedded nanoparticles is very important. This review focuses on nanoparticles, in particular magnetic nanoparticles, embedded in different metal matrices. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provides an excellent means of probing atomic structure in nanocomposite materials, and an overview of this technique is given. Its application in probing catalytic metal clusters is described briefly, before giving an account of the use of EXAFS in determining atomic structure in magnetic nanocomposite films. In particular, we focus on cluster-assembled films comprised of Fe and Co nanosized particles embedded in various metal matrices, and show how the crystal structure of the particles can be changed by appropriate choice of the matrix material. The work discussed here demonstrates that combining the results of structural and magnetic measurements, as well as theoretical calculations, can play a significant part in tailoring the properties of new magnetic cluster-assembled materials.

  12. Exciton Fine-Structure Splitting in Self-Assembled Lateral InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Molecular Structures.

    PubMed

    Fillipov, Stanislav; Puttisong, Yuttapoom; Huang, Yuqing; Buyanova, Irina A; Suraprapapich, Suwaree; Tu, Charles W; Chen, Weimin M

    2015-06-23

    Fine-structure splitting (FSS) of excitons in semiconductor nanostructures is a key parameter that has significant implications in photon entanglement and polarization conversion between electron spins and photons, relevant to quantum information technology and spintronics. Here, we investigate exciton FSS in self-organized lateral InAs/GaAs quantum-dot molecular structures (QMSs) including laterally aligned double quantum dots (DQDs), quantum-dot clusters (QCs), and quantum rings (QRs), by employing polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence (μPL) spectroscopy. We find a clear trend in FSS between the studied QMSs depending on their geometric arrangements, from a large FSS in the DQDs to a smaller FSS in the QCs and QRs. This trend is accompanied by a corresponding difference in the optical polarization directions of the excitons between these QMSs, namely, the bright-exciton lines are linearly polarized preferably along or perpendicular to the [11̅0] crystallographic axis in the DQDs that also defines the alignment direction of the two constituting QDs, whereas in the QCs and QRs, the polarization directions are randomly oriented. We attribute the observed trend in the FSS to a significant reduction of the asymmetry in the lateral confinement potential of the excitons in the QRs and QCs as compared with the DQDs, as a result of a compensation between the effects of lateral shape anisotropy and piezoelectric field. Our work demonstrates that FSS strongly depends on the geometric arrangements of the QMSs, which effectively tune the degree of the compensation effects and are capable of reducing FSS even in a strained QD system to a limit similar to strain-free QDs. This approach provides a pathway in obtaining high-symmetry quantum emitters desirable for realizing photon entanglement and spintronic devices based on such nanostructures, utilizing an uninterrupted epitaxial growth procedure without special requirements for lattice-matched materials combinations

  13. Structural transitions of mechanically alloyed Fe 100- xCu x systems studied by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shiqiang; Yan, Wensheng; Li, Yuzhi; Liu, Wenhan; Fan, Jiangwei; Zhang, Xinyi

    2001-11-01

    The local structures of the immiscible Fe 100- xCu x alloys ( x=0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100) produced by mechanical alloying have been investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure technique. For the Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩾40, the local environment around the Fe atoms changes from bcc to fcc structure and the Cu atoms maintain the original coordination geometry after milling for 160 h. In contrast, the local structures around the Cu atoms in both Fe 80Cu 20 and Fe 90Cu 10 alloys exhibit a transition from fcc to bcc structure. Furthermore, we found that the coordination numbers N in the first shell of the Fe and Cu atoms were largely deviated from the stoichiometric composition for the Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩾40. The Debye-waller factor σ of the fcc Fe-Cu phase is larger than that of the bcc Fe-Cu phase, and the σ (0.099 Å) around Fe atoms is larger than that around Cu atoms (0.089 Å) in the Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩾40. This indicates that the mechanically alloyed Fe 100- xCu x supersaturated solid solutions with x⩾40 is not a homogeneous alloy, but consists of fcc Fe-rich and fcc Cu-rich regions. However, In Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩽20, the Cu atoms were almost homogeneously solved into the bcc Fe-Cu phase. A possible mechanism for bcc-to-fcc and fcc-to-bcc changes in Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions is discussed in relation to the interdiffusion and the transition induced by the ball milling.

  14. Heat flux at the base of lake ice cover estimated from fine structure of the ice-water boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Georgiy; Aslamov, Ilya; Kozlov, Vladimir; Granin, Nikolay; Engelhardt, Christof; Förster, Josephine

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal lake ice is a highly changeable part of the cryosphere undergoing remarkable impact by global warming. Vertical heat transport across the boundary layer under ice affects strongly the growth and melting of lake ice cover. The existing models of ice cover dynamics focus basically on the dependence of the ice thickness on the air temperature with implicit account of the snow cover effects. The heat flux at the water-ice boundary, in turn, is usually neglected or parameterized in a very simplistic form. However, neglecting of the basal ice melting due to heat flux at the ice-water interface produces appreciable errors in the modeled ice cover duration. We utilize fine-structure observations taken during 2009-2015 in ice-water boundary layers of Lake Baikal and arctic Lake Kilpisjärvi to reveal the major physical drivers of the heat exchange at the ice bottom and to explain the high geographical, spatial, and temporal variability in the heat flux magnitudes. The methods provide first detailed estimations of the heat exchange beneath the ice cover, available previously only from bulk estimations. The fluxes in Lake Baikal have magnitudes of 101 W m-2 and vary strongly between different parts of the lake being influenced by large-scale horizontal circulation with current velocities amounting at up to 7 cm s-1. The shallow lake fluxes, while an order of magnitude weaker, are highly non-stationary, being affected by the turbulence due to oscillating currents under ice. Our results demonstrate the role played by the boundary layer mixing in the ice growth and melting, as well as characterize the physical processes responsible for the vertical heat exchange and provide a basis for an improved parameterization of ice cover in coupled lake-atmosphere models.

  15. Spectroscopic Constants of the Known Electronic States of Lead Monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    McRaven, C.P.; Sivakumar, P.; Shafer-Ray, N.E.; Hall, G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2010-08-01

    Based on measurements made by mass-resolved 1 + 1{prime} + 1{double_prime} resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy, we have determined new molecular constants describing the rotational and fine structure levels of the B, D, E, and F states of the most abundant isotopic variant {sup 208}Pb{sup 19}F, and we summarize the spectroscopic constants for all the know electronic states of the radical. Many spectroscopic constants for the isotopologues {sup 206}Pb{sup 19}F and {sup 207}Pb{sup 19}F have also been determined. The symmetry of the D-state is found to be {sup 2}{pi}{sub 1/2}, and the F-state is found to be an {Omega} = 3/2 state.

  16. Search for shape coexistence in {sup 188,190}Pb via fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192,194}Po

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Davids, C.; Janssens, R.V.F.

    1995-08-01

    The interaction between coexisting shapes in nuclei near closed shells was of great interest in the past decade. Excited 0{sup +} states at low energy can often be identified as the bandheads of structures with differing shapes built on those states, These structures were identified in {sup 190-198}Pb via beta decay and alpha decay {open_quotes}fine structure{close_quotes} studies. Coexistence of different shapes in Pb nuclei was predicted by Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations, in which both the oblate and prolate minima were predicted to have excitation energies near 1 MeV. It was our intention to continue the systematic study of the Pb nuclides by searching for excited O{sup +} states in {sup 188}Pb by observing the fine structure in the alpha decay of {sup 192}Po.

  17. Adsorption of dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110): a photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark J; Syres, Karen L; Cant, David J H; Hardman, Samantha J O; Thomas, Andrew G

    2014-07-29

    Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) techniques have been used to study the adsorption of dopamine on a rutile TiO2 (110) single crystal. Photoemission results suggest that dopamine bonds through the oxygen molecules in a bidentate fashion. From the data, it is ambiguous whether the oxygens bond to the same 5-fold coordinated surface titanium atom or bridges across two, although based on the bonding of pyrocatechol on rutile TiO2 (110), it is likely that the dopamine bridges two titanium atoms. Using the searchlight effect, the carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure NEXAFS spectra recorded for dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110) show the phenyl ring to be oriented at 78° ± 5° from the surface and twisted 11 ± 10° relative to the (001) direction.

  18. Excitonic fine-structure splitting in telecom-wavelength InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Statistical distribution and height-dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, Elias Barthel, Stefan; Florian, Matthias; Jahnke, Frank; Schuh, Kolja

    2013-12-09

    The variation of the excitonic fine-structure splitting is studied for semiconductor quantum dots under the influence of a strain-reducing layer, utilized to shift the emission wavelength of the excitonic transition into the telecom-wavelength regime of 1.3–1.5 μm. By means of a sp{sup 3}s{sup *}-tight-binding model and configuration interaction, we calculate wavelength shifts and fine-structure splittings for various quantum dot geometries. We find the splittings remaining small and even decreasing with strain-reducing layer composition for quantum dots with large height. Combined with an observed increased emission efficiency, the applicability for generation of entanglement photons is persistent.

  19. Twelve million resolving power on 4.7 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance instrument with dynamically harmonized cell--observation of fine structure in peptide mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Popov, Igor A; Nagornov, Konstantin; Vladimirov, Gleb N; Kostyukevich, Yury I; Nikolaev, Eugene N

    2014-05-01

    Resolving power of about 12,000 000 at m/z 675 has been achieved on low field homogeneity 4.7 T magnet using a dynamically harmonized Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT ICR) cell. Mass spectra of the fine structure of the isotopic distribution of a peptide were obtained and strong discrimination of small intensity peaks was observed in case of resonance excitation of the ions of the whole isotopic cluster to the same cyclotron radius. The absence of some peaks from the mass spectra of the fine structure was explained basing on results of computer simulations showing strong ion cloud interactions, which cause the coalescence of peaks with m/z close to that of the highest magnitude peak. The way to prevent peak discrimination is to excite ion clouds of different m/z to different cyclotron radii, which was demonstrated and investigated both experimentally and by computer simulations.

  20. Magnetic field control of the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Mrowiński, P.; Musiał, A.; Maryński, A.; Syperek, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Somers, A.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-02

    We investigated the neutral and charged exciton fine structure in single InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dashes emitting at 1.55 μm using polarization-resolved microphotoluminescence in a magnetic field. Inverted spin configuration of horizontally [1–10] and vertically [110] polarized transitions has been observed. An in-plane magnetic field of up to 5 Tesla has been applied to tailor the fine structure, and eventually to reduce the splitting of the bright exciton states down to zero. This inverted structure has been observed for all the investigated excitons, making it a characteristic feature for this class of nanostructures with the largest splitting reduction of 170 μeV.

  1. Energy, fine structure, hyperfine structure, and radiative transition rates of the high-lying multi-excited states for B-like neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun Mei; Chen, Chao; Sun, Yan; Gou, Bing Cong; Shao, Bin

    2015-04-01

    The Rayleigh-Ritz variational method with multiconfiguration interaction wave functions is used to obtain the energies of high-lying multi-excited quartet states 1 s 22 s2 pnl and 1 s 22 p 2 nl 4Pe,o ( n ≥ 2) in B-like neon, including the mass polarization and relativistic corrections. The fine structure and hyperfine structure of the excited quartet states for this system are investigated. Configuration structures of the high-lying multi-excited series are further identified by relativistic corrections and fine structure splittings. The transition rates and wavelengths are also calculated. Calculated wavelengths include the quantum electrodynamic effects. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental data in the literature.

  2. Adsorption of dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110): a photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark J; Syres, Karen L; Cant, David J H; Hardman, Samantha J O; Thomas, Andrew G

    2014-07-29

    Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) techniques have been used to study the adsorption of dopamine on a rutile TiO2 (110) single crystal. Photoemission results suggest that dopamine bonds through the oxygen molecules in a bidentate fashion. From the data, it is ambiguous whether the oxygens bond to the same 5-fold coordinated surface titanium atom or bridges across two, although based on the bonding of pyrocatechol on rutile TiO2 (110), it is likely that the dopamine bridges two titanium atoms. Using the searchlight effect, the carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure NEXAFS spectra recorded for dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110) show the phenyl ring to be oriented at 78° ± 5° from the surface and twisted 11 ± 10° relative to the (001) direction. PMID:25003716

  3. Analysis of the near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure of anthracene: A combined theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Klues, Michael; Witte, Gregor; Hermann, Klaus

    2014-01-07

    The near-edge fine structure of the carbon K-edge absorption spectrum of anthracene was measured and theoretically analyzed by density functional theory calculations implemented in the StoBe code. It is demonstrated that the consideration of electronic relaxation of excited states around localized core holes yields a significant improvement of the calculated excitation energies and reproduces the experimentally observed fine structure well. The detailed analysis of excitation spectra calculated for each symmetry inequivalent excitation center allows in particular to examine the influence of chemical shifts and core hole effects on the excitation energies. Moreover, the visualization of final states explains the large variations in the oscillator strength of various transitions as well as the nature of Rydberg-states that exhibit a notable density of states below the ionization potentials.

  4. Polarization fine structure and enhanced single-photon emission of self-assembled lateral InGaAs quantum dot molecules embedded in a planar microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermannstädter, C.; Witzany, M.; Beirne, G. J.; Schulz, W.-M.; Eichfelder, M.; Rossbach, R.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.; Wang, L.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2009-06-01

    Single lateral InGaAs quantum dot molecules have been embedded in a planar microcavity in order to increase the luminescence extraction efficiency. Using a combination of metal-organic vapor phase and molecular beam epitaxy samples could be produced that exhibit a 30 times enhanced single-photon emission rate. We also show that the single-photon emission is fully switchable between two different molecular excitonic recombination energies by applying a lateral electric field. Furthermore, the presence of a polarization fine structure splitting of the molecular neutral excitonic states is reported which leads to two polarization split classically correlated biexciton-exciton cascades. The fine structure splitting is found to be on the order of 10 μeV.

  5. Dynamical Study of Femtosecond-Laser-Ablated Liquid-Aluminum Nanoparticles Using Spatiotemporally Resolved X-Ray-Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2007-10-19

    We study the temperature evolution of aluminum nanoparticles generated by femtosecond laser ablation with spatiotemporally resolved x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. We successfully identify the nanoparticles based on the L-edge absorption fine structure of the ablation plume in combination with the dependence of the edge structure on the irradiation intensity and the expansion velocity of the plume. In particular, we show that the lattice temperature of the nanoparticles is estimated from the L-edge slope, and that its spatial dependence reflects the cooling of the nanoparticles during plume expansion. The results reveal that the emitted nanoparticles travel in a vacuum as a condensed liquid phase with a lattice temperature of about 2500 to 4200 K in the early stage of plume expansion.

  6. Applications of x ray absorption fine structure to the in situ study of the effect of cobalt in nickel hydrous oxide electrodes for fuel cells and rechargeable batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, Donald A.; Scherson, Daniel A.; Antonio, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic and structural aspects of composite nickel-cobalt hydrous oxides have been examined in alkaline solutions using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results obtained have indicated that cobalt in this material is present as cobaltic ions regardless of the oxidation state of nickel in the lattice. Furthermore, careful analysis of the Co K-edge Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data reveals that the co-electrodeposition procedure generates a single phase, mixed metal hydrous oxide, in which cobaltic ions occupy nickel sites in the NiO2 sheet-like layers and not two intermixed phases each consisting of a single metal hydrous oxide.

  7. Surface structure of CdSe Nanorods revealed by combined X-rayabsorption fine structure measurements and ab-initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aruguete, Deborah A.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Li, Liang-shi; Williamson, Andrew; Fakra, Sirine; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-01-27

    We report orientation-specific, surface-sensitive structural characterization of colloidal CdSe nanorods with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and ab-initio density functional theory calculations. Our measurements of crystallographically-aligned CdSe nanorods show that they have reconstructed Cd-rich surfaces. They exhibit orientation-dependent changes in interatomic distances which are qualitatively reproduced by our calculations. These calculations reveal that the measured interatomic distance anisotropy originates from the nanorod surface.

  8. Fine Structure in the Electron Emission Process for Two DX-Like Centers in Sn-Doped AlGaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hua-han; Kang, Jun-yong; Huang, Qi-sheng

    1998-01-01

    Fine structure in the electron emission process for DX(Sn) centers in AlGaAs has been studied with high resolution Laplace defect spectroscopy. The influence of the different local configuration of Al and Ga atoms around the centers on the electron thermal emissions was observed. An experimental evidence for the microscopic structure of two DX-like centers in Sn-doped AlGaAs is provided.

  9. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  10. Ne+, Ne2+, Ar+, and Ar2+ fine-structure electron-impact excitation data for applications in ultra low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, YE; Wang, Qianxia; Pearce, Jonathan; Pindzola, Michael; Loch, Stuart; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Ballance, Connor

    2016-01-01

    Fine-structure electron-impact excitation of ions plays an important role in cooling most interstellar environments and is important for far infrared (IR) and submillimeter (submm) observations. New atomic structure and collisonal data are presented using both semi-relativistic and fully-relativistic R-matrix methods for Ne+, Ne2+, Ar+, and Ar2+. Some illustrative modeling results using the data are also given.

  11. The Herschel Comprehensive (U)LIRG Emission Survey (HERCULES): CO Ladders, Fine Structure Lines, and Neutral Gas Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; González-Alfonso, E.; Greve, T. R.; Harris, A. I.; Henkel, C.; Israel, F. P.; Isaak, K. G.; Kramer, C.; Meijerink, R.; Naylor, D. A.; Sanders, D. B.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; Spinoglio, L.; Stacey, G. J.; Veenendaal, I.; Veilleux, S.; Walter, F.; Weiß, A.; Wiedner, M. C.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 μm) luminosities (L LIRG > 1011 L ⊙ and L ULIRG > 1012 L ⊙). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (PI: van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (1011 L ⊙ <= L IR <= 1013 L ⊙). With the Herschel Space Observatory, we observe [C II] 157 μm, [O I] 63 μm, and [O I] 145 μm line emission with Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer, CO J = 4-3 through J = 13-12, [C I] 370 μm, and [C I] 609 μm with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [O I] 63 μm emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite 60/100 μm ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [C II], [Si II], [O I], and [C I] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO 4 <= J upp <= 13. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J = 1-0 linewidth, and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. X-ray absorption fine structure determination of pH-dependent U-bacterial cell wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fein, J. B.; Fowle, D. A.; Boyanov, M. I.; Bunker, B. A.; Yee, N.

    2002-11-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements was used at the U L3-edge to directly determine the pH dependence of the cell wall functional groups responsible for the absorption of aqueous UO 22+ to Bacillus subtilis from pH 1.67 to 4.80. Surface complexation modeling can be used to predict metal distributions in water-rock systems, and it has been used to quantify bacterial adsorption of metal cations. However, successful application of these models requires a detailed knowledge not only of the type of bacterial surface site involved in metal adsorption/desorption, but also of the binding geometry. Previous acid-base titrations of B. subtilis cells suggested that three surface functional group types are important on the cell wall; these groups have been postulated to correspond to carboxyl, phosphoryl, and hydroxyl sites. When the U(VI) adsorption to B. subtilis is measured, observed is a significant pH-independent absorption at low pH values (<3.0), ascribed to an interaction between the uranyl cation and a neutrally charged phosphoryl group on the cell wall. The present study provides independent quantitative constraints on the types of sites involved in uranyl binding to B. subtilis from pH 1.67 to 4.80. The XAFS results indicate that at extremely low pH (pH 1.67) UO 22+ binds exclusively to phosphoryl functional groups on the cell wall, with an average distance between the U atom and the P atom of 3.64 ± 0.01 Å. This U-P distance indicates an inner-sphere complex with an oxygen atom shared between the UO 22+ and the phosphoryl ligand. The P signal at extremely low pH value is consistent with the UO 22+ binding to a protonated phosphoryl group, as previously ascribed. With increasing pH (3.22 and 4.80), UO 22+ binds increasingly to bacterial surface carboxyl functional groups, with an average distance between the U atom and the C atom of 2.89 ± 0.02 Å. This U-C distance indicates an inner-sphere complex with two oxygen atoms shared between the UO 22

  13. The eggshell of Drosophila melanogaster. I. Fine structure of the layers and regions of the wild-type eggshell.

    PubMed

    Margaritis, L H; Kafatos, F C; Petri, W H

    1980-06-01

    The fine structure of the several layers and regional specializations in the Drosophila melanogaster eggshell has been studied by a combination of shell isolation procedures and ultrastructural techniques (conventional TEM, whole-mount TEM, SEM, HVEM, freeze-fracture electron microscopy utilizing rotary replication, shadow casting, optical diffraction and stereo imaging). The main shell consists of 5 layers: the vitelline membrane (300 nm thick), the wax layer, the innermost chorionic layer (40-50 nm), the endochorion (500-700 nm), and the exochorion (300-500 nm). The vitelline membrane consists of irregularly organized particles. The wax layer appears to contain multilayered hydrophobic plates which split tangenitally upon freeze fracturing. The innermost chorionic layer is composed of a crystalling lattice. The endochorion is made of a thin (40 nm) fenestrated floor composed of 40-nm fibres and an outer solid (200 nm) roof covered with a network of 40-nm strands. Intermittently spaced pillar connect these 2 parts. Similarities in the substructure of the floor, pillars and roof suggest that they may be composed of similar or identical structural elements. The specialized regions of the shell are the 2 respiratory appendages, the operculum area and the posterior pole. The appendages exhibit 2 sharply distinct surfaces, a dorsal side with isolated 1.5-micrometer plaques and a ventral side with strands of 40-50 nm connected in a network with openings of 70-80 nm. The operculum area, which includes the micropoyle and the collar, is distinguished by 3 unique types of cell imprints. The posterior pole contains 2 distinctive populations of cell imprints: the central area has very thin intercellular ridges and a thin, perforated, endochorionic roof, while the peripheral area contains mixed, thick and thin, intercellular ridges and serves as a transition zone to the main shell pattern. The pillars in the central area of the posterior pole have a distinct arrangement

  14. THE HERSCHEL COMPREHENSIVE (U)LIRG EMISSION SURVEY (HERCULES): CO LADDERS, FINE STRUCTURE LINES, AND NEUTRAL GAS COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Van der Werf, P. P.; Israel, F. P.; Meijerink, R.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Charmandaris, V.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; González-Alfonso, E.; Greve, T. R.; Harris, A. I.; Henkel, C.; Isaak, K. G.; and others

    2015-03-10

    (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 μm) luminosities (L {sub LIRG} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉} and L {sub ULIRG} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (PI: van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (10{sup 11} L {sub ☉} ≤ L {sub IR} ≤ 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}). With the Herschel Space Observatory, we observe [C II] 157 μm, [O I] 63 μm, and [O I] 145 μm line emission with Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer, CO J = 4-3 through J = 13-12, [C I] 370 μm, and [C I] 609 μm with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [O I] 63 μm emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite 60/100 μm ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [C II], [Si II], [O I], and [C I] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO 4 ≤ J {sub upp} ≤ 13. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J = 1-0 linewidth, and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important.

  15. (1,3;1,4)-β-Glucan Biosynthesis by the CSLF6 Enzyme: Position and Flexibility of Catalytic Residues Influence Product Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Dimitroff, George; Little, Alan; Lahnstein, Jelle; Schwerdt, Julian G; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Bulone, Vincent; Burton, Rachel A; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2016-04-01

    Cellulose synthase-like F6 (CslF6) genes encode polysaccharide synthases responsible for (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan biosynthesis in cereal grains. However, it is not clear how both (1,3)- and (1,4)-linkages are incorporated into a single polysaccharide chain and how the frequency and arrangement of the two linkage types that define the fine structure of the polysaccharide are controlled. Through transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, two CSLF6 orthologs from different cereal species were shown to mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans with very different fine structures. Chimeric cDNA constructs with interchanged sections of the barley and sorghum CslF6 genes were developed to identify regions of the synthase enzyme responsible for these differences. A single amino acid residue upstream of the TED motif in the catalytic region was shown to dramatically change the fine structure of the polysaccharide produced. The structural basis of this effect can be rationalized by reference to a homology model of the enzyme and appears to be related to the position and flexibility of the TED motif in the active site of the enzyme. The region and amino acid residue identified provide opportunities to manipulate the solubility of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan in grains and vegetative tissues of the grasses and, in particular, to enhance the solubility of dietary fibers that are beneficial to human health. PMID:26967377

  16. Revisiting Dialogues and Monologues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2012-01-01

    In educational discourse dialogue tends to be viewed as being (morally) superior to monologue. When we look at them as basic forms of communication, we find that dialogue is a two-way, one-to-one form and monologue is a one-way, one-to-many form. In this paper I revisit the alleged (moral) superiority of dialogue. First, I problematize certain…

  17. Time functions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Albert

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we revisit our joint work with Antonio Siconolfi on time functions. We will give a brief introduction to the subject. We will then show how to construct a Lipschitz time function in a simplified setting. We will end with a new result showing that the Aubry set is not an artifact of our proof of existence of time functions for stably causal manifolds.

  18. Clinical ethics revisited

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Peter A; Pellegrino, Edmund D; Siegler, Mark

    2001-01-01

    A decade ago, we reviewed the field of clinical ethics; assessed its progress in research, education, and ethics committees and consultation; and made predictions about the future of the field. In this article, we revisit clinical ethics to examine our earlier observations, highlight key developments, and discuss remaining challenges for clinical ethics, including the need to develop a global perspective on clinical ethics problems. PMID:11346456

  19. Antimony(III) complexing with O-bearing organic ligands in aqueous solution: An X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and solubility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tella, Marie; Pokrovski, Gleb S.

    2009-01-01

    The stability and structure of aqueous complexes formed by trivalent antimony (Sb III) with carboxylic acids (acetic, adipic, malonic, lactic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid), phenols (catechol), and amino acids (glycine) having O- and N-functional groups (carboxyl, alcoholic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl and amine) typical of natural organic matter, were determined at 20 and 60 °C from solubility and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy measurements. In organic-free aqueous solutions and in the presence of acetic, adipic, malonic acids and glycine, both spectroscopic and solubility data are consistent with the dominant formation of Sb III hydroxide species, Sb(OH)3-nn+,Sb(OH)30andSb(OH)4-, at strongly acid, acid-to-neutral and basic pH, respectively, demonstrating negligible complexing with mono-functional organic ligands (acetic) or those having non adjacent carboxylic groups (adipic, malonic). In contrast, in the presence of poly-functional carboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids and catechol, Sb III forms stable 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with the studied organic ligands over a wide pH range typical of natural waters (3 < pH < 9). XAFS spectroscopy measurements show that in these species the central Sb III atom has a distorted pseudo-trigonal pyramidal geometry composed of the lone pair of 5s 2 electrons of Sb and four oxygen atoms from two adjacent functional groups of the ligand (O dbnd C-OH and/or C sbnd OH), forming a five-membered bidendate chelate cycle. Stability constants for these species, generated from Sb 2O 3 (rhomb.) solubility experiments, were used to model Sb complexing with natural humic acids possessing the same functional groups as those investigated in this study. Our predictions show that in an aqueous solution of pH between 2 and 10, containing 1 μg/L of Sb and 5 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), up to 35% of total dissolved Sb binds to aqueous organic matter via carboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic groups. This amount of

  20. Iron (III)-silica interactions in aqueous solution: insights from X.-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Schott, Jacques; Farges, François; Hazemann, Jean-Louis

    2003-10-01

    The influence of aqueous silica on the hydrolysis of iron(III) nitrate and chloride salts in dilute aqueous solutions ( mFe ˜ 0.01 mol/kg) was studied at ambient temperature using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge. Results show that in Si-free iron nitrate and chloride solutions at acid pH (pH < 2.5), Fe is hexa-coordinated with 6 oxygens of H 2O- and/or OH-groups in the first coordination sphere of the metal, at an Fe-O distance of 2.00 ± 0.01 Å. With increasing pH (2.7 < pH < 13), these groups are rapidly replaced by bridging hydroxyls (-OH-) or oxygens (-O-), and polymerized Fe hydroxide complexes form via Fe-(O/OH)-Fe bonds. In these polymers, the first atomic shell of iron represents a distorted octahedron with six O/OH groups and Fe-O distances ranging from 1.92 to 2.07 Å. The Fe octahedra are linked together by their edges (Fe-Fe distance 2.92-3.12 Å) and corners (Fe-Fe distance ˜3.47 ± 0.03 Å). The Fe-Fe coordination numbers ( Nedge = 1-2; Ncorner = 0.5-0.7) are consistent with the dominant presence of iron dimers, trimers and tetramers at pH 2.5 to 2.9, and of higher-polymerized species at pH > 3. At pH > 2.5 in the presence of aqueous silica, important changes in Fe(III) hydrolysis are detected. In 0.05- m Si solutions (pH ˜ 2.7-3.0), the corner linkages between Fe octahedra in the polymeric complexes disappear, and the Fe-Fe distances corresponding to the edge linkages slightly increase (Fe-Fe edge ˜ 3.12-3.14 Å). The presence of 1 to 2 silicons at 3.18 ± 0.03 Å is detected in the second atomic shell around iron. At basic pH (˜12.7), similar structural changes are observed for the iron second shell. The Fe-Si and Fe-Fe distances and coordination numbers derived in this study are consistent with (1) Fe-Si complex stoichiometries Fe 2Si 1-2 and Fe 3Si 2-3 at pH < 3; (2) structures composed of Fe-Fe dimers and trimers sharing one or two edges of FeO 6-octahedra; and (3) silicon tetrahedra linked to two

  1. Studying the local structures of novel materials using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu

    2009-12-01

    In this dissertation, investigations on the local lattice structures for a variety of novel materials using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique are presented. Different experiment schemes were applied to obtain EXAFS data with high quality, and some interesting results were obtained by careful analysis. The power of the EXAFS technique was once again proved. In Chapter 1, I first briefly introduce the EXAFS theory and experiments, then give readers who are not familiar with this technique a short introduction on data reduction and analysis, and finally discuss some problems that are easily ignored in the interpretation of the experiment results. In Chapter 2, a temperature-dependent EXAFS investigation of La 1-xCaxMnO 3 is presented for the concentration range that spans the ferromagnetic-insulator (FMI) to ferromagnetic-metal (FMM) transition region, x = 0.16, 0.18, 0.20, and 0.22; the titrated hole concentrations are slightly higher y = 0.2, 0.22, 0.24, and 0.25 respectively. In Chapter 3, I report EXAFS studies of n- and p-type Ba8Ga 16Ge30 samples (type I clathrate) at the Ga, Ge, and Ba K-edges, to probe the local structure, particularly around the Ba atoms located inside 20- and 24-atom cages (Ba1 and Ba2 sites respectively) formed of Ga/Ge atoms. In agreement with diffraction analysis we find Ba2 is off-center, with a component in the bc plane (0.15 A) comparable to that found in diffraction; however, under the assumption of a stiff cage we also require a significant a component. This suggests a coupling or attraction between the Ba2 atoms and the hexagonal rings at the top or bottom of the cage that encloses the Ba2 site. In Chapter 4, I report detailed degradation and rejuvenation studies for AC electro-luminescence (EL) devices made using the phosphor ZnS:Cu,CI. We find that the AC EL emission spectra vary considerably with AC driving frequency but all spectra can be fit to a sum of four Gaussians. The combined experiments place

  2. Spatial structure determination of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees}CO on Cu(111) using angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.

    1997-04-01

    The authors report a study of the spatial structure of ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{degrees} (low coverage) and (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} (intermediate coverage) CO adsorbed on Cu(111), using the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) technique at beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The CO molecule adsorbs on an atop site for both adsorption phases. Full multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) calculations were used to extract the C-Cu. bond length and the first Cu-Cu layer spacing for each adsorption phase. The authors find that the C-Cu bond length remains unchanged with increasing coverage, but the 1st Cu-Cu layer spacing contracts at the intermediate coverage. They calculate the bending mode force constant in the (1.5 x 1.5)R18{degrees} phase to be K{sub {delta}} = 2.2 (1) x 10{sup {minus}12} dyne-cm/rad from their experimentally determined bond lengths combined with previously published infra-red absorption frequencies.

  3. [CuCln](2-n) Ion-Pair Species in 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Ionic Liquid-Water Mixtures: Ultraviolet-Visible, X-ray Absorbtion Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Camaioni, Donald M.; Amonette, James E.; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Johnson, Timothy J.; Fulton, John L.

    2010-10-07

    We report details of the coordination environment about Cu(II) in a pure ionic liquid, 1- ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM]Cl) and in mixtures containing varying amounts of water from 0-100% of the [EMIM]Cl. There are many stages in the ion pairing of the divalent cation, Cu(II) including the contact ion pairing of Cu2+ with multiple Cl- to form various CuCln (2-n) polyanions. Thereis also the subsequent solvation and ion pairing of the polychlorometallate anion with the EMIM+ cation. Using a combination of x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), UV-Vis spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations (TDDFT) we are able to follow the detailed structural changes about Cu(II). Ion pair formation is strongly promoted in [EMIM]Cl by the low dielectric constant and by the extensive breakdown of the water hydrogen bond network in [EMIM]Cl/water mixtures. In the [EMIM]Cl solvent the CuCl4 2- species dominates and it’s geometry is quite similar to gas-phase structure. These results are important in understanding catalysis and separation processes involving transition metals in ionic liquid systems.

  4. Structural Study of Cu-Deficient Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 Solar Cell Materials by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Yamazoe, Seiji; Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2012-10-01

    Cu-poor Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 powders were prepared from elemental powders. The crystal structure of Cu-poor Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses. Kesterite-type Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 could be prepared in the range of 0≤x ≤0.0750. The lattice parameters were refined by the Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction data. The lattice constants a and c decreased with a decrease in the Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio. However, there was little change in c/a value. On the other hand, the position of the Se atom (u parameters) changed considerably. The XAFS study showed that the local structure of Sn in Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) changed with a decrease in Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio and the local structural changes in Cu, Zn, or Se could not be clearly observed. These local structural changes around Sn are due to the disordering of Cu, Zn, and Sn atoms. The diffuse reflectance spectra showed that the band gap of Cu2ZnSnSe4 is 0.98 eV and that the band gaps do not depend on Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio in the range of 0≤x ≤0.0750.

  5. Fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of half-metallic ferromagnet ``zinc-blende CrAs'' grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofuchi, H.; Mizuguchi, M.; Ono, K.; Oshima, M.; Akinaga, H.; Manago, T.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, geometric structures for a half-metallic ferromagnet "zinc-blende CrAs", which showed ferromagnetic behavior beyond room temperature, were investigated using fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement. The EXAFS measurements revealed that As atoms around Cr atoms in the 2 nm CrAs film grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate were coordinated tetrahedrally, indicating formation of zinc-blende CrAs. The Cr-As bond length in the zinc-blende CrAs is 2.49 Å. This value is close to that which was estimated from the lattice constant (5.82 Å) of ferromagnetic zinc-blende CrAs calculated by full-potential linearized augmented-plane wave method. The EXAFS analysis show that the theoretically predicted zinc-blende CrAs can be fabricated on GaAs(0 0 1) substrate by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy.

  6. Fundamental Constants as Monitors of Particle Physics and Dark Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2016-03-01

    This contribution considers the constraints on particle physics and dark energy parameter space imposed by the astronomical observational constraints on the variation of the proton to electron mass ratio μ and the fine structure constant α. These constraints impose limits on the temporal variation of these parameters on a time scale greater than half the age of the universe, a time scale inaccessible by laboratory facilities such as the Large Hadron Collider. The limits on the variance of μ and α constrain combinations of the QCD Scale, the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa coupling on the particle physics side and a combination of the temporal variation of rolling scalar field and its coupling to the constants on the dark energy side.

  7. 42 CFR 488.30 - Revisit user fee for revisit surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... surveys conducted during the time period for which authority to levy a revisit user fee exists. (e... of the revisit user fee, such as clerical errors, billing for a fee already paid, or assessment of a... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revisit user fee for revisit surveys....

  8. Reframing in dentistry: revisited.

    PubMed

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Kamatham, Rekalakshmi; Challa, Ramasubbareddy; Asokan, Sharath

    2013-01-01

    The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child's behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice. PMID:24021326

  9. Multicomponent diffusion revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, S. H.

    2006-07-01

    The derivation of the multicomponent diffusion law is revisited. Following Furry [Am. J. Phys. 16, 63 (1948)], Williams [Am. J. Phys. 26, 467 (1958); Combustion Theory, 2nd ed. (Benjamin/Cummings , Menlo Park, CA,1985)] heuristically rederived the classical kinetic theory results using macroscopic equations, and pointed out that the dynamics of the mixture fluid had been assumed inviscid. This paper generalizes the derivation, shows that the inviscid assumption can easily be relaxed to add a new term to the classical diffusion law, and the thermal diffusion term can also be easily recovered. The nonuniqueness of the multicomponent diffusion coefficient matrix is emphasized and discussed.

  10. Frequency Fine Structures of Type III Bursts Due to Localized Medium-Scale Density Structures Along Paths of Type III Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2012-07-01

    Predictions from large-scale kinetic simulations are presented for the effects on coronal type III bursts of localized, medium-scale, enhanced density structures superposed on the coronal background along the paths of type III beams. The simulations show that these density structures can produce pronounced frequency fine structures in type III spectra. Flux intensifications and reductions of f p and 2 f p emission relative to those for the unperturbed background corona occur at frequencies corresponding to the density structures, where f p is the local electron plasma frequency. Frequency fine structures that are intense, slowly drifting, and narrowband, and thus resemble the characteristics of stria bursts, are predicted for the 2 f p emission. The 2 f p results are consistent with the qualitative proposal of Takakura and Yousef ( Solar Phys. 40, 421, 1975) for the interpretation of stria/type IIIb bursts. However, the predicted f p emission is much weaker than the 2 f p emission and generally below observable levels, and the predicted frequency fine structures do not always show stria characteristics. The predictions are thus inconsistent with the qualitative suggestion of Takakura and Yousef and the interpretations of many observers that stria bursts occur more often in f p than in 2 f p emission. The significant discrepancies for f p emission between our numerical calculations and the qualitative proposition of Takakura and Yousef (1975) are mainly caused by: i) differences in the detailed emission processes, ii) neglect of scattering of f p emission off small-scale density fluctuations by Takakura and Yousef (1975), and iii) other simplifications made in both works. Possible improvements to the simulations are discussed, including improvements to the emission processes and the coronal and beam conditions ( e.g., beam speed), in order to produce realistic stria/type IIIb bursts in f p emission.

  11. Speciation of deeply buried TiOx nanolayers with grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence combined with a near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollakowski, Beatrix; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Reinhardt, Falk; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Nondestructive methods based on electron emission may encounter serious difficulties when probing the chemical state of deeply buried nanolayers due to restricted information depth. The purpose of the present work is to evaluate to which extent photon emission can overcome these restrictions. Grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence combined with a near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure investigation (GIXRF-NEXAFS) offers access to depth-resolving analysis of buried nanolayers with respect to both the chemical speciation and the layer composition. By varying the angle of incidence, the penetration depth can be tuned from a few to several hundreds of nanometers. The information depth of the emitted fluorescence radiation is in the same general range as the soft x-ray regime. Initial measurements were performed on nominally 30 nm thick titanium nanolayers oxidized to different extents and buried below 5 nm carbon layers. These layered structures were produced by means of ion beam sputtering deposition. The plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron storage ring BESSY II provides tunable radiation of both well-known flux and high spectral purity for GIXRF-NEXAFS studies. The current results confirm that GIXRF-NEXAFS has the potential to substantially contribute to the speciation of deeply buried nanolayers. The analysis of measurements at a constant incident angle demonstrated that it is not possible to find an angle of incidence for the NEXAFS region to ensure a stable penetration depth. However, appropriate angular corrections can ensure a constant mean penetration depth, in particular, in the vicinity of absorption edges.

  12. Fine structure of the epicytoplasmic eimerid coccidium Acroeimeria pintoi Lainson & Paperna, 1999, a gut parasite of the lizard Ameiva ameiva in north Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paperna, L; Lainson, R

    1999-12-01

    An account is given of the fine structure of Acroeimerio pintoi, an epicytoplasmic coccidium infecting the small intestine of the teiid lizard Ameiva ameiva in north Brazil. The merozoile becomes encircled by outgrowths of the host-cell wall which then merge to form a parasitophorous sack in which the parasite continues to develop when this bulges out above the epithelium surface. The account includes a description of merozoites, young meronts and young and mature macrogamonts. The parasitophorous vacuole has a complex tubular system connected to its junction with the host-cell. The parasites are coated with a droplet-like glycocalyx and covered by a fine filamentous layer. PMID:10633508

  13. C 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) of substituted benzoic acids: a theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Baldea,I.; Schimmelpfennig, B.; Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J.; Schirmer, J.; Trofimov, A.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to explain the discrete transitions in experimental C 1s-NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) spectra of various benzoic acid derivates. Transition energies and oscillator strengths of the contributing C 1s-{pi}* excitations are computed using the ADC(2) (second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction) method. This method is demonstrated to be well suited for the finite electronic systems represented by these simple organic acids. There is good agreement between experiment and theory reproducing all the relevant spectral features. Some transitions can only be assigned based on a theoretical foundation. Remaining discrepancies between experimental and computed spectra are discussed.

  14. Na-induced bonding and bond-length changes for CO on Pt(111): A near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sette, F.; Stöhr, J.; Kollin, E. B.; Dwyer, D. J.; Gland, J. L.; Robbins, J. L.; Johnson, A. L.

    1985-03-01

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure studies above the C and O K edges for CO on Pt(111) reveal a 4-eV shift of the σ shape resonance when Na(0.2 monolayer) is coabsorbed. This allows determination of a Na-induced (0.12+/-0.03)-Å expansion of the C-O bond. Na does not affect the vertical molecular orientation on the surface. Reduction and broadening of the 1s-->2π* resonance and the CO bond lengthening in the presence of Na signifies substantially increased metal to CO backbonding.

  15. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy fine structure of the Cu L2,3 ionization edge in substitutional Cu-Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Cécile; Clair, Sylvain; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph; Bangert, Herwig; Jouffrey, Bernard; Schattschneider, Peter

    2001-04-01

    We present a study of Cu-Ni alloys with different Ni concentrations using electron energy-loss spectroscopy in order to establish a relationship between the Ni concentration and the energy-loss near-edge structures of the Cu L3 ionization edge. The experimental results are compared with ab initio band-structure calculations made with the WIEN97 and TELNES packages. We found excellent agreement between experiment and simulation making use of a supercell for modelling the Cu-Ni alloy. We were able to interpret the evolution of the fine structures in terms of local and global composition.

  16. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure examination of chemical bonding in sputter deposited boron and boron-nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Suthreland, D.G.J.

    1996-05-01

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) is used to examine the chemical bonding in boron and boron-nitride films sputter deposited from a fully-dense, pure boron target. Reactive sputtering is used to prepare the boron-nitride and multilayered films. Although the process of sputter deposition often produces films that lack long range order, NEXAFS reveals the distinguishing features of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybridization that are associated with different crystalline structures. The sensitivity of NEXAFS to local order further provides details in bonding modifications that exist in these films.

  17. State of manganese in the photosynthetic apparatus. 1. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies on chloroplasts and di-.mu.-oxo-bridged dimanganese model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J. A.; Robertson, A. S.; Smith, J. P.; Thompson, A. C.; Cooper, S. R.; Klein, M. P.

    1981-09-01

    In this paper, extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies on the manganese contained in spinach chloroplasts and on certain di-p-oxo-bridged manganese dimers of the form (X2Mn)O2(MnX2) (X = 2,2'-bipyridine and 1 ,10-phenanthroline) are reported. From these studies, the manganese associated with photosynthetic oxygen evolution is suggested to occur as a bridged transition-metal dimer with most likely another manganese. Finally, extensive details on the analysis are included.

  18. Accurate determination of the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground states of C-13 and C-12 by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooksy, A. L.; Saykally, R. J.; Brown, J. M.; Evenson, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate values are presented for the fine-structure intervals in the 3P ground state of neutral atomic C-12 and C-13 as obtained from laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The rigorous analysis of C-13 hyperfine structure, the measurement of resonant fields for C-12 transitions at several additional far-infrared laser frequencies, and the increased precision of the C-12 measurements, permit significant improvement in the evaluation of these energies relative to earlier work. These results will expedite the direct and precise measurement of these transitions in interstellar sources and should assist in the determination of the interstellar C-12/C-13 abundance ratio.

  19. Ab initio calculations of the 2p3/2-2p1/2 fine-structure splitting in boronlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. N.; Shabaev, V. M.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Plunien, G.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2013-09-01

    We have performed ab initio QED calculations of the (1s)2(2s)22p3/2-(1s)2(2s)22p1/2 fine-structure splitting along the boron isoelectronic sequence for all ions with 17≤Z≤100. This level splitting was evaluated within the extended Furry picture and by making use of four different screening potentials in order to estimate the effects of interelectronic correlations. The accuracy of the predicted transition energies has been improved significantly when compared with previous computations.

  20. Variation of fundamental constants in space and time: Theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2008-10-01

    Review of recent works devoted to the temporal and spatialvariation of the fundamental constants and dependence of the fundamentalconstants on the gravitational potential (violation of local position invariance) is presented. We discuss the variation of the fine structure constant α=e2/ħc, strong interaction andfundamental masses (Higgs vacuum), e.g. the electron-to-proton mass ratioμ=me/Mp or Xe=me/ΛQCD and Xq=mq/ΛQCD.We also present new results from Big Bang nucleosynthesisand Oklo natural nuclear reactor data and propose new measurements of enhanced effects in atoms, nuclei and molecules, both in quasar and laboratory spectra.