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Sample records for fine-structure constant revisited

  1. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α ^{-6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δ α /α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10^{-5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing "dark energy" and "warm dark matter", but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter.

  2. Cosmic concordance and the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Crittenden, Robert; Weller, Jochen

    2001-02-01

    Recent measurements of a peak in the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background suggest that the geometry of the universe is close to flat. But if other accepted indicators of cosmological parameters are also correct then the best fit model is marginally closed, with the peak in the spectrum at slightly larger scales than in a flat universe. If these observations persevere, one way they might be reconciled with a flat universe is if the fine structure constant had a lower value at earlier times, which would delay the recombination of electrons and protons and also act to suppress secondary oscillations as observed. We discuss evidence for a few percent increase in the fine structure constant between the time of recombination and the present.

  3. Revisiting the 53Mn-53Cr Isotopic Systematics in Phosphates Minerals in IIIAB Iron Meteorites: Implications for the Fine Structure Constant Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, B.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Phinney, D. L.

    2007-03-01

    New Mn-Cr isotope data on phosphate minerals in the Grant IIIAB iron meteorite places new constraint on the uncertainty for the 187Re decay constant and leads to the "fine structure constant" variations at 3.3x10E-16/y over the last 4.567 Ga.

  4. The fine-structure constant before quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2003-03-01

    This paper focuses on the early history of the fine-structure constant, largely the period until 1925. Contrary to what is generally assumed, speculations concerning the interdependence of the elementary electric charge and Planck's constant predated Arnold Sommerfeld's 1916 discussion of the dimensionless constant. This paper pays particular attention to a little known work from 1914 in which G N Lewis and E Q Adams derived what is effectively a numerical expression for the fine-structure constant.

  5. Revisit to diffraction anomalous fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Tokuda, K.; Shimada, K.; Ichitsubo, T.; Oishi, M.; Mizuki, J.; Matsubara, E.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) method that is a spectroscopic analysis combined with resonant X-ray diffraction enables the determination of the valence state and local structure of a selected element at a specific crystalline site and/or phase. This method has been improved by using a polycrystalline sample, channel-cut monochromator optics with an undulator synchrotron radiation source, an area detector and direct determination of resonant terms with a logarithmic dispersion relation. This study makes the DAFS method more convenient and saves a large amount of measurement time in comparison with the conventional DAFS method with a single crystal. The improved DAFS method has been applied to some model samples, Ni foil and Fe3O4 powder, to demonstrate the validity of the measurement and the analysis of the present DAFS method. PMID:25343791

  6. A simple cosmology with a varying fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Håvard Bunes; Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2002-01-21

    We investigate the cosmological consequences of a theory in which the electric charge e can vary. In this theory the fine structure "constant," alpha, remains almost constant in the radiation era, undergoes a small increase in the matter era, but approaches a constant value when the universe starts accelerating because of a positive cosmological constant. This model satisfies geonuclear, nucleosynthesis, and cosmic microwave background constraints on time variation in alpha, while fitting the observed accelerating Universe and evidence for small alpha variations in quasar spectra. It also places specific restrictions on the nature of the dark matter. Further tests, involving stellar spectra and Eötvös experiments, are proposed.

  7. Fine structure constant and quantized optical transparency of plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Kravets, V G; Schedin, F; Grigorenko, A N

    2012-01-24

    Optics is renowned for displaying quantum phenomena. Indeed, studies of emission and absorption lines, the photoelectric effect and blackbody radiation helped to build the foundations of quantum mechanics. Nevertheless, it came as a surprise that the visible transparency of suspended graphene is determined solely by the fine structure constant, as this kind of universality had been previously reserved only for quantized resistance and flux quanta in superconductors. Here we describe a plasmonic system in which relative optical transparency is determined solely by the fine structure constant. The system consists of a regular array of gold nanoparticles fabricated on a thin metallic sublayer. We show that its relative transparency can be quantized in the near-infrared, which we attribute to the quantized contact resistance between the nanoparticles and the metallic sublayer. Our results open new possibilities in the exploration of universal dynamic conductance in plasmonic nanooptics.

  8. Variations in the fine-structure constant constraining gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Cunha, M. S.; Muniz, C. R.; Tahim, M. O.; Vieira, H. S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the fine-structure constant, α, locally varies in the presence of a static and spherically symmetric gravitational source. The procedure consists in calculating the solution and the energy eigenvalues of a massive scalar field around that source, considering the weak-field regime. From this result, we obtain expressions for a spatially variable fine-structure constant by considering suitable modifications in the involved parameters admitting some scenarios of semi-classical and quantum gravities. Constraints on free parameters of the approached theories are calculated from astrophysical observations of the emission spectra of a white dwarf. Such constraints are finally compared with those obtained in the literature.

  9. Deeper Probing of the Fine-structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-10-01

    In our earlier attempt in [1] to derive fine-structure constant, one subtle reason why the natural logarithm of the age of the universe in Planck times comes out to be slightly greater than the reciprocal of the fine structure constant is that the variable W in Boltzmann's expression should be the age of the universe in Planck times divided by the bit depth for our specific application. Since we cannot decode the nature's bit depth, we cannot come up with the expected value of ALPHA. For an assumed bit depth of 10, the reciprocal of ALPHA goes down by ln10 (2.3) without having a significant impact on the order of magnitude of the baud rate (baud rate = bits per second/bit depth = 10^43 (Planck time/second)/10 = 10^42). Use of terms and equations from informatics in both of author's interrelated abstracts this meeting is meant to engage a wider audience simply. [1] Goradia, Shantilal ``What is Fine-structure Constant?'' http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040v3.

  10. Topological Quantization in Units of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejko, Joseph; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Drew, H.Dennis; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Fundamental topological phenomena in condensed matter physics are associated with a quantized electromagnetic response in units of fundamental constants. Recently, it has been predicted theoretically that the time-reversal invariant topological insulator in three dimensions exhibits a topological magnetoelectric effect quantized in units of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/{h_bar}c. In this Letter, we propose an optical experiment to directly measure this topological quantization phenomenon, independent of material details. Our proposal also provides a way to measure the half-quantized Hall conductances on the two surfaces of the topological insulator independently of each other.

  11. New Tests for Variations of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant, by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atomos with different atomic number Z. H- maser, Cs and Hg+ clocks have a different dependence on ia relativistic contributions of order (Z. Recent H-maser vs Hg+ clock comparison data improves laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to giveFuture laser cooled clocks (Be+, Rb, Cs, Hg+, etc.), when compared, will yield the most senstive of all tests for.

  12. QED Based Calculation of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Lestone, John Paul

    2016-10-13

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. Here, semi-classical approaches are used to obtain a more intuitive feel for what causes electrostatics, and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. These intuitive arguments lead to a possible answer to the question of the nature of charge. Virtual photons, with a reduced wavelength of λ, are assumed to interact with isolated electrons with a cross section of πλ2. This interaction is assumed to generate time-reversed virtual photons that are capable of seeking out and interacting with other electrons. This exchange of virtual photons between particles is assumed to generate and define the strength of electromagnetism. With the inclusion of near-field effects the model presented here gives a fine structure constant of ~1/137 and an anomalous magnetic moment of the electron of ~0.00116. These calculations support the possibility that near-field corrections are the key to understanding the numerical value of the dimensionless fine structure constant.

  13. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  14. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  15. Fine-structure constant for gravitational and scalar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.

    2014-08-01

    Starting from the coupling of a relativistic quantum particle to the curved Schwarzschild space time, we show that the Dirac-Schwarzschild problem has bound states and calculate their energies including relativistic corrections. Relativistic effects are shown to be suppressed by the gravitational fine-structure constant αG=Gm1m2/(ℏc), where G is Newton's gravitational constant, c is the speed of light, and m1 and m2≫m1 are the masses of the two particles. The kinetic corrections due to space-time curvature are shown to lift the familiar (n,j) degeneracy of the energy levels of the hydrogen atom. We supplement the discussion by a consideration of an attractive scalar potential, which, in the fully relativistic Dirac formalism, modifies the mass of the particle according to the replacement m →m(1-λ/r), where r is the radial coordinate. We conclude with a few comments regarding the (n,j) degeneracy of the energy levels, where n is the principal quantum number, and j is the total angular momentum, and illustrate the calculations by way of a numerical example.

  16. Varying fine structure 'constant' and charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2009-12-15

    Speculation that the fine-structure constant {alpha} varies in spacetime has a long history. We derive, in 4-D general relativity and in isotropic coordinates, the solution for a charged spherical black hole according to the framework for dynamical {alpha} J. D. Bekenstein, Phys. Rev. D 25, 1527 (1982).. This solution coincides with a previously known one-parameter extension of the dilatonic black hole family. Among the notable properties of varying-{alpha} charged black holes are adherence to a 'no hair' principle, the absence of the inner (Cauchy) horizon of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, the nonexistence of precisely extremal black holes, and the appearance of naked singularities in an analytic extension of the relevant metric. The exteriors of almost extremal electrically (magnetically) charged black holes have simple structures which makes their influence on applied magnetic (electric) fields transparent. We rederive the thermodynamic functions of the modified black holes; the otherwise difficult calculation of the electric potential is done by a shortcut. We confirm that variability of {alpha} in the wake of expansion of the universe does not threaten the generalized second law.

  17. A New Physical Meaning of Sommerfeld Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    2015-04-01

    Identifying physical space or Casimir vacuum as a compressible tachyon fluid, Planck compressible ether, leads to stochastic definitions of Planck h = mk <λk > c and Boltzmann k = mk <νk > c constants, finite photon mass mk = (hk/c3)1/2 , amu = mk c2 = (hkc)1/2 , and modified Avogadro-Loschmidt number No = 1/(hkc)1/2 = 6.03766 x1023 mole-1 . Thus, Lorentz-FitzGerald contractions now result from compressibility of physical space and become causal (Pauli) in accordance with Poincaré-Lorentz dynamic theory of relativity as opposed to Einstein kinematic theory of relativity. At thermodynamic equilibrium he = me <λe > ve = hk = mk <λk > c = h, Compton wavelength can be expressed as λc = h/me c = (ve /c)h <λe > /(me <λe > ve) = αλe . Hence, Sommerfeld fine structure constant α is identified as the ratio of electron to photon speeds α = e2/(2ɛo hc) = ve/c = 1/137.036. The mean thermal speed of electron at equilibrium with photon gas is ve = 2.187640x106 m/s and its de Broglie wavelength is λe = 3.3250x10-10 m. Also, electron kinetic energy for oscillations in two directions < x + > and < x- > or ɛe = hνe = me ve2= kTe results in electron temperature Te = 3.15690x105 K.

  18. A Potential Link Between the Cosmological Constant and the Fine-structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-04-01

    The age of the universe, about 10^60 Planck times, makes the spherical radius (R) of its space 10^60 Planck lengths, as the light moves one Planck length per one Planck time. The fine-structure constant (α) closely equals the natural logarithm of the square root of the reciprocal of the cosmological constant (λ), making α ln (1/λ), where λ = 1/ R^2 as originally introduced by Einstein in equation number (14) in his 1917 paper: Cosmological Considerations on the General Theory of Relativity. This confirms the time-dependent variation of fine-structure constant in [1], but does not address the issue of dark energy. While [1] invokes negative entropy (-Q/T), so it also invokes dark energy simply. The problem still remains that no theory, as yet, combines the probabilistic aspect of quantum mechanics with gravity. In the meanwhile, we can link [1] with the quantum information theory as information links to entropy. [1] Goradia S. Preprint at (http://www.arxiv.org/physics/0210040 v3 (Jan 2007).

  19. Enhanced effect of temporal variation of the fine-structure constant in diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-03-15

    We show that the relative effect of variation of the fine-structure constant in microwave transitions between very close and narrow rotational-hyperfine levels may be enhanced 2-3 orders of magnitude in diatomic molecules with unpaired electrons like LaS, LaO, LuS, LuO, YbF, and similar molecular ions. The enhancement is result of cancellation between the hyperfine and rotational intervals.

  20. Constraining spatial variations of the fine structure constant using clusters of galaxies and Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martino, I.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Ebeling, H.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an improved methodology to constrain spatial variations of the fine structure constant using clusters of galaxies. We use the Planck 2013 data to measure the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect at the location of 618 x-ray selected clusters. We then use a Monte Carlo Markov Chain algorithm to obtain the temperature of the cosmic microwave background at the location of each galaxy cluster. When fitting three different phenomenological parametrizations allowing for monopole and dipole amplitudes in the value of the fine structure constant we improve the results of earlier analysis involving clusters and the cosmic microwave background power spectrum, and we also find that the best-fit direction of a hypothetical dipole is compatible with the direction of other known anomalies. Although the constraining power of our current data sets do not allow us to test the indications of a fine structure constant dipole obtained though high-resolution optical/UV spectroscopy, our results do highlight that clusters of galaxies will be a very powerful tool to probe fundamental physics at low redshift.

  1. Strong limit on the spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    Observed spectra of quasars provide a powerful tool to test the possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/ћc over the history of the Universe. It is demonstrated that high sensitivity to the variation of α can be obtained from a comparison of the spectra of quasars and laboratories. We reported a new constraint on the variation of the fine-structure constant based on the analysis of the optical spectra of the fine-structure transitions in [NeIII], [NeV], [OIII], [OI] and [SII] multiplets from 14 Seyfert 1.5 galaxies. The weighted mean value of the α-variation derived from our analysis over the redshift range 0.035 < z < 0.281 Δα/α= (4.50 +/- 5.53) \\times 10-5. This result presents strong limit improvements on the constraint on Δα/α compared to the published in the literature

  2. On the fine-structure constant in a plasma model of the fluctuating vacuum substratum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of an intimate connection between the quivering motion of electrons and positrons (Zitterbewegung), predicted by the Dirac equation, and the zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum is suggested. The nature of the proposed connection is discussed quantitatively, and an approximate self-consistency relation is derived, supplying a purely mathematical expression that relates the dimensionless coupling strengths (fine-structure constants) alpha sub e and alpha sub g of electromagnetism and gravity. These considerations provide a tentative explanation for the heretofore puzzling number 1/alpha sub e of about 137.036 and suggest that attempts to unify gravity with the electroweak and strong interactions will ultimately prove successful.

  3. Quantum field theory and classical optics: determining the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchs, Gerd; Hawton, Margaret; Sánchez-Soto, Luis L.

    2017-01-01

    The properties of the vacuum are described by quantum physics including the response to external fields such as electromagnetic radiation. Of the two parameters that govern the details of the electromagnetic field dynamics in vacuum, one is fixed by the requirement of Lorentz invariance c = 1/\\sqrt {ε 0 μ 0 } . The other one, Z0 = \\sqrt {μ 0 /ε 0 } = 1/(cε 0 ) and its relation to the quantum vacuum, is discussed in this contribution. Deriving ε 0 from the properties of the quantum vacuum implies the derivation of the fine structure constant.

  4. Sensitivity of ultracold-atom scattering experiments to variation of the fine-structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Borschevsky, A.; Beloy, K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Schwerdtfeger, P.

    2011-05-15

    We present numerical calculations for cesium and mercury to estimate the sensitivity of the scattering length to the variation of the fine-structure constant {alpha}. The method used follows the ideas of Chin and Flambaum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 230801 (2006)], where the sensitivity to the variation of the electron-to-proton mass ratio {beta} was considered. We demonstrate that for heavy systems, the sensitivity to the variation of {alpha} is of the same order of magnitude as to the variation of {beta}. Near narrow Feshbach resonances, the enhancement of the sensitivity may exceed nine orders of magnitude.

  5. Enhanced Laboratory Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant using Highly Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-09-17

    We study atomic systems that are in the frequency range of optical atomic clocks and have enhanced sensitivity to potential time variation of the fine-structure constant {alpha}. The high sensitivity is due to coherent contributions from three factors: high nuclear charge Z, high ionization degree, and significant differences in the configuration composition of the states involved. Configuration crossing keeps the frequencies in the optical range despite the large ionization energies. We discuss a few promising examples that have the largest {alpha} sensitivities seen in atomic systems.

  6. Enhanced laboratory sensitivity to variation of the fine-structure constant using highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V

    2010-09-17

    We study atomic systems that are in the frequency range of optical atomic clocks and have enhanced sensitivity to potential time variation of the fine-structure constant α. The high sensitivity is due to coherent contributions from three factors: high nuclear charge Z, high ionization degree, and significant differences in the configuration composition of the states involved. Configuration crossing keeps the frequencies in the optical range despite the large ionization energies. We discuss a few promising examples that have the largest α sensitivities seen in atomic systems.

  7. New determination of the fine structure constant from the electron value and QED.

    PubMed

    Gabrielse, G; Hanneke, D; Kinoshita, T; Nio, M; Odom, B

    2006-07-21

    Quantum electrodynamics (QED) predicts a relationship between the dimensionless magnetic moment of the electron (g) and the fine structure constant (alpha). A new measurement of g using a one-electron quantum cyclotron, together with a QED calculation involving 891 eighth-order Feynman diagrams, determine alpha(-1)=137.035 999 710 (96) [0.70 ppb]. The uncertainties are 10 times smaller than those of nearest rival methods that include atom-recoil measurements. Comparisons of measured and calculated g test QED most stringently, and set a limit on internal electron structure.

  8. Time variation of the fine structure constant in the early universe and the Bekenstein model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, M. E.; Scóccola, C. G.; Landau, S. J.; Vucetich, H.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:We calculate the bounds on the variation in the fine structure constant at the time of primordial nucleosynthesis and at the time of neutral hydrogen formation. We used these bounds and other bounds from the late universe to test the Bekenstein model. Methods: We modified the Kawano code, CAMB, and CosmoMC to include the possible variation in the fine structure constant. We used observational primordial abundances of D, ^4He, and ^7Li, recent data from the cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, to obtain bounds on the variation in α. We calculated a piecewise solution to the scalar field equation of the Bekenstein model in two different regimes: i) matter and radiation, ii) matter and cosmological constant. We match both solutions with the appropriate boundary conditions. We performed a statistical analysis, using the bounds obtained from the early universe and other bounds from the late universe to constrain the free parameters of the model. Results: Results are consistent with no variation in α for the early universe. Limits on α are inconsistent with the scale length of the theory l being larger than the Planck scale. Conclusions: In order to fit all observational and experimental data, the assumption l > Lp implied in Bekenstein's model has to be relaxed.

  9. Probing the Gravitational Dependence of the Fine-Structure Constant from Observations of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Matthew; Barstow, Martin; Reindl, Nicole; Tchang-Brillet, W.-Ü.; Ayres, Thomas; Webb, John; Barrow, John; Hu, Jiting; Holberg, Jay; Preval, Simon; Ubachs, Wim; Dzuba, Vladimir; Flambaum, Victor; Dumont, Vincent; Berengut, Julian

    2017-03-01

    Hot white dwarf stars are the ideal probe for a relationship between the fine-structure constant and strong gravitational fields, providing us with an opportunity for a direct observational test. We study a sample of hot white dwarf stars, combining far-UV spectroscopic observations, atomic physics, atmospheric modelling and fundamental physics, in the search for variation in the fine structure constant. This variation manifests as shifts in the observed wavelengths of absorption lines, such as quadruply ionized iron (FeV) and quadruply ionized nickel (NiV), when compared to laboratory wavelengths. Berengut et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 010801) demonstrated the validity of such an analysis using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra of G191-B2B. We have made three important improvements by: (a) using three new independent sets of laboratory wavelengths, (b) analysing a sample of objects, and (c) improving the methodology by incorporating robust techniques from previous studies towards quasars (the Many Multiplet method). A successful detection would be the first direct measurement of a gravitational field effect on a bare constant of nature. Here we describe our approach and present preliminary results from nine objects using both FeV and NiV.

  10. The variation of the fine-structure constant from disformal couplings

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruck, Carsten van; Mifsud, Jurgen; Nunes, Nelson J. E-mail: jmifsud1@sheffield.ac.uk

    2015-12-01

    We study a theory in which the electromagnetic field is disformally coupled to a scalar field, in addition to a usual non-minimal electromagnetic coupling. We show that disformal couplings modify the expression for the fine-structure constant, α. As a result, the theory we consider can explain the non-zero reported variation in the evolution of α by purely considering disformal couplings. We also find that if matter and photons are coupled in the same way to the scalar field, disformal couplings itself do not lead to a variation of the fine-structure constant. A number of scenarios are discussed consistent with the current astrophysical, geochemical, laboratory and the cosmic microwave background radiation constraints on the cosmological evolution of α. The models presented are also consistent with the current type Ia supernovae constraints on the effective dark energy equation of state. We find that the Oklo bound in particular puts strong constraints on the model parameters. From our numerical results, we find that the introduction of a non-minimal electromagnetic coupling enhances the cosmological variation in α. Better constrained data is expected to be reported by ALMA and with the forthcoming generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs such as PEPSI, ESPRESSO, and ELT-HIRES. Furthermore, an expected increase in the sensitivity of molecular and nuclear clocks will put a more stringent constraint on the theory.

  11. New determination of the fine structure constant and test of the quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bouchendira, Rym; Cladé, Pierre; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Nez, François; Biraben, François

    2011-02-25

    We report a new measurement of the ratio h/m(Rb) between the Planck constant and the mass of (87)Rb atom. A new value of the fine structure constant is deduced, α(-1)=137.035999037(91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.6×10(-10). Using this determination, we obtain a theoretical value of the electron anomaly a(e)=0.00115965218113(84), which is in agreement with the experimental measurement of Gabrielse [a(e)=0.00115965218073(28)]. The comparison of these values provides the most stringent test of the QED. Moreover, the precision is large enough to verify for the first time the muonic and hadronic contributions to this anomaly. © 2011 American Physical Society

  12. New limit on the present temporal variation of the fine structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Peik, E.; Lipphardt, B.; Schnatz, H.; Schneider, T.; Tamm, Chr.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2005-05-05

    A comparison of different atomic frequency standards over time can be used to perform a measurement of the present value of the temporal derivative of the fine structure constant {alpha} in a model-independent way without assumptions on constancy or variability of other parameters. We have measured an optical transition frequency at 688 THz in Yb+ with a cesium atomic clock at two times separated by 2.8 years and find that a variation of this frequency can be excluded within a 1{sigma} relative uncertainty of 4.4{center_dot}10-15 yr-1. Combined with recently published values for the constancy of other transition frequencies this measurement provides a limit on the present variability of {alpha} at the level of 2.0{center_dot}10-15 yr-1. Constraints are also derived for the drift rates of other fundamental constants like the electron/proton mass ratio and the proton g-factor.

  13. Enhanced sensitivity to the fine-structure-constant variation in the Th IV atomic clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.; Porsev, S. G.

    2009-12-15

    Our calculations have shown that the 5f{sub 5/2}-7s{sub 1/2} 23 131 cm{sup -1} transition from the ground state in the ion Th{sup 3+} is very sensitive to the temporal variation of the fine-structure constant alpha=e{sup 2}/(Planck constant/2pi)c (q=-75 300 cm{sup -1}). The line is very narrow, the ion has been trapped and laser cooled, and the positive shifter line 5f{sub 5/2}-5f{sub 7/2} 4325 cm{sup -1} (q=+2900 cm{sup -1}) may be used as a reference. A comparison may also be made with a positive shifter in another atom or ion. This makes Th{sup 3+} a good candidate to search for the alpha variation.

  14. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize Talk: Measuring the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    2011-05-01

    The electron magnetic moment in Bohr magnetons has been measured to a precision of 3 parts in 1013. This measurement, with quantum electrodynamics (AED) theory, provides the most precise value of the fine structure constant. This measurement, with a value of the fine structure from other measurements, also tests QED and sets a limit on the internal structure of the electron. A one-electron quantum cyclotron is at the heart of the measurement -- an electron suspended in a magnetic field and cooled enough that its lowest cyclotron and spin quantum states can be deduced with quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements. A cylindrical Penning trap cavity inhibits spontaneous emission and feedback methods make the electron excite and sustain its own motion for detection. A new apparatus is being commissioned in pursuit of more precise measurements. Adapted methods are promising for observing a proton spin flip, which should make it possible to compare the antiproton and proton magnetic moments a million times more accurately than is currently possible.

  15. Cosmological constant and quantum gravitational corrections to the running fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Toms, David J

    2008-09-26

    The quantum gravitational contribution to the renormalization group behavior of the electric charge in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a cosmological constant is considered. Quantum gravity is shown to lead to a contribution to the running charge not present when the cosmological constant vanishes. This reopens the possibility, suggested by Robinson and Wilczek, of altering the scaling behavior of gauge theories at high energies although our result differs. We show the possibility of an ultraviolet fixed point that is linked directly to the cosmological constant.

  16. Fisher matrix forecasts for astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, C. S.; Silva, T. A.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Leite, A. C. O.

    2017-07-01

    We use Fisher Matrix analysis techniques to forecast the cosmological impact of astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant to be carried out by the forthcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at the VLT (due for commissioning in late 2017), as well by the planned high-resolution spectrograph (currently in Phase A) for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Assuming a fiducial model without α variations, we show that ESPRESSO can improve current bounds on the Eötvös parameter-which quantifies Weak Equivalence Principle violations-by up to two orders of magnitude, leading to stronger bounds than those expected from the ongoing tests with the MICROSCOPE satellite, while constraints from the E-ELT should be competitive with those of the proposed STEP satellite. Should an α variation be detected, these measurements will further constrain cosmological parameters, being particularly sensitive to the dynamics of dark energy.

  17. Highly charged ions for atomic clocks and search for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    We review a number of highly charged ions which have optical transitions suitable for building extremely accurate atomic clocks. This includes ions from Hf 12+ to U 34+, which have the 4 f 12 configuration of valence electrons, the Ir 17+ ion, which has a hole in almost filled 4 f subshell, the Ho 14+, Cf 15+, Es 17+ and Es 16+ ions. Clock transitions in most of these ions are sensitive to variation of the fine structure constant, α (α = e2/hbar c). E.g., californium and einsteinium ions have largest known sensitivity to α-variation while holmium ion looks as the most suitable ion for experimental study. We study the spectra of the ions and their features relevant to the use as frequency standards.

  18. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions.

    PubMed

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Stocke, J T; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Conway, J; Moore, C P

    2000-12-25

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine structure constant: alpha/ alpha<3.5x10(-15) yr(-1), to a look-back time of 4.8 Gyr. In the context of string theory, the limit on the secular evolution of the scale factor of the compact dimensions, R, is &Rdot/ R<10(-15) yr(-1). Including terrestrial and other astronomical measurements places 2sigma limits on slow oscillations of R from the present to the epoch of cosmic nucleosynthesis, just seconds after the big bang, of DeltaR /R<10(-5).

  19. Constraining spatial variations of the fine-structure constant in symmetron models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, A. M. M.; Martinelli, M.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a methodology to test models with spatial variations of the fine-structure constant α, based on the calculation of the angular power spectrum of these measurements. This methodology enables comparisons of observations and theoretical models through their predictions on the statistics of the α variation. Here we apply it to the case of symmetron models. We find no indications of deviations from the standard behavior, with current data providing an upper limit to the strength of the symmetron coupling to gravity (log ⁡β2 < - 0.9) when this is the only free parameter, and not able to constrain the model when also the symmetry breaking scale factor aSSB is free to vary.

  20. Reexamination of the effective fine structure constant of graphene as measured in graphite

    DOE PAGES

    Gan, Yu; de la Pena Munoz, Gilberto; Kogar, Anshul; ...

    2016-05-24

    Here we present a refined and improved study of the influence of screening on the effective fine structure constant of graphene, α*, as measured in graphite using inelastic x-ray scattering. This followup to our previous study [J. P. Reed et al., Science 330, 805 (2010)] was carried out with two times better energy resolution, five times better momentum resolution, and an improved experimental setup with lower background. We compare our results to random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations and evaluate the relative importance of interlayer hopping, excitonic corrections, and screening from high energy excitations involving the sigma bands. We find that themore » static, limiting value of α* falls in the range 0.25-0.35, which is higher than our previous result of 0.14, but still below the value expected from RPA. We show the reduced value is not a consequence of interlayer hopping effects, which were ignored in our previous analysis, but of a combination of excitonic effects in the π→ π* particle-hole continuum, and background screening from the σ-bonded electrons. We find that σ-band screening is extremely strong at distances of less than a few nanometers, and should be highly effective at screening out short-distance, Hubbard-like interactions in graphene as well as other carbon allotropes.« less

  1. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high-resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium-argon calibration can be tracked with ˜10 m s-1 precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders (˜50-100 Å) and entire spectrographs arms (˜1000-3000 Å). Using archival spectra from the past 20 yr, we have probed the supercalibration history of the Very Large Telescope-Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (VLT-UVES) and Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically ±200 m s-1 per 1000 Å. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra that characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The spurious deviations in α produced by the model closely match important aspects of the VLT-UVES quasar results at all redshifts and partially explain the HIRES results, though not self-consistently at all redshifts. That is, the apparent ubiquity, size and general characteristics of the distortions are capable of significantly weakening the evidence for variations in α from quasar absorption lines.

  2. Nonlinear Schrödinger-Poisson definition of fine-structure-constant's value ~1/137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinisch, G.

    2010-06-01

    By numerically investigating the nonlinear Schrödinger-Poisson eigenstates of a condensed Bose gas of charged particles that is confined in a two-dimensional axisymmetric parabolic potential ½meω2r2 (e.g. quantum-dot helium), it is shown that the probability amplitude between two nonlinear—and hence non-orthogonal—eigenstates displays an interference pattern scaled (within 0.03 %) by graphic equation Since α = e2/hbarc ~ 1/137 is the fine structure constant, this stunning result—indeed velocity of light c does not enter the present non-relativistic model—is tentatively explained by the existence of a "nonlinear" bound state of the trapped particle-particle interaction Coulomb field whose energy cal E = half pi hbar omega defines the induced emission or absorption equilibrium processes between two appropriate chemical potentials. Besides, a non-decoherence quantum-classical transition with increasing nonlinearity is pointed out. As a possible experimental test for the present theory, the 0s2 → 1s2 nonlinear transition in an hbarω = 1.66meV GaAs quantum-dot helium is emphasized.

  3. Atomic transition energies and the variation of the fine-structure constant {alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Borschevsky, Anastasia; Eliav, Ephraim; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Kaldor, Uzi

    2006-12-15

    Relativistic energy shifts of atomic excitation energies, showing the dependence of these energies on the value of the fine-structure constant {alpha}, are needed to extract past changes in {alpha} from spectra of distant quasars. These shifts are calculated by the Fock-space coupled cluster method and its extrapolated intermediate Hamiltonian extension, which allow high-accuracy treatment of electron correlation. The accuracy of the method is tested by comparing 33 transition energies in heavy atoms (obtained with the laboratory {alpha}) with experiment; the average error is 258 cm{sup -1}, and the largest error is 711 cm{sup -1}. This may be compared with an average error of 432 cm{sup -1} and a maximum error of 2150 cm{sup -1} in the work of Dzuba et al., who reported most of the available energy shift calculations. The enhanced accuracy is due to more extensive inclusion of electron correlation. To obtain the energy shifts, we repeated the calculations with different values of {alpha} (within 0.1% of the current value). Our shifts differ by up to 30% from the values given by Dzuba et al., with an average difference of 9%. Based on the better quality of the present-day excitation energies, we believe the energy shifts reported here are more accurate than earlier work.

  4. New limits on variation of the fine-structure constant using atomic dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Leefer, N; Weber, C T M; Cingöz, A; Torgerson, J R; Budker, D

    2013-08-09

    We report on the spectroscopy of radio-frequency transitions between nearly degenerate, opposite-parity excited states in atomic dysprosium (Dy). Theoretical calculations predict that these states are very sensitive to variation of the fine-structure constant α owing to large relativistic corrections of opposite sign for the opposite-parity levels. The near degeneracy reduces the relative precision necessary to place constraints on variation of α, competitive with results obtained from the best atomic clocks in the world. Additionally, the existence of several abundant isotopes of Dy allows isotopic comparisons that suppress common-mode systematic errors. The frequencies of the 754-MHz transition in 164Dy and 235-MHz transition in 162Dy are measured over the span of two years. The linear variation of α is α·/α=(-5.8±6.9([1σ]))×10(-17)  yr(-1), consistent with zero. The same data are used to constrain the dimensionless parameter kα characterizing a possible coupling of α to a changing gravitational potential. We find that kα=(-5.5±5.2([1σ]))×10(-7), essentially consistent with zero and the best constraint to date.

  5. Reexamination of the effective fine structure constant of graphene as measured in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yu; de la Pena Munoz, Gilberto; Kogar, Anshul; Ochoa, Bruno; Casa, Diego; Gog, Thomas; Fradkin, Eduardo; Abbamonte, Peter

    2016-05-24

    Here we present a refined and improved study of the influence of screening on the effective fine structure constant of graphene, α*, as measured in graphite using inelastic x-ray scattering. This followup to our previous study [J. P. Reed et al., Science 330, 805 (2010)] was carried out with two times better energy resolution, five times better momentum resolution, and an improved experimental setup with lower background. We compare our results to random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations and evaluate the relative importance of interlayer hopping, excitonic corrections, and screening from high energy excitations involving the sigma bands. We find that the static, limiting value of α* falls in the range 0.25-0.35, which is higher than our previous result of 0.14, but still below the value expected from RPA. We show the reduced value is not a consequence of interlayer hopping effects, which were ignored in our previous analysis, but of a combination of excitonic effects in the π→ π* particle-hole continuum, and background screening from the σ-bonded electrons. We find that σ-band screening is extremely strong at distances of less than a few nanometers, and should be highly effective at screening out short-distance, Hubbard-like interactions in graphene as well as other carbon allotropes.

  6. Chemistry as a function of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio

    SciTech Connect

    King, Rollin A.; Siddiqi, Ali; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer, Henry F. III

    2010-04-15

    In standard computations in theoretical quantum chemistry the accepted values of the fundamental physical constants are assumed. Alternatively, the tools of computational quantum chemistry can be used to investigate hypothetical chemistry that would result from different values of these constants, given the same physical laws. In this work, the dependence of a variety of basic chemical quantities on the values of the fine-structure constant and the electron-proton mass ratio is explored. In chemistry, the accepted values of both constants may be considered small, in the sense that their increase must be substantial to seriously impact bond energies. It is found that if the fine-structure constant were larger, covalent bonds between light atoms would be weaker, and the dipole moment and hydrogen-bonding ability of water would be reduced. Conversely, an increase in the value of the electron-proton mass ratio increases dissociation energies in molecules such as H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. Specifically, a sevenfold increase in the fine-structure constant decreases the strength of the O-H bond in the water molecule by 7 kcal mol{sup -1} while reducing its dipole moment by at least 10%, whereas a 100-fold increase in the electron-proton mass ratio increases the same bond energy by 11 kcal mol{sup -1}.

  7. Constraining the variation of the fine-structure constant with observations of narrow quasar absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10{sup –5}, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (– 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10{sup –5} in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10{sup –5}, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (– 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10{sup –5}. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (– 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10{sup –5}. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of

  8. Constraining the Variation of the Fine-structure Constant with Observations of Narrow Quasar Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10-5, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (- 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10-5 in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10-5, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (- 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10-5. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (- 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10-5. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of quasar absorption lines are not yet capable of

  9. Rate Constants for Fine-structure Excitations in O–H Collisions with Error Bars Obtained by Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Daniel; Krems, Roman V.

    2017-02-01

    We present an approach using a combination of coupled channel scattering calculations with a machine-learning technique based on Gaussian Process regression to determine the sensitivity of the rate constants for non-adiabatic transitions in inelastic atomic collisions to variations of the underlying adiabatic interaction potentials. Using this approach, we improve the previous computations of the rate constants for the fine-structure transitions in collisions of O({}3{P}j) with atomic H. We compute the error bars of the rate constants corresponding to 20% variations of the ab initio potentials and show that this method can be used to determine which of the individual adiabatic potentials are more or less important for the outcome of different fine-structure changing collisions.

  10. Time variation of the proton-electron mass ratio and the fine structure constant with a runaway dilaton

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2007-02-15

    Recent astrophysical observations indicate that the proton-electron mass ratio and the fine structure constant have gone through nontrivial time evolution. We discuss their time variation in the context of a dilaton runaway scenario with gauge coupling unification at the string scale M{sub s}. We show that the choice of adjustable parameters allows them to fit the same order magnitude of both variations and their (opposite) signs in such a scenario.

  11. Cosmological variation of the fine-structure constant versus a new interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E.J.; Flambaum, V.V.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2004-10-01

    We show that using the modified form of the Dirac Hamiltonian as suggested by Bekenstein does not affect the analysis of QSO data pertaining to a measurement of {alpha} variation. We obtain the present time limit on Bekenstein's parameter, tan{sup 2} {chi}=(0.2{+-}0.7)x10{sup -6}, from the measurement of the hydrogen 2p fine structure using a value of {alpha} obtained from different experiments.

  12. Constraining possible variations of the fine structure constant in strong gravitational fields with the Kα iron line

    SciTech Connect

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2014-03-01

    In extensions of general relativity and in theories aiming at unifying gravity with the forces of the Standard Model, the value of the ''fundamental constants'' is often determined by the vacuum expectation value of new fields, which may thus change in different backgrounds. Variations of fundamental constants with respect to the values measured today in laboratories on Earth are expected to be more evident on cosmological timescales and/or in strong gravitational fields. In this paper, I show that the analysis of the Kα iron line observed in the X-ray spectrum of black holes can potentially be used to probe the fine structure constant α in gravitational potentials relative to Earth of Δφ ≈ 0.1. At present, systematic effects not fully under control prevent to get robust and stringent bounds on possible variations of the value of α with this technique, but the fact that current data can be fitted with models based on standard physics already rules out variations of the fine structure constant larger than some percent.

  13. Optical transitions in highly charged californium ions with high sensitivity to variation of the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Dzuba, V A; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A

    2012-08-17

    We study electronic transitions in highly charged Cf ions that are within the frequency range of optical lasers and have very high sensitivity to potential variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The transitions are in the optical range despite the large ionization energies because they lie on the level crossing of the 5f and 6p valence orbitals in the thallium isoelectronic sequence. Cf(16+) is a particularly rich ion, having several narrow lines with properties that minimize certain systematic effects. Cf(16+) has very large nuclear charge and large ionization energy, resulting in the largest α sensitivity seen in atomic systems. The lines include positive and negative shifters.

  14. Optical Transitions in Highly Charged Californium Ions with High Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Ong, A.

    2012-08-01

    We study electronic transitions in highly charged Cf ions that are within the frequency range of optical lasers and have very high sensitivity to potential variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The transitions are in the optical range despite the large ionization energies because they lie on the level crossing of the 5f and 6p valence orbitals in the thallium isoelectronic sequence. Cf16+ is a particularly rich ion, having several narrow lines with properties that minimize certain systematic effects. Cf16+ has very large nuclear charge and large ionization energy, resulting in the largest α sensitivity seen in atomic systems. The lines include positive and negative shifters.

  15. A new limit on the variation of the fine-structure constant using absorption line multiplets in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, Le Duc

    2015-08-01

    One of the key questions of modern physics concerns the possibility that physical constants vary over space and time during the history of the universe. The Standard Model of physics is built on these constants, but it does not provide any explanation for their values, nor requires their constancy over space and time. Here we set a new limit on possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant , by comparing transitions line multiplets in an ensemble of Fe II 1608, 2344, 2374, 2383, 2587 and 2600 observed in the early universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on the optical spectra observations of QSO HE 0515-4414, we deduced a constraint of at redshift z = 1.15. This is at present the tightest limit on at early cosmological epochs compared to the published results in the literature.

  16. Attempts at a determination of the fine-structure constant from first principles: a brief historical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Nándori, I.

    2014-12-01

    It has been a notably elusive task to find a remotely sensical ansatz for a calculation of Sommerfeld's electrodynamic fine-structure constant αQED ≈ 1 / 137.036 based on first principles. However, this has not prevented a number of researchers to invest considerable effort into the problem, despite the formidable challenges, and a number of attempts have been recorded in the literature. Here, we review a possible approach based on the quantum electrodynamic (QED) β function, and on algebraic identities relating αQED to invariant properties of "internal" symmetry groups, as well as attempts to relate the strength of the electromagnetic interaction to the natural cutoff scale for other gauge theories. Conjectures based on both classical as well as quantum-field theoretical considerations are discussed. We point out apparent strengths and weaknesses of the most prominent attempts that were recorded in the literature. This includes possible connections to scaling properties of the Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian which describes gravitational and electromagnetic interactions on curved space-times. Alternative approaches inspired by string theory are also discussed. A conceivable variation of the fine-structure constant with time would suggest a connection of αQED to global structures of the Universe, which in turn are largely determined by gravitational interactions.

  17. Limits on evolution of the fine-structure constant in runaway dilaton models from Sunyaev-Zeldovich observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Colaço, L. R.; Gonçalves, R. S.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, new bounds on possible variations of the fine structure constant, α, for a class of runaway dilaton models are performed. By considering a possible evolution with redshift, z, such as Δα/α = - γln ⁡ (1 + z), where in γ are the physical properties of the model, we constrain this parameter by using a deformed cosmic distance duality relation jointly with gas mass fraction (GMF) measurements of galaxy clusters and luminosity distances of type Ia supernovae. The GMF's used in our analyses are from cluster mass data from 82 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.12 < z < 1.36, detected via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect at 148 GHz by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The type Ia supernovae are from the Union2.1 compilation. We also explore the dependence of the results from four models used to describe the galaxy clusters. As a result no evidence of variation was obtained.

  18. The Doubling Theory Corrects the Titius-Bode Law and Defines the Fine Structure Constant in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier-Malet, Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    The fundamental movement of the ``doubling theory'', developed in our preceding papers, is applied as a model of the dynamics of the solar system. It is shown that this model justifies and corrects the distances of the planets given by the Titius-Bode law, and predicts new planets between the Kuiper Belt and the Oort Cloud. Indeed, the empirical Titius-Bode law defines in an approximate way the distances of the planets to the sun, and becomes totally false for the most distant planets (Neptune and Pluto) and does not include the Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt. The doubling theory is based on successive embedded finite structures of space-time domain at different scale levels. The cycle of the doubling movement in the solar system corresponds to 25920 years. It is shown that this cycle defines the fine structure constant.

  19. Limits on the Dependence of the Fine-Structure Constant on Gravitational Potential from White-Dwarf Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.; Ong, A.; Webb, J. K.; Barrow, John D.; Barstow, M. A.; Preval, S. P.; Holberg, J. B.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10-5 and (-6.1±5.8)×10-5 from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δϕ≈5×10-5. With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  20. Limits on the dependence of the fine-structure constant on gravitational potential from white-dwarf spectra.

    PubMed

    Berengut, J C; Flambaum, V V; Ong, A; Webb, J K; Barrow, John D; Barstow, M A; Preval, S P; Holberg, J B

    2013-07-05

    We propose a new probe of the dependence of the fine-structure constant α on a strong gravitational field using metal lines in the spectra of white-dwarf stars. Comparison of laboratory spectra with far-UV astronomical spectra from the white-dwarf star G191-B2B recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph gives limits of Δα/α=(4.2±1.6)×10(-5) and (-6.1±5.8)×10(-5) from FeV and NiV spectra, respectively, at a dimensionless gravitational potential relative to Earth of Δφ≈5×10(-5). With better determinations of the laboratory wavelengths of the lines employed these results could be improved by up to 2 orders of magnitude.

  1. Tenth-order QED contribution to the electron g-2 and an improved value of the fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tatsumi; Hayakawa, Masashi; Kinoshita, Toichiro; Nio, Makiko

    2012-09-14

    This letter presents the complete QED contribution to the electron g-2 up to the tenth order. With the help of the automatic code generator, we evaluate all 12,672 diagrams of the tenth-order diagrams and obtain 9.16 (58)(α/π)(5). We also improve the eighth-order contribution obtaining -1.9097 (20)(α/π)(4), which includes the mass-dependent contributions. These results lead to a(e)(theory)=1,159,652,181.78(77)×10(-12). The improved value of the fine-structure constant α(-1)=137.035999173 (35) [0.25 ppb] is also derived from the theory and measurement of a(e).

  2. A Stringent Limit on Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Absorption Line Multiplets in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-06-01

    One of the key questions of modern physics concerns the possibility that physical constants have varied throughout the history of the Universe. The standard model of physics is built on these constants, but it does not provide any explanation for their values, nor does it require their constancy over space and time. Here, we set a new limit on possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/4πɛ0 ħc by comparing transitions and line multiplets in an ensemble of Fe II λ 1608, λ 2344, λ 2374, λ 2383, λ 2587, and λ 2600 observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on the optical spectrum observations of QSO HE 0515-4414, we deduce a constraint of Δα/α = (-0.157± 0.300)×10-6 at redshift z = 1.15. At present, this represents the tightest limit on Δα/α in early cosmological epochs compared to the published results in the literature.

  3. Precision atomic spectroscopy for improved limits on variation of the fine structure constant and local position invariance.

    PubMed

    Fortier, T M; Ashby, N; Bergquist, J C; Delaney, M J; Diddams, S A; Heavner, T P; Hollberg, L; Itano, W M; Jefferts, S R; Kim, K; Levi, F; Lorini, L; Oskay, W H; Parker, T E; Shirley, J; Stalnaker, J E

    2007-02-16

    We report tests of local position invariance and the variation of fundamental constants from measurements of the frequency ratio of the 282-nm 199Hg+ optical clock transition to the ground state hyperfine splitting in 133Cs. Analysis of the frequency ratio of the two clocks, extending over 6 yr at NIST, is used to place a limit on its fractional variation of <5.8x10(-6) per change in normalized solar gravitational potential. The same frequency ratio is also used to obtain 20-fold improvement over previous limits on the fractional variation of the fine structure constant of |alpha/alpha|<1.3x10(-16) yr-1, assuming invariance of other fundamental constants. Comparisons of our results with those previously reported for the absolute optical frequency measurements in H and 171Yb+ vs other 133Cs standards yield a coupled constraint of -1.5x10(-15)

  4. Dark energy and equivalence principle constraints from astrophysical tests of the stability of the fine-structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, C.J.A.P.; Pinho, A.M.M.; Alves, R.F.C.; Pino, M.; Wietersheim, M. von E-mail: Ana.Pinho@astro.up.pt E-mail: mpc_97@yahoo.com E-mail: maxivonw@gmail.com

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical tests of the stability of fundamental couplings, such as the fine-structure constant α, are becoming an increasingly powerful probe of new physics. Here we discuss how these measurements, combined with local atomic clock tests and Type Ia supernova and Hubble parameter data, constrain the simplest class of dynamical dark energy models where the same degree of freedom is assumed to provide both the dark energy and (through a dimensionless coupling, ζ, to the electromagnetic sector) the α variation. Specifically, current data tightly constrains a combination of ζ and the present dark energy equation of state w{sub 0}. Moreover, in these models the new degree of freedom inevitably couples to nucleons (through the α dependence of their masses) and leads to violations of the Weak Equivalence Principle. We obtain indirect bounds on the Eötvös parameter η that are typically stronger than the current direct ones. We discuss the model-dependence of our results and briefly comment on how the forthcoming generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs will enable significantly tighter constraints.

  5. Artificial intelligence applied to the automatic analysis of absorption spectra. Objective measurement of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Webb, John K.

    2017-06-01

    A new and automated method is presented for the analysis of high-resolution absorption spectra. Three established numerical methods are unified into one `artificial intelligence' process: a genetic algorithm (Genetic Voigt Profile FIT, gvpfit); non-linear least-squares with parameter constraints (vpfit); and Bayesian model averaging (BMA). The method has broad application but here we apply it specifically to the problem of measuring the fine structure constant at high redshift. For this we need objectivity and reproducibility. gvpfit is also motivated by the importance of obtaining a large statistical sample of measurements of Δα/α. Interactive analyses are both time consuming and complex and automation makes obtaining a large sample feasible. In contrast to previous methodologies, we use BMA to derive results using a large set of models and show that this procedure is more robust than a human picking a single preferred model since BMA avoids the systematic uncertainties associated with model choice. Numerical simulations provide stringent tests of the whole process and we show using both real and simulated spectra that the unified automated fitting procedure out-performs a human interactive analysis. The method should be invaluable in the context of future instrumentation like ESPRESSO on the VLT and indeed future ELTs. We apply the method to the zabs = 1.8389 absorber towards the zem = 2.145 quasar J110325-264515. The derived constraint of Δα/α = 3.3 ± 2.9 × 10-6 is consistent with no variation and also consistent with the tentative spatial variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al.

  6. High-precision limit on variation in the fine-structure constant from a single quasar absorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotuš, S. M.; Murphy, M. T.; Carswell, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    The brightest southern quasar above redshift z = 1, HE 0515-4414, with its strong intervening metal absorption line system at zabs = 1.1508, provides a unique opportunity to precisely measure or limit relative variations in the fine-structure constant (Δα/α). A variation of just ˜3 parts per million (ppm) would produce detectable velocity shifts between its many strong metal transitions. Using new and archival observations from the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), we obtain an extremely high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum (peaking at S/N ≈ 250 pix-1). This provides the most precise measurement of Δα/α from a single absorption system to date, Δα/α = -1.42 ± 0.55stat ± 0.65sys ppm, comparable with the precision from previous, large samples of ˜150 absorbers. The largest systematic error in all (but one) previous similar measurements, including the large samples, was long-range distortions in the wavelength calibration. These would add an ˜2 ppm systematic error to our measurement and up to ˜10 ppm to other measurements using Mg and Fe transitions. However, we corrected the UVES spectra using well-calibrated spectra of the same quasar from the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher, leaving a residual 0.59 ppm systematic uncertainty, the largest contribution to our total systematic error. A similar approach, using short observations on future well-calibrated spectrographs to correct existing high S/N spectra, would efficiently enable a large sample of reliable Δα/α measurements. The high-S/N UVES spectrum also provides insights into analysis difficulties, detector artefacts and systematic errors likely to arise from 25-40-m telescopes.

  7. Artificial intelligence applied to the automatic analysis of absorption spectra. Objective measurement of the fine structure constant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Webb, John K.

    2017-01-01

    A new and automated method is presented for the analysis of high-resolution absorption spectra. Three established numerical methods are unified into one "artificial intelligence" process: a genetic algorithm (GVPFIT); non-linear least-squares with parameter constraints (VPFIT); and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA). The method has broad application but here we apply it specifically to the problem of measuring the fine structure constant at high redshift. For this we need objectivity and reproducibility. GVPFIT is also motivated by the importance of obtaining a large statistical sample of measurements of Δα/α. Interactive analyses are both time consuming and complex and automation makes obtaining a large sample feasible. In contrast to previous methodologies, we use BMA to derive results using a large set of models and show that this procedure is more robust than a human picking a single preferred model since BMA avoids the systematic uncertainties associated with model choice. Numerical simulations provide stringent tests of the whole process and we show using both real and simulated spectra that the unified automated fitting procedure out-performs a human interactive analysis. The method should be invaluable in the context of future instrumentation like ESPRESSO on the VLT and indeed future ELTs. We apply the method to the zabs = 1.8389 absorber towards the zem = 2.145 quasar J110325-264515. The derived constraint of Δα/α = 3.3 ± 2.9 × 10-6 is consistent with no variation and also consistent with the tentative spatial variation reported in Webb et al. (2011) and King et al. (2012).

  8. A New Contribution for WYP 2005: The Golden Ratio, Bohr Radius, Planck's Constant, Fine-Structure Constant and g-Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyrovska, R.; Narayan, S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, the ground state Bohr radius (aB) of hydrogen was shown to be divided into two Golden sections, aB,p = aB/ø2 and aB,e = aB/ø at the point of electrical neutrality, where ø = 1.618 is the Golden ratio (R. Heyrovska, Molecular Physics 103: 877-882, and the literature cited therein). The origin of the difference of two energy terms in the Rydberg equation was thus shown to be in the ground state energy itself, as shown below: EH = (1/2)e2/(κaB) = (1/2)(e2/κ) [(1/aB,p - (1/aB,e)] (1). This work brings some new results that 1) a unit charge in vacuum has a magnetic moment, 2) (e2/2κ) in eq. (1) is an electromagnetic condenser constant, 3) the de Broglie wavelengths of the proton and electron correspond to the Golden arcs of a circle with the Bohr radius, 4) the fine structure constant (α) is the ratio of the Planck's constants without and with the interaction of light with matter, 5) the g-factors of the electron and proton, ge/2 and gp/2 divide the Bohr radius at the magnetic center and 6) the ``mysterious'' value (137.036) of α -1 = (360/ø2) - (2/ø3), where (2/ø3) arises from the difference, (gp - ge).

  9. Immunological fine structure of the variable and constant regions of a polymorphic malarial surface antigen from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Jones, G L; Edmundson, H M; Lord, R; Spencer, L; Mollard, R; Saul, A J

    1991-09-01

    The 51-kDa merozoite surface antigen MSA2 of Plasmodium falciparum shows considerable strain-dependent polymorphism. Although marked sequence variation occurs in the central region of the molecule, the N and C-terminal sequences are highly conserved. A number of monoclonal antibodies directed against MSA2 have been described which inhibit parasite growth in vitro, but these are all directed against variable regions. In an attempt to raise strain independent antibodies we have prepared peptide-diphtheria toxoid (DT) constructs from 36 N-terminal octapeptides spanning the constant region and extending into the variable region of the FCQ/27 PNG variant staggered by one amino acid at either end. Similarly, we prepared 26 C-terminal octapeptides spanning the C-terminal constant region as well as 10 octapeptides from the variable region of the Indochina I variant MSA2. Most of the peptides elicited antipeptide titres in excess of 1/10(4) when administered to mice as peptide-DT adducts emulsified with Freund's complete adjuvant. Only 3 of the 43 N- and C-terminal constant region peptides elicited antibodies which reacted appropriately on immunofluorescence (IFA) or immunoblotting analysis with the intact MSA2 of both strains studied (FCQ/27 and Indochina I), whereas 3 other peptides from the variable region elicited antibodies reactive with the parent MSA2 only. Peptide constructs eliciting antibodies recognising the intact protein corresponded to elements in the cognate sequence of high antigenicity as predicted by the Jameson and Wolf algorithm.

  10. Weighted difference of g factors of light Li-like and H-like ions for an improved determination of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V. A.; Berseneva, E.; Harman, Z.; Tupitsyn, I. I.; Keitel, C. H.

    2016-08-01

    A weighted difference of the g factors of the Li- and H-like ion of the same element is studied and optimized in order to maximize the cancelation of nuclear effects. To this end, a detailed theoretical investigation is performed for the finite nuclear size correction to the one-electron g factor, the one- and two-photon exchange effects, and the QED effects. The coefficients of the Z α expansion of these corrections are determined, which allows us to set up the optimal definition of the weighted difference. It is demonstrated that, for moderately light elements, such weighted difference is nearly free from uncertainties associated with nuclear effects and can be utilized to extract the fine-structure constant from bound-electron g -factor experiments with an accuracy competitive with or better than its current literature value.

  11. Accurate laboratory wavelengths of some ultraviolet lines of Cr, Zn and Ni relevant to time variations of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickering, J. C.; Thorne, A. P.; Murray, J. E.; Litzén, U.; Johansson, S.; Zilio, V.; Webb, J. K.

    2000-11-01

    The quality of astronomical spectroscopic data now available is so high that interpretation and analysis are often limited by the uncertainties of the laboratory data base. In particular, the limit with which space-time variations in the fine structure constant α can be constrained using quasar spectra depends on the availability of more accurate laboratory rest wavelengths. We recently measured some transitions in magnesium by high-resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy for this purpose, and we now report measurements on some ultraviolet resonance lines of Znii (2062 and 2026Å), Crii (2066, 2062 and 2056Å) and Niii (1751, 1741, 1709 and 1703Å). Apart from the last line, which is very weak, the uncertainty of these measurements is 0.002cm-1 (0.08må) for the lines around 2000Å and 0.004cm-1 (0.12må) for the lines around 1700Å.

  12. The Sun-Earth connect 2: Modelling patterns of a fractal Sun in time and space using the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-similar matrices of the fine structure constant of solar electromagnetic force and its inverse, multiplied by the Carrington synodic rotation, have been previously shown to account for at least 98% of the top one hundred significant frequencies and periodicities observed in the ACRIM composite irradiance satellite measurement and the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Flux data sets. This self-similarity allows for the development of a time-space differential equation (DE) where the solutions define a solar model for transmissions through the core, radiative, tachocline, convective and coronal zones with some encouraging empirical and theoretical results. The DE assumes a fundamental complex oscillation in the solar core and that time at the tachocline is smeared with real and imaginary constructs. The resulting solutions simulate for tachocline transmission, the solar cycle where time-line trajectories either 'loop' as Hermite polynomials for an active Sun or 'tail' as complementary error functions for a passive Sun. Further, a mechanism that allows for the stable energy transmission through the tachocline is explored and the model predicts the initial exponential coronal heating from nanoflare supercharging. The twisting of the field at the tachocline is then described as a quaternion within which neutrinos can oscillate. The resulting fractal bubbles are simulated as a Julia Set which can then aggregate from nanoflares into solar flares and prominences. Empirical examples demonstrate that time and space fractals are important constructs in understanding the behaviour of the Sun, from the impact on climate and biological histories on Earth, to the fractal influence on the spatial distributions of the solar system. The research suggests that there is a fractal clock underpinning solar frequencies in packages defined by the fine structure constant, where magnetic flipping and irradiance fluctuations at phase changes, have periodically impacted on the

  13. Measurement of the running of the fine structure constant and γγ physics at KLOE-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandaglio, G.; KLOE-2 Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    A measurement of the effective QED coupling constant αQED (s) in the time-like region 600-975 MeV by using the Initial State Radiation process e+e- →μ+μ- γ will be presented. It represents the first measurement of the running of αQED in this energy region. Our results show more than 5 σ significance on the hadronic contribution to the running of α(s), which is the strongest direct evidence ever achieved both in time- and space-like regions by a single experiment. By using the dipion cross section previously measured at KLOE, the Real and Imaginary part of the shift Δα has been extracted. By fitting the ReΔα, the product of the Branching Fraction BR (ω →e+e-) BR (ω →μ+μ-) has been measured. Status and prospects in γγ physics at KLOE-2 experiment will be also presented.

  14. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  15. Relativistic calculations of radiative properties and fine structure constant varying sensitivity coefficients in the astrophysically relevant Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, D. K.; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-03-01

    We have carried out calculations of the relativistic sensitivity coefficients, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, lifetimes and magnetic dipole hyperfine structure constants for a number of low-lying states in the Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions which are abundant in the distant quasars and various stellar plasmas. These spectroscopic data will be very useful for probing temporal variation of the fine structure constant (αe) and in the diagnostic processes of some of the astrophysical plasmas. We have employed all-order perturbative methods in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian to calculate the atomic wavefunctions of the considered ions. Reference states are constructed with the VN-1 and VN+1 potentials and then the electron-electron correlation effects are taken into account by constructing all possible singly and doubly excited configurations, involving both the core and valence electrons, from the respective reference states. We have also determined one electron affinities and ionization potentials of many excited states in these Zn II, Si IV and Ti IV ions. Except for a few states we have attained accuracies within 1 per cent for the energies compared with their experimental values. Our calculated sensitivity coefficients are estimated to have similar accuracies as of the calculated energies. Furthermore, combining our calculated transition matrix elements with the experimental wavelengths we evaluate transition probabilities, oscillator strengths and lifetimes of some of the excited states in these ions. These results are compared with the available data in a few cases and found to be in very good agreement among themselves. Using our reported hyperfine structure constants due to the dominant magnetic dipole interaction, it is possible to determine hyperfine splittings approximately in the above considered ions.

  16. SeD radical as a probe for the measurement of the time variation of the fine-structure constant α and proton-to-electron mass ratio μ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Gaurab; Sen, Avijit; Mukherjee, Manas; Paul, Ankan

    2014-07-01

    Based on the spectroscopic constants derived from highly accurate potential-energy surfaces, the SeD radical is identified as a spectroscopic probe for measuring spatial and temporal variation of fundamental physical constants such as the fine-structure constant (denoted as α =e2ℏc) and the proton-to-electron mass ratio (denoted as μ =mpme). The ground state of SeD (X2Π), due to spin-orbit coupling, splits into two fine-structure multiplets 2Π3/2 and 2Π1/2. The potential-energy surfaces of these spin-orbit components are derived from a state of the art electronic structure method, MRCI + Q inclusive of scalar relativistic effects with the spin-orbit effects accounted for through the Breit-Pauli operator. The relevant spectroscopic data are evaluated using a Murrel-Sorbie fit to the potential-energy surfaces. The spin-orbit splitting ωf between the two multiplets is similar in magnitude with the harmonic frequency ωe of the diatomic molecule. The amplification factor K derived from this theoretical method for this particular molecule can be as large as 350; on the lower side it can be about 34. The significantly large values of K indicate that the SeD radical can be a plausible experimental candidate for measuring variation in α and μ.

  17. Enhanced sensitivity to the time variation of the fine-structure constant and m{sub p}/m{sub e} in diatomic molecules: A closer examination of silicon monobromide

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.; Borschevsky, A.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-08-15

    Recently it was pointed out that transition frequencies in certain diatomic molecules have an enhanced sensitivity to variations in the fine-structure constant {alpha} and the proton-to-electron mass ratio m{sub p}/m{sub e} due to a near cancellation between the fine structure and vibrational interval in a ground electronic multiplet [V. V. Flambaum and M. G. Kozlov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 150801 (2007)]. One such molecule possessing this favorable quality is silicon monobromide. Here we take a closer examination of SiBr as a candidate for detecting variations in {alpha} and m{sub p}/m{sub e}. We analyze the rovibronic spectrum by employing the most accurate experimental data available in the literature and perform ab initio calculations to determine the precise dependence of the spectrum on variations in {alpha}. Furthermore, we calculate the natural linewidths of the rovibronic levels, which place a fundamental limit on the accuracy to which variations may be determined.

  18. Determining the value of the fine-structure constant from a current balance: Getting acquainted with some upcoming changes to the SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Richard S.

    2017-05-01

    The revised International System of Units (SI), expected to be approved late in 2018, has implications for physics pedagogy. The ampere definition, which dates from 1948, will be replaced by a definition that fixes the numerical value of the elementary charge e in coulombs. The kilogram definition, which dates from 1889, will be replaced by a definition that fixes the numerical value of the Planck constant h in joule seconds. Existing SI equations will be completely unaffected. However, there will be a largely negligible, but nevertheless necessary, change to published numerical factors relating SI electrical units to their corresponding units in the Gaussian and other CGS systems of units. The implications of the revised SI for electrical metrology are neatly illustrated by considering the interpretation of results obtained from a current balance in the present SI and in the revised SI.

  19. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  20. Revisiting Hartert's 1962 Calculation of the Physical Constants of Thrombelastography.

    PubMed

    Hochleitner, Gerald; Sutor, Ken; Levett, Caroline; Leyser, Harald; Schlimp, Christoph J; Solomon, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Thrombelastography (TEG)/thromboelastometry (ROTEM) devices measure viscoelastic clot strength as clot amplitude (A). Transformation of clot amplitude into clot elasticity (E with TEG; CE with ROTEM) is sometimes necessary (eg, when calculating platelet component of the clot). With TEG, clot amplitude is commonly transformed into shear modulus (G; expressed in Pa or dyn/cm(2)) as follows: G = (5000 × A)/(100 - A). Use of the constant "5000" stems from Hartert's 50-year-old calculation of G for a normal blood clot. We question the value of calculating G as follows: (1) It may be questioned whether TEG/ROTEM analysis enable measurement of elasticity because viscosity may also contribute to clot amplitude. (2) It has been suggested that absolute properties of a blood clot cannot be measured with TEG/ROTEM analysis because the strain amplitude applied by the device is uncontrolled and changes during the course of coagulation. (3) A review of the calculation of G using Hartert's methods and some updated assumptions suggests that the value of 5000 is unreliable. (4) Recalculation of G for the ROTEM device yields a different value from that with Hartert TEG, indicating a degree of inaccuracy with the calculations. (5) Shear modulus is simply a multiple of E/CE and, because of the unreliability of G in absolute terms, it provides no additional value versus E/CE. The TEG and ROTEM are valuable coagulation assessment tools that provide an evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of a clot, not through measuring absolute viscoelastic forces but through continuous reading of the clot amplitude relative to an arbitrary, preset scale.

  1. Fine structure in krypton excimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hemici, M.; Saoudi, R.; Descroix, E.; Audouard, E.; Laporte, P. ); Spiegelmann, F. )

    1995-04-01

    By using laser reduced fluorescence techniques, molecular absorption from the first relaxed excited excimer states of krypton is obtained in the 960--990-nm wavelength range. Five bands are observed and analyzed by comparison with an [ital ab] [ital initio] calculated spectrum. The fine structure is thus evidenced.

  2. A symmetry relating certain processes in 2-and 4-dimensional space-times and the value {alpha}{sub 0} = 1/4{pi} of the bare fine structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Ritus, V. I.

    2006-04-15

    with subluminal velocities of the ends. The symmetry predicts one and the same value e{sub 0}= {radical}{Dirac_h}c for the electric and scalar charges in 3 + 1 dimensional space. Arguments are adduced in favor of the conclusion that this value and the corresponding value {alpha}{sub 0} = 1/4{pi} of the fine structure constant are the bare, nonrenormalized values.

  3. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  4. Revisiting the decoupling effects in the running of the Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipin, Oleg; Melić, Blaženka

    2017-09-01

    We revisit the decoupling effects associated with heavy particles in the renormalization group running of the vacuum energy in a mass-dependent renormalization scheme. We find the running of the vacuum energy stemming from the Higgs condensate in the entire energy range and show that it behaves as expected from the simple dimensional arguments meaning that it exhibits the quadratic sensitivity to the mass of the heavy particles in the infrared regime. The consequence of such a running to the fine-tuning problem with the measured value of the Cosmological Constant is analyzed and the constraint on the mass spectrum of a given model is derived. We show that in the Standard Model (SM) this fine-tuning constraint is not satisfied while in the massless theories this constraint formally coincides with the well known Veltman condition. We also provide a remarkably simple extension of the SM where saturation of this constraint enables us to predict the radiative Higgs mass correctly. Generalization to constant curvature spaces is also given.

  5. Fine Structure of Plasmaspheric Hiss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, D.; Omura, Y.; Nakamura, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays a key role in controlling the structure and dynamics of Earth's radiation belts.The quiet time slot region between the inner and outer belts can be explained as a steady-state balance between earthward radial diffusion and pitch-angle scattering loss of energetic electrons to the atmosphere induced by plasmaspheric hiss. Plasmaspheric hiss can also induce gradual precipitation loss of MeV electrons from the outer radiation belt. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband,structureless,incoherent emission. Here, by examining burst-mode vector waveform data from the EMFISIS instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission,we show that plasmaspheric hiss is a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Specifically, plasmaspheric hiss appears as discrete rising tone and falling tone elements. By means of waveform analysis we identify typical amplitudes,phase profiles,and sweep rates of the rising and falling tone elements. The new observations reported here can be expected to fuel a re-examination of the properties of plasmaspheric hiss, including a further re-analysis of the generation mechanism for hiss.

  6. Fine Structure of Thiobacillus thiooxidans.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, R P; Edwards, M R

    1966-08-01

    Mahoney, Robert P. (Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.), and Mercedes R. Edwards. Fine structure of Thiobacillus thiooxidans. J. Bacteriol. 92: 487-495. 1966.-Thin section analysis of the chemosynthetic autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans revealed structures comparable to gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria. Although this species is unique in that it oxidizes elemental sulfur for energy, uses carbon dioxide as its sole source of carbon, and can withstand a pH of less than 1, thin sections revealed a profile of the cell envelope (cell wall and plasmalemma) similar to other gram-negative species which have more common physiological traits. The cell wall is composed of five layers with an overall width of approximately 200 A, and the plasmalemma appears as a conventional "unit membrane" with a width of about 85 A. Volutin granules and less-dense bodies of similar shape and size were frequently observed in close association with the nucleoplasm. The nature and function of these bodies are unknown at this time.

  7. Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Kavic, Michael; Minic, Djordje

    2007-01-01

    Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, for which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss observational consequences of such a picture of darkmore » energy and constrain the distribution function.« less

  8. Fine structures in the light diffraction pattern of striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Leung, A F

    1984-10-01

    Single skeletal muscle fibres of frog were illuminated with a He-Ne, argon-ion or rhodamine 6G dye laser. The fine structures lying within the diffraction columns moved parallel to the fibre axis without changing their pattern when either the wavelength or the incident angle of the laser beam was varied, or when the fibre was stretched slightly. However, their pattern remained nearly constant when the fibre was submerged in hypotonic or hypertonic solution. As the illumination of about 1 mm or 0.1 mm width scanned along the length of the fibre, new structures emerged while others faded away giving rise to the notion that the diffraction columns were moving in the direction of the scan. A decrease in the illumination width caused the structures lying on the periphery of the diffraction column to disappear and the width of the remaining structures to increase. Measurements rule out the existence of large diffraction planes in these muscles. In addition, they indicate that the fine structures come from the diffraction of the whole rather than independent components of the illuminated volume. The origin of the fine structures is explained by two diffraction models.

  9. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF DIPLOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE

    PubMed Central

    Tomasz, Alexander; Jamieson, James D.; Ottolenghi, Elena

    1964-01-01

    The fine structure of an unencapsulated strain of Diplococcus pneumoniae is described. A striking feature of these bacteria is an intracytoplasmic membrane system which appears to be an extension of septa of dividing bacteria. The possible function of these structures and their relationship to the plasma membrane and other types of intracytoplasmic membranes found in pneumococcus is discussed. PMID:14203390

  10. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE RAT CEREBELLUM

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    This paper describes the fine structure of the granule cells, stellate neurons, astrocytes, Bergmann glia, oligodendrocytes, and microglia of the rat cerebellum after fixation by perfusion with buffered 1 per cent osmium tetroxide. Criteria are given for differentiating the various cell types, and the findings are correlated with previous light microscope and electron microscope studies of the cerebellum. PMID:14222815

  11. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE PURKINJE CELL

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, Robert M.

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes the fine structure of the Purkinje cell of the rat cerebellum after fixation by perfusion with 1 per cent buffered osmium tetroxide. Structures described include a large Golgi apparatus, abundant Nissl substance, mitochondria, multivesicular bodies, osmiophilic granules, axodendritic and axosomatic synapses, the nucleus, the nucleolus, and the nucleolar body. A new and possibly unique relationship between mitochondria and subsurface cisterns is described. Possible functional correlations are discussed. PMID:13953993

  12. Universal fine structure of nematic hedgehogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Samo; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2001-02-01

    We study in a Landau-de Gennes approach the biaxial structure of a nematic point defect with topological charge M = + 1. We aim to illuminate the role of the confining boundaries in determining the fine structure of the defect. We show that there are different regimes associated with different values of the ratio between the typical size R of the region in space occupied by the material and the biaxial correlation length ξb. For R/ξb>20 the core structure is already qualitatively universal, that is, independent of the confining geometry, while also for R/ξb>200 any quantitative difference is unlikely to be detected.

  13. DIAZOPHTHALOCYANINS AS REAGENTS FOR FINE STRUCTURAL CYTOCHEMISTRY

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Lois Withrow; Barrnett, Russell J.

    1965-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of 14 diazophthalocyanins containing Mg, Cu, or Pb as the chelated metal. To assess the usefulness of these compounds for fine structural cytochemistry, the relative coupling rates with naphthols were tested as well as the solubility of the resulting azo dyes. Three of the diazotates were reacted with tissue proteins in aldehyde-fixed material, and the density increases thus produced were compared in the electron microscope with those produced by staining similarly fixed material with the phthalocyanin dye, Alcian Blue. Finally, one of the diazotates was used as a capture reagent for the demonstration of the sites of acid phosphatase activity with the electron microscope. PMID:14283629

  14. Linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and the variation of constants method. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  15. Contribution of the cosmological constant to the relativistic bending of light revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Rindler, Wolfgang; Ishak, Mustapha

    2007-08-15

    We study the effect of the cosmological constant {lambda} on the bending of light by a concentrated spherically symmetric mass. Contrarily to previous claims, we show that, when the Schwarzschild-de Sitter geometry is taken into account, {lambda} does indeed contribute to the bending.

  16. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  17. Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of…

  18. Thermal stability analysis of the fine structure of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, Pascal; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Raadu, Mickael A.

    1986-01-01

    The linear thermal stability of a 2D periodic structure (alternatively hot and cold) in a uniform magnetic field is analyzed. The energy equation includes wave heating (assumed proportional to density), radiative cooling and both conduction parallel and orthogonal to magnetic lines. The equilibrium is perturbed at constant gas pressure. With parallel conduction only, it is found to be unstable when the length scale 1// is greater than 45 Mn. In that case, orthogonal conduction becomes important and stabilizes the structure when the length scale is smaller than 5 km. On the other hand, when the length scale is greater than 5 km, the thermal equilibrium is unstable, and the corresponding time scale is about 10,000 s: this result may be compared to observations showing that the lifetime of the fine structure of solar prominences is about one hour; consequently, our computations suggest that the size of the unresolved threads could be of the order of 10 km only.

  19. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  20. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF ACANTHAMOEBA CASTELLANII

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Blair; Korn, Edward D.

    1968-01-01

    The fine structure of the trophozoite of Acanthamoeba castellanii (Neff strain) has been studied. Locomotor pseudopods, spikelike "acanthopodia," and microprojections from the cell surface are all formed by hyaline cytoplasm, which excludes formed elements of the cell and contains a fine fibrillar material. Golgi complex, smooth and rough forms of endoplasmic reticulum, digestive vacuoles, mitochondria, and the water-expulsion vesicle (contractile vacuole) are described. A canicular system opening into the water-expulsion vesicle contains tubules about 600 A in diameter that are lined with a filamentous material. The tubules are continuous with unlined vesicles or ampullae of larger diameter. Centrioles were not observed, but cytoplasmic microtubules radiate from a dense material similar to centriolar satellites and are frequently centered in the Golgi complex. Cytoplasmic reserve materials include both lipid and glycogen, each of which amounts to about 10% of the dry weight. PMID:5678452

  1. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The Effect of Quantum-Mechanical Interference on Precise Measurements of the n = 2 Triplet P Fine Structure of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Marsman, A.; Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    For many decades, improvements in both theory and experiment of the fine structure of the n = 2 triplet P levels of helium have allowed for an increasingly precise determination of the fine-structure constant. Recently, it has been observed that quantum-mechanical interference between neighboring resonances can cause significant shifts, even if such neighboring resonances are separated by thousands of natural widths. The shifts depend in detail on the experimental method used for the measurement, as well as the specific experimental parameters employed. Here, we review how these shifts apply for the most precise measurements of the helium 2{sup 3}P fine-structure intervals.

  3. The Br+HO 2 reaction revisited: Absolute determination of the rate constant at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdet, G.; Le Bras, G.; Mellouki, A.; Poulet, G.

    1990-09-01

    The absolute determination of the rate constant for the reaction Br+HO 2→HBr+O 2 has been done at 298 K using the discharge-flor EPR method. The value k1 = (1.5±0.2) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was obtained. Previous indirect measurements of k1 from a discharge-flow, LIF/mass spectrometric study of the Br/H 2CO/O 2 system have been reinterpreted, leading to values for k1 ranging from 1.0 × 10 -12 to 2.2 × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 at 298 K. These results are discussed and compared with other literature values.

  4. The Proline Enamine Formation Pathway Revisited in Dimethyl Sulfoxide: Rate Constants Determined via NMR.

    PubMed

    Haindl, Michael H; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2015-10-14

    Enamine catalysis is a fundamental activation mode in organocatalysis and can be successfully combined with other catalytic methods, e.g., photocatalysis. Recently, the elusive enamine intermediates were detected, and their stabilization modes were revealed. However, the formation pathway of this central organocatalytic intermediate is still a matter of dispute, and several mechanisms involving iminium and/or oxazolidinone are proposed. Here, the first experimentally determined rate constants and rates of enamine formation are presented using 1D selective exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) buildup curves and initial rate approximation. The trends of the enamine formation rates from exo-oxazolidinones and endo-oxazolidinones upon variation of the proline and water concentrations as well as the nucelophilic/basic properties of additives are investigated together with isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones. These first kinetic data of enamine formations in combination with theoretical calculations reveal the deprotonation of iminium intermediates as the dominant pathway in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The dominant enamine formation pathway varies according to the experimental conditions, e.g., the presence and strength of basic additives. The enamine formation is zero-order in proline and oxazolidinones, which excludes the direct deprotonation of oxazolidinones via E2 mechanism. The nucleophilicity of the additives influences only the isomerization rates of the oxazolidinones and not the enamine formation rates, which excludes a nucleophile-assisted anti elimination of oxazolidinones as a major enamine formation pathway.

  5. Vertical fine structure observations in the eastern equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.P.

    1981-11-20

    Measurements of vertical displacement and horizontal velocity finestructure near the equator at 110/sup 0/W in the eastern Pacific Ocean are reported. Profiles were scaled to a constant Bruent-Vaeisaelae frequency ocean (N/sub 0/ = 1 cph) in accordance with a WKBJ approximation. A total of 57 CTD casts between 3/sup 0/N and 3/sup 0/S taken during five cruises in 1979 were analyzed. Results show an equatorial enhancement of vertical displacement is similar variance for vertical wavelengths longer than 50 sdbar (stretched decibars). This enhancement is similar to that which has been reported at 125/sup 0/W and 179/sup 0/E. Difference between locations can be accounted for by the observed temporal variability at 110/sup 0/W. Coherence between vertical displacement profiles separated in time by dealys of 2 hours to 120 hour indicate that the high wave number structures were largely associated with time scales of 4 days and less. Meridionally, vertical structures longer than 300 sdbar were coherent within 50 km of the equator. We interpret this vertical displacement fine structure enhancement as high wave number equatorially trapped inertial-gravity waves. The velocity fine structure measurements in July 1979 also indicate equatorially enhanced horizontal kinetic energy for vertical wave lengths longer than 100 sdbar. The velocity structures persisted over the 56 hour of measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy measurement and appeared to have longer time scales than the vertical displacements. Meridional energy exceeded zonal energy; however, the two components were coherent. We interpret these velocity structures as inertial-gravity waves which were produced off the equator and are propagating through the equatorial region.

  6. Cell fine structure and function - Past and present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1970-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of nerve membrane fine structure, discussing cell membrane multienzyme and macromolecular energy and information transduction, protein synthesis and nucleic acids interrelations

  7. Revisiting Hartert’s 1962 Calculation of the Physical Constants of Thrombelastography

    PubMed Central

    Hochleitner, Gerald; Sutor, Ken; Levett, Caroline; Leyser, Harald; Schlimp, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombelastography (TEG)/thromboelastometry (ROTEM) devices measure viscoelastic clot strength as clot amplitude (A). Transformation of clot amplitude into clot elasticity (E with TEG; CE with ROTEM) is sometimes necessary (eg, when calculating platelet component of the clot). With TEG, clot amplitude is commonly transformed into shear modulus (G; expressed in Pa or dyn/cm2) as follows: G = (5000 × A)/(100 – A). Use of the constant “5000” stems from Hartert's 50-year-old calculation of G for a normal blood clot. We question the value of calculating G as follows: (1) It may be questioned whether TEG/ROTEM analysis enable measurement of elasticity because viscosity may also contribute to clot amplitude. (2) It has been suggested that absolute properties of a blood clot cannot be measured with TEG/ROTEM analysis because the strain amplitude applied by the device is uncontrolled and changes during the course of coagulation. (3) A review of the calculation of G using Hartert's methods and some updated assumptions suggests that the value of 5000 is unreliable. (4) Recalculation of G for the ROTEM device yields a different value from that with Hartert TEG, indicating a degree of inaccuracy with the calculations. (5) Shear modulus is simply a multiple of E/CE and, because of the unreliability of G in absolute terms, it provides no additional value versus E/CE. The TEG and ROTEM are valuable coagulation assessment tools that provide an evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of a clot, not through measuring absolute viscoelastic forces but through continuous reading of the clot amplitude relative to an arbitrary, preset scale. PMID:26400661

  8. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  9. The fine structure of developing elastic cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, R W; Peacock, M A

    1977-01-01

    The fine structure of the elastic cartilage of the pinna has been examined in young rabbits aged from 1 day to 1108 days. Changes associated with growth and development are related not only to age but also to the actual situation in the pinna. In the midline, progressive changes are seen from the tip to the base. The changes in the chondroblasts with time are compared with those described in hyaline cartilage. Structures occur that, except for the presence of crystals, are apparently morphologically identical with the matrix vesicles of calcifying cartilage. These matrix vesicles, however, become very prominent with age, and aggregations of them appear to be released into the intercellular tissue from vacuoles at the periphery of the chondroblasts. There is no obvious association with calcification. Occasional single cilia, desmosomes and giant mitochondria are seen. Elastica is present at birth, and eventually every cell is separated from its neighbours by a partial investment of elastica. The quantity of matrix seems to increase with time, and with distance from the tip of the ear. This is accompanied by a marked increase in cell size with time. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:870470

  10. Beta environmental fine structure characterization of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, G.; Fiorini, E.; Giuliani, A.; Milani, P.; Monfardini, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Prandoni, M. L.; Sancrotti, M.

    1999-04-01

    The fine structure of beta emission (BEFS) due to the interference with the scattered waves from neighboring atoms, analogous to EXAFS, is known to produce oscillations in the Kurie plot. Here we suggest the use of BEFS for characterizing the lattice environment of β-emitting defects located at a distance from the crystal surface not exceeding the mean free path of β-electrons. Examples of defective structures in semiconductors whose atomic arrangement could be conveniently studied with BEFS are tritium-passivated dangling bonds, β-radioactive ions implanted in the crystal lattice or segregated at extended defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries or radiation damage. Also 14C-doped diamond-like materials and other exotic carbon forms, as well as the atomic environment of ions in metal alloys could be good candidate for BEFS. In this work we have calculated the fractional BEFS modulation for 187Re in its ordinary hcp crystal lattice for which experimental data by Cosulich et al. are available. The good correspondence between theory and experiment permits to conclude that BEFS experiments at low temperature are accessible to the present bolometric detection techniques and can provide an expedient method, as compared to EXAFS, for an accurate structural assessment of extended defects in solids.

  11. Internal Fine Structure of Ellerman Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ishii, Takako T.; Hagino, Masaoki; Komori, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Nakamura, Tahei; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We conducted coordinated observations of Ellerman bombs (EBs) between Hinode Satellite and Hida Observatory (HOP12). CaII H broad-band filter images of NOAA 10966 on 2007 August 9 and 10 were obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode Satellite, and many bright points were observed. We identified a total of 4 bright points as EBs, and studied the temporal variation of their morphological fine structures and spectroscopic characteristics. With high-resolution CaII H images of SOT, we found that the EBs, thus far thought of as single bright features, are composed of a few of fine subcomponents. Also, by using Stokes I/V filtergrams with Hinode/SOT, and CaII H spectroheliograms with Hida/Domeless Solar Telescope (DST), our observation showed: (1) The mean duration, the mean width, the mean length, and the mean aspect ratio of the subcomponents were 390 s, 170 km, 450 km, and 2.7, respectively. (2) Subcomponents started to appear on the magnetic neutral lines, and extended their lengths from the original locations. (3) When the CaII H line of EBs showed the characteristic blue asymmetry, they are associated with the appearance or re-brightening of subcomponents. Summarizing our results, we obtained an observational view that elementary magnetic reconnections take place one by one successively and intermittently in EBs, and that their manifestation is the fine subcomponents of the EB phenomena.

  12. The Fine Structure of the Parathyroid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Jerry Steven

    1958-01-01

    The fine structure of the parathyroid of the macaque is described, and is correlated with classical parathyroid cytology as seen in the light microscope. The two parenchymal cell types, the chief cells and the oxyphil cells, have been recognized in electron micrographs. The chief cells contain within their cytoplasm mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi bodies similar to those found in other endocrine tissues as well as frequent PAS-positive granules. The juxtanuclear body of the light microscopists is identified with stacks of parallel lamellar elements of the endoplasmic reticulum of the ergastoplasmic or granular type. Oxyphil cells are characterized by juxtanuclear bodies and by numerous mitochondria found throughout their cytoplasm. Puzzling lamellar whorls are described in the cytoplasm of some oxyphil cells. The endothelium of parathyroid capillaries is extremely thin in some areas and contains numerous fenestrations as well as an extensive system of vesicles. The possible significance of these structures is discussed. The connective tissue elements found in the perivascular spaces of macaque parathyroid are described. PMID:13502423

  13. Analysis of Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Julie Olmsted

    This thesis presents a systematic study of the application of DAFS to determine site-specific local structural and chemical information in complex materials, and the first application of state-of-the-art theoretical XAFS calculations using the computer program scFEFF to model DAFS data. In addition, the iterative dispersion analysis method, first suggested by Pickering, et al., has been generalized to accommodate the off-resonance anomalous scattering from heavy atoms in the unit cell. The generalized algorithm scKKFIT was applied to DAFS data from eight (00 l) reflections of the high-T _{c} superconductor YBa _2Cu_3O_ {6.8} to obtain the weighted complex resonant scattering amplitudes Delta f_{ rm w}(Q, E). The fine-structure functions chi_{rm w}(Q, E) isolated from the Delta f_{ rm w}(Q, E) are linear combinations of the individual site fine structure functions chi _{rm w}(Q, E) = Sigma_{i}W_{i,{ bf Q}}chi_{i}(E) from the two inequivalent Cu sites, added together according to the structure factor for the Cu sublattice. The chi_{rm w}(Q, E) were fit en masse using the XAFS analysis program scFEFFIT under a set of constraints on the coefficients W _{i,{bf Q}} based on the structure factor for kinematic scattering. The W_{i,{bf Q}} determined by scFEFFIT were used to obtain the fully separated complex resonant scattering amplitudes Delta f(E) for the two Cu sites. The theoretical connection between DAFS and XAFS is used to justify the application of state-of-the-art theoretical XAFS calculations to DAFS analysis. The polarization dependence of DAFS is described in terms of individual virtual photoelectron scattering paths in the Rehr-Albers separable curved-wave formalism. Polarization is shown to be an important factor in all DAFS experiments. Three experimental constraints are found necessary for obtaining site-separated Delta f(E) from DAFS data by linear inversion of the W_{i, {bf Q}} matrix and scKKFIT isolated Delta f_{rm w }(Q, E): (1) The diffraction must be

  14. Fine Structure and Function in Stentor polymorphus

    PubMed Central

    Randall, J. T.; Jackson, Sylvia Fitton

    1958-01-01

    The fine structure of the ciliate Stentor has been studied by means of the electron microscope and the results have been correlated with observations made on the living organism by means of light microscopy; special reference has been made to structural features which may be responsible for contraction and extension in Stentor. Descriptions have been given of the structure of the macronucleus, the vacuolated cytoplasm, mitochondria and the pellicle; a detailed study has also been made of the adoral membranelles. About 250 membranelles encircle the peristomal cap and each is composed of 3 rows of cilia, with 20 to 25 cilia in each row; a fibrillar root system connected with the membranelles depends into the endoplasm for about 20 µ and each is essentially in the shape of a fan, the terminal ends of each root bifurcating to connect to neighbouring roots. The membranelles thus form a cohesive unit and this morphological arrangement may have a bearing on the motion and coordination of the whole system. Two structural features extending throughout the length of the animal have been identified per cortical stripe in the body wall of Stentor; first, km fibres lying just beneath the pellicle are composed of stacks of fibrillar sheets and are identical with the birefringent fibres observed in the living animal. The individual fibrils of the sheets are in turn connected to the kinetosomes of the body cilia; thus the km fibres are homologous to kinetodesmata. Secondly, M bands lie beneath the km fibres and form an interconnected system in contact with the surrounding vacuolated cytoplasm; the thickness of the M bands is greatest at the base of a contracted animal. The contractile and extensile properties of these organelles have been discussed in the light of experimental results and theoretical considerations. PMID:13610947

  15. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF GIARDIA MURIS

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Daniel S.

    1966-01-01

    Giardia is a noninvasive intestinal zooflagellate. This electron microscope study demonstrates the fine structure of the trophozoite of Giardia muris in the lumen of the duodenum of the mouse as it appears after combined glutaraldehyde and acrolein fixation and osmium tetroxide postfixation. Giardia muris is of teardrop shape, rounded anteriorly, with a convex dorsal surface and a concave ventral one. The anterior two-thirds of the ventral surface is modified to form an adhesive disc. The adhesive disc is divided into 2 lobes whose medial surfaces form the median groove. The marginal grooves are the spaces between the lateral crests of the adhesive disc and a protruding portion of the peripheral cytoplasm. The organism has 2 nuclei, 1 dorsal to each lobe of the adhesive disc. Between the anterior poles of the nuclei, basal bodies give rise to 8 paired flagella. The median body, unique to Giardia, is situated between the posterior poles of the nuclei. The cytoplasm contains 300-A granules that resemble particulate glycogen, 150- to 200-A granules that resemble ribosomes, and fusiform clefts. The dorsal portion of the cell periphery is occupied by a linear array of flattened vacuoles, some of which contain clusters of dense particles. The ventrolateral cytoplasm is composed of regularly packed coarse and fine filaments which extend as a striated flange around the adhesive disc. The adhesive disc is composed of a layer of microtubules which are joined to the cytoplasm by regularly spaced fibrous ribbons. The plasma membrane covers the ventral and lateral surfaces of the disc. The median body consists of an oval aggregate of curved microtubules. Microtubules extend ventrally from the median body to lie alongside the caudal flagella. The intracytoplasmic portions of the caudal, lateral, and anterior flagella course considerable distances, accompanied by hollow filaments adjacent to their outer doublets. The intracytoplasmic portions of the anterior flagella are

  16. Temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in InGaN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Zhu, Tongtong; Jarman, John C.; Kocher, Claudius C.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots using a non-polar (11-20) a-plane InGaN system, up to the on-chip Peltier cooling threshold of 200 K. At 5 K, a statistical average splitting of 443 ± 132 μeV has been found based on 81 quantum dots. The degree of fine structure splitting stays relatively constant for temperatures less than 100 K and only increases above that temperature. At 200 K, we find that the fine structure splitting ranges between 2 and 12 meV, which is an order of magnitude higher than that at low temperatures. Our investigations also show that phonon interactions at high temperatures might have a correlation with the degree of exchange interactions. The large fine structure splitting at 200 K makes it easier to isolate the individual components of the polarized emission spectrally, increasing the effective degree of polarization for potential on-chip applications of polarized single-photon sources.

  17. Is there correlation between fine structure and dark energy cosmic dipoles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariano, Antonio; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2012-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis (including redshift tomography) of the cosmic dipoles in the Keck+VLT quasar absorber and in the Union2 SnIa samples. We show that the fine structure constant cosmic dipole obtained through the Keck+VLT quasar absorber sample at 4.1σ level is anomalously aligned with the corresponding dark energy dipole obtained through the Union2 sample at 2σ level. The angular separation between the two dipole directions is 11.3°±11.8°. We use Monte Carlo simulations to find the probability of obtaining the observed dipole magnitudes with the observed alignment, in the context of an isotropic cosmological model with no correlation between dark energy and fine structure constant α. We find that this probability is less than one part in 106. We propose a simple physical model (extended topological quintessence) which naturally predicts a spherical inhomogeneous distribution for both dark energy density and fine structure constant values. The model is based on the existence of a recently formed giant global monopole with Hubble scale core which also couples nonminimally to electromagnetism. Aligned dipole anisotropies would naturally emerge for an off-center observer for both the fine structure constant and for dark energy density. This model smoothly reduces to ΛCDM for proper limits of its parameters. Two predictions of this model are (a) a correlation between the existence of strong cosmic electromagnetic fields and the value of α and (b) the existence of a dark flow on Hubble scales due to the repulsive gravity of the global defect core (“Great Repulser”) aligned with the dark energy and α dipoles. The direction of the dark flow is predicted to be towards the spatial region of lower accelerating expansion. Existing data about the dark flow are consistent with this prediction.

  18. Fine Structure of Solar Acoustic Oscillations Due to Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, P. R.; Dziembowski, W.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the fine structure of high order, low degree five minute period solar oscillations following from various postulated forms of spherical rotation is predicted. The first and second order effects of rotation are included.

  19. Fine Structure of Solar Acoustic Oscillations Due to Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, P. R.; Dziembowski, W.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the fine structure of high order, low degree five minute period solar oscillations following from various postulated forms of spherical rotation is predicted. The first and second order effects of rotation are included.

  20. Current Work to Improve Precision in Measurements of Helium Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, Davis

    2013-05-01

    With the recent improvement on the 23P Helium fine structure calculation by Pachucki and the quest for finding the most precise value for α, spectroscopic measurement of the helium atom has a great advantage to find this primary constant. Distinctively, the 32 GHz atomic fine structure of 23P J2 to J0 interval with uncertainty of 100Hz leads a factor of three better than the best current value of α and an impulsion to the theory to evaluate the largest term of order mα8 is our ambition. This measurement not only tests the quantum electrodynamics, but also establishes the fine structure constant α with uncertainty of 1.6 ppb. The electron g-factor measurement of α, even though, is by far more accurate at 0.37 ppb, our end result would be a examination to the best alternative atom recoil measurements with different approach. To reach on this level of accuracy, we implement our frequency selector with precision better than 1 to 100 along with laser cooling mechanism to enhance the signal to noise ratio by increasing the signal strength. This work is supported by NSF grant.

  1. Current Work to Improve Precision in Measurements of Helium Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan Rezaeian, Nima; Shiner, David

    2013-06-01

    With the recent improvement on the 23P Helium fine structure calculation by Pachucki and the quest for finding the most precise value for α, spectroscopic measurement of the helium atom has a great advantage to find this primary constant. Distinctively, the 32 GHz atomic fine structure of 23P J2 to J0 interval with uncertainty of 100Hz leads a factor of three better than the best current value of α and an impulsion to the theory to evaluate the largest term of order mα8 is our ambition. This measurement not only tests the quantum electrodynamics, but also establishes the fine structure constant α with uncertainty of 1.6 ppb. The electron g-factor measurement of α, even though, is by far more accurate at 0.37 ppb, our end result would be a examination to the best alternative atom recoil measurements with different approach. To reach on this level of accuracy, we implement our frequency selector with precision better than 1 to 100 along with laser cooling mechanism to enhance the signal to noise ratio by increasing the signal strength. This work is supported by NSF grant.

  2. The fine-structure intervals of (N-14)+ by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Varberg, Thomas D.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Cooksy, Andrew L.

    1994-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectra associated with both fine-structure transitions in (N-14)+ in its ground P-3 state have been recorded. This is the first laboratory observation of the J = 1 left arrow 0 transition and its frequency has been determined two orders of magnitude more accurately than previously. The remeasurement of the J = 2 left arrow 1 spectrum revealed a small error in the previous laboratory measurements. The fine-structure splittings (free of hyperfine interactions) determined in this work are (delta)E(sub 10) = 1461.13190 (61) GHz, (delta)E(sub 21) = 2459.38006 (37) GHz. Zero-field transition frequencies which include the effects of hyperfine structure have also been calculated. Refined values for the hyperfine constants and the g(sub J) factors have been obtained.

  3. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-04-20

    We present the first 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence obtained from nonlinear force-free field simulations, with a detailed description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Through the use of a novel radiative transfer visualization technique for the Hα line such plasma-loaded magnetic field model produces synthetic images of the modeled prominence comparable with high-resolution observations. This allows us for the first time to use a single technique to consistently study, in both emission on the limb and absorption against the solar disk, the fine structures of prominences/filaments produced by a magnetic field model.

  4. A Newtonian Explanation of the Hydrogen Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Paul; Espinosa, James; Woodyard, James

    2010-10-01

    The Hydrogen spectrum as seen by low dispersion spectrometers is correctly described by a classical theory founded on Ritz's magnetic model. With increasingly powerful instruments, individual lines are split into smaller groupings that are three orders of magnitude smaller. Arnold Sommerfeld was the first to develop a theory based on the mass variation of the electron to correctly describe this ``fine'' structure. A few years later, Vannevar Bush pointed out that Weber's force law could be used instead of Einstein's theory of relativity. We will utilize this line of approach to present a purely classical theory of the fine structure of the Hydrogen atom. Ritz's theory of electromagnetism replaces Weber's law; we will summarize all the other atomic physics experiments that our classical theory already describes correctly. Finally we will show how this fine structure theory logically paves the way for an explanation of the linear Stark effect.

  5. Fine structure of triplet exciton polarons in polydiacetylene molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmar, C.; Rühle, W.; Frick, J.; Sixl, H.; Schütz, J. U. v.

    1988-07-01

    Triplet states on conjugated polydiacetylene chains which are created by UV excitation are examined experimentally using ODMR spectroscopy. The observed fine structure shows that the triplet state can be ascribed to the conjugated chain rather than to the side groups and that it is localized. This leads to the suggestion of an exciton polaron. In the theoretical part the wave function of the exciton polaron is calculated using the configuration model in analogy to the description of pz radical electrons on carbene chain ends of reactive short-chain intermediates. The total fine structure tensor is obtained by summing up the fine structure tensors of the individual configurations weighted by their probability densities. The transfer integral t of the configuration model is fitted with respect to good agreement between experimentally observed and calculated fine structure parameters. Finally, comparison between the experimentally observed ESR linewidth and the calculated hyperfine structure splitting shows that the linewidth is motionally narrowed leading to the conclusion that the exciton polaron is mobile.

  6. Temporal Fine Structure and Applications to Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Complex broadband sounds are decomposed by the auditory filters into a series of relatively narrowband signals, each of which conveys information about the sound by time-varying features. The slow changes in the overall amplitude constitute envelope, while the more rapid events, such as zero crossings, constitute temporal fine structure (TFS).…

  7. Ultrafast exciton fine structure relaxation dynamics in lead chalcogenide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin C; Gerth, Kathrine A; Song, Qing; Murphy, James E; Nozik, Arthur J; Scholes, Gregory D

    2008-05-01

    The rates of fine structure relaxation in PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanocrystals were measured on a femtosecond time scale as a function of temperature with no applied magnetic field by cross-polarized transient grating spectroscopy (CPTG) and circularly polarized pump-probe spectroscopy. The relaxation rates among exciton fine structure states follow trends with nanocrystal composition and size that are consistent with the expected influence of material dependent spin-orbit coupling, confinement enhanced electron-hole exchange interaction, and splitting between L valleys that are degenerate in the bulk. The size dependence of the fine structure relaxation rate is considerably different from what is observed for small CdSe nanocrystals, which appears to result from the unique material properties of the highly confined lead chalcogenide quantum dots. Modeling and qualitative considerations lead to conclusions about the fine structure of the lowest exciton absorption band, which has a potentially significant bearing on photophysical processes that make these materials attractive for practical purposes.

  8. Strained spiral vortex model for turbulent fine structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    1982-01-01

    A model for the intermittent fine structure of high Reynolds number turbulence is proposed. The model consists of slender axially strained spiral vortex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. The tightening of the spiral turns by the differential rotation of the induced swirling velocity produces a cascade of velocity fluctuations to smaller scale. The Kolmogorov energy spectrum is a result of this model.

  9. Temporal Fine Structure and Applications to Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Complex broadband sounds are decomposed by the auditory filters into a series of relatively narrowband signals, each of which conveys information about the sound by time-varying features. The slow changes in the overall amplitude constitute envelope, while the more rapid events, such as zero crossings, constitute temporal fine structure (TFS).…

  10. Catalog of fine-structured electron velocity distribution functions - Part 1: Antiparallel magnetic-field reconnection (Geospace Environmental Modeling case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, Philippe-A.

    2017-09-01

    To understand the essential physics needed to reproduce magnetic reconnection events in 2.5-D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we revisit the Geospace Environmental Modeling (GEM) setup. We set up a 2-D Harris current sheet (that also specifies the initial conditions) to evolve the reconnection of antiparallel magnetic fields. In contrast to the GEM setup, we use a much smaller initial perturbation to trigger the reconnection and evolve it more self-consistently. From PIC simulation data with high-quality particle statistics, we study a symmetric reconnection site, including separatrix layers, as well as the inflow and the outflow regions. The velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of electrons have a fine structure and vary strongly depending on their location within the reconnection setup. The goal is to start cataloging multidimensional fine-structured electron velocity distributions showing different reconnection processes in the Earth's magnetotail under various conditions. This will enable a direct comparison with observations from, e.g., the NASA Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission, to identify reconnection-related events. We find regions with strong non-gyrotropy also near the separatrix layer and provide a refined criterion to identify an electron diffusion region in the magnetotail. The good statistical significance of this work for relatively small analysis areas reveals the gradual changes within the fine structure of electron VDFs depending on their sampling site.

  11. The origin of the distortion product otoacoustic emission fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskorski, Pawel

    Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are sounds detected in the ear canal which are generated by the nonlinear processes in the inner ear (cochlea) in response to the external stimulation of two or more tones (primaries). Their generation region in the cochlea can be systematically changed by varying the primary frequencies, and they are currently being evaluated for possible clinical use in screening for hearing defects. The phase and amplitude of various orders of DPOAEs of frequencies, f/sb [dp]=f1-n(f2-f1),/ (n=1,2,/...), were measured in human subjects for two- tone stimuli of frequencies f1 and f2 (>f1). A number of experimental paradigms (fixed primary ratio f2/f1, fixed f1, fixed f2, and fixed f/sb [dp]) were used to investigate the nature of peaks and valleys (fine structure) of DPOAEs in their phase and amplitude dependence on the primary frequencies. This fine structure must be taken into account in any potential clinical applications of DPOAEs. The experimental results largely support a model in which the fine structure stems from interference at the base of the cochlea between distortion product (DP) components coming from the primary DPOAE source region (around the f2 tonotopic place) and components coming from the DP tonotopic place (via reflection of an apically moving DP wave). The spectral periodicity of the fine structures for several orders of apical DPOAEs corresponds to a tonotopic displacement of about 0.4 mm along the basilar membrane (BM) (0.4 bark). In agreement with the reaction model, this spectral spacing is also characteristic of synchronous evoked and spontaneous otoacoustic emission spectra as well as the microstructure of the hearing threshold. Approximate analytic expressions for the mechanisms which are responsible for the fine structure are used to interpret the data.

  12. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  13. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  14. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  15. A Fresh Look at Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients. Revisiting the Impulsive Response Method Using Factorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as…

  16. Fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monozon, B. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-02-01

    Wannier-Mott excitons in a semiconductor layered superlattice (SL) are investigated analytically for the case that the period of the superlattice is much smaller than the 2D exciton Bohr radius. Additionally we assume the presence of a longitudinal external static electric field directed parallel to the SL axis. The exciton states and the optical absorption coefficient are derived in the tight-binding and adiabatic approximations. Strong and weak electric fields providing spatially localized and extended electron and hole states, respectively, are studied. The dependencies of the exciton states and the exciton absorption spectrum on the SL parameters and the electric field strength are presented in an explicit form. We focus on the fine structure of the ground quasi-2D exciton level formed by the series of closely spaced energy levels adjacent from the high frequencies. These levels are related to the adiabatically slow relative exciton longitudinal motion governed by the potential formed by the in-plane exciton state. It is shown that the external electric fields compress the fine structure energy levels, decrease the intensities of the corresponding optical peaks and increase the exciton binding energy. A possible experimental study of the fine structure of the exciton electroabsorption is discussed.

  17. Fine structure of a resonantly excited p -shell exciton in a CdTe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoleński, T.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Wojnar, P.; Kossacki, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-resolved photoluminescence excitation study of the absorption spectrum of a p -shell neutral exciton in a single CdTe/ZnTe quantum dot. We find that the fine structure of the p -shell exciton is completely analogous to the fine structure of the s -shell exciton, including the selection rules and the effects of a magnetic field applied in Faraday and Voigt configurations. The energy spectrum of the p -shell exciton is found to be well described by introducing respective isotropic and anisotropic constants of the exchange interaction between a p -shell electron and a p -shell hole. The typical values of these exchange constants averaged over several randomly selected quantum dots yield δ0p p=(0.92 ±0.16 ) meV and δ1p p=(0.58 ±0.25 ) meV. Additionally, we demonstrate that the nonresonant relaxation of the p -shell exciton conserves the exciton spin to a very high degree for both bright and dark exciton configurations.

  18. Fine Structure of Anomalously Intense Pulses of PSR J0814+7429 Radio Emission in the Decameter Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoryk, A. O.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Shevtsova, A. I.; Vasylieva, I. Y.; Plakhov, M. S.; Kravtsov, I. M.

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: The fine structure of the anomalously intense pulses of PSR J0814+7429 (B0809+74) has been studied. The pulsar radio emission fine structure is investigated to determine its parameters in the lowest part of spectrum available for groundbased observations. Design/methodology/approach: The scattering measure in the interstellar plasma have been estimated using the spectral and correlation analyses of pulsar data recorded by the UTR-2 radio telescope. Results: Two characteristic time scales of the anomalously intense pulses fine structure of the PSR J0814+7429 radio emission have been found. The strongest pulses of this pulsar in the decameter range can have a duration of about t 2÷3 ms. These pulses are emitted in short series. In some cases, they are emitted over the low-intensity plateau consisting of the “long” subpulse component. Conclusions: The narrowest correlation scale of pulsar J0814+7429 radio emission corresponds to the doubled scattering time constant of the interstellar medium impulse response. Broader scale of the fine structure of its radio emission can be explained by the radiation of a short series of narrow pulses or relatively broad pulses inside this pulsar magnetosphere.

  19. A fresh look at linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients. Revisiting the impulsive response method using factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporesi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to the impulsive response method for solving linear constant-coefficient ordinary differential equations of any order based on the factorization of the differential operator. The approach is elementary, we only assume a basic knowledge of calculus and linear algebra. In particular, we avoid the use of distribution theory, as well as of the other more advanced approaches: Laplace transform, linear systems, the general theory of linear equations with variable coefficients and variation of parameters. The approach presented here can be used in a first course on differential equations for science and engineering majors.

  20. Taxonomic Implications of Spore Fine Structure in Clostridium bifermentans

    PubMed Central

    Rode, L. J.; Smith, Louis Ds

    1971-01-01

    Thirty-five strains of Clostridium bifermentans were, in most part, culturally homogeneous by conventional taxonomic criteria but were heterogeneous with respect to spore fine structure. Fourteen of the strains produced spores with appendages, distributed among four distinct ultrastructural types. No consistent correlation existed between spore type and other variable properties of these strains. It is proposed, therefore, that these spore appendage-type strains be considered as “varieties” of C. bifermentans and that they should not be designated as new species. Images PMID:5541019

  1. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure in photoelectron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Rothberg, G.M.; Choudhary, K.M.; denBoer, M.L.; Williams, G.P.; Hecht, M.H.; Lindau, I.

    1984-09-17

    We report the first definitive measurements of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) made by monitoring the direct photoelectron emission as a function of photon energy. We have measured EXAFS associated with the Mn 3p and F 2s core levels in evaporated films of MnF/sub 2/ and found good agreement with bulk transmission EXAFS associated with the Mn 1s level. Photoelectron EXAFS makes possible surface-sensitive structural determinations using vacuum uv radiation on a virtually unlimited range of systems.

  2. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, R.G.

    1987-02-01

    Results of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of the iron atom in deoxygenated hemoglobin are reviewed. It is shown that the iron-porphinato nitrogen distance has been determined to be 2.06 +/- 0.01 A by two independent investigations. Difficulties experienced in using this distance to calculate the iron's distance above the plane by triangulation are shown to be due to ignoring differences between ferrous and ferric hemes. It is concluded that the iron is 0.2 +/- 0.1/0.2 A above the plane of the nitrogens as originally shown.

  3. Morphological relationships in the chromospheric H-alpha fine structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.

    1971-01-01

    A continuous relationship is proposed between the basic elements of the dark fine structure of the quiet and active chromosphere. A progression from chromospheric bushes to fibrils, then to chromospheric threads and active region filaments, and finally to diffuse quiescent filaments, is described. It is shown that the horizontal component of the field on opposite sides of an active region quiescent filament can be in the same direction and closely parallel to the filament axis. Consequently, it is unnecessary to postulate twisted or otherwise complex field configurations to reconcile the support mechanism of filaments with the observed motion along their axis.

  4. Revisiting the effect of posture on high-intensity constant-load cycling performance in men and women.

    PubMed

    Egaña, Mikel; Smith, Stephanie; Green, Simon

    2007-03-01

    It was recently observed that inclining the body from a supine to upright position improved the performance of high-intensity, constant-load cycling to a larger extent in men than women (Egaña et al. in Eur J Appl Physiol 96:1-9, 2006), although this gender-related effect was based on a small number of men (n = 5) and women (n = 5). To explore this effect further, we studied the effect of body tilt on cycling performance in a larger and different group of men (n = 8) and women (n = 18). Peak power, peak VO2 and the ventilatory threshold (VT) were determined during an upright maximal graded cycle test, and a high-intensity test (80% peak power) was performed to failure in both the upright and supine positions. Performance was significantly longer in the upright compared with supine position in men (17.4 +/- 7.7 vs. 7.6 +/- 3.4 min) and women (14.1 +/- 6.0 vs. 6.0 +/- 3.7 min). The magnitude of this postural effect was not significantly different between men and women; whereas it was significantly correlated with the relative intensity of exercise expressed as a function of VT (r = -0.39). These data demonstrate that the postural effect on high-intensity cycling performance is not influenced by gender; but that it is related to the intensity of exercise relative to the ventilatory threshold.

  5. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  6. Fine structure in the cluster decays of the translead nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, O. |; Cioaca, C.

    1995-06-01

    Within the one level {ital R}-matrix approach several hindrance factors for the radioactive decays in which are emitted {sup 4}He, {sup 14}C, and {sup 20}O atomic nuclei are calculated. The interior wave functions are supposed to be given by the recently proposed enlarged superfluid model, an extension of the JINR-Dubna`s quasiparticle phonon nuclear model. The spectroscopic factors are expanded in terms of products of cluster overlaps and intrinsic overlap integrals. The cluster overlaps are equivalents of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage, while for the intrinsic overlap integrals we construct a model, which is an extension of the usual models for simple particle decay such as deuteron, triton, and {alpha} decay. The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster-nucleus double-folding model potential obtained with the {ital M}3{ital Y} interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Fm, {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 20}O decay of {sup 229}Th and {sup 255}Fm. A relatively good agreement with the experimental data is obtained especially in the case of the {alpha}-decay fine structure.

  7. Fine structures of type III radio bursts observed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalenic, Jasmina; Marque, Christophe; Fallows, Richard; Mann, Gottfried; Vocks, Christian

    2017-04-01

    On August 25, 2014, NOAA AR 2146 produced the M2.0 class flare (peaked at 15:11 UT). The flare was associated with a coronal dimming, a EUV wave, a halo CME and a radio event observed by LOFAR (the LOw-Frequency Array). The radio event consisted of a type II, type III and type IV radio emissions. In this study, we focus on LOFAR observations of the type III bursts, generally considered to be radio signatures of fast electron beams propagating along open or quasi open field lines. The group of type III bursts was, as usually, observed during the impulsive phase of the flare. At first hand, type III bursts show no peculiarity, but the high frequency/time resolution LOFAR observations reveal that only few of these type III bursts have a smooth emission profile. The majority of bursts is strongly fragmented. Some show a structuring similar to type IIIb bursts, but on a smaller frequency scale, and others show a non-organized patchy structure which gives indication on the possibly related turbulence processes. Although fine structures of type III bursts were already reported, the wealth of fine structures, and the fragmentation of the radio emission observed in this August 25 event is unprecedented. We show that these LOFAR observations bring completely new insight and pose a new challenge for the physics of the acceleration of electron beams and associated emission processes.

  8. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF INHIBITORY SYNAPSES IN THE CRAYFISH

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, R. Price; Pepe, Frank A.

    1961-01-01

    Physiological investigations have shown that the synaptic input to the sensory neuron of the stretch receptor in the abdominal muscles of the crayfish is purely inhibitory. This neuron was chosen, therefore, as a site in which to study the fine structure of inhibitory synaptic endings. It was hoped that this fine structure might (a) provide a morphological prototype for the study of more complex synaptic systems and (b) reflect the inhibitory mechanisms. Stretch receptors were fixed in situ in buffered OsO4, dehydrated, and embedded in Araldite. Both cross and longitudinal sections were examined after staining with phosphotungstic acid. The inhibitory endings were easily identified by their great similarity to previously described excitatory endings. Small circular profiles (synaptic vesicles) about 460 A in diameter and an accumulation of mitochondria were consistently observed within the presynaptic endings. An increased osmiophilia of pre- and postsynaptic membranes, where they were in apposition, was also seen. The only observed difference between these inhibitory endings and excitatory endings, described by other authors, was the variable presence of a latticework of 230 A tubules in the connective tissue immediately adjacent to the inhibitory endings. Inhibitory endings were observed on all parts of the sensory neuron except the axon. PMID:14485811

  9. Applications of extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy to studies of bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Anatoly I

    2012-12-21

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been used to study short range order in heterometallic alloys for almost four decades. In this critical review, experimental, theoretical and data analytical approaches are revisited to examine their power, and limitations, in studies of bimetallic nanocatalysts. This article covers the basics of EXAFS experiments, data analysis, and modelling of nanoscale clusters. It demonstrates that, in the best case scenario, quantitative information about the nanocatalyst's size, shape, details of core-shell architecture, as well as static and dynamic disorder in metal-metal bond lengths can be obtained. The article also emphasizes the main challenge accompanying such insights: the need to account for the statistical nature of the EXAFS technique, and discusses corrective strategies.

  10. Progress on a higher precision measurement of the n =2 triplet P fine structure of atomic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E. B.; Kato, K.; Beica, H.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Weel, M.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    Precision measurement of the 23P fine structure of atomic helium, when combined with precise theory, can be used to determine the value of the fine-structure constant. We report on progress towards an improved measurement using a new technique which reduces systematic effects, while improving the signal-to-noise ratio. An intense beam of 23S metastable helium atoms is created in a hollow-cathode liquid-nitrogen-cooled DC-discharge source. The atoms are laser excited to the 23P state and microwave transitions are driven between the 23P states using the Ramsey method of separated oscillatory fields (SOF). Atoms which complete the SOF sequence are shelved into the 23S m =-1 metastable state using laser transitions through the 33S state. These m =-1 atoms can be detected with high efficiency.

  11. Solution spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, M.R.; Soderholm, L.; Song, I.

    1995-06-12

    A purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ fluorescence XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements of bulk solution species during constant-potential electrolysis is described. The cell performance was demonstrated by the collection of europium L{sub 3}-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) throughout the course of electrolysis of an aqueous solution of EuCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The europium L{sub 3}-edge resonances reported here for the Eu{sup III} and Eu{sup II} ions demonstrate that their 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 5d electronic transition probabilities are not the same.

  12. High resolution telescope and spectrograph observations of solar fine structure in the 1600 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution spectroheliograms of the 1600 A region obtained during the HRTS rocket flight of 1978 February 13 are presented. The morphology, fine structure, and temporal behavior of emission bright points (BPs) in active and quiet regions are illustrated. In quiet regions, network elements persist as morphological units, although individual BPs may vary in intensity while usually lasting the flight duration. In cell centers, the BPs are highly variable on a 1 minute time scale. BPs in plages remain more constant in brightness over the observing sequence. BPs cover less than 4 percent of the quiet surface. The lifetime and degree of packing of BPs vary with the local strength of the magnetic field.

  13. Fine structure of microwave spike bursts and associated cross-field energy transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of the maser emission from a driven system where energetic electrons continue to flow through the source region is investigated using electronic particle simulations. It is shown that, under appropriate conditions, the maser can efficiently radiate a significant portion of the energy of the fast electrons in a very short time. The radiation is emitted in pulses even though the flow of electrons through the system is at a constant rate. The mission of these pulses is proposed as the source of the fine structure. Under other conditions the dominant maser emission changes from fundamental x-mode to either fundamental z-mode or to electrostatic upper hybrid or Bernstein modes. The bulk of the emission from the maser instability cannot propagate across field lines in this regime, and hence strong local plasma heating is expected, with little energy transport across the magnetic field lines.

  14. Fine-structure transitions as a tool for studying variation of α at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2017-07-01

    Star-forming galaxies at high redshifts are the ideal targets to probe the hypothetical variation of the fine-structure (FS) constant α over cosmological time-scales. We propose a modification of the alkali doublets method that allows us to search for variation in α combining far-infrared and submillimetre spectroscopic observations. This variation manifests as velocity offsets between the observed positions of the FS and gross-structure transitions when compared to laboratory wavelengths. Here we describe our method whose sensitivity limit to the fractional changes in α is about 5 × 10-7. We also demonstrate that current spectral observations of hydrogen and [C ii] 158 μm lines provide an upper limit on |Δα/α| ≲ 6 × 10 - 5 at redshifts z = 3.1 and 4.7.

  15. [Morphogenesis and the fine structure of Stibiobacter senarmontii].

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, T A; Lialikova, N N

    1980-01-01

    The morphogenesis and fine structure of Stibiobacter senarmontii were studied during its cultivation in the autotrophic conditions of growth in a mineral medium as well as in a medium containing yeast extract. The morphology of the organism was shown to be variable. A young culture was represented mainly by rods with three flagella. Coccoid, club-shaped and branching forms were observed during aging of the culture. The cells multiplied by irregular division and by breaking along the partition of the parent cell. The latter process yielded cell aggregates looking like rings and hieroglyphs. Electronograms revealed a complex membrane apparatus, polyribosomes, large electron-transparent inclusions, and unknown electron-dense inclusions in the nuclear zone. The cell wall looked on cross-sections as a three-layer structure. The assignment of St. senarmontii to Gram-positive bacteria is discussed. The morphogenesis of this organism suggests that it is related to the coryneform group of bacteria.

  16. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED FINE STRUCTURE WITH AUTOREGRESSIVE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Autoregressive prediction is adapted to double the resolution of Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) Fourier transforms. Even with the optimal taper (weighting function), the commonly used taper-and-transform Fourier method has limited resolution: it assumes the signal is zero beyond the limits of the measurement. By seeking the Fourier spectrum of an infinite extent oscillation consistent with the measurements but otherwise having maximum entropy, the errors caused by finite data range can be reduced. Our procedure developed to implement this concept applies autoregressive prediction to extrapolate the signal to an extent controlled by a taper width. Difficulties encountered when processing actual ARPEFS data are discussed. A key feature of this approach is the ability to convert improved measurements (signal-to-noise or point density) into improved Fourier resolution.

  17. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure of bimetallic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary Electronic and magnetic properties strongly depend on the structure of the material, especially on the crystal symmetry and chemical environment. In nanoparticles, the break of symmetry at the surface may yield different physical properties with respect to the corresponding bulk material. A useful tool to investigate the electronic structure, magnetic behaviour and local crystallographic structure is X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this review, recent developments in the field of extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements and in the analysis methods for structural investigations of bimetallic nanoparticles are highlighted. The standard analysis based on Fourier transforms is compared to the relatively new field of wavelet transforms that have the potential to outperform traditional analysis, especially in bimetallic alloys. As an example, the lattice expansion and inhomogeneous alloying found in FePt nanoparticles is presented, and this is discussed below in terms of the influence of employed density functional theory calculations on the magnetic properties. PMID:21977436

  18. Small-angle electron scattering of magnetic fine structures.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Yoshihiko

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic structures in magnetic artificial lattices and chiral magnetic orders in chiral magnets have been quantitatively analyzed in the reciprocal space by means of small-angle electron scattering (SAES) method. Lorentz deflection due to magnetic moments and Bragg diffraction due to periodicity are simultaneously recorded at an angle of the order of or less than 1 × 10(-6) rad, using a camera length of more than 100 m. The present SAES method, together with TEM real-space imaging methods such as in-situ Lorentz microscopy, is very powerful in analyzing magnetic fine structures in magnetic materials. Indeed, the existence of both a chiral helimagnetic structure and a chiral magnetic soliton lattice in a chiral magnet CrNb3S6 has been successfully verified for the first time using the present complementary methods.

  19. Exploring the fine structure at the limb in coronal holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karovska, Magarita; Blundell, Solon F.; Habbal, Shadia Rifai

    1994-01-01

    The fine structure of the solar limb in coronal holes is explored at temperatures ranging from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 6) K. An image enhancement algorithm orignally developed for solar eclipse observations is applied to a number of simultaneous multiwavelength observations made with the Harvard Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer experiment on Skylab. The enhanced images reveal the presence of filamentary structures above the limb with a characteristic separation of approximately 10 to 15 sec . Some of the structures extend from the solar limb into the corona to at least 4 min above the solar limb. The brightness of these structures changes as a function of height above the limb. The brightest emission is associated with spiculelike structures in the proximity of the limb. The emission characteristic of high-temperature plasma is not cospatial with the emission at lower temperatures, indicating the presence of different temperature plasmas in the field of view.

  20. Ship Wake Distortion as Indicator of Spatial Current Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga Yu.; Sabinin, Konstantin D.

    2013-03-01

    Parameter determination of current fine structure is attempted for a case of ship wake distortion. In high resolution radar and optical images, one can clearly detect long narrow slick bands formed on the sea surface as a result of discharges of waters containing surfactants. During intense algae bloom, ship wakes are manifested in radar images as bright contrast bands hundreds of kilometers long observed on the sea surface for several hours. Comparing the true route of a vessel with its wake one can obtain more detailed information about the current component. The impact of various hydrological processes on ship wake patterns are discussed, in particular, ship wake distortions caused by meso- and submesoscale eddies and internal waves that allowed to determine orbital current velocities in the processes from the distortion characteristics.

  1. Fine structure generation in a double-diffusive system.

    PubMed

    Kozitskiy, S B

    2005-11-01

    Double-diffusive convection in a horizontally infinite layer of a unit height in a large-Rayleigh-number limit is considered. From linear stability analysis it is shown that the convection tends to have a form of traveling tall thin rolls with width about 30 times less than height. Amplitude equations of type for vertical variations of the amplitude of these rolls and mean values of diffusive components are derived. As a result of its numerical simulation it is shown that for a wide variety of parameters considered system have solutions, known as diffusive chaos, which can be useful for the explanation of fine structure generation in some important oceanographical systems like thermohaline staircases.

  2. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  3. Herschel Galactic Plane Survey of [NII] Fine Structure Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10-8-10-7 Wm-2 sr-1 level over the range -60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10-50 cm-3 with an average value of 29 cm-3 and N+ column densities 1016-1017 cm-2. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  4. Cold Molecule Spectroscopy for Constraining the Evolution of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Eric R.; Lewandowski, H.J.; Sawyer, Brian C.; Ye Jun

    2006-04-14

    We report precise measurements of ground-state, {lambda}-doublet microwave transitions in the hydroxyl radical molecule (OH). Utilizing slow, cold molecules produced by a Stark decelerator we have improved over the precision of the previous best measurement 25-fold for the F{sup '}=2{yields}F=2 transition, yielding (1 667 358 996{+-}4) Hz, and by tenfold for the F{sup '}=1{yields}F=1 transition, yielding (1 665 401 803{+-}12) Hz. Comparing these laboratory frequencies to those from OH megamasers in interstellar space will allow a sensitivity of 1 ppm for {delta}{alpha}/{alpha} over {approx}10{sup 10} yr.

  5. Rotational and Fine Structure of Pseudo-Jahn Molecules with C_1 Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    It has been found in our previous works that rotational and fine-structure analysis of spectra involving nearly degenerate electronic states may aid in interpretation and analysis of the vibronic structure, specifically in the case of pseudo-Jahn-Teller (pJT) molecules with C_s symmetry. The spectral analysis of pJT derivatives (isopropoxy and cyclohexoxy of a prototypical JT molecule (the methoxy radical) allowed for quantitative determination of various contributions to the energy separation between the nearly degenerate electronic states, including the relativistic spin-orbit (SO) effect, the electrostatic interaction, and their zero-point energy difference. These states are coupled by SO and Coriolis interactions, which can also be determined accurately in rotational and fine structure analysis. Most recently, the spectroscopic model for rotational analysis of pJT molecules has been extended for analysis of molecules with C_1 symmetry, i.e., no symmetry. This model includes the six independently determinable components of the spin-rotation (SR) tensor and the three components of the SO and Coriolis interactions. It has been employed to simulate and fit high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra of jet-cooled alkoxy radicals with C_1 symmetry, including the 2-hexoxy and the 2-pentoxy radicals, as well as previously recorded LIF spectrum of the trans-conformer (defined by its OCCC dihedral angle) of the 2-butoxy radical. Although the LIF spectra can be reproduced by using either the SR constants or SO and Coriolis constants, the latter simulation offers results that are physically more meaningful whereas the SR constants have to be regarded as effective constants. Furthermore, we will review the SO and Coriolis constants of alkoxy radicals that have been investigated, starting from the well-studied methoxy radical (CH_3O). J. Liu, D. Melnik, and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 094308 (2013) J. Liu and T. A. Miller, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 11871

  6. Damping of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Solar Prominence Fine Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution observations of solar filaments and prominences reveal that these large-scale coronal structures are formed by a myriad of long and thin ribbons, here called threads, which are piled up to form the prominence body. Evidences suggest that these fine structures are magnetic flux tubes anchored in the solar photosphere, which are partially filled with the cool and dense prominence material. Individual and collective oscillations of prominence and filament fine structures are frequently reported by means of oscillatory variations in Doppler signals and spectral line intensity. Common features of these observations are that the reported oscillatory periods are usually in a narrow range between 2 and 10 minutes, that the velocity amplitudes are smaller than ˜3 km/s, and that the oscillations seem to be strongly damped after a few periods. Typically, the ratio of the damping time, tD, to the period, P, is tD/P < 10. While the oscillations have been interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, i.e., in terms of the MHD normal modes supported by the filament thread body and/or propagating MHD waves, the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the damping are not well-known and a comparative study between different damping mechanisms is needed. In this Thesis, we study the efficiency of several physical mechanisms for the damping of MHD oscillations in prominence fine structures. Both individual and collective oscillations of threads are analyzed. We model a filament thread as a straight cylindrical magnetic flux tube with prominence conditions, embedded in a magnetized environment representing the solar coronal medium. The basic MHD equations are applied to the model and contain non-ideal terms accounting for effects as, e.g., non-adiabatic mechanisms, magnetic diffusion, ion-neutral collisions, etc., that may be of relevance in prominence plasmas and whose role on the damping of the oscillations is assessed. Our method combines

  7. Fine structure of the nucleus of the galaxy NGC 1275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveyenko, L. I.; Seleznev, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The fine structure of the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1275 was investigated in 2005-2010 at a wavelength of 2 cm with a resolution as high as 50 μas. The structure consists of two parallel identical systems, eastern and western, spaced 0.5 pc apart in the plane of the sky. Each of them contains an ejector and a bipolar outflow. There are extended regions, lobes, at the extension of the bipolar outflows in the -10° and 170° directions at distances of 5 pc northward and 6.5 pc southward of the active zone. The observed difference between the jet and counterjet sizes by a factor of ~3 and between the distances to the lobes by a factor of 0.8 is determined by the difference between their velocities and by the change of sign of the outflow acceleration in the period of silence. The high-velocity bipolar outflows are surrounded by three pairs of low-velocity components. The diameters of the low-velocity coaxial outflows and the third component are Ø1 ≈ 0.3 pc, Ø2 ≈ 0.8 pc, and Ø3 ≈ 1.4 pc at the detection limit. The outer low-velocity components of the outflows encompass both high-velocity outflows. The velocities of the outflows and their brightness temperatures increase exponentially as the center of the high-velocity outflows is approached. The brightness temperatures of the high-velocity outflows at the ejector exit are T b > 1012 K. The spectral line velocities in the nuclear region differ by ~600 km s-1 due to the velocity difference between the two systems. In the case of Keplerian motion, the revolution period is ~5 × 103 yr, and the mass of the central massive bodies, black holes, is M ≈ 107M⊙. The fine structure suggests a vortical nature of the formation. In the case under consideration, two parallel vortices spaced ~0.5 pc apart and shifted by ~0.5 pc relative to each other were formed. The surrounding material inflows onto the disk of each system, is transferred in a spiral to the center, and is ejected in the -10° and 170

  8. Investigation Of Boundary Layers Fine Structure In Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golitsyn, G. S.; Granberg, I. G.; Andronova, A. V.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.; Smirnov, V. V.; Ponomarev, V. M.

    In connection with insufficiency of the quantitative items of information about the structure of surface and boundary layers structure of the atmosphere in the periods previous dusty ejection, and also absence of the description of an arid atmospheres micrometeorological mode, when the dry spreading surface thermally is non-uniform, that is characteristic for midday hours, the forwarding researches of fine structure of boundary layers in deserted regions of Kalmykia (1995-1997) and on dried bottom of the Aral sea (1991-1992 and in 1998) were carried out. Is was established that in dry hot weather above sandy "saucers" at heights of 1-2 meters there are micro- inversions of temperature and humidity. On our supervisions, this process occurs at temperatures of air above 25 deg.C and relative humidity less than 40%. Thus the gra- dient of temperature in bottom (5 cm) layer in absence of an external wind reaches 200-500 , i.e., arises strongly unstable subsurface boundary layer. Thus during dehydration of aggregate particles consisting, as has shown the soil anal- ysis, from particles of size 80-150 microns, the organic-mineral compositions (OMC) are allocated, and the thin-dispersion aerosol is formed. These thin-dispersion par- ticles (0.01-0.1 microns) first accumulate in this layer, and then at the expense of strong temperature (vertical and horizontal) gradient pass through viscous sub-layer and rise above, as whirlwinds - standing motionless thermics, or dust-devils, or as sim- ple convective of flows. During investigations, is was established, that in a hot season in absence of dusty storms convective processes lift into air from sandy landscapes of Kalmykia and Sub-Aral regions, consisting from aggregate particles, significant amounts of long-living aerosol of size less than 5 microns (including thin-dispersion (0.01-0.1 microns) aerosol), which renders essential influence on formation of aerosol pollution of an atmosphere and, thus, on a climate. Is was

  9. PDR modeling of the LWS fine-structure lines in ultraluminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhman, M. L.; Satyapal, S.; Fischer, J.; Wolfire, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The observations performed onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) on the fine structure lines in ultraluminous galaxies are reported on. The C II 158 micrometer, the O I 63 and 146 micrometer fine structure lines were detected. These lines were compared to the results of the revised theoretical models of extragalactic photodissociation regions (PDRs). The PDR origin of the fine structure lines and the physical properties of the PDR component are discussed.

  10. Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2008-04-01

    The lighting of the underwater environment is constantly changing due to attenuation by water, scattering by suspended particles, as well as the refraction and reflection caused by the surface waves. These factors pose a great challenge for marine animals which communicate through visual signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks and stomatopod crustaceans utilize the polarization properties of light. While the mechanisms behind the polarization vision of these two animal groups are similar, several distinctive types of polarizers (i.e. the structure producing the signal) have been found in these animals. To gain a better knowledge of how these polarizers function, we studied the relationships between fine structures and optical properties of four types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat similar spectral range, around 450- 550 nm, the reflectance properties of the signals and the mechanisms used to produce them have dramatic differences. In cephalopods, stack-plates polarizers produce the polarization patterns found on the arms and around their eyes. In stomatopods, we have found one type of beam-splitting polarizer based on photonic structures and two absorptive polarizer types based on dichroic molecules. These stomatopod polarizers may be found on various appendages, and on the cuticle covering dorsal or lateral sides of the animal. Since the efficiencies of all these polarizer types are somewhat sensitive to the change of illumination and viewing angle, how these animals compensate with different behaviors or fine structural features of the polarizer also varies.

  11. Fine structure genetic analysis of a beta-globin promoter.

    PubMed

    Myers, R M; Tilly, K; Maniatis, T

    1986-05-02

    A novel procedure for saturation mutagenesis of cloned DNA was used to obtain more than 100 single base substitutions within the promoter of the mouse beta-major globin gene. The effects of these promoter substitutions on transcription were determined by transfecting the cloned mutant genes into HeLa cells on plasmids containing an SV40 transcription enhancer, and measuring the levels of correctly initiated beta-globin transcripts after 2 days. Mutations in three regions of the promoter resulted in a significant decrease in the level of transcription: (i) the CACCC box, located between -87 and -95, (ii) the CCAAT box, located between -72 and -77, and (iii) the TATA box, located between -26 and -30 relative to the start site of transcription. In contrast, two different mutations in nucleotides immediately upstream from the CCAAT box resulted in a 3- to 3.5-fold increase in transcription. With two minor exceptions, single base substitutions in all other regions of the promoter had no effect on transcription. These results precisely delineate the cis-acting sequences required for accurate and efficient initiation of beta-globin transcription, and they establish a general approach for the fine structure genetic analysis of eukaryotic regulatory sequences.

  12. Fine structure analysis of Salmonella typhimurium glutamate synthase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Madonna, M J; Fuchs, R L; Brenchley, J E

    1985-01-01

    Glutamate synthase activity is required for the growth of Salmonella typhimurium on media containing a growth-rate-limiting nitrogen source. Mutations that alter glutamate synthase activity had been identified in the gltB gene, but it was not known which of the two nonidentical subunits of the enzyme was altered. To examine the gene-protein relationship of the glt region, two nonsense mutations were identified and used to demonstrate that gltB encodes the large subunit of the enzyme. Six strains with independent Mu cts d1 (lac bla) insertions were isolated, from which a collection of deletion mutations was obtained. The deletions were transduced with the nonsense mutations and 38 other glt point mutations to construct a fine-structure genetic map. Chromosome mobilization studies, mediated by Hfr derivatives of Mu cts d1 lysogens, showed that gltB is transcribed in a clockwise direction, as shown in the S. typhimurium linkage map. Studies of the polar effects of three Mu cts d1 insertions indicated that the gene for the small subunit maps clockwise to gltB and that the two genes are cotranscribed to form a glt operon. Images PMID:3881392

  13. Hymenolepis nana: the fine structure of the embryonic envelopes.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, I; Threadgold, L T

    1981-06-01

    The fine structure of the envelopes surrounding hatched and unhatched oncospheres of Hymenolepis nana has been investigated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), together with light microscope histochemical observations of JB-4 embedded material. The oncosphere is surrounded by 3 layers--the capsule, the outer envelope and the inner envelope, the latter giving rise to the embryophore and the 'oncospheral membrane'. An additional layer--the polar filament layer--lies between the 'oncospheral membrane' and the oncosphere. Shell material is deposited on the capsule as a thin layer. It is secreted by the outer envelope, which degenerates once shell formation is complete. The uterus may also contribute to shell formation. The embryophore forms a thin incomplete and peripheral layer within the inner envelope. In the basal region of this envelope, partial development of an 'oncospheral membrane' takes place, but it does not become detached as a separate layer. The polar filaments, which are characteristic of the oncosphere of H. nana, are derived from the epithelial covering of the oncosphere itself, which delaminates to form a separate polar filament layer. The filaments arise from knob-like projections at opposite poles of this layer. The design of the embryonic envelopes in H. nana show a number of modifications from the basic cyclophyllidean pattern, and these can be related to the demands of its 'direct' life-cycle.

  14. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE ELECTRIC ORGAN OF TORPEDO MARMORATA

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Michael N.

    1965-01-01

    The fine structure of the electric organ of the fish Torpedo marmorata has been examined after osmium tetroxide or potassium permanganate fixation, acetone dehydration, and Araldite embedment. This organ consists of stacks of electroplaques which possess a dorsal noninnervated and a ventral richly innervated surface. Both surfaces are covered with a thin basement membrane. A tubular membranous network whose lumen is continuous with the extracellular space occupies the dorsal third of the electroplaque. Nerve endings, separated from the ventral surface of the electroplaque by a thin basement membrane, contain synaptic vesicles (diameter 300 to 1200 A), mitochondria, and electron-opaque granules (diameter 300 A). Projections from the nerve endings occupy the lumina of the finger-like invaginations of the ventral surface. The cytoplasm of the electroplaques contains the usual organelles. A "cellular cuff" surrounds most of the nerve fibers in the intercellular space, and is separated from the nerve fibre and its Schwann cell by a space containing connective tissue fibrils. The connective tissue fibrils and fibroblasts in the intercellular space are primarily associated with the dorsal surface of the electroplaque. PMID:14286287

  15. Observations on the Fine Structure of the Turtle Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Don W.; Selby, Cecily C.

    1958-01-01

    The general fine structure of the atrial musculature of the turtle heart is described, including; the nature of the sarcolemma; the cross-banded structure of the myofibrils; the character of the sarcoplasm, and the form and disposition of its organelles. An abundant granular component of the sarcoplasm in this species is tentatively identified as a particulate form of glycogen. The myocardium is composed of individual cells joined end to end at primitive intercalated discs, and side to side at sites of cohesion that resemble the desmosomes of epithelia. Transitional forms are found between desmosomes and intercalated discs. Both consist of a thickened area of the cell membrane with an accumulation of dense material in the subjacent cytoplasm. This dense amorphous component is often continuous with the Z substance of the myofibrils and may be of the same composition. The observations reported reemphasize the basic similarity between desmosomes and terminal bars of epithelia and intercalated discs of cardiac muscle. Numerous unmyelinated nerves are found beneath the endocardium. Some of these occupy recesses in the surface of Schwann cells; others are naked axons. No specialized nerve endings are found. Axons passing near the sarcolemma contain synaptic vesicles, and it is believed that this degree of proximity is sufficient to constitute a functioning myoneural junction. PMID:13502430

  16. Fine structure behaviour of VVER-1000 RPV materials under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B. A.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Erak, D. Yu.; Chernobaeva, A. A.; Zabusov, O. O.

    2009-06-01

    Changes in the fine structure and mechanical properties of the base metal (BM) and weld metal (WM) of VVER-1000 pressure vessels during accumulation of neutron dose in the range of fluences ˜(3.2-15) × 10 23 m -2 ( E > 0.5 MeV) at 290 °C are studied using methods of transmission electron microscopy, fractographic analysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy. A correlation was found between the changes of mechanical properties and the micro- and nano-structures of the studied steels. Accumulation of neutron dose considerably raises the strength characteristics and transition temperature of VVER-1000 pressure vessel steels. The rate of changes in the mechanical properties of the weld metal is significantly higher than that of the base metal. The slower growth of strength characteristics and transition temperature shift of the base metal under irradiation as compared with the weld metal is due to the slower growth of the density of radiation defects and radiation-induced precipitates. The level of intergranular embrittlement under irradiation in the weld metal is not higher then in the base metal in spite of the higher content of nickel.

  17. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF STREPTOMYCES VIOLACEORUBER (S. COELICOLOR)

    PubMed Central

    Glauert, Audrey M.; Hopwood, David A.

    1961-01-01

    A study of thin sections of hyphae of Streptomyces violaceoruber in the electron microscope showed that the structure of the walls and the mode of formation of cross-walls are similar to those of Gram-positive bacteria. A beaded structure was seen in some regions of the wall, and the significance of this observation is discussed in relation to previous studies of the fine structure of bacterial cell walls. Elements of the intracytoplasmic membrane system appear to be involved in the process of cross-wall formation. The walls of the hyphae of the aerial mycelium divide into two layers before the spores are formed, and only the inner component of the wall grows inwards to form the cross-walls and so delimit the spores. The outer component remains intact for a time and acts as a sheath around the developing spores. Finally the sheath breaks and the spores are liberated. This process is contrasted with the formation of endospores in eubacteria. When the spores germinate, the walls of the germ tubes are continuous with those of the spores. PMID:13705984

  18. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements.

    PubMed

    Boeddeker, Norbert; Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns ("saccades") are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees' head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves.

  19. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements

    PubMed Central

    Boeddeker, Norbert; Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns (“saccades”) are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees’ head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves. PMID:26352836

  20. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  1. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF VON EBNER'S GLAND OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Hand, Arthur R.

    1970-01-01

    The fine structure of von Ebner's gland was studied in untreated rats and rats stimulated to secrete by fasting-refeeding or injection of pilocarpine. Cytological features were similar to those reported for pancreas and parotid gland. Abundant granular endoplasmic reticulum filled the basal portion of the cell, a well-developed Golgi complex was located in the vicinity of the nucleus, and the apical portion of the cell was filled with dense secretory granules. Dense heterogeneous bodies resembling lysosomes were closely associated with the Golgi complex. Coated vesicles were seen in the Golgi region and also in continuity with the cell membrane. Granule discharge occurred by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell membrane at the secretory surface. Successive fusion of adjacent granules to the previously fused granule formed a connected string of granules in the apical cytoplasm. Myoepithelial cells were present within the basement membrane, and nerve processes were seen adjacent to acinar and myoepithelial cells. Duct cells resembled the intercalated duct cells of the major salivary glands. PMID:5411078

  2. Benzene at 1 GHz. Magnetic field-induced fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heist, L. M.; Poon, C.-D.; Samulski, E. T.; Photinos, D. J.; Jokisaari, J.; Vaara, J.; Emsley, J. W.; Mamone, S.; Lelli, M.

    2015-09-01

    The deuterium NMR spectrum of benzene-d6 in a high field spectrometer (1 GHz protons) exhibits a magnetic field-induced deuterium quadrupolar splitting Δν. The magnitude of Δν observed for the central resonance is smaller than that observed for the 13C satellite doublets Δν‧. This difference, Δ(Δν) = Δν‧ - Δν, is due to unresolved fine structure contributions to the respective resonances. We determine the origins of and simulate this difference, and report pulse sequences that exploit the connectivity of the peaks in the 13C and 2H spectra to determine the relative signs of the indirect coupling, JCD, and Δν. The positive sign found for Δν is consonant with the magnetic field biasing of an isolated benzene molecule-the magnetic energy of the aromatic ring is lowest for configurations where the C6 axis is normal to the field. In the neat liquid the magnitude of Δν is decreased by the pair correlations in this prototypical molecular liquid.

  3. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE HUMAN OVUM IN THE PRONUCLEAR STAGE

    PubMed Central

    Zamboni, Luciano; Mishell, Daniel R.; Bell, James H.; Baca, Manuel

    1966-01-01

    A penetrated ovum was recovered from the oviduct of a 33 year old surgical patient who had had sexual intercourse 26 hr before the operation. The ovum was in the pronuclear stage. The ooplasmic organelles were mainly represented by mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum components, and Golgi elements. Small vesicles were found in the space between the two sheets of the pronuclear envelope. These vesicles appeared to be morphologically similar to the ER vesicles in the ooplasm and were considered to be involved in pronuclear development. Numerous annulate lamellae were seen in the ooplasm as well as in the pronuclei. Ooplasmic crystalloids were also observed. These were thought to represent cytoplasmic yolk. Remnants of the penetrating spermatozoon were found in close relation to one of the pronuclei. The fine structure of the first and second polar body is also described. The nuclear complement of the first polar body consisted of isolated chromosomes, whereas the second polar body contained a membrane-bounded nucleus. In consideration of the possibility that polar body fertilization may take place, these differences in nuclear organization could be of importance. Other recognizable differences between the two polar bodies were presence of dense cortical granules and microvilli in the first polar body, and absence of these structures in the second. These dissimilarities were considered to be related to the organization of the egg cytoplasm at the time of polar body separation. PMID:6008199

  4. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE EYE OF A CHAETOGNATH.

    PubMed

    EAKIN, R M; WESTFALL, J A

    1964-04-01

    Electron microscopy reveals a star-like pigment cell at the center of the eye of the arrow-worm, Sagitta scrippsae. Between the arms of the pigment cell are clusters of photoreceptor cell processes, each process consisting of: (1) a tubular segment containing longitudinally arranged microtubules about 500 A in diameter and 20 micro in length; (2) a remarkable conical body, composed of cords and large granules, situated at the base of the tubular segment; and (3) a connecting piece which, like that of rods and cones, connects the process with the sensory cell proper and through which runs a fibrillar apparatus consisting of nine peripheral double tubules. Beneath the connecting piece lies a typical centriole with a striated rootlet. The receptor cell process is deeply recessed into the sensory cell which may possess a corona of microvilli at its inner surface. A nerve fiber arises from the outer end of the cell and passes into the optic nerve. Additional features are some supporting cells, an external layer of flattened epithelial cells, and an over-all investment of basement membrane and thick fibrous capsule. The fine structure and function of these elements of the eye are discussed in relation to earlier studies with the light microscope. The ciliary nature of the photoreceptor cell process in S. scrippsae points to a probable evolutionary relationship of chaetognaths to echinoderms and chordates.

  5. Understanding the fine structure of intermediate materials of maize starches.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenfang; Zhang, Binjia; Li, Jiangtao; Zhao, Siming; Niu, Meng; Jia, Caihua; Xiong, Shanbai

    2017-10-15

    Here we concern the molecular fine structure of intermediate material (IM) fraction in regular maize starch (RMS) and Starpro 40 maize starch (S40). IM had a branching degree and a molar mass (Mw) somewhere between amylopectin (AP) and amylose (AM). Compared with AP, IM had more extra-long (Fr I) and long (Fr II) chains and fb3-chains (degree of polymerization (DP)>36), with a higher average chain length (CL). Also, IM contained less A-chains but more B-chains (both BS-chains with DP 3-25 and BL-chains with DP≥26), accompanied by longer B- and BL-chains, total internal chains (TICL) and average internal chains (ICL), and a similar average external chain length (ECL). Furthermore, relative to RMS-IM, the IM of S40 (with higher apparent amylose content than RMS) showed increases in relatively-long chains, e.g., Fr II, fb3-chains and BL-chains, but reductions in Mw, relatively-short chains (those with DP 6-12, etc.). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Substrate effects on the exciton fine structure of black phosphorus quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, J. S.; Lino, M. A.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Pereira, J. M.; Farias, G. A.

    2017-07-01

    We study the size-dependent exciton fine structure in monolayer black phosphorus quantum dots (BPQDs) deposited on different substrates (isolated, Si, and SiO2) using a combination of the tight-binding method to calculate single-particle states and the configuration interaction formalism to determine the excitonic spectrum. We demonstrate that the substrate plays a dramatic role in the excitonic gaps and excitonic spectrum of the QDs. For reasonably high dielectric constants (ɛsub˜ɛSi=11.7 ɛ0 ), the excitonic gap can be described by a single power law EX(R ) =EX(bulk)+C /Rγ . For low dielectric constants ɛsub≤ɛSiO2=3.9 ɛ0 , the size dependence of the excitonic gaps requires the sum of two power laws EX(R ) =Eg(bulk)+A /Rn-B /Rm to describe both strong and weak quantum confinement regimes, where A , B , C , γ , n , and m are substrate-dependent parameters. We also predict that the exciton lifetimes exhibit a strong temperature dependence, ranging between 2-8 ns (Si substrate) and 3-11 ns (SiO2 substrate) for QDs up 10 nm in size.

  7. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  8. Fine structure of A and M antigens from Brucella biovars.

    PubMed

    Meikle, P J; Perry, M B; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Bundle, D R

    1989-09-01

    Brucella A and M epitopes were found on single O-polysaccharide chains of all biotype strains of this species. Lipopolysaccharides from the type and reference strains of five of the six Brucella species, B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, B. canis, and B. neotomae, were extracted and purified. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in conjunction with silver staining and immunoblotting developed by monoclonal antibodies, showed bands characteristic of A, M, or mixed A and M antigens. The A antigen previously described as an exclusively alpha 1,2-linked homopolymer of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose was shown by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to possess a fine structure consistent with the low-frequency occurrence of alpha 1, 3-linked 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose residues. This feature was previously attributed only to the M antigen, which is also a homopolymer of the same sugar. B. melitensis biotype 3 and B. suis biotype 4 lipopolysaccharides showed characteristics of mixed A and M antigens. Immunoabsorption of these O polysaccharides on a column of immobilized A-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody enriched polymer chains with A-antigen characteristics but did not eliminate M epitopes. Composite A- and M-antigen characteristics resulted from O polysaccharides in which the frequency of alpha 1,3 linkages, and hence, M-antigen characteristics, varied. All biotypes assigned as A+ M- expressed one or two alpha 1,3-linked residues per polysaccharide O chain. M antigens (M+ A-) also possessed a unique M epitope as well as a tetrasaccharide determinant common to A-antigen structures. B. canis and B. abortus 45/20, both rough strains, expressed low-molecular-weight A antigen.

  9. FINE STRUCTURE OF CHLORIDE CELLS FROM THREE SPECIES OF FUNDULUS

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, C. W.; Copeland, D. E.

    1963-01-01

    A morphological basis for osmoregulation in the teleosts was studied by comparing the fine structure of chloride cells found in epithelia of the gills of three species of fish: Fundulus heteroclitus which can survive in a wide range of salinities, and F. similis and F. chrysotus which are usually restricted to salt water and fresh water environments, respectively. Gills were removed from F. heteroclitus which had been laboratory adapted to either sea water or pond water. For a comparison, gills were also removed from the marine F. similis and the fresh water F. chrysotus which had been adapted to their natural environments. Gill-filaments were fixed in Millonig's phosphate buffered (pH 7.4), 1 per cent osmium tetroxide and were embedded in Epon. Thin sections of filaments were stained with lead hydroxide. The cytoplasm of chloride cells of all three species of Fundulus is heavily populated with mitochondria and is filled with tubules of the agranular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). An orderly secretory cycle was indicated for chloride cells of salt water adapted F. heteroclitus and the marine F. similis. An amorphous material is observed in the agranular ER. Its density increases towards the apical end of the cell. In the apical cytoplasm, tubules of the agranular ER appear to converge and to discharge the amorphous material into an apical cavity. Except for the actual opening of the apical cavity, the distal end of salt water adapted chloride cells is characteristically shielded from the hypertonic environment by thin cytoplasmic flanges projecting from the neighboring epithelial cells. Chloride cells of the fresh water F. chrysotus resemble chloride cells of pond water adapted F. heteroclitus, in that these cells do not have apical cavities with the functional appearance of those in the sea water adapted forms. The distal end of fresh water adapted chloride cells is typically exposed to the free surface of the gill-filament. The possible function of the cell type is

  10. Laser Spectroscopy of the H 2 ( n = 3 Triplet Gerade) Complex: Fine Structure of the Levels in para-H 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozefowski, L.; Ottinger, C.; Rox, T.

    1994-02-01

    Doppler-free LIF spectroscopy was performed on a beam of para-H 2 (95% enriched) in the metastable c3Π -u state. Using the method of beam saturation spectroscopy, the resolution was increased to 20 MHz FWHM. Compared to the preceding paper of this series, this allowed the fine structure of the H 2( n = 3) states to be largely resolved. The total number of independently measured fine structure splittings in the levels v = 0 to 3 was 66. Theoretically the fine structure in the n = 3 compared is described by 17 coupling constants. The present study has provided for the first time a sufficient number of independent fs measurements to allow, in principle, an unambiguous determination of all 17 constants. The eigenvectors of the true, mixed wavefunctions as obtained in the preceding paper were here used as a critical prerequisite to the diagonalization of the fs Hamiltonian. In practice, in the fitting routine some of the nondiagonal constants were found to be highly statistically correlated within the experimental error. These constants have only collective significance. This is a fundamental limitation, because the experimental resolution was already close to the natural linewidth limit. The variation of the leading diagonal constants with v and, comparing with other work, with n is discussed.

  11. Fine structure of high-power microwave-induced resistance oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Zudov, M. A.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Baldwin, K. Â. W.; Pfeiffer, L. Â. N.; West, K. Â. W.

    2017-01-01

    We report on observation of a fine structure of microwave-induced resistance oscillations in an ultraclean two-dimensional electron gas. This fine structure is manifested by multiple secondary sharp extrema, residing beside the primary ones, which emerge at high radiation power. Theoretical considerations reveal that this fine structure originates from multiphoton-assisted scattering off short-range impurities. Unique properties of the fine structure allow us to access all experimental parameters, including microwave power, and to separate different contributions to photoresistance. Furthermore, we show that the fine structure offers a convenient means to quantitatively assess the correlation properties of the disorder potential in high-quality systems, allowing separation of short- and long-range disorder contributions to the electron mobility.

  12. Fine structure of the 2003 geomagnetic jerk near China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, J.; Du, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 2003 jerk has an abrupt change in the geomagnetic secular variation (SV), and was recognized as a local phenomenon of internal origin from the satellite observations (Olsen and Mandea, 2007). Notable strength of the 2003 jerk is located near China. The temporal and spatial features at this area are important to resolve the Earth's core fluid flow dynamics at local scale (e.g. Wardinski et al., 2008). We investigate the temporal-spatial development of the 2003 jerk in more detail near China with the ground-based observations and CHAOS-3 core field model. We select the data in the international geomagnetic quiet days to calculate the monthly means. In order to reduce the influence of the external field, we adopt a function comprising the terms associated with the indices of the geomagnetic activity, and the terms of the periodic signals on the observatory monthly means data (Stewart and Whaler, 1992). We then use an empirical AR-2 model to represent the internal field signals in the observatory data. The extreme detection is applied to identify the jerk in the SV time series. The onset time and the strength of the 2003 jerk are obtained through the detection for geomagnetic field component, X, Y and Z. The maximum of the strength of the 2003 jerk is located under the Indian mainland. The onset time of this jerk propagates approximately southeastward. Two jerks in 2001 and 2003 for the Z component are further compared and they are confirmed as independent processes. We suggest the jerk in 2001 identical to the well known 1999 jerk in Europe (Mandea et al., 2000). Our results reveal the fine structures of the 2003 jerk that corroborate the conclusions in previous studies. The larger scale time-spatial structure given by the AR-2 model constructed from ground observatory data (monthly values) is consistent with the results from the CHAOS-3 model. This structure can be applied for further inversion of the local core surface fluid flow motions.

  13. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE TRANSITIONAL EPITHELIUM OF RAT URETER

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, R. M.

    1965-01-01

    The fine structure of the transitional epithelium of rat ureter has been studied in thin sections with the electron microscope, including some stained cytochemically to show nucleoside triphosphatase activity. The epithelium is three to four cells deep with cuboidal or columnar basal cells, intermediate cells, and superficial squamous cells. The basal cells are attached by half desmosomes, or attachment plates, on their basal membranes to a basement membrane which separates the epithelium from the lamina propria. Fine extracellular fibres, ca. 100 A in diameter, are to be found in the connective tissue layer immediately below the basement membrane of this epithelium. The plasma membranes of the basal and intermediate cells and the lateral and basal membranes of the squamous cells are deeply interdigitated, and nucleoside triphosphatase activity is associated with them. All the cells have a dense feltwork of tonofilaments which ramify throughout the cytoplasm. The existence of junctional complexes, comprising a zonula occludens, zonula adhaerens, and macula adhaerens or desmosome, between the lateral borders of the squamous cells is reported. It is suggested that this complex is the major obstacle to the free flow of water from the extracellular spaces into the hypertonic urine. The free luminal surface of the squamous cells and many cytoplasmic vesicles in these cells are bounded by an unusually thick plasma membrane. The three leaflets of this unit membrane are asymmetric, with the outer one about twice as thick as the innermost one. The vesicles and the plasma membrane maintain angular conformations which suggest the membrane to be unusually rigid. No nucleoside triphosphatase activity is associated with this membrane. Arguments are presented to support a suggestion that this thick plasma membrane is the morphological site of a passive permeability barrier to water flow across the cells, and that keratin may be included in the membrane structure. The possible

  14. Relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in lexical-tone perception (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2003-12-01

    The relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in speech and music perception was investigated by Smith et al. [Nature (London) 416, 87-90 (2002)] using ``auditory chimera'' in which the envelope from one sound was paired with the fine structure of another. Smith et al. found that, when 4 to 16 frequency bands were used, recognition of English speech was dominated by the envelope, whereas recognition of melody was dominated by the fine structure. In the present study, Mandarin Chinese monosyllables were divided into 4, 8, or 16 frequency bands and the fine structure and envelope of one tone pattern were exchanged with those of another tone pattern of the same monosyllable. Five normal-hearing native Mandarin Chinese speakers completed a four-alternative forced-choice tone-identification task. In the vast majority of trials, subjects based their identification of the monosyllables on the fine structure rather than the envelope. Thus, the relative importance of envelope and fine structure for lexical-tone perception resembled that for melody recognition rather than that for English speech recognition. Delivering fine-structure information in cochlear implant stimulation could be particularly beneficial for lexical-tone perception.

  15. Fine-Structure Branching in N 2 C 4 1 Sigma + U (0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Kanik, I.; Ajello, J. M.

    1995-10-01

    We report a quantitative measurement of the predissociation fraction in the N2c'41Σ+u-X1Σ+g (0, 0) band, with an experimental determination of rotational line strengths. The fine structure of the N2(c'4-X) (0, 0) band has been analyzed in optically thin laboratory emission spectra obtained from crossed electron and N2 beams. The distortion of the emission envelope from calculations based on constant rotational level radiative transition probabilities and a thermalized ground state source population has been used to obtain an estimated predissociation loss fraction of 0.15 + -0.045+0.01 for the N2 c'4 (0) level averaged over rotational structure at a neutral gas temperature of 300 K. The analysis has been aided by measurements at gas temperatures depressed over a range from 300 to 30 K. The predissociation rate is temperature dependent, caused by nonuniform predissociation at intermediate and high rotational levels. The coupling of the rotational branches, also measured quantitatively for N2 c'4 (0) for the first time in this experiment, is complicated by configuration mixing with the c3 1Πu and b1Πu states forcing strong departures from Hönl-London factors.

  16. Helical Motions of Fine-structure Prominence Threads Observed by Hinode and IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Liu, Wei; Tsuneta, Saku

    2016-11-01

    Fine-structure dynamics in solar prominences holds critical clues to understanding their physical nature of significant space-weather implications. We report evidence of rotational motions of horizontal helical threads in two active-region prominences observed by the Hinode and/or Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph satellites at high resolution. In the first event, we found transverse motions of brightening threads at speeds up to 55 km s-1 seen in the plane of the sky. Such motions appeared as sinusoidal space-time trajectories with a typical period of ˜390 s, which is consistent with plane-of-sky projections of rotational motions. Phase delays at different locations suggest the propagation of twists along the threads at phase speeds of 90-270 km s-1. At least 15 episodes of such motions occurred in two days, none associated with an eruption. For these episodes, the plane-of-sky speed is linearly correlated with the vertical travel distance, suggestive of a constant angular speed. In the second event, we found Doppler velocities of 30-40 km s-1 in opposite directions in the top and bottom portions of the prominence, comparable to the plane-of-sky speed. The moving threads have about twice broader line widths than stationary threads. These observations, when taken together, provide strong evidence for rotations of helical prominence threads, which were likely driven by unwinding twists triggered by magnetic reconnection between twisted prominence magnetic fields and ambient coronal fields.

  17. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF CORTICAL COMPONENTS OF PARAMECIUM MULTIMICRONUCLEATUM

    PubMed Central

    Sedar, Albert W.; Porter, Keith R.

    1955-01-01

    additional fiber system, the infraciliary lattice system, which is separate and distinct from the kinetodesmal system. This system consists of a fibrous network of irregular polygons and runs roughly parallel to the surface of the animal. Mitochondria have a fine structure similar in general features to that described for a number of mammalian cell types, but different in certain details. The structures corresponding to cristae mitochondriales appear as finger-like projections or microvilli extending into the matrix of the organelle from the inner membrane of the paired mitochondrial membrane. The cortical cytoplasm contains also a particulate component and a system of vesicles respectively comparable to the nucleoprotein particles and to the endoplasmic reticulum described in various metazoan cell types. An accessory kinetosome has been observed in oblique sections of a number of non-dividing specimens slightly removed from the ciliary kinetosome and on the same meridional line as the cilia and trichocysts. Its position corresponds to the location of the kinetosome of the newly formed cilium in animals selected as being in the approaching fission stage of the life cycle. PMID:13278368

  18. On the 1s24d Fine Structures of B III and Ne VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiwen; Z, W. Wang; Kwong, T. Chung; Zhu, Xiaowei

    1995-01-01

    The fine structure of lithium-like 1s24d states in the literature behaves irregularly as a function of Z. The fine structures of the B III and Ne VIII fall well below the isoelectronic curve. The term energies of these two systems in the data tables also give worse agreement with the theoretical prediction. In this work, we show that the reason for this unusual situation is caused by a misidentification in the original spectra. When the correct identifications are made, the fine structures of both systems fall on the isoelectronic curve and the agreement between theory and experiment is excellent.

  19. Hall effect and fine structures in magnetic reconnection with high plasma {beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.P.; Yang, H.A.; Wang, X.G.

    2005-04-15

    Magnetic reconnection with various plasma {beta} (the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) is studied numerically using a 2.5 dimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code developed from a multistep implicit scheme. The initial state of the Hall MHD simulation is an equilibrium Harris sheet with L{sub c}=0.5d{sub i} (where L{sub c} is the half-width of the equilibrium current layer and d{sub i} is the ion inertial length) and a zero guide field (i.e., B{sub y0}=0 at t=0). Driven by a constant boundary inflow a quasisteady fast reconnection occurs in the plasma with a low uniform resistivity. The out-of-plane magnetic field component B{sub y} is then spontaneously generated and its quadrupolar structure is shown around the X point. It is demonstrated by the comparing studies that the reconnection dynamics is controlled by the Hall effect and the effect of scalar electron pressure gradient is negligible in the generalized Ohm's law. It is also found that the openness of the magnetic separatrix angle and associated quadrupolar B{sub y} structure is enlarged as {beta} increases. When {beta}>2.0 fine structures of B{sub y} contours with reversed sign emerge. The numerical results indicate that the variations in electron velocity V{sub e} are greater than those in ion velocity V{sub i} and the decoupling of electron and ion occurs in larger scale lengths than d{sub i} as {beta} increases. Clearly, the reserve current, which is associated with the relative motion between electrons and ions, generates the fine structures of B{sub y} contours in the outflow region. Then the corresponding profile of B{sub y} component exhibits a static whistler wave signature. Enhanced wave activities observed during a Cluster crossing of the high-{beta} exterior cusp region [Y. Khotyaintsev, A. Vaivads, Y. Ogawa, B. Popielawska, M. Andre, S. Buchert, P. Decreau, B. Lavraud, and H. Reme, Ann. Geophys. 22, 2403 (2004)] might be related to the Hall effects of magnetic

  20. Magnetic diffusion instability and the fine structures of soler active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dao-qi; Qian, Jing-kui; Ai, Guo-xiang

    1990-03-01

    Continuous observations over five days with the magnetic field telescope at Huairou yielded some clear characteristics of the fine structures in sunspot active regions. Starting from magnetic diffusivity being a function of temperature and using the induction equation we investigated the cause of the fine structures. Using linear perturbation of the MHD equations we found the instability mode. This gives rise to inhomogeneous structures in the originally smooth magnetic field and is the cause of the fine structures. Our observed fibrilles are about 1.5″ to 3.0″, or 1000 to 2000km in size, whereas, with certain typical values of sunspot parameters the theoretical lower limit for the fine structures is about 220km, in agreement with some observational estimates.

  1. Fine structural characterization of microbodies and Woronin bodies in Trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    PubMed

    Vannini, G L; Mares, D

    1975-08-15

    Microbodies and Woronin bodies, organelles surrounded by a single unit membrane, were identified in the hyphal cells of Trichophyton mentagrophytes by employing a fixative containing TAPO. The fine structure of the organelles is described and their possible significance discussed.

  2. A Simple Model for Fine Structure Transitions in Alkali-Metal Noble-Gas Collisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    A SIMPLE MODEL FOR FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITIONS IN ALKALI - METAL NOBLE-GAS COLLISIONS THESIS Joseph A. Cardoza, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-079... ALKALI - METAL NOBLE-GAS COLLISIONS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air...AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-079 A SIMPLE MODEL FOR FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITIONS IN ALKALI - METAL NOBLE-GAS COLLISIONS Joseph A. Cardoza, BS Captain, USAF Committee

  3. Path integral formalism for the spectral line shape in plasmas: Lyman-{alpha} with fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedida, N.; Meftah, M. T.; Boland, D.; Stamm, R.

    2008-10-22

    We examine in this work the expression of the dipolar autocorrelation function for an emitter in the plasma using the path integrals formalism. The results for Lyman alpha lines with fine structure are retrieved in a compact formula. The expression of the dipolar autocorrelation function takes into account the ions dynamics and the fine structure effects. The electron's effect is represented by the impact operator {phi}{sub e} in the final formula.

  4. Impaired perception of temporal fine structure and musical timbre in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Heng, Joseph; Cantarero, Gabriela; Elhilali, Mounya; Limb, Charles J

    2011-10-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users demonstrate severe limitations in perceiving musical timbre, a psychoacoustic feature of sound responsible for 'tone color' and one's ability to identify a musical instrument. The reasons for this limitation remain poorly understood. In this study, we sought to examine the relative contributions of temporal envelope and fine structure for timbre judgments, in light of the fact that speech processing strategies employed by CI systems typically employ envelope extraction algorithms. We synthesized "instrumental chimeras" that systematically combined variable amounts of envelope and fine structure in 25% increments from two different source instruments with either sustained or percussive envelopes. CI users and normal hearing (NH) subjects were presented with 150 chimeras and asked to determine which instrument the chimera more closely resembled in a single-interval two-alternative forced choice task. By combining instruments with similar and dissimilar envelopes, we controlled the valence of envelope for timbre identification and compensated for envelope reconstruction from fine structure information. Our results show that NH subjects utilize envelope and fine structure interchangeably, whereas CI subjects demonstrate overwhelming reliance on temporal envelope. When chimeras were created from dissimilar envelope instrument pairs, NH subjects utilized a combination of envelope (p = 0.008) and fine structure information (p = 0.009) to make timbre judgments. In contrast, CI users utilized envelope information almost exclusively to make timbre judgments (p < 0.001) and ignored fine structure information (p = 0.908). Interestingly, when the value of envelope as a cue was reduced, both NH subjects and CI users utilized fine structure information to make timbre judgments (p < 0.001), although the effect was quite weak in CI users. Our findings confirm that impairments in fine structure processing underlie poor perception of musical timbre in CI

  5. Globular Clusters as Tracers of Fine Structure in the Dramatic Shell Galaxy NGC 474

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsoon; Peng, Eric W.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Fensch, Jérémy; Durrell, Patrick R.; Harris, William E.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Gwyn, Stephen; Lançon, Ariane; Sánchez-Janssen, Rúben

    2017-02-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are some of the most visible tracers of the merging and accretion histories of galaxy halos. Metal-poor GCs, in particular, are thought to arrive in massive galaxies largely through dry, minor merging events, but it is rare to see a direct connection between GCs and visible stellar streams. NGC 474 is a post-merger early-type galaxy with dramatic fine structures made of concentric shells and radial streams that have been more clearly revealed by deep imaging. We present a study of GCs in NGC 474 to better establish the relationship between merger-induced fine structure and the GC system. We find that many GCs are superimposed on visible streams and shells, and about 35% of GCs outside 3{R}{{e},{galaxy}} are located in regions of fine structure. The spatial correlation between GCs and fine structure is significant at the 99.9% level, which shows that this correlation is not coincidental. The colors of GCs on fine structures are mostly blue, and we also find an intermediate-color population that is dominant in the central region and that will likely passively evolve to have colors consistent with a traditional metal-rich GC population. The association of the blue GCs with fine structures is direct confirmation that many metal-poor GCs are accreted onto massive galaxy halos through merging events and that the progenitors of these mergers are sub-{L}\\star galaxies.

  6. Analysis of the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions by optical spectroscopy in an electron-beam ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windberger, A.; Torretti, F.; Borschevsky, A.; Ryabtsev, A.; Dobrodey, S.; Bekker, H.; Eliav, E.; Kaldor, U.; Ubachs, W.; Hoekstra, R.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Versolato, O. O.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally re-evaluate the fine structure of Sn11 +-Sn14 + ions. These ions are essential in bright extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) plasma-light sources for next-generation nanolithography, but their complex electronic structure is an open challenge for both theory and experiment. We combine optical spectroscopy of magnetic dipole M 1 transitions, in a wavelength range covering 260 to 780 nm, with charge-state selective ionization in an electron beam ion trap. Our measurements confirm the predictive power of ab initio calculations based on Fock space coupled cluster theory. We validate our line identification using semiempirical cowan calculations with adjustable wave-function parameters. Available Ritz combinations further strengthen our analysis. Comparison with previous work suggests that line identifications in the EUV need to be revisited.

  7. Quantum electrodynamics, high-resolution spectroscopy and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in high-resolution spectroscopy has delivered us a variety of accurate optical results, which can be used for the determination of the atomic fundamental constants and for constraining their possible time variation. We present a brief overview of the results discussing in particular, the determination of the Rydberg constant, the relative atomic weight of the electron and proton, their mass ratio and the fine structure constant. Many individual results on those constants are obtained with use of quantum electrodynamics, and we discuss which sectors of QED are involved. We derive constraints on a possible time variation of the fine structure constants and me/mp.

  8. Effects of contralateral acoustic stimulation on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and hearing threshold fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dewey, James B; Lee, Jungmee; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2014-12-01

    Medial olivocochlear (MOC) influence on cochlear mechanics can be noninvasively, albeit indirectly, explored via the effects of contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS) on otoacoustic emissions. CAS-mediated effects are particularly pronounced for spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs), which are typically reduced in amplitude and shifted upward in frequency by CAS. We investigated whether similar frequency shifts and magnitude reductions were observed behaviorally in the fine structure of pure-tone hearing thresholds, a phenomenon thought to share a common underlying mechanism with SOAEs. In normal-hearing listeners, fine-resolution thresholds were obtained over a narrow frequency range centered on the frequency of an SOAE, both in the absence and presence of 60-dB SPL broadband CAS. While CAS shifted threshold fine structure patterns and SOAEs upward in frequency by a comparable amount, little reduction in the presence or depth of fine structure was observed at frequencies near those of SOAEs. In fact, CAS typically improved thresholds, particularly at threshold minima, and increased fine structure depth when reductions in the amplitude of the associated SOAE were less than 10 dB. Additional measurements made at frequencies distant from SOAEs, or near SOAEs that were more dramatically reduced in amplitude by the CAS, revealed that CAS tended to elevate thresholds and reduce threshold fine structure depth. The results suggest that threshold fine structure is sensitive to MOC-mediated changes in cochlear gain, but that SOAEs complicate the interpretation of threshold measurements at nearby frequencies, perhaps due to masking or other interference effects. Both threshold fine structure and SOAEs may be significant sources of intersubject and intrasubject variability in psychoacoustic investigations of MOC function.

  9. Quantifying envelope and fine-structure coding in auditory nerve responses to chimaeric speech.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Michael G; Swaminathan, Jayaganesh

    2009-09-01

    Any sound can be separated mathematically into a slowly varying envelope and rapidly varying fine-structure component. This property has motivated numerous perceptual studies to understand the relative importance of each component for speech and music perception. Specialized acoustic stimuli, such as auditory chimaeras with the envelope of one sound and fine structure of another have been used to separate the perceptual roles for envelope and fine structure. Cochlear narrowband filtering limits the ability to isolate fine structure from envelope; however, envelope recovery from fine structure has been difficult to evaluate physiologically. To evaluate envelope recovery at the output of the cochlea, neural cross-correlation coefficients were developed that quantify the similarity between two sets of spike-train responses. Shuffled auto- and cross-correlogram analyses were used to compute separate correlations for responses to envelope and fine structure based on both model and recorded spike trains from auditory nerve fibers. Previous correlogram analyses were extended to isolate envelope coding more effectively in auditory nerve fibers with low center frequencies, which are particularly important for speech coding. Recovered speech envelopes were present in both model and recorded responses to one- and 16-band speech fine-structure chimaeras and were significantly greater for the one-band case, consistent with perceptual studies. Model predictions suggest that cochlear recovered envelopes are reduced following sensorineural hearing loss due to broadened tuning associated with outer-hair cell dysfunction. In addition to the within-fiber cross-stimulus cases considered here, these neural cross-correlation coefficients can also be used to evaluate spatiotemporal coding by applying them to cross-fiber within-stimulus conditions. Thus, these neural metrics can be used to quantitatively evaluate a wide range of perceptually significant temporal coding issues relevant to

  10. Comparative study of fine structure in samples of isolated and paired early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reduzzi, L.; Longhetti, M.; Rampazzo, R.

    1996-09-01

    Fine structure in early-type galaxies is considered to be among the more robust indicators of a past merging or acquisition event, although growing evidence from numerical simulations suggests that fine structure may be also interpreted in a `weak interaction' framework. We present a morphological study of a sample composed of 61 `isolated' early-type galaxies addressed to the detection of fine structure. This sample has been selected in order to be statistically comparable to a set of 54 early-type galaxies, members of pairs analysed by Reduzzi & Rampazzo with a similar technique. The rate of occurrence of fine structure detected in the `isolated' galaxy sample is significantly higher than that found for the pairs. In particular, the fraction of isolated early-type galaxies exhibiting shells is 16.4 per cent, a percentage similar to that found by Malin & Carter for RC2 isolated objects in the southern sky, while the fraction of early-type galaxies in pairs is ~=4 per cent. We discuss the comparison between the two samples in the context of the merger versus the weak interaction origin of fine structures. Concerning the formation of shells, although the merger origin cannot be ruled out, the observed difference is more naturally explained within the weak interaction framework.

  11. A simulation for gravity fine structure recovery from high-low GRAVSAT SST data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Lancaster, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Covariance error analysis techniques were applied to investigate estimation strategies for the high-low SST mission for accurate local recovery of gravitational fine structure, considering the aliasing effects of unsolved for parameters. Surface density blocks of 5 deg x 5 deg and 2 1/2 deg x 2 1/2 deg resolution were utilized to represent the high order geopotential with the drag-free GRAVSAT configured in a nearly circular polar orbit at 250 km. altitude. GEOPAUSE and geosynchronous satellites were considered as high relay spacecraft. It is demonstrated that knowledge of gravitational fine structure can be significantly improved at 5 deg x 5 deg resolution using SST data from a high-low configuration with reasonably accurate orbits for the low GRAVSAT. The gravity fine structure recoverability of the high-low SST mission is compared with the low-low configuration and shown to be superior.

  12. Excited-state energies and fine structure of highly charged lithiumlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-ying; Ding, Da-jun; Wang, Zhi-wen

    2013-10-01

    The full-core-plus-correlation method (FCPC) is extended to calculate the energies and fine structures of 1s2nd and 1s2nf (n≤5) states for the lithiumlike systems with high nuclear charge from Z = 41 to 50. In calculating energy, the higher-order relativistic contribution is estimated under a hydrogenic approximation. The nonrelativistic energies and wave functions are calculated by the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The mass polarization and the relativistic corrections including the kinetic energy correction, the Darwin term, the electron-electron contact term, and the orbit-orbit interaction are calculated perturbatively as the first-order correction. The quantum-electrodynamics contributions to the energy and to the fine-structure splitting are estimated by using the effective nuclear charge formula. The excited energies, the fine structures, and other relevant term energies are given and compared with the data available in the literature.

  13. Enhancement of speech intelligibility in reverberant rooms: role of amplitude envelope and temporal fine structure.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Nirmal Kumar; Zahorik, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    The temporal envelope and fine structure of speech make distinct contributions to the perception of speech in normal-hearing listeners, and are differentially affected by room reverberation. Previous work has demonstrated enhanced speech intelligibility in reverberant rooms when prior exposure to the room was provided. Here, the relative contributions of envelope and fine structure cues to this intelligibility enhancement were tested using an open-set speech corpus and virtual auditory space techniques to independently manipulate the speech cues within a simulated room. Intelligibility enhancement was observed only when the envelope was reverberant, indicating that the enhancement is envelope-based.

  14. Transition wavelengths and fine structure for the doublet states of Be/sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.F.; Chung, K.T.

    1984-05-01

    Seventeen bound and core-excited states of Be/sup +/ are calculated using configuration-interaction wave functions. Relativistic and mass-polarization correction are included. The relativistic corrections considered are correction to the kinetic energy, Darwin term, contact terms, and retardation effect. The fine structure is calculated by using spin-orbit and spin-other-orbit operators. The wavelengths computed for the transitions from the core-excited states improve the agreement between theory and experiment. The lifetimes for these states are also calculated. Our calculated transition wavelengths and fine structures for the bound states agree well in most cases with the experimental data tabulated by Bashkin and Stoner.

  15. A note on chromospheric fine structure at active region polarity boundaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prata, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution H-alpha filtergrams from Big Bear Solar Observatory reveal that some filamentary features in active regions have fine structure and hence magnetic field transverse to the gross structure and the zero longitudinal field line. These features are distinct from the usual active region filament, in which fine structure, magnetic field, and filament are all parallel to the zero longitudinal field line. The latter occur on boundaries between regions of weaker fields, while the former occur at boundaries between regions of stronger field.

  16. Progress towards a precision measurement of the n=2 triplet P fine structure of atomic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; Fitzakerley, D. W.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report progress on the measurement of the J = 1 to J = 2 23 P fine-structure interval of atomic helium. The measurement uses a liquid-nitrogen-cooled DC discharge source of metastable helium and the atomic beam is laser cooled in the transverse directions. The atoms are excited to 23 P by a 1083-nm diode laser, and the fine-structure transition is driven by microwaves using the frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique. The transition is detected by further laser excitation to a Rydberg state, followed by Stark ionization. This work is supported by NSERC, CRC.

  17. Modification of DPOAE Fine Structure Stemming from Changes in Outer and Middle Ear Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Glenis R.; Henin, Simon; Thompson, Suzanne

    2011-11-01

    High resolution DPOAE fine structure was evaluated when the output impedance of the cochlea was modified by: (1) Changes in outer ear volume, due to accumulation of cerumen, which does not modify input impedance. (2) Manipulation of middle ear pressure and scarring of the tympanic membrane (which modify both input and output impedance). At high primary levels a wider and deeper DPOAE structure combined with (and sometimes dominated) DPOAE level fine structure. The group delay was also modified, sometimes giving rise to negative group delay. The data can be modeled by assuming that the increased impedance at the oval widow produces reflections back into the cochlea which can be re-reflected.

  18. Reaction rate constant of CH2O + H = HCO + H2 revisited: a combined study of direct shock tube measurement and transition state theory calculation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Dames, Enoch E; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-11-06

    The rate constant of the H-abstraction reaction of formaldehyde (CH2O) by hydrogen atoms (H), CH2O + H = H2 + HCO, has been studied behind reflected shock waves with use of a sensitive mid-IR laser absorption diagnostic for CO, over temperatures of 1304-2006 K and at pressures near 1 atm. C2H5I was used as an H atom precursor and 1,3,5-trioxane as the CH2O precursor, to generate a well-controlled CH2O/H reacting system. By designing the experiments to maintain relatively constant H atom concentrations, the current study significantly boosted the measurement sensitivity of the target reaction and suppressed the influence of interfering reactions. The measured CH2O + H rate constant can be expressed in modified Arrhenius from as kCH2O+H(1304-2006 K, 1 atm) = 1.97 × 10(11)(T/K)(1.06) exp(-3818 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1)s(-1), with uncertainty limits estimated to be +18%/-26%. A transition-state-theory (TST) calculation, using the CCSD(T)-F12/VTZ-F12 level of theory, is in good agreement with the shock tube measurement and extended the temperature range of the current study to 200-3000 K, over which a modified Arrhenius fit of the rate constant can be expressed as kCH2O+H(200-3000 K) = 5.86 × 10(3)(T/K)(3.13) exp(-762 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1)s(-1).

  19. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  20. Site-specific ionisation edge fine-structure of Rutile in the electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hetaba, Walid; Löffler, Stefan; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Schlögl, Robert; Schattschneider, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Combined Bloch-wave and density functional theory simulations are performed to investigate the effects of different channelling conditions on the fine-structure of electron energy-loss spectra. The simulated spectra compare well with experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that using this technique, the site-specific investigation of atomic orbitals is possible. This opens new possibilities for chemical analyses.

  1. Accuracy of mapping the Earth's gravity field fine structure with a spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The spaceborne gravity gradiometer is a potential sensor for mapping the fine structure of the Earth's gravity field. Error analyses were performed to investigate the accuracy of the determination of the Earth's gravity field from a gravity field satellite mission. The orbital height of the spacecraft is the dominating parameter as far as gravity field resolution and accuracies are concerned.

  2. Photoionization modeling of the LWS fine-structure lines in IR bright galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyapal, S.; Luhman, M. L.; Fischer, J.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Wolfire, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    The long wavelength spectrometer (LWS) fine structure line spectra from infrared luminous galaxies were modeled using stellar evolutionary synthesis models combined with photoionization and photodissociation region models. The calculations were carried out by using the computational code CLOUDY. Starburst and active galactic nuclei models are presented. The effects of dust in the ionized region are examined.

  3. The impact of cochlear fine structure on hearing thresholds and DPOAE levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungmee; Long, Glenis; Talmadge, Carrick L.

    2004-05-01

    Although otoacoustic emissions (OAE) are used as clinical and research tools, the correlation between OAE behavioral estimates of hearing status is not large. In normal-hearing individuals, the level of OAEs can vary as much as 30 dB when the frequency is changed less than 5%. These pseudoperiodic variations of OAE level with frequency are known as fine structure. Hearing thresholds measured with high-frequency resolution reveals a similar (up to 15 dB) fine structure. We examine the impact of OAE and threshold fine structures on the prediction of auditory thresholds from OAE levels. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured with sweeping primary tones. Psychoacoustic detection thresholds were measured using pure tones, sweep tones, FM tones, and narrow-band noise. Sweep DPOAE and narrow-band threshold estimates provide estimates that are less influenced by cochlear fine structure and should lead to a higher correlation between OAE levels and psychoacoustic thresholds. [Research supported by PSC CUNY, NIDCD, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research in U.S. Department of Education, and The Ministry of Education in Korea.

  4. Fine structure of the subradular organ of Lepidochitona cinereus (L), (Mollusca, Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Boyle, P R

    1975-10-13

    Electron microscopy of the subradular organ of the chiton Lepidochitona cinereus (L) reveals at least three cell types, microvillous, ciliated and mucus-secreting, situated in a single epithelium. The base of the epithelium is abundantly innervated and supplied with muscle cells. The fine structure is consistent with a chemosensory function for the subradular organ.

  5. The fine structure of the oocyte of bankia australis (teredinidae, bivalvia) before and after fertilization.

    PubMed

    Popham, J D

    1975-01-01

    The fine structure of the oocyte of Bankia australis is compared with that of other bivalve oocytes. It was observed that following fertilization, the microvilli changed their spatial organisation and behaviour towards sperm, the cortical granules disappeared in regions of high concentrations of supernumerary sperm, and the mitochondria apparently stated to divide.

  6. Exciton fine structure and spin relaxation in semiconductor colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Wong, Cathy Y; Scholes, Gregory D

    2009-08-18

    Quantum dots (QDs) have discrete quantum states isolated from the environment, making QDs well suited for quantum information processing. In semiconductor QDs, the electron spins can be coherently oriented by photoexcitation using circularly polarized light, creating optical orientation. The optically induced spin orientation could serve as a unit for data storage and processing. Carrier spin orientation is also envisioned to be a key component in a related, though parallel, field of semiconductor spintronics. However, the oriented spin population rapidly loses its coherence by interaction with the environment, thereby erasing the prepared information. Since long-lasting spin orientation is desirable in both areas of investigation, spin relaxation is the central focus of investigation for optimization of device performance. In this Account, we discuss a topic peripherally related to these emerging areas of investigation: exciton fine structure relaxation (EFSR). The radiationless transition occurring in the exciton fine structure not only highlights a novel aspect of QD exciton relaxation but also has implications for carrier spin relaxation in QDs. We focus on examining the EFSR in connection with optical spin orientation and subsequent ultrafast relaxation of electron and hole spin densities in the framework of the exciton fine structure basis. Despite its significance, the study of exciton fine structure in colloidal QDs has been hampered by the experimental challenge arising from inhomogeneous line broadening that obscures the details of closely spaced fine structure states in the frequency domain. In this Account, we show that spin relaxation occurring in the fine structure of CdSe QDs can be probed by a time-domain nonlinear polarization spectroscopy, circumventing the obstacles confronted in the frequency-domain spectroscopy. In particular, by combining polarization sequences of multiple optical pulses with the unique optical selection rules of

  7. New Constraints on Temporal Variation of the Fine-Structure “Constant” from the Laboratory Search with Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Leefer, N.; Cingöz, A.; Weber, C. T. M.

    2012-05-01

    Atomic dysprosium is a unique system with nearly degenerate opposite-parity states that have large and oppositely-signed sensitivity to a variation of α, lending itself to a possibility of a sensitive test for a variation of a fundamental constant [1], which does not rely on a particularly sensitive clock. Building upon our earlier results [2] constraining the variation at a few parts per 1015 per year level (competitive with the state-of-the-art at that time), we conducted a new, at least an order of magnitude more sensitive search, the results of which will be presented at the meeting. A study of a systematic effect associated with the level shifts due to the black-body radiation will also be discussed. [1] V. A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and J. K. Webb, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 888 (1999). [2] A. Cingöz, N.A. Leefer, S.J. Ferrell, A. Lapierre, A.-T. Nguyen, V. V. Yashchuk, D. Budker, S. K. Lamoreaux, and J. R. Torgerson, A laboratory search for variation of the fine-structure constant using atomic dysprosium, Eur. Phys. J. Special Topics 163, 71-88 (2008).

  8. Revisiting the Dielectric Constant Effect on the Nucleophile and Leaving Group of Prototypical Backside Sn2 Reactions: a Reaction Force and Atomic Contribution Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pedraza-González, Laura Milena; Galindo, Johan Fabian; Gonzalez, Ronald; Reyes, Andrés

    2016-10-09

    The solvent effect on the nucleophile and leaving group atoms of the prototypical F(-) + CH3Cl → CH3F + Cl(-) backside bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction (SN2) is analyzed employing the reaction force and the atomic contributions methods on the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC). Solvent effects were accounted for using the polarizable continuum solvent model. Calculations were performed employing eleven dielectric constants, ε, ranging from 1.0 to 78.5, to cover a wide spectrum of solvents. The reaction force data reveals that the solvent mainly influences the region of the IRC preceding the energy barrier, where the structural rearrangement to reach the transition state occurs. A detailed analysis of the atomic role in the reaction as a function of ε reveals that the nucleophile and the carbon atom are the ones that contribute the most to the energy barrier. In addition, we investigated the effect of the choice of nucleophile and leaving group on the ΔE0 and ΔE(↕) of Y(-) + CH3X → YCH3 + X(-) (X,Y= F, Cl, Br, I) in aqueous solution. Our analysis allowed us to find relationships between the atomic contributions to the activation energy and leaving group ability and nucleophilicity.

  9. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  10. Fine structure in plasma waves and radiation near the plasma frequency in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1994-01-01

    Novel observations are presented of intrunsic fine structure in the frequency spectrum of electomagnetic (EM) radiation and plasma waves near the electron plasma frequency f(sub p) during a period of unusually high interplanetary magnetic field strength. Measured using the wideband receiver on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 spacecraft, fine-structured emissions are observed both in the solar wind and the foreshock, The fine structure is shown to correspond to emissions spaced above f(sub p) near half harmonies of the electon cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), i.e., near f(sub p) + nf(sub ce)/2. These appear to be the first space physics observations of emissions spaced by f(sub ce)/2. Indirect but strong arguments are used to discriminate between EM and electrostatic (ES) signals, to identify whether ISEE 1 is in the solar wind or the foreshock, and to determine the relative frequencies of the emissions and the local f(sub p). The data are consistent with generation of the ES and EM emissions in the foreshock, with subsequent propagation of the EM emissions into the solar wind. It remains possible that some emissions currently identified as ES have significant EM character. The ES and EM emisions often merge into one another with minimal changes in frequency, arguing that their source regions and generation mechanisms are related and imposing significant constraints on theories. The f(sub ce)/2 ES and EM fine structures observed may be intrinsic to the emission mechanisms or to superposition of two series of signals with f(sub ce) spacing that differ in starting frequency by f(sub ce)/2. Present theories for nonlinear wave coupling processes, cyclotron maser emission, and other linear instability processes are all unable to explain multiple EM and/or ES components spaced by approximately f(sub ce)/2 above f(sub p) for f(sub p)/f(sub ce) much greater than 1 and typical for shock beams parameters. Suitable avenues for further theoretical research are

  11. X-ray absorption fine structure study of heavily P doped (111) and (001) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikata, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Koji; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Tamenori, Yusuke; Yahiro, Jumpei; Kunisu, Masahiro; Yamada, Takatoshi

    2017-02-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XANES) measurements were carried out for P doped (111) and (001) diamond films, and the results were compared with those from simulations. For the (111) spectrum, the main strong peak observed at 2147.0 eV and three broad peaks centered at 2150 eV, 2157 eV, and 2165 eV were observed. The assignment with the estimation by the simulation of the XANES peaks showed the interstitial sites additional to the substitutional site. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) result of the P doped (111) diamond showed that the first and second neighboring peaks are observed at 1.21 A and 2.0 A, respectively. The assignment with the estimation by the simulation of the EXAFS peaks also showed the interstitial sites additional to the substitutional site. Overall, P in diamonds presumably has dopant sites in both the substitutional and interstitial sites.

  12. Topological map of the Hofstadter butterfly: Fine structure of Chern numbers and Van Hove singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-04-01

    The Hofstadter butterfly is a quantum fractal with a highly complex nested set of gaps, where each gap represents a quantum Hall state whose quantized conductivity is characterized by topological invariants known as the Chern numbers. Here we obtain simple rules to determine the Chern numbers at all scales in the butterfly fractal and lay out a very detailed topological map of the butterfly by using a method used to describe quasicrystals: the cut and projection method. Our study reveals the existence of a set of critical points that separates orderly patterns of both positive and negative Cherns that appear as a fine structure in the butterfly. This fine structure can be understood as a small tilting of the projection subspace in the cut and projection method and by using a Chern meeting formula. Finally, we prove that the critical points are identified with the Van Hove singularities that exist at every band center in the butterfly landscape.

  13. Relation Between Basophilia and Fine Structure of Cytoplasm in the Fungus Allomyces macrogynus Em

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Benigna; Turian, Gilbert

    1960-01-01

    In a fungus, Allomyces macrogynus Em., staining tests have revealed changes in the location of cytoplasmic basophilia following different phases of the developmental cycle. These variations in location were used to observe which fine structures correspond to basophile and non-basophile areas of the cytoplasm. Hyphae, gametangia, zygotes, and plants were fixed at various developmental stages in OsO4, pH 6.1, and embedded in vestopal. Sections were examined in the electron microscope. Comparison of basophile and non-basophile cytoplasms leads to the conclusion that cytoplasmic particles of 150 to 200 A in diameter are responsible for basophilia. The possibility of these particles being ribosomes is discussed and confirmed. The present paper also describes some observations on the fine structure of other cellular components of this fungus, such as nuclei, mitochondria, various granules, and flagella. PMID:13801597

  14. Fine structure in plasma waves and radiation near the plasma frequency in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1994-01-01

    Novel observations are presented of intrunsic fine structure in the frequency spectrum of electomagnetic (EM) radiation and plasma waves near the electron plasma frequency f(sub p) during a period of unusually high interplanetary magnetic field strength. Measured using the wideband receiver on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 spacecraft, fine-structured emissions are observed both in the solar wind and the foreshock, The fine structure is shown to correspond to emissions spaced above f(sub p) near half harmonies of the electon cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), i.e., near f(sub p) + nf(sub ce)/2. These appear to be the first space physics observations of emissions spaced by f(sub ce)/2. Indirect but strong arguments are used to discriminate between EM and electrostatic (ES) signals, to identify whether ISEE 1 is in the solar wind or the foreshock, and to determine the relative frequencies of the emissions and the local f(sub p). The data are consistent with generation of the ES and EM emissions in the foreshock, with subsequent propagation of the EM emissions into the solar wind. It remains possible that some emissions currently identified as ES have significant EM character. The ES and EM emisions often merge into one another with minimal changes in frequency, arguing that their source regions and generation mechanisms are related and imposing significant constraints on theories. The f(sub ce)/2 ES and EM fine structures observed may be intrinsic to the emission mechanisms or to superposition of two series of signals with f(sub ce) spacing that differ in starting frequency by f(sub ce)/2. Present theories for nonlinear wave coupling processes, cyclotron maser emission, and other linear instability processes are all unable to explain multiple EM and/or ES components spaced by approximately f(sub ce)/2 above f(sub p) for f(sub p)/f(sub ce) much greater than 1 and typical for shock beams parameters. Suitable avenues for further theoretical research are

  15. Fine structure of a biexciton in a single quantum dot with a magnetic impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojnar, Anna H.; Korkusinski, Marek; Mendes, Udson C.; Goryca, Mateusz; Koperski, Maciej; Smolenski, Tomasz; Kossacki, Piotr; Wojnar, Piotr; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2013-05-01

    We show theoretically and experimentally that the ground state of a biexciton in a CdTe self-assembled quantum dot with a magnetic Mn impurity exhibits a fine structure due to electron-electron Coulomb and electron-Mn exchange interactions. Results of exact diagonalization of the microscopic biexciton-manganese-ion model predict a pattern of three pairs of states in the ground-state manifold, each pair labeled by the projection of Mn spin. We show that the fine structure determines the ordering of the biexciton emission maxima and can be derived from the biexciton and exciton emission spectra. Theoretical predictions are successfully compared with measured biexciton and exciton emission spectra of a single CdTe dot with a Mn ion in its center.

  16. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  17. HRTS observations of the fine structure and dynamics of the solar chromosphere and transition zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dere, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    Arc-second UV observations of the Sun by the NRL High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) have led to the discovery of dynamic fine structures such as 400 km/s coronal jets and chromospheric jets (spicules) and have provided new information about the structure and dynamics of the transition zone. These observations are reviewed and their relevance to the origin of the solar wind is discussed.

  18. ISO observation of molecular hydrogen and fine-structure lines in the photodissociation region IC63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, W.-F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Bell, T.; Viti, S.; Black, J.

    2009-12-01

    We wish to constrain the main physical properties of the photodissociation region (PDR) IC63. We present the results of a survey for the lowest pure-rotational lines of H2 with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer and for the major fine-structure cooling lines of OI at 63 and 145μm and CII at 157.7μm with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in the high-density PDR IC63. The observations are compared with available photochemical models based on optical absorption and/or millimetre emission line data with and without enhanced H2 formation rate on grain surfaces. The cloud density nH is constrained by the fine-structure lines. The models include both collisional excitation and ultraviolet (UV) pumping of the H2 ro-vibrational levels. Molecular pure-rotational lines up to S(5) are detected. The inferred column density of warm H2 at 106 +/- 11K is (5.9 +/- 1.8)+0.9-0.7 × 1021cm-2, while that of the hot component at 685 +/- 68K is (1.2 +/- 0.4) × 1019cm-2. Fine-structure lines are also detected in the far-infrared spectrum of IC63. The fine-structure lines constrain the density of the PDR to be (1-5) × 103cm-3. The impinging UV field on the PDR is enhanced by a factor of 103 compared to the mean interstellar field and is consistent with direct measurements in the UV. PDR models that include an enhanced H2 formation at high dust temperature give higher H2 intensities than models without enhancement. However, the predicted intensities are still lower than the observed intensities.

  19. MCDHF calculations of isotope shifts of even-parity fine-structure levels in neutral osmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Bouazza, S.

    2016-12-01

    Ab initio multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) calculations have been carried out in order to determine the isotope shifts of all the fine-structure levels belonging to the even-parity configurations (5d+6s)8 in neutral osmium, Os I. The theoretical predictions have been compared to laser spectroscopy measurements available in the literature showing a good agreement between theory and experiment.

  20. Fine structure of mycorrhiza in Neottia nidus-avis (L.) L. C. Rich. (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Dörr, I; Kollmann, R

    1969-12-01

    The fine structural features of the symbiotic relationship between Neottia and the fungus Rhizoctonia have been examined. Different stages of development of the fungus within the orchid's root cells are described. The fungus-attacked Neottia cells show striking changes. The central vacuole is partly filled by a conspicuous plasmatic network while the nucleus enlarges considerably. Of special interest is the development of an extended rough-surfaced ER.

  1. The 16th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwaldt, J.-D.; Hagelstein, M.; Rothe, J.

    2016-05-01

    This preface of the proceedings volume of the 16th International Conference on X- ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16) gives a glance on the five days of cutting-edge X-ray science which were held in Karlsruhe, Germany, August 23 - 28, 2015. In addition, several satellite meetings took place in Hamburg, Berlin and Stuttgart, a Sino-German workshop, three data analysis tutorials as well as special symposia on industrial catalysis and XFELs were held at the conference venue.

  2. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  3. Robust Cortical Entrainment to the Speech Envelope Relies on the Spectro-temporal Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nai; Chatterjee, Monita; Simon, Jonathan Z.

    2013-01-01

    Speech recognition is robust to background noise. One underlying neural mechanism is that the auditory system segregates speech from the listening background and encodes it reliably. Such robust internal representation has been demonstrated in auditory cortex by neural activity entrained to the temporal envelope of speech. A paradox, however, then arises, as the spectro-temporal fine structure rather than the temporal envelope is known to be the major cue to segregate target speech from background noise. Does the reliable cortical entrainment in fact reflect a robust internal “synthesis” of the attended speech stream rather than direct tracking of the acoustic envelope? Here, we test this hypothesis by degrading the spectro-temporal fine structure while preserving the temporal envelope using vocoders. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings reveal that cortical entrainment to vocoded speech is severely degraded by background noise, in contrast to the robust entrainment to natural speech. Furthermore, cortical entrainment in the delta-band (1–4 Hz) predicts the speech recognition score at the level of individual listeners. These results demonstrate that reliable cortical entrainment to speech relies on the spectro-temporal fine structure, and suggest that cortical entrainment to the speech envelope is not merely a representation of the speech envelope but a coherent representation of multiscale spectro-temporal features that are synchronized to the syllabic and phrasal rhythms of speech. PMID:24188816

  4. Effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions in Si VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2014-05-20

    The effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of fine-structure transitions in Si VII are calculated as a function of electron temperature in the range 5000-2,000,000 K. The B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method has been used to calculate collision strengths by electron impact. The target wave functions have been obtained using the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The 92 fine-structure levels belonging to the 46 LS states of 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 4}, 2s2p {sup 5}, 2p {sup 6}, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3s, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3p, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3d, and 2s2p {sup 4}3s configurations are included in our calculations of oscillator strengths and collision strengths. There are 4186 possible fine-structure allowed and forbidden transitions among the 92 levels. The present excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and collision strengths have been compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Generally, a good agreement is found with the 6 LS-state close-coupling approximation results of Butler and Zeippen and the 44 LS-state distorted wave calculation of Bhatia and Landi.

  5. Shape dependence of band-edge exciton fine structure in CdSe nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingzhong; Graf, Peter A; Jones, Wesley B; Franceschetti, Alberto; Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang; Kim, Kwiseon

    2007-11-01

    The band-edge exciton fine structure of wurtzite CdSe nanocrystals is investigated by a plane-wave pseudopotential method that includes spin-orbit coupling, screened electron-hole Coulomb interactions, and exchange interactions. Large-scale, systematic simulations have been carried out on quantum dots, nanorods, nanowires, and nanodisks. The size and shape dependence of the exciton fine structure is explored over the whole diameter-length configuration space and is explained by the interplay of quantum confinement, intrinsic crystal-field splitting, and electron-hole exchange interactions. Our results show that the band-edge exciton fine structure of CdSe nanocrystals is determined by the origin of their valence-band single-particle wave functions. Nanocrystals where the valence-band maximum originates from the bulk A band have a "dark" ground-state exciton. Nanocrystals where the valence-band maximum is derived from the bulk B band have a "quasi-bright" ground-state exciton. Thus, the diameter-length configuration map can be divided into two regions, corresponding to dark and quasi-bright ground-state excitons. We find that the dark/quasi-bright ground-state exciton crossover is not only diameter-dependent but also length-dependent, and it is characterized by a curve in the two-parameter space of diameter and length.

  6. Considering distortion product otoacoustic emission fine structure in measurements of the medial olivocochlear reflex

    PubMed Central

    Abdala, Carolina; Mishra, Srikanta K.; Williams, Tracy L.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, when the medial olivocochlear (MOC) pathway is activated by noise in the opposite ear, changes in distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level, i.e., the MOC reflex, can be recorded in the test ear. Recent evidence suggests that DPOAE frequency influences the direction (suppression∕enhancement) of the reflex. In this study, DPOAEs were recorded at fine frequency intervals from 500 to 2500 Hz, with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS) in a group of 15 adults. The MOC reflex was calculated only at DPOAE frequencies corresponding to peaks in the fine structure. Additionally, inverse fast-Fourier transform was conducted to evaluate MOC effects on individual DPOAE components. Results show the following: (1) When considering peaks only, the mean MOC reflex was −2.05 dB and 97% of observations reflected suppression, (2) CAS reduced distortion characteristic frequency component levels more than overlap component levels, and (3) CAS produced an upward shift in fine structure peak frequency. Results indicate that when the MOC reflex is recorded at DPOAE frequencies corresponding to fine structure maxima (i.e., when DPOAE components are constructive and in phase), suppression is reliably observed and level enhancement, which probably reflects component mixing in the ear canal rather than strength of the MOC reflex, is eliminated. PMID:19275316

  7. Atomistic theory of excitonic fine structure in InAs/InP nanowire quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świderski, M.; Zieliński, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanowire quantum dots have peculiar electronic and optical properties. In this work we use atomistic tight binding to study excitonic spectra of artificial molecules formed by a double nanowire quantum dot. We demonstrate a key role of atomistic symmetry and nanowire substrate orientation rather than cylindrical shape symmetry of a nanowire and a molecule. In particular for [001 ] nanowire orientation we observe a nonvanishing bright exciton splitting for a quasimolecule formed by two cylindrical quantum dots of different heights. This effect is due to interdot coupling that effectively reduces the overall symmetry, whereas single uncoupled [001 ] quantum dots have zero fine structure splitting. We found that the same double quantum dot system grown on [111 ] nanowire reveals no excitonic fine structure for all considered quantum dot distances and individual quantum dot heights. Further we demonstrate a pronounced, by several orders of magnitude, increase of the dark exciton optical activity in a quantum dot molecule as compared to a single quantum dot. For [111 ] systems we also show spontaneous localization of single particle states in one of nominally identical quantum dots forming a molecule, which is mediated by strain and origins from the lack of the vertical inversion symmetry in [111 ] nanostructures of overall C3 v symmetry. Finally, we study lowering of symmetry due to alloy randomness that triggers nonzero excitonic fine structure and the dark exciton optical activity in realistic nanowire quantum dot molecules of intermixed composition.

  8. Exciton fine structure and spin/valley dynamics in nanosystems (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, Mikhail M.

    2015-09-01

    In my invited talk the fine structure of neutral and charged excitons for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on (111) plane as well for transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) monolayers will be discussed. These, at first glance, different systems posses similar trigonal symmetry, which makes exciton fine structure and spin dynamics unusual compared with standard low-dimensional semiconductors. The effects of long-range exchange interaction induced mixing of excitons in two valleys of TMDCs and of magneto-induced mixing of bright and dark excitonic states in trigonal QDs are predicted and confirmed experimentally. Manifestations of excitonic spin/valley dynamics in photoluminescence, pump-probe Kerr rotation and spin noise are discussed. The presentation will be based on the following references: [1] G. Sallen, B. Urbaszek, M. M. Glazov, et al., Dark-Bright Mixing of Interband Transitions in Symmetric Semiconductor Quantum Dots, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 166604 (2011). [2] L. Bouet, M. Vidal, T. Mano, N. Ha, T. Kuroda, M. V. Durnev, M. M. Glazov, et al., Charge tuning in [111] grown GaAs droplet quantum dots, Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 082111 (2014). [3] M. M. Glazov, et al., Exciton fine structure and spin decoherence in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides Phys. Rev. B 89, 201302(R) (2014). [4] C. R. Zhu, K. Zhang, M. Glazov, et al., Exciton valley dynamics probed by Kerr rotation in WSe2 monolayers, Phys. Rev. B 90, 161302(R) (2014).

  9. Fine structure of tooth enamel in the yellowing human teeth: SEM and HRTEM studies.

    PubMed

    Wakasa, Masanobu; Nakanishi, Kuniyuki; Manago, Kenji; Isobe, Tsutomu; Eshita, Yoshiyuki; Okamoto, Masayuki; Isshiki, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify an influence of the fine structure of human tooth enamel to the yellowing teeth. Sound maxillary first premolars of 15-50-year-old females that were extracted for the orthodontic treatment were used as the test samples. The tooth enamel sections of these teeth that prepared by ion polishing were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the fine structure of substance filling the inter-rod spaces was analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In white tooth, the inter-rod spaces were observed at the width of about 0.1 μm, while in yellow tooth, the inter-rod spaces were not clearly observed by SEM. HRTEM observations revealed for the first time that the inter-rod spaces were filled with fine particles of poorly crystallized hydroxyapatite in the yellow tooth. In yellow tooth, it was considered that the color of the inner dentin was recognized due to the decrease of light scattering by filling the tooth enamel inter-rod spaces. The generation of particles in the tooth enamel inter-rod spaces was considered to be caused by the long-time progression of calcification. These results suggested that the change in fine structure, filling in inter-rod spaces of tooth enamel, was related to progression of calcification in the inter-rod spaces with advancing age and one of the factors of yellowness of human tooth. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Electronic fine structure calculation of metal complexes with three-open-shell s, d, and p configurations.

    PubMed

    Ramanantoanina, Harry; Daul, Claude

    2017-08-01

    The ligand field density functional theory (LFDFT) algorithm is extended to treat the electronic structure and properties of systems with three-open-shell electron configurations, exemplified in this work by the calculation of the core and semi-core 1s, 2s, and 3s one-electron excitations in compounds containing transition metal ions. The work presents a model to non-empirically resolve the multiplet energy levels arising from the three-open-shell systems of non-equivalent ns, 3d, and 4p electrons and to calculate the oscillator strengths corresponding to the electric-dipole 3d (m)  → ns (1)3d (m) 4p (1) transitions, with n = 1, 2, 3 and m = 0, 1, 2, …, 10 involved in the s electron excitation process. Using the concept of ligand field, the Slater-Condon integrals, the spin-orbit coupling constants, and the parameters of the ligand field potential are determined from density functional theory (DFT). Therefore, a theoretical procedure using LFDFT is established illustrating the spectroscopic details at the atomic scale that can be valuable in the analysis and characterization of the electronic spectra obtained from X-ray absorption fine structure or electron energy loss spectroscopies.

  11. On the balance of envelope and temporal fine structure in the encoding of speech in the early auditory system.

    PubMed

    Shamma, Shihab; Lorenzi, Christian

    2013-05-01

    There is much debate on how the spectrotemporal modulations of speech (or its spectrogram) are encoded in the responses of the auditory nerve, and whether speech intelligibility is best conveyed via the "envelope" (E) or "temporal fine-structure" (TFS) of the neural responses. Wide use of vocoders to resolve this question has commonly assumed that manipulating the amplitude-modulation and frequency-modulation components of the vocoded signal alters the relative importance of E or TFS encoding on the nerve, thus facilitating assessment of their relative importance to intelligibility. Here we argue that this assumption is incorrect, and that the vocoder approach is ineffective in differentially altering the neural E and TFS. In fact, we demonstrate using a simplified model of early auditory processing that both neural E and TFS encode the speech spectrogram with constant and comparable relative effectiveness regardless of the vocoder manipulations. However, we also show that neural TFS cues are less vulnerable than their E counterparts under severe noisy conditions, and hence should play a more prominent role in cochlear stimulation strategies.

  12. Spatial hearing benefits demonstrated with presentation of acoustic temporal fine structure cues in bilateral cochlear implant listeners.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Tyler H; Kan, Alan; Goupell, Matthew J; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2014-09-01

    Most contemporary cochlear implant (CI) processing strategies discard acoustic temporal fine structure (TFS) information, and this may contribute to the observed deficits in bilateral CI listeners' ability to localize sounds when compared to normal hearing listeners. Additionally, for best speech envelope representation, most contemporary speech processing strategies use high-rate carriers (≥900 Hz) that exceed the limit for interaural pulse timing to provide useful binaural information. Many bilateral CI listeners are sensitive to interaural time differences (ITDs) in low-rate (<300 Hz) constant-amplitude pulse trains. This study explored the trade-off between superior speech temporal envelope representation with high-rate carriers and binaural pulse timing sensitivity with low-rate carriers. The effects of carrier pulse rate and pulse timing on ITD discrimination, ITD lateralization, and speech recognition in quiet were examined in eight bilateral CI listeners. Stimuli consisted of speech tokens processed at different electrical stimulation rates, and pulse timings that either preserved or did not preserve acoustic TFS cues. Results showed that CI listeners were able to use low-rate pulse timing cues derived from acoustic TFS when presented redundantly on multiple electrodes for ITD discrimination and lateralization of speech stimuli.

  13. Fine Structure in the Mm-Wavelength Spectra of the Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Faltan observaciones solares espectrosc6picas en la longitud de onda milimetrica. Hay sugerencias de que se puede superponer una fi na estructura en frecuencia a la componente-S de la regi6n solar activa, asi como a la componente del brote en las longitudes de onda milimetri- cas. Se ha desarrollado un receptor de alta sensibilidad de pasos de frecuencia que opera en el intervalo de 23-18 GHz con una resoluci6n de 1 GHz y resoluci6n de tiempo variable entre 1.2 y 96 sec, usando la an- tena de Itapetinga de 13.7-m para estudiar la estructura fina en frecuencia y tiempo. Discutimos el espectro en longitud de onda-mm en re- giones activas y su evoluci6n en el tiempo. El estudio de Ia evoluci6n en el tiempo de la regi6n activa en AR 5569 observada el 29 de junio de 1989, sugiere la existencia de estructuras finas como funci6n deltiempo. ABSTRACT. There is a lack of mm-wavelength spectroscopic solar observations. There are suggestions that a fine structure in frequency may be superimposed on the S-component of solar active region as well as on the burst component at inm-wavelengths. To study fine structure in frequency and time, a high sensitivity step frequency receiver operating in the frequency range 23-18 GHz with frequency resolution of 1 GHz and variable time resolution 1.2 to 96 sec, using 13.7 m diameter Itapetinga radome covered antenna, has been developed. Here, we discuss mm-wavelength spectra of active regions and their time evolution. Study of time evolution of an active region AR 5569 observed on 29th June, 1989 suggests existence of fine structures as a function of time. ( Ck : SUN-ACTIVITY - SUN-RADIO RADIATION

  14. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING. II. PROMINENCE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-10-20

    We use the new three-dimensional (3D) whole-prominence fine structure model to study the evolution of prominences and their fine structures in response to changes in the underlying photospheric magnetic flux distribution. The applied model combines a detailed 3D prominence magnetic field configuration with a realistic description of the prominence plasma distributed along multiple fine structures. In addition, we utilize an approximate Hα visualization technique to study the evolution of the visible cool prominence plasma both in emission (prominence) and absorption (filament). We show that the initial magnetic field configuration of the modeled prominence is significantly disturbed by the changing position of a single polarity of a magnetic bipole as the bipole is advected toward the main body of the filament. This leads to the creation of a barb, which becomes the dominant feature visible in the synthetic Hα images of both the prominence and filament views. The evolution of the bipole also creates conditions that lead to the disappearance and reappearance of large portions of the main body. We also show that an arch-like region containing a dark void (a bubble) can be naturally produced in the synthetic prominence Hα images. While not visible in terms of the magnetic field lines, it is due to a lack of Hα emission from low-pressure, low-density plasma located in shallow magnetic dips lying along the lines of sight intersecting the dark void. In addition, a quasi-vertical small-scale feature consisting of short and deep dips, piled one above the other, is produced.

  15. Global investigation of the fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Burda, O.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    Fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) in {sup 58}Ni, {sup 89}Y, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 166}Er, and {sup 208}Pb has been observed in high-energy-resolution ({delta}E{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}35-50 keV) inelastic proton scattering measurements at E{sub 0}=200 MeV at iThemba LABS. Calculations of the corresponding quadrupole excitation strength functions performed within models based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) reveal similar fine structure when the mixing of one-particle one-hole states with two-particle two-hole states is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the experimental data is made with results from the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock (ETDHF) method. For {sup 208}Pb, additional theoretical results from second RPA and the extended theory of finite Fermi systems (ETFFS) are discussed. A continuous wavelet analysis of the experimental and the calculated spectra is used to extract dominant scales characterizing the fine structure. Although the calculations agree with qualitative features of these scales, considerable differences are found between the model and experimental results and amongst different models. Within the framework of the QPM and ETDHF calculations it is possible to decompose the model spaces into subspaces approximately corresponding to different damping mechanisms. It is demonstrated that characteristic scales mainly arise from the collective coupling of the ISGQR to low-energy surface vibrations.

  16. Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana; Li Luhua; Chen Ying; Cowie, Bruce C. C.

    2013-05-15

    The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

  17. Studying the fine structure of a nanosecond breakdown channel in potassium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emlin, R. V.; Punanov, I. F.

    2017-08-01

    The fine structure of a breakdown channel from a positive electrode in KCl single crystal is studied in the multipulse exposure at a voltage of 140 kV. The dimensions and the shapes of breakdown structures are established as the functions of the applied voltage. The velocity of propagation of a crack vertex forming the breakdown structure, as well as the pressure in the breakdown channel, are estimated. It is shown that under certain conditions the mechanical destruction structure near the breakdown channel is retained even after several dozen pulses are applied.

  18. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  19. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  20. X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Study for Fe60Ni40 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong-Seok; Oh, Kyuseung; Na, Wonkyung; Kim, Nayoung; Yoo, Yong-Goo; Min, Seung-Gi; Yu, Seong-Cho

    2007-02-02

    Fe60Ni40 alloys were fabricated by the mechanical alloying process with process periods of 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours, respectively. The formation of alloy and the structural evolution of the alloy were examined by X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure methods. With increase of alloying time the BCC phase of iron was changed significantly during the mechanical alloying process. The alloying was activated in about 6 hours and completed in about 24 hours.

  1. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study of CaSO 4:Dy phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Bakshi, A. K.; Ciatto, G.; Aquilanti, G.; Pradhan, A. S.; Pascarelli, S.

    2006-03-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements have been carried out on CaSO 4:Dy phosphors at the Dy L 3 edge with synchrotron radiation. The data have been analysed to find out the Dy-S and Dy-O bond lengths in the neighborhood of the Dy atoms. Measurements have been carried out over several samples thermally annealed for different cycles at 400 °C in air for 1 h and the change in bond lengths in samples with increasing number of annealing cycles have been studied by analyzing the EXAFS data.

  2. The fine structure of the sperm of the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Jeffrey D.; Walker, Glenn K.; Nichols, Susan J.; Sorenson, Dorothy

    2004-01-01

    The fine structural details of the spermatozoon of the round goby are presented for the first time in this study. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic examination of testis reveals an anacrosomal spermatozoon with a slightly elongate head and uniformly compacted chromatin. The midpiece contains a single, spherical mitochondrion. Two perpendicularly oriented centrioles lie in a deep, eccentric nuclear fossa with no regularly observed connection to the nucleus. The flagellum develops bilateral fins soon after emerging from the fossa; each extends approximately 1 A?m from the axoneme and persists nearly the length of the flagellum.

  3. Biology of Budding Bacteria III. Fine Structure of Rhodomicrobium and Hyphomicrobium spp

    PubMed Central

    Conti, S. F.; Hirsch, Peter

    1965-01-01

    Conti, S. F. (Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, N.H.), and Peter Hirsch. Biology of budding bacteria. III. Fine structure of Rhodomicrobium and Hyphomicrobium spp. J. Bacteriol. 89:503–512. 1965.—The ultrastructure of 14 strains of hyphomicrobia, and of Rhodomicrobium vannielii, was investigated by means of electron microscopy of thin sections. The majority of the strains of hyphomicrobia possessed a well-developed internal membrane system, which appeared to be derived by invagination from the cytoplasmic membrane. The subcellular organization of the hyphomicrobia and R. vannielii was investigated. Images PMID:14255720

  4. Fine structure of density ducts formed by active radiofrequency action on laboratory and space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Rapoport, V. O.; Shorokhova, E. A.; Aidakina, N. A.; Gushchin, M. E.; Zudin, I. Yu.; Korobkov, S. V.; Kostrov, A. V.; Parrot, M.; Rauch, J.-L.

    2015-03-01

    The results of active ionospheric and model laboratory experiments on the generation of artificial irregularities of a magnetized plasma (density ducts), which can be used as waveguide channels for low-frequency waves, have been reported. It has been found that ducts formed at the localized high-frequency heating of the plasma have a fine structure under certain conditions: they include irregularities of the plasma density, which significantly affect the propagation of low-frequency waves, ensuring the deep amplitude modulation of low-frequency radiation and changing its spatial structure. A mechanism of the formation of such irregularities has been proposed.

  5. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section and length is developed for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  6. Tailoring the exciton fine structure of cadmium selenide nanocrystals with shape anisotropy and magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sinito, Chiara; Fernée, Mark J; Goupalov, Serguei V; Mulvaney, Paul; Tamarat, Philippe; Lounis, Brahim

    2014-11-25

    We use nominally spheroidal CdSe nanocrystals with a zinc blende crystal structure to study how shape perturbations lift the energy degeneracies of the band-edge exciton. Nanocrystals with a low degree of symmetry exhibit splitting of both upper and lower bright state degeneracies due to valence band mixing combined with the isotropic exchange interaction, allowing active control of the level splitting with a magnetic field. Asymmetry-induced splitting of the bright states is used to reveal the entire 8-state band-edge fine structure, enabling complete comparison with band-edge exciton models.

  7. Ground-based and spaceborn observations of the type II burst with developed fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V.; Melnik, V.; Konovalenko, A.; Brazhenko, A.; Rucker, H.; Stanislavskyy, A.; Panchenko, M.

    2012-09-01

    The combination of two huge ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) operated in decameter wavelengths with three spatially separated spacecrafts (SOHO, STEREO-A and STEREO-B) equipped with white light coronagraphs, UV telescopes and decameter-hectometer band radio telescopes created a unique opportunity to investigate the high energy solar transients, such as CMEs and their manifestations in radio bands - type II bursts. In this paper we made detailed analysis of the powerful and complex event occurred on 7 June 2011 consisted of Halo-CME and type II burst with rich fine structure.

  8. The fine structure of muscle attachments in a spider (Latrodectus mactans, Fabr.).

    PubMed

    Smith, D S; Järlfors, U; Russell, F E

    1969-01-01

    The fine structure of a spider myo-apodeme junction is described, and discussed in terms of other arthropod muscle attachments. This is contrasted with the situation in the venom gland, equipped with muscle fibers that control expulsion of the secreted material. The latter involves a cell-free collagenous matrix, lying between the muscle cells and the sheath of the gland. As in other arthropods, skeletal fibers are attached to the apodeme cuticle via specialized epidermal cells, containing oriented microtubules. Interdigitations between these cells and muscle, basally, and cuticle, apically, are described. Extracellular tonofibrillae described elsewhere are inconspicuous in the apodeme cuticle.

  9. Systematic in the relativistic oscillator strengths for fine-structure transitions in the aluminium isoelectronic sequence.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavin, C.; Alvarez, A. B.; Martin, I.

    1997-06-01

    Theoretical oscillator strengths for 3s23p 2P-3s23d 2D, 3s23p 2P-3s24s 2S and 3s24s 2S-3s24p 2P fine-structure transitions in some ions of the aluminium isoelectronic sequence are reported. The computations have been carried out with two formalisms within the context of quantum defect theory: the quantum defect orbital method (QDO) and its relativistic counterpart (RQDO). The advantages of including relativistic effects are made apparent. Some of these are reflected by the correct systematic trends displayed by the RQDO f-values along the isoelectronic sequence.

  10. A cascade interpretation of Lundgren's stretched spiral vortex model for turbulent fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Andrew D.

    1993-11-01

    Lundgren's [Phys. Fluids 25, 2193 (1982)] model for turbulent fine structure comprises coherent vortices which wind up vorticity variations into spiral structures; simultaneously the vortices are stretched axially by a background strain field. The model predicts a k-5/3 energy spectrum and is remarkably robust to the form of the coherent vortices and the form of the vorticity variations. To understand this the present article introduces a simple cascade argument which illuminates how the dynamical processes of vortex stretching and reduction of scale conspire to give this Kolmogorov spectrum. Some generalizations are considered.

  11. Fine structure of transient waves in a random medium: The correlation and spectral density functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    This is essentially a progress report on a theoretical investigation of the propagation of transient waves in a random medium. The emphasis in this study is on applications to sonic-boom propagation, particularly as regards the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the sonic-boom waveform. The analysis is general, however, and is applicable to other types of waves besides sonic-boom waves. The phenomenon of primary concern in this investigation is the fine structure of the wave. A figure is used to illustrate what is meant by finestructure.

  12. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  13. THERMAL FINE STRUCTURE AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE: SPICULES AND FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Philip G.; Low, Boon Chye; Tritschler, Alexandra E-mail: low@ucar.edu

    2011-03-20

    The relationship between observed structures in the solar atmosphere and the magnetic fields threading them is known only for the solar photosphere, even then imprecisely. We suggest that some of the fine structures in the more tenuous chromosphere and corona-specifically some populations of spicules and fibrils-correspond to warps in two-dimensional sheet-like structures, as an alternative to conventional interpretations in terms of tube-like structures. The sheets are perhaps related to magnetic tangential discontinuities, which Parker has argued arise naturally in low-{beta} conditions. Some consequences of this suggestion, if it can be confirmed, are discussed.

  14. Fine-structure splittings in high-lying {sup 2}F states of rubidium via three-step laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, J. R.; Malyshev, G. S.

    2010-03-15

    Three-step laser spectroscopy has been used to measure six additional fine-structure splittings in the n {sup 2}F states of {sup 87}Rb for 11{<=}n{<=}16. When combined with our previous measurements for 4{<=}n{<=}10, they constitute a continuous sequence of 13 measurements suitable for comparison to fine-structure calculations in heavy alkali-metal atoms where relativistic effects, core polarization, configuration mixing, and electron correlation are important.

  15. A comparative study of distortion-product-otoacoustic-emission fine structure in human newborns and adults with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Sumitrajit; Abdala, Carolina

    2007-10-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) measured in human newborns are not adult-like. More than a decade of work from various investigators has created a well-developed body of evidence describing these differences but the putative anatomy or physiology has only been partially explained. Recently, Abdala and Keefe [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 3832-3842 (2006)] have identified outer and middle ear immaturities that at least partially describe the differences observed between newborn and adult input-output functions and suppression tuning curves. DPOAE fine structure characteristics and their maturation have not been examined to any extent in the literature. Fine structure characteristics in two groups of ten newborns and young adults with normal hearing sensitivity are compared here. Consistent with previous reports, the newborns show higher DPOAE levels; greater fine structure depth and wider fine structure spacing is also observed in the newborns. Differences in fine structure morphology are also observed between the two age groups. While some of these findings are attributable to an immature outer and middle ear system in the newborns, it is argued that some observed differences in fine structure characteristics might be due to remnant immaturities in passive motion of the basilar membrane in the newborn cochlea.

  16. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  17. Fine structure of synaptic sites and circuits in mushroom bodies of insect brains.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2016-09-01

    In the insect brain, mushroom bodies represent a prominent central neuropil for multisensory integration and, crucially, for learning and memory. For this reason, special attention has been focused on its small chemical synapses. Early studies on synaptic types and their distribution, using conventional electron microscopy, and recent publications have resolved basic features of synaptic circuits. More recent studies, using experimental methods for resolving neurons, such as immunocytochemistry, genetic labelling, high resolution confocal microscopy and more advanced electron microscopy, have revealed many new details about the fine structure and molecular contents of identifiable neurons of mushroom bodies and has led to more refined modelling of functional organisation. Synaptic circuitries have been described in most detail for the calyces. In contrast, the mushroom bodies' columnar peduncle and lobes have been explored to a lesser degree. In dissecting local microcircuits, the scientist is confronted with complex neuronal compartmentalisation and specific synaptic arrangements. This article reviews classical and modern studies on the fine structure of synapses and their networks in mushroom bodies across several insect species.

  18. Retinular fine structure in compound eyes of diurnal and nocturnal sphingid moths.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, E

    1982-01-01

    Retinular fine structure has been compared in the superposition compound eyes of three sphingid moths, one nocturnal, Cechenena, and two diurnal, Cephonodes and Macroglossum. Cechenena and Cephonodes have tiered retinas with three kinds of retinular cells: two distal, six regular and one basal. The distal retinular cells in Cechenena are special in having a complex partially intracellular rhabdomere not present in Cephonodes. Macroglossum lacks the distal retinular cell. In Cephonodes a unique rhabdom type, formed by the six regular retinular cells in the middle region of the retinula, is divided into three separate longitudinal plates arranged closely parallel to one another. Their constituent microvilli are consequently all nearly unidirectional. The ratio of rhabdom volume to retinular cell volume in the two diurnal sphingids is 10-27%; this is about the same as that (25%) of skipper butterflies, but significantly smaller than in the nocturnal Cechenena (60%). In the diurnal sphingids retinular cell membranes show elongate meandering profiles with septate junctions between adjacent retinular cells. From the comparative fine structure of their eyes the diurnal sphingids and the skippers would appear to be phylogenetically closely related.

  19. Features of sound propagation in the ocean with fine-structure inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostev, V. S.; Mikryukov, A. V.; Popov, O. E.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the results of an experiment using an explosive sound source in the tropical part of the Indian Ocean. We consider the time structure of sound signals in geometric shadow zones to a distance of 270 km and the scheme of how the sound field in the shadow zone is formed by rays reflected from horizontally extended fine-structured sound velocity layers. From the results of calculation using a wave program that realizes the method of psuedodifferential parabolic equations, we analyze the influence of signal scattering by fine-structure sound velocity inhomogeneities on the sound field distribution in a waveguide. We show that the field formed by spots of light in each of the shadow zones is generated by a regular field and propagates in parallel to it, taking energy from the regular zone in the near field and in each subsequent convergence zone. This mechanism causes an additional decrease in the field in illuminated zones, which can be interpreted as additional attenuation of the regular sound field.

  20. Low-energy fine-structure resonances in photoionization of O ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, Maximiliano; Eissner, Werner; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2010-12-01

    Resonant features in low-energy photoionization cross sections are reported in coupled-channel calculations for O ii including relativistic fine structure. The calculations reveal extensive near-threshold resonant structures in the small energy region between the fine structure levels of the ground state 2p2(3P0,1,2) of the residual ion O iii. Although the resonances have not yet been observed, they are similar to other experimentally observed features. They are expected to significantly enhance the very-low-temperature dielectronic recombination rates, potentially leading to the resolution of an outstanding nebular abundances anomaly. Higher energy partial and total photoionization cross sections of the ground configuration levels 2p3(4S3/2o,2D3/2,5/2o,2P1/2,3/2o) are found to be in agreement with experimental measurements on synchrotron-based photon sources [1-3], thereby identifying the excited O iii levels present in the ion beams. These are also the first results from a recently developed version of Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) codes, with inclusion of two-body magnetic interaction terms. The improved relativistic treatment could be important for other astrophysical applications and for more precise benchmarking of experimental measurements.

  1. Infrared fine-structure line diagnostics of shrouded active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Far-infrared spectroscopy of celestial objects will improve dramatically in the coming decade, allowing astronomers to use fine-structure line emission to probe photoionized regions obscured in the optical band by thick clouds of dust. The ultraluminous far-IR galaxies revealed by IRAS, quasar-like in luminosity but smothered in molecular gas, probably conceal either immense starbursts or luminous active nuclei. In both scenarios, these objects ought to produce copious infrared fine-structure emission with several lines comparable to H(beta) in luminosity. This paper shows how these lines, if detected, can be used to determine the electron densities and far-IR obscurations of shrouded photoionized regions and to constrain the shape and ionization parameter of the ionizing spectra. The presence of (Ne V) emission in particular will distinguish shrouded AGN's from shrouded starbursts. Since all active galaxies photoionize at least some surrounding material, these diagnostics can also be applied to active galaxies in general and will aid in studying how an active nucleus interacts with the interstellar medium of its host galaxy.

  2. Fine Structure of the Stoma of Bunonema sp. and Teratorhabditis palmarum (Nematoda) and Its Phylogenetic Significance

    PubMed Central

    Dolinski, C. M.; Baldwin, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Fine structure of the stoma, including the cheilostom, gymnostom, and stegostom of Bunonema sp. and Teratorhabditis palmarum was compared with Caenorhabditis elegans to consider fine structural characters that may be phylogenetically informative. The stegostom, enclosed by the anterior end of the pharynx, includes a triradiate lumen surrounded by radial cells (interradial or pairs of adradial cells) repeated in the dorsal and subventral sectors; in Rhabditina, typically the stegostom includes anteriorly two sets of epithelial and posteriorly two sets of muscular radial cells. These muscle cells are anteriorly m1 and posteriorly m2. In Bunonema sp., unlike T. palmarum and C. elegans, the stegostom has a third set of interradial epithelial cells. In Bunonema sp., m1 is expressed by three interradial cells, whereas in T. palmarum and C. elegans m1 is three pairs of adradial muscle cells (i.e., six cells). In all three taxa m2 is expressed as three pairs of adradial muscle cells. Posterior processes of adjacent adradial cells fuse, and closely apposed nuclei may present a figure-eight shape. However, in Bunonema the three interradial m1 cells each have a long posterior process enclosing two separate round nuclei. In combination with additional characters, these diverse stoma features may prove phylogenetically informative. Specifically, the radial epithelial cells of the stegostom appear to be a synapomorphy consistent with a bunonemid-diplogastrid-rhabditid clade, whereas a thickening in the dorsal sector of the stoma cuticle lining is interpreted as a synapomorphy supporting a bunonemid-diplogastrid clade. PMID:19262757

  3. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  4. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE NUCLEOLUS DURING MITOSIS IN THE GRASSHOPPER NEUROBLAST CELL

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Barbara J.

    1965-01-01

    The behavior of the nucleolus during mitosis was studied by electron microscopy in neuroblast cells of the grasshopper embryo, Chortophaga viridifasciata. Living neuroblast cells were observed in the light microscope, and their mitotic stages were identified and recorded. The cells were fixed and embedded; alternate thick and thin sections were made for light and electron microscopy. The interphase nucleolus consists of two fine structural components arranged in separate zones. Concentrations of 150 A granules form a dense peripheral zone, while the central regions are composed of a homogeneous background substance. Observations show that nucleolar dissolution in prophase occurs in two steps with a preliminary loss of the background substance followed by a dispersal of the granules. Nucleolar material reappears at anaphase as small clumps or layers at the chromosome surfaces. These later form into definite bodies, which disappear as the nucleolus grows in telophase. Evidence suggests both a collecting and a synthesizing role for the nucleolus-associated chromatin. The final, mature nucleolar form is produced by a rearrangement of the fine structural components and an increase in their mass. PMID:14326121

  5. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-03

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy.

  6. On the mechanisms involved in the recovery of envelope information from temporal fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Millman, Rebecca E.; Viemeister, Neal F.; Brown, Christopher A.; Bacon, Sid P.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were designed to provide psychophysical evidence for the existence of envelope information in the temporal fine structure (TFS) of stimuli that were originally amplitude modulated (AM). The original stimuli typically consisted of the sum of a sinusoidally AM tone and two unmodulated tones so that the envelope and TFS could be determined a priori. Experiment 1 showed that normal-hearing listeners not only perceive AM when presented with the Hilbert fine structure alone but AM detection thresholds are lower than those observed when presenting the original stimuli. Based on our analysis, envelope recovery resulted from the failure of the decomposition process to remove the spectral components related to the original envelope from the TFS and the introduction of spectral components related to the original envelope, suggesting that frequency- to amplitude-modulation conversion is not necessary to recover envelope information from TFS. Experiment 2 suggested that these spectral components interact in such a way that envelope fluctuations are minimized in the broadband TFS. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the modulation depth at the original carrier frequency is only slightly reduced compared to the depth of the original modulator. It also indicated that envelope recovery is not specific to the Hilbert decomposition. PMID:21786897

  7. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  8. Fine structure of uterus and non-functioning paruterine organ in Orthoskrjabinia junlanae (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea).

    PubMed

    Korneva, Janetta V; Kornienko, Svetlana A; Jones, Malcolm K

    2016-06-01

    Some cyclophyllidean cestodes provide protection for their eggs in the external environment by providing them with additional protective layers around the egg membranes. In attempting to examine such adaptations, the microanatomy and fine structure of the uterus of pregravid and gravid proglottids of the cyclophyllidean cestode Orthoskrjabinia junlanae, a parasite of mammals that inhabit a terrestrial but moist environment, were studied. In the initial stages of uterine development, developing embryos locate freely in the lumen of a saccate uterus that later partitions into chambers. Each chamber that forms encloses several embryos. The chambers are surrounded by muscle cells that synthesize extracellular matrix actively. The paruterine organs consist of stacks of flattened long outgrowths of muscular cells, interspersed with small lipid droplets. In the gravid proglottids, the size of paruterine organ increases and consists of flattened basal and small rounded apical parts separated by constrictions. The fine structure of the organ wall remains the same: sparse nuclei and stacks of flattened cytoplasmic outgrowths but internal invaginations or lumen in the paruterine organ are absent. Completely developed eggs remain localized in the uterus. Based on the comparative morpho-functional analysis of uterine and paruterine organs and uterine capsules in cestodes, we conclude that these non-functioning paruterine organ in O. junlanae is an example of an atavism. We postulate that the life cycle of the parasite, which infects mammals living in wet habitats, where threats of desiccation of parasite ova is reduced, has favoured a reversion to a more ancestral form of uterine development.

  9. Fine structure of epithelial canal cells in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymowych, R.; Ledbetter, M.C. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1987-01-01

    Secretory canals were examined in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum (Cocklebur) grown under long day illumination to maintain vegetative growth. The fine structure of the canal and its epithelium was studied by electron microscopy of thin section cut transverse to the principal axis of petioles from leaves in an early stage of development. The canal proper is delimited by walls of epithelial cells which protrude into a scallop shaped cavity. In comparison to the surrounding parenchyma, the epithelial cells are smaller, cytoplasmically more dense, and less vacuolate. The epithelium contains pleomorphic starch-free plastids with planar thylakoids frequently stacked into grana; thus, the plastids are presumed photosynthetically active. Mitochondria are abundant and often dense. The cytoplasm is rich in free polysomes, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum predominates over the rough form. Spheroidal granules averaging about 530 nm in diameter are numerous in the epithelium and appear at lower concentration in neighboring cells. Many features of fine structure of the epithelial cells suggest that a high metabolic activity in present in this tissue during this early stage of development. A possible function of the canals is defense against insect predation and animal grazing.

  10. Low-energy fine-structure resonances in photoionization of O ii

    SciTech Connect

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Montenegro, Maximiliano; Eissner, Werner

    2010-12-15

    Resonant features in low-energy photoionization cross sections are reported in coupled-channel calculations for O ii including relativistic fine structure. The calculations reveal extensive near-threshold resonant structures in the small energy region between the fine structure levels of the ground state 2p{sup 2}({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) of the residual ion O iii. Although the resonances have not yet been observed, they are similar to other experimentally observed features. They are expected to significantly enhance the very-low-temperature dielectronic recombination rates, potentially leading to the resolution of an outstanding nebular abundances anomaly. Higher energy partial and total photoionization cross sections of the ground configuration levels 2p{sup 3}({sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{sup o},{sup 2}D{sub 3/2,5/2}{sup o},{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}{sup o}) are found to be in agreement with experimental measurements on synchrotron-based photon sources [1-3], thereby identifying the excited O iii levels present in the ion beams. These are also the first results from a recently developed version of Breit-Pauli R-matrix (BPRM) codes, with inclusion of two-body magnetic interaction terms. The improved relativistic treatment could be important for other astrophysical applications and for more precise benchmarking of experimental measurements.

  11. Relative salience of envelope and fine structure cues in zebra finch song

    PubMed Central

    Vernaleo, Beth A.; Dooling, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Zebra finches produce a learned song that is rich in harmonic structure and highly stereotyped. More is generally known about how birds learn and produce this song than how they perceive it. Here, zebra finches were trained with operant techniques to discriminate changes in natural and synthetic song motifs. Results show that zebra finches are quite insensitive to changes to the overall envelope of the motif since they were unable to discriminate more than a doubling in inter-syllable interval durations. By contrast, they were quite sensitive to changes in individual syllables. A series of tests with synthetic song syllables, including some made of frozen noise and Schroeder harmonic complexes, showed that birds used a suite of acoustic cues in normal listening but they could also distinguish among syllables simply on the basis of the temporal fine structure in the waveform. Thus, while syllable perception is maintained by multiple redundant cues, temporal fine structure features alone are sufficient for syllable discrimination and may be more important for communication than previously thought. PMID:21568438

  12. Perceptual weighting of individual and concurrent cues for sentence intelligibility: Frequency, envelope, and fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The speech signal may be divided into frequency bands, each containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. For maximal speech understanding, listeners must allocate their perceptual resources to the most informative acoustic properties. Understanding this perceptual weighting is essential for the design of assistive listening devices that need to preserve these important speech cues. This study measured the perceptual weighting of young normal-hearing listeners for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials. Perceptual weights were obtained under two listening contexts: (1) when each acoustic property was presented individually and (2) when multiple acoustic properties were available concurrently. The processing method was designed to vary the availability of each acoustic property independently by adding noise at different levels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener’s performance with the availability of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrated that weights were (1) equal when acoustic properties were presented individually and (2) biased toward envelope and mid-frequency information when multiple properties were available. Results suggest a complex interaction between the available acoustic properties and the listening context in determining how best to allocate perceptual resources when listening to speech in noise. PMID:21361454

  13. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF THE URINARY BLADDER OF THE TOAD, BUFO MARINUS

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Kwon

    1963-01-01

    The urinary bladder of the toad (Bufo marinus) was studied with both the light and the electron microscope. The bladder wall consists of epithelium, submucosa, and serosa. In the epithelium, four different cell types were recognized on the basis of their fine structure and staining properties with several different dyes. These four were designated as granular cells, mitochondria-rich cells, mucous cells, and basal cells. In addition, migratory cells of a different type were found in the basal region of the epithelium. The luminal surface of the epithelial cells presents irregular microvilli and is coated by PAS-positive material which has been further investigated by histochemical procedures and radioautography. Included is a description of the fine structural details of cell membranes, cell junctions, and intracellular components. The submucosa consists of a delicate stroma of fibroblasts and collagen fibers and also contains blood and lymph vessels, unmyelinated nerves, migratory cells, and smooth muscle cells. The serosa consists of a single layer of serosal (mesothelial) cells which form an uninterrupted covering of the viscus. Possible pathways of sodium and water transport across the bladder wall are discussed. PMID:14020969

  14. Fine structure and mineral components of primary calculi in some human prostates.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, Tetsuo; Hirayama, Akihiko; Sano, Tsuneyoshi; Debari, Kazuhiro; Mayahara, Mitsuori; Nakamura, Masanori

    2008-08-01

    The fine structure of prostatic calculi has not been elucidated yet, although the chemical components were reported in detail. We studied the primary or endogenous calculi removed from eight human prostates by secondary scanning electron microscopy, backscattered electron imaging, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. The primary calculi containing Mg, Zn and S, besides Ca and P were basically classified into four stone groups (I-IV) by fine structure and mineral components. Stone I had the core deposits of calcospherites showing concentric rings and the laminated deposits concentrically around the core. Their deposits were identified as apatite. Stone II was occupied with the calcospherite deposits of apatite although the stone growth showed a rough concentric formation. Stone III contained the core of calcospherites and concentric laminated structures, similar to a smaller type of group I, whereas the wider peripheral region was deposited with needle-like structures, identified as calcium oxalates. Stone IV had the core deposits containing small hexahedral structures, identified as whitlockite, which were surrounded with several incompletely concentric laminated bands of apatite. Whitlockite crystals were also found between the fused large calculi. The initial and formative calculi were basically observed as the deposition of mineralizing spherical structures suggesting variously sized corpora amylaceous bodies. Thus, the primary prostatic calculi of stones I-III will begin from the mineralization of amylaceous bodies as a core, while the organic substances, which form stone IV, might be derived from the simple precipitation of prostatic secretion.

  15. Frequency-dependent fine structure in the frequency-following response: The byproduct of multiple generators.

    PubMed

    Tichko, Parker; Skoe, Erika

    2017-05-01

    The frequency-following response (FFR) is an auditory-evoked response recorded at the scalp that captures the spectrotemporal properties of tonal stimuli. Previous investigations report that the amplitude of the FFR fluctuates as a function of stimulus frequency, a phenomenon thought to reflect multiple neural generators phase-locking to the stimulus with different response latencies. When phase-locked responses are offset by different latencies, constructive and destructive phase interferences emerge in the volume-conducted signals, culminating in an attenuation or amplification of the scalp-recorded response in a frequency-specific manner. Borrowing from the literature on the audiogram and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), we refer to this frequency-specific waxing and waning of the FFR amplitude as fine structure. While prior work on the human FFR was limited by small sets of stimulus frequencies, here, we provide the first systematic investigation of FFR fine structure using a broad stimulus set (90 + frequencies) that spanned the limits of human pitch perception. Consistent with predictions, the magnitude of the FFR response varied systematically as a function of stimulus frequency between 16.35 and 880 Hz. In our dataset, FFR high points (local maxima) emerged at ∼44, 87, 208, and 415 Hz with FFR valleys (local minima) emerging ∼62, 110, 311, and 448 Hz. To investigate whether these amplitude fluctuations are the result of multiple neural generators with distinct latencies, we created a theoretical model of the FFR that included six putative generators. Based on the extant literature on the sources of the FFR, our model adopted latencies characteristic of the cochlear microphonic (0 ms), cochlear nucleus (∼1.25 ms), superior olive (∼3.7 ms), and inferior colliculus (∼5 ms). In addition, we included two longer latency putative generators (∼13 ms, and ∼25 ms) reflective of the characteristic latencies of primary and non-primary auditory

  16. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social…

  17. Lakatos Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Court, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Revisits and reviews Imre Lakatos' ideas on "Falsification and the Methodology of Scientific Research Programmes." Suggests that Lakatos' framework offers an insightful way of looking at the relationship between theory and research that is relevant not only for evaluating research programs in theoretical physics, but in the social…

  18. Laser Spectroscopy of the Fine-Structure Splitting in the 2 PJ 3 Levels of He 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X.; Sun, Y. R.; Chen, J.-J.; Jiang, W.; Pachucki, K.; Hu, S.-M.

    2017-02-01

    The fine-structure splitting in the 2 PJ 3 (J =0 , 1, 2) levels of He 4 is of great interest for tests of quantum electrodynamics and for the determination of the fine-structure constant α . The 2 P0 3 -2 P2 3 and 2 P1 3 -2 P2 3 intervals are measured by laser spectroscopy of the PJ 3 -2 S1 3 transitions at 1083 nm in an atomic beam, and are determined to be 31 908 130.98 ±0.13 kHz and 2 291 177.56 ±0.19 kHz , respectively. Compared with calculations, which include terms up to α5Ry , the deviation for the α -sensitive interval 2 P0 3 -2 P2 3 is only 0.22 kHz. It opens the window for further improvement of theoretical predictions and an independent determination of the fine-structure constant α with a precision of 2 ×10-9 .

  19. AMPLITUDE FINE STRUCTURE IN THE CEPHEID P-L RELATION. I. AMPLITUDE DISTRIBUTION ACROSS THE RR LYRAE INSTABILITY STRIP MAPPED USING THE ACCESSIBILITY RESTRICTION IMPOSED BY THE HORIZONTAL BRANCH

    SciTech Connect

    Sandage, Allan

    2010-10-10

    The largest amplitude light curves for both RR Lyrae (RRL) variables and classical Cepheids with periods less than 10 days and greater than 20 days occur at the blue edge of the respective instability strips. It is shown that the equation for the decrease in amplitude with penetration into the strip from the blue edge, and hence the amplitude fine structure within the strip, is the same for RRL and the Cepheids despite their metallicity differences. However, the manifestation of this identity is different between the two classes of variables because the sampling of the RRL strip is restricted by the discrete strip positions of the horizontal branch, a restriction that is absent for the Cepheids in stellar aggregates with a variety of ages. To show the similarity of the strip amplitude fine structure for RRL and Cepheids, we make a grid of lines of constant amplitude in the H-R diagram of the strip using amplitude data for classical Cepheids in the Galaxy, LMC, and SMC. The model implicit in the grid, that also contains lines of constant period, is used to predict the correlations between period, amplitude, and color for the two Oosterhoff RRL groups in globular clusters. The good agreement of the predictions with the observations using the classical Cepheid amplitude fine structure also for the RRL shows one aspect of the unity of the pulsation processes between the two classes of variables.

  20. Perception of Interaural Phase Differences With Envelope and Fine Structure Coding Strategies in Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Susan; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect a target signal masked by noise is improved in normal-hearing listeners when interaural phase differences (IPDs) between the ear signals exist either in the masker or in the signal. To improve binaural hearing in bilaterally implanted cochlear implant (BiCI) users, a coding strategy providing the best possible access to IPD is highly desirable. In this study, we compared two coding strategies in BiCI users provided with CI systems from MED-EL (Innsbruck, Austria). The CI systems were bilaterally programmed either with the fine structure processing strategy FS4 or with the constant rate strategy high definition continuous interleaved sampling (HDCIS). Familiarization periods between 6 and 12 weeks were considered. The effect of IPD was measured in two types of experiments: (a) IPD detection thresholds with tonal signals addressing mainly one apical interaural electrode pair and (b) with speech in noise in terms of binaural speech intelligibility level differences (BILD) addressing multiple electrodes bilaterally. The results in (a) showed improved IPD detection thresholds with FS4 compared with HDCIS in four out of the seven BiCI users. In contrast, 12 BiCI users in (b) showed similar BILD with FS4 (0.6 ± 1.9 dB) and HDCIS (0.5 ± 2.0 dB). However, no correlation between results in (a) and (b) both obtained with FS4 was found. In conclusion, the degree of IPD sensitivity determined on an apical interaural electrode pair was not an indicator for BILD based on bilateral multielectrode stimulation. PMID:27659487

  1. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of quasi-isentropically compressed vanadium targets on the OMEGA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Remington, B. A.; Allen, P. G.; Pollaine, S. M.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Lorenz, K. T.; Hawreliak, J. A.

    2008-06-15

    The use of in situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for characterizing nanosecond laser-shocked vanadium, titanium, and iron has recently been demonstrated. These measurements are extended to laser-driven, quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE). The radiation source (backlighter) for EXAFS in all of these experiments is obtained by imploding a spherical target on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)]. Isentropic compression (where the entropy is kept constant) enables to reach high compressions at relatively low temperatures. The absorption spectra are used to determine the temperature and compression in a vanadium sample quasi-isentropically compressed to pressures of up to {approx}0.75 Mbar. The ability to measure the temperature and compression directly is unique to EXAFS. The drive pressure is calibrated by substituting aluminum for the vanadium and interferometrically measuring the velocity of the back target surface by the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). The experimental results obtained by EXAFS and VISAR agree with each other and with the simulations of a hydrodynamic code. The role of a shield to protect the sample from impact heating is studied. It is shown that the shield produces an initial weak shock that is followed by a quasi-isentropic compression at a relatively low temperature. The role of radiation heating from the imploding target as well as from the laser-absorption region is studied. The results show that in laser-driven ICE, as compared with laser-driven shocks, comparable compressions can be achieved at lower temperatures. The EXAFS results show important details not seen in the VISAR results.

  2. Time dependent density functional theory study of the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of benzene in gas phase and on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Asmuruf, Frans A; Besley, Nicholas A

    2008-08-14

    The near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of benzene in the gas phase and adsorbed on the Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces is studied with time dependent density functional theory. Excitation energies computed with hybrid exchange-correlation functionals are too low compared to experiment. However, after applying a constant shift the spectra are in good agreement with experiment. For benzene on the Au(111) surface, two bands arising from excitation to the e(2u)(pi(*)) and b(2g)(pi(*)) orbitals of benzene are observed for photon incidence parallel to the surface. On Pt(111) surface, a broader band arises from excitation to benzene orbitals that are mixed with the surface and have both sigma(*)(Pt-C) and pi(*) characters.

  3. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.R.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has led to a significant increase in activity in many areas of science dealing with the interaction of x-rays with matter. Synchrotron radiation provides intense, linearly polarized, naturally collimated, continuously tunable photon beams, which are used to determine not only the elemental composition of a complex, polyatomic, dilute material but also the chemical form of the elements with improved accuracy. Examples of the application of synchrotron radiation include experiments in synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. New synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobes for elemental analysis in the parts per billion range are under construction at several laboratories. 76 references, 24 figures.

  4. Glucose and Fluoxetine Induce Fine Structural Change in Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Minoo; Daneshi-Mehr, Fatemeh; Tadayon, Roya; Hoseinzade Salavati, Behrooz; Akbar Zadeh-Baghban, Ali-Reza; Zamanian, Abbas; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin has been used as a model protein for protein folding and ligand binding studies over many decades. Due to its long life period and high concentration in plasma, HSA is highly sensitive to glycation. It is reported that 175 mg/dL glucose concentration is a threshold of kidney activity for the beginning of excretion of glucose. pH denaturation of HSA in absence and presence of different concentrations of glucose is studied and based on the Pace two-state model, the findings are analyzed. In addition, florescence emission data of albumin range in the period of 300-500 nm was depicted. The amounts of free energy change and [D]1/2 parameters of unfolding in correspond to florescence date indicate that glucose induces fine structural change in human serum albumin. Results showed that 175 mg/dL glucose concentration is a critical point for albumin structural and functional alteration. PMID:24250587

  5. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pysmenetska, I.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    The isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al has been investigated with high-energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at Ep=200 MeV and at scattering angles close to the maximum of Δ L =2 angular distributions with the K600 magnetic spectrometer of iThemba LABS, South Africa. Characteristic scales are extracted from the observed fine structure with a wavelet analysis and compared for 28Si with random-phase approximation and second random phase approximation calculations with an interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential by a unitary transformation. A recent extension of the method to deformed nuclei provides the best description of the data, suggesting the significance of Landau damping.

  6. Automated fine structure image analysis method for discrimination of diabetic retinopathy stage using conjunctival microvasculature images

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maziyar M; O’Neill, William; Penn, Richard; Chau, Felix; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The conjunctiva is a densely vascularized mucus membrane covering the sclera of the eye with a unique advantage of accessibility for direct visualization and non-invasive imaging. The purpose of this study is to apply an automated quantitative method for discrimination of different stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR) using conjunctival microvasculature images. Fine structural analysis of conjunctival microvasculature images was performed by ordinary least square regression and Fisher linear discriminant analysis. Conjunctival images between groups of non-diabetic and diabetic subjects at different stages of DR were discriminated. The automated method’s discriminate rates were higher than those determined by human observers. The method allowed sensitive and rapid discrimination by assessment of conjunctival microvasculature images and can be potentially useful for DR screening and monitoring. PMID:27446692

  7. Bright-Exciton Fine-Structure Splittings in Single Perovskite Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chunyang; Chen, Liyang; Song, Nan; Lv, Yan; Hu, Fengrui; Sun, Chun; Yu, William W.; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Yu; Xiao, Min

    2017-07-01

    Here we show that, in single perovskite CsPbI3 nanocrystals synthesized from a colloidal approach, a bright-exciton fine-structure splitting as large as hundreds of μ eV can be resolved with two orthogonally and linearly polarized photoluminescence peaks. This doublet could switch to a single peak when a single CsPbI3 nanocrystal is photocharged to eliminate the electron-hole exchange interaction. The above findings have prepared an efficient platform suitable for probing exciton and spin dynamics of semiconductor nanostructures at the visible-wavelength range, from which a variety of practical applications such as in entangled photon-pair source and quantum information processing can be envisioned.

  8. Novel angular encoder for a quick-extended x-ray absorption fine structure monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Stoetzel, J.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.; Fonda, E.; De Oliveira, N.; Briois, V.

    2008-08-15

    New concepts for time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy using the quick-extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) method are presented. QEXAFS is a powerful tool to gain structural information about, e.g., fast chemical reactions or phase transitions on a subsecond scale. This can be achieved with a monochromator design that employs a channel-cut crystal on a cam driven tilt table for rapid angular oscillations of the Bragg angle. A new angular encoder system and a new data acquisition were described and characterized that were applied to a QEXAFS monochromator to get spectra with a directly measured accurate energy scale. New electronics were designed to allow a fast acquisition of the Bragg angle values and the absorption data during the measurements simultaneously.

  9. A review of fine structures of nanoporous materials as evidenced by microscopic methods.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Fujita, Nobuhisa; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Han, Lu; Stevens, Sam M; Suga, Mitsuo; Asahina, Shunsuke; Slater, Ben; Xiao, Changhong; Sakamoto, Yasuhiro; Anderson, Michael W; Ryoo, Ryong; Terasaki, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    This paper reviews diverse capabilities offered by modern electron microscopy techniques in studying fine structures of nanoporous crystals such as zeolites, silica mesoporous crystals, metal organic frameworks and yolk-shell materials. For the case of silica mesoporous crystals, new approaches that have been developed recently to determine the three-dimensionally periodic average structure, e.g., through self-consistent analysis of electron microscope images or through consideration of accidental extinctions, are presented. Various structural deviations in nanoporous materials from their average structures including intergrowth, surface termination, incommensurate modulation, quasicrystal and defects are demonstrated. Ibidem observations of the scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope give information about the zeolite-crystal-growth mechanism, and an energy for unstitching a building-unit from a crystal surface is directly observed by an anatomic force microscope. It is argued how these observations lead to a deeper understanding of the materials.

  10. Confocal imaging reveals three-dimensional fine structure difference between ventral and dorsal nerve roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuxiang; Sui, Tao; Cao, Xiaojian; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun; Sun, Peng

    2011-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair is one of the most challenging problems in neurosurgery, partially due to lack of knowledge of three-dimensional (3-D) fine structure and organization of peripheral nerves. In this paper, we explored the structures of nerve fibers in ventral and dorsal nerves with a laser scanning confocal microscopy. Thick tissue staining results suggested that nerve fibers have a different 3-D structure in ventral and dorsal nerves, and reconstruction from serial sectioning images showed that in ventral nerves the nerve fibers travel in a winding form, while in dorsal nerves, the nerve fibers form in a parallel cable pattern. These structural differences could help surgeons to differentiate ventral and dorsal nerves in peripheral nerve injury repair, and also facilitate scientists to get a deeper understanding about nerve fiber organization.

  11. The coefficient of bond thermal expansion measured by extended x-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R

    2014-10-28

    The bond thermal expansion is in principle different from the lattice expansion and can be measured by correlation sensitive probes such as extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and diffuse scattering. The temperature dependence of the coefficient α(bond)(T) of bond thermal expansion has been obtained from EXAFS for CdTe and for Cu. A coefficient α(tens)(T) of negative expansion due to tension effects has been calculated from the comparison of bond and lattice expansions. Negative lattice expansion is present in temperature intervals where α(bond) prevails over α(tens); this real-space approach is complementary but not equivalent to the Grüneisen theory. The relevance of taking into account the asymmetry of the nearest-neighbours distribution of distances in order to get reliable bond expansion values and the physical meaning of the third cumulant are thoroughly discussed.

  12. Confocal imaging reveals three-dimensional fine structure difference between ventral and dorsal nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxiang; Sui, Tao; Cao, Xiaojian; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun; Sun, Peng

    2011-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injury repair is one of the most challenging problems in neurosurgery, partially due to lack of knowledge of three-dimensional (3-D) fine structure and organization of peripheral nerves. In this paper, we explored the structures of nerve fibers in ventral and dorsal nerves with a laser scanning confocal microscopy. Thick tissue staining results suggested that nerve fibers have a different 3-D structure in ventral and dorsal nerves, and reconstruction from serial sectioning images showed that in ventral nerves the nerve fibers travel in a winding form, while in dorsal nerves, the nerve fibers form in a parallel cable pattern. These structural differences could help surgeons to differentiate ventral and dorsal nerves in peripheral nerve injury repair, and also facilitate scientists to get a deeper understanding about nerve fiber organization.

  13. A simulation for gravity fine structure recovery from low-low GRAVSAT SST data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Lancaster, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Covariance error analysis techniques were applied to investigate estimation strategies for the low-low SST mission for accurate local recovery of gravitational fine structure, considering the aliasing effects of unsolved for parameters. A 5 degree by 5 degree surface density block representation of the high order geopotential was utilized with the drag-free low-low GRAVSAT configuration in a circular polar orbit at 250 km altitude. Recovery of local sets of density blocks from long data arcs was found not to be feasible due to strong aliasing effects. The error analysis for the recovery of local sets of density blocks using independent short data arcs demonstrated that the estimation strategy of simultaneously estimating a local set of blocks covered by data and two "buffer layers" of blocks not covered by data greatly reduced aliasing errors.

  14. The fine structure of pulmonary contusion and the effect of various drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J. R.; Eckert, P.; Földi-Börcsök, E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of contusion were examined by electron and light microscopy in the lungs of rats. It was found that the results here were very similar to those elsewhere in the body, with a few minor modifications due to the unique structure of the lung. Densitometry of protein concentration and visual estimation of oedema were used to quantitate the effects on the injury. The benzo-pyrone drug Venalot had a considerable effect in reducing the protein concentration in the air spaces and the interstitial tissue, and of the oedema in the latter. Neither the proteinase inhibitor Trasylol nor the pectin-based plasma expander HAS had any significant effect on the fine structural alterations of pulmonary contusion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:1087159

  15. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF STALKED BACTERIA BELONGING TO THE FAMILY CAULOBACTERACEAE.

    PubMed

    STOVEPOINDEXTER, J L; COHEN-BAZIRE, G

    1964-12-01

    The fine structure of a series of stalked bacteria belonging to the genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis has been examined in thin sections. The cell wall has the multilayered structure typical of many Gram-negative bacteria, and continues without interruption throughout the length of the stalk. The core of the stalk, continuous with the cytoplasmic region of the cell, is enclosed in an extension of the cell membrane, and contains a system of internal membranes: it is devoid of ribosomes and nucleoplasm. A membranous organelle occupies the juncture of stalk and cell, separating the ribosomal region from the core of the stalk. Typical mesosomes also occur in the cell, being particularly frequent at the plane of division. The secreted holdfast is located at the tip of the stalk in Caulobacter, and at the pole of the cell adjacent to the stalk in Asticcacaulis.

  16. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section is developed and used for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the domain nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field within the material. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  17. The tardigrade cuticle. I. Fine structure and the distribution of lipids.

    PubMed

    Wright, J C

    1988-01-01

    Fine structure and lipid distribution are studied in cuticles of five tardigrade species using TEM and SEM. Double osmication using partitioning methods reveals a substantial lipid component in the intracuticle and in irregular granular regions within the procuticle. These results are substantiated by the loss of osmiophily following lipid extraction with chloroform and methanol. Other lipid components are revealed by osmication following unmasking of lipo-protein complexes with thymol. These occur in the outer epicuticle and in the trilaminar layer lying between the epi- and intracuticles. Anhydrous fixation of dehydrated tardigrades (tuns) reveals dense, superficial masses of osmiophilic material, apparently concentrated lumps of the surface mucopolysaccharide ('flocculent coat'). However, cryo-SEMs of tuns reveal similar dense aggregations which apparently exude from pores (not visible) and are removed by chloroform. These results suggest extruded lipids since the flocculent coat is unaffected by chloroform; likely functions of such lipids are discussed.

  18. Splittings, Satellites and Fine Structure in the Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J. G.; Yu, S. -W.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-06-14

    Perhaps the most demanding and powerful actinide spectroscopy is that using soft X-ray and VUV photons. Because of the relatively low energy and fairly small sampling depths of these photons and the corresponding electrons, it is necessary to use un-encapsulated samples with highly cleaned and well-prepared surfaces. This causes a myriad of sample containment problems for these radioactive materials. Despite these hindrances and difficulties, the soft-X-ray and ultra-violet spectroscopy of the actinides can provide an amazing level of detailed information, particularly having to do with 5f electronic structure. In this paper, the splittings, satellites and fine structure of the following actinide soft X-ray spectroscopies will be discussed: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; X-ray absorption spectroscopy; and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, including Bremstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy and resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Infrared fine-structure line diagnostics of shrouded active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The ultraluminous far-IR galaxies revealed by IRAS, quasar-like in luminosity but smothered in molecular gas, probably conceal either immense starbursts or luminous active nuclei. In both scenarios, these objects ought to produce copious infrared fine-structure emission with several lines comparable to H-beta in luminosity. We show how these lines, if detected, can be used to determine the electron densities and far-IR obscurations of shrouded photoionized regions and to constrain the shape and ionization parameter of the ionizing spectra. The presence of Ne v emission in particular will distinguish shrouded AGNs from shrouded starbursts. Since all active galaxies photoionize at least some surrounding material, these diagnostics can also be applied to active galaxies in general and will aid in studying how an active nucleus interacts with the interstellar medium of its host galaxy.

  20. Single shot near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mantouvalou, I. Witte, K.; Martyanov, W.; Jonas, A.; Grötzsch, D.; Kanngießer, B.; Streeck, C.; Löchel, H.; Rudolph, I.; Erko, A.; Stiel, H.

    2016-05-16

    With the help of adapted off-axis reflection zone plates, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at the C and N K-absorption edge have been recorded using a single 1.2 ns long soft X-ray pulse. The transmission experiments were performed with a laser-produced plasma source in the laboratory rendering time resolved measurements feasible independent on large scale facilities. A resolving power of E/ΔE ∼ 950 at the respective edges could be demonstrated. A comparison of single shot spectra with those collected with longer measuring time proves that all features of the used reference samples (silicon nitrate and polyimide) can be resolved in 1.2 ns. Hence, investigations of radiation sensitive biological specimen become possible due to the high efficiency of the optical elements enabling low dose experiments.

  1. Nearest-neighbour distribution of distances in crystals from extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornasini, P.; Grisenti, R.; Dapiaggi, M.; Agostini, G.; Miyanaga, T.

    2017-07-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is a powerful probe of the distribution of nearest-neighbour distances around selected atomic species. We consider here the effect of vibrational disorder in crystals. The potential of EXAFS for the accurate evaluation of the coefficient of bond thermal expansion and its temperature dependence is discussed, with the aim of stimulating and facilitating the comparison with the results from total scattering experiments. The meaning of the distribution asymmetry in crystals and its connection with the effective potential anharmonicity and the bond expansion is quantitatively explored by comparing the results for a number of different systems. The extent of the relative atomic vibrations perpendicular to the bond direction and the perpendicular to parallel anisotropy are correlated with the extent of lattice negative thermal expansion as well as with the ionic mobility in superionic crystals.

  2. Negative thermal expansion in CuCl: An extended x-ray absorption fine structure study

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccari, M.; Grisenti, R.; Fornasini, P.; Rocca, F.; Sanson, A.

    2007-05-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been measured from liquid helium to ambient temperature at the Cu K edge of copper chloride (CuCl) to investigate the local origin of negative thermal expansion. A quantitative analysis of the first coordination shell, performed by the cumulant method, reveals that the nearest-neighbor Cu-Cl interatomic distance undergoes a strong positive expansion, contrasting with the much weaker negative expansion of the crystallographic distance between average atomic positions below 100 K. The anisotropy of relative thermal vibrations, monitored by the ratio {gamma} between perpendicular and parallel mean square relative displacements, is considerably high, while the diffraction thermal factors are isotropic. The relative perpendicular vibrations measured by EXAFS are related to the tension mechanism and to the transverse acoustic modes, which are considered responsible for negative thermal expansion in zinc-blende structures.

  3. Nearest-neighbour distribution of distances in crystals from extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R; Dapiaggi, M; Agostini, G; Miyanaga, T

    2017-07-28

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is a powerful probe of the distribution of nearest-neighbour distances around selected atomic species. We consider here the effect of vibrational disorder in crystals. The potential of EXAFS for the accurate evaluation of the coefficient of bond thermal expansion and its temperature dependence is discussed, with the aim of stimulating and facilitating the comparison with the results from total scattering experiments. The meaning of the distribution asymmetry in crystals and its connection with the effective potential anharmonicity and the bond expansion is quantitatively explored by comparing the results for a number of different systems. The extent of the relative atomic vibrations perpendicular to the bond direction and the perpendicular to parallel anisotropy are correlated with the extent of lattice negative thermal expansion as well as with the ionic mobility in superionic crystals.

  4. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF STALKED BACTERIA BELONGING TO THE FAMILY CAULOBACTERACEAE

    PubMed Central

    Stove Poindexter, Jeanne L.; Cohen-Bazire, Germaine

    1964-01-01

    The fine structure of a series of stalked bacteria belonging to the genera Caulobacter and Asticcacaulis has been examined in thin sections. The cell wall has the multilayered structure typical of many Gram-negative bacteria, and continues without interruption throughout the length of the stalk. The core of the stalk, continuous with the cytoplasmic region of the cell, is enclosed in an extension of the cell membrane, and contains a system of internal membranes: it is devoid of ribosomes and nucleoplasm. A membranous organelle occupies the juncture of stalk and cell, separating the ribosomal region from the core of the stalk. Typical mesosomes also occur in the cell, being particularly frequent at the plane of division. The secreted holdfast is located at the tip of the stalk in Caulobacter, and at the pole of the cell adjacent to the stalk in Asticcacaulis. PMID:14245437

  5. Gravity field fine structure estimation techniques for a spaceborne gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.; Englar, T. S., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Use of standard estimation techniques to recover geopotential fine structure from gradiometer data requires the adjustment of small subsets of parameters while constraining others to their a priori values in order to minimize the computational load. Here, gravitational anomalies are selected as a parametrization of the gravity field which permits such an approach. Techniques coupled with numerical results for a spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission simulation are described which demonstrate that if a satellite is in a polar/circular orbit at an altitude of 160 km, 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies can be recovered to an accuracy of 0.4 mgal, where 1 mgal = 0.001 cm/sq s.

  6. Xe nanocrystals in Si studied by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, Giuseppe; Pennisi, Agata R.; Zontone, Federico

    2007-07-15

    The structural configuration of Xe clusters, obtained by ion implantation in a Si matrix, has been investigated as a function of the temperature by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. In contrast with previous results, we demonstrate that an accurate analysis of the data, using high order cumulants, gives evidence of Xe fcc nanocrystals at low temperature, even in the as-implanted Si; expansion of the Xe lattice is always found as a function of the temperature, with no appreciable overpressure. We point out that a dramatic modification of these conclusions can be induced by an incorrect analysis using standard symmetrical pair distribution function G(r); for this reason, all the results were checked by x-ray diffraction measurements.

  7. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  8. Fine structure of the dogfish egg case: a unique collagenous material.

    PubMed

    Knight, D P; Hunt, S

    1976-01-01

    The fine structure of the dogfish egg case is described with special reference to the highly ordered, unique, collagen-containing fibrils. The outer layer of the case wall contains densely packed, amorphous granules, rich in tyrosine while approximately 98% of the thickness of the case is built up from orthogonally stacked laminae of closely packed, collagen-containing fibrils. These fibrils show a paracrystalline three-dimensional construction. A model for the structure of the B band of the fibril is proposed, based on appearances in transverse sections of different thickness and on two projection seen in longitudinal sections. The transverse projection of the unit cell appears to be a square lattice with sides approximately 110 A possibly containing a pseudocell with sides (see article). The structure of these fibrils is discussed in relation to those of rat tail tendon collagen.

  9. On the fine structure of sunspot penumbrae. III. The vertical extension of penumbral filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero, J. M.; Solanki, S. K.; Lagg, A.; Socas-Navarro, H.; Lites, B.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper we study the fine structure of the penumbra as inferred from the uncombed model (flux tube embedded in a magnetic surrounding) when applied to penumbral spectropolarimetric data from the neutral iron lines at 6300 Å. The inversion infers very similar radial dependences in the physical quantities (LOS velocity, magnetic field strength etc.) as those obtained from the inversion of the Fe I 1.56 μm lines. In addition, the large Stokes V area asymmetry exhibited by the visible lines helps to constrain the size of the penumbral flux tubes. As we demonstrate here, the uncombed model is able to reproduce the area asymmetry with striking accuracy, returning flux tubes as thick as 100-300 kilometers in the vertical direction, in good agreement with previous investigations.

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structural studies of copper and nickel ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malviya, P. K.; Sharma, P.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Bhalse, D.

    2014-09-01

    The Cu-Ni ferrites with general formula Cu1-xNix Fe2O4 (where x=0.0, 0.05, 0.10, 0. 15, 0.20) were prepared by solid state root method. X-ray, K- absorption fine structural measurements were carried out. EXAFS spectra have been recorded at the K-edge of Fe using the dispersive EXAFS (DEXAFS) beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source RRCAT, Indore, India. The EXAFS data have been analysed using the computer software Athena. These have been used to determine the bond lengths in these ferrites with the help of four different methods, namely, Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods.

  11. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  12. Engineering quantum dots for electrical control of the fine structure splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, M. A.; Bennett, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied the variation in fine-structure splitting (FSS) under application of vertical electric field in a range of quantum dots grown by different methods. In each sample, we confirm that this energy splitting changes linearly over the field range we can access. We conclude that this linear tuning is a general feature of self-assembled quantum dots, observed under different growth conditions, emission wavelengths, and in different material systems. Statistical measurements of characteristic parameters such as emission energy, Stark shift, and FSS tuning are presented which may provide a guide for future attempts to increase the yield of quantum dots that can be tuned to a minimal value of FSS with vertical electric field.

  13. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  14. The role of temporal fine structure in harmonic segregation through mistuning.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Glasberg, Brian R

    2010-01-01

    Bernstein and Oxenham [(2008). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, 1653-1667] measured thresholds for discriminating the fundamental frequency, F0, of a complex tone that was passed through a fixed bandpass filter. They found that performance worsened when the F0 was decreased so that only harmonics above the tenth were audible. However, performance in this case was improved by mistuning the odd harmonics by 3%. Bernstein and Oxenham considered whether the results could be explained in terms of temporal fine structure information available at the output of a single auditory filter and concluded that their results did not appear to be consistent with such an explanation. Here, it is argued that such cues could have led to the improvement in performance produced by mistuning the odd harmonics.

  15. Impact of heavy hole-light hole coupling on the exciton fine structure in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitsishvili, E.

    2017-03-01

    We present analytical results which describe the properties of the exciton ground state in a single semiconductor quantum dot (QD). Calculations are performed within the Luttinger-Kohn and Bir-Pikus Hamiltonian theory. We show in an explicit form that an interplay of the exchange interaction and the heavy hole-light hole coupling, which is due to the in-plane asymmetries of the dot shape and the strain distribution, plays an essential role. For both the bright and dark exciton, this combined effect leads to a dependence of the fine structure splitting and polarizations on the main anisotropy axis direction relative to the dot orientation. Basing on the obtained analytical expressions, we discuss some special cases in details.

  16. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of MDI and TDI polyurethane polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Urquhart, S.G.; Smith, A.P.; Ade, H.W.; Hitchcock, A.P.; Rightor, E.G.; Lidy, W.

    1999-06-03

    The sensitivity of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) to differences in key chemical components of polyurethane polymers is presented. Carbon is NEXAFS spectra of polyurethane polymers made from 4,4{prime}-methylene di-p-phenylene isocyanate (MDI) and toluene diisocyanate (TDI) isocyanate monomers illustrate that there is an unambiguous spectroscopic fingerprint for distinguishing between MDI-based and TDI-based polyurethane polymers. NEXAFS spectra of MDI and TDI polyurea and polyurethane models show that the urea and carbamate (urethane) linkages in these polymers can be distinguished. The NEXAFS spectroscopy of the polyether component of these polymers is discussed, and the differences between the spectra of MDI and TDI polyurethanes synthesized with polyether polyols of different molecular composition and different molecular weight are presented. These polymer spectra reported herein provide appropriate model spectra to represent the pure components for quantitative microanalysis.

  17. Hemicellulose fine structure is affected differently during ripening of tomato lines with contrasted texture.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Marc; Quemener, Bernard; Causse, Mathilde; Seymour, Graham B

    2012-11-01

    The impact of genetic and fruit ripening on hemicelluloses fine structure was studied in twelve near isogenic lines of tomato fruits harboring firmness QTL. The sugar composition and the MALDI-TOF MS oligosaccharides profile after glucanase hydrolysis of the cell walls were determined from all green and red fruits pericarp tissue. MS profiles showed two major series of oligomers attributed to xyloglucan (XG) and glucomannan (GM) with minor peaks for xylan and ions attributed to galacto-oligomers. The oligosaccharides MS intensity varied significantly with the fruit genetic and ripening status. Correlations between MS intensity indicated structural regulations of both XG and GM structures with genetics and ripening. These results point to a region on the tomato chromosome 9 controlling cell wall galactose metabolism.

  18. Systematics of fine structure in the α decay of deformed odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhongzhou; Ni, Dongdong

    2014-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the a-decay fine structure in 32 deformed odd-mass nuclei from Z = 93 to Z = 102. The α-decay half-lives are systematically calculated within the multichannel cluster model (MCCM), which turns out to well reproduce the experimental data and show the neutron deformed shell structure. The branching ratios for various daughter states are investigated in the MCCM and in the WKB barrier penetration approach, respectively. It is found that the MCCM results agree well with the experimental data, while the WKB results have relatively large deviations from the experimental data for the α transitions to the high-lying members of the rotational band.

  19. Half-lives and fine structure for the α decay of deformed even-even nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, DongDong; Ren, ZhongZhou

    2011-08-01

    The α-decay properties of well-deformed even-even nuclei are systematically calculated within the multichannel cluster model (MCCM). Instead of working in the WKB framework, the quasibound solution to the coupled Schrödinger equation is presented with outgoing wave boundary conditions, and the coupling potential is taken into full account in terms of the general quantum theories. The calculated α-decay half-lives are found to agree well with the experimental data with a mean factor of less than 2. The fine structure observed in α decay is also well reproduced by the four-channel microscopic calculation. Very strikingly, the MCCM can give relatively precise descriptions of the branching ratio to excited 4+ states, which is often overestimated in the usual WKB calculations. We expect it to be a significant development of theoretical models toward quantitative descriptions of α transitions to high-spin daughter states.

  20. Theoretical description of fine structure in the α decay of heavy odd-odd nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2013-02-01

    The newly developed multichannel cluster model (MCCM), based on the coupled-channel Schrödinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions, is extended to study the α-decay fine structure in heavy odd-odd nuclei. Calculations are performed for the α transitions to favored rotational bands where the unpaired nucleons remain unchanged. The simple WKB barrier penetration formula is also used to evaluate the branching ratios for various daughter states. It is found that the WKB formula seems to overestimate the branching ratios for the second and third members of the favored rotational band, while the MCCM gives a precise description of them without any adjustable parameters. Moreover, the experimental total α-decay half-lives are well reproduced within the MCCM.

  1. Local structure studies of some cobalt (II) complexes using extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Ninama, Samrath; Trivedi, Apurva

    2014-09-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis of Cobalt (II) complex as a ligand of 2 -methyl-3-[(bis-aniline(R) phenyl]-3H-l,5 benzodiazepine for finding local structure using conventional method .The Co(II) complexes were prepared by chemical root method. The EXAFS spectra were recorded at Cobalt K-edge i.e.; 7709 eV using Dispersive EXFAS beam line at 2.5GeV Indus-2 Synchrotron Radiation Source(SRS) at RRCAT, Indore, India. The recorded EXAFS data were analysed using the computer software Athena for determine the nearest neighbouring distances (bond lengths) of these complexes with conventional methods and it compared with Fourier transform(FT) analysis. The Fourier Transform convert EXAFS data signal into r-space or k-space. This is useful for visualizing the major contributions to the EXAFS spectrum.

  2. Fine structure of all-particle energy spectrum in the knee region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garyaka, A.; Martirosov, R.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Babayan, H.; Erlykin, A.; Gallant, Y.; Jones, L.; Kempa, J.; Nikolskaya, N.; Pattison, B.; Procureur, J.; Sokhoyan, S.; Vardanyan, H.

    2013-02-01

    All-particle energy spectrum in the knee region obtained from extensive air shower (EAS) measurements (GAMMA experiment, 700 g/cm2, Armenia) is presented. Energies of primary particles in the range of 106-108 GeV were evaluated on the basis of observed shower parameters Nch,Nμ, s, θ and corresponding parameterisation of CORSIKA simulated database for SIBYLL interaction model. All shower detection and reconstruction uncertainties were included in the simulated showers for four kinds (H, He, O, Fe) of primary nuclei. The reliability of observed all-particle energy spectrum is investigated from viewpoint of methodical errors and statistical fluctuations. Observed fine structure of all-particle energy spectrum can be interpreted by the rigidity-dependent steepening Galactic diffuse nuclei flux and an additional iron component in the region of 70-80 PeV primary energies most likely originated from nearby pulsars.

  3. Fine structure of spermatozoa in the common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus Linnaeus, 1758) (Perciformes, Sparidae).

    PubMed

    Maricchiolo, G; Genovese, L; Laurà, R; Micale, V; Muglia, U

    2004-10-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to investigate the fine structure of the sperm of the Sparid fish Pagellus erythrinus L. The spermatozoon of pandora has a spherical head lacking an acrosome, a cone-shaped midpiece and a long tail. The midpiece houses a single mitochondrion. The centriolar complex lies inside the nuclear fossa and is composed of a proximal and a distal centriole which are arranged at right angles to each other. The flagellum is inserted medio-laterally into the head, contains the conventional 9+2 axoneme and possesses one pair of lateral fins. On the basis of its ultrastructural organization, the pandora sperm can be regarded as an evolved form of the primitive spermatozoon found in Teleosts. According to the morphological classification proposed by Mattei (1970), the sperm of pandora belongs to a "type I" designation, like that of the other Sparid fish.

  4. Fine structure in RF spectra of lightning return stroke wave forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1988-01-01

    The power spectra of the wide-band (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic-field signals for a number of lightning return strokes measured during a thunderstorm which occurred in Lindau in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data are obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. Each return stroke data stream is passed through an adaptive filter designed to whiten its spectrum. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks in the spectra of many of the waveforms. A peak at f of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the power spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  5. `Fingerprint' Fine Structure in the Solar Decametric Radio Spectrum Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E. Y.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    We study a unique fine structure in the dynamic spectrum of the solar radio emission discovered by the UTR-2 radio telescope (Kharkiv, Ukraine) in the frequency band of 20 - 30 MHz. The structure was observed against the background of a broadband type IV radio burst and consisted of parallel drifting narrow bands of enhanced emission and absorption on the background emission. The observed structure differs from the widely known zebra pattern at meter and decimeter wavelengths by the opposite directions of the frequency drift within a single stripe at a given time. We show that the observed properties can be understood in the framework of the radiation mechanism by virtue of the double plasma resonance effect in a nonuniform coronal magnetic trap. We propose a source model providing the observed frequency drift of the stripes.

  6. Fine structural changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus of aging rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Miquel, J.

    1974-01-01

    The fine structure of the lateral vestibular nucleus was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, that were sacrified at 4 weeks, 6-8 weeks, 6-8 months, and 18-20 months of age. In the neuronal perikaria, the following age-associated changes were seen with increasing frequency with advancing age: rodlike nuclear inclusions and nuclear membrane invaginations; cytoplasmic dense bodies with the characteristics of lipofuscin; and moderate disorganization of the granular endoplasmic reticulum. Dense bodies were also seen in glial cells. Rats 18 to 20 months old showed dendritic swellings, axonal degeneration, and an apparent increase in the number of axosomatic synaptic terminals containing flattened vesicles (presumed to be inhibitory in function).

  7. Observation of fine structures in laser-driven electron beams using coherent transition radiation.

    PubMed

    Glinec, Y; Faure, J; Norlin, A; Pukhov, A; Malka, V

    2007-05-11

    We have measured the coherent optical transition radiation emitted by an electron beam from laser-plasma interaction. The measurement of the spectrum of the radiation reveals fine structures of the electron beam in the range 400-1000 nm. These structures are reproduced using an electron distribution from a 3D particle-in-cell simulation and are attributed to microbunching of the electron bunch due to its interaction with the laser field. When the radiator is placed closer to the interaction point, spectral oscillations have also been recorded, signature of the interference of the radiation produced by two electron bunches delayed by 74 fs. The second electron bunch duration is shown to be ultrashort to match the intensity level of the radiation. Whereas transition radiation was used at longer wavelengths in order to estimate the electron bunch length, this study focuses on the ultrashort structures of the electron beam.

  8. Comparison of Fine Structures of Electron Cyclotron Harmonic Emissions in Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labelle, J. W.; Dundek, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries of emissions at four and five times the electron cyclotron frequency in aurora occuring under daylit conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-4 and 2014-5. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events revealed that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches the cyclotron harmonic, which for higher harmonics requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously showed that only rarely, about ten percent of the time, are the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions in exact integer ratio (e.g., 3:2, 4:3, or 5:4 depending on which combination of harmonics is observed). In the remaining approximately ninety percent of the cases, the higher harmonic occurred at a lower ratio than the appropriate integer ratio, as expected if the harmonics are generated independently at their separate matching conditions in the bottomside ionosphere, where the upper hybrid frequency increases with altitude while the gyroharmonics decrease with altitude. (The bottomside is the most likely source of the emissions, since from there the mode converted Z-modes have access to ground-level.) Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at locations where the upper hybrid frequency matches each harmonic, i.e., at a separate source altitude for each harmonic. Generation of higher harmonics through coalescence of lower harmonic waves explains at most a small minority of events.

  9. Speech perception problems of the hearing impaired reflect inability to use temporal fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Christian; Gilbert, Gaëtan; Carn, Héloïse; Garnier, Stéphane; Moore, Brian C. J.

    2006-01-01

    People with sensorineural hearing loss have difficulty understanding speech, especially when background sounds are present. A reduction in the ability to resolve the frequency components of complex sounds is one factor contributing to this difficulty. Here, we show that a reduced ability to process the temporal fine structure of sounds plays an important role. Speech sounds were processed by filtering them into 16 adjacent frequency bands. The signal in each band was processed by using the Hilbert transform so as to preserve either the envelope (E, the relatively slow variations in amplitude over time) or the temporal fine structure (TFS, the rapid oscillations with rate close to the center frequency of the band). The band signals were then recombined and the stimuli were presented to subjects for identification. After training, normal-hearing subjects scored perfectly with unprocessed speech, and were ≈90% correct with E and TFS speech. Both young and elderly subjects with moderate flat hearing loss performed almost as well as normal with unprocessed and E speech but performed very poorly with TFS speech, indicating a greatly reduced ability to use TFS. For the younger hearing-impaired group, TFS scores were highly correlated with the ability to take advantage of temporal dips in a background noise when identifying unprocessed speech. The results suggest that the ability to use TFS may be critical for “listening in the background dips.” TFS stimuli may be useful in evaluating impaired hearing and in guiding the design of hearing aids and cochlear implants. PMID:17116863

  10. Fine structure of Tibetan kefir grains and their yeast distribution, diversity, and shift.

    PubMed

    Lu, Man; Wang, Xingxing; Sun, Guowei; Qin, Bing; Xiao, Jinzhou; Yan, Shuling; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan kefir grains (TKGs), a kind of natural starter for fermented milk in Tibet, China, host various microorganisms of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and occasionally acetic acid bacteria in a polysaccharide/protein matrix. In the present study, the fine structure of TKGs was studied to shed light on this unusual symbiosis with stereomicroscopy and thin sections. The results reveal that TKGs consist of numerous small grain units, which are characterized by a hollow globular structure with a diameter between 2.0 and 9.0 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 200 µm. A polyhedron-like net structure, formed mainly by the bacteria, was observed in the wall of the grain units, which has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Towards the inside of the grain unit, the polyhedron-like net structures became gradually larger in diameter and fewer in number. Such fine structures may play a crucial role in the stability of the grains. Subsequently, the distribution, diversity, and shift of yeasts in TKGs were investigated based on thin section, scanning electron microscopy, cloning and sequencing of D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene, real-time quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization with specific fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These show that (i) yeasts appear to localize on the outer surface of the grains and grow normally together to form colonies embedded in the bacterial community; (ii) the diversity of yeasts is relatively low on genus level with three dominant species--Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica; (iii) S. cerevisiae is the stable predominant yeast species, while the composition of Kluyveromyces and Yarrowia are subject to change over time. Our results indicate that TKGs are relatively stable in structure, and culture conditions to some extent shape the microbial community and interaction in kefir grains. These findings pave the way for further study of the specific symbiotic associations between S

  11. Fine-structure energy levels, radiative rates and lifetimes in Si-like nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. P.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2012-07-01

    Large scale CIV3 calculations of excitation energies from ground state as well as of oscillator strengths and radiative decay rates for all electric-dipole-allowed and intercombination transitions among the fine-structure levels of the terms belonging to the (1s22s22p6)3s23p2, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s23p3d, 3s23p4s, 3s23p4p, 3s23p4d and 3s23p4f configurations of Ni XV, are performed using very extensive configuration-interaction wave functions. The relativistic effects in intermediate coupling are incorporated by means of the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. In order to keep our calculated energy splittings as close as possible to the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) values, we have made small adjustments to the diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrices. Our calculated excitation energies, including their ordering, are in excellent agreement with the available NIST results. From our radiative decay rates we have also calculated radiative lifetimes of the fine-structure levels. It is noted that our calculated radiative rates show significant disagreement (23-30%) with those calculated by Ishikawa and Vilkas (2002 Phys. Scr. 65 219) for the transitions involving the 3s3p3(5S2) level. For this high spin level 3s3p3(5S2) our calculated lifetime is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental value of Träbert et al (1989 Z. Phys. D 11 207). In this calculation, we also predict many additional new and accurate data for various optically allowed and intercombination transitions to complete the void in the existing data.

  12. Hydrogenic Lamb shift in iron Fe{sup 25+} and fine-structure Lamb shift

    SciTech Connect

    Chantler, C. T.; Laming, J. M.; Dietrich, D. D.; Hallett, W. A.; McDonald, R.; Silver, J. D.

    2007-10-15

    1s-2p Lyman {alpha} transitions in hydrogenic iron Fe{sup 25+} have been observed from a beam-foil source in fourth-order diffraction off ADP 101 and PET 002 crystals, simultaneously with the n=2 to n=4 Balmer {beta} transitions diffracted in first order. Calibration of the local dispersion relation of the spectrometer using Balmer {beta} lines provides measurements of Lyman {alpha} wavelengths. The approach of fitting the full two-dimensional dispersion relation, including other members of Balmer and Lyman series, limits random and systematic correlation of parameters, and reveals a major systematic due to dynamical diffraction depth penetration into a curved crystal. The development of a theory of x-ray diffraction from mosaic crystals was necessary for the accurate interpretation of the experimental data. Photographic theory was also developed in the process of this research. Several systematics are discussed and quantified for the first time for these medium-Z QED comparisons. 2s-1s and 4f-2p satellites are explicitly investigated, and a dominant systematic is uncovered, which is due to the variable location of spectral emission downstream of the beam-foil target. 1s-2p{sub 3/2}, 1s-2p{sub 1/2} iron Lamb shifts are measured to be 35 376{+-}1900 cm{sup -1} and 35 953{+-}1800 cm{sup -1}. These agree with but lie higher than theory. This represents a 5.7% measurement of the hydrogenic 1s-2p{sub 1/2} Lamb shift in iron. The technique also reports the iron 2p{sub 3/2}-2p{sub 1/2} fine structure as 171 108 cm{sup -1}{+-}180 cm{sup -1}, which represents a 51% measurement of the hydrogenic iron fine-structure Lamb shift, and reports measurements of secondary lines.

  13. Spiky Fine Structure of Type III-like Radio Bursts in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Yan, Y. H.; Tan, C. M.; Chen, B.; Fu, Q. J.

    2010-03-01

    An uncommon fine structure in the radio spectrum consisting of bursts in absorption was observed with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radiospectrometer (SBRS) in the frequency range of 2.6 - 3.8 GHz during an X3.4/4B flare on 13 December 2006 in active region NOAA 10930 (S05W33). Usual fine structures in emission such as spikes, zebra stripes, and drifting fibers were observed at the peak of every new flare brightening. Within an hour at the decay phase of the event we observed bursts consisting of spikes in absorption, which pulsated periodically in frequency. Their instantaneous frequency bandwidths were found to be in the 75 MHz range. Moreover, in the strongest Type III-like bursts in absorption, the spikes showed stripes of the zebra-pattern (ZP) that drifted to higher frequencies. All spikes had the duration as short as down to the limit of the instrument resolution of ≈8 ms. The TRACE 195 Å images indicate that the magnetic reconnection at this moment occurred in the western edge of the flare loop arcade. Taking into account the presence of the reverse-drifting bursts in emission, in the course of the restoration of the magnetic structures in the corona, the acceleration of the beams of fast particles must have occurred both upward and downward at different heights. The upward beams will be captured by the magnetic trap, where the loss-cone distribution of fast particles (responsible for the emission of continuum and ZP) were formed. An additional injection of fast particles will fill the loss-cone later, breaking the loss-cone distribution. Therefore, the generation of continuum will be quenched at these moments, which was evidenced by the formation of bursts in absorption.

  14. Neutral hydrogen associated with shells and other fine structure in NGC 2865: A dynamically young elliptical?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiminovich, D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Van Der Hulst, J. M.; Malin, D. F.

    1995-01-01

    We report the discovery of neutral hydrogen in a second elliptical galaxy with shells, NGC 2865. Very Large Array (VLA) images reveal an association between the neutral hydrogen (H I) and the fine structure (shells, tails, and loops) in the galaxy. Similar to what we previously observed in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), most of the 6 x 10(exp 8)/h(exp 2) solar mass of cold gas is found in a broken ring in the outer regions of NGC 2865 (beyond 0.5D(sub 25)) and is displaced to the outside of the shells and loops. The measured velocities cover a range of 500 km/s around the systematic velocity. The velocity field of the outer H I has the same sense and magnitude (and line of nodes) as that of the stars in the elliptical body. Although NGC 2865 appears to be a relaxed elliptical galaxy, deep images, photometry, and spectroscopy suggest that the galaxy might be the recent (less than 7 Gyr) product of a major disk-disk merger -- a 'dynamically young elliptical.' Our H I data support this hypothesis. Nevertheless, the association between gas and stellar fine structure, with gas displaced outward from the stars in projected position, implies gas motions not predicted by any of the current merger scenarios. Using the H I ring and assuming nearly circular motion, we measure M/L(sub B) at large radii (4 x 0.5D(sub 25)). We find M/L(sub B) = 33 +/- 4 h, a factor of 5 greater than the value of M/L(sub B) found for the central regions, indicating the presence of a dark halo.

  15. Fine Structure of Solar Radio Bursts Observed at Decametric and Hectometric Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Fomichev, V. V.; Gorgutsa, R. V.

    2007-03-01

    The analysis of WIND/WAVES RAD2 spectra with fine structure in the form of different fibers in 14 events covering 1997 2005 is carried out. A splitting of broad bands of the interplanetary (IP) type II bursts into narrow band fibers of different duration is observed. The instantaneous-frequency bandwidth of fibers is stable: 200 300 kHz for slow-drifting fibers in type II bursts, and 700 1000 kHz for fast-drifting fibers in type II + IV (continuum). Intermediate drift bursts (IDB or fiber bursts) and zebra patterns with variable frequency drift of stripes, typical for the metric range, were not found. Comparison of spectra with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (SOHO/LASCO C2) images shows a connection of the generation of the fiber structures with the passage of shock fronts through narrow jets in the wake of Coronal Mass Ejections (CME). Therefore the most probable emission mechanism of fibers in IP type II bursts appears to be resonance transition radiation (RTR) of fast particles at the boundary of two media with different refractive indices. The same mechanism is also valid for striae in the type III bursts. Taking into account a high-density contrast in the CME wake and the actually observed small-scale inhomogeneities, the effectiveness of the RTR mechanism in IP space must be considerably higher than in the meter or decimeter wavelengths. For the most part the fibers in the type IV continuum at frequencies of 14 8 MHz were seen as the direct expansion of similar fine structure (as fibers or “herringbone” structure) in the decametric range observed with the Nançay and IZMIRAN spectrographs.

  16. Comparison of fine structures of electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBelle, J.; Dundek, M.

    2015-10-01

    Recent discoveries of higher harmonic cyclotron emissions in aurora occurring under daylight conditions motivated the modification of radio receivers at South Pole Station, Antarctica, to measure fine structure of such emissions during two consecutive austral summers, 2013-2014 and 2014-2015. The experiment recorded 347 emission events over 376 days of observation. The seasonal distribution of these events reveals that successively higher harmonics require higher solar zenith angles for occurrence, as expected if they are generated at the matching condition fuh = Nfce, which for higher N requires higher electron densities which are associated with higher solar zenith angles. This result implies that generation of higher harmonics from lower harmonics via wave-wave processes explains only a minority of events. Detailed examination of 21 cases in which two harmonics occur simultaneously shows that in almost all events the higher harmonic comes from higher altitudes, and only for a small fraction of events is it plausible that the frequencies of the fine structures of the emissions are correlated and in exact integer ratio. This observation puts an upper bound of 15-20% on the fraction of emissions which can be explained by wave-wave interactions involving Z mode waves at fce and, combined with consideration of source altitudes, puts an upper bound of 75% on the fraction explained by coalescence of Z mode waves at 2fce. Taken together, these results suggest that the dominant mechanism for the higher harmonics is independent generation at the matching points fuh = Nfce and that the wave-wave interaction mechanisms explain a relatively small fraction of events.

  17. [Spectrum characterization and fine structure of copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-lin; Zhang, Xin-yi; Zhong, Ju-hua; Zhu, Yi-hua; He, Bo; Wei, Shi-qiang

    2007-10-01

    Copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities were fabricated by chemistry method. Their spectrum characterization was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and their fine structure was analyzed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results show that there is interaction of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and TiO2 microcavities after TiO2 microcavities was doped with CuPc. For example, there is absorption at 900.76 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra, and the "red shift" of both OH vibration at 3392.75 cm(-1) and CH vibration at 2848.83 cm(-1). There exist definite peak shifts and intensity changes in infrared absorption in the C-C or C-N vibration in the planar phthalocyanine ring, the winding vibration of C-H inside and C-N outside plane of benzene ring. In Raman spectrum, there are 403.4, 592.1 and 679.1 cm(-1) characterized peaks of TiO2 in CuPc-doped TiO2 microcavities, but their wave-numbers show shifts to anatase TiO2. The vibration peaks at 1586.8 and 1525.6 cm(-1) show that there exists the composite material of CuPc and TiO2. These changes are related to the plane tropism of the molecule structure of copper phthalocyanine. XAFS showed tetrahedron TiO4 structure of Ti in TiO2 microcavities doped with copper phthalocyanine, and the changes of inner "medial distances" and the surface structure of TiO2 microcavities.

  18. On the Visibility of Prominence Fine Structures at Radio Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, P.; Berlicki, A.; Bárta, M.; Karlický, M.; Rudawy, P.

    2015-07-01

    Prominence temperatures have so far mainly been determined by analyzing spectral line shapes, which is difficult when the spectral lines are optically thick. The radio spectra in the millimeter range offer a unique possibility to measure the kinetic temperature. However, studies in the past used data with insufficient spatial resolution to resolve the prominence fine structures. The aim of this article is to predict the visibility of prominence fine structures in the submillimeter/millimeter (SMM) domain, to estimate their brightness temperatures at various wavelengths, and to demonstrate the feasibility and usefulness of future high-resolution radio observations of solar prominences with ALMA ( Atacama Large Millimeter-submillimeter Array). Our novel approach is the conversion of H coronagraphic images into microwave spectral images. We show that the spatial variations of the prominence brightness both in the H line and in the SMM domain predominantly depend on the line-of-sight emission measure of the cool plasma, which we derive from the integrated intensities of the observed H line. This relation also offers a new possibility to determine the SMM optical thickness from simultaneous H observations with high resolution. We also describe how we determine the prominence kinetic temperature from SMM spectral images. Finally, we apply the ALMA image-processing software Common Astronomy Software Applications (CASA) to our simulated images to assess what ALMA would detect at a resolution level that is similar to the coronagraphic H images used in this study. Our results can thus help in preparations of first ALMA prominence observations in the frame of science and technical verification tests.

  19. Fine structures of electron distribution functions in the electron diffusion region during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessho, N.; Shuster, J. R.; Chen, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    We study the origin and evolution of fine structures in electron distribution functions in the electron diffusion region (EDR) during anti-parallel magnetic reconnection. In the EDR, electron non-gyrotropic motion causes a variety of fine structures in electron distributions. Recently, Ng et al. 2011 and 2012 reported that striations in the electron distribution near the X-line are due to particle reflections. We have advanced the understanding of the formation mechanism of striations near the X-line by means of analytical analysis and particle tracing in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Based on an approximation that nonlinear terms are negligible in the EDR, we derive a formula for the separation of striations, and explain the triangular shape of the distribution. We also show that an electron distribution with striations in the horizontal (p_x) direction evolves within about 8 ion cyclotron oscillations into a fork-like structure exhibiting three branches in the vertical (p_y) direction. We show by theory and PIC simulation that the length of the EDR is proportional to p_s^2, where p_s is the separation of the outer branches. Away from the X-line toward the end of electron outflows, electron distribution functions show arcs, swirls, and rings. The arcs and swirls are caused by partial gyration of accelerated electrons around the normal magnetic field. Near the end of the EDR, rings are formed in electron distributions due to magnetization process of electrons. Predictions of various structures of the EDR electron distributions will enable identifications of EDR crossings at different locations based on satellite measurements.

  20. The Effect of X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure in Soft X-ray Astronomical Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan; Denby, Michael; Wells, Alan; Keay, Adam; Graessle, Dale E.; Blake, Richard L.

    1997-02-01

    Recent in-orbit measurements by high resolution soft X-ray telescopes have revealed low-level fine structure in target spectra that cannot be attributed to a celestial source. Ultimately, this can be traced to the ability of the new high spectral resolution silicon detectors to resolve X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) produced in the various detection subsystems. Based on measurements taken at the Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), we have modeled the full-up response function of the Joint European X-ray Telescope (JET-X), taking into account edge structure generated in the detectors, filters, and mirrors. It is found that unfolding celestial source spectra using a response function in which the detailed edge shapes are calculated from standard absorption cross sections leads to the generation of spectral artifacts at every absorption edge. These in turn produce unacceptably high values of χ2 in model fits for total source fluxes above ~4 × 104 counts. For JET-X, this corresponds to a source strength of ~0.4 millicrab observed for 105 s. Statistically significant ``linelike'' features are introduced into the derived source spectra with amplitudes as great as 10% of the source flux. For JET-X, these features rise above the 3 σ level for integral source exposures above ~5 × 104 source counts. The largest deviations in the residuals arise near 0.5 keV and 2.2 keV and are attributed to XAFS produced in the oxide surface layers of the CCD and the gold reflective surface of the mirrors, respectively. These results are significant for data interpretation tasks with the ASCA, JET-X, XMM, and Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) telescopes.

  1. Fine Structure of Tibetan Kefir Grains and Their Yeast Distribution, Diversity, and Shift

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Man; Wang, Xingxing; Sun, Guowei; Qin, Bing; Xiao, Jinzhou; Yan, Shuling; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan kefir grains (TKGs), a kind of natural starter for fermented milk in Tibet, China, host various microorganisms of lactic acid bacteria, yeasts, and occasionally acetic acid bacteria in a polysaccharide/protein matrix. In the present study, the fine structure of TKGs was studied to shed light on this unusual symbiosis with stereomicroscopy and thin sections. The results reveal that TKGs consist of numerous small grain units, which are characterized by a hollow globular structure with a diameter between 2.0 and 9.0 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 200 µm. A polyhedron-like net structure, formed mainly by the bacteria, was observed in the wall of the grain units, which has not been reported previously to our knowledge. Towards the inside of the grain unit, the polyhedron-like net structures became gradually larger in diameter and fewer in number. Such fine structures may play a crucial role in the stability of the grains. Subsequently, the distribution, diversity, and shift of yeasts in TKGs were investigated based on thin section, scanning electron microscopy, cloning and sequencing of D1/D2 of the 26S rRNA gene, real-time quantitative PCR, and in situ hybridization with specific fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probes. These show that (i) yeasts appear to localize on the outer surface of the grains and grow normally together to form colonies embedded in the bacterial community; (ii) the diversity of yeasts is relatively low on genus level with three dominant species – Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Yarrowia lipolytica; (iii) S. cerevisiae is the stable predominant yeast species, while the composition of Kluyveromyces and Yarrowia are subject to change over time. Our results indicate that TKGs are relatively stable in structure, and culture conditions to some extent shape the microbial community and interaction in kefir grains. These findings pave the way for further study of the specific symbiotic associations between S

  2. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H.; Li, Bo

    2014-07-20

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency f{sub p} to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both f{sub p} and 2 f{sub p} radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in f{sub p} than 2 f{sub p} emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 f{sub p} radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  3. FINE STRUCTURAL OBSERVATIONS RELATING TO THE PRODUCTION OF COLOR BY THE IRIDOPHORES OF A LIZARD, ANOLIS CAROLINENSIS

    PubMed Central

    Rohrlich, Susannah T.; Porter, Keith R.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the results of light and electron microscopy done on iridophores in the dorsal skin of the lizard Anolis carolinensis. New fine-structural details are revealed, and their importance is discussed. Of some interest is the complex of filaments between crystalline sheets in the cell. It is proposed that this complex is involved in the arrangement of crystals into crystalline sheets, and that the crystal arrangement and spacing are critical for the production of the cells' blue-green color. Tyndall scattering and thin-film interference are discussed as possible explanations for iridophore color production in relation to the fine-structural data obtained. PMID:5013601

  4. Fine Structure of the Gamow-Teller Resonance in {sup 90}Nb and Level Density of 1{sup +} States

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V.Yu.; Richter, A.; Shevchenko, A.; Wambach, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Berg, G.P.A.; Fujita, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Kamiya, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Fujita, H.; Smit, F.D.

    2006-01-13

    The fine structure of the Gamow-Teller resonance in a medium-heavy nucleus is observed for the first time in a high-resolution {sup 90}Zr({sup 3}He,t){sup 90}Nb experiment at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka. Using a novel wavelet analysis technique, it is possible to extract characteristic energy scales and to quantify their relative importance for the generation of the fine structure. This method combined with the selectivity of the reaction permits an extraction of the level density of 1{sup +} states in {sup 90}Nb.

  5. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  6. Planck intermediate results. XXIV. Constraints on variations in fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Uzan, J.-P.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-08-01

    Any variation in the fundamental physical constants, more particularly in the fine structure constant, α, or in the mass of the electron, me, affects the recombination history of the Universe and cause an imprint on the cosmic microwave background angular power spectra. We show that the Planck data allow one to improve the constraint on the time variation of the fine structure constant at redshift z ~ 103 by about a factor of 5 compared to WMAP data, as well as to break the degeneracy with the Hubble constant, H0. In addition to α, we can set a constraint on the variation in the mass of the electron, me, and in the simultaneous variation of the two constants. We examine in detail the degeneracies between fundamental constants and the cosmological parameters, in order to compare the limits obtained from Planck and WMAP and to determine the constraining power gained by including other cosmological probes. We conclude that independent time variations of the fine structure constant and of the mass of the electron are constrained by Planck to Δα/α = (3.6 ± 3.7) × 10-3 and Δme/me = (4 ± 11) × 10-3 at the 68% confidence level. We also investigate the possibility of a spatial variation of the fine structure constant. The relative amplitude of a dipolar spatial variation in α (corresponding to a gradient across our Hubble volume) is constrained to be δα/α = (-2.4 ± 3.7) × 10-2. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Role of Binaural Temporal Fine Structure and Envelope Cues in Cocktail-Party Listening.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Mason, Christine R; Streeter, Timothy M; Best, Virginia; Roverud, Elin; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-08-03

    While conversing in a crowded social setting, a listener is often required to follow a target speech signal amid multiple competing speech signals (the so-called "cocktail party" problem). In such situations, separation of the target speech signal in azimuth from the interfering masker signals can lead to an improvement in target intelligibility, an effect known as spatial release from masking (SRM). This study assessed the contributions of two stimulus properties that vary with separation of sound sources, binaural envelope (ENV) and temporal fine structure (TFS), to SRM in normal-hearing (NH) human listeners. Target speech was presented from the front and speech maskers were either colocated with or symmetrically separated from the target in azimuth. The target and maskers were presented either as natural speech or as "noise-vocoded" speech in which the intelligibility was conveyed only by the speech ENVs from several frequency bands; the speech TFS within each band was replaced with noise carriers. The experiments were designed to preserve the spatial cues in the speech ENVs while retaining/eliminating them from the TFS. This was achieved by using the same/different noise carriers in the two ears. A phenomenological auditory-nerve model was used to verify that the interaural correlations in TFS differed across conditions, whereas the ENVs retained a high degree of correlation, as intended. Overall, the results from this study revealed that binaural TFS cues, especially for frequency regions below 1500 Hz, are critical for achieving SRM in NH listeners. Potential implications for studying SRM in hearing-impaired listeners are discussed. Acoustic signals received by the auditory system pass first through an array of physiologically based band-pass filters. Conceptually, at the output of each filter, there are two principal forms of temporal information: slowly varying fluctuations in the envelope (ENV) and rapidly varying fluctuations in the temporal fine

  8. Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Wealthall, Rosamund J; Brooker, Lesley R; Macey, David J; Griffin, Brendan J

    2005-08-01

    The major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata are composite structures composed of three distinct mineral zones: a posterior layer of magnetite; a thin band of lepidocrocite just anterior to this; and apatite throughout the core and anterior regions of the cusp. Biomineralization in these teeth is a matrix-mediated process, in which the minerals are deposited around fibers, with the different biominerals described as occupying architecturally discrete compartments. In this study, a range of scanning electron microscopes was utilized to undertake a detailed in situ investigation of the fine structure of the major lateral teeth. The arrangement of the organic and biomineral components of the tooth is similar throughout the three zones, having no discrete borders between them, and with crystallites of each mineral phase extending into the adjacent mineral zone. Along the posterior surface of the tooth, the organic fibers are arranged in a series of fine parallel lines, but just within the periphery their appearance takes on a "fish scale"-like pattern, reflective of the cross section of a series of units that are overlaid, and offset from each other, in adjacent rows. The units are approximately 2 microm wide and 0.6 microm thick and comprise biomineral plates separated by organic fibers. Two types of subunits make up each "fish scale": one is elongate and curved and forms a trough, in which the other, rod-like unit, is nestled. Adjacent rod and trough units are aligned into large sheets that define the fracture plane of the tooth. The alignment of the plates of rod-trough units is complex and exhibits extreme spatial variation within the tooth cusp. Close to the posterior surface the plates are essentially horizontal and lie in a lateromedial plane, while anteriorly they are almost vertical and lie in the posteroanterior plane. An understanding of the fine structure of the mineralized teeth of chitons, and of the relationship between the organic and

  9. X-ray absorption fine structure study of multinuclear copper(I) thiourea mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Srivastava, K.; Prasad, J.; Raghuwanshi, V. S.

    2013-07-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of five copper(I) thiourea complexes [Cu4(thu)6 (NO3)4 (H2O)4] (1), [Cu4(thu)9 (NO3)4 (H2O)4] (2), [Cu2(thu)6 (SO4) H2O] (3), [Cu2(thu)5 (SO4) (H2O)3] (4), and [Cu(thu)Cl 0.5H2O] (5) have been investigated. Complexes 1 and 3 are supposed to have one type of copper centers in trigonal planar and tetrahedral environment, respectively. Complexes 2 and 4 are supposed to have two types of copper centers, one center having trigonal planar geometry and another center having tetrahedral geometry. The aim of the present work is to show how extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of these complexes, having different types of coordination environment, can be analyzed to yield the coordination geometry around one type of copper centers present in complexes 1 and 3, and two types of copper centers present in complexes 2 and 4. The crystal structure of complex 5 is unavailable due to inability of growing its single crystals, and hence the coordination geometry of this complex has been determined from EXAFS. The structural parameters determined from the EXAFS spectra have been reported and the coordination geometry has been depicted for the metal centers present in all the five complexes. Also, the chemical shifts have been used to determine the oxidation state of copper in these complexes. The X-ray absorption near edge spectra features have also been correlated with the coordination geometry. Also, the presence of both three and four coordinated Cu(I) centers in complexes 2 and 4 has been suggested from a comparison of the intensity of the feature at 8984 eV with those of 1 and 3. Further, in case of complex 5, the high intensity of peak A at 8986.5 eV is found to correspond to the presence of Cl coordinated to the copper center.

  10. Properties of the prominence magnetic field and plasma distributions as obtained from 3D whole-prominence fine structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We analyze distributions of the magnetic field strength and prominence plasma (temperature, pressure, plasma β, and mass) using the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. Methods: The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence, obtained from non-linear force-free field simulations, with a detailed semi-empirically derived description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Results: We show that in the modeled prominence, the variations of the magnetic field strength and its orientation are insignificant on scales comparable to the smallest dimensions of the observed prominence fine structures. We also show the ability of the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to reveal the distribution of the prominence plasma with respect to its temperature within the prominence volume. This provides new insights into the composition of the prominence-corona transition region. We further demonstrate that the values of the plasma β are small throughout the majority of the modeled prominences when realistic photospheric magnetic flux distributions and prominence plasma parameters are assumed. While this is generally true, we also find that in the region with the deepest magnetic dips, the plasma β may increase towards unity. Finally, we show that the mass of the modeled prominence plasma is in good agreement with the mass of observed non-eruptive prominences.

  11. Local atomic structure of a clean surface by surface-extended x-ray absorption fine structure: Amorphized Si

    SciTech Connect

    Comin, F.; Incoccia, L.; Lagarde, P.; Rossi, G.; Citrin, P.H.

    1985-01-14

    The application of near-edge surface, extended x-ray absorption fine structure to the study of a clean surface is reported. Direct evidence is found for surface recrystallization of ion-damaged (amorphized) Si, whereas no such evidence is seen for evaporated (amorphous) Si. The procedures described here are applicable to almost all clean or adsorbate-covered surfaces.

  12. A tale of two pectins: Diverse fine structures can result from identical processive PME treatments on similar high DM subtrates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of a processive pectin-methylesterase treatment on two different pectins, both possessing a high degree of methylesterification, were investigated. While the starting samples were purportedly very similar in fine structure, and even though the sample-averaged degree of methylesterificati...

  13. Variation in beta-glucan fine structure, extractability, and flour slurry viscosity in oats due to genotype and environment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effects of genotype and environment on oats on beta-glucan extractability,flour slurry viscosity, and beta-glucan polymer fine structure were tested. Certain environments had unpredictable catastrophic effects on slurry viscosity. Learning the cause of such viscosity loss should be of high priority ...

  14. Discrimination of Speech Sounds Based upon Temporal Envelope versus Fine Structure Cues in 5- to 7-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoncini, Josiane; Serniclaes, Willy; Lorenzi, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the capacity of young children and adults with normal hearing to discriminate speech on the basis of either relatively slow (temporal envelope, E) or fast (temporal fine structure, TFS) auditory cues. Method: Vowel-consonant-vowel nonsense disyllables were processed to preserve either the E or the TFS information in 16…

  15. A fine structure physical map of the short arm of chromosome 5.

    PubMed Central

    Overhauser, J; Beaudet, A L; Wasmuth, J J

    1986-01-01

    A series of somatic cell hybrids that retain abnormal chromosomes 5 from 11 different persons with deletions or translocations involving 5p have been isolated. One hundred twenty DNA fragments isolated from a genomic library enriched for sequences from 5p were regionally localized by Southern blot analysis of the hybrid cell deletion mapping panel, including five DNA fragments that reveal restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The fine structure physical map of 5p together with the identification of additional polymorphic loci will facilitate the construction of a complete linkage map of this region. In addition, DNA fragments localized to a region near the 5p15.2-5p15.3 border, which appears to be the segment of 5p that is critical in producing the phenotype associated with the cri du chat syndrome when it is rendered hemizygous by deletion, will be useful in a molecular and DNA level analysis of this deletion syndrome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2878609

  16. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF SYMPATHETIC NEURONS IN X-IRRADIATED FROGS

    PubMed Central

    Pick, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    The effects of whole body x-irradiation on the fine structure of sympathetic neurons were studied in 15 unanesthetized adult frogs (Rana pipiens), as seen at intervals ranging from 1 hour to 2 weeks after single exposures to 1000 r and 2000 r. Using standard procedures, the lumbar sympathetic ganglia of experimental and 20 control animals were prepared for electron microscope examination. Radiation produced conspicuous but irregular and variable deterioration, swelling, and clearing of neuronal lysosomes. These changes may have been due to an increased permeability of lysosomal membranes, causing the entry of fluid into lysosomes and their swelling and deterioration, but a pronounced escape of lysosomal enzymes into the cytoplasm was questionable. Less frequent were the dilatation and the parallel layering or complete fusion and tight packing of the rough-edged endoplasmic reticulum. The number of vacuoles, probably derived from Golgi cisternae, was somewhat increased. These vacuoles were conjectured to serve the "sequestration" of damaged cytoplasmic areas. Abnormal amounts of presumptive glycogen granules occupied some axons of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers, especially of presynaptic nerve fibers. This was assumed to be due to a decreased breakdown of glycogen and probably caused the interruption of the transmission of nerve impulses in presynaptic fibers. The maximal incidence of these alterations seemingly occurred 8 days after exposure to 1000 r, and 1 hour after x-irradiation with 2000 r. Signs of recovery appeared 2 weeks after exposure to 2000 r. PMID:5865928

  17. DISCOVERY OF FINELY STRUCTURED DYNAMIC SOLAR CORONA OBSERVED IN THE Hi-C TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Savage, Sabrina; Alexander, Caroline; Golub, Leon; DeLuca, Edward; Schuler, Timothy

    2014-05-20

    In the Summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew on board a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e., have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70% of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  18. The morphology and fine structure of the giant interneurons of the wood cricket Nemobius sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Insausti, T C; Lazzari, C R; Casas, J

    2011-02-01

    The structural and ultrastructural characteristics of giant interneurons in the terminal abdominal ganglion of the cricket Nemobius sylvestris were investigated by means of cobalt and fluorescent dye backfilling and transmission electron microscopy. The projections of the 8 eight pairs of the biggest ascending interneurons (giant interneurons) are described in detail. The somata of all interneurons analyzed are located contralateral to their axons, which project to the posterior region of the terminal ganglion and arborise in the cercal glomerulus. Neuron 7-1a is an exception, because its arborisation is restricted to the anterior region of the ganglion. The fine structure of giant interneurons shows typical features of highly active cells. We observed striking indentations in the perineural layer, enabling the somata of the giant interneurons to be very close to the haemolymph. The cercal glomerulus exhibits a high diversity of synaptic contacts (i.e. axo-dendritic, axo-axonic, dendro-axonic, and dendro-dendritic), as well as areas of tight junctions. Electrical synapses seem to be present, as well as mixed synapses. The anatomical organization of the giant interneurons is finally discussed in terms of functional implications and on a comparative basis.

  19. Elongation pattern and fine structure of the sheaths formed by Thiothrix nivea and Thiothrix fructosivorans.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Yuta; Endo, Tomoyuki; Fujiwara, Atsuo; Kondo, Keiko; Katahira, Masato; Nittami, Tadashi; Sato, Michio; Takeda, Minoru

    2017-02-01

    Thiothrix strains are filamentous sulfur-oxidizing bacteria common in activated sludge. Some of the members, including Thiothrix nivea and T. fructosivorans, are known to form a microtubular sheath that covers a line of cells. The sheaths are assemblages of [→4)-β-d-GlcN-(1→4)-β-d-Glc-(1→]n modified with unusual deoxy sugars. In an attempt to elucidate the sheath-forming mechanism, the patterns of sheath formation and cell proliferation were determined in this study. Prior to analysis, both sheaths were confirmed to be highly de-N-acetylated. Sheaths in viable filaments were N-biotinylated followed by cultivation and then fluorescently immunostained. Epifluorescence microscopy of the filaments revealed ubiquitous elongation of the sheaths. For visualization of the cell proliferation pattern, the cell membrane was fluorescently stained. The epifluorescence images demonstrated that cell proliferation also proceeds ubiquitously, suggesting that sheath elongation proceeds surrounding an elongating cell. In addition, the fine structure of the Thiothrix filaments was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy employing a freeze-substitution technique. The micrographs of freeze-substituted filaments showed that the sheaths were thin and single layered. In contrast, the sheaths in chemically fixed filaments appeared thick and multilayered. Treatment with glutaraldehyde probably caused deformation of the sheaths. Supporting this possibility, the sheaths were found to be deformed or solubilized by N-acetylation.

  20. The fine structure of the ocelli of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Insausti, T C; Lazzari, C R

    2002-12-01

    The morphology and fine structure of the ocelli of Triatoma infestans have been analyzed by means of light and electron microscopy. The two dorsal ocelli of this species are located behind the compound eyes, looking dorsally and frontally. Externally, the ocelli are marked by the corneal lenses virtually spherical in form and limited internally by a cuticular apodeme. The lens focuses the incoming rays beyond the retina. A single layer of corneagen cells lies below the cuticular lens. The corneagen cells and photoreceptors are arranged in a cup-like fashion beneath the cuticular lens. A distal retinal zone comprises the rhabdoms, which are laterally connected in an hexagonal meshwork. A middle retinal zone comprises the receptor cell segment free of rhabdom, and a proximal zone their axons. In the middle zone, the oviform nuclei and spheroids are located. Screening pigment granules are present within the retinal cell. Spherical mitochondria are homogeneously distributed in the cytoplasm of the cell body. In the axonal zone, mitochondria are found in the peripheral region. Axons from receptor cells extend into the ocellar neuropile at the base of the ocelli, to synapse with second order neurons. The large axons of second order neurons are bundled by glial cells. The ocellar plexus exhibits a high diversity of synaptic unions (i.e. axo-dendritic, axo-axonic, dendro-axonic, and dendro-dendritic).

  1. Fine structure of low-energy H(+) in the nightside auroral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chao; Perez, J. D.; Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Low-energy H(+) data with 6-s resolution from the retarding ion mass spectrometer instrument on Dynamics Explorer (DE) 1 have been analyzed to reveal the fine structure at middle altitudes of the nightside auroral region. A new method for deconvolving the energy-integrated count rate in the spin plane of the satellite has been used to derive the two-dimensional phase space density. A detailed analysis reveals an alternating conic-beam-conic pattern with the observed conics correlated with large earthward currents in the auroral region. The strong downward current (larger than 1 microamperes per sq m (equivalent value at ionosphere)) provides a free energy source for the perpendicular ion heating, that generates the ion conics with energies from several eV to tens of eV. The bowl shape distribution of the low-energy H(+) is caused by the extended perpendicular heating. The strong correlation between conics and large downward currents suggests that the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave is an appropriate candidate for the transverse heating mechanism.

  2. Influence of dense quantum plasmas on fine-structure splitting of Lyman doublets of hydrogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Madhab; Ray, Debasis

    2015-05-01

    Relativistic calculations are performed to study the effects of oscillatory quantum plasma screening on the fine-structure splitting between the components of Lyman-α and β line doublets of atomic hydrogen and hydrgen-like argon ion within dense quantum plasmas, where the effective two-body (electron-nucleus) interaction is modeled by the Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential. The numerical solutions of the radial Dirac equation for the quantum plasma-embedded atomic systems reveal that the oscillatory quantum screening effect suppresses the doublet (energy) splitting substantially and the suppression becomes more prominent at large quantum wave number kq. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, much larger amount of suppression is noticed at larger values of kq, and the corresponding results represent the screening effect of an exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction. The Z4 scaling of the Lyman doublet splitting in low-Z hydrogen isoelectronic series of ions in free space is violated in dense quantum plasma environments. The relativistic data for the doublet splitting in the zero screening (kq = 0) case are in very good agreement with the NIST reference data, with slight discrepancies (˜0.2%) arising from the neglect of the quantum electrodynamic effects.

  3. Sensitivity to temporal fine structure and hearing-aid outcomes in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elvira; McCormack, Abby; Edmonds, Barrie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) on subjective measures of hearing aid outcome. Design: Prior to receiving hearing aids, participants completed a test to assess sensitivity to TFS and two self-assessment questionnaires; the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP), and the Speech, Spatial and Qualities of hearing (SSQ-A). Follow-up appointments, comprised three self-assessment questionnaires; the GHABP, the SSQ-B, and the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aid Outcomes (IOI-HA). Study sample: 75 adults were recruited from direct referral clinics. Results: Two thirds of participants were found to have good sensitivity to TFS; listeners with good sensitivity to TFS rated their hearing abilities higher at pre-fitting (SSQ-A) than those with poor sensitivity to TFS. At follow-up, participants with good sensitivity to TFS showed a smaller improvement on SSQ-B over listeners with poor sensitivity to TFS. Among the questionnaires, only the SSQ showed greater sensitivity to measure subjective differences between listeners with good and poor sensitivity to TFS. Conclusions: The clinical identification of a patient's ability to process TFS information at an early stage in the treatment pathway could prove useful in managing expectations about hearing aid outcomes. PMID:24550769

  4. Sorption mechanisms of zinc to calcium silicate hydrate: X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) investigation.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, F; Scheidegger, A M; Johnson, C A; Dähn, R; Wieland, E

    2001-04-01

    In this study, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy has been used to further elucidate the binding mechanisms of Zn(II) to calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), the quantitatively most important cement mineral. Such knowledge is essential for the assessment of the longterm behavior of cement-stabilized waste materials. XAFS spectra of the Zn(II) equilibrated with C-S-H(I) for up to 28 days are best modeled by tetrahedral coordination of Zn(II) by four O atoms in the first atomic shell. Beyond the first coordination shell, data analysis of more highly concentrated samples suggests the presence of two distinct Zn distances and possibly the presence of an Si shell. On the basis of the comparison with a set of reference compounds, this coordination environment can be reasonably related to the structure of hemimorphite, a naturally occurring zinc silicate, and/or the presence of gamma-Zn(OH)2. At the lowest Zn uptake, the above fitting approach failed and data could be described best with a Zn-Si and a Zn-Ca shell. Previous work has been able to show that Zn(II) diffuses into the C-S-H(I) particles and does not form discrete precipitates, so the findings appear to confirm the incorporation of Zn(II) in the interlayer of C-S-H(I).

  5. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-09-13

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  6. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  7. Fine-structure transitions of interstellar atomic sulfur and silicon induced by collisions with helium.

    PubMed

    Lique, F; Kłos, J; Le Picard, S D

    2017-10-02

    Atomic sulfur and silicon are important constituents of the interstellar matter and are both used as tracers of the physical conditions in interstellar shocks and outflows. We present an investigation of the spin-orbit (de-)excitation of S((3)P) and Si((3)P) atoms induced by collisions with helium with the aim to improve the determination of atomic sulfur and silicon abundances in the interstellar medium from S and Si emission spectra. Quantum-mechanical calculations have been performed in order to determine rate coefficients for the fine-structure transitions in the 5-1000 K temperature range. The scattering calculations are based on new highly correlated ab initio potentials. The theoretical results show that the (de-)excitation of Si is much faster than that of S. The rate coefficients deduced from this study are in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical findings despite some deviations at low temperatures. From the computation of critical densities defined as the ratios between Einstein coefficients and the sum of the relevant collisional de-excitation rate coefficients, we show that local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are not fulfilled for analyzing S and Si emission spectra observed in the interstellar medium. Hence, the present rate coefficients will be extremely useful for the accurate determination of interstellar atomic sulfur and silicon abundances.

  8. Sensitivity of bilateral cochlear implant users to fine-structure and envelope interaural time differences.

    PubMed

    Noel, Victor A; Eddington, Donald K

    2013-04-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant users have poor sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of high-rate pulse trains, which precludes use of these stimuli to convey fine-structure ITD cues. However, previous reports of single-neuron recordings in cats demonstrated good ITD sensitivity to 1000 pulses-per-second (pps) pulses when the pulses were sinusoidally amplitude modulated. The ability of modulation to restore ITD sensitivity to high-rate pulses in humans was tested by measuring ITD thresholds for three conditions: ITD encoded in the modulated carrier pulses alone, in the envelope alone, and in the whole waveform. Five of six subjects were not sensitive to ITD in the 1000-pps carrier, even with modulation. One subject's 1000-pps carrier ITD sensitivity did significantly improve due to modulation. Sensitivity to ITD encoded in the envelope was also measured as a function of modulation frequency, including at frequencies from 4 to 16 Hz where much of the speech envelope's energy and information resides. Sensitivity was best at the modulation frequency of 100 Hz and degraded rapidly outside of a narrow range. These results provide little evidence to support encoding ITD in the carrier of current bilateral processors, and suggest envelope ITD sensitivity is poor for an important segment of the speech modulation spectrum.

  9. FINE STRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF INTERPHASE NUCLEI OF LYMPHOCYTES STIMULATED TO GROWTH ACTIVITY IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyasu, K.; Madden, S. C.; Zeldis, L. J.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes fine structural changes of interphase nuclei of human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated to growth by short-term culture with phytohemagglutinin. Chromatin is found highly labile, its changes accompanying the sequential increases of RNA and DNA synthesis which are known to occur in lymphocyte cultures. In "resting" lymphocytes, abundant condensed chromatin appears as a network of large and small aggregates. Early in the response to phytohemagglutinin, small aggregates disappear during increase of diffuse chromatin regions. Small aggregates soon reappear, probably resulting from disaggregation of large masses of condensed chromatin. Loosened and highly dispersed forms then appear prior to the formation of prophase chromosomes. The loosened state is found by radioautography to be most active in DNA synthesis. Small nucleoli of resting lymphocytes have concentric agranular, fibrillar, and granular zones with small amounts of intranucleolar chromatin. Enlarging interphase nucleoli change chiefly (1) by increase in amount of intranucleolar chromatin and alteration of its state of aggregation and (2) by increase in granular components in close association with fibrillar components. PMID:5699935

  10. Properties and Modeling of Unresolved Fine Structure Loops Observed in the Solar Transition Region by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Reep, Jeffrey W.; Warren, Harry P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have discovered a new class of numerous low-lying dynamic loop structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFSs) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. In this letter, we combine IRIS measurements of the properties of a sample of 108 UFSs (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) with one-dimensional non-equilibrium ionization simulations, using the HYDRAD hydrodynamic model to examine whether the UFSs are now truly spatially resolved in the sense of being individual structures rather than being composed of multiple magnetic threads. We find that a simulation of an impulsively heated single strand can reproduce most of the observed properties, suggesting that the UFSs may be resolved, and the distribution of UFS widths implies that they are structured on a spatial scale of 133 km on average. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, and we conjecture that this could be an important clue for understanding the coronal heating process.

  11. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  12. All-Optical dc Nanotesla Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancy Fine Structure in Isotopically Purified Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simin, D.; Soltamov, V. A.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Anisimov, A. N.; Babunts, R. A.; Tolmachev, D. O.; Mokhov, E. N.; Trupke, M.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Sperlich, A.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    We uncover the fine structure of a silicon vacancy in isotopically purified silicon carbide (4H-28SiC) and reveal not yet considered terms in the spin Hamiltonian, originated from the trigonal pyramidal symmetry of this spin-3 /2 color center. These terms give rise to additional spin transitions, which would be otherwise forbidden, and lead to a level anticrossing in an external magnetic field. We observe a sharp variation of the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of this level anticrossing, which can be used for a purely all-optical sensing of the magnetic field. We achieve dc magnetic field sensitivity better than 100 nT /√{Hz } within a volume of 3 ×10-7m m3 at room temperature and demonstrate that this contactless method is robust at high temperatures up to at least 500 K. As our approach does not require application of radio-frequency fields, it is scalable to much larger volumes. For an optimized light-trapping waveguide of 3 mm3 , the projection noise limit is below 100 fT /√{Hz } .

  13. DIRECT IMAGING OF FINE STRUCTURE IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF A SUNSPOT UMBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Socas-Navarro, H.

    2009-05-10

    High-resolution imaging observations from the Hinode spacecraft in the Ca II H line are employed to study the dynamics of the chromosphere above a sunspot. We find that umbral flashes and other brightenings produced by the oscillation are extremely rich in fine structure, even beyond the resolving limit of our observations (0.''22). The umbra is tremendously dynamic to the point that our time cadence of 20 s does not suffice to resolve the fast lateral (probably apparent) motion of the emission source. Some bright elements in our data set move with horizontal propagation speeds of 30 km s{sup -1}. We have detected filamentary structures inside the umbra (some of which have a horizontal extension of {approx}1500 km) which, to our best knowledge, had not been reported before. The power spectra of the intensity fluctuations reveal a few distinct areas with different properties within the umbra that seem to correspond with the umbral cores that form it. Inside each one of these areas the dominant frequencies of the oscillation are coherent, but they vary considerably from one core to another.

  14. Fine structure analysis and sintering properties of Si-doped hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Z Y; Li, G; Zhang, Y Q; Liu, J; Hu, W; Ma, J; Zhang, S M

    2012-08-01

    Si-doped hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) has been intensively investigated as a promising bone biomaterial because of the biomineralization and bone formation benefit from silicon addition. In the current work, Si-HA samples were synthesized by the aqueous precipitation method. The sintering property of Si-HA was studied in terms of phase composition and transition, which was influenced by the Si doping percentage and sintering temperature. The results indicate that all the as-prepared and sintered low Si doping samples (Si% ≤ 1.6 wt%) possess HA phases; while the high Si doping samples (Si% ≥ 2 wt%) present amorphous phases as prepared, and largely or even completely transform to β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) phase after sintering at 1250 °C. The Rietveld refinement on x-ray diffraction patterns was conducted to determine the particle sizes, microstrain factors and anisotropic distributions. According to the refined results, the calculated anisotropic particle sizes correspond to the observations made by transmission electron microscopy. The microstrains also present anisotropic distributions in all refinements. The accurate variation in the fine structure of Si-HA has been studied by the improved refinements after considering the anisotropic distribution.

  15. Universal Growth Scheme for Quantum Dots with Low Fine-Structure Splitting at Various Emission Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Stevenson, R. Mark; Varnava, Christiana; Felle, Martin; Huwer, Jan; Müller, Tina; Bennett, Anthony J.; Lee, James P.; Farrer, Ian; Krysa, Andrey B.; Spencer, Peter; Goff, Lucy E.; Ritchie, David A.; Heffernan, Jon; Shields, Andrew J.

    2017-07-01

    Efficient sources of individual pairs of entangled photons are required for quantum networks to operate using fiber-optic infrastructure. Entangled light can be generated by quantum dots (QDs) with naturally small fine-structure splitting (FSS) between exciton eigenstates. Moreover, QDs can be engineered to emit at standard telecom wavelengths. To achieve sufficient signal intensity for applications, QDs have been incorporated into one-dimensional optical microcavities. However, combining these properties in a single device has so far proved elusive. Here, we introduce a growth strategy to realize QDs with small FSS in the conventional telecom band, and within an optical cavity. Our approach employs ``droplet-epitaxy'' of InAs quantum dots on (001) substrates. We show the scheme improves the symmetry of the dots by 72%. Furthermore, our technique is universal, and produces low FSS QDs by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs emitting at ˜900 nm , and metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy on InP emitting at ˜1550 nm , with mean FSS 4 × smaller than for Stranski-Krastanow QDs.

  16. Growth scheme for quantum dots with low fine structure splitting at telecom wavelengths (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Tina; Skiba-Szymanska, Joanna; Stevenson, R. Mark; Varnava, Christiana; Felle, Martin; Huwer, Jan; Farrer, Ian; Krysa, Andrey B.; Spencer, Peter; Ritchie, David A.; Heffernan, Jon; Shields, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum dots based on InAs/InP hold the promise to deliver entangled photons with wavelength suitable for the standard telecom window around 1550 nm, which makes them predestined to be used in future quantum networks applications based on existing fiber optics infrastructure. A prerequisite for the generation of such entangled photons is a small fine structure splitting (FSS) in the quantum dot excitonic eigenstates, as well as the ability to integrate the dot into photonic structures to enhance and direct its emission. Using optical spectroscopy, we show that a growth strategy based on droplet epitaxy can simultaneously address both issues. Contrary to the standard Stranski-Krastanow technique, droplet epitaxy dots do not rely on material strains during growth, which results in a drastic improvement in dot symmetry. As a consequence, the average exciton FSS is reduced by more than a factor 4, which in fact makes all the difference between easily finding a dot with the required FSS and not finding one at all. Furthermore, we demonstrate that droplet epitaxy dots can be grown on the necessary surface (001) for high quality optical microcavities, which increases dot emission count rates by more than a factor of five. Together, these properties make droplet epitaxy quantum dots readily suitable for the generation of entangled photons at telecom wavelengths.

  17. Retinal pigment epithelial fine structure in the great blue heron (Ardea herodias).

    PubMed

    Braekevelt, C R; Young, D L

    1994-09-01

    The fine structure of the retinal epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris and Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) has been studied by light and electron microscopy in the great blue heron (Ardea herodias). In this species the RPE consists of a single layer of cuboidal cells which display numerous basal (scleral) infoldings and plentiful apical (vitreal) processes which surround photoreceptor outer segments. These epithelial cells are joined laterally by a series of tight junctions located in the mid to basal region. Within the epithelial cells, smooth endoplasmic reticulum is very abundant while rough ER is not. Mitochondria (some of which are ring-shaped) and polysomes are abundant. In light-adaptation the RPE nuclei are large vesicular and basally located while the melanosomes of these cells are almost exclusively located within the apical processes. Myeloid bodies are large and numerous and often show ribosomes on their outer surface. Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) shows the typical pentalaminate structure noted in the majority of vertebrates except teleosts. The choriocapillary endothelium is very thin facing Bruch's membrane but is only moderately fenestrated. The majority of these fenestrations show a single-layered diaphragm but double-layered diaphragms are also noted.

  18. Supratentorial intracerebral epithelial (ependymal) cysts: review, case reports, and fine structure.

    PubMed Central

    Friede, R L; Yasargil, M G

    1977-01-01

    The paper concerns the rare supratentorial, intracerebral or convexity cysts in adults having a wall lined with an epithelium resembling ependyma. The clincopathological aspects of such cysts are reviewed from 15 published cases and two specimens of the authors which could be examined with the electronmicroscope. These cysts manifest at a median age of 46 years as progressive, space occupying lesions with a fairly rapid clinical course of about one to two years. Twelve of 17 cysts were located in the frontal lobes, most were unequivocally intracerebral and none communicated with the lateral ventricle. Microscopic examination of the cyst wall disclosed some variance in structure, the most common feature being a monolayer of ciliated cells sitting on a very thin collagen membrane. One of the present cases was unique in that the compression by the cyst had caused a shell of infarction in the encompassing tissue. The fine structure of the cysts is described and compared with that of potential host tissues from which such cysts may originate. It is concluded that the cysts arise from displaced segments of the wall of the neural tube which correspond to the sites from which the tela chorioidea forms. Images PMID:864476

  19. Influence of dense quantum plasmas on fine-structure splitting of Lyman doublets of hydrogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    De, Madhab Ray, Debasis

    2015-05-15

    Relativistic calculations are performed to study the effects of oscillatory quantum plasma screening on the fine-structure splitting between the components of Lyman-α and β line doublets of atomic hydrogen and hydrgen-like argon ion within dense quantum plasmas, where the effective two-body (electron–nucleus) interaction is modeled by the Shukla–Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential. The numerical solutions of the radial Dirac equation for the quantum plasma-embedded atomic systems reveal that the oscillatory quantum screening effect suppresses the doublet (energy) splitting substantially and the suppression becomes more prominent at large quantum wave number k{sub q}. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, much larger amount of suppression is noticed at larger values of k{sub q}, and the corresponding results represent the screening effect of an exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction. The Z{sup 4} scaling of the Lyman doublet splitting in low-Z hydrogen isoelectronic series of ions in free space is violated in dense quantum plasma environments. The relativistic data for the doublet splitting in the zero screening (k{sub q} = 0) case are in very good agreement with the NIST reference data, with slight discrepancies (∼0.2%) arising from the neglect of the quantum electrodynamic effects.

  20. Fine structure of low-energy H(+) in the nightside auroral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chao; Perez, J. D.; Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Low-energy H(+) data with 6-s resolution from the retarding ion mass spectrometer instrument on Dynamics Explorer (DE) 1 have been analyzed to reveal the fine structure at middle altitudes of the nightside auroral region. A new method for deconvolving the energy-integrated count rate in the spin plane of the satellite has been used to derive the two-dimensional phase space density. A detailed analysis reveals an alternating conic-beam-conic pattern with the observed conics correlated with large earthward currents in the auroral region. The strong downward current (larger than 1 microamperes per sq m (equivalent value at ionosphere)) provides a free energy source for the perpendicular ion heating, that generates the ion conics with energies from several eV to tens of eV. The bowl shape distribution of the low-energy H(+) is caused by the extended perpendicular heating. The strong correlation between conics and large downward currents suggests that the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave is an appropriate candidate for the transverse heating mechanism.

  1. Fine structure and functional comments of mouthparts in Platypus cylindrus (Col., Curculionidae: Platypodinae).

    PubMed

    Belhoucine, Latifa; Bouhraoua, Rachid T; Prats, Eva; Pulade-Villar, Juli

    2013-02-01

    Oak pinhole borer, Platypus cylindrus is seen in recent years as one of the biggest enemies directly involved in the observed decline of cork oak in Mediterranean forests with all the economic implications. As an ambrosia beetle, it has developed its effective drilling mouthpart enough to make tunnels in hardwood of the tree. The fine structural aspects of the mouthpart using the field emission scanning electron microscopy are analyzed about 23 adults collected in galleries of infested cork oak trees (Quercus suber) in a littoral forest of northwest Algeria. These adults are preserved in alcohol 70%, cleaned and coated with gold. The mouthparts of this beetle consist commonly of a labrum, a pair of mandibles, a pair of maxillae and the labium but with adapted structure to excavate galleries in the hardwood. In this role is also involved the first pair of legs. The function that present the different structures related to the construction of the tunnels is discussed. Both of maxillary and labial palpi direct the food to the mouth and hold it while the mandibles chew the food. The distal ends of these palpi are flattened and have shovel-like setae. Females have larger maxillary palpi than males and this is related to the particular biology of each sex.

  2. On the quantitative method for measurement and analysis of the fine structure of Fraunhofer line profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuli-Zade, D. M.

    The methods of measurement and analysis of the fine structure of weak and moderate Fraunhofer line profiles are considered. The digital spectral materials were obtained using rapid scanning high dispersion and high resolution double monochromators. The methods of asymmetry coefficient, bisector method and new quantitative method pro- posed by the author are discussed. The new physical values of differential, integral, residual and relative asymmetries are first introduced. These quantitative values permit us to investigate the dependence of asymmetry on microscopic (atomic) and macro- scopic (photospheric) values. It is shown that the integral profile asymmetries grow appreciably with increase in line equivalent width. The average effective depths of the formation of used Fraunhofer lines in the photosphere of the Sun are determined. It is shown that with the increasing of the effective formation depths of the lines integral and residual asymmetries of the lines profiles noticeably decrease. It is in fine agree- ment with the results of intensity dependence of asymmetry. The above-mentioned methods are critically compared and the advantages of author's method are shown. The computer program of calculation of the line-profile asymmetry parameters has been worked out.

  3. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  4. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS. PMID:27604778

  5. Plant growth in elevated CO2 alters mitochondrial number and chloroplast fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Kevin L.; Anderson, O. Roger; Gastrich, Mary D.; Lewis, James D.; Lin, Guanghui; Schuster, William; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Tissue, David T.; Turnbull, Matthew H.; Whitehead, David

    2001-01-01

    With increasing interest in the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on plant growth and the global carbon balance, there is a need for greater understanding of how plants respond to variations in atmospheric partial pressure of CO2. Our research shows that elevated CO2 produces significant fine structural changes in major cellular organelles that appear to be an important component of the metabolic responses of plants to this global change. Nine species (representing seven plant families) in several experimental facilities with different CO2-dosing technologies were examined. Growth in elevated CO2 increased numbers of mitochondria per unit cell area by 1.3–2.4 times the number in control plants grown in lower CO2 and produced a statistically significant increase in the amount of chloroplast stroma (nonappressed) thylakoid membranes compared with those in lower CO2 treatments. There was no observable change in size of the mitochondria. However, in contrast to the CO2 effect on mitochondrial number, elevated CO2 promoted a decrease in the rate of mass-based dark respiration. These changes may reflect a major shift in plant metabolism and energy balance that may help to explain enhanced plant productivity in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:11226263

  6. The fine structure of electron irradiation induced EL2-like defects in n-GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunhuma, S. M.; Auret, F. D.; Legodi, M. J.; Diale, M.

    2016-04-01

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in n-GaAs have been studied using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace DLTS (L-DLTS). The E0.83 (EL2) is the only defect observed prior to irradiation. Ru/n-GaAs Schottky diodes were irradiated with high energy electrons from a Sr-90 radionuclide up to a fluence of 2.45 × 1013 cm-2. The prominent electron irradiation induced defects, E0.04, E0.14, E0.38, and E0.63, were observed together with the metastable E0.17. Using L-DLTS, we observed the fine structure of a broad base EL2-like defect peak. This was found to be made up of the E0.75, E0.83, and E0.85 defects. Our study reveals that high energy electron irradiation increases the concentration of the E0.83 defect and introduces a family of defects with electronic properties similar to those of the EL2.

  7. Fine structure and synaptology of the nitrergic neurons in medial septum of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Halasy, Katalin; Szőke, Balázs; Janzsó, Gergely

    2017-03-01

    The nitrergic neuron population and certain aspects of their connectivity (peptidergic inputs, co-localization with GABA, synaptic target distribution) were studied in the medial septum of the rat brain. The histochemical localization of NADPH diaphorase and immunohistochemical identification of nNOS at light and electron microscopic level was applied. Double-labeling experiments with galanin and leucine enkephalin, moreover the postembedding GABA immunogold staining was also carried out. NADPH diaphorase- and nNOS-immunopositive neurons could be identified inside the borders of medial septum. Out of their peptidergic inputs galanin- and leucine enkephaline-immunopositive varicose fibers were found in close apposition with nNOS-immunopositive neurons. Based on fine structural characteristics (large indented nucleus, thin cytoplasmic rim, lack of axosomatic synapses) the nitrergic neurons are suggested to be identical with the septal cholinergic nerve cells. Their boutons established asymmetrical synapses mainly on dendritic shafts and spines, some of which were also nNOS-immunopositive. A lower amount of nNOS-immunopositive boutons of presumably extrinsic origin were found to be GABAergic.

  8. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p{sub o} final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA.

  9. The Effects of Instrumental Elliptical Polarization on Stellar Point Spread Function Fine Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Joseph C.; Kern, Brian D.; Breckinridge, James B.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    We present procedures and preliminary results from a study on the effects of instrumental polarization on the fine structure of the stellar point spread function (PSF). These effects are important to understand because the the aberration caused by instrumental polarization on an otherwise diffraction-limited will likely have have severe consequences for extreme high contrast imaging systems such as NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission and the proposed NASA Eclipse mission. The report here, describing our efforts to examine these effects, includes two parts: 1) a numerical analysis of the effect of metallic reflection, with some polarization-specific retardation, on a spherical wavefront; 2) an experimental approach for observing this effect, along with some preliminary laboratory results. While the experimental phase of this study requires more fine-tuning to produce meaningful results, the numerical analysis indicates that the inclusion of polarization-specific phase effects (retardation) results in a point spread function (PSF) aberration more severe than the amplitude (reflectivity) effects previously recorded in the literature.

  10. Fine structure of the antennal glands of the ant nest beetle Paussus favieri (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Paussini).

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Andrea; Rossi Stacconi, Marco Valerio; Romani, Roberto

    2009-07-01

    The antennae of the ant nest beetle Paussus favieri are studied by using both SEM and TEM. In the myrmecophilous genus Paussus, these structures are composed of three joints: scape, pedicel and a wide third joint, the "antennal club", resulting from the fusion of antennomeres A3-A11 (flagellum). The antennal club shows an exceptional glandular activity, with the presence of pores mostly crowded in special hairless cuticular areas, surrounding the base of single setae, grouped at the base of tufts of setae, or positioned inside deep pockets that store the secretions, with filiform material arising from them. The surface of A1 and A3 are covered by mechanoreceptors, modified to spread the glandular exudates, while the chemoreceptors are restricted to the apex of the club. The fine structural analysis shows a great number of antennal glands, that can be referred to three main typologies: type A (GhA) bi-cellular, composed of a large secretory cell and a small duct cell, positioned close to the antennal surface; type B (GhB), tri-cellular, composed of two secretory cells and one duct cell, less frequent and positioned deep inside the antennal club; type C (GhC), rare, located deeply within the antennal lumen, in the vicinity of the trophocytes. This complexity indicates that more than one substance could be released from the antennae. Possible functional aspects of the secretions dealing with symbiotic interaction with the host ants are discussed.

  11. Sensitivity of bilateral cochlear implant users to fine-structure and envelope interaural time differencesa

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Victor A.; Eddington, Donald K.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant users have poor sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of high-rate pulse trains, which precludes use of these stimuli to convey fine-structure ITD cues. However, previous reports of single-neuron recordings in cats demonstrated good ITD sensitivity to 1000 pulses-per-second (pps) pulses when the pulses were sinusoidally amplitude modulated. The ability of modulation to restore ITD sensitivity to high-rate pulses in humans was tested by measuring ITD thresholds for three conditions: ITD encoded in the modulated carrier pulses alone, in the envelope alone, and in the whole waveform. Five of six subjects were not sensitive to ITD in the 1000-pps carrier, even with modulation. One subject's 1000-pps carrier ITD sensitivity did significantly improve due to modulation. Sensitivity to ITD encoded in the envelope was also measured as a function of modulation frequency, including at frequencies from 4 to 16 Hz where much of the speech envelope's energy and information resides. Sensitivity was best at the modulation frequency of 100 Hz and degraded rapidly outside of a narrow range. These results provide little evidence to support encoding ITD in the carrier of current bilateral processors, and suggest envelope ITD sensitivity is poor for an important segment of the speech modulation spectrum. PMID:23556598

  12. Preferred Compression Speed for Speech and Music and Its Relationship to Sensitivity to Temporal Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J; Sęk, Aleksander

    2016-09-07

    Multichannel amplitude compression is widely used in hearing aids. The preferred compression speed varies across individuals. Moore (2008) suggested that reduced sensitivity to temporal fine structure (TFS) may be associated with preference for slow compression. This idea was tested using a simulated hearing aid. It was also assessed whether preferences for compression speed depend on the type of stimulus: speech or music. Twenty-two hearing-impaired subjects were tested, and the stimulated hearing aid was fitted individually using the CAM2A method. On each trial, a given segment of speech or music was presented twice. One segment was processed with fast compression and the other with slow compression, and the order was balanced across trials. The subject indicated which segment was preferred and by how much. On average, slow compression was preferred over fast compression, more so for music, but there were distinct individual differences, which were highly correlated for speech and music. Sensitivity to TFS was assessed using the difference limen for frequency at 2000 Hz and by two measures of sensitivity to interaural phase at low frequencies. The results for the difference limens for frequency, but not the measures of sensitivity to interaural phase, supported the suggestion that preference for compression speed is affected by sensitivity to TFS.

  13. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  14. Fine structure of the landers fault zone: Segmentation and the rupture process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Y.-G.; Vidale, J.E.; Aki, K.; Marone, C.J.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1994-01-01

    Observations and modeling of 3- to 6-hertz seismic shear waves trapped within the fault zone of the 1992 Landers earthquake series allow the fine structure and continuity of the zone to be evaluated. The fault, to a depth of at least 12 kilometers, is marked by a zone 100 to 200 meters wide where shear velocity is reduced by 30 to 50 percent. This zone forms a seismic waveguide that extends along the southern 30 kilometers of the Landers rupture surface and ends at the fault bend about 18 kilometers north of the main shock epicenter. Another fault plane waveguide, disconnected from the first, exists along the northern rupture surface. These observations, in conjunction with surface slip, detailed seismicity patterns, and the progression of rupture along the fault, suggest that several simple rupture planes were involved in the Landers earthquake and that the inferred rupture front hesitated or slowed at the location where the rupture jumped from one to the next plane. Reduction in rupture velocity can tentatively be attributed to fault plane complexity, and variations in moment release can be attributed to variations in available energy.

  15. Fine structure of the entanglement entropy in the O(2) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yuzhi; Zou, Haiyuan; Xie, Z. Y.; Meurice, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We compare two calculations of the particle density in the superfluid phase of the O(2) model with a chemical potential μ in 1+1 dimensions. The first relies on exact blocking formulas from the Tensor Renormalization Group (TRG) formulation of the transfer matrix. The second is a worm algorithm. We show that the particle number distributions obtained with the two methods agree well. We use the TRG method to calculate the thermal entropy and the entanglement entropy. We describe the particle density, the two entropies and the topology of the world lines as we increase μ to go across the superfluid phase between the first two Mott insulating phases. For a sufficiently large temporal size, this process reveals an interesting fine structure: the average particle number and the winding number of most of the world lines in the Euclidean time direction increase by one unit at a time. At each step, the thermal entropy develops a peak and the entanglement entropy increases until we reach half-filling and then decreases in a way that approximately mirrors the ascent. This suggests an approximate fermionic picture.

  16. Fine structure of extracellular fibers in primo-nodes and vessels.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong Hyun; Sung, Baeckkyoung; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the extracellular matrices in the primo-nodes (PNs) and vessels (PVs) (Bonghan corpuscles and ducts), fine structure of the fibers comprising the extracellular matrices was studied in relation to the diameter and the periodicity to identify the types of the fibers. Electron micrographs of the fibers from the previously published works on the PNs and PVs were analyzed by using MATLAB programming and ImageJ software. The extracellular fibrous components of the PNs and PVs could be classified generally into two groups--thin collagen fibrils and thick non-collagenous wavy bent fibers. The thick bent fibers were fibrin-like. The diameters of the thick bent fibers were 30-200 nm and they were highly bent. This group included organ surface PNs and lymphatic PNs/PVs. The diameters of the collagen fibrils were 30-70 nm. Organ surface, heart, and hypodermis PVs were categorized in this group. The periodicity of bent fibers in an organ surface PN was 16.1 +/- 0.2 (SE) nm, and the periodicity of collagen fibrils in the hypodermis PVs was 37.4 +/- 0.5 (SE) nm. Further investigations are required to reveal the physiological implications of the two types of fibers in the PNs and PVs.

  17. Morphogenesis and Fine Structure of Leucothrix mucor and Effects of Calcium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Snellen, James E.; Raj, H. D.

    1970-01-01

    Phenotypic expressions of morphogenesis and fine structure of Leucothrix mucor were determined when the organism was grown with and without added CaCl2 in a synthetic seawater medium. Evidence is presented to show that a bulb can form in the absence of a knot formation and that a bulb may give rise to a “germ-tube.” In comparison with normal cells, which show transverse septa at right angles to the axis in dividing cells, the bulbs exhibited transverse septa at odd angles, which may explain the mechanism of bulb formation. The most striking morphological feature due to Ca++ deficiency was the absence of rosettes; instead, the culture showed an extremely filamentous morphology and a peculiar cord formation. Also, the Ca++-deficient cells contained heavily stained intracytoplasmic granules which possibly represent tight packing of the smaller particles of ribonucleoprotein. Various bulbous forms observed in the Ca++-deficient culture showed more pronounced elaboration of mesosomes as intracytoplasmic structures than those seen in the complete medium. Images PMID:5411751

  18. Characteristics of the starch fine structure and pasting properties of waxy rice during storage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chan; Lai, Hsi-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Two waxy rice (TNW1 and TCSW1, exhibiting high and low amylase activity, respectively), were stored at 4 and 17 °C (polished rice) and at room temperature (paddy rice) for 15 months. The fine structure of starch isolated from the aged rice and the pasting properties of starch and rice flour were studied. After storage, the percentage of short amylopectin (AP) chains increased in TNW1, and no uniform changing pattern was observed in the chain-length (CL) distribution of TCSW1. The viscosity of starch isolated from the aged rice increased as the storage temperature and duration increased. We hypothesised that this increase was due to the hydrolysis of AP by endogenous amylase and the generation of small clusters during storage, which caused the simple dissociation of AP and a high swelling degree of starch granules during gelatinisation. Factor analysis of the first two factors associated with the characteristics of viscograms and the CL of AP explained 72% of the total variation.

  19. Fine structure of the copulatory apparatus of the tapeworm Tetrabothrius erostris (Cestoda: Tetrabothriidea).

    PubMed

    Korneva, Janetta V; Jones, Malcolm K; Kuklin, Vadim V

    2015-05-01

    The organization and fine structure of the complex copulatory apparatus of Tetrabothrius erostris (Tetrabothriidea) is investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. A diversity of microstructures was found on the surface of genital ducts. The apical surfaces of male gonadoducts possess tubular and blade-like microtriches that have specific structure in each section of the duct. The apical part of the tubular microtriches contains numerous constrictions in the proximal section of the sperm duct; blade-like microtriches of cirrus possess longitudinal striation in the apical part, and their basal part is reinforced with electron-dense strands. Two types of microtriches occur on the surface of cirrus, and their presence may be considered as systematic features. Prostate glands containing granules of medium electron density (up to 130 nm diameter) are localized in the cirrus sac. The genital atrium contains numerous non-ciliated receptors. Paramyosin-like fibers (up to 200 nm) were found in the muscle fibers surrounding the male atrium canal. Microtriches on the surface of the distal region of the male atrial canal are covered by a glycocalyx. Electron-dense, membrane-like structures (up to 40 nm) lie under the apical membrane of the genital atrium and vagina. These structures do not form a continuous layer; its edges turn down and sink into the apical invaginations of epithelium. Hypotheses on the possible ways of copulation in T. erostris based on the observed ultrastructure are discussed.

  20. ;Long-hissler; fine structure within auroral hiss: A review and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Howard F.; LaBelle, James; Spasojević, Maria

    2017-04-01

    One of the most prominent fine-structures of auroral hiss is the ;long-hissler;, defined here as a dispersed feature embedded within broadband auroral hiss emissions in the frequency range 1-40 kHz and lasting longer than 0.3 s. While theory is limited, there is evidence that hisslers can be used in remote sensing of density characteristics at altitudes of thousands of km. By applying an automatic threshold algorithm to VLF data collected at South Pole 2230-0130 UT daily during June-August 2014, 22 h of auroral hiss are identified on 49 of 93 days analyzed, for an occurrence rate of 9.7% during the applicable MLT interval. From manual inspection of these intervals, 414 groups (trains) of long hisslers are identified on 34 of the 49 days on which hiss occurred. Median lower (upper) frequency bounds of these features are 8 (22) kHz, median frequency-time slope is -10 kHz/s, and median hissler repetition time within a train (hissler period) is 1.2 s. Hissler period and frequency-time slope are inversely related. Data from previous studies are reviewed to provide a comprehensive description of the phenomenon. Contrary to some previous studies, subsequent long hissler features are found to commonly overlap in time, and no evidence is found for an inverse relationship between hissler train duration and geomagnetic activity.

  1. Fine structure and immunocytochemistry of a new chemosensory system in the Chiton larva (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Haszprunar, Gerhard; Friedrich, Stefan; Wanninger, Andreas; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard

    2002-02-01

    Combined electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of the larvae of several polyplacophoran species (Chiton olivaceus, Lepidochitona aff. corrugata, Mopalia muscosa) revealed a sensory system new to science, a so-called "ampullary system." The cells of the "ampullary system" are arranged in four symmetrically situated pairs lying dorsolaterally and ventrolaterally in the pretrochal part of the trochophore-like larva and they send axons into the cerebral commissure. They are lost at metamorphosis. The fine structure of these cells strongly resembles that of so-called "ampullary cells" known from various sensory organs of other molluscs, such as the apical complex of gastropod and bivalve larvae, osphradia of vetigastropods, and olfactory organs of cephalopods, and nuchal organs of certain polychaetes. The ampullary cells and their nerves are densely stained by anti-FMRF-amide fluorescence dyes, whereas antiserotonin staining is only weak. While cytological homology of the ampullary cells with those of other organs is probable, the ampullary system as a whole is regarded as a synapomorphy of the Polyplacophora or Chitonida.

  2. Fine structure of the retinal pigment epithelium of the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Braekevelt, C R; Thorlakson, I J

    1993-01-01

    The fine structure of the retinal epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaries and Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) has been studied by light and electron microscopy in the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus). The RPE consists of a single layer of cuboidal cells joined laterally in the mid to basal region by a series of tight junctions forming part of the blood-ocular barrier. Basally (sclerally) the epithelial cells show numerous deep infoldings while apically (vitreally) a wealth of microvillar processes interdigitate with the photoreceptor cells. Internally the RPE cells display a large vesicular nucleus, plentiful smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and polysomes with only small scattered profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). Numerous pleomorphic mitochondria are basally located. In the light-adapted state the melanosomes are located almost exclusively within the apical processes indicating retinomotor movements. Myeloid bodies are numerous and often show ribosomes on their outer surface. Bruch's membrane is typical of avian species in that it is pentalaminate and the lamina densa is displaced towards the choriocapillaris. The choriocapillaris itself is but minimally fenestrated facing Bruch's membrane. Most fenestrations present show a single layered diaphragm while others display a double-layered diaphragm.

  3. Retinal pigment epithelial fine structure in the red-tailed hawk (Buto jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Braekevelt, C R

    1992-03-01

    As part of a comparative morphological study, the fine structure of the retinal epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris and Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) has been studied by electron microscopy in the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis). In this species the RPE consists of a single layer of low cuboidal cells which display numerous basal (scleral) infoldings and extensive apical (vitreal) processes which interdigitate with photoreceptor outer segments. These epithelial cells are joined laterally by a series of basally located tight junctions. Internally SER is the most abundant cell organelle while only small amounts of RER are present. Polysomes are however abundant as are mitochondria. The RPE cell nucleus is large and vesicular. Melanosomes are mainly located in the apical processes of the RPE cells in light-adaptation. Myeloid bodies are large and numerous in light-adaptation and often show ribosomes on their outer border. Bruch's membrane (complexus basalis) shows the typical pentalaminate structure noted in most vertebrates but with only a poorly defined central elastic layer. The endothelium of the choriocapillaris is very thin facing the RPE but is only moderately fenestrated. The choriocapillaris in this species is unusual however in that many of the fenestrae show a double-layered diaphragm.

  4. Fine structural analysis of the neuronal inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Helen; Atherton, Joe; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2009-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is a major component of the pathological inclusions of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 proteinopathy, also called FTLD with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions (FTLD-U), and motor neuron disease (MND). TDP-43 is predominantly expressed in the nucleus and regulates gene expression and splicing. In FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, neuronal inclusions present variably as cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs), dystrophic neurites (DNs), and intranuclear inclusions (NIIs), leading to a fourfold neuropathological classification correlating with genotype. There have been few fine structural studies of these inclusions. Thus, we undertook an immunoelectron microscopic study of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy, including sporadic and familial cases with progranulin (GRN) mutation. TDP-43-immunoreactive inclusions comprised two components: granular and filamentous. Filament widths, expressed as mean (range) were: NCI, 9 nm (4–16 nm); DN, 10 nm (5–16 nm); NII, 18 nm (9–50 nm). Morphologically distinct inclusion components may reflect the process of TDP-43 aggregation and interaction with other proteins: determining these latter may contribute towards understanding the heterogeneous pathogenesis of FTLD with TDP-43 proteinopathy. PMID:18974920

  5. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of IBS Fe--Tb alloy films

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, V.G.; Aylesworth, K.D.; Kim, K.H.; Elam, W.T.; Koon, N.C. )

    1991-11-15

    We have employed extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis to study the compositional dependence of the atomic structure in Fe--Tb alloy films. Fourier transforms of EXAFS data, relative to both the Fe {ital K} and the Tb {ital L}{sub III} absorption edges, provide information about the local atomic environments relative to each atom. Results indicate the Fe EXAFS data to be dominated by Fe--Fe correlations, and consists of contributions from two Fe atomic shells at radial distances near 2.47 and 2.66 A and a Tb shell near 2.91 A. The coordination number of the Fe shells are measured to increase, while radial distances decrease, with increased Fe content. The Tb EXAFS data was found to have an atomic shells of Fe and Tb at 2.91 and 3.47 A, respectively. Analysis suggests that the Fe shell is very disordered and is comprised of approximately 9.5 atoms while the Tb shell has {approx}3 atoms.

  6. Fine Structure and Molecular Phylogeny of Parametopidium circumlabens (Ciliophora: Armophorea), Endocommensal of Sea Urchins.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Neto, Inácio Domingos; da Silva Paiva, Thiago; do Nascimento Borges, Bárbara; Harada, Maria Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Metopid armophoreans are ciliates commonly found in anaerobic environments worldwide; however, very little is known of their fine structure. In this study, the metopid Parametopidium circumlabens (Biggar and Wenrich 1932) Aescht, 1980, a common endocommensal of sea urchins, is investigated for the first time with emphasis on transmission electron microscopy, revealing several previously unknown elements of its morphology. Somatic dikinetids of P. circumlabens have a typical ribbon of transverse microtubules, an isolated microtubule near triplets 4 and 5 of the anterior kinetosome, plus two other microtubules between anterior and posterior kinetosomes, a short kinetodesmal striated fiber and long postciliary microtubules. In the dikinetids of the perizonal stripe, the kinetodesmal fiber is very pronounced, and there is a conspicuous microfibrillar network system associated with the kinetosomes. A new structure, shaped as a dense, roughly cylindrical mass surrounded by microtubules, is found associated with the posterior kinetosome of perizonal dikinetids. The paroral membrane is diplostichomonad and the adoral membranelles are of the "paramembranelle" type. Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood analysis of the 18S-rDNA gene unambiguously placed P. circumlabens as sister group of the cluster formed by ((Atopospira galeata, Atopospira violacea) Metopus laminarius) + Clevelandellida, corroborating its classification within the Metopida. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  7. Cochlear implants with fine structure processing improve speech and tone perception in Mandarin-speaking adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueqing; Liu, Bo; Liu, Sha; Mo, Lingyan; Li, Yuling; Kong, Ying; Zheng, Jun; Li, Yongxin; Gong, Shusheng; Han, Demin

    2013-07-01

    This study indicates that Mandarin-speaking subjects acquire significant benefit from a cochlear implant (CI) and audio processor with the fine structure processing (FSP) coding strategy. It can take adult Mandarin CI users time to become accustomed to their CI and appreciate the benefits. This study aimed to determine speech perception outcomes in Mandarin-speaking adults who received the FSP coding strategy. This was a prospective study. Ten adults who were implanted unilaterally with a PULSARCI(100), and received an OPUS 1 or OPUS 2 speech processor, were included in this study. The mean age at implantation was 31.1 years. We determined the benefit to postlingually deafened Mandarin-speaking adults with a severe to profound hearing loss using the tests: monosyllables in quiet, sentences in quiet and the Mandarin Hearing in Noise Test (MHINT). Tone perception was evaluated using a tone perception test. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to score sound quality and ease of listening. The results showed a significant improvement between first fitting and 6 months in all speech tests and in tone perception. The VAS scores showed a significant improvement over 6 months in sound quality and an immediate benefit in ease of listening.

  8. Dual-carrier processing to convey temporal fine structure cues: Implications for cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Youngdahl, Carla L.; Yoho, Sarah E.; Healy, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    Speech intelligibility in noise can be degraded by using vocoder processing to alter the temporal fine structure (TFS). Here it is argued that this degradation is not attributable to the loss of speech information potentially present in the TFS. Instead it is proposed that the degradation results from the loss of sound-source segregation information when two or more carriers (i.e., TFS) are substituted with only one as a consequence of vocoder processing. To demonstrate this segregation role, vocoder processing involving two carriers, one for the target and one for the background, was implemented. Because this approach does not preserve the speech TFS, it may be assumed that any improvement in intelligibility can only be a consequence of the preserved carrier duality and associated segregation cues. Three experiments were conducted using this “dual-carrier” approach. All experiments showed substantial sentence intelligibility in noise improvements compared to traditional single-carrier conditions. In several conditions, the improvement was so substantial that intelligibility approximated that for unprocessed speech in noise. A foreseeable and potentially promising implication for the dual-carrier approach involves implementation into cochlear implant speech processors, where it may provide the TFS cues necessary to segregate speech from noise. PMID:26428784

  9. Characterization of a bioactive polysaccharide from Ganoderma atrum: Re-elucidation of the fine structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Nie, Shaoping; Cui, Steve W; Xu, Ming; Ding, Huihuang; Xie, Mingyong

    2017-02-20

    The fine structure in terms of backbone and branch chain features of a bioactive polysaccharide from Ganoderma atrum (PSG-1) was re-elucidated systematically using high performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), methylation and GLC-MS analysis, and 1D & 2D NMR spectroscopy. Monosaccharide composition analysis revealed that PSG-1-F0.2 fraction mainly consisted of glucose (73.8%) and glucuronic acid (15.3%), with small amount of mannose (5.7%) and galactose (5.2%). Based on methylation, multistep partial acid hydrolysis and NMR study, were proposed to substitute at the O-6 position of β-(1→3)-glucan. The small amount of mannose and galactose residues were considered to be from the other fraction in PSG which was very difficult to be separated from PSG-1-F0.2. This revised structure as an acidic β-(1→3, 1→6)-glucan is considered to be more accurate than the previous proposal of PSG-1.

  10. Fine structure of Chrysomya nigripes (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a fly species of medical importance.

    PubMed

    Ngern-klun, Radchadawan; Sukontason, Kom; Methanitikorn, Rungkanta; Vogtsberger, Roy C; Sukontason, Kabkaew L

    2007-04-01

    The fine structure of Chrysomya nigripes Aubertin, a blow fly species of medical importance, is presented using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to contribute information on the morphology of the adult of this fly species. The surface of the dome-shaped ommatidia exhibits a microscopic granulose appearance. The palpus is equipped with small sensilla basiconica and sensilla chaetica, which provide sensory reception for detecting environmental information. At the apex of the mouthparts, the labellum is endowed with large numbers of sensilla trichodea and basiconic-like sensilla of variable length. The anterior (mesothoracic) spiracle is elliptical in shape and covered with extensively ramified setae except for a small dorsal aperture. The posterior (metathoracic) spiracle is shaped like a rounded isosceles triangle and covered by two valves of unequal size. The larger valve covers the upper approximately 2/3 of the spiracular opening, whereas the smaller valve covers the lower approximately 1/3 of the opening. Extensively ramified setae line and cover the valves over the entire spiracle. SEM analyses of the haltere knob and the prosternal organs, located adjacent to the cervical sclerites, revealed a striking resemblance of the morphological features of their sensilla. Each sensillum emanates from a cuticular ring, is approximately 12-15 mum in length, has a smooth surface, and terminates in a sharp tip. Various types of sensilla were associated with the ovipositor including sensilla trichodea, sensilla basiconica, sensilla placodea and probably sensilla styloconica. The possible function of sensilla distributed in particular regions of the fly integument is discussed.

  11. He i Vector Magnetic Field Maps of a Sunspot and Its Superpenumbral Fine-Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.; Tritschler, A.

    2015-06-01

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He i triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions because superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization, while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated, but also exhibit signatures that might be induced by symmetry-breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere and furthermore show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear to be finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests that fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux, but are instead distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also directly compare our inverted values with a current-free extrapolation of the chromospheric field. With improved measurements in the future, the average shear angle between the inferred magnetic field and the potential field may offer a means to quantify the non-potentiality of the chromospheric magnetic field to study the onset of explosive solar phenomena.

  12. Synthesis, fine structural characterization, and CO2 adsorption capacity of metal organic frameworks-74.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Abhijit Krishna; Lin, Kuen-Song

    2014-04-01

    Two metal organic frameworks of MOF-74 group (zinc and copper-based) were successfully synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for CO2 adsorption. The both samples such as MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were characterized with FE-SEM for morphology and particle size, XRD patterns for phase structure, FTIR for organic functional groups, nitrogen adsorption for pore textural properties, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for fine structural parameters and oxidation states of central metal atoms. CO2 adsorption isotherms of MOF-74 samples were measured in a volumetric adsorption unit at 273 K and pressure up to 1.1 bar. The MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) adsorbents have the pore widths of 8.58 and 8.04 angstroms with the BET specific surface areas of 1,474 and 1,345 m2 g(-1), respectively. CO2 adsorption capacities of MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were 4.10 and 3.38 mmol x g(-1), respectively measured at 273 K and 1.1 bar. The oxidation state of central atoms in MOF-74(Zn) was Zn(II) confirmed by XANES spectra while MOF-74(Cu) was composed of Cu(I) and Cu(II) central atoms. The bond distances of Zn--O and Cu--O were 1.98 and 1.94 angstroms, respectively.

  13. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  14. Fine structure of Langmuir waves observed upstream of the bow shock at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Highly structured Langmuir waves, also known as electron plasma oscillations, have been observed in the foreshock of Venus using the plasma wave experiment on the Galileo spacecraft during the gravity assist flyby on February 10, 1990. The Galileo wideband sampling system provides digital electric field waveform measurements at sampling rates up to 201,600 samples per second, much higher than any previous instrument of this type. The main Langmuir wave emission band occurs near the local electron plasma frequency, which was approximately 43 kHz. The Langmuir waves are observed to shift above and below the plasma frequency, sometimes by as much as 20 kHz. The shifts in frequency are closely correlated with the downstream distance from the tangent field line, implying that the shifts are controlled by the electron beam velocity. Considerable fine structure is also evident, with timescales as short as 0.15 ms, corresponding to spatial scales of a few tens of Debye lengths. The frequency spectrum often consists of beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 7 kHz, and in a few cases, isolated wave packets. The peak electric field strengths are approximately 1 mV/m. These field strengths are too small for strongly nonlinear processes to be important. The beat-type waveforms are suggestive of a parametric decay process.

  15. The fine structure of Langmuir waves observed upstream of the bow shock at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Highly structured Langmuir waves, also known as electron plasma oscillations, have been observed in the foreshock of Venus using the plasma wave experiment on the Galileo spacecraft during the gravity assist flyby on February 10, 1990. The Galileo wideband sampling system provides digital electric field waveform measurements at sampling rates up to 201,600 samples per second, much higher than any previous instrument of this type. The main Langmuir wave emission band occurs near the local electron plasma frequency, which was approximately 43 kHz. The Langmuir waves are observed to shift above and below the plasma frequency, sometimes by as much as 20 kHz. The shifts in frequency are closely correlated with the downstream distance from the tangent field line, implying that the shifts are controlled by the electron beam velocity. Considerable fine structure is also evident, with time scales as short as 0.15 milliseconds, corresponding to spatial scales of a few tens of Debye lengths. The frequency spectrum often consists of beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from 0.2 to 7 kHz, and in a few cases, isolated wavepackets. The peak electric field strengths are approximately 1 mV/m. These field strengths are too small for strongly nonlinear processes to be important. The beat-type waveforms are suggestive of a parametric decay process.

  16. Electronic fine structure in the nickel carbide superconductor Th2NiC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Y.; Pickett, W. E.

    2013-07-01

    The recently reported nickel carbide superconductor body centered tetragonal I4/mmm Th2NiC2 with Tc=8.5 K increasing to 11.2 K upon alloying Th with Sc is found to have very fine structure in its electronic spectrum, according to density functional based first-principles calculations. The filled Ni 3d band complex is hybridized with C 2p and Th character to and through the Fermi level (EF), and a sharply structured density of states arises only when spin-orbit coupling is included, which splits a zone-center degeneracy, leaving a very flat band edge lying at the Fermi level. The flat part of the band corresponds to an effective mass mz*→∞ with large and negative mx*=my*. Although the region over which the effective mass characterization applies is less than 1% of the zone volume, it supplies on the order of half the states at (or just above) the Fermi level. The observed increase of Tc by hole doping is accounted for if the reference as-synthesized sample is minutely hole doped, which decreases the Fermi level density of states and will provide some stabilization. In this scenario, electron doping will increase the Fermi level density of states and the superconducting critical temperature. Vibrational properties are presented, and enough coupling to the C-Ni-C stretch mode at 70 meV is obtained to imply that superconductivity is electron-phonon mediated.

  17. A FINE-STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE FUSION OF MYOGENIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Bruce H.; Konigsberg, Irwin R.

    1972-01-01

    The fusion of myogenic cells has been examined on the fine-structural level in muscle cell cultures of embryonic Japanese Coturnix quail. Cells, selected by light microscopy, were serially sectioned normal to their long axis. In this plane, oblique sections of cell membranes are rare and plasmalemmal profiles are more easily traced between adjacent cells. In seven cases, pairs of cells, apparently fixed in the process of fusion, are joined by a single cytoplasmic bridge. Since obliquely sectioned membranes often suggest cytoplasmic confluence, tilting stage analysis was employed to resolve cell membranes in suspect cases. In contrast to such artifacts of superposition, however, the observed intercommunicating pores are contained within a pair of culs-de-sac formed by the fused membranes of both cells. These blind pouches can be traced back between the cells to the external space. The confluent regions are clearly demarcated and they are not simply areas between vesicular profiles. The results of this analysis suggest that (a) at no time is there any loss of integrity of the cellular envelope, and (b) fusion is most probably initiated at single sites between pairs of cells, the pore enlarging, leaving first vestiges and eventually no trace of the original intervening membranes. PMID:4554365

  18. New analysis methods for skin fine-structure via optical image and development of 3D skin Cycloscan(™).

    PubMed

    Han, J Y; Nam, G W; Lee, H K; Kim, M J; Kim, E J

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to develop methods for measuring skin fine-structure via optical image and apparatus for photographing to analyze efficacy of anti-aging. We developed an apparatus named 3D Skin CycloScan(™) to evaluate the efficacy of cosmetics by imagification of skin fine-structure such as wrinkles, pores, and skin texture. The semi-sphere shaped device has 12 different sequential flashing light sources captures optical image simultaneously in one second to exclude the influence of the subject's movement. The normal map that is extracted through shape from shading method is composed of face contour and skin fine-structure parts. When the low-frequency component which is the result of the Gaussian Filter application is eliminated, we can get only skin fine-structure. In this normal map, it is possible to extract two-dimensional vector map called direction map and we can regulate the intensity of the image of wrinkles, pores, and skin texture after filtering the direction map. We performed a clinical study to apply this new apparatus and methods to evaluate an anti-aging efficacy of cosmetics visually and validate with other conventional methods. After using anti-aging cream including 2% adenosine for 8 weeks, the total amount of fine wrinkle around eye area detected via 3D Skin CycloScan(™) was reduced by 12.1%. Also, wrinkles on crow's feet measured by PRIMOS COMPACT(®) (GFMesstechnik GmbH, Germany) reduced 11.7%. According to an aspect of the present study, by changing the direction of the lights toward to subject's skin, we can obtain the information about the fine structures present on the skin such as wrinkles, pores, or skin texture and represent it as an image. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. QUDeX-MS: hydrogen/deuterium exchange calculation for mass spectra with resolved isotopic fine structure.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Joseph P; Liu, Qian; Agar, Jeffrey N

    2014-12-11

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to mass spectrometry permits analysis of structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. HDX mass spectrometry is confounded by deuterium exchange-associated peaks overlapping with peaks of heavy, natural abundance isotopes, such as carbon-13. Recent studies demonstrated that high-performance mass spectrometers could resolve isotopic fine structure and eliminate this peak overlap, allowing direct detection and quantification of deuterium incorporation. Here, we present a graphical tool that allows for a rapid and automated estimation of deuterium incorporation from a spectrum with isotopic fine structure. Given a peptide sequence (or elemental formula) and charge state, the mass-to-charge ratios of deuterium-associated peaks of the specified ion is determined. Intensities of peaks in an experimental mass spectrum within bins corresponding to these values are used to determine the distribution of deuterium incorporated. A theoretical spectrum can then be calculated based on the estimated distribution of deuterium exchange to confirm interpretation of the spectrum. Deuterium incorporation can also be detected for ion signals without a priori specification of an elemental formula, permitting detection of exchange in complex samples of unidentified material such as natural organic matter. A tool is also incorporated into QUDeX-MS to help in assigning ion signals from peptides arising from enzymatic digestion of proteins. MATLAB-deployable and standalone versions are available for academic use at qudex-ms.sourceforge.net and agarlabs.com . Isotopic fine structure HDX-MS offers the potential to increase sequence coverage of proteins being analyzed through mass accuracy and deconvolution of overlapping ion signals. As previously demonstrated, however, the data analysis workflow for HDX-MS data with resolved isotopic fine structure is distinct. QUDeX-MS we hope will aid in the adoption of isotopic fine structure HDX

  20. The contribution of visual information to the perception of speech in noise with and without informative temporal fine structure.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Paula C; Kitterick, Pádraig T; Morris, Saffron D; Sumner, Christian J

    2016-06-01

    Understanding what is said in demanding listening situations is assisted greatly by looking at the face of a talker. Previous studies have observed that normal-hearing listeners can benefit from this visual information when a talker's voice is presented in background noise. These benefits have also been observed in quiet listening conditions in cochlear-implant users, whose device does not convey the informative temporal fine structure cues in speech, and when normal-hearing individuals listen to speech processed to remove these informative temporal fine structure cues. The current study (1) characterised the benefits of visual information when listening in background noise; and (2) used sine-wave vocoding to compare the size of the visual benefit when speech is presented with or without informative temporal fine structure. The accuracy with which normal-hearing individuals reported words in spoken sentences was assessed across three experiments. The availability of visual information and informative temporal fine structure cues was varied within and across the experiments. The results showed that visual benefit was observed using open- and closed-set tests of speech perception. The size of the benefit increased when informative temporal fine structure cues were removed. This finding suggests that visual information may play an important role in the ability of cochlear-implant users to understand speech in many everyday situations. Models of audio-visual integration were able to account for the additional benefit of visual information when speech was degraded and suggested that auditory and visual information was being integrated in a similar way in all conditions. The modelling results were consistent with the notion that audio-visual benefit is derived from the optimal combination of auditory and visual sensory cues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-wavelength fine structure and mass flows in solar microflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Gömöry, P.; Veronig, A. M.; Rybák, J.; Sütterlin, P.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: We study the multi-wavelength characteristics at high spatial resolution, as well as chromospheric evaporation signatures of solar microflares. To this end, we analyze the fine structure and mass flow dynamics in the chromosphere, transition region and corona of three homologous microflares (GOES class finely structured chromospheric flare brightenings for all three events, loop-shaped fibrils of increased emission between Hα brightenings, as well as a similar feature in Ca ii. For all three events, a RHESSI X-ray source (3-8 keV, T ≳ 10 MK) is located in between two chromospheric brightenings situated in magnetic flux of opposite polarity. We find the flow dynamics associated with the events to be very complex. In the chromosphere and transition region, CDS observed downflows for the first (v ≲ 40 km s-1), and

  2. ISO-SWS observations of OMC-1: H_2 and fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, D.; Bertoldi, F.; Drapatz, S.

    2000-04-01

    Using the Short-Wavelength-Spectrometer on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we obtained near- and mid-infrared spectra toward the brightest H_2 emission peak of the Orion OMC-1 outflow. A wealth of emission and absorption features were detected, dominated by 56 H_2 ro-vibrational and pure rotational lines reaching from H_2 0-0 S(1) to 0-0 S(25). The spectra also show a number of H i recombination lines, atomic and ionic fine structure lines, and molecular lines of CO and H_2O. Between 6 and 12 μm the emission is dominated by PAH features. The extinction toward the molecular and atomic line emitting regions is estimated from relative line intensities, and it is found that the H_2 emission arises from within the OMC-1 cloud at an average K-band extinction of 1.0 mag, whereas the atomic hydrogen emission and much of the fine structure emission comes from the foreground H ii region and its bounding photodissociation front. H_2 1-0 S(1) emission of the OMC-1 outflow as seen with the NICMOS camera aboard the HST (Schultz et al. 1999). Overlaid are the various apertures of our ISO-SWS observations, which were centered on alpha_2000 . = 5h 35m 13.s 67, delta_2000 . = -5 degr 22 arcmin 8. arcsec 5, with an aperture of 14 arcsec x 20 arcsec for lambda < 12 μm, 14 arcsec x 27 arcsec at 12 to 27.5μm, 20 arcsec x 27 arcsec at 27.5 to 29μm, and 20 arcsec x 33 arcsec at 29 to 45.2μm. The total H_2 luminosity in the ISO-SWS aperture is estimated at (17 +/- 5) Lsun , and extrapolated to the entire outflow, (120 +/- 60) Lsun . The H_2 level column density distribution shows no signs of fluorescent excitation or a deviation from an ortho-to-para ratio of three. It shows an excitation temperature which increases from about 600 K for the lowest rotational and vibrational levels to about 3200 K at level energies E(v,J)/k > 14 000 K. No single steady state shock model can reproduce the observed H_2 excitation. The higher energy H_2 levels may be excited either thermally in non

  3. Fine structure processing improves telephone speech perception in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Javier; Lassaletta, Luis; Mora, Rosa Pérez; Castro, Alejandro; Bastarrica, Marta; Gavilán, Javier

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare telephone speech perception and subjective preferences in cochlear implant users with two different speech-processing strategies: high-definition continuous interleaved sampling (HDCIS) and fine structure processing (FSP). A randomized double-blind study was designed for intra-individual comparison of HDCIS and FSP. Twenty-five post-lingually deafened patients with either the PulsarCI(100) or SonataTI(100) and Opus2 acoustic processor were tested consecutively with both coding strategies, assigned in a random order. Disyllabic word speech perception was tested 6 weeks after each fitting under the following conditions: landline use with (LWN) and without (LWoN) background noise, mobile use with (MWN), and without (MWoN) background noise and mobile use with a Bluetooth magnetic field transmitter necklace (MB). Changes in health-related quality of life (QoL) were assessed using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) and Faber's questionnaire. Personal preferences between strategies were surveyed upon completion of the study. All subjects included in this study performed better with FSP in the landline tests. There was an improvement of 11.5 % in LWN use (p = 0.014; CI 95 % = 3-20 %) and 10 % in LWoN use (p = 0.001; CI 95 % = 5-15 %). MWoN showed an improvement of 6.3 % with FSP (p = 0.03; CI 95 % = 0-13 %). MB tests showed an improvement of 11 % with FSP (p < 0.05; CI 95 % = 1.5-22 %). Quality of life was significantly better using FSP. Eighty-four percent of participants preferred FSP. The FSP speech coding strategy improved the speech recognition of cochlear implant users when using the telephone compared to HDCIS. Cochlear implantation with FSP coding improved QoL.

  4. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration.

  5. Cellular Organization of Normal Mouse Liver: A Histological, Quantitative Immunocytochemical, and Fine Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Janie L.; Ngo, Anthony; Lopez, Bryan; Kasabwalla, Natasha; Longmuir, Kenneth J.; Robertson, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular organization of normal mouse liver was studied using light and electron microscopy and quantitative immunocytochemical techniques. The general histological organization of the mouse liver is similar to livers of other mammalian species, with a lobular organization based on the distributions of portal areas and central venules. The parenchymal hepatocytes were detected with immunocytochemical techniques to recognize albumin or biotin containing cells. The macrophage Kupffer cells were identified with F4-80 immunocytochemistry, Ito stellate cells were identified with GFAP immunocytochemistry, and endothelial cells were labeled with the CD-34 antibody. Kupffer cells were labeled with intravascularly administered fluorescently labeled latex microspheres of both large (0.5 μm) and small (0.03 μm) diameters, while endothelial cells were labeled only with small diameter microspheres. Neither hepatocytes nor Ito stellate cells were labeled by intravascularly administered latex microspheres. The principal fine structural features of hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells of mouse liver are similar to those reported for rat. Counts of immunocytochemically labeled cells with stained nuclei indicated that hepatocytes constituted approximately 52% of all labeled cells, Kupffer cells about 18%, Ito cells about 8%, and endothelial cells about 22% of all labeled cells. Approximately 35% of the hepatocytes contained two nuclei; none of the Kupffer or Ito cells were double nucleated. The presence of canaliculi and a bile duct system appear similar to that reported for other mammalian species. The cellular organization of the mouse liver is quite similar to that of other mammalian species, confirming that the mouse presents a useful animal model for studies of liver structure and function. PMID:19255771

  6. Radiation effects in water ice: a near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Laffon, C; Lacombe, S; Bournel, F; Parent, Ph

    2006-11-28

    The changes in the structure and composition of vapor-deposited ice films irradiated at 20 K with soft x-ray photons (3-900 eV) and their subsequent evolution with temperatures between 20 and 150 K have been investigated by near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) at the oxygen K edge. We observe the hydroxyl OH, the atomic oxygen O, and the hydroperoxyl HO(2) radicals, as well as the oxygen O(2) and hydrogen peroxide H(2)O(2) molecules in irradiated porous amorphous solid water (p-ASW) and crystalline (I(cryst)) ice films. The evolution of their concentrations with the temperature indicates that HO(2), O(2), and H(2)O(2) result from a simple step reaction fuelled by OH, where O(2) is a product of HO(2) and HO(2) a product of H(2)O(2). The local order of ice is also modified, whatever the initial structure is. The crystalline ice I(cryst) becomes amorphous. The high-density amorphous phase (I(a)h) of ice is observed after irradiation of the p-ASW film, whose initial structure is the normal low-density form of the amorphous ice (I(a)l). The phase I(a)h is thus peculiar to irradiated ice and does not exist in the as-deposited ice films. A new "very high density" amorphous phase-we call I(a)vh-is obtained after warming at 50 K the irradiated p-ASW ice. This phase is stable up to 90 K and partially transforms into crystalline ice at 150 K.

  7. Statistical Study of Auroral Kilometric Radiation Fine Structure Striations Observed by Polar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Persoon, A. M.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    We have conducted a statistical survey of a semirandom sample of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) data observed by the plasma wave instrument wideband receiver on board the Polar spacecraft. We have determined that AKR fine structure patterns with very narrowband, negative drifting striations occur in approximately 6% of the high-resolution wideband spectrograms when AKR is present. Positive sloping striations are also observed, but at a much lower rate. More than 8200 AKR stripes have been scaled. The stripes are predominantly found in the 40 to 215-kHz frequency range and have a frequency extent of about 4 kHz and a duration of usually less than 2 s. The majority of the stripes have drift rates between -8 and -2 kHz/s, with a peak in the distribution between -6 and -4 kHz/s. There is also a much smaller group of striations with positive drift rates of up to about 5 or 6 kHz/s. We have further investigated the change of drift rate with frequency. Almost all striations are observed in the lowest two frequency bands of the wideband receiver (f < 215 kHz). There is an increase in the statistical drift rate with increasing frequency. The statistical slope of the striations increases with frequency from about -4.4 kHz/s at 75 kHz to about -5.7 kHz/s at 170 kHz. This frequency dependence of the drift rate is consistent, under certain conditions, with a production mechanism stimulated by an upward propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave, as had been suggested earlier. However, such a changing drift rate is also compatible with a stimulated source region that propagates upward along the magnetic field line at the velocity of an ion beam accelerated by a local, upward directed electric field, as is typically observed in the auroral region. An explanation for this association is not apparent at this time.

  8. INTENSITY MAPPING OF THE [C II] FINE STRUCTURE LINE DURING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Silva, Marta; Santos, Mario G.; Bock, James; Bradford, C. Matt; Zemcov, Michael

    2012-01-20

    The atomic C II fine-structure line is one of the brightest lines in a typical star-forming galaxy spectrum with a luminosity {approx}0.1%-1% of the bolometric luminosity. It is potentially a reliable tracer of the dense gas distribution at high redshifts and could provide an additional probe to the era of reionization. By taking into account the spontaneous, stimulated, and collisional emission of the C II line, we calculate the spin temperature and the mean intensity as a function of the redshift. When averaged over a cosmologically large volume, we find that the C II emission from ionized carbon in individual galaxies is larger than the signal generated by carbon in the intergalactic medium. Assuming that the C II luminosity is proportional to the carbon mass in dark matter halos, we also compute the power spectrum of the C II line intensity at various redshifts. In order to avoid the contamination from CO rotational lines at low redshift when targeting a C II survey at high redshifts, we propose the cross-correlation of C II and 21 cm line emission from high redshifts. To explore the detectability of the C II signal from reionization, we also evaluate the expected errors on the C II power spectrum and C II-21 cm cross power spectrum based on the design of the future millimeter surveys. We note that the C II-21 cm cross power spectrum contains interesting features that capture physics during reionization, including the ionized bubble sizes and the mean ionization fraction, which are challenging to measure from 21 cm data alone. We propose an instrumental concept for the reionization C II experiment targeting the frequency range of {approx}200-300 GHz with 1, 3, and 10 m apertures and a bolometric spectrometer array with 64 independent spectral pixels with about 20,000 bolometers.

  9. AN ELECTRON MICROSCOPE STUDY OF THE FINE STRUCTURE OF FEATHER KERATIN

    PubMed Central

    Filshie, B. K.; Rogers, G. E.

    1962-01-01

    Thin sections of the rachis of regenerating follicles of pigmented fowl feathers and of mature non-pigmented seagull feather rachis, embedded in methacrylate and Araldite respectively, were studied in the electron microscope. The late stages of development of keratin fibrils were examined in OsO4-fixed follicle material, and after poststaining with lead hydroxide the keratin aggregates were found to be composed of fine microfibrils approximately 30 A in diameter apparently embedded in a matrix material which had absorbed the lead stain. The centre-to-centre separation of the microfibrils was of the order of 35 A. After bulk treatment by reduction with thioglycollic acid, OsO4 staining, and poststaining with lead hydroxide, a similar microfibrillar fine structure was observed in mature rachis. Only after lead staining could the microfibrils be delineated, and their diameter and separation were similar to that found in the keratin of the follicle. It is suggested that feather keratin resembles α-keratins in consisting of microfibrils embedded in an amorphous protein matrix. However, in comparison with α-keratins, the microfibrils are much smaller in diameter, their arrangement is less orderly, and on the basis of the reactions towards the electron staining procedures, the cystine content of the matrix appears to be not greatly different from that of the microfibrils. The significance of a microfibrillar constitution of feather keratin is discussed in relation to current structural models for this fibrous protein deduced from x-ray diffraction studies. The boundaries between the component cells of feather rachis are desmosomal in character and similar to those of related keratinous structures and a number of different types of cells; the melanin granules are dissimilar to those of mammalian epidermis in their apparent lack of melanin-protein lamellae. PMID:13892901

  10. Influence of fine structure of lipid A on Limulus amebocyte lysate clotting and toxic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, K; Qureshi, N; Raetz, C R; Ribi, E; Peterson, J; Cantrell, J L; Pearson, F C; Wiggins, J; Johnson, A G

    1984-01-01

    We examined the relationship between the fine structure of lipid A and the toxicity of endotoxin or lipopolysaccharides as measured by the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), rabbit pyrogenicity, chicken embryo lethal dose, and dermal Shwartzman reaction tests. Lipid A and lipid A-like compounds obtained from deep-rough mutants of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli had a wide range of structural variations. These compounds included native lipopolysaccharides, diphosphoryl and monophosphoryl lipid A's, and lipid X (a monosaccharide). The LAL test was positive for all lipids tested with lysates from Travenol Laboratories and from Associates of Cape Cod (2.9 X 10(3) to 2.6 X 10(7) endotoxin units per mg), except for O-deacylated and dephosphorylated lipid X, which were negative. The Mallinckrodt lysate gave negative tests for lipid X. In the rabbit pyrogenicity and chicken embryo lethal dose tests, only native lipopolysaccharide and diphosphoryl lipid A's were judged toxic. The Shwartzman reaction was positive for a specific purified diphosphoryl lipid A (thin-layer chromatography-3 fraction) but negative for the purified monophosphoryl lipid A (also a thin-layer chromatography-3 fraction). These results show that the LAL test is not a valid measure of all parameters of toxicity of a lipid A or lipid A-like compound and can yield false-positive results. However, these findings are not in conflict with the widespread use of the LAL assay for pyrogens in the pharmaceutical industry since a good correlation exists between LAL results and pyrogenicity when undegraded endotoxin is evaluated in parallel assays. Images PMID:6378795

  11. Imaging of Vascular Wall Fine Structure in the Human Retina Using Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Toco Y. P.; Gast, Thomas J.; Burns, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To improve the ability to image the vascular walls in the living human retina using multiply-scattered light imaging with an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Methods. In vivo arteriolar wall imaging was performed on eight healthy subjects using the Indiana AOSLO. Noninvasive imaging of vascular mural cells and wall structure were performed using systematic control of the position of a 10× Airy disk confocal aperture. Retinal arteries and arterioles were divided into four groups based on their lumen diameters (group 1: ≥100 μm; group 2: 50–99 μm; group 3: 10–49 μm; group 4: <10 μm). Results. Fine structure of retinal vasculature and scattering behavior of erythrocytes were clearly visualized in all eight subjects. In group 1 vessels the mural cells were flatter and formed the outer layer of regularly spaced cells of a two (or more) layered vascular wall. In the vessels of groups 2 and 3, mural cells were visualized as distinct cells lying along the lumen of the blood vessel, resulting in a wall of irregular thickness. Vascular wall components were not readily identified in group 4 vessels. Conclusions. Our results show that retinal vascular mural cells and wall structure can be readily resolved in healthy subjects using AOSLO with multiply scattered light imaging for retinal vessels with a lumen diameter greater than or equal to 10 μm. Our noninvasive imaging approach allows direct assessment of the cellular structure of the vascular wall in vivo with potential applications in retinal vascular diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. PMID:24071955

  12. ISO-LWS observations of Herbig Ae/Be stars. I. Fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Tommasi, E.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.; Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Strafella, F.; Barlow, M.; Clegg, P. E.; Cohen, M.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Liseau, R.; Molinari, S.; Palla, F.; Saraceno, P.; Smith, H. A.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.

    1999-06-01

    We present the results of the first spectrophotometric survey of a sample of eleven Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBE) obtained with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The [OI] 63mu m and the [CII] 158mu m lines are observed in all the investigated sources, while the [OI] 145mu m transition, due to its relative faintness, sometimes remains undetected. By comparing line intensity ratios with model predictions, photodissociation, due to the UV photons from the central star, results the dominating excitation mechanism although contributions of C-shocks to the [OI] emission cannot be ruled out. A clear example for the presence of a photodissociation region (PDR) illuminated by an HAEBE is shown by LWS spectroscopic mapping of NGC 7129. Some diagnostic probes of the radiation field and density are provided for the objects in our sample: these substantially agree with the known characteristics of both the star and its circumstellar environment, although the observed ratio [OI]63/[OI]145 tends to be smaller than predicted by PDR models. The most likely explanation for this behaviour is self-absorption at 63mu m by cold atomic oxygen. Fine structure lines of the ionised species [OIII], [NII] were detected whenever the star had a spectral type of B0 or earlier; in particular, around the star CoD-42(deg) 11721, besides a compact HII region, evidence is given for an extended low electron density ionised region. Finally, molecular line emission is associated with stars powering a CO outflow, and clumpy PDR models, better than C-shock models, predict for them relative cooling (CO vs OI and CO vs OH) similar to the observed ones. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States and with the participation of ISAS and NASA}

  13. Composite fermions and the first-Landau-level fine structure of the fractional quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, W. C.; Haxton, Daniel J.

    2016-04-01

    A set of scalar operators, originally introduced in connection with an analytic first-Landau-level (FLL) construction of fractional quantum Hall (FQHE) wave functions for the sphere, are employed in a somewhat different way to generate explicit representations of both hierarchy states (e.g., the series of fillings ν =1 /3 , 2/5, 3/7,⋯) and their conjugates (ν =1 , 2/3, 3/5,⋯) as noninteracting quasielectrons filling fine-structure subshells within the FLL. This yields, for planar and spherical geometries, a quasielectron representation of the incompressible FLL state of filling p /(2 p +1 ) in a magnetic field of strength B that is algebraically identical to the IQHE state of filling ν =p in a magnetic field of strength B /(2 p +1 ) . The construction provides a precise definition of the quasielectron/composite fermion that differs in some respects from common descriptions: they are eigenstates of L ,Lz ; they and the FLL subshells they occupy carry a third index I that is associated with breaking of scalar pairs; they absorb in their internal wave functions one, not two, units of magnetic flux; and they share a common, simple structure as vector products of a spinor creating an electron and one creating magnetic flux. We argue that these properties are a consequence of the breaking of the degeneracy of noninteracting electrons within the FLL by the scale-invariant Coulomb potential. We discuss the sense in which the wave function construction supports basic ideas of both composite fermion and hierarchical descriptions of the FQHE. We describe symmetries of the quasielectrons in the ν =1 /2 limit, where a deep Fermi sea of quasielectrons forms, and the quasielectrons take on Majorana and pseudo-Dirac characters. Finally, we show that the wave functions can be viewed as fermionic excitations of the bosonic half-filled shell, producing at ν =1 /2 an operator that differs from but plays the same role as the Pfaffian.

  14. Effects of Age and Hearing Loss on the Processing of Auditory Temporal Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2016-01-01

    Within the cochlea, broadband sounds like speech and music are filtered into a series of narrowband signals, each of which can be considered as a relatively slowly varying envelope (ENV) imposed on a rapidly oscillating carrier (the temporal fine structure, TFS). Information about ENV and TFS is conveyed in the timing and short-term rate of nerve spikes in the auditory nerve. There is evidence that both hearing loss and increasing age adversely affect the ability to use TFS information, but in many studies the effects of hearing loss and age have been confounded. This paper summarises evidence from studies that allow some separation of the effects of hearing loss and age. The results suggest that the monaural processing of TFS information, which is important for the perception of pitch and for segregating speech from background sounds, is adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, the former being more important. The monaural processing of ENV information is hardly affected by hearing loss or by increasing age. The binaural processing of TFS information, which is important for sound localisation and the binaural masking level difference, is also adversely affected by both hearing loss and increasing age, but here the latter seems more important. The deterioration of binaural TFS processing with increasing age appears to start relatively early in life. The binaural processing of ENV information also deteriorates somewhat with increasing age. The reduced binaural processing abilities found for older/hearing-impaired listeners may partially account for the difficulties that such listeners experience in situations where the target speech and interfering sounds come from different directions in space, as is common in everyday life.

  15. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  16. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  17. Band-Edge Exciton Fine Structure and Recombination Dynamics in InP/ZnS Colloidal Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Biadala, Louis; Siebers, Benjamin; Beyazit, Yasin; Tessier, Mickaël D; Dupont, Dorian; Hens, Zeger; Yakovlev, Dmitri R; Bayer, Manfred

    2016-03-22

    We report on a temperature-, time-, and spectrally resolved study of the photoluminescence of type-I InP/ZnS colloidal nanocrystals with varying core size. By studying the exciton recombination dynamics we assess the exciton fine structure in these systems. In addition to the typical bright-dark doublet, the photoluminescence stems from an upper bright state in spite of its large energy splitting (∼100 meV). This striking observation results from dramatically lengthened thermalization processes among the fine structure levels and points to optical-phonon bottleneck effects in InP/ZnS nanocrystals. Furthermore, our data show that the radiative recombination of the dark exciton scales linearly with the bright-dark energy splitting for CdSe and InP nanocrystals. This finding strongly suggests a universal dangling bonds-assisted recombination of the dark exciton in colloidal nanostructures.

  18. E1 Transitions from the Υ'' State and the Fine Structure of the χ'b States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narain, M.; Lovelock, D. M. J.; Heintz, U.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Schamberger, R. D.; Willins, J.; Yanagisawa, C.; Franzini, P.; Tuts, P. M.; Kanekal, S.; Wu, Q. W.

    1991-06-01

    Using the CUSB-II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have made precision measurements of the electric dipole transition rates from Υ'' toχ'b, which are in excellent agreement with theory. The fine-structure splitting is found to beM(χ'b2)-M(χ'b1=13.5+/-0.4+/-0.5 MeV and(χ'b1)-M(χ'b0)=23.2+/-0.7+/-0.7 MeV, leading to a ratioR=0.584+/-0.024+/-0.02. The fine structure measures the relative contributions of the spin-orbit interaction a=9.5+/-0.2+/-0.1 MeV and tensor interaction b=2.3+/-0.1+/-0.1 MeV. We also find that the long-range confining potential transforms as a Lorentz scalar.

  19. A SCENARIO FOR THE FINE STRUCTURES OF SOLAR TYPE IIIb RADIO BURSTS BASED ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-10

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb–III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb–IIIb or III–IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  20. Electrical control of quantum-dot fine-structure splitting for high-fidelity hole spin initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar, J. D.; Baumberg, J. J.; Xu, X. L.; Irvine, A. C.; Williams, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate electrical control of the neutral exciton fine-structure splitting in a single InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dot by significantly reducing the splitting to near zero through the application of a vertical electric field in the fast electron tunneling regime. This is verified by performing high-resolution photocurrent spectroscopy of the two fine-structure split exciton eigenstates as a function of reverse bias voltage. Using the qubit initialization scheme for a quantum-dot hole spin based on rapid electric-field ionization of a spin-polarized exciton, our results suggest a practical approach towards achieving qubit initialization with near-unity fidelity in the absence of magnetic fields.

  1. A Scenario for the Fine Structures of Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts Based on Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb-III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  2. Lanthanide ion probes of structure in biology. Environmentally sensitive fine structure in laser-induced terbium(III) luminescence.

    PubMed

    Sudnick, D R; Horrocks, W D

    1979-05-23

    The 488 nm line of the CW argon ion laser provides a convenient visible source for the direct excitation of the emissive 5D4 state of the Tb(III) ion. Room temperature emission spectra of Tb(III) in a variety of environments have been examined under relatively high resolution. The samples studied include structurally well-characterized crystalline solids, model chelate complexes in solution and Tb(III) bound to the enzyme thermolysin and the protein parvalbumin. The fine structure in the emissions is caused by ligand field splittings of both ground and excited state J manifolds. These spectra provide signatures sensitive to the immediate coordination environment of the Tb(III) ion. Solid state/solution state structural comparisons are made. The emission fine structure reveal differences between the EF side calcium-binding sites of parvalbumin and the calcium site 1 of thermolysin.

  3. Comparison of the coupled-channel calculation with the WKB method for α-decay fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2013-05-01

    The α-decay fine structures in heavy deformed even-even and odd-mass nuclei are investigated using the newly developed multichannel cluster model (MCCM) and the WKB barrier penetration formalism. The MCCM is based on the coupled-channel Schrödinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. For even-even nuclei, the two methods yield comparable results concerning the branching ratios for 0+ and 2+ states but the WKB formula fails in reproducing the branching ratios for excited 4+ states. For odd-mass nuclei, it is hard to use the WKB formula to interpret the unexpected behavior BRI+1 >BRI while the MCCM succeeds. These emphasize that the coupling effects of decay channels cannot be ignored in describing the α-decay fine structure.

  4. Human brain detects short-time nonlinear predictability in the temporal fine structure of deterministic chaotic sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2013-04-01

    Deterministic nonlinear dynamical processes are ubiquitous in nature. Chaotic sounds generated by such processes may appear irregular and random in waveform, but these sounds are mathematically distinguished from random stochastic sounds in that they contain deterministic short-time predictability in their temporal fine structures. We show that the human brain distinguishes deterministic chaotic sounds from spectrally matched stochastic sounds in neural processing and perception. Deterministic chaotic sounds, even without being attended to, elicited greater cerebral cortical responses than the surrogate control sounds after about 150 ms in latency after sound onset. Listeners also clearly discriminated these sounds in perception. The results support the hypothesis that the human auditory system is sensitive to the subtle short-time predictability embedded in the temporal fine structure of sounds.

  5. R-matrix calculations for electron-impact excitation of C(+), N(2+), and O(3+) including fine structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, D.; Pradhan, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    The new R-matrix package for comprehensive close-coupling calculations for electron scattering with the first three ions in the boron isoelectronic sequence, the astrophysically significant C(+), N(2+), and O(3+), is presented. The collision strengths are calculated in the LS coupling approximation, as well as in pair-coupling scheme, for the transitions among the fine-structure sublevels. Calculations are carried out at a large number of energies in order to study the detailed effects of autoionizing resonances.

  6. Symmetry Breaking and Fine Structure Splitting in Zincblende Quantum Dots: Atomistic Simulations of Long-Range Strain and Piezoelectric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shaikh; Usman, Muhammad; Heitzinger, Clemens; Rahman, Rajib; Schliwa, Andrei; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2007-04-01

    Electrons and holes captured in self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) are subject to symmetry breaking that cannot be represented in with continuum material representations. Atomistic calculations reveal symmetry lowering due to effects of strain and piezo-electric fields. These effects are fundamentally based on the crystal topology in the quantum dots. This work studies these two competing effects and demonstrates the fine structure splitting that has been demonstrated experimentally can be attributed to the underlying atomistic structure of the quantum dots.

  7. Rocket experiments for spectral estimation of electron density fine structure in the auroral and equatorial ionosphere and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomei, B. A.; Smith, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    Sounding rockets equipped to monitor electron density and its fine structure were launched into the auroral and equatorial ionosphere in 1980 and 1983, respectively. The measurement electronics are based on the Langmuir probe and are described in detail. An approach to the spectral analysis of the density irregularities is addressed and a software algorithm implementing the approach is given. Preliminary results of the analysis are presented.

  8. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhengqing

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2x1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16±2° from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94±0.02Å. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27±0.04Å, up from 1.10Å for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25Å Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20Å and 15--23°) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16Å and 19°. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95Å for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius ~ 1.5 Å for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2x2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  9. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  10. Observations and modeling of the fine structure of loops in the transition region and corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    The physical dimensions of loops hold important clues to the coronal heating process. Theoretical arguments universally indicate that coronal heating should operate on very small spatial scales and loops should be unresolvable by current instrumentation. There are a number of observational results, however, that suggest that coronal loops are organized on spatial scales of several hundred km. For example, recent observations from IRIS have discovered a new class of low-lying dynamic loops structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFS) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. Here we show that the properties of the UFS (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) are consistent with 1-D non-equilibrium ionization simulations of an impulsively heated single strand, suggesting that they are resolved, and that the distribution of UFS widths implies that like coronal loops they are also structured on a spatial scale of a few hundred km. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, but it is unclear whether the true distribution of loop widths is normalized around this scale, or whether it extends to much smaller scales - perhaps by a power-law - below the resolution of current instruments. We have extended our previous modeling of the cross-field intensity profiles of coronal loops observed by EIS and AIA, to investigate what the modeled profiles would look like at Hi-C resolution, what they would look like if loops are composed only of < 10km threads, and what they would look like if there is a power-law distribution of loop widths. We find that the models with strands on spatial scales of a few hundred km are most consistent with the data. Very small threads do not produce smooth profiles when their properties are driven by the measured temperatures and densities, and the intensity profiles from the power-law simulations are

  11. Active region fine structure observed at 0.08 arcsec resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichenmaier, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Hoch, S.; Soltau, D.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Hofmann, A.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Staude, J.; Feller, A.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Collados, M.; Sigwarth, M.; Volkmer, R.; Waldmann, T.; Kneer, F.; Nicklas, H.; Sobotka, M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The various mechanisms of magneto-convective energy transport determine the structure of sunspots and active regions. Aims: We characterise the appearance of light bridges and other fine-structure details and elaborate on their magneto-convective nature. Methods: We present speckle-reconstructed images taken with the broad-band imager (BBI) at the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope in the 486 nm and 589 nm bands. We estimate the spatial resolution from the noise characteristics of the image bursts and obtain 0.08″ at 589 nm. We describe structure details in individual best images as well as the temporal evolution of selected features. Results: We find branched dark lanes extending along thin (≈1″) light bridges in sunspots at various heliocentric angles. In thick (≳ 2″) light bridges the branches are disconnected from the central lane and have a Y shape with a bright grain toward the umbra. The images reveal that light bridges exist on varying intensity levels and that their small-scale features evolve on timescales of minutes. Faint light bridges show dark lanes outlined by the surrounding bright features. Dark lanes are very common and are also found in the boundary of pores. They have a characteristic width of 0.1″ or smaller. Intergranular dark lanes of that width are seen in active region granulation. Conclusions: We interpret our images in the context of magneto-convective simulations and findings: while central dark lanes in thin light bridges are elevated and associated with a density increase above upflows, the dark lane branches correspond to locations of downflows and are depressed relative to the adjacent bright plasma. Thick light bridges with central dark lanes show no projection effect. They have a flat elevated plateau that falls off steeply at the umbral boundary. There, Y-shaped filaments form as they do in the inner penumbra. This indicates the presence of inclined magnetic fields, meaning that the umbral magnetic field is wrapped around

  12. Fine Structures and Kinematics of an Intriguing Chromospheric Jet Observed by Hinode Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Berger, T. E.; Title, A. M.; Tarbell, T. D.

    2009-12-01

    Transient, small-scale ejections of plasma from the lower atmosphere are common manifestations of solar activity. Hinode, with its superior resolutions, has spurred renewed interest in solar jets since its launch. Here we report a chromospheric jet lasting for more than 1 hr on 2007 February 9 observed by the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) in unprecedented detail. SOT Ca II H passband observations at high resolution of 0.2 arcsecond and cadence of 8 s allowed us to investigate the fine structures and kinematics of the jet. The ejection occurred in three episodes, rather than continuously, with the amount and velocity of material decreasing with time. The upward velocities along the jet range from ~440 to ~30 km/s, while the downward velocities of the material falling back have much smaller values (mean: -60 km/s) and a narrower distribution. Some tracks in the space-time plot clearly show parabolic shapes and the inferred acceleration is a fraction of the solar gravitational acceleration. The jet consists of fine threads (0.5-2 arcsecond wide), which exhibit coherent, oscillatory transverse motions perpendicular to the jet axis and about a common equilibrium position. These motions propagate upward, with the maximum phase speed of ~740 km/s found at the leading front of the jet. The transverse oscillation velocities range from 150 to 30 km/s, amplitudes from 6 to 2 Mm, and periods from 250 to 550 s. The oscillations slow down with time and cease when the material starts to fall back. The falling material travels along almost straight lines in the original direction of ascent, showing no transverse motions. These observations are consistent with the models suggested by Shibata & Uchida (1985) and Canfield et al. (1996). In this scenario, the jet involves untwisting helical threads, which rotate about the axis of a single large cylinder and shed magnetic helicity into the upper atmosphere. Implications of this event in the context of multiwavelength data in H

  13. Fine structure analysis of biocompatible ceramic materials based hydroxyapatite and metallic biomaterials 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelina, F. V.; Ungureanu, D. N.; Bratu, V.; Popescu, I. N.; Rusanescu, C. O.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to obtain and characterize (surface morphology and fine structure) two types of materials: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 hydroxyapatite powder (HAp) as biocompatible ceramic materials and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels as metallic biomaterials, which are the components of the metal-ceramic composites used for medical implants in reconstructive surgery and prosthetic treatment. The HAp was synthesized by coprecipitation method, heat treated at 200 °C, 800 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The stainless steel 316L type was made by casting, annealing and machined with a low speed (100 mm/s) in order to obtain a smooth surface and after that has been studied from residual stresses point of view in three polishing regimes conditions: at low speed polishing (150 rpm), at high speed polishing (1500 rpm) and high speed-vibration contact polishing (1500 rpm) using wide angle X-ray diffractions (WAXD). The chemical compositions of AISI 316 steel samples were measured using a Foundry Master Spectrometer equipped with CCD detector for spectral lines and the sparking spots of AISI 316L samples were analyzed using SEM. By XRD the phases of HAp powders have been identified and also the degree of crystallinity and average size of crystallites, and with SEM, we studied the morphology of the HAp. It has been found from XRD analysis that we obtained HAp with a high degree of crystallinity at 800 °C and 1200 °C, no presence of impurity and from SEM analysis we noticed the influence of heat treatment on the ceramic particles morphology. From the study of residual stress profiles of 316L samples were observed that it differs substantially for different machining regimes and from the SEM analysis of sparking spots we revealed the rough surfaces of stainless steel rods necessary for a better adhesion of HAp on it.

  14. Recovery and fine structure variability of RGII sub-domains in wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot)

    PubMed Central

    Buffetto, F.; Ropartz, D.; Zhang, X. J.; Gilbert, H. J.; Guillon, F.; Ralet, M.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhamnogalacturonan II (RGII) is a structurally complex pectic sub-domain composed of more than 12 different sugars and 20 different linkages distributed in five side chains along a homogalacturonan backbone. Although RGII has long been described as highly conserved over plant evolution, recent studies have revealed variations in the structure of the polysaccharide. This study examines the fine structure variability of RGII in wine, focusing on the side chains A and B obtained after sequential mild acid hydrolysis. Specifically, this study aims to differentiate intrinsic structural variations in these RGII side chains from structural variations due to acid hydrolysis. Methods RGII from wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot) was sequentially hydrolysed with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and the hydrolysis products were separated by anion-exchange chromatography (AEC). AEC fractions or total hydrolysates were analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Key Results The optimal conditions to recover non-degraded side chain B, side chain A and RGII backbone were 0·1 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h, 0·48 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h (or 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 8 h) and 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 16 h, respectively. Side chain B was particularly prone to acid degradation. Side chain A and the RGII GalA backbone were partly degraded by 0·1 m TFA at 80 °C for 1–4 h. AEC allowed separation of side chain B, methyl-esterified side chain A and non-methyl-esterified side chain A. The structure of side chain A and the GalA backbone were highly variable. Conclusions Several modifications to the RGII structure of wine were identified. The observed dearabinosylation and deacetylation were primarily the consequence of acidic treatment, while variation in methyl-esterification, methyl-ether linkages and oxidation reflect natural diversity. The physiological significance of this variability, however, remains to be determined. PMID:24908680

  15. Recovery and fine structure variability of RGII sub-domains in wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot).

    PubMed

    Buffetto, F; Ropartz, D; Zhang, X J; Gilbert, H J; Guillon, F; Ralet, M-C

    2014-10-01

    Rhamnogalacturonan II (RGII) is a structurally complex pectic sub-domain composed of more than 12 different sugars and 20 different linkages distributed in five side chains along a homogalacturonan backbone. Although RGII has long been described as highly conserved over plant evolution, recent studies have revealed variations in the structure of the polysaccharide. This study examines the fine structure variability of RGII in wine, focusing on the side chains A and B obtained after sequential mild acid hydrolysis. Specifically, this study aims to differentiate intrinsic structural variations in these RGII side chains from structural variations due to acid hydrolysis. RGII from wine (Vitis vinifera Merlot) was sequentially hydrolysed with trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and the hydrolysis products were separated by anion-exchange chromatography (AEC). AEC fractions or total hydrolysates were analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The optimal conditions to recover non-degraded side chain B, side chain A and RGII backbone were 0·1 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h, 0·48 m TFA at 40 °C for 16 h (or 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 8 h) and 0·1 m TFA at 60 °C for 16 h, respectively. Side chain B was particularly prone to acid degradation. Side chain A and the RGII GalA backbone were partly degraded by 0·1 m TFA at 80 °C for 1-4 h. AEC allowed separation of side chain B, methyl-esterified side chain A and non-methyl-esterified side chain A. The structure of side chain A and the GalA backbone were highly variable. Several modifications to the RGII structure of wine were identified. The observed dearabinosylation and deacetylation were primarily the consequence of acidic treatment, while variation in methyl-esterification, methyl-ether linkages and oxidation reflect natural diversity. The physiological significance of this variability, however, remains to be determined. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights

  16. The Long-Range Model of High-L Rydberg Fine Structure: A Critical Comparison with Experimental Data..

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Erica L.; Wright, Laura E.; Lundeen, Stephen R.

    2006-05-01

    A simple view of the fine structure of non-penetrating Rydberg levels, suggested over 70 years ago [1], was refined to treat the fine structure of helium, lithium [2], and other atoms with S-state ion cores [3]. In this view the ion polarizabilities determine the fine structure pattern. Current experimental techniques provide access to highly excited high-L states in He [4], Li [5], Mg, SiIII [6], and Ba[7], and a test of the long-range model is possible with the availability of independent theoretical calculations. A critical comparison of the data treated with the long-range model will be made to the a-priori calculations of the ionic polarizabilities. [1] Joseph E. Mayer and Maria Goeppert Mayer, Phys. Rev. 43 605 (1933). [2] Richard J. Drachman and A. K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 51 2926 (1995). [3] C. Laughlin, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 28 2787 (1995). [4] G. D. Stevens and S. R. Lundeen, Comments on At. and Mol. Phys., Comments on Mod. Phys. 1,D 207 (2000). [5] C. H. Storry, N. E. Rothery, and E. A. Hessels, Phys. Rev. A 55 128 (1997). [6] R. A. Komara et. al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 S87 (2005). [7] E.L. Snow, et. al. Phys. Rev. A 71, 022510 (2005)

  17. Quiescent Prominences in the Era of ALMA: Simulated Observations Using the 3D Whole-prominence Fine Structure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, Stanislav; Heinzel, Petr; Mackay, Duncan H.; Anzer, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    We use the detailed 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to produce the first simulated high-resolution ALMA observations of a modeled quiescent solar prominence. The maps of synthetic brightness temperature and optical thickness shown in the present paper are produced using a visualization method for synthesis of the submillimeter/millimeter radio continua. We have obtained the simulated observations of both the prominence at the limb and the filament on the disk at wavelengths covering a broad range that encompasses the full potential of ALMA. We demonstrate here extent to which the small-scale and large-scale prominence and filament structures will be visible in the ALMA observations spanning both the optically thin and thick regimes. We analyze the relationship between the brightness and kinetic temperature of the prominence plasma. We also illustrate the opportunities ALMA will provide for studying the thermal structure of the prominence plasma from the cores of the cool prominence fine structure to the prominence-corona transition region. In addition, we show that detailed 3D modeling of entire prominences with their numerous fine structures will be important for the correct interpretation of future ALMA observations of prominences.

  18. A mechanism for the Fine Structures of Solar Radio Bursts Based on the Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Tong, Z.; Liu, J.

    2015-12-01

    A scenario based on the electron cyclotron maser emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission in the present discussion. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro-frequency by ultra low frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of the maser instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation of the observed fine-structure components in the solar type IIIb burst is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of the type IIIb bursts are addressed: 1) what is the physical mechanism that results in the intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of type IIIb bursts, 2) what causes the split pair (or double stria) and the triple stria, 3) why in the events of fundamental-harmonic pair emission there is only IIIb-III, but IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb cases are very rarely observed. The application of the scenario to some other type of solar radio bursts and their fine structures are also discussed.

  19. A correlational method to concurrently measure envelope and temporal fine structure weights: effects of age, cochlear pathology, and spectral shaping.

    PubMed

    Fogerty, Daniel; Humes, Larry E

    2012-09-01

    The speech signal may be divided into spectral frequency-bands, each band containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. This study measured the perceptual weights for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials in young normal-hearing listeners, older normal-hearing listeners, aided older hearing-impaired listeners, and spectrally matched young normal-hearing listeners. The availability of each acoustic property was independently varied through noisy signal extraction. Thus, the full speech stimulus was presented with noise used to mask six different auditory channels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener's performance with the signal-to-noise ratio of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrate that temporal fine structure perceptual weights remain stable across the four listener groups. However, a different weighting typography was observed across the listener groups for envelope cues. Results suggest that spectral shaping used to preserve the audibility of the speech stimulus may alter the allocation of perceptual resources. The relative perceptual weighting of envelope cues may also change with age. Concurrent testing of sentences repeated once on a previous day demonstrated that weighting strategies for all listener groups can change, suggesting an initial stabilization period or susceptibility to auditory training.

  20. Close-coupling calculations of fine-structure excitation of Ne II due to H and electron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Wang, Qianxia; Loch, Stuart; Pindzola, Michael; Schultz, David R.; Buenker, Robert; McLaughlin, Brendan; Ballance, Connor

    2016-06-01

    Fine-structure transitions within the ground term of ions and neutral atoms dominate the cooling in a variety of molecular regions and also provide important density and temperature diagnostics. While fine-structure rates due to electron collisions have been studied for many systems, data are generally sparse for elements larger than oxygen, at low temperatures, and for collisions due to heavy particles. We provide rate coefficients for H collisions for the first time. The calculations were performed using the quantum molecular-orbital close-coupling approach and the elastic approximation. The heavy-particle collisions use new potential energies for the lowest-lying NeH+ states computed with the MRDCI method. The focus of the electron-impact calculations is to provide fine-structure excitation rate coefficients down to 10 K. We compare with previous calculations at higher temperatures (Griffin et al. 2001), and use a range of calculations to provide an estimate of the uncertainty on our recommended rate coefficients. A brief discussion of astrophysical applications is also provided.Griffin, D.C., et al., 2001, J. Phys. B, 34, 4401This work partially supported by NASA grant No. NNX15AE47G.

  1. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure and micro-Raman spectra of Bridgman grown Cd1-xZnxTe ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Devki N.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Becla, P.

    2014-03-01

    We have performed low-temperature micro-Raman scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements on the Bridgman-grown bulk zinc-blende Cd1-x Zn x Te (1.0 ≧̸ x ≧̸ 0.03) ternary alloys to comprehend their structural and lattice dynamical properties. The micro-Raman results are carefully appraised to authenticate the classical two-phonon mode behavior insinuated by far-infrared (FIR) reflectivity study. The composition-dependent EXAFS experiments have revealed a bimodal distribution of the nearest-neighbor bond lengths—its analysis by first-principles bond-orbital model enabled us to estimate the lattice relaxations around Zn/Cd atoms in CdTe/ZnTe to help evaluate the necessary force constant variations for constructing the impurity-perturbation matrices. The simulated results of impurity vibrational modes by average-t-matrix Green’s function (ATM-GF) theory has put our experimental findings of the gap mode ˜153 cm-1 near x ≈ 1 on a much firmer ground.

  2. Correlation between the fine structure of spin-coated PEDOT:PSS and the photovoltaic performance of organic/crystalline-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funda, Shuji; Ohki, Tatsuya; Liu, Qiming; Hossain, Jaker; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Keiji; Shirai, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between the fine structure of spin-coated conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films and the photovoltaic performance of PEDOT:PSS crystalline-Si (PEDOT:PSS/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. Real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed that there were two different time constants for the formation of the PEDOT:PSS network. Upon removal of the polar solvent, the PEDOT:PSS film became optically anisotropic, indicating a conformational change in the PEDOT and PSS chain. Polarized Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements also indicated that thermal annealing promoted an in-plane π-conjugated Cα = Cβ configuration attributed to a thiophene ring in PEDOT and an out-of-plane configuration of -SO3 groups in the PSS chain with increasing composition ratio of oxidized (benzoid) to neutral (quinoid) PEDOT, Iqui/Iben. The highest power conversion efficiency for the spin-coated PEDOT:PSS/c-Si heterojunction solar cells was 13.3% for Iqui/Iben = 9-10 without employing any light harvesting methods.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of correlated fine structure branching ratios arising from state-selected predissociation of BrO (A2Π3/2).

    PubMed

    Grubb, Michael P; Dooley, Kristin S; Freeman, C Daniel; Peterson, Kirk A; North, Simon W

    2014-01-14

    We present results for the v'-dependent predissociation dynamics of the BrO (A(2)Π3/2) state using velocity map ion imaging. Correlated fine structure branching ratios, Br((2)P(J)) + O((3)P(J)), have been measured for v' = 5-16 states. The experimental branching ratios are non-statistical and strongly dependent on the initial vibronic state. The current measurements represent an extensive dataset containing rich information about the predissociation dynamics of this system and should provide a stringent test for modern theory. New high level ab initio excited state potentials are presented and have been optimized using experimental v'-dependent predissociation lifetimes and calculated coupling constants. Comparisons between the experimental branching ratios and the predictions based on diabatic and adiabatic limiting models are presented. We find that the adiabatic model is most consistent with the observed trends in the correlated branching ratios, in contrast to previous studies on the related ClO system.

  4. Correlation between the fine structure of spin-coated PEDOT:PSS and the photovoltaic performance of organic/crystalline-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Funda, Shuji; Ohki, Tatsuya; Liu, Qiming; Hossain, Jaker; Ishimaru, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Keiji; Shirai, Hajime

    2016-07-21

    We investigated the relationship between the fine structure of spin-coated conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films and the photovoltaic performance of PEDOT:PSS crystalline-Si (PEDOT:PSS/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. Real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry revealed that there were two different time constants for the formation of the PEDOT:PSS network. Upon removal of the polar solvent, the PEDOT:PSS film became optically anisotropic, indicating a conformational change in the PEDOT and PSS chain. Polarized Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements also indicated that thermal annealing promoted an in-plane π-conjugated C{sub α} = C{sub β} configuration attributed to a thiophene ring in PEDOT and an out-of-plane configuration of -SO{sub 3} groups in the PSS chain with increasing composition ratio of oxidized (benzoid) to neutral (quinoid) PEDOT, I{sub qui}/I{sub ben}. The highest power conversion efficiency for the spin-coated PEDOT:PSS/c-Si heterojunction solar cells was 13.3% for I{sub qui}/I{sub ben} = 9–10 without employing any light harvesting methods.

  5. Photoluminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies on cadmium telluride material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangxin

    The direct-band-gap semiconductor CdTe is an important material for fabricating high efficiency, polycrystalline thin-film solar cells in a heterojunction configuration. The outstanding physical properties of this material such as its good band-gap match to the solar spectrum, ease of fabrication of stoichiometric films, and easy grain boundary passivation make it an important candidate for large area, thin-film solar cells. However, there are several poorly understood processing steps that are commonly utilized in cell fabrication. One of these is a CdCl2 treatment near 400°C in the presence of oxygen, which can improve the cell efficiency a factor of two or more. Another factor is the role of copper in cell performance. In high performance CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells, copper is usually included in the fabrication of low-resistance back contacts to obtain heavy p-type doping of the absorber CdTe at the contact. However, most of the copper is not electrically active. For example, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) on typical CdTe cells has shown Cu concentrations of 1019 atoms/cm3 and even higher, although capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements indicate typical ionized acceptor levels on the order of 1014/cm 3. Thus, there is great interest in the location and role of this inactive copper in CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. In this thesis, I will describe results obtained on magnetron-sputtered CdTe films that were diffused with copper following the procedure used for creating a cell back contact. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements identified the chemical environment of the majority of the copper and show major differences depending on whether the CdTe film has been treated with chloride prior to the Cu diffusion. The EXAFS data indicate that the Cu chemistry is strongly affected by the chloride treatments---predominantly Cu2Te when Cu was diffused into the as-deposited CdTe film, but a Cu2O environment when Cu was diffused after

  6. Attenuation of changes in capillary fine structure and leukocyte adhesion improves muscle performance following chronic ischaemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hudlická, O; Garnham, A; Shiner, R; Egginton, S

    2008-01-01

    Acute ischaemia–reperfusion disrupts capillary fine structure and increases leukocyte adhesion in postcapillary venules. We determined whether chronic muscle ischaemia has similar consequences, and whether it is possible to ameliorate its effect on muscle performance. Following ischaemia (unilateral ligation, common iliac artery) rat hindlimb muscles were examined without other intervention or following treatment with an xanthine oxidase inhibitor (allopurinol), a Na+/H+ exchange blocker (amiloride), or an oxygen free radical scavenger (vitamin E). No significant leukocyte adhesion or rolling, nor changes in capillary fine structure were observed 3 days postsurgery, when limb use was limited. However, leukocyte rolling and adhesion almost trebled by 7 days (P < 0.001), when normal gait was largely restored. Capillary fine structure was disturbed over a similar time course, e.g. relative endothelial volume (control 46%, 7 days 61%; P < 0.05), that resolved by 5 weeks. Where activity was increased by mild electrical stimulation 3 days after ligation muscles showed enhanced capillary swelling (endothelial volume 66%versus 50%, P < 0.005), but improved fatigue index (52%versus 16%, P < 0.001) as a result of greater blood flow. Muscle fatigue after ligation was related to the extent of contraction-induced hyperaemia (R2= 0.725), but not capillary swelling. Amiloride, and to a lesser extent allopurinol but not vitamin E, significantly decreased leukocyte rolling and adhesion, as well as capillary endothelial swelling. We conclude that increased activity of ischaemic muscles on recovery is likely to accentuate acidosis accompanying changes in microcirculation and contribute to enhanced muscle fatigue, whereas formation of oxygen free radicals may be attenuated by endogenous protective mechanisms. PMID:18755748

  7. Titanium dioxide fine structures by RF magnetron sputter method deposited on an electron-beam resist mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Hideomi; Miyazaki, Yuta; Matsushita, Sachiko

    2013-09-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been draw attention for wide range of applications from photonic crystals for visible light range by its catalytic characteristics to tera-hertz range by its high refractive index. We present an experimental study of fabrication of fine structures of TiO2 with a ZEP electron beam resist mask followed by Ti sputter deposition techniques. A TiO2 thin layer of 150 nm thick was grown on an FTO glass substrate with a fine patterned ZEP resist mask by a conventional RF magnetron sputter method with Ti target. The deposition was carried out with argon-oxygen gases at a pressure of 5.0 x 10 -1 Pa in a chamber. During the deposition, ratio of Ar-O2 gas was kept to the ratio of 2:1 and the deposition ratio was around 0.5 Å/s to ensure enough oxygen to form TiO2 and low temperature to avoid deformation of fine pattern of the ZPU resist mask. Deposited TiO2 layers are white-transparent, amorphous, and those roughnesses are around 7 nm. Fabricated TiO2 PCs have wider TiO2 slabs of 112 nm width leaving periodic 410 x 410 nm2 air gaps. We also studied transformation of TiO2 layers and TiO2 fine structures by baking at 500 °C. XRD measurement for TiO2 shows that the amorphous TiO2 transforms to rutile and anatase forms by the baking while keeping the same profile of the fine structures. Our fabrication method can be one of a promising technique to optic devices on researches and industrial area.

  8. Counting Classes and the Fine Structure between NC 1 and L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Samir; Mahajan, Meena; Rao, B. V. Raghavendra; Thomas, Michael; Vollmer, Heribert

    The class NC 1of problems solvable by bounded fan-in circuit families of logarithmic depth is known to be contained in logarithmic space L, but not much about the converse is known. In this paper we examine the structure of classes in between NC 1 and L based on counting functions or, equivalently, based on arithmetic circuits. The classes PNC 1 and C = NC 1, defined by a test for positivity and a test for zero, respectively, of arithmetic circuit families of logarithmic depth, sit in this complexity interval. We study the landscape of Boolean hierarchies, constant-depth oracle hierarchies, and logarithmic-depth oracle hierarchies over PNC 1 and C = NC 1. We provide complete problems, obtain the upper bound L for all these hierarchies, and prove partial hierarchy collapses - in particular, the constant-depth oracle hierarchy over PNC 1 collapses to its first level PNC 1, and the constant-depth oracle hierarchy over C = NC 1 collapses to its second level.

  9. Apparent mismatch between extended x-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction structures of crystalline metastable WO3 phases.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, J; Rougier, A; Laruelle, S; Michalowicz, A

    2006-09-28

    The local structure of monoclinic, monohydrate, hexagonal, and pyrochlore WO3 phases was investigated by the extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy as preliminary studies of model compounds of amorphous and thin film WO3 based electrochromic species. In the four cases, we found a large W-O distribution of distances ranging from 1.70 to 2.35 A. The apparent discrepancy of these results and previously published crystal structures are discussed and interpreted as the detection of vacancies and local distortion disorder.

  10. Fine structure of the epidermal Leydig cells in the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum in relation to their function.

    PubMed Central

    Jarial, M S

    1989-01-01

    The fine structure of the Leydig cells in the epidermis of the strictly aquatic adult axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum resembles that of similar cells in larval salamanders. The major finding of this study is that the mucous secretion of the Leydig cells is released into the intercellular spaces from which it is discharged through pores onto the surface of the epidermis where it forms a mucous layer to protect the skin. Images Figs. 1-2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Figs. 11-13 PMID:2630544

  11. Diffraction anomalous fine structure analysis on (Bi,Pb){sub 2}PtO{sub 4} powders

    SciTech Connect

    Vacinova, J.; Hodeau, J.L.; Bordet, P.

    1995-12-31

    The Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS) method can provide site selective and chemical selective structural information. The possibilities of DAFS experimental and data analysis procedures are demonstrated for (Bi{sub 1.67},Pb{sub 0.33}) powder samples. Experiments have been performed at both L{sub III} and K Pt edges (11.56.564keV and 78keV), using several data collection set-ups (analyser crystals, 1D-detector, 2D-detector). Based on this example, a comparison between these experimental procedures and analysis is given and discussed.

  12. Accurate electron affinity of V and fine-structure splittings of V- via slow-electron velocity-map imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoxi; Luo, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-10-01

    We report the high-resolution photoelectron spectra of negative vanadium ions obtained via the slow-electron velocity-map imaging method. The electron affinity of V was determined to be 4255.9(18) cm-1 or 0.527 66(20) eV. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 60 with regard to the previous measurement. The fine structure of V- was well resolved: 35.9(11) (5D1), 103.8(12) (5D2), 204.17(74) (5D3), and 330.58(40) cm-1 (5D4) above the ground state 5D0, respectively.

  13. Accurate electron affinity of V and fine-structure splittings of V(-) via slow-electron velocity-map imaging.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoxi; Luo, Zhihong; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-10-28

    We report the high-resolution photoelectron spectra of negative vanadium ions obtained via the slow-electron velocity-map imaging method. The electron affinity of V was determined to be 4255.9(18) cm(-1) or 0.527 66(20) eV. The accuracy was improved by a factor of 60 with regard to the previous measurement. The fine structure of V(-) was well resolved: 35.9(11) ((5)D1), 103.8(12) ((5)D2), 204.17(74) ((5)D3), and 330.58(40) cm(-1) ((5)D4) above the ground state (5)D0, respectively.

  14. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  15. Development of the surface-sensitive soft x-ray absorption fine structure measurement technique for the bulk insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemura, Takumi Iihara, Junji; Uemura, Shigeaki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Niibe, Masahito

    2016-07-27

    We have succeeded in measuring X-ray absorption fine structure (TEY-XAFS) spectra of insulating plate samples by total electron yield. The biggest problem is how to suppress the charge-up. We have attempted to deposit a gold stripe electrode on the surface and obtained a TEY-XAFS spectrum. This indicates that the metal stripe electrode is very useful in the TEY-XAFS measurement of the insulating plate samples. In the detailed analysis, we have found that the effective area for suppressing charge-up was approximately 120 μm from the edge of the electrode.

  16. InGaN Selfassembled Quantum Dots Investigated By X-Ray Diffraction-Anomalous-Fine Structure Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorska, E.; Siebert, M.; Schmidt, T.; Falta, J.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hommel, D.; Renevier, H.

    2007-04-10

    Local chemical composition of InGaN quantum dots grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaN virtual substrates was investigated by x-ray diffraction anomalous fine-structure method. Using this approach, we found that the In content increases from 20% at the dot base to 40-50% at the top. From the detailed numerical analysis of the data we were able to reconstruct the local neighborhood of Ga atoms in different positions in the dots, as well as the local elastic relaxation state.

  17. Methods for determining the polarisability of the fine structure levels in the ground state of the thulium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovizin, A. A.; Kalganova, E. S.; Sukachev, D. D.; Vishnyakova, G. A.; Tregubov, D. O.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Sorokin, V. N.; Kolachevsky, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    We have calculated the scalar and tensor parts of the polarisabilities of the fine-structure sublevels J = 7/2 and 5/2 of the thulium atom ground state. The static polarisabilities are in a good agreement with the values known from the literature. We also present experimental techniques for measuring the dynamic scalar polarisabilities of these levels at a wavelength of 532 nm. The measured values agree with our calculations within the errors. The results of this work can be used for designing an optical frequency standard based on laser-cooled thulium atoms.

  18. FS4, FS4-p, and FSP: a 4-month crossover study of 3 fine structure sound-coding strategies.

    PubMed

    Riss, Dominik; Hamzavi, Jafar-Sasan; Blineder, Michaela; Honeder, Clemens; Ehrenreich, Isabella; Kaider, Alexandra; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Gstoettner, Wolfgang; Arnoldner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare two novel fine structure strategies "FS4" and "FS4-p" with the established fine structure processing (FSP) strategy. FS4 provides fine structure information on the apical four-electrode channels. With FS4-p, these electrodes may be stimulated in a parallel manner. The authors evaluated speech perception, sound quality, and subjective preference. A longitudinal crossover study was done on postlingually deafened adults (N = 33) who were using FSP as their default strategy. Each participant was fitted with FS4, FS4-p, and FSP, for 4 months in a randomized and blinded order. After each run, an Adaptive Sentence test in noise (Oldenburger Sentence Test [OLSA]) and a Monosyllable test in quiet (Freiburger Monosyllables) were performed, and subjective sound quality was determined with a Visual Analogue Scale. At the end of the study the preferred strategy was noted. Scores of the OLSA did not reveal any significant differences among the three strategies, but the Freiburger test showed a statistically significant effect (p = 0.03) with slightly worse scores for FS4 (49.7%) compared with FSP (54.3%). Performance of FS4-p (51.8%) was comparable with the other strategies. Both audiometric tests depicted a high variability among subjects. The number of best-performing strategies for each participant individually was as follows: (a) for the OLSA: FSP, N = 10.5; FS4, N = 10.5; and FS4-p, N = 12; and (b) for the Freiburger test: FSP, N = 14; FS4, N = 9; and FS4-p, N = 10. A moderate agreement was found in the best-performing strategies of the Speech tests within the participants. For sound quality, speech in quiet, classical, and pop music were assessed. No significant effects of strategy were found for speech in quiet and classical music, but auditory impression of pop music was rated as more natural in FSP compared with FS4 (p = 0.04). It is interesting that at the end of the study, a majority of the participants favored the new

  19. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  20. [Correlation of fine structures of distributions of amplitudes of a photomultiplier dark current fluctuations with the Earth rotations about its axis].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, M V; Belousov, L V; Voeĭkov, V L; Zenchenko, K I; Zenchenko, T A; Konradov, A A; Shnol', S E

    2001-01-01

    The fine structures of distributions of photomultiplier dark current fluctuations measured in two laboratories 2000 km distant from other: in the international Institute of Biophysics (Neuss, Germany) and in the Moscow State University (Moscow, Russia) were compared. It is shown that similar forms of appropriate histograms are apparently more often realized at both locations at the same local time. This confirms the previous conclusion that the fine structure of distributions correlates with rotation of the Earth about its axis.