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Sample records for finesse optical cavities

  1. Diffraction-limited high-finesse optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S. R.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2010-04-15

    High-quality optical cavities with wavelength-sized end mirrors are important to the growing field of micro-optomechanical systems. We present a versatile method for calculating the modes of diffraction limited optical cavities and show that it can be used to determine the effect of a wide variety of cavity geometries and imperfections. Additionally, we show these calculations agree remarkably well with FDTD simulations for wavelength-sized optical modes, even though our method is based on the paraxial approximation.

  2. Rydberg-blockaded medium inside a high-finesse optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Kumar, Santosh; Whiteneck, William; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James

    2015-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical progress on a Rydberg-blockaded atomic ensemble coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity. Theoretically, we analyze the role that the Rydberg blockade mechanism can play in synthesizing collective quantum states and non-classical states of light in this system. We study the correlation of two photon emission in the case of two Rydberg excitations within the cavity. Experimentally, we show that a cold atomic cloud can be transported into a high-finesse optical cavity by using a focus-tunable lens and that a collective state can be created inside the cavity using Rydberg atom blockade. Future work to realize collective quantum states in the atom-cavity experiment and study the interesting dynamics of the correlated photon emission will be presented.

  3. Optical filter finesses enhancement based on nested coupled cavities and active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-04-01

    Optical filters with relatively large FSR and narrow linewidth are simultaneously needed for different applications. The ratio between the FSR and the 3-dB linewidth is given by finesse of the filter, which is solely determined by the different energy loss mechanisms limited by the technology advancement. In this work, we present a novel coupled-cavity configuration embedding an optical filter and a gain medium; allowing an overall finesse enhancement and simultaneous FSR and 3-dB linewidth engineering beyond the technological limits of the filter fabrication method. The configuration consists of two resonators. An active ring resonator comprises an optical gain medium and a passive resonator. In one configuration, the optical filter is the passive resonator itself. In a second configuration, the passive resonator is another ring resonator that embeds the optical filter. The presented configurations using a semiconductor optical amplifier are applied one time to a mechanically Fabry-Perot filter in the first presented configuration; and a second time to a fiber ring filter in the second presented configuration. The mechanical filter has an original 3-dB linewidth of 1nm and an FSR that is larger than 100nm while the enhanced linewidth is about 0.3nm. The fiber ring filter length is 4 m and directional coupler ratios of 90/10corresponding to a 3-dBlinewidth of about 4MHz and an FSR of 47 MHz. The enhanced 3- dBlinewidth of the overall filter configuration is 200kHz, demonstrating finesse enhancement up to20 times the original finesse of the filter.

  4. Complete characterization of a broadband high-finesse cavity using an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Schliesser, Albert; Gohle, Christoph; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2006-06-26

    We demonstrate a new method to simultaneously measure spectrally resolved dispersion and losses (finesse) of a passive optical cavity over the entire bandwidth of an optical frequency comb. To this end, we record and analyze the spectral Moiré pattern between the perfectly equidistant frequency comb emitted from a Ti:Sapphire laser and the longitudinal modes of the passive cavity as a function of the laser's carrier-envelope-offset phase slippage (ø)CE. In the group-delay dispersion measurement of additionally introduced optical elements we verify a 2fs(2) accuracy in a 2THz resolution bandwidth and find good agreement of the measured performance and the target design of a high reflectance dielectric mirror. The sensitivity of the method is essentially equivalent to a cavity ring down technique allowing us also to readily observe signatures of atmospheric gas species. PMID:19516768

  5. Water-walled microfluidics for high-optical finesse cavities

    PubMed Central

    Maayani, Shai; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In submerged microcavities there is a tradeoff between resonant enhancement for spatial water and light overlap. Why not transform the continuously resonating optical mode to be fully contained in a water microdroplet per se? Here we demonstrate a sustainable 30-μm-pure water device, bounded almost completely by free surfaces, enabling >1,000,000 re-circulations of light. The droplets survive for >16 h using a technique that is based on a nano-water bridge from the droplet to a distant reservoir to compensate for evaporation. More than enabling a nearly-perfect optical overlap with water, atomic-level surface smoothness that minimizes scattering loss, and ∼99% coupling efficiency from a standard fibre. Surface tension in our droplet is 8,000 times stronger than gravity, suggesting a new class of devices with water-made walls, for new fields of study including opto-capillaries. PMID:26794271

  6. Water-walled microfluidics for high-optical finesse cavities.

    PubMed

    Maayani, Shai; Martin, Leopoldo L; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In submerged microcavities there is a tradeoff between resonant enhancement for spatial water and light overlap. Why not transform the continuously resonating optical mode to be fully contained in a water microdroplet per se? Here we demonstrate a sustainable 30-μm-pure water device, bounded almost completely by free surfaces, enabling >1,000,000 re-circulations of light. The droplets survive for >16 h using a technique that is based on a nano-water bridge from the droplet to a distant reservoir to compensate for evaporation. More than enabling a nearly-perfect optical overlap with water, atomic-level surface smoothness that minimizes scattering loss, and ∼99% coupling efficiency from a standard fibre. Surface tension in our droplet is 8,000 times stronger than gravity, suggesting a new class of devices with water-made walls, for new fields of study including opto-capillaries. PMID:26794271

  7. Water-walled microfluidics for high-optical finesse cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maayani, Shai; Martin, Leopoldo L.; Carmon, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In submerged microcavities there is a tradeoff between resonant enhancement for spatial water and light overlap. Why not transform the continuously resonating optical mode to be fully contained in a water microdroplet per se? Here we demonstrate a sustainable 30-μm-pure water device, bounded almost completely by free surfaces, enabling >1,000,000 re-circulations of light. The droplets survive for >16 h using a technique that is based on a nano-water bridge from the droplet to a distant reservoir to compensate for evaporation. More than enabling a nearly-perfect optical overlap with water, atomic-level surface smoothness that minimizes scattering loss, and ~99% coupling efficiency from a standard fibre. Surface tension in our droplet is 8,000 times stronger than gravity, suggesting a new class of devices with water-made walls, for new fields of study including opto-capillaries.

  8. High finesse optical fiber cavities: optimal alignment and robust stabilization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratschbacher, Lothar; Gallego, Jose; Ghosh, Sutapa; Alavi, Seyed; Alt, Wolfgang; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications. Some of the most promising areas of application of these optical micro-resonators with high finesse and small mode volume are in the field of quantum communication and information. The resonator-enhanced light-matter interaction, for instance, provide basis for the realization of efficient optical interfaces between stationary matter-based quantum nodes and flying single-photon qubits. To date fiber Fabry-Perot cavities have been successfully applied in experiments interfacing single photons with a wide range of quantum systems, including cold atoms, ions and solid state emitters as well as quantum optomechanical experiments. Here we address some important practical questions that arise during the experimental implementation of high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: How can optimal fiber cavity alignment be achieved and how can the efficiency of coupling light from the optical fibers to the cavity mode and vice versa be characterized? How should optical fiber cavities be constructed and stabilized to fulfill their potential for miniaturization and integration into robust scientific and technological devices that can operate outside of dedicated laboratory environments in the future? The first two questions we answer with an analytic mode matching calculation that relates the alignment dependent fiber-to-cavity mode-matching efficiency to the easily measurable dip in the reflected light power at the cavity resonance. Our general analysis provides a simple recipe for the optimal alignment of fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and moreover for the first time explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes. The latter question we explore by investigating a novel, intrinsically rigid fiber cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal

  9. High finesse optical cavity coupled with a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopic sensor.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Borri, Simone; Galli, Iacopo; Mazzotti, Davide; Giusfredi, Giovanni; Akikusa, Naota; Yamanishi, Masamichi; Scamarcio, Gaetano; De Natale, Paolo; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2015-02-01

    An ultra-sensitive and selective quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) combined with a high-finesse cavity sensor platform is proposed as a novel method for trace gas sensing. We call this technique Intra-cavity QEPAS (I-QEPAS). In the proposed scheme, a single-mode continuous wave quantum cascade laser (QCL) is coupled into a bow-tie optical cavity. The cavity is locked to the QCL emission frequency by means of a feedback-locking loop that acts directly on a piezoelectric actuator mounted behind one of the cavity mirrors. A power enhancement factor of ∼240 was achieved, corresponding to an intracavity power of ∼0.72 W. CO2 was selected as the target gas to validate our sensor. For the P(42) CO2 absorption line, located at 2311.105 cm(-1), a minimum detection limit of 300 parts per trillion by volume at a total gas pressure of 50 mbar was achieved with a 20 s integration time. This corresponds to a normalized noise equivalent absorption of 3.2 × 10(-10) W cm(-1) Hz(-1/2), comparable with the best results reported for the QEPAS technique on much faster relaxing gases. A comparison with standard QEPAS performed under the same experimental conditions confirms that the I-QEPAS sensitivity scales with the intracavity laser power enhancement factor.

  10. Phase-Matched Raman-Resonant Four-Wave Mixing in a Dispersion-Compensated High-Finesse Optical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsu, Shin-Ichi; Izaki, Hirotomo; Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-02-01

    A highly efficient intracavity four-wave mixing in a Raman-active medium pumped by a continuous-wave laser is first demonstrated. Managing the intracavity dispersion to satisfy the phase matching in a high-finesse cavity substantially enhances the anti-Stokes emission. This process is observed in a region far beyond small signal approximation, indicating the generation of phase-locked sidebands arising from molecular modulation. This points to a novel approach of an optical modulator and mode-locked laser operating at a frequency of more than 10 THz.

  11. Birefringence-induced frequency beating in high-finesse cavities by continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    By analyzing the decaying intensity, leaking out a high-finesse cavity previously "filled" by a cw laser source (using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique), we observed frequency beating between what we think are two orthogonal eigenpolarization states of the intracavity electromagnetic field. The time decay (ring down) is analyzed by varying the angle of the polarization analyzer located in front of the detector. A full modeling of the observed signal is proposed. It is based on the Jones matrix formalism required for modeling the cavity behavior following a rotated phase shifter. The full transfer function is first established in the frequency domain, and then Fourier transformed to recover the temporal response. The same optical cavity, i.e., constituted of the same set of mirrors, is used at two different wavelengths (˜800 and ˜880 nm). It demonstrates the differences in behavior between a high-finesse cavity (˜400 000 ) and a lower finesse cavity (˜50 000 ). Beating frequency, characteristics time, and beat amplitude are mainly discussed versus the analyzer angle. A cavity birefringence of ˜1.6 ×10-5 rad, resulting from the mirror birefringence is suggested. If the current analysis is in agreement with pulsed CRDS experiments (polarimetry) obtained in an isotropic moderate-finesse cavity, it differs from a recent work report on a high-finesse cavity associated with a source mode locking [Phys. Rev. A 85, 013837 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.013837].

  12. High-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities: stabilization and mode matching analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Ghosh, S.; Alavi, S. K.; Alt, W.; Martinez-Dorantes, M.; Meschede, D.; Ratschbacher, L.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, formed by micro-machined mirrors on the end-facets of optical fibers, are used in an increasing number of technical and scientific applications, where they typically require precise stabilization of their optical resonances. Here, we study two different approaches to construct fiber Fabry-Perot resonators and stabilize their length for experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics with neutral atoms. A piezo-mechanically actuated cavity with feedback based on the Pound-Drever-Hall locking technique is compared to a novel rigid cavity design that makes use of the high passive stability of a monolithic cavity spacer and employs thermal self-locking and external temperature tuning. Furthermore, we present a general analysis of the mode matching problem in fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, which explains the asymmetry in their reflective line shapes and has important implications for the optimal alignment of the fiber resonators. Finally, we discuss the issue of fiber-generated background photons. We expect that our results contribute toward the integration of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities into compact and robust quantum-enabled devices in the future.

  13. Shot-noise-limited measurement of sub-parts-per-trillion birefringence phase shift in a high-finesse cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Mathieu; Morville, Jerome; Romanini, Daniele

    2010-09-15

    We report on a promising approach to high-sensitivity anisotropy measurements using a high-finesse cavity locked by optical feedback to a diode laser. We provide a simple and effective way to decouple the weak anisotropy of interest from the inherent mirror's birefringence whose drift may be identified as the key limiting parameter in cavity-based techniques. We demonstrate a shot-noise-limited phase shift resolution previously inaccessible in an optical cavity, readily achieving the state-of-the-art level of 3x10{sup -13} rad.

  14. High-finesse cavities fabricated by buckling self-assembly of a-Si/SiO2 multilayers.

    PubMed

    Allen, T W; Silverstone, J; Ponnampalam, N; Olsen, T; Meldrum, A; DeCorby, R G

    2011-09-26

    Arrays of half-symmetric Fabry-Perot micro-cavities were fabricated by controlled formation of circular delamination buckles within a-Si/SiO(2) multilayers. Cavity height scales approximately linearly with diameter, in reasonable agreement with predictions based on elastic buckling theory. The measured finesse (F > 10(3)) and quality factors (Q > 10(4) in the 1550 nm range) are close to reflectance limited predictions, indicating that the cavities have low roughness and few defects. Degenerate Hermite-Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian modes were observed, suggesting a high degree of cylindrical symmetry. Given their silicon-based fabrication, these cavities hold promise as building blocks for integrated optical sensing systems.

  15. Compton scattering off polarized electrons with a high-finesse Fabry-Perot Cavity at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas Falletto; Martial Authier; Maud Baylac; M. Boyer; Francois Bugeon; Etienne Burtin; Christian Cavata; Nathalie Colombel; G. Congretel; R. Coquillard; G. Coulloux; Bertrand Couzy; P Deck; Alain Delbart; D. Desforges; A. Donati; B. Duboue; Stephanie Escoffier; F. Farci; Bernard Frois; P Girardot; J Guillotau; C Henriot; Claude Jeanney; M Juillard; J. P. Jorda; P. Legou; David Lhuillier; Y Lussignol; Phillippe Mangeot; X. Martin; Frederic Marie; Jacques Martino; M. Maurier; Bernard Mazeau; J.F. Millot; F. Molinie; J.-P. Mols; Jean-pierre Mouly; M. Mur; Damien Neyret; T. Pedrol; Stephane Platchkov; G. Pontet; Thierry Pussieux; Yannick Queinec; Philippe Rebourgeard; J. C. Sellier; Gerard Tarte; Christian Veyssiere; Andre Zakarian; Pierre Bertin; Alain Cosquer; Jian-ping Chen; Joseph Mitchell; J.-M. Mackowski; L. Pinard

    2001-03-01

    We built and commissioned a new type of Compton polarimeter to measure the electron beam polarization at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Virginia, USA). The heart of this polarimeter is a high-finesse monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity. Its purpose is to amplify a primary 300 mW laser beam in order to improve the signal to noise ratio of the polarimeter. It is the first time that a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity is enclosed in the vacuum of a particle accelerator to monitor the beam polarization by Compton polarimetry. The measured finesse and amplification gain of the cavity are F=26000 and G=7300. The electron beam crosses this high-power photon source at an angle of 23 mrad in the middle of the cavity where the photon beam power density is estimated to be 0.85MW/cm2. We have used this facility during the HAPPEX experiment (April-July 1999) and we give a preliminary measurement of Compton scattering asymmetry.

  16. Diode laser frequency stabilization using a low cost, low finesse Fabry-Perot cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Hannah; Jaber, Noura B.; Piatt, Georgia; Gregoric, Vincent C.; Carroll, Thomas J.; Noel, Michael W.

    2016-05-01

    Our lab employs low cost, low finesse Fabry-Perot cavities to stabilize the frequency of diode lasers used in ultra-cold Rydberg atom experiments. To characterize the stability of this technique, we perform a self-heterodyne linewidth measurement. For comparison, we also measure the linewidth when using a saturated absorption spectrometer to provide frequency stability. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1205895 and No. 1205897.

  17. Precision interferometric measurements of mirror birefringence in high-finesse optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Long, David A.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    High-finesse optical resonators found in ultrasensitive laser spectrometers utilize supermirrors ideally consisting of isotropic high-reflectivity coatings. Strictly speaking, however, the optical coatings are often nonuniformly stressed during the deposition process and therefore do possess some small amount of birefringence. When physically mounted the cavity mirrors can be additionally stressed in such a way that large optical birefringence is induced. Here we report a direct measurement of optical birefringence in a two-mirror Fabry-Pérot cavity with R =99.99 % by observing TEM00 mode beating during cavity decays. Experiments were performed at a wavelength of 4.53 μ m , with precision limited by both quantum and technical noise sources. We report a splitting of δν=618 (1 ) Hz, significantly less than the intrinsic cavity line width of δcav≈3 kHz. With a cavity free spectral range of 96.9 MHz, the equivalent fractional change in mirror refractive index due to birefringence is therefore Δ n /n =6.38 (1 ) ×10-6 .

  18. Precision Interferometric Measurements of Mirror Birefringence in High-Finesse Optical Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Long, David A.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    High-finesse optical resonators found in ultrasensitive laser spectrometers utilize supermirrors ideally consisting of isotropic high-reflectivity coatings. Strictly speaking, however, the optical coatings are often non-uniformly stressed during the deposition process and therefore do possess some small amount of birefringence. When physically mounted the cavity mirrors can be additionally stressed in such a way that large optical birefringence is induced. Here we report a direct measurement of optical birefringence in a two-mirror Fabry-Pérot cavity with R = 99.99 % by observing TEM00 mode beating during cavity decays. Experiments were performed at a wavelength of 4.53 μm, with precision limited by both quantum and technical noise sources. We report a splitting of δν = 618(1) Hz, significantly less than the intrinsic cavity linewidth of δcav ≈ 3 kHz. With a cavity free spectral range of 96.9 MHz, the equivalent fractional change in mirror refractive index due to birefringence is therefore Δn/n = 6.38(1) × 10−6. PMID:27088133

  19. Frequency stabilization based on high finesse glass-ceramic Fabry-Perot cavity for a 632.8-nm He-Ne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tingting; Yang, Kaiyong; Tan, Zhongqi; Luo, Zhifu; Wu, Suyong

    2014-12-01

    A frequency stabilization technique for a 632.8nm He-Ne laser with a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity is introduced in this paper. The resonant frequency of the cavity is taken as the frequency standard .In this system the Fabry-Perot cavity is composed of a glass-ceramic spacer, with thermal expansion coefficient smaller than 2×10-8/°C , which means an excellent thermal stabilization which greatly decreases the thermal impacts on the cavity length in the desired constant-temperature environment.The intra-cavity spherical mirror is specially designed, which makes the Fabry-cavity a sensor element in our subsequent experiments for a new practical optical accelerometer .Both cavity mirrors were custom made in our laboratory which have reflectivities greater than 99.995% at 632.8nm, so the Fabry-Perot cavity has a finesse of about 62830. The half-maximum transmission line width is about 55.48 KHz and the free spectral range is 3.5GHz .In the experimental setup, we adopt the frequency stabilization circuit with small dithering .With proper dithering voltage, the laser can be precisely locked to the Fabry-Perot cavity minimum reflection point. Theoretically the frequency stability can reach 10-10 order.

  20. Preventing and reversing vacuum-induced optical losses in high-finesse tantalum (V) oxide mirror coatings.

    PubMed

    Gangloff, Dorian; Shi, Molu; Wu, Tailin; Bylinskii, Alexei; Braverman, Boris; Gutierrez, Michael; Nichols, Rosanna; Li, Junru; Aichholz, Kai; Cetina, Marko; Karpa, Leon; Jelenković, Branislav; Chuang, Isaac; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-07-13

    High-finesse optical cavities placed under vacuum are foundational platforms in quantum information science with photons and atoms. We study the vacuum-induced degradation of high-finesse optical cavities with mirror coatings composed of SiO₂-Ta₂O₅ dielectric stacks, and present methods to protect these coatings and to recover their initial low loss levels. For separate coatings with reflectivities centered at 370 nm and 422 nm, a vacuum-induced continuous increase in optical loss occurs if the surface-layer coating is made of Ta₂O₅, while it does not occur if it is made of SiO₂. The incurred optical loss can be reversed by filling the vacuum chamber with oxygen at atmospheric pressure, and the recovery rate can be strongly accelerated by continuous laser illumination at 422 nm. Both the degradation and the recovery processes depend strongly on temperature. We find that a 1 nm-thick layer of SiO₂ passivating the Ta₂O₅ surface layer is sufficient to reduce the degradation rate by more than a factor of 10, strongly supporting surface oxygen depletion as the primary degradation mechanism. PMID:26191861

  1. Optical single photons on-demand teleported from microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a scheme for entangling the optical and microwave output modes of the respective cavities by using a micro mechanical resonator. The micro mechanical resonator, on one side, is capacitively coupled to the microwave cavity and, on the other side, it is coupled to a high-finesses optical cavity. We then show how this continuous variable entanglement can be profitably used to teleport the non-Gaussian number state |1> and the superposition (|0\\rangle +|1\\rangle )/\\sqrt 2 from the microwave cavity output mode onto an output of the optical cavity mode with fidelity much larger than the no-cloning limit.

  2. A high-finesse fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometer based magnetic-field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feifei; Jiang, Yi; Gao, Hongchun; Jiang, Lan

    2015-08-01

    A high-finesse extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor for the measurement of weak dc magnetic fields is demonstrated. The Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by aligning the fiber end-face and the TbDyFe rod end-face, and each end-face is coated by a mirror with a micro-lens. The length of the TbDyFe rod is changed by the variation of an applied dc magnetic field, leading a change of the Fabry-Perot cavity length. By interrogating the white-light interferometric spectrum, the wavelength of the resonant peak is tracked and the length of the Fabry-Perot cavity is obtained. The sensor exhibits a high sensitivity of 1510 nm/mT with a magnetic resolution of 25 nT.

  3. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  4. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  5. Dynamical entanglement purification using chains of atoms and optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gonta, Denis; Loock, Peter van

    2011-10-15

    In the framework of cavity QED, we propose a practical scheme to purify dynamically a bipartite entangled state using short chains of atoms coupled to high-finesse optical cavities. In contrast to conventional entanglement purification protocols, we avoid controlled-not gates, thus reducing complicated pulse sequences and superfluous qubit operations. Our interaction scheme works in a deterministic way and, together with entanglement distribution and swapping, opens a route toward efficient quantum repeaters for long-distance quantum communication.

  6. High finesse external cavity VCSELs: from very low noise lasers to dual frequency lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baili, Ghaya; Alouini, Medhi; Morvan, Loic; Bretenaker, Fabien; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud; Dolfi, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Low noise-level optical sources are required for numerous applications such as microwave photonics, fiber-optic sensing and time/frequency references distribution. In this paper, we demonstrate how inserting a SC active medium into a centimetric high-Q external cavity is a simple way to obtain a shot-noise-limited laser source over a very wide frequency bandwidth. This approach ensures, with a compact design, a sufficiently long photon lifetime to reach the oscillation-relaxation- free class-A regime. This concept has been illustrated by inserting a 1/2-VCSEL in an external cavity including an etalon filter. A -156dB/Hz relative intensity noise level is obtained over the 100 MHz to 18 GHz bandwidth of interest. This is several orders of magnitude better than the noise, previously observed in VCSELs, belonging to the class-B regime. The optimization, in terms of noise, is shown to be a trade-off between the cavity length and the laser mode filtering. The transition between the class-B and class-A dynamical behaviors is directly observed by continuously controlling the photon lifetime is a sub-millimetric to a centimetric cavity length. It's proven that the transition occurs progressively, without any discontinuity. Based on the same laser architecture, tunable dual-frequency oscillation is demonstrated by reducing the polarized eigenstates overlap in the gain medium. The class-A dynamics of such a laser, free of relaxation oscillations, enables to suppress the electrical phase noise in excess, usually observed in the vicinity of the beat note. An original technique for jitter reduction in mode-locked VECSELs is also investigated. Such lasers are needed for photonic analog to digital converters.

  7. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled green laser for precision Compton polarimetry at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhman, A.; Hafez, M.; Nanda, S.; Benmokhtar, F.; Camsonne, A.; Cates, G. D.; Dalton, M. M.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Michaels, R. W.; Nelyubin, V.; Parno, D. S.; Paschke, K. D.; Quinn, B. P.; Souder, P. A.; Tobias, W. A.

    2016-06-01

    A high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled continuous wave green laser (532 nm) has been built and installed in Hall A of Jefferson Lab for high precision Compton polarimetry. The infrared (1064 nm) beam from a ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier seeded by a Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator laser is frequency doubled in a single-pass periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The maximum achieved green power at 5 W infrared pump power is 1.74 W with a total conversion efficiency of 34.8%. The green beam is injected into the optical resonant cavity and enhanced up to 3.7 kW with a corresponding enhancement of 3800. The polarization transfer function has been measured in order to determine the intra-cavity circular laser polarization within a measurement uncertainty of 0.7%. The PREx experiment at Jefferson Lab used this system for the first time and achieved 1.0% precision in polarization measurements of an electron beam with energy and current of 1.06 GeV and 50 μA.

  8. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled green laser for precision Compton polarimetry at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Rakhman, A.; Hafez, Mohamed A.; Nanda, Sirish K.; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Camsonne, Alexandre; Cates, Gordon D.; Dalton, Mark M.; Franklin, Gregg B.; Friend, Megan L.; Michaels, Robert W.; et al

    2016-03-31

    Here, a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity with a frequency-doubled continuous wave green laser (532 nm) has been built and installed in Hall A of Jefferson Lab for high precision Compton polarimetry. The infrared (1064 nm) beam from a ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier seeded by a Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillator laser is frequency doubled in a single-pass periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. The maximum achieved green power at 5 W infrared pump power is 1.74 W with a total conversion efficiency of 34.8%. The green beam is injected into the optical resonant cavity and enhanced up to 3.7 kW with a corresponding enhancement ofmore » 3800. The polarization transfer function has been measured in order to determine the intra-cavity circular laser polarization within a measurement uncertainty of 0.7%. The PREx experiment at Jefferson Lab used this system for the first time and achieved 1.0% precision in polarization measurements of an electron beam with energy and current of 1.0 GeV and 50 μA.« less

  9. An optical cavity with a strongly focused mode

    SciTech Connect

    Durak, Kadir; Victor, Leong Xu Heng; Huan, Nguyen Chi; Maslennikov, Gleb; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2013-12-16

    Atom-photon interfaces are one of the building blocks of the future quantum information protocols. Accomplishing a strong interaction between the atom and the photons can be successfully done by high finesse and small mode volume cavities. However, this method requires sophisticated dielectric coatings and stabilization of the cavity against even small vibrations and small line width of those cavities impose higher input photon numbers if spontaneously emitted photons are to be used, which make it seem hard to scale up such atom-light interfaces to form quantum networks. An alternative method is to use a nearly concentric cavity, which has a strongly focused optical mode.

  10. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  11. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  12. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  13. A 23.75-GHz frequency comb with two low-finesse filtering cavities in series for high resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hou; Hai-Nian, Han; Wei, Wang; Long, Zhang; Li-Hui, Pang; De-Hua, Li; Zhi-Yi, Wei

    2015-02-01

    A laser frequency comb with several tens GHz level is demonstrated, based on a Yb-doped femtosecond fiber laser and two low-finesse Fabry-Pérot cavities (FPCs) in series. The original 250-MHz mode-line-spacing of the source comb is filtered to 4.75 GHz and 23.75 GHz, respectively. According to the multi-beam interferences theory of FPC, the side-mode suppression rate of FPC schemes is in good agreement with our own theoretical results from 27 dB of a single FPC to 43 dB of paired FPCs. To maintain long-term stable operation and determine the absolute frequency mode number in the 23.75-GHz comb, the Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) locking technology is utilized. Such stable tens GHz frequency combs have important applications in calibrating astronomical spectrographs with high resolution. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821304) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11078022 and 61378040).

  14. Crosstalk analysis of the in-line quasi-distributed low-coherence low-finesse Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojlović, Lazo M.

    2016-09-01

    A crosstalk analysis of the in-line quasi-distributed low-coherence low-finesse Fabry-Pérot fiber-optic interferometric sensors is presented in this paper. The appropriate selection of the sensor cavity lengths eliminates the presence of the second-order intermodulations. Therefore, the intermodulations that can significantly influence the sensors crosstalk are the third-order intermodulations. For a typical sensor configuration by choosing the in-fiber mirror reflection coefficient lower than 0.5%, the minimum achievable signal-to-intermodulation ratio is higher than 26 dB for a maximal possible number of sensor placed along the fiber that satisfies broad range of requirements for most of the quasi-distributed measurements of typical parameters such as strain and temperature.

  15. Realistic loss estimation due to the mirror surfaces in a 10 meters-long high finesse Fabry-Perot filter-cavity.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Nicolas; Degallaix, Jérôme; Flaminio, Raffaele; Pinard, Laurent; Cagnoli, Gianpietro

    2015-08-10

    In order to benefit over the entire frequency range from the injection of squeezed vacuum light at the output of laser gravitational wave detectors, a small bandwidth high finesse cavity is required. In this paper, we investigate the light losses due to the flatness and the roughness of realistic mirrors in a 10 meters-long Fabry-Perot filter cavity. Using measurements of commercial super-polished mirrors, we were able to estimate the cavity round trip losses separating the loss contribution from low and high spatial frequencies. By careful tuning of the cavity g-factor and the incident position of the light on the mirrors, round trip losses due to imperfect mirror surfaces as low as 3 ppm can be achieved in the simulations. PMID:26367993

  16. High-finesse micro-lens fiber-optic extrinsic Fabry Perot interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi; Tang, Caijie

    2008-10-01

    Micro-lenses are produced on two mirror-coated fiber ends in an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) by curing epoxy droplets to obtain a high-finesse resonator. The high-finesse resonator is easy to construct, and can be used as a highly sensitive sensor at a low cost. The experimental results show that a temperature resolution of 0.025 °C and a strain resolution of 0.0625 µɛ can be achieved with such an EFPI.

  17. Ultra-Low Power Cross-Phase Shifts using Metastable Xenon in a High-Finesse Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Garrett; Pittman, Todd; Franson, James

    Many important applications in quantum information and quantum communications make use of weak single-photon nonlinearities. These nonlinearities have been produced using a number of methods, but they generally require a complicated experimental setup. We demonstrate a relatively simple system for producing ultra-low power cross-phase modulation, by using metastable xenon as the nonlinear medium within an optical cavity. Using metastable xenon prevents the degradation of optical surfaces which typically occurs with the use of alkali vapors such as rubidium. We produce phase shifts of up to 10 mrad using 4.5-fJ control pulses. We discuss the performance of this system and outline the planned improvements that will allow the cavity to produce single-photon phase shifts on the order of 1 mrad. This work was supported in part by DARPA DSO Grant No. W31P4Q-12-1-0015 and by NSF Grant No. PHY-1402708.

  18. Contribution of thermal noise to frequency stability of rigid optical cavity via Hertz-linewidth lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Notcutt, Mark; Ma, L.-S.; Ludlow, Andrew D.; Foreman, Seth M.; Ye Jun; Hall, John L.

    2006-03-15

    We perform detailed studies of state-of-the-art laser stabilization to high finesse optical cavities, revealing fundamental mechanical thermal noise-related length fluctuations. We compare the frequency noise of lasers tightly locked to the resonances of a variety of rigid Fabry-Perot cavities of differing lengths and mirror substrate materials. The results are in agreement with the theoretical model proposed in K. Numata, A. Kemery, and J. Camp [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 250602 (2004)]. The results presented here on the fundamental limits of FP references will impact planning and construction of next generation ultrastable optical cavities.

  19. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    We present noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS), a recently developed technique for sensitive, broadband, and high resolution spectroscopy. In NICE-OFCS an optical frequency comb (OFC) is locked to a high finesse cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency precisely equal to (a multiple of) the cavity free spectral range. Since each comb line and sideband is transmitted through a separate cavity mode in exactly the same way, any residual frequency noise on the OFC relative to the cavity affects each component in an identical manner. The transmitted intensity contains a beat signal at the modulation frequency that is immune to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity, in a way similar to continuous wave noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The light transmitted through the cavity is detected with a fast-scanning Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) and the NICE-OFCS signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform of the synchronously demodulated interferogram. Our NICE-OFCS system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity with a finesse of ˜9000 and a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We measured NICE-OFCS signals from the 3νb{1}+νb{3} overtone band of CO_2 around 1.57 μm and achieved absorption sensitivity 6.4×10-11cm-1 Hz-1/2 per spectral element, corresponding to a minimum detectable CO_2 concentration of 25 ppb after 330 s integration time. We will describe the principles of the technique and its technical implementation, and discuss the spectral lineshapes of the NICE-OFCS signals. A. Khodabakhsh, C. Abd Alrahman, and A. Foltynowicz, Opt. Lett. 39, 5034-5037 (2014). J. Ye, L. S. Ma, and J. L. Hall, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 6-15 (1998). A. Khodabakhsh, A. C. Johansson, and A. Foltynowicz, Appl. Phys. B (2015) doi:10.1007/s00340-015-6010-7.

  20. Novel laser machining of optical fibers for long cavities with low birefringence.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Morphew, Jack; Oručević, Fedja; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kassa, Ezra; Keller, Matthias

    2014-12-15

    We present a novel method of machining optical fiber surfaces with a CO₂ laser for use in Fiber-based Fabry-Perot Cavities (FFPCs). Previously FFPCs were prone to large birefringence and limited to relatively short cavity lengths (≤ 200 μm). These characteristics hinder their use in some applications such as cavity quantum electrodynamics with trapped ions. We optimized the laser machining process to produce large, uniform surface structures. This enables the cavities to achieve high finesse even for long cavity lengths. By rotating the fibers around their axis during the laser machining process the asymmetry resulting from the laser's transverse mode profile is eliminated. Consequently we are able to fabricate fiber mirrors with a high degree of rotational symmetry, leading to remarkably low birefringence. Through measurements of the cavity finesse over a range of cavity lengths and the polarization dependence of the cavity linewidth, we confirmed the quality of the produced fiber mirrors for use in low-birefringence FFPCs.

  1. Novel laser machining of optical fibers for long cavities with low birefringence.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Morphew, Jack; Oručević, Fedja; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kassa, Ezra; Keller, Matthias

    2014-12-15

    We present a novel method of machining optical fiber surfaces with a CO₂ laser for use in Fiber-based Fabry-Perot Cavities (FFPCs). Previously FFPCs were prone to large birefringence and limited to relatively short cavity lengths (≤ 200 μm). These characteristics hinder their use in some applications such as cavity quantum electrodynamics with trapped ions. We optimized the laser machining process to produce large, uniform surface structures. This enables the cavities to achieve high finesse even for long cavity lengths. By rotating the fibers around their axis during the laser machining process the asymmetry resulting from the laser's transverse mode profile is eliminated. Consequently we are able to fabricate fiber mirrors with a high degree of rotational symmetry, leading to remarkably low birefringence. Through measurements of the cavity finesse over a range of cavity lengths and the polarization dependence of the cavity linewidth, we confirmed the quality of the produced fiber mirrors for use in low-birefringence FFPCs. PMID:25607080

  2. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  3. Ultra-low-loss optical fiber cavities for applications in quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Niemietz, Dominik; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Single atoms strongly coupled to optical cavities are well suited as light-matter interfaces at the single photon level. The strength of the coupling is inversely proportional to the square root of the mode volume of the cavity, which depends on the radius of curvature of the mirrors. We report on the fabrication of near-spherical surfaces with small radii of curvature on the end facets of optical fibers using a CO2 laser at 9.3 μm wavelength. The surfaces are coated with a commercial, highly reflective, dielectric coating. Cavities built from two of these fibers show a finesse of up to 190000. Due to the small radii of curvature and the high finesse of these cavities, deviations from the paraxial approximation become relevant. This results in a frequency splitting of polarization eigenmodes depending on the eccentricity of the mirrors. Our analytic model that explains this effect is in excellent agreement with our measurements. This allows for the control of the frequency splitting by the geometry of the mirror surfaces. Our results confirm the great prospects of laser-machined cavities for experiments in quantum information processing. The possibility of implementing a quantum repeater node based on our cavity technologies will also be discussed.

  4. Nanofiber Fabry-Perot microresonator for nonlinear optics and cavity quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, C; Becker, M; Brückner, S; Rothhardt, M; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2012-06-01

    We experimentally realize a Fabry-Perot-type optical microresonator near the cesium D2 line wavelength based on a tapered optical fiber, equipped with two fiber Bragg gratings that enclose a subwavelength diameter waist. Owing to the very low taper losses, the finesse of the resonator reaches F=86 while the on-resonance transmission is T=11%. The characteristics of our resonator fulfill the requirements of nonlinear optics and cavity quantum electrodynamics in the strong coupling regime. These characteristics, combined with the demonstrated ease of use and advantageous mode geometry, open a realm of applications.

  5. Quantum theory of spontaneous emission in a one-dimensional optical cavity with two-side output coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiao-Ping; Ujihara, Kikuo

    1990-03-01

    A quantum theory of spontaneous emission from an initially excited two-level atom in a one-dimensional optical cavity with output coupling from both sides is developed. Orthonormal mode functions with a continuous spectrum are employed, which are derived by imposing a periodic boundary condition on the whole space with a period much larger than the cavity length. The delay differential equation of the atomic state of Cook and Milonni [Phys. Rev. A 35, 5081 (1987)] is re-derived in a strict manner, where the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is included naturally in the mode functions. An approximate solution at a single-resonant-mode limit shows the results of ``vacuum'' Rabi oscillation in an underdamped cavity and enhanced spontaneous emission rate in an overdamped cavity. For the latter case, it is found that in the optical range the spontaneous emission rate is enhanced by a factor F (finesse of the cavity).

  6. Self-amplified lock of an ultra-narrow linewidth optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kiwamu; Sigg, Daniel; Barsotti, Lisa

    2014-09-15

    High finesse optical cavities are an essential tool in modern precision laser interferometry. The incident laser field is often controlled and stabilized with an active feedback system such that the field resonates in the cavity. The Pound-Drever-Hall reflection locking technique is a convenient way to derive a suitable error signal. However, it only gives a strong signal within the cavity linewidth. This poses a problem for locking an ultra-narrow linewidth cavity. We present a novel technique for acquiring lock by utilizing an additional weak control signal, but with a much larger capture range. We numerically show that this technique can be applied to the laser frequency stabilization system used in the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), which has a linewidth of 0.8 Hz. This new technique will allow us to robustly and repeatedly lock the LIGO laser frequency to the common mode of the interferometer. PMID:26466252

  7. Probabilistic Generation of Entanglement in Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Anders S.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2003-03-01

    We propose to produce entanglement by measuring the reflection from an optical cavity. Conditioned on the detection of a reflected photon, pairs of atoms in the cavity are prepared in maximally entangled states. The success probability depends on the cavity parameters, but high quality entangled states may be produced with a high probability even for cavities of moderate quality.

  8. Continuous optical discharge in a laser cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivel', Yu. A.

    2016-08-01

    Optical discharge in a laser cavity is experimentally studied. A significant increase in the absorption of laser radiation (up to total absorption) is revealed. Optical schemes for initiation and maintaining of optical discharge in the cavity are proposed for technological applications of the optical discharge.

  9. Nonlinear spectroscopy of Sr atoms in an optical cavity for laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Tieri, David; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray J.; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-11-01

    We study the nonlinear interaction of a cold sample of 88Sr atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit, and we investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak intercombination line |5 s21S0>-|5 s 5 p 3P1> at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures—the cavity transmitted phase and absorption—by employing frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy (noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical-heterodyne molecular spectroscopy). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free-space situation in which no cavity is present. Furthermore, the nonlinear dynamics of the phase dispersion slope is experimentally investigated, and the optimal conditions for laser stabilization are established. Our experimental results are compared to state-of-the-art cavity QED theoretical calculations.

  10. Interacting Rydberg atoms in an optical cavity to synthesize coherent collective states using dipole blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Sheng, Jiteng; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Ewel, Charlie; Fan, Haoquan; Shaffer, James

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the coherent manipulation of interacting Rydberg atoms placed inside a high-finesse optical cavity for the preparation of strongly coupled light-matter systems. We consider a four-level diamond scheme with one common Rydberg level. One side of the diamond is used to collectively excite the atoms to the Rydberg level using a pair of pulses. The other side of the diamond is used to produce a collective state that is close to resonance with a field mode of a high-finesse optical cavity. The interaction between Rydberg atoms creates a blockade which is useful for synthesizing the coherent collective state. We use numerical simulation to generate non-classical states of light and also investigate different decay mechanisms affecting this system. We also analyze our system in the case of two Rydberg excitations within the blockade volume. In this case, we show that more elaborate few excitation quantum states can be prepared in the cavity to observe interesting dynamics and analyze the correlation of the two-photon emission. This work is supported by the DARPA Quasar program by a grant through ARO, AFOSR and NSF.

  11. Ray splitting in paraxial optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Puentes, G; Aiello, A; Woerdman, J P

    2004-03-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the ray dynamics in a paraxial optical cavity when a ray-splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. We show that depending on the position of the beam splitter the optical resonator can become unstable and the ray dynamics displays a positive Lyapunov exponent. PMID:15089394

  12. Lattice-supersolid phase of strongly correlated bosons in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqiang; He, Liang; Hofstetter, Walter

    2013-05-01

    We numerically simulate strongly correlated ultracold bosons coupled to a high-finesse cavity field, pumped by a laser beam in the transverse direction. Assuming a weak classical optical lattice added in the cavity direction, we model this system by a generalized Bose-Hubbard model, which is solved by means of bosonic dynamical mean-field theory. The complete phase diagram is established, which contains two novel self-organized quantum phases, lattice supersolid and checkerboard solid, in addition to conventional phases such as superfluid and Mott insulator. At finite but low temperature, thermal fluctuations are found to enhance the buildup of the self-organized phases. We demonstrate that cavity-mediated long-range interactions can give rise to stable lattice supersolid and checkerboard solid phases even in the regime of strong s-wave scattering. In the presence of a harmonic trap, we discuss coexistence of these self-organized phases, as relevant to experiments.

  13. Quantum-Noise-Limited Sensitivity-Enhancement of a Passive Optical Cavity by a Fast-Light Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Luckay, H. A.; Chang, Hongrok; Myneni, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate for a passive optical cavity containing an intracavity dispersive atomic medium, the increase in scale factor near the critical anomalous dispersion is not cancelled by mode broadening or attenuation, resulting in an overall increase in the predicted quantum-noiselimited sensitivity. Enhancements of over two orders of magnitude are measured in the scale factor, which translates to greater than an order-of-magnitude enhancement in the predicted quantumnoise- limited measurement precision, by temperature tuning a low-pressure vapor of noninteracting atoms in a low-finesse cavity close to the critical anomalous dispersion condition. The predicted enhancement in sensitivity is confirmed through Monte-Carlo numerical simulations.

  14. Non-resonant optical cavity design for optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, B. G.; Symonds, G.; Gragossian, A.; Ghasemkhani, M. R.; Albrecht, A. R.; Sheik-Bahae, M.; Epstein, R. I.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study of non-resonant optical cavities for optical refrigerators. Designs have been studied to maximize pump light-trapping to improve absorption and thereby increase the efficiency of optical refrigeration. The approaches of non-resonant optical cavities by Herriott-cell and total-internal-reflection were studied. Ray-tracing simulations and experiments were performed to analyze and optimize the different light-trapping configurations. We present a trade-off analysis between performance, reliability, and manufacturability.

  15. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  16. Investigation on an evanescent wave fiber-optic absorption sensor based on fiber loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Meng; Zhang, Weigang; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Yaping; Liu, Bo

    2010-01-01

    An improved ring-down measurement principle for optical waveguides is presented. Fiber loop ring-down spectroscopy allows for measurement of minute optical losses in high-finesse fiber-optic cavities and immunity to the fluctuation of laser source. The evanescent wave absorption losses dependent on the absorption and the refractive index of ambient solution have been theoretically analyzed. The complex refractive index is introduced into our model and extinction coefficient can be calculated accurately through finite element analysis by setting the boundaries of the fiber and the ambient conditions. Using this method, the refractive index of environment can be taken into consideration. Our principle is validated by the highly-sensitive measurement of evanescent wave absorption loss. By chemically processing the surface of sensing segment along an extending ring-down cavity, the concentration of small volume Diethyl Sulphoxide solution where the etched fiber immersed into has been successfully measured and discussed.

  17. Cavity Enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an Optical Comb: Detection of atmospheric radicals in the near UV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, G.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    The atmospheric chemistry community suffers a lack of fast, reliable and space resolved measurement for a wide set of very reactive molecules (e.g. radicals such as OH, NO3, BrO, IO, etc.). Due to their high reactivity, these molecules largely control the lifetime and concentration of numerous key atmospheric species. The concentrations of radicals are extremely low (ppbv or less) and highly variable in time and space. Measuring their concentration is often extremely laborious, expensive and requires heavy equipment (chemical sampling and treatment followed by mass spectrometry and/or chromatography). We recently introduced an optical spectroscopy technique based on a femtosecond laser oscillator, "Mode-Locked Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy", that we propose to develop into an instrument for in situ measurement of local concentration of traces of reactive molecules [1-3]. We have already demonstrated the possibility of measuring part in 1E12 by volume concentrations of radicals of high atmospheric interest, such as IO or BrO [4], as needed for monitoring these species in the environment. We apply cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the near UV range using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa modelocked femtosecond laser. Efficient broadband injection of a high finesse cavity is obtained by matching this optical frequency-comb source to the comb of cavity transmission resonances. A grating spectrograph and a detector array disperse and detect the spectrum transmitted by the cavity carrying the absorption features of intracavity molecules. IO traces were obtained by mixing together controlled flows of gaseous iodine and ozone inside a high finesse cavity (F~6000). A Chameleon Ultra II ML-Laser (gracefully lent during 1 month by Coherent Inc.) was frequency doubled to address an absorption band of IO at 436 nm. A locking scheme allowed the cavity transmission to be smooth and stable. The transmitted light was dispersed using a high resolution (0.07nm) grating

  18. Some aspects of simulation and realization of an optical reference cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Guyomarc'h, Didier; Hagel, Gaeetan; Zumsteg, Cedric; Knoop, Martina

    2009-12-15

    The interrogation of an ultranarrow clock transition of a single trapped ion for optical frequency metrology requires a laser stabilized to a couple of Hz per second with a linewidth of the same order of magnitude. Today, lasers in the visible have reached the Hz-range in frequency stability, if locked onto a high-finesse, ultrastable reference cavity. Vertical mounting of the reference cavity can reduce its sensitivity to vibrations as described in [M. Notcutt, L. Ma, J. Ye, and J. Hall, Opt. Lett. 30, 1815 (2005)]. We have designed a comparable vertical cavity with an overall length of 150 mm resulting in a free spectral range of 1 GHz. Optimization of the cavity design has been carried out with a finite elements method, leading to expected relative length variations below 10{sup -14} under the influence of gravity acceleration (1g). The variation in different geometric parameters has been studied. The analysis of the different noise sources shows that, for a regime superior to a tenth of a hertz, the fast linewidth of the laser will not be limited by the cavity characteristics.

  19. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectrometry Modelling Under Saturated Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is a modern technique renowned for its ultimate sensitivity, because it combines long equivalent absorption length provided by a high finesse cavity, and a detection theoretically limited by the sole photon-shot-noise. One fallout of the high finesse is the possibility to accumulating strong intracavity electromagnetic fields (EMF). Under this condition, molecular transitions can be easy saturated giving rise to the usual Lamb dips (or hole burning). However, the unusual shape of the basically trichromatic EMF (due to the RF lateral sidebands) induces nonlinear couplings, i.e., new crossover transitions. An analytical methodology will be presented to calculate spectra provided by NICE-OHMS experiments. It is based on the solutions of the equations of motion of an open two-blocked-level system performed in the frequency-domain (optically thin medium). Knowing the transition dipole moment, the NICE-OHMS signals (``absorption-like'' and ``dispersion-like'') can be simulated by integration over the Doppler shifts and by paying attention to the molecular Zeeman sublevels and to the EMF polarization The approach has been validated by discussion experimental data obtained on two transitions of {C2H2} in the near-infrared under moderated saturation. One of the applications of the saturated absorption is to be able to simultaneously determine the transition intensity and the density number while only one these 2 quantities can only be assessed in nonlinear absorption. J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 32, 838 (2015) Optics Express 16, 14689 (2008)

  20. Optical Resonant Cavity in a Nanotaper

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Goto, Takenari; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Chang, Jiho; Yao, Takafumi

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes an optical resonant cavity in a nanotaper with scale reduction from micro to several nanometers. Both experimental results and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulation suggested that the nanometer-scale taper with a diameter similar to the wavelength of light acted as a mirror, which facilitated the formation of a laser cavity and caused lasing in ZnO nanotapers. As the light inside the nanotaper propagated toward the apex, the lateral mode was reduced and reflection occurred. This report suggests that use of the resonant optical cavities in nanotapers might result in novel active and passive optical components, which will broaden the horizons of photonic technology.

  1. Transformation optics for cavity array metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Quach, James Q; Su, Chun-Hsu; Greentree, Andrew D

    2013-03-11

    Cavity array metamaterials (CAMs), composed of optical microcavities in a lattice coupled via tight-binding interactions, represent a novel architecture for engineering metamaterials. Since the size of the CAMs' constituent elements are commensurate with the operating wavelength of the device, it cannot directly utilise classical transformation optics in the same way as traditional metamaterials. By directly transforming the internal geometry of the system, and locally tuning the permittivity between cavities, we provide an alternative framework suitable for tight-binding implementations of metamaterials. We develop a CAM-based cloak as the case study.

  2. Laser diode cavity ring-down spectroscopy using acousto-optic modulator stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Paldus, B.A.; Harris, J.S. Jr.; Martin, J.; Xie, J.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-10-01

    By using an acousto-optic modulator, we have stabilized a free-running continuous wave (CW) laser diode in the presence of strong reflections from a high finesse Fabry{endash}Perot resonator. The laser diode linewidth can be stabilized from several MHz, for high resolution spectroscopy of species at low pressures, to several hundred MHz, for lower resolution spectroscopy of species at atmospheric pressures. We demonstrated CW cavity ring-down spectroscopy of water vapor at both 1 atm and 5 Torr. We achieved ring-down repetition rates of 10{endash}50 kHz, and a noise level of 2{times}10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an interband cascade laser: application to SO2 trace analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Lucile; Ventrillard, Irene; Chau, Guilmin; Jaulin, Kevin; Kerstel, Erik; Romanini, Daniele

    2016-09-01

    The combination of interband cascade lasers (ICL) with cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) offers new perspectives in trace analysis and isotope ratio measurements. ICLs cover a mid-infrared spectral window (3-4 µm), in between those covered by Ga(InAs)Sb diode lasers and quantum cascade lasers (QCL), where strong molecular transitions can be found. While ICLs have lower emission power than QCLs, their thermal dissipation is much closer to that of telecom diode lasers and their current tuning range larger, which are both major advantages for developing compact instruments. We present an OF-CEAS implementation with an ICL at 4.015 µm, in which optical feedback (OF) enables efficient injection into the high-finesse cavity. In this paper, we also discuss a procedure allowing to obtain an accurate measurement of the OF rate. With regard to performance, we obtain a rms noise-equivalent absorption of 7.7 × 10-9 cm-1 for one acquired spectrum (80 ms) with a cavity of finesse 3900, which translates to a normalized figure of merit of 2.2 × 10-9 cm-1/√Hz, allowing for SO2 trace analysis down to ppbv levels with a response time of seconds.

  4. Thermodynamics and dynamics of atomic self-organization in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, Stefan; Jäger, Simon B.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    Pattern formation of atoms in high-finesse optical resonators results from the mechanical forces of light associated with superradiant scattering into the cavity mode. It occurs when the laser intensity exceeds a threshold value such that the pumping processes counteract the losses. We consider atoms driven by a laser and coupling with a mode of a standing-wave cavity and describe their dynamics with a Fokker-Planck equation, in which the atomic motion is semiclassical but the cavity field is a full quantum variable. The asymptotic state of the atoms is a thermal state, whose temperature is solely controlled by the detuning between the laser and the cavity frequency and by the cavity loss rate. From this result we derive the free energy and show that in the thermodynamic limit self-organization is a second-order phase transition. The order parameter is the field inside the resonator to which one can associate a magnetization in analogy to ferromagnetism, the control field is the laser intensity, but the steady state is intrinsically out of equilibrium. In the symmetry-broken phase, quantum noise induces jumps of the spatial density between two ordered patterns: We characterize the statistical properties of this temporal behavior at steady state and show that the thermodynamic properties of the system can be extracted by detecting the light at the cavity output. The results of our analysis are in full agreement with previous studies; we extend them by deriving a self-consistent theory which is valid also when the cavity field is in the shot-noise limit and elucidate the nature of the self-organization transition.

  5. Quantum-noise-limited sensitivity enhancement of a passive optical cavity by a fast-light medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David D.; Luckay, H. A.; Chang, Hongrok; Myneni, Krishna

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that for a passive optical cavity containing a dispersive atomic medium, the increase in scale factor near the critical anomalous dispersion is not canceled by mode broadening or attenuation, resulting in an overall increase in the predicted quantum-noise-limited sensitivity. Enhancements of over two orders of magnitude are measured in the scale factor, which translates to greater than an order-of-magnitude enhancement in the predicted quantum-noise-limited measurement precision, by temperature-tuning a low-pressure vapor of noninteracting atoms in a low-finesse cavity close to the critical anomalous dispersion condition. The predicted enhancement in sensitivity is confirmed through Monte Carlo numerical simulations.

  6. Spectroscopy of Exoplanet Atmospheres with the FINESSE Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Green, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    FINESSE (Fast INfrared Exoplanet Spectroscopic Survey Explorer) will provide uniquely detailed information on the growing number of newly discovered planets by characterizing their atmospheric composition and temperature structure. This NASA Explorer mission, selected for a competitive Phase A study, is unique in its breath and scope thanks to broad instantaneous spectroscopy from the optical to the mid-IR (0.7 - 5 micron), with a survey of exoplanets measured in a consistent, uniform way. For 200 transiting exoplanets ranging from Terrestrial to Jovians, FINESSE will measure the chemical composition and temperature structure of their atmospheres and trace changes over time with exoplanet longitude. The mission will do so by measuring the spectroscopic time series for a primary and secondary eclipse over the exoplanet orbital phase curve. With spectrophotometric precision being a key enabling aspect for combined light exoplanet characterization, FINESSE is designed to produce spectrophotometric precision of better than 100 parts-per-million per spectral channel without the need for decorrelation. The exceptional stability of FINESSE will even allow the mission to characterize non-transiting planets, potentially as part of FINESSE's Participating Scientist Program. In this paper, we discuss the flow down from the target availability to observations and scheduling to the analysis and calibration of the data and how it enables FINESSE to be the mission that will truly expand the new field of comparative exoplanetology.

  7. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. Because of the Einstein principle of equivalence (EEP), one can find a local coordinate system (a local freely falling frame), in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate, . Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to unambiguously decide whether atomic clocks based on quantum transitions of atoms, ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of a cavity. To resolve this ambiguity we have to analyse the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its electromagnetic modes in an expanding universe by employing the full machinery of the Maxwell equations irrespectively of the underlying theory of gravity. We proceed in this way and found out that the size of the cavity and the electromagnetic frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal (unphysical) coordinates as the universe expands in accordance with the Hubble law. We set up the oscillation equation for the resonant electromagnetic modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect mutual cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by space transformation to local coordinates and the time counted by the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that if general relativity is correct and the local expansion of space is isotropic there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a

  8. Hybrid ion chains inside an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zichao; Siverns, James; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    Trapped ions remain a leading candidate for the implementation of large-scale quantum networks. These networks require nodes that can store and process quantum information as well as communicate with each other though photonic flying qubits. We propose to use hybrid ion chains of barium, for communication, and ytterbium, for quantum information processing. We report on progress in setting up a hybrid ion chain in a versatile four-blade trap using high numerical aperture collection optics. Although the visible photons produced from barium ions are more favorable as they are not suitable for long distance fiber communication. With this in mind, we intend to implement frequency conversion to overcome this issue. Also, with the view toward increasing the flying-qubit production rate, we propose a cavity-based system to enhance interactions between the ions and photons. The cavity axis is to be placed along the axial direction of the trap allowing a chain of multiple ions to interact with the cavity at the same time. With this configuration the atom-photon coupling strength can be improved by sqrt(N), where N is the number of ions. Experiments will focus on exploring the dynamics of hybrid ion chain, dual species quantum information processing, two-colour entanglement and phase gates assisted by the ion-cavity coupling are to be explored.

  9. Specimen illumination apparatus with optical cavity for dark field illumination

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Sudar, Damir; Albertson, Donna

    1999-01-01

    An illumination apparatus with a specimen slide holder, an illumination source, an optical cavity producing multiple reflection of illumination light to a specimen comprising a first and a second reflective surface arranged to achieve multiple reflections of light to a specimen is provided. The apparatus can further include additional reflective surfaces to achieve the optical cavity, a slide for mounting the specimen, a coverslip which is a reflective component of the optical cavity, one or more prisms for directing light within the optical cavity, antifading solutions for improving the viewing properties of the specimen, an array of materials for analysis, fluorescent components, curved reflective surfaces as components of the optical cavity, specimen detection apparatus, optical detection equipment, computers for analysis of optical images, a plane polarizer, fiberoptics, light transmission apertures, microscopic components, lenses for viewing the specimen, and upper and lower mirrors above and below the specimen slide as components of the optical cavity. Methods of using the apparatus are also provided.

  10. A simple technique for accurate and complete characterisation of a Fabry-Perot cavity.

    PubMed

    Locke, C R; Stuart, D; Ivanov, E N; Luiten, A N

    2009-11-23

    It has become a significant challenge to accurately characterise the properties of recently developed very high finesse optical resonators (F > 10(6)). A similar challenge is encountered when trying to measure the properties of cavities in which either the probing laser or the cavity length is intrinsically unstable. We demonstrate in this article the means by which the finesse, mode-matching, free spectral range, mirror transmissions and dispersion may be measured easily and accurately even when the laser or cavity has a relatively poor intrinsic frequency stability. PMID:19997438

  11. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  12. Temporal laser pulse manipulation using multiple optical ring-cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An optical pulse stretcher and a mathematical algorithm for the detailed calculation of its design and performance is disclosed. The optical pulse stretcher has a plurality of optical cavities, having multiple optical reflectors such that an optical path length in each of the optical cavities is different. The optical pulse stretcher also has a plurality of beam splitters, each of which intercepts a portion of an input optical beam and diverts the portion into one of the plurality of optical cavities. The input optical beam is stretched and a power of an output beam is reduced after passing through the optical pulse stretcher and the placement of the plurality of optical cavities and beam splitters is optimized through a model that takes into account optical beam divergence and alignment in the pluralities of the optical cavities. The optical pulse stretcher system can also function as a high-repetition-rate (MHz) laser pulse generator, making it suitable for use as a stroboscopic light source for high speed ballistic projectile imaging studies, or it can be used for high speed flow diagnostics using a laser light sheet with digital particle imaging velocimetry. The optical pulse stretcher system can also be implemented using fiber optic components to realize a rugged and compact optical system that is alignment free and easy to use.

  13. Optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser yields the lowest formaldehyde detection limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrotxategi-Carbajo, P.; Fasci, E.; Ventrillard, I.; Carras, M.; Maisons, G.; Romanini, D.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the first application of Optical Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to formaldehyde trace gas analysis at mid-infrared wavelengths. A continuous-wave room-temperature, distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser emitting around 1,769 cm-1 has been successfully coupled to an optical cavity with finesse 10,000 in an OF-CEAS spectrometer operating on the ν2 fundamental absorption band of formaldehyde. This compact setup (easily transportable) is able to monitor H2CO at ambient concentrations within few seconds, presently limited by the sample exchange rate. The minimum detectable absorption is 1.6 × 10-9 cm-1 for a single laser scan (100 ms, 100 data points), with a detectable H2CO mixing ratio of 60 pptv at 10 Hz. The corresponding detection limit at 1 Hz is 5 × 10-10 cm-1, with a normalized figure of merit of 5 × 10-11cm^{-1}/sqrtHz (100 data points recorded in each spectrum taken at 10 Hz rate). A preliminary Allan variance analysis shows white noise averaging down to a minimum detection limit of 5 pptv at an optimal integration time of 10 s, which is significantly better than previous results based on multi-pass or cavity-enhanced tunable QCL absorption spectroscopy.

  14. Photon momentum and optical forces in cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Mikko; Häyrynen, Teppo; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka

    2016-03-01

    During the past century the electromagnetic field momentum in material media has been under debate in the Abraham-Minkowski controversy as convincing arguments have been advanced in favor of both the Abraham and Minkowski forms of photon momentum. Here we study the photon momentum and optical forces in cavity structures in the cases of dynamical and steady state fields. In the description of the single-photon transmission process we use a field-kinetic one-photon theory. Our model suggests that in the medium photons couple with the induced atomic dipoles forming polariton quasiparticles with the Minkowski form momentum. The Abraham momentum can be associated to the electromagnetic field part of the coupled polariton state. The polariton with the Minkowski momentum is shown to obey the uniform center of mass of energy motion that has previously been interpreted to support only the Abraham momentum. When describing the steady state non-equilibrium field distributions we use the recently developed quantized fluctuational electrodynamics (QFED) formalism. While allowing detailed studies of light propagation and quantum field fluctuations in interfering structures, our methods also provide practical tools for modeling optical energy transfer and the formation of thermal balance in nanodevices as well as studying electromagnetic forces in optomechanical devices.

  15. Quantum jumps and spin dynamics of interacting atoms in a strongly coupled atom-cavity system.

    PubMed

    Khudaverdyan, M; Alt, W; Kampschulte, T; Reick, S; Thobe, A; Widera, A; Meschede, D

    2009-09-18

    We experimentally investigate the spin dynamics of one and two neutral atoms strongly coupled to a high finesse optical cavity. We observe quantum jumps between hyperfine ground states of a single atom. The interaction-induced normal-mode splitting of the atom-cavity system is measured via the atomic excitation. Moreover, we observe the mutual influence of two atoms simultaneously coupled to the cavity mode.

  16. Stable fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmetz, T.; Colombe, Y.; Hunger, D.; Haensch, T. W.; Balocchi, A.; Warburton, R. J.; Reichel, J.

    2006-09-11

    The development of a fiber-based, tunable optical cavity with open access is reported. The cavity is of the Fabry-Perot type and is formed with miniature spherical mirrors positioned on the end of single- or multimode optical fibers by a transfer technique, which involves lifting a high-quality mirror from a smooth convex substrate, either a ball lens or microlens. The cavities typically have a finesse of {approx}1000 and a mode volume of 600 {mu}m{sup 3}. The detection of small ensembles of cold Rb atoms guided through such a cavity on an atom chip is demonstrated.

  17. A master equation for a two-sided optical cavity

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Thomas M.; Bennett, Robert; Beige, Almut

    2015-01-01

    Quantum optical systems, like trapped ions, are routinely described by master equations. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a master equation for two-sided optical cavities with spontaneous photon emission. To do so, we use the same notion of photons as in linear optics scattering theory and consider a continuum of travelling-wave cavity photon modes. Our model predicts the same stationary state photon emission rates for the different sides of a laser-driven optical cavity as classical theories. Moreover, it predicts the same time evolution of the total cavity photon number as the standard standing-wave description in experiments with resonant and near-resonant laser driving. The proposed resonator Hamiltonian can be used, for example, to analyse coherent cavity-fiber networks [E. Kyoseva et al., New J. Phys. 14, 023023 (2012)].

  18. NO_2 Trace Measurements by Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard-Courtillot, I.; Desbois, Th.; Foldes, T.; Romanini, D.

    2009-06-01

    In order to reach the sub-ppb NO_2 detection level required for environmental applications in remote areas, we develop a spectrometer based on a technique introduced a few years ago, named Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) [1]. It allows very sensitive and selective measurements, together with the realization of compact and robust set-ups as was subsequently demonstrated during measurements campaigns in harsh environments [2]. OF-CEAS benefits from the optical feedback to efficiently inject a cw-laser in a V-shaped high finesse cavity (typically 10 000). Cavity-enhanced absorption spectra are acquired on a small spectral region (˜1 cm^{-1}) that enables selective and quantitative measurements at a fast acquisition rate with a detection limit of several 10^{-10} cm^{-1} as reported in this work. Spectra are obtained with high spectral definition (150 MHz highly precisely spaced data points) and are self calibrated by cavity rind-down measurements regularly performed (typically every second). NO_2 measurements are performed with a commercial extended cavity diode laser around 411 nm, spectral region where intense electronic transitions occur. We will describe the set-up developed for in-situ measurements allowing real time concentration measurements at typically 5 Hz; and then report on the measurements performed with calibrated NO_2 reference samples to evaluate the linearity of the apparatus. The minimum detectable absorption loss is estimated by considering the standard deviation of the residual of one spectrum. We achieved 2x10^{-10} cm^{-1} for a single spectrum recorded in less than 100 ms at 100 mbar. It leads to a potential detection limit of 3x10^8 molecules/cm^3, corresponding to about 150 pptv at this pressure. [1] J. Morville, S. Kassi, M. Chenevier, and D. Romanini, Appl. Phys. B, 80, 1027 (2005). [2] D. Romanini, M. Chenevrier, S. Kassi, M. Schmidt, C. Valant, M. Ramonet, J. Lopez, and H.-J. Jost, Appl. Phys. B, 83, 659

  19. Quantum optics, cavity QED, and quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meystre, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Quantum optomechanics provides a universal tool to achieve the quantum control of mechanical motion. It does that in devices spanning a vast range of parameters, with mechanical frequencies from a few Hertz to GHz, and with masses from 10-20 g to several kilos. Its underlying ideas can be traced back to the study of gravitational wave antennas, quantum optics, cavity QED and laser cooling which, when combined with the recent availability of advanced micromechanical and nanomechanical devices, opens a path to the realization of macroscopic mechanical systems that operate deep in the quantum regime. At the fundamental level this development paves the way to experiments that will lead to a more profound understanding of quantum mechanics; and from the point of view of applications, quantum optomechanical techniques will provide motion and force sensing near the fundamental limit imposed by quantum mechanics (quantum metrology) and significantly expand the toolbox of quantum information science. After a brief summary of key historical developments, the talk will give a broad overview of the current state of the art of quantum optomechanics, and comment on future prospects both in applied and in fundamental science. Work supported by NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuASAR and ORCHID programs.

  20. Cavity cooling of an optically levitated submicron particle

    PubMed Central

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Blaser, Florian; Delić, Uroš; Grass, David; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of a levitated submicron particle and an optical cavity field promises access to a unique parameter regime both for macroscopic quantum experiments and for high-precision force sensing. We report a demonstration of such controlled interactions by cavity cooling the center-of-mass motion of an optically trapped submicron particle. This paves the way for a light–matter interface that can enable room-temperature quantum experiments with mesoscopic mechanical systems. PMID:23940352

  1. Different optical properties in different periodic slot cavity geometrical morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Shen, Meng; Du, Lan; Deng, Caisong; Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, optical properties of two-dimensional periodic annular slot cavity arrays in hexagonal close-packing on a silica substrate are theoretically characterized by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation method. By simulating reflectance spectra, electric field distribution, and charge distribution, we confirm that multiple cylindrical surface plasmon resonances can be excited in annular inclined slot cavities by linearly polarized light, in which the four reflectance dips are attributed to Fabry–Perot cavity resonances in the coaxial cavity. A coaxial waveguide mode TE11 will exist in these annular cavities, and the wavelengths of these reflectance dips are effectively tailored by changing the geometrical pattern of slot cavity and the dielectric materials filled in the cavities. These resonant wavelengths are localized in annular cavities with large electric field enhancement and dissipate gradually due to metal loss. The formation of an absorption peak can be explained from the aspect of phase matching conditions. We observed that the proposed structure can be tuned over the broad spectral range of 600–4000 nm by changing the outer and inner radii of the annular gaps, gap surface topography. Meanwhile, different lengths of the cavity may cause the shift of resonance dips. Also, we study the field enhancement at different vertical locations of the slit. In addition, dielectric materials filling in the annular gaps will result in a shift of the resonance wavelengths, which make the annular cavities good candidates for refractive index sensors. The refractive index sensitivity of annular cavities can also be tuned by the geometry size and the media around the cavity. Annular cavities with novel applications can be implied as surface enhanced Raman spectra substrates, refractive index sensors, nano-lasers, and optical trappers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178044), the Natural Science

  2. Different optical properties in different periodic slot cavity geometrical morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Shen, Meng; Du, Lan; Deng, Caisong; Ni, Haibin; Wang, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, optical properties of two-dimensional periodic annular slot cavity arrays in hexagonal close-packing on a silica substrate are theoretically characterized by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation method. By simulating reflectance spectra, electric field distribution, and charge distribution, we confirm that multiple cylindrical surface plasmon resonances can be excited in annular inclined slot cavities by linearly polarized light, in which the four reflectance dips are attributed to Fabry-Perot cavity resonances in the coaxial cavity. A coaxial waveguide mode TE11 will exist in these annular cavities, and the wavelengths of these reflectance dips are effectively tailored by changing the geometrical pattern of slot cavity and the dielectric materials filled in the cavities. These resonant wavelengths are localized in annular cavities with large electric field enhancement and dissipate gradually due to metal loss. The formation of an absorption peak can be explained from the aspect of phase matching conditions. We observed that the proposed structure can be tuned over the broad spectral range of 600-4000 nm by changing the outer and inner radii of the annular gaps, gap surface topography. Meanwhile, different lengths of the cavity may cause the shift of resonance dips. Also, we study the field enhancement at different vertical locations of the slit. In addition, dielectric materials filling in the annular gaps will result in a shift of the resonance wavelengths, which make the annular cavities good candidates for refractive index sensors. The refractive index sensitivity of annular cavities can also be tuned by the geometry size and the media around the cavity. Annular cavities with novel applications can be implied as surface enhanced Raman spectra substrates, refractive index sensors, nano-lasers, and optical trappers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61178044), the Natural Science Foundation

  3. Calculations of laser cavity dumping for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.; Rayman, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    For deep-space pulse-position modulation (PPM) optical communication links using Nd:YAG lasers, two types of laser transmitter modulation techniques are available for efficiently producing laser pulses over a broad range of repetition rates: Q-switching and cavity dumping. The desired modulation scheme is dependent on the required pulse repetition frequency and link parameters. These two techniques are discussed, theoretical and numerical calculations of the internal energy of the laser cavity in cavity dumping are described, and an example of cavity dumping is applied to a link for a proposed experiment package on Cassini.

  4. Fiber-coupled, Littrow-grating cavity displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Allen, Graham; Sun, Ke-Xun; Byer, Robert

    2010-04-15

    We have demonstrated a compact, optical-fiber-fed, optical displacement sensor utilizing a Littrow-mounted diffraction grating to form a low-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. Length changes of the cavity are read out via the Pound-Drever-Hall rf modulation technique at 925 MHz. The sensor has a nominal working distance of 2 cm and a total dynamic range of 160 nm. The displacement noise floor was less than 3x10(-10) m/sqrt[Hz] above 10(-2) Hz, limited by the frequency drift of the reference laser. A frequency-stabilized laser would reduce the noise floor to below 10(-12) m/sqrt[Hz]. The use of a 925 MHz modulation frequency demonstrates high-precision readout of a low-finesse compact resonant cavity.

  5. Polarization-controlled optical ring cavity (PORC) tunable pulse stretcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew P.; Kiefer, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    A new concept and a theoretical approach for modeling a tunable polarization-controlled optical ring cavity pulse stretcher is demonstrated. The technique discussed herein permits highly simplified and flexible tuning of the temporal shape of nanosecond duration pulses. Using half-wave plates positioned extra- and intracavity, transmission to reflection ratios across both input faces of a polarization beam splitter can easily be controlled. The resulting models indicate a further reduction in peak intensity of 30%, with respect to conventional dielectric beam splitting optical ring cavities, when configured under equivalent and optimized cavity settings.

  6. Optimal feedback in efficient single-cavity optical parametric oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Petnikova, V M; Shuvalov, Vladimir V

    2010-09-10

    An approach based on the description of competition of quadratic processes of merging and decomposition of quanta resulting in the formation of cnoidal waves on an effective cascade cubic Kerr-type nonlinearity is used to optimise the scheme of a single-cavity optical parametric oscillator. It is shown that the use of a feedback circuit (cavity) decreases the period of cnoidal waves produced in a nonlinear crystal, while the optimisation procedure of the transfer constant of this circuit (reflectivity of the output mirror of the cavity) is reduced to matching this period with the nonlinear crystal length. (optical parametric oscillators)

  7. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry on N₂O 1.283 μm transition based on a quantum-dot external-cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzu-Ling; Liu, Yi-Wei

    2015-09-15

    To access the wavelength within the 1.1-1.3 μm region, we have developed a quantum-dot (QD) laser with an external-cavity configuration and a linewidth of kilohertz at a 1 ms integration time. The residual electroluminescence, due to the inhomogeneous broadening of the QD gain medium, was observed and filtered out using a grating. While a fiber-coupled electro-optical modulator was employed, this laser system was locked to a high-finesse (F∼18,500) optical cavity, and noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy was used to observe weak transitions. The Doppler-broadened spectra of a weak N(2)O transition at 1.283 μm are obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 30 for a gas pressure of 54 mTorr. The minimum noise-equivalent absorption coefficient is 5.3×10(-10)  cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). This system can be a powerful and stable light source for atomic parity nonconservation measurements using thallium, ytterbium, lead, and iodine. PMID:26371934

  8. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  9. Acoustic superradiance from optical vortices in self-defocusing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Francesco; Ciszak, Marzena; Ortolan, Antonello

    2009-12-15

    In a self-defocusing optical cavity, optical-field perturbations on a vortex background behave as sound waves in a (2+1) rotating acoustic black-hole spacetime. Numerical integration of the associated Klein-Gordon equation using typical experimental parameters shows that optical perturbations in the appropriate frequency range are amplified through the mechanism of superradiance. These results suggest the possibility to observe this phenomenon in a common nonlinear optical system.

  10. Cavity-enhanced optical bottle beam as a mechanical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freegarde, Tim; Dholakia, Kishan

    2002-07-01

    We analyze the resonant cavity enhancement of a hollow ``optical bottle beam'' for the dipole-force trapping of dark-field-seeking species. We first improve upon the basic bottle beam by adding further Laguerre-Gaussian components to deepen the confining potential. Each of these components itself corresponds to a superposition of transverse cavity modes, which are then enhanced simultaneously in a confocal cavity to produce a deep optical trap needing only a modest incident power. The response of the trapping field to displacement of the cavity mirrors offers an unusual form of mechanical amplifier in which the Gouy phase shift produces an optical Vernier scale between the Laguerre-Gaussian beam components.

  11. Design and optimization of microbolometer multilayer optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, E.; Al-Khalli, N.; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Debbar, N.; Alduraibi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Microbolometers are the most widely used detectors in long-wave infrared uncooled thermal imagers. An optical cavity is required within a microbolometer structure to increase its optical absorption. In this work we present a detailed study on the design and optimization of a microbolometer optical cavity using Essential-Macleod package. In the simulations, the cavity is considered as thin film multi-layers that form cascaded Fabry-Perot optical cavities. In the design phase, the layers structures are selected including materials and initial thickness. The absorbing layers are chosen to be vanadium-pentoxide (V2O5) and titanium (Ti). In the optimization phase, the designed layer thicknesses are varied to maximize optical absorption within the absorbing layers. The simulations show that Ti layer absorption dominates over V2O5 layer. Also, the optimization proves that the air-gap cavity thickness is not simply quarter-wavelength because of the complex cascaded Fabry-Perot structure. The optimized air-gap thickness here is ≈3.5 µm at 10.6µm wavelength.

  12. Design and optimization of microbolometer multilayer optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, E.; Al-Khalli, N.; Debbar, N.; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Alduraibi, M.

    2015-03-30

    Microbolometers are the most widely used detectors in long-wave infrared uncooled thermal imagers. An optical cavity is required within a microbolometer structure to increase its optical absorption. In this work we present a detailed study on the design and optimization of a microbolometer optical cavity using Essential-Macleod package. In the simulations, the cavity is considered as thin film multi-layers that form cascaded Fabry-Perot optical cavities. In the design phase, the layers structures are selected including materials and initial thickness. The absorbing layers are chosen to be vanadium-pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and titanium (Ti). In the optimization phase, the designed layer thicknesses are varied to maximize optical absorption within the absorbing layers. The simulations show that Ti layer absorption dominates over V{sub 2}O{sub 5} layer. Also, the optimization proves that the air-gap cavity thickness is not simply quarter-wavelength because of the complex cascaded Fabry-Perot structure. The optimized air-gap thickness here is ≈3.5 µm at 10.6µm wavelength.

  13. Slot-waveguide cavities for optical quantum information applications.

    PubMed

    Hiscocks, Mark P; Su, Chun-Hsu; Gibson, Brant C; Greentree, Andrew D; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Ladouceur, François

    2009-04-27

    To take existing quantum optical experiments and devices into a more practical regimes requires the construction of robust, solid-state implementations. In particular, to observe the strong-coupling regime of tom-photon interactions requires very small cavities and large quality factors. Here we show that the slot-waveguide geometry recently introduced for photonic applications is also promising for quantum optical applications in the visible regime. We study diamond- and GaP-based slot-waveguide cavities (SWCs) compatible with diamond colour centres e.g. nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect. We show that one can achieve increased single-photon Rabi frequencies of order O(10(11)) rad s(-1) in ultra-small cavity modal volumes, nearly 2 orders of magnitude smaller than previously studied diamond-based photonic crystal cavities.

  14. Femtojoule-Scale All-Optical Latching and Modulation via Cavity Nonlinear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yeong-Dae; Armen, Michael A.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally characterize Hopf bifurcation phenomena at femtojoule energy scales in a multiatom cavity quantum electrodynamical (cavity QED) system and demonstrate how such behaviors can be exploited in the design of all-optical memory and modulation devices. The data are analyzed by using a semiclassical model that explicitly treats heterogeneous coupling of atoms to the cavity mode. Our results highlight the interest of cavity QED systems for ultralow power photonic signal processing as well as for fundamental studies of mesoscopic nonlinear dynamics.

  15. Scattering-free optical levitation of a cavity mirror.

    PubMed

    Guccione, G; Hosseini, M; Adlong, S; Johnsson, M T; Hope, J; Buchler, B C; Lam, P K

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of levitating a small mirror using only radiation pressure. In our scheme, the mirror is supported by a tripod where each leg of the tripod is a Fabry-Perot cavity. The macroscopic state of the mirror is coherently coupled to the supporting cavity modes allowing coherent interrogation and manipulation of the mirror motion. The proposed scheme is an extreme example of the optical spring, where a mechanical oscillator is isolated from the environment and its mechanical frequency and macroscopic state can be manipulated solely through optical fields. We model the stability of the system and find a three-dimensional lattice of trapping points where cavity resonances allow for buildup of optical field sufficient to support the weight of the mirror. Our scheme offers a unique platform for studying quantum and classical optomechanics and can potentially be used for precision gravitational field sensing and quantum state generation. PMID:24237512

  16. Optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles in resonant cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Juejun; Lin Shiyun; Crozier, Kenneth; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2010-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the opto-mechanical interactions between a dielectric nanoparticle and the resonantly enhanced optical field inside a high Q, small-mode-volume optical cavity. We develop an analytical method based on open system analysis to account for the resonant perturbation due to particle introduction and predict trapping potential in good agreement with three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations. Strong size-dependent trapping dynamics distinctly different from free-space optical tweezers arise as a consequence of the finite cavity perturbation. We illustrate single nanoparticle trapping from an ensemble of monodispersed particles based on size-dependent trapping dynamics. We further discover that the failure of the conventional dipole approximation in the case of resonant cavity trapping originates from a new perturbation interaction mechanism between trapped particles and spatially localized photons.

  17. Scattering-free optical levitation of a cavity mirror.

    PubMed

    Guccione, G; Hosseini, M; Adlong, S; Johnsson, M T; Hope, J; Buchler, B C; Lam, P K

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of levitating a small mirror using only radiation pressure. In our scheme, the mirror is supported by a tripod where each leg of the tripod is a Fabry-Perot cavity. The macroscopic state of the mirror is coherently coupled to the supporting cavity modes allowing coherent interrogation and manipulation of the mirror motion. The proposed scheme is an extreme example of the optical spring, where a mechanical oscillator is isolated from the environment and its mechanical frequency and macroscopic state can be manipulated solely through optical fields. We model the stability of the system and find a three-dimensional lattice of trapping points where cavity resonances allow for buildup of optical field sufficient to support the weight of the mirror. Our scheme offers a unique platform for studying quantum and classical optomechanics and can potentially be used for precision gravitational field sensing and quantum state generation.

  18. Scattering-Free Optical Levitation of a Cavity Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guccione, G.; Hosseini, M.; Adlong, S.; Johnsson, M. T.; Hope, J.; Buchler, B. C.; Lam, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of levitating a small mirror using only radiation pressure. In our scheme, the mirror is supported by a tripod where each leg of the tripod is a Fabry-Perot cavity. The macroscopic state of the mirror is coherently coupled to the supporting cavity modes allowing coherent interrogation and manipulation of the mirror motion. The proposed scheme is an extreme example of the optical spring, where a mechanical oscillator is isolated from the environment and its mechanical frequency and macroscopic state can be manipulated solely through optical fields. We model the stability of the system and find a three-dimensional lattice of trapping points where cavity resonances allow for buildup of optical field sufficient to support the weight of the mirror. Our scheme offers a unique platform for studying quantum and classical optomechanics and can potentially be used for precision gravitational field sensing and quantum state generation.

  19. Cavity cooling a single charged levitated nanosphere.

    PubMed

    Millen, J; Fonseca, P Z G; Mavrogordatos, T; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-03-27

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres. PMID:25860743

  20. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  1. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  2. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  3. Microgel photonics: a breathing cavity onto optical fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, A.; Aliberti, A.; Giaquinto, M.; Micco, A.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel multifunctional optical fiber probe resulting from the integration between two rapidly emerging technologies such as Lab-on-Fiber and Microgel Photonics. The device consists of a microgel based cavity formed by metallic slabs supporting plasmonic resonances, directly integrated on the optical fiber tip. By exploiting the multiresponsivity of microgel systems, variations of temperature, PH, ionic strength, as well as molecular binding events, make the cavity to `breath', thus modulating the interference pattern in the reflection spectrum. The microgel layer can be synthetized in such a way to obtain different thicknesses, corresponding to different operating regimes, opening new avenues for the realization of advanced multifunctional nanoprobes.

  4. A scanning cavity microscope.

    PubMed

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm(2); we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  5. An historical overview of cavity-enhanced methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paldus, B. A.; Kachanov, A. A.

    2005-10-01

    An historical overview of laser-based, spectroscopic methods that employ high-finesse optical resonators is presented. The overview begins with the early work in atomic absorption (1962) and optical cavities (1974) that led to the first mirror reflectivity measurements in 1980. This paper concludes with very recent extensions of cavity-enhanced methods for the study of condensed-phase media and biological systems. Methods described here include cavity ring-down spectroscopy, integrated cavity output spectroscopy, and noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy. Given the explosive growth of the field over the past decade, this review does not attempt to present a comprehensive bibliography of all work published in cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, but rather strives to illustrate the rich history, creative diversity, and broad applications potential of these methods.

  6. An optical storage cavity-based, Compton-backscatter x-ray source using the MKV free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadmack, Michael R.

    A compact, high-brightness x-ray source is presently under development at the University of Hawai`i Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This source utilizes Compton backscattering of an infrared laser from a relativistic electron beam to produce a narrow beam of monochromatic x-rays. The scattering efficiency is greatly increased by tightly focusing the two beams at an interaction point within a near-concentric optical storage cavity, designed with high finesse to coherently stack the incident laser pulses and greatly enhance the number of photons available for scattering with the electron beam. This dissertation describes the effort and progress to integrate and characterize the most important and challenging aspects of the design of this system. A low-power, near-concentric, visible-light storage cavity has been constructed as a tool for the exploration of the performance, alignment procedures, and diagnostics required for the operation of a high power infrared storage cavity. The use of off-axis reflective focussing elements is essential to the design of the optical storage cavity, but requires exquisite alignment to minimize astigmatism and other optical aberrations. Experiments using a stabilized HeNe laser have revealed important performance characteristics, and allowed the development of critical alignment and calibration procedures, which can be directly applied to the high power infrared storage cavity. Integration of the optical and electron beams is similarly challenging. A scanning-wire beam profiler has been constructed and tested, which allows for high resolution measurement of the size and position of the laser and electron beams at the interaction point. This apparatus has demonstrated that the electron and laser beams can be co-aligned with a precision of less than 10 microm, as required to maximize the x-ray production rate. Equally important is the stabilization of the phase of the GHz repetition rate electron pulses arriving at the interaction point

  7. Optical cavity integrated surface ion trap for enhanced light collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, Francisco M.

    Ion trap systems allow the faithful storage and manipulation of qubits encoded in the energy levels of the ions, and can be interfaced with photonic qubits that can be transmitted to connect remote quantum systems. Single photons transmitted from two remote sites, each entangled with one quantum memory, can be used to entangle distant quantum memories by interfering on a beam splitter. Efficient remote entanglement generation relies upon efficient light collection from single ions into a single mode fiber. This can be realized by integrating an ion trap with an optical cavity and employing the Purcell effect for enhancing the light collection. Remote entanglement can be used as a resource for a quantum repeater for provably secure long-distance communication or as a method for communicating within a distributed quantum information processor. We present the integration of a 1 mm optical cavity with a micro-fabricated surface ion trap. The plano-concave cavity is oriented normal to the chip surface where the planar mirror is attached underneath the trap chip. The cavity is locked using a 780 nm laser which is stabilized to Rubidium and shifted to match the 369 nm Doppler transition in Ytterbium. The linear ion trap allows ions to be shuttled in and out of the cavity mode. The Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission into the cavity mode would then allow efficient collection of the emitted photons, enabling faster remote entanglement generation.

  8. Optothermal transport behavior in whispering gallery mode optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, Soheil; Armani, Andrea M.

    2014-08-04

    Over the past century, whispering gallery mode optical cavities have enabled numerous advances in science and engineering, such as discoveries in quantum mechanics and non-linear optics, as well as the development of optical gyroscopes and add drop filters. One reason for their widespread appeal is their ability to confine light for long periods of time, resulting in high circulating intensities. However, when sufficiently large amounts of optical power are coupled into these cavities, they begin to experience optothermal or photothermal behavior, in which the optical energy is converted into heat. Above the optothermal threshold, the resonance behavior is no longer solely defined by electromagnetics. Previous work has primarily focused on the role of the optothermal coefficient of the material in this instability. However, the physics of this optothermal behavior is significantly more complex. In the present work, we develop a predictive theory based on a generalizable analytical expression in combination with a geometry-specific COMSOL Multiphysics finite element method model. The simulation couples the optical and thermal physics components, accounting for geometry variations as well as the temporal and spatial profile of the optical field. To experimentally verify our theoretical model, the optothermal thresholds of a series of silica toroidal resonant cavities are characterized at different wavelengths (visible through near-infrared) and using different device geometries. The silica toroid offers a particularly rigorous case study for the developed optothermal model because of its complex geometrical structure which provides multiple thermal transport paths.

  9. Augmentation of Cavity Optical Inspection by Replicas Without Performance Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M.; Burk, D.; Hicks, D.; Wu, G.; Thompson, C.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Although cavity optical inspection systems provide a huge amount of qualitative information about surface features, the amount of quantitative topographic informa-tion is limited. Here, we report the use of silicone-based RTV for replicas and moldings that provide increased details of topographic data associated with the optical cavity images. Profilometry scans of the molds yield mi-crometer-scale details associated with equator weld struc-tures and weld pits. This confirms at least two different types of pits, one which is bowl-shaped, and one which has a small peak at the bottom. The contour information extracted from profilometry can be used to evaluate mechanisms by which pits and other features limit RF performance. We present calculations based on a con-formal transformation of the profiles above. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  10. Laser Pulse-Stretching Using Multiple Optical Ring-Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a simple and passive nanosecond-long (ns-long) laser 'pulse-stretcher' using multiple optical ring-cavities. We present a model of the pulse-stretching process for an arbitrary number of optical ring-cavities. Using the model, we optimize the design of a pulse-stretcher for use in a spontaneous Raman scattering excitation system that avoids laser-induced plasma spark problems. From the optimized design, we then experimentally demonstrate and verify the model with a 3-cavity pulse-stretcher system that converts a 1000 mJ, 8.4 ns-long input laser pulse into an approximately 75 ns-long (FWHM) output laser pulse with a peak power reduction of 0.10X, and an 83% efficiency.

  11. Diffraction-limited Fabry-Perot cavity in the near concentric regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, K.; Nguyen, C. H.; Leong, V.; Straupe, S.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2014-10-01

    Nearly concentric optical cavities can be used to prepare optical fields with a very small mode volume. We implement an anaclastic design of such a cavity that significantly simplifies mode matching to the fundamental cavity mode. The cavity is shown to have diffraction-limited performance for a mode volume of ≈ {{10}4}{{λ }3}. This is in sharp contrast with the behavior of cavities with plano-concave mirrors, where aberrations significantly decrease the coupling of the input mode to the fundamental mode of the cavity and increase the coupling to the higher-order modes. We estimate the related cavity quantum electrodynamics parameters and show that the proposed cavity design allows for strong coupling without a need for high finesse or small physical-cavity volume.

  12. Weak Langmuir optical turbulence in a fiber cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Garnier, J.; Mussot, A.; Trillo, S.; Churkin, D.; Tarasov, N.; Turitsyn, S.; Picozzi, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study theoretically and numerically the dynamics of a passive optical fiber ring cavity pumped by a highly incoherent wave: an incoherently injected fiber laser. The theoretical analysis reveals that the turbulent dynamics of the cavity is dominated by the Raman effect. The forced-dissipative nature of the fiber cavity is responsible for a large diversity of turbulent behaviors: Aside from nonequilibrium statistical stationary states, we report the formation of a periodic pattern of spectral incoherent solitons, or the formation of different types of spectral singularities, e.g., dispersive shock waves and incoherent spectral collapse behaviors. We derive a mean-field kinetic equation that describes in detail the different turbulent regimes of the cavity and whose structure is formally analogous to the weak Langmuir turbulence kinetic equation in the presence of forcing and damping. A quantitative agreement is obtained between the simulations of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with cavity boundary conditions and those of the mean-field kinetic equation and the corresponding singular integrodifferential reduction, without using adjustable parameters. We discuss the possible realization of a fiber cavity experimental setup in which the theoretical predictions can be observed and studied.

  13. Optical modulator based on coupled photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovich, Pavel G.; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose and numerically investigate an optical signal modulator based on two-photonic crystal nanobeam cavities coupled through a waveguide. The suggested modulator shifts the resonant frequency over a scalable range. We design a compact optical modulator based on photonic crystal nanobeams cavities that exhibits high stability to manufacturing. Photonic crystal waveguide tuning in the low-intensity region of the resonant mode is demonstrated. The advantages of the suggested approach over the single-resonator optical modulator approaches include the possibilities to shift the modulator frequency over a scalable range that depends on switching energy level and to effectively electrically tune the device in the low-intensity region of the resonant mode.

  14. Nanoplasmonics: New Design Concepts For Nanoscale Optical Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Stefan A.

    2010-10-07

    The design of nanoplasmonic cavities exploiting coherent processes such as sub- and superradiance as well as Fano-type interactions will be discussed, under the framework of plasmon hybridization theory. In such cavities, interactions between bright and dark localized plasmon modes lead to a complex mode spectrum, which can be visualized using electron energy loss spectroscopy. First implementations fabricated using electron beam lithography will be presented. Furthermore, it will be shown how the concept of transformation optics can be utilized for the design of nanoresonators with a broadband absorption spectrum, showing high promise for light harvesting over the whole visible and infrared range of the spectrum.

  15. Chaotic ray dynamics in an optical cavity with a beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Graciana; Aiello, Andrea; Woerdman, J P

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the ray dynamics in an optical cavity when a ray-splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator, and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. Using Hamiltonian optics, we show that such a simple device presents surprisingly rich chaotic ray dynamics.

  16. An elementary quantum network of single atoms in optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Stephan; Nölleke, Christian; Hahn, Carolin; Reiserer, Andreas; Neuzner, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Mücke, Martin; Figueroa, Eden; Bochmann, Joerg; Rempe, Gerhard

    2012-04-11

    Quantum networks are distributed quantum many-body systems with tailored topology and controlled information exchange. They are the backbone of distributed quantum computing architectures and quantum communication. Here we present a prototype of such a quantum network based on single atoms embedded in optical cavities. We show that atom-cavity systems form universal nodes capable of sending, receiving, storing and releasing photonic quantum information. Quantum connectivity between nodes is achieved in the conceptually most fundamental way-by the coherent exchange of a single photon. We demonstrate the faithful transfer of an atomic quantum state and the creation of entanglement between two identical nodes in separate laboratories. The non-local state that is created is manipulated by local quantum bit (qubit) rotation. This efficient cavity-based approach to quantum networking is particularly promising because it offers a clear perspective for scalability, thus paving the way towards large-scale quantum networks and their applications.

  17. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kochergin, Vladimir

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  18. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750-800, 900, and 130-180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  19. Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouno, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Hoshi; Kishino, Katsumi; Sakai, Masaru; Hara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Biosensors based on GaN nanoring optical cavities were demonstrated using room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The outer diameter, height, and thickness of the GaN nanorings were approximately 750–800, 900, and 130–180 nm, respectively. The nanorings functioned as whispering-gallery-mode (WGM)-type optical cavities and exhibited sharp resonant peaks like lasing actions. The evanescent component of the WGM was strongly affected by the refractive index of the ambient environment, the type of liquid, and the sucrose concentration of the analyzed solution, resulting in shifts of the resonant wavelengths. The results indicate that the GaN nanorings can potentially be used in sugar sensors of the biosensors.

  20. Optical cavity modes of a single crystalline zinc oxide microsphere.

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, Rakesh Singh; Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chien, Paul Ching-Hang; Ngo, Buu Trong Huynh; Chang, Shu-Wei; Tien, Chung-Hao; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2013-02-11

    A detailed study on the optical cavity modes of zinc oxide microspheres under the optical excitation is presented. The zinc oxide microspheres with diameters ranging from 1.5 to 3.0 µm are prepared using hydrothermal growth technique. The photoluminescence measurement of a single microsphere shows prominent resonances of whispering gallery modes at room temperature. The experimentally observed whispering gallery modes in the photoluminescence spectrum are compared with theoretical calculations using analytical and finite element methods in order to clarify resonance properties of these modes. The comparison between theoretical analysis and experiment suggests that the dielectric constant of the ZnO microsphere is somewhat different from that for bulk ZnO. The sharp resonances of whispering gallery modes in zinc oxide microspheres cover the entire visible window. They may be utilized in realizations of optical resonators, light emitting devices, and lasers for future chip integrations with micro/nano optoelectronic circuits, and developments of optical biosensors. PMID:23481759

  1. Testing the Lorentz Invariance of Light with a Birefringent Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohensee, Michael; Monsalve, Francisco; Müller, Holger

    2010-03-01

    We report on the progress of a novel experimental test of the isotropy of c, based on measuring the birefringence of a single optical cavity. Tests of the isotropy of c typically compare the phase velocities of two orthogonally propagating optical modes. Using pairs of high-finesse optical cavities, such tests have constrained direction-dependent variations in the speed of light to the level of parts per 10^17 [1-2]. The precision of these tests is presently limited by systematic stochastic fluctuations in the relative length of such cavities. We have developed an experiment which compares the phase velocities of two orthogonally polarized optical modes in a single high-finesse dielectric-filled optical cavity. Since anisotropies in c can make otherwise isotropic materials optically birefringent [3-4], we anticipate that we will be able to place significantly tighter constraints on Lorentz violation for photons. [4pt] [1] S. Herrmann, A. Senger, K. Möhle, M. Nagel, E.V. Kovalchuk and A. Peters, PRD 80, 105011 (2009).[2] Ch. Eisel, A. Yu. Nevsky, and S. Schiller, PRL 103, 090401 (2009).[3] H. Müller, PRD 71, 045004 (2005).[4] V.A. Kosteleck'y and M. Mewes, PRD 80, 015020 (2009).

  2. Cooling enhancement in optical refrigeration by non-resonant optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farfan, B. G.; Gragossian, A.; Symonds, G.; Ghasemkhani, M. R.; Albrecht, A. R.; Sheik-Bahae, M.; Epstein, R. I.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of cooling enhancement in optical refrigerators by the implementation of advanced non-resonant optical cavities. Cavity designs have been studied to maximize pump light-trapping to improve absorption and thereby increase the efficiency of optical refrigeration. The approaches of non-resonant optical cavities by Herriott-cell and totalinternal- reflection were studied. Ray-tracing simulations and experiments were performed to analyze and optimize the different light-trapping configurations. Light trapping was studied for laser sources with high quality beams and for beams with large divergences, roughly corresponding to the output from fiber lasers and from diode lasers, respectively. We present a trade-off analysis between performance, reliability, and manufacturability.

  3. Nonperturbative atom-photon interactions in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, H.J.; Tian, L.; Ren, W.

    1994-12-31

    One of the principal developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics in the last few years has been the extension of the ideas originally applied to systems of Rydberg atoms in microwave cavities to optical frequencies. As a corollary of this, more attention is being paid to quantum fluctuations and photon statistics. Another development, still in its infancy, is a move toward experiments using slowed or trapped atoms, or velocity selected beams; these methods are needed to enter the nonperturbative (strong dipole coupling) regime for one atom where there are experiments on subtle quantum-statistical effects go carry out. In this chapter we solve a number of theoretical problems related to these themes. Although the focus of the work is on optical systems, most of what we do is also relevant at microwave frequencies. We emphasize quantum fluctuations and photon statistics, and we try always to separate the quantum physics from those aspects of the physics that are understandable in classical terms. On the whole we only pay attention to the nonperturbative regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics where the dipole coupling strength is larger than the dissipation rates. 59 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Optical and electrical mappings of surface plasmon cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fan; Merlo, Juan M.; Burns, Michael J.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    Plasmonics is a rapidly expanding field, founded in physics but now with a growing number of applications in biology (biosensing), nanophotonics, photovoltaics, optical engineering and advanced information technology. Appearing as charge density oscillations along a metal surface, excited by electromagnetic radiation (e.g., light), plasmons can propagate as surface plasmon polaritons, or can be confined as standing waves along an appropriately-prepared surface. Here, we review the latter manifestation, both their origins and the manners in which they are detected, the latter dominated by near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM/SNOM). We include discussion of the "plasmonic halo" effect recently observed by the authors, wherein cavity-confined plasmons are able to modulate optical transmission through step-gap nanostructures, yielding a novel form of color (wavelength) selection.

  5. Three-dimensional nanometer-scale optical cavities of indefinite medium.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong; Yin, Xiaobo; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-07-12

    Miniaturization of optical cavities has numerous advantages for enhancing light-matter interaction in quantum optical devices, low-threshold lasers with minimal power consumption, and efficient integration of optoelectronic devices at large scale. However, the realization of a truly nanometer-scale optical cavity is hindered by the diffraction limit of the nature materials. In addition, the scaling of the photon life time with the cavity size significantly reduces the quality factor of small cavities. Here we theoretically present an approach to achieve ultrasmall optical cavities using indefinite medium with hyperbolic dispersion, which allows propagation of electromagnetic waves with wave vectors much larger than those in vacuum enabling extremely small 3D cavity down to (λ/20)(3). These cavities exhibit size-independent resonance frequencies and anomalous scaling of quality factors in contrast to the conventional cavities, resulting in nanocavities with both high Q/V(m) ratio and broad bandwidth.

  6. Large scale quantum walks by means of optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutari, J.; Feizpour, A.; Barz, S.; Di Franco, C.; Kim, M. S.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a platform for implementing quantum walks that overcomes many of the barriers associated with photonic implementations. We use coupled fiber-optic cavities to implement time-bin encoded walks in an integrated system. We show that this platform can achieve very low losses combined with high-fidelity operations, enabling an unprecedented large number of steps in a passive system, as required for scenarios with multiple walkers. Furthermore the platform is reconfigurable, enabling variation of the coin, and readily extends to multidimensional lattices. We demonstrate variation of the coin bias experimentally for three different values.

  7. Optical heterodyne detection for cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, Marc D.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Zare, Richard N.

    2000-07-25

    A cavity ring-down system for performing cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using optical heterodyne detection of a ring-down wave E.sub.RD during a ring-down phase or a ring-up wave E.sub.RU during a ring up phase. The system sends a local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and a signal wave E.sub.SIGNAL to the cavity, preferably a ring resonator, and derives an interference signal from the combined local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD (or ring-up wave E.sub.RU). The local oscillator wave E.sub.LO has a first polarization and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD has a second polarization different from the first polarization. The system has a combining arrangement for combining or overlapping local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD at a photodetector, which receives the interference signal and generates a heterodyne current I.sub.H therefrom. Frequency and phase differences between the waves are adjustable.

  8. In-plane diffraction loss free optical cavity using coated optical fiber and silicon micromachined spherical mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabry, Yasser; Bourouina, Tarik; Saadany, Bassam; Khalil, Diaa

    2013-03-01

    Light trapping in optical cavities has many applications in optical telecommunications, biomedical optics, atomic studies, and chemical analysis. Efficient optical coupling in these cavities is an important engineering problem that affects greatly the cavity performance. One interesting way to form an optical cavity, while simultaneously connected to the rest of the optical systems, is to use an optical fiber surface as one of the cavity mirrors while the second mirror is fabricated by MEMS technology. In this way, cavity tuning with a MEMS actuator is a simple achievable task with low cost in mass production. The main problem in this solution is the high diffraction loss associated with the small spot size at the output of the standard single-mode fiber (SMF). Diffraction loss in the cavity is usually overcome by using an expensive lensed fiber or by inserting a coated lens in the cavity leading to a long cavity with small free spectral range (FSR). In this work, we report a Fabry-Perot cavity formed by a multilayer-coated cleaved-surface SMF inserted into a grove while facing a spherical micromirror; both are fabricated by silicon micromachining. The light is trapped inside the cavity while propagating in-plane of the wafer substrate. The light is injected in and collected from a Corning SMF-28 optical fiber with a coated surface reflectivity of about 98% at 1330 nm (O-band). The silicon mirror surface is aluminum metalized with a reflectivity of about 92%. The measured cavity has a line width of 0.45 nm around 1330 nm with a FSR of 26 nm. The obtained results indicate an almost diffraction-loss free optical cavity with a quality factor close to 3000, limited by the optical surfaces reflectivity that can be improved in future by an optimized mirror fabrication process and better matching of the fiber multilayer coating.

  9. Disorder-induced transparency in a one-dimensional waveguide side coupled with optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yongyou Dong, Guangda; Zou, Bingsuo

    2014-05-07

    Disorder influence on photon transmission behavior is theoretically studied in a one-dimensional waveguide side coupled with a series of optical cavities. For this sake, we propose a concept of disorder-induced transparency appearing on the low-transmission spectral background. Two kinds of disorders, namely, disorders of optical cavity eigenfrequencies and relative phases in the waveguide side coupled with optical cavities are considered to show the disorder-induced transparency. They both can induce the optical transmission peaks on the low-transmission backgrounds. The statistical mean value of the transmission also increases with increasing the disorders of the cavity eigenfrequencies and relative phases.

  10. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  11. Coherence optimization of vertical-cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Michael; Wen, Pengyue; Gross, Matthias; Kibar, Osman; Esener, Sadik C.

    2002-06-01

    Vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (VCSOAs) are attractive devices for use in coherent optical amplification, especially where 2-D amplifier arrays are required. However, the coherence preservation quality of a VCSOA depends strongly on the bias condition, resonant wavelength mismatch, and the optical input power level. We characterize the coherence degree of a VCSOA as a function of these parameters by measuring interference fringe visibility with an interferometer. The dominant factors influencing the contrast of the fringes are the ratio of coherent, stimulated emission photons to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) photons, and the spectral distortion of the amplified signal. Mostly, the overall gain and the saturation characteristic of the amplifier determine the ratio of stimulated emission to ASE. The spectral distortion of the signal is due to the narrow gain window of the VCSOA, but the effect significantly degrades the visibility only for relatively large wavelength mismatch from the gain peak. Analytic expressions may be used to identify the optimal bias current and optical input power to maximize the amplifier gain and visibility of the interference.

  12. Coupling of Solute Vibrational Modes with a Fabry-Perot Optical Cavity Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkelberger, Adam; Compton, Ryan; Fears, Kenan; Spann, Bryan; Long, James; Simpkins, Blake; Owrutsky, Jeffrey

    2015-03-01

    Electronic transitions of systems confined in optical microcavities can strongly couple to cavity modes, giving rise to new, mixed-character modes. Recent studies have demonstrated similar coherent coupling between the vibrational modes of a thin polymer film and a Fabry-Perot optical cavity mode. This coupling manifests experimentally as a splitting of the transmissive cavity mode into two dispersive branches separated by the vacuum Rabi splitting. Here we present recent experimental results for the coupling of solution-phase compounds with an optical cavity. Solutions of W(CO)6, Mo(CO)6, and NCS- contained in cavities show strong coupling between the solute chromophores in the mid-infrared and cavity modes. We show that the methodology established with polymer-filled cavities is generally applicable to liquids but that the fluidity of the sample complicates the cavity construction. Varied cavity thicknesses can give rise to spatial gradients in coupling strength and difficulty in targeting a specific cavity-mode order. We also compare the transmission of the mixed vibrational-cavity modes in cavities constructed from either metallic or dielectric reflectors which impacts the cavity resonance line width. NRC Postdoctoral Fellow.

  13. Optimum cavity length and absolute cavity detuning in acousto-optically mode-locked argon-ion lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddock, I. S.; Illingworth, R.

    1987-09-01

    Acousto-optic mode-locking in an argon-ion laser was investigated in detail. Measurement of the discharge current is shown to be an accurate means of locating the optimum cavity length which depends strongly on level of excitation. The absolute cavity mismatch between the optimum length and that corresponding to c/4 vRF was determined by direct measurement and by using a cw dye laser as an active interferometer.

  14. Microcontroller-based locking in optics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Le Jeannic, H.; Ruaudel, J.; Morin, O.; Laurat, J.

    2014-12-15

    Optics experiments critically require the stable and accurate locking of relative phases between light beams or the stabilization of Fabry-Perot cavity lengths. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive technique based on a stand-alone microcontroller unit to perform such tasks. Easily programmed in C language, this reconfigurable digital locking system also enables automatic relocking and sequential functioning. Different algorithms are detailed and applied to fringe locking and to low- and high-finesse optical cavity stabilization, without the need of external modulations or error signals. This technique can readily replace a number of analog locking systems advantageously in a variety of optical experiments.

  15. Heralded quantum gates with integrated error detection in optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Borregaard, J; Kómár, P; Kessler, E M; Sørensen, A S; Lukin, M D

    2015-03-20

    We propose and analyze heralded quantum gates between qubits in optical cavities. They employ an auxiliary qubit to report if a successful gate occurred. In this manner, the errors, which would have corrupted a deterministic gate, are converted into a nonunity probability of success: once successful, the gate has a much higher fidelity than a similar deterministic gate. Specifically, we describe that a heralded, near-deterministic controlled phase gate (CZ gate) with the conditional error arbitrarily close to zero and the success probability that approaches unity as the cooperativity of the system, C, becomes large. Furthermore, we describe an extension to near-deterministic N-qubit Toffoli gate with a favorable error scaling. These gates can be directly employed in quantum repeater networks to facilitate near-ideal entanglement swapping, thus greatly speeding up the entanglement distribution.

  16. Quantum atomic lithography via cross-cavity optical Stern-Gerlach setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Máximo, C. E.; Batalhão, T. B.; Bachelard, R.; de Moraes Neto, G. D.; de Ponte, M. A.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2014-10-01

    We present a fully quantum scheme to perform 2D atomic lithography based on a cross-cavity optical Stern-Gerlach setup: an array of two mutually orthogonal cavities crossed by an atomic beam perpendicular to their optical axes, which is made to interact with two identical modes. After deriving an analytical solution for the atomic momentum distribution, we introduce a protocol allowing us to control the atomic deflection by manipulating the amplitudes and phases of the cavity field states.

  17. Cavity dumping of fiber lasers by phase-modulated optical loop mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Okhotnikov, O.G.; Araujo, F.M.

    1996-01-01

    We report the generation of high-repetition-rate pulses from an erbium-doped fiber laser with a phase-driven optical loop mirror as a cavity dumper. The result demonstrates the potential of this novel method for efficient and ultrafast cavity dumping of fiber lasers. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  18. Quantum optics and cavity QED Quantum network with individual atoms and photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, G.

    2013-08-01

    Quantum physics allows a new approach to information processing. A grand challenge is the realization of a quantum network for long-distance quantum communication and large-scale quantum simulation. This paper highlights a first implementation of an elementary quantum network with two fibre-linked high-finesse optical resonators, each containing a single quasi-permanently trapped atom as a stationary quantum node. Reversible quantum state transfer between the two atoms and entanglement of the two atoms are achieved by the controlled exchange of a time-symmetric single photon. This approach to quantum networking is efficient and offers a clear perspective for scalability. It allows for arbitrary topologies and features controlled connectivity as well as, in principle, infinite-range interactions. Our system constitutes the largest man-made material quantum system to date and is an ideal test bed for fundamental investigations, e.g. quantum non-locality.

  19. Mean-field theory of atomic self-organization in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Simon B.; Schütz, Stefan; Morigi, Giovanna

    2016-08-01

    Photons mediate long-range optomechanical forces between atoms in high-finesse resonators, which can induce the formation of ordered spatial patterns. When a transverse laser drives the atoms, the system undergoes a second-order phase transition that separates a uniform spatial density from a Bragg grating maximizing scattering into the cavity and is controlled by the laser intensity. Starting from a Fokker-Planck equation describing the semiclassical dynamics of the N -atom distribution function, we systematically develop a mean-field model and analyze its predictions for the equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium dynamics. The validity of the mean-field model is tested by comparison with the numerical simulations of the N -body Fokker-Planck equation and by means of a Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy. The mean-field theory predictions well reproduce several results of the N -body Fokker-Planck equation for sufficiently short times and are in good agreement with existing theoretical approaches based on field-theoretical models. The mean field, on the other hand, predicts thermalization time scales which are at least one order of magnitude shorter than the ones predicted by the N -body dynamics. We attribute this discrepancy to the fact that the mean-field ansatz discards the effects of the long-range incoherent forces due to cavity losses.

  20. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  1. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOEpatents

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.

    1999-08-24

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  2. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOEpatents

    Pipino, Andrew Charles Rule

    1999-11-16

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  3. Cavity Enhanced Thomson Scattering for Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalin, Azer; Friss, Adam; Lee, Brian; Franka, Isaiah

    2013-09-01

    This contribution describes the design, simulation, and initial experimental development of a novel laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system for measurement of weakly-ionized low temperature plasmas. The LTS approach uses a high power intra-cavity beam of power ~10-100 kW to provide increased scattered photon counts and sensitivity as compared to conventional LTS experiments that use light sources with orders of magnitude lower average power. The high power intra-cavity beam is generated by locking a narrow linewidth source laser to a high-finesse optical cavity via Pound-Drever-Hall locking. The plasma (to be studied) is housed with the high-finesse optical cavity. The high-power source is combined with a detection system comprised of a high-suppression triple monochromator and a low-noise photomultiplier tube used in photon counting mode. We present simulations of signal strengths and scattering spectra including elastic scatter background, detector dark counts, and random (counting) noise contributions. Expected experimental performance is assessed from fits to the simulated data. The number density and electron temperature of a 1010 cm-3 plasma should be accurately measurable with standard deviation of <5% in a measurement time of 5 minutes per wavelength channel. We also present experimental development including characterization of laser locking, and initial Rayleigh and Raman signals which will be used to calibrate the Thomson system.

  4. Optimized Multi-Ion Cavity Coupling.

    PubMed

    Begley, Stephen; Vogt, Markus; Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) are paving the way to utilize multiple quantum emitters confined in a single optical cavity. In such systems, it is crucially important to control the quantum mechanical coupling of individual emitters to the cavity mode. In this regard, combining ion trap technologies with CQED provides a particularly promising approach due to the well-established motional control over trapped ions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate coupling of up to five trapped ions in a string to a high-finesse optical cavity. By changing the axial position and spacing of the ions in a fully deterministic manner, we systematically characterize their coupling to the cavity mode through visibility measurements of the cavity emission. In good agreement with the theoretical model, the results demonstrate that the geometrical configuration of multiple trapped ions can be manipulated to obtain optimal cavity coupling. Our system presents a new ground for exploring CQED with multiple quantum emitters, enabled by the highly controllable collective light-matter interaction. PMID:27314716

  5. Optimized Multi-Ion Cavity Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, Stephen; Vogt, Markus; Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) are paving the way to utilize multiple quantum emitters confined in a single optical cavity. In such systems, it is crucially important to control the quantum mechanical coupling of individual emitters to the cavity mode. In this regard, combining ion trap technologies with CQED provides a particularly promising approach due to the well-established motional control over trapped ions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate coupling of up to five trapped ions in a string to a high-finesse optical cavity. By changing the axial position and spacing of the ions in a fully deterministic manner, we systematically characterize their coupling to the cavity mode through visibility measurements of the cavity emission. In good agreement with the theoretical model, the results demonstrate that the geometrical configuration of multiple trapped ions can be manipulated to obtain optimal cavity coupling. Our system presents a new ground for exploring CQED with multiple quantum emitters, enabled by the highly controllable collective light-matter interaction.

  6. Self-adaptive, narrowband tuning of a pulsed optical parametric oscillator and a continuous-wave diode laser via phase-conjugate photorefractive cavity reflectors: verification by high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Orr, B. J.

    2009-08-01

    A dynamic self-adaptive Bragg grating formed in a photorefractive crystal is shown to be a convenient way to attain single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) operation and narrowband tuning both in a pulsed, injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and in a continuous-wave (cw) extended-cavity diode laser. The pulsed OPO cavity comprises a Rh:BaTiO3 photorefractive (PR) crystal, a periodically poled KTiOPO4 nonlinear-optical crystal, and a dielectrically-coated end mirror. A continuous-wave seed beam at 820-850 nm from a tunable SLM diode laser traverses firstly the Rh:BaTiO3 crystal and then is retro-reflected by the end mirror; this creates a wavelength-selective Bragg grating reflector in the PR crystal, thereby completing the OPO cavity. The cavity stays automatically resonant with the seed radiation, with no need to actively control its length or to make any other mechanical adjustment. One form of injection seeder comprises a novel extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) design incorporating a self-pumped photorefractive phase-conjugate reflector and a compact, high-finesse tunable intracavity ring filter. This combination facilitates robust tunable single-frequency operation with narrow optical bandwidth. The performance characteristics of the OPO and the ECDL are evaluated by recording high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra. Notably, fluorescence-detected sub-Doppler two-photon excitation at 822 nm, of the 8 S ←6 S transition in atomic Cs, provides a crucial linewidth test.

  7. Laser-induced plasmas in ambient air for incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Albert A; Dixneuf, Sophie; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    The emission from a laser-induced plasma in ambient air, generated by a high power femtosecond laser, was utilized as pulsed incoherent broadband light source in the center of a quasi-confocal high finesse cavity. The time dependent spectra of the light leaking from the cavity was compared with those of the laser-induced plasma emission without the cavity. It was found that the light emission was sustained by the cavity despite the initially large optical losses of the laser-induced plasma in the cavity. The light sustained by the cavity was used to measure part of the S(1) ← S(0) absorption spectrum of gaseous azulene at its vapour pressure at room temperature in ambient air as well as the strongly forbidden γ-band in molecular oxygen: b(1)Σ(g)(+)(ν'=2)←X(3)Σ(g)(-)(ν''=0). PMID:25836833

  8. Optical storage based on coupling of one-way edge modes and cavity modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y.; Ni, Zh.; He, H. Q.; Jiang, T.

    2015-08-01

    We design a new kind of optical storage composed of a ring resonator that is based on both the one-way property of the edge modes of magneto-optical photonic crystals and the coupling effect of cavities. The ring resonator can be served as an optical storage through a close field circulation. Through another edge waveguide and coupling cavity, the electromagnetic signals can either be written into the storage or be taken out from it.

  9. Musical instrument recordings made with a fiber Fabry-Perot cavity: photonic guitar pickup.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Kung, Peter; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2010-04-10

    A 1 cm long, low-finesse fiber-optic cavity was used as a transducer for the vibrations of the soundboard of an acoustic guitar and of a violin. The reflected light is detected and then amplified and recorded using conventional audio instrumentation. The fiber-optic pickup is found to have a high response range in both amplitude (up to 100 microm displacement) and audio frequency (DC to 20 kHz) and good linearity up to a displacement of 225 microm. The audio noise is found to arise from the fiber-optic cables and, to a lesser extent, from the laser and laser driver.

  10. Optical Detection of Disordered Water Within a Protein Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Goldbeck, Robert A.; Pillsbury, Marlisa L.; Jensen, Russell A.; Mendoza, Juan L.; Nguyen, Rosa L.; Olson, John S.; Soman, Jayashree; Kliger, David S.; Esquerra, Raymond M.

    2009-01-01

    Internal water molecules are important to protein structure and function, but positional disorder and low occupancies can obscure their detection by x-ray crystallography. Here we show that water can be detected within the distal cavities of myoglobin mutants by subtle changes in the absorbance spectrum of pentacoordinate heme, even when the presence of solvent is not readily observed in the corresponding crystal structures. A well defined, non-coordinated water molecule hydrogen bonded to the distal histidine (His64) is seen within the distal heme pocket in the crystal structure of wild type (wt) deoxymyoglobin. Displacement of this water decreases the rate of ligand entry into wt Mb, and we have shown previously that the entry of this water is readily detected optically after laser photolysis of MbCO complexes. However, for L29F and V68L Mb no discrete positions for solvent molecules are seen in the electron density maps of the crystal structures even though His64 is still present and slow rates of ligand binding indicative of internal water are observed. In contrast, time-resolved perturbations of the visible absorption bands of L29F and V68L deoxyMb generated after laser photolysis detect the entry and significant occupancy of water within the distal pockets of these variants. Thus, the spectral perturbation of pentacoordinate heme offers a potentially robust system for measuring non-specific hydration of the active sites of heme proteins. PMID:19655795

  11. Atom-mediated effective interactions between modes of a bimodal cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Prado, F. O.; Luiz, F. S.; Villas-Boas, J. M.; Alcalde, A. M.; Duzzioni, E. I.; Sanz, L.

    2011-11-15

    We show a procedure for engineering effective interactions between two modes in a bimodal cavity. Our system consists of one or more two-level atoms, excited by a classical field, interacting with both modes. The two effective Hamiltonians have forms similar to beam-splitter and quadratic beam-splitter interactions. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear Hamiltonian can be used to prepare an entangled coherent state, also known as a multidimensional entangled coherent state, which has been pointed out as an important entanglement resource. We show that the nonlinear interaction parameter can be enhanced considering N independent atoms trapped inside a high-finesse optical cavity.

  12. Manipulating the optical bistability at terahertz frequency in the Fabry-Perot cavity with graphene.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Leyong; Guo, Jun; Wu, Leiming; Dai, Xiaoyu; Xiang, Yuanjiang

    2015-11-30

    We investigate theoretically the optical bistability from a Fabry-Perot cavity with graphene in the terahertz (THz) frequency. It is demonstrated that the optical bistablility in this cavity can be realized due to the electric field enhancement and the giant third-order nonlinear conductivity of graphene. The optical bistable behavior is strongly dependent on the transmission amplitude of the mirror and the position of the graphene in the cavity. It is especially important that the hysterical behaviors of the transmitted light rely on the optical conductivity of graphene, making the Fabry-Perot cavity to be a good candidate for dynamic tunable optical bistable device in the THz frequencies, owing to the possibility of high tunability of graphene conductivity by means of external electrostatic or magnetostatic field.

  13. Fast ground-state cooling of mechanical resonators with time-dependent optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Wu, Lian-Ao; Wang, Z. D.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a feasible scheme to cool down a mechanical resonator (MR) in a three-mirror cavity optomechanical system with controllable external optical driving fields. Under the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the whole dynamics of the mechanical resonator and cavities is reduced to that of a time-dependent harmonic oscillator, whose effective frequency can be controlled through the optical driving fields. The fast cooling of the MR can be realized by controlling the amplitude of the optical driving fields. Significantly, we further show that the ground-state cooling may be achieved via the three-mirror cavity optomechanical system without the resolved sideband condition.

  14. A tunable fiber-coupled optical cavity for agile enhancement of detector absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Robert M.; Tanner, Michael G.; Kirkwood, Robert A.; Miki, Shigehito; Warburton, Richard J.; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2016-09-01

    Maximizing photon absorption into thin active structures can be the limiting factor for photodetector efficiency. In this work, a fiber-coupled tunable cavity is demonstrated, designed to achieve close to unity absorption of photons into a thin film superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD). A technique for defining a stable cavity between the end of a telecommunications optical fiber and a reflective substrate is described and realized. Cavity resonances are demonstrated both through the tuning of input wavelength and cavity length. The resulting optical cavity can tune the resonant absorption in situ over a wavelength range of 100 nm. This technique is used to maximize the single photon absorption into both a back-side-coupled Au mirror SNSPD and a front-side-coupled distributed Bragg reflector cavity SNSPD. The system detection efficiency (SDE) is limited by imperfections in the thin films, but in both cases we demonstrate an improvement of the SDE by 40% over bare fiber illumination.

  15. Acousto-optic coupling in phoxonic crystal nanobeam cavities with plasmonic behavior.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jin-Chen; Lu, Tsung-Yi; Lin, Tzy-Rong

    2015-10-01

    Acousto-optic (AO) coupling in a two-layer GaAs/Ag heterogeneous phoxonic crystal nanobeam cavity with plasmonic behavior is studied numerically. Because of the Ag metal layer, the cavity structure hybridizes photons and surface plasmons, squeezing the optical energy into small regions near the GaAs/Ag interface; the phononic cavity modes can be simultaneously tailored to highly match the photonic cavity modes at reduced regions in the cavity. Consequently, AO coupling is enhanced at near-infrared wavelengths. Boosting of the interface effect by the acoustic displacement field mainly contributes to the AO coupling enhancement. The simultaneous small photonic mode volume and high spatial matching of photonic and phononic cavity modes enhance the photonic resonance wavelength shift by one order of magnitude. This study enables applications of strong AO or photon-phonon interaction in subwavelength nano-structures. PMID:26480095

  16. Selective engineering of cavity resonance for frequency matching in optical parametric processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Rogers, Steven; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-10-13

    We propose to selectively engineer a single cavity resonance to achieve frequency matching for optical parametric processes in high-Q microresonators. For this purpose, we demonstrate an approach, selective mode splitting (SMS), to precisely shift a targeted cavity resonance, while leaving other cavity modes intact. We apply SMS to achieve efficient parametric generation via four-wave mixing in high-Q silicon microresonators. The proposed approach is of great potential for broad applications in integrated nonlinear photonics.

  17. Performance of resonator fiber optic gyroscope using external-cavity laser stabilization and optical filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tiequn; Wu, Jianfeng; Strandjord, Lee K.; Sanders, Glen A.

    2014-05-01

    A bench-top resonator fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG) was assembled and tested, showing encouraging progress toward navigation grade performance. The gyro employed a fiber length of 19 meters of polarizing fiber for the sensing coil which was wound on an 11.5 cm diameter PZT cylinder. A bias stability of approximately 0.1 deg/hr was observed over a 2 hour timeframe, which is the best bias stability reported to date in an RFOG to our knowledge. Special care was taken to minimize laser phase noise, including stabilization to an optical cavity which was also used for optical filtering, giving angle random walk (ARW) values in the range of 0.008 deg/rt-hr. The ARW performance and bias stability are within 2x and 10x, respectively, of many civil inertial navigation grade requirements.

  18. Hyperparallel optical quantum computation assisted by atomic ensembles embedded in double-sided optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective, scalable, hyperparallel photonic quantum computation scheme in which photonic qubits are hyperencoded both in the spatial degrees of freedom (DOF) and the polarization DOF of each photon. The deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-cnot) gate on a two-photon system is attainable with our interesting interface between the polarized photon and the collective spin wave (magnon) of an atomic ensemble embedded in a double-sided optical cavity, and it doubles the operations in the conventional quantum cnot gate. Moreover, we present a compact hyper-cnotN gate on N +1 hyperencoded photons with only two auxiliary cavity-magnon systems, not more, and it can be faithfully constituted with current experimental techniques. Our proposal enables various applications with the hyperencoded photons in quantum computing and quantum networks.

  19. Excess noise depletion of a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Szirmai, G; Nagy, D; Domokos, P

    2009-02-27

    Quantum fluctuations of a cavity field coupled into the motion of ultracold bosons can be strongly amplified by a mechanism analogous to the Petermann excess noise factor in lasers with unstable cavities. For a Bose-Einstein condensate in a stable optical resonator, the excess noise effect amounts to a significant depletion on long time scales. PMID:19257722

  20. Excess Noise Depletion of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in an Optical Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Szirmai, G.; Nagy, D.; Domokos, P.

    2009-02-27

    Quantum fluctuations of a cavity field coupled into the motion of ultracold bosons can be strongly amplified by a mechanism analogous to the Petermann excess noise factor in lasers with unstable cavities. For a Bose-Einstein condensate in a stable optical resonator, the excess noise effect amounts to a significant depletion on long time scales.

  1. All-optical signal amplifier and distributor using cavity-atom coupling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yafan; Lin, Gongwei; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2016-05-01

    We report an all-optical signal amplifier and a signal distributor using cavity-atom coupling systems. In this system we couple atoms with an optical cavity and realize the great enhancement of a control laser by the cavity with the help of two high coupling lasers. By this effect, we can use one weak control field to control another strong target field and the intensity changes are linear with our experimental conditions. This can be used as an all-optical signal amplifier, also known as a ‘transphasor’. In our experiment, the gain of the weak field to strong field can be as high as 60. Furthermore, we can realize the distribution of optical signals, if we coordinate multiple cavity-atom coupling systems.

  2. Ultra-low power fiber-coupled gallium arsenide photonic crystal cavity electro-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Shambat, Gary; Ellis, Bryan; Mayer, Marie A; Majumdar, Arka; Haller, Eugene E; Vučković, Jelena

    2011-04-11

    We demonstrate a gallium arsenide photonic crystal cavity injection-based electro-optic modulator coupled to a fiber taper waveguide. The fiber taper serves as a convenient and tunable waveguide for cavity coupling with minimal loss. Localized electrical injection of carriers into the cavity region via a laterally doped p-i-n diode combined with the small mode volume of the cavity enable ultra-low energy modulation at sub-fJ/bit levels. Speeds of up to 1 GHz are demonstrated with photoluminescence lifetime measurements revealing that the ultimate limit goes well into the tens of GHz.

  3. Cooperative effects of two optical dipole antennas coupled to plasmonic Fabry-Pérot cavity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Qu-Quan; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the cooperative effects of two optical dipole antennas that are coupled to a finite Au nanowire acting as plasmonic Fabry-Pérot (F-P) cavity. The coherent coupling between one single antenna and the F-P cavity can result in Fano resonance, and the coupling strength is antenna position dependent. For two antennas coupled to the F-P cavity, constructive or destructive interference between antennas could be achieved by adjusting their positions along the F-P cavity. Consequently, the Fano resonance will become stronger or weaker correspondingly.

  4. External cavity diode laser based upon an FBG in an integrated optical fiber platform.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Stephen G; Holmes, Christopher; Berry, Sam A; Gates, James C; Jantzen, Alexander; Ferreiro, Teresa I; Smith, Peter G R

    2016-04-18

    An external cavity diode laser is demonstrated using a Bragg grating written into a novel integrated optical fiber platform as the external cavity. The cavity is fabricated using flame-hydrolysis deposition to bond a photosensitive fiber to a silica-on-silicon wafer, and a grating written using direct UV-writing. The laser operates on a single mode at the acetylene P13 line (1532.83 nm) with 9 mW output power. The noise properties of the laser are characterized demonstrating low linewidth operation (< 14 kHz) and superior relative intensity noise characteristics when compared to a commercial tunable external cavity diode laser. PMID:27137276

  5. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  6. Intra-cavity cryogenic optical refrigeration using high power vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs).

    PubMed

    Ghasemkhani, Mohammadreza; Albrecht, Alexander R; Melgaard, Seth D; Seletskiy, Denis V; Cederberg, Jeffrey G; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2014-06-30

    A 7% Yb:YLF crystal is laser cooled to 131 ± 1 K from room temperature by placing it inside the external cavity of a high power InGaAs/GaAs VECSEL operating at 1020 nm with 0.15 nm linewidth. This is the lowest temperature achieved in the intracavity geometry to date and presents major progress towards realizing an all-solid-state compact optical cryocooler.

  7. Cancellation of lateral displacement noise of three-port gratings for coupling light to cavities.

    PubMed

    Meinders, Melanie; Kroker, Stefanie; Singh, Amrit Pal; Kley, E-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Reflection gratings enable light coupling to optical cavities without transmission through substrates. Gratings that have three ports and are mounted in a second-order Littrow configuration even allow the coupling to high-finesse cavities using low diffraction efficiencies. In contrast to conventional transmissive cavity couplers, however, the phase of the diffracted light depends on the lateral position of the grating, which introduces an additional noise coupling. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that this kind of noise cancels out once both diffracted output ports of the grating are combined. We achieve the same signal-to-shot-noise ratio as for a conventional coupler. From this perspective, three-port grating couplers in a second-order Littrow configuration remain a valuable approach to reducing optical absorption of cavity coupler substrates in future gravitational-wave detectors. PMID:25927782

  8. All-optical buffer based on temporal cavity solitons operating at 10 Gb/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae K.; Erkintalo, Miro; Schröder, Jochen; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Murdoch, Stuart G.; Coen, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate the operation of an all-optical buffer based on temporal cavity solitons stored in a nonlinear passive fiber ring resonator. Unwanted acoustic interactions between neighboring solitons are suppressed by modulating the phase of the external laser driving the cavity. A new locking scheme is presented that allows the buffer to operate with an arbitrarily large number of cavity solitons in the loop. Experimentally, we are able to demonstrate the storage of 4536 bits of data, written all-optically into the fiber ring at 10 Gb/s, for 1 minute.

  9. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrary macropulse width and repetition rate.

  10. Power enhancement of burst-mode ultraviolet pulses using a doubly resonant optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    We report a doubly resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed, and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (1064 nm) and its frequency-tripled ultraviolet (355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber-optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique enables novel applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrary macropulse width and repetition rate. PMID:26625051

  11. Tuning the Sensitivity of an Optical Cavity with Slow and Fast Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Myneni, Krishna; Chang, H.; Toftul, A.; Schambeau, C.; Odutola, J. A.; Diels, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured mode pushing by the dispersion of a rubidium vapor in a Fabry-Perot cavity and have shown that the scale factor and sensitivity of a passive cavity can be strongly enhanced by the presence of such an anomalous dispersion medium. The enhancement is the result of the atom-cavity coupling, which provides a positive feedback to the cavity response. The cavity sensitivity can also be controlled and tuned through a pole by a second, optical pumping, beam applied transverse to the cavity. Alternatively, the sensitivity can be controlled by the introduction of a second counter-propagating input beam that interferes with the first beam, coherently increasing the cavity absorptance. We show that the pole in the sensitivity occurs when the sum of the effective group index and an additional cavity delay factor that accounts for mode reshaping goes to zero, and is an example of an exceptional point, commonly associated with coupled non-Hermitian Hamiltonian systems. Additionally we show that a normal dispersion feature can decrease the cavity scale factor and can be generated through velocity selective optical pumping

  12. Coupled-Cavity Interferometer for the Optics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the construction of a flexible coupled-cavity interferometer for student use. A helium-neon laser and phonograph turntable are the main components. Lists activities which may be performed with the apparatus. (Author/CP)

  13. Cavity modes with optical orbital angular momentum in a metamaterial ring based on transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Wu, H W; Wang, F; Dong, Y Q; Shu, F Z; Zhang, K; Peng, R W; Xiong, X; Wang, Mu

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we theoretically study the cavity modes with transverse orbital angular momentum in metamaterial ring based on transformation optics. The metamaterial ring is designed to transform the straight trajectory of light into the circulating one by enlarging the azimuthal angle, effectively presenting the modes with transverse orbital angular momentum. The simulation results confirm the theoretical predictions, which state that the transverse orbital angular momentum of the mode not only depends on the frequency of the incident light, but also depends on the transformation scale of the azimuthal angle. Because energy dissipation inevitably reduces the field amplitude of the modes, the confined electromagnetic energy and the quality factor of the modes inside the ring are also studied in order to evaluate the stability of those cavity modes. The results show that the metamaterial ring can effectively confine light with a high quality factor and maintain steady modes with the orbital angular momentum, even if the dimension of the ring is much smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. This technique for exploiting the modes with optical transverse orbital angular momentum may provides a unique platform for applications related to micromanipulation.

  14. Feasibility of a feedback control of atomic self-organization in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D. A. Ivanova, T. Yu.

    2015-08-15

    Many interesting nonlinear effects are based on the strong interaction of motional degrees of freedom of atoms with an optical cavity field. Among them is the spatial self-organization of atoms in a pattern where the atoms group in either odd or even sites of the cavity-induced optical potential. An experimental observation of this effect can be simplified by using, along with the original cavity-induced feedback, an additional electronic feedback based on the detection of light leaking the cavity and the control of the optical potential for the atoms. Following our previous study, we show that this approach is more efficient from the laser power perspective than the original scheme without the electronic feedback.

  15. Nano-scale optical actuation based on two-dimensional heterostructure photonic crystal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Zhou, Guangya; Chau, Fook Siong; Tian, Feng; Deng, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Nowadays, nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) actuators using electrostatic forces are facing the bottleneck of the electromagnetic interference which greatly degrades their performances. On the contrary, the hybrid circuits driven by optical gradient forces which are immune to the electromagnetic interference show prominent advantages in communication, quantum computation, and other application systems. In this paper we propose an optical actuator utilizing the optical gradient force generated by a hetero-structure photonic crystal cavity. This type of cavity has a longitudinal air-slot and characteristics of ultrahigh quality factor (Q) and ultra-small mode volume (V) which is capable of producing a much larger force compared with the waveguide-based structures. Due to the symmetry property, attractive optical gradient force is generated. Additionally, the optomechanical coefficient (gom) of this cavity is two orders of magnitude larger than that of the coupled nanobeam photonic crystal cavities. The 2D hetero-structure cavity, comb drives, folded beam suspensions and the displacement sensor compose the whole device. The cavity serves as the optical actuator whilst the butt-coupled waveguide acts as the displacement sensor which is theoretically proved to be insensitive to the temperature variations. As known, the thermo-optic effect prevails especially in the cavity-based structures. The butt-coupled waveguide can be used to decouple the thermal effect and the optoemchanical effect (OM) with the aid of comb drives. The results demonstrate that the proposed optical gradient force actuator show great potential in the future of all-optical reconfigurable circuits.

  16. Optical AND/OR gates based on monolithically integrated vertical cavity laser with depleted optical thyristor structure.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woon-Kyung; Kim, Doo-Gun; Kim, Do-Gyun; Choi, Young-Wan; Choquette, Kent D; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deok-Ha

    2006-11-27

    Latching optical switches and optical logic gates with AND and OR functionality are demonstrated for the first time by the monolithic integration of a vertical cavity lasers with depleted optical thyristor structure. The thyristors have a low threshold current of 0.65 mA and a high on/off contrast ratio of more than 50 dB. By simply changing a reference switching voltage, this single device operates as two logic functions, optical logic AND and OR. The thyristor laser fabricated by using the oxidation process and has achieved high optical output power efficiency and a high sensitivity to the optical input light.

  17. Flight-Like Optical Reference Cavity for GRACE Follow-On Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; deVine, G.; Klipstein, W. M.; McKenzie, K.; Spero, R.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.; Stephens, M.; Leitch, J.; Pierce, R.; Shaddock, D.; Lam, T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a prototype optical cavity and associated optics that has been developed to provide a stable frequency reference for a future space-based laser ranging system. This instrument is being considered for inclusion as a technology demonstration on the recently announced GRACE follow-on mission, which will monitor variations in the Earth's gravity field.

  18. New route to optical turbulence in detuned lasers with a compound cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, K.; Kawaguchi, H.

    1984-09-01

    A successive subharmonic modulation cascade of self-sustained relaxation oscillations in an inverse order leading to optical turbulence in detuned lasers with compound-cavity configurations is predicted. A brief experimental result which supports the predicted subharmonic modulation phenomenon is shown. The suppression effect of optical turbulence by external light injection, which is important for practical applications, is demonstrated theoretically.

  19. Cavity Nonlinear Optics at Low Photon Numbers from Collective Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Subhadeep; Moore, Kevin L.; Murch, Kater W.; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2007-11-23

    We report on Kerr nonlinearity and dispersive optical bistability of a Fabry-Perot optical resonator due to the displacement of ultracold atoms trapped within. In the driven resonator, such collective motion is induced by optical forces acting upon up to 10{sup 5} {sup 87}Rb atoms prepared in the lowest band of a one-dimensional intracavity optical lattice. The longevity of atomic motional coherence allows for strongly nonlinear optics at extremely low cavity photon numbers, as demonstrated by the observation of both branches of optical bistability at photon numbers below unity.

  20. In situ characterization of an optically thick atom-filled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munns, J. H. D.; Qiu, C.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.; Saunders, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    A means for precise experimental characterization of the dielectric susceptibility of an atomic gas inside an optical cavity is important for the design and operation of quantum light-matter interfaces, particularly in the context of quantum information processing. Here we present a numerically optimized theoretical model to predict the spectral response of an atom-filled cavity, accounting for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening at high optical densities. We investigate the regime where the two broadening mechanisms are of similar magnitude, which makes the use of common approximations invalid. Our model agrees with an experimental implementation with warm caesium vapor in a ring cavity. From the cavity response, we are able to extract important experimental parameters, for instance the ground-state populations, total number density, and the magnitudes of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening.

  1. High-Q silica zipper cavity for optical radiation pressure driven MOMS switch

    SciTech Connect

    Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2014-07-15

    We design a silica zipper cavity that has high optical and mechanical Q (quality factor) values and demonstrate numerically the feasibility of a radiation pressure driven micro opto-mechanical system (MOMS) directional switch. The silica zipper cavity has an optical Q of 4.0 × 10{sup 4} and an effective mode volume V{sub mode} of 0.67λ{sup 3} when the gap between two cavities is 34 nm. The mechanical Q (Q{sub m}) is determined by thermo-elastic damping and is 2.0 × 10{sup 6} in a vacuum at room temperature. The opto-mechanical coupling rate g{sub OM} is as high as 100 GHz/nm, which allows us to move the directional cavity-waveguide system and switch 1550-nm light with 770-nm light by controlling the radiation pressure.

  2. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Miyoshi, S.; Takahashi, T. Tanaka, R.; Uesugi, Y.; Yoshitama, H.; Sakaue, K.; Washio, M.

    2015-04-15

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  3. Demonstration of the stabilization technique for nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, T.; Araki, S.; Funahashi, Y.; Honda, Y.; Miyoshi, S.; Okugi, T.; Omori, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sakaue, K.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, R.; Terunuma, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Urakawa, J.; Washio, M.; Yoshitama, H.

    2015-04-01

    Based on our previously developed scheme to stabilize nonplanar optical resonant cavities utilizing polarization caused by a geometric phase in electromagnetic waves traveling along a twisted path, we report an application of the technique for a cavity installed in the Accelerator Test Facility, a 1.3-GeV electron beam accelerator at KEK, in which photons are generated by laser-Compton scattering. We successfully achieved a power enhancement of 1200 with 1.4% fluctuation, which means that the optical path length of the cavity has been controlled with a precision of 14 pm under an accelerator environment. In addition, polarization switching utilizing a geometric phase of the nonplanar cavity was demonstrated.

  4. Optical transfer cavity stabilization using current-modulated injection-locked diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlouli-Zanjani, P.; Afrousheh, K.; Martin, J. D. D.

    2006-09-15

    It is demonstrated that rf current modulation of a frequency stabilized injection-locked diode laser allows the stabilization of an optical cavity to adjustable lengths, by variation of the rf frequency. This transfer cavity may be used to stabilize another laser at an arbitrary wavelength, in the absence of atomic or molecular transitions suitable for stabilization. Implementation involves equipment and techniques commonly used in laser cooling and trapping laboratories and does not require electro- or acousto-optic modulators. With this technique we stabilize a transfer cavity using a rf current-modulated diode laser which is injection locked to a 780 nm reference diode laser. The reference laser is stabilized using polarization spectroscopy in a Rb cell. A Ti:sapphire ring laser at 960 nm is locked to this transfer cavity and may be precisely scanned by varying the rf modulation frequency. We demonstrate the suitability of this system for the excitation of laser cooled Rb atoms to Rydberg states.

  5. Modeling of multi-cavity Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzba, Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Reflectance characteristics of a two-cavity extrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensor were investigated using computer modeling. Calculations were performed using a plane wave-based approach, selected for clarity of results. Based on the modeling results, it can be concluded that the two-cavity Fabry-Perot interferometer can be used to measure two different quantities, such as refractive index and temperature, independently. It is also possible to use one of its cavities as a wavelength or optical path length reference, especially when a tunable laser is used as a light source. Spectral signal processing needed in such sensor is not substantially more complicated than that used in single cavity sensors.

  6. XTREME OPTICS: the behavior of cavity optics for the Jefferson Lab free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; Fred Dylla; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; George Neil; and Shukui Zhanga

    2006-09-25

    The cavity optics within high power free-electron lasers based on energy-recovering accelerators are subjected to extreme conditions associated with illumination from a broad spectrum of radiation, often at high irradiances. This is especially true for the output coupler, where absorption of radiation by both the mirror substrate and coating places significant design restrictions to properly manage heat load and prevent mirror distortion. Besides the fundamental lasing wavelength, the mirrors are irradiated with light at harmonics of the fundamental, THz radiation generated by the bending magnets downstream of the wiggler, and x-rays produced when the electron beam strikes accelerator diagnostic components (e.g., wire scanners and view screens) or from inadvertent beam loss. The optics must reside within high vacuum at ~ 10-8 Torr and this requirement introduces its own set of complications. This talk discusses the performance of numerous high reflector and output coupler optics assemblies and provides a detailed list of lessons learned gleaned from years of experience operating the Upgrade IR FEL, a 10 kW-class, sub-ps laser with output wavelength from 1 to 6 microns.

  7. In situ observation of optomechanical Bloch oscillations in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keßler, H.; Klinder, J.; Prasanna Venkatesh, B.; Georges, Ch; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-10-01

    It is shown experimentally that a Bose–Einstein condensate inside an optical cavity, operating in the regime of strong cooperative coupling, responds to an external force by an optomechanical Bloch oscillation, which can be directly observed in the light leaking out of the cavity. Previous theoretical work predicts that the frequency of this oscillation matches with that of conventional Bloch oscillations such that its in situ monitoring may help to increase the data acquisition speed in precision force measurements.

  8. Generation and purification of maximally entangled atomic states in optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Walther, H.; Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We present a probabilistic scheme for generating and purifying maximally entangled states of two atoms inside an optical cavity via no-photon detection at the cavity output, where ideal detectors are not required. The intermediate mixed states can be continuously purified so as to violate Bell inequalities in a parametrized manner. The scheme relies on an additional strong-driving field that realizes, atypically, simultaneous Jaynes-Cummings and anti-Jaynes-Cummings interactions.

  9. Polymer-based Photonic Crystal Cavity Sensor for Optical Detection in the Visible Wavelength Region.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Kenichi; Aki, Shoma; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Endo, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) cavity for visible-light-based optical-sensing applications was designed and fabricated for the first time. The PhC cavity configuration was designed to operate at 650 nm, and fabricated with a polymer (resist) on a silicon substrate using electron-beam lithography. For investigating sensing applications based on shifting of condition exhibiting a photonic bandgap (PBG), the polymer monolayer deposition (layer-by-layer method) was monitored as the light-intensity change at the cavity position. Consequently, the monolayer-level detection of polyions was achieved. PMID:26753717

  10. Two-photon phase gate with linear optical elements and atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Xia, Yan; Lu, Pei-Min

    2016-09-01

    We propose a protocol for implementing π phase gate of two photons with linear optical elements and an atom-cavity system. The evolution of the atom-cavity system is based on the quantum Zeno dynamics. The devices in the present protocol are simple and feasible with current experimental technology. Moreover, the method we proposed here is deterministic with a high fidelity. Numerical simulation shows that the evolution in cavity is efficient and robust. Therefore, the protocol may be helpful for quantum computation field.

  11. Modeling of optically controlled reflective bistability in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, L.

    2015-05-01

    Bistability switching between two optical signals has been studied theoretically utilizing the concept of cross absorption modulation in a vertical cavity semiconductor saturable absorber (VCSSA). The probe beam is fixed at a wavelength other than the low power cavity resonance wavelength, which exhibits bistable characteristic by controlling the power of a pump beam (λpump≠λprobe). The cavity nonlinear effects that arises simultaneously from the excitonic absorption bleaching, and the carrier induced nonlinear index change has been considered in the model. The high power absorption in the active region introduces thermal effects within the nonlinear cavity due to which the effective cavity length changes. This leads to a red-shift of the cavity resonance wavelength, which results a change in phase of the optical fields within the cavity. In the simulation, the phase-change due to this resonance shifting is considered to be constant over time, and it assumes the value corresponding to the maximum input power. Further, an initial phase detuning of the probe beam has been considered to investigate its effect on switching. It is observed from the simulated results that, the output of the probe beam exhibits either clockwise or counter-clockwise bistability, depending on its initial phase detuning.

  12. Dynamics of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser subject to dual-cavity optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaurigue, Lina; Nikiforov, Oleg; Schöll, Eckehard; Breuer, Stefan; Lüdge, Kathy

    2016-02-01

    We study the influence of dual-cavity optical feedback on the emission dynamics and timing stability of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser using a delay differential equation model and verify the timing stability results by an initial experiment. By bifurcation analysis in dependence of the feedback delay times and feedback strength bistability, quasiperiodic and chaotic dynamics, as well as fundamental mode-locking are investigated, yielding a comprehensive overview on the nonlinear emission dynamics arising due to dual-cavity optical feedback. Optimum self-locking ranges for improving the timing stability by dual-cavity optical feedback are identified. A timing jitter reduction and an increase of the repetition rate tuning range of up to a factor of three, compared with single-cavity feedback, are predicted for the parameter ranges investigated. Improved timing stability on short and long timescales is predicted for dual-cavity feedback through the suppression of noise-induced fluctuations. Based on the numerical predictions, experimentally, a maximum timing jitter reduction up to a factor of 180 is found, accompanied by a side-band reduction by a factor of 58 dB, when both feedback cavities are resonant.

  13. Optomechanical Entanglement Between an Ion and an Optical Cavity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2016-04-01

    I study an optomechanical system in which the mechanical motion of a single trapped ion is coupled to a cavity field for the realization of a strongly quantum correlated two-mode system. I show that for large pump intensities the steady state photon number exhibits bistable behaviour. I further analyze the occurrence of normal mode splitting (NMS) due to mixing of the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the ion motion which indicates a coherent energy exchange. I also find that in the parameter regime where NMS exists, the steady state of the system shows continuous variable entanglement. Such a two-mode optomechanical system can be used for the realization of continuous variable quantum information interfaces and networks.

  14. Cavity Optomechanics with High-Stress Silicon Nitride Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dalziel Joseph

    There has been a barrage of interest in recent years to marry the fields of nanomechanics and quantum optics. Mechanical systems provide sensitive and scalable architectures for sensing applications ranging from atomic force microscopy to gravity wave interferometry. Optical resonators driven by low noise lasers provide a quiet and well-understood means to read-out and manipulate mechanical motion, by way of the radiation pressure force. Taken to an extreme, a device consisting of a high-Q nanomechanical oscillator coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity may enable ground-state preparation of the mechanical element, thus paving the way for a new class of quantum technology based on chip-scale phononic devices coupled to optical photons. By way of mutual coupling to the optical field, this architecture may enable coupling of single phonons to real or artificial atoms, an enticing prospect because of the vast "quantum optics toolbox" already developed for cavity quantum electrodynamics. The first step towards these goals --- ground-state cooling of the mechanical element in a "cavity optomechanical" system --- has very recently been realized in a cryogenic setup. The work presented in this thesis describes an effort to extend this capability to a room temperature apparatus, so that the usual panoply of table-top optical/atomic physics tools can be brought to bear. This requires a mechanical oscillator with exceptionally low dissipation, as well as careful attention to extraneous sources of noise in both the optical and mechanical componentry. Our particular system is based on a high- Q, high-stress silicon nitride membrane coupled to a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. The purpose of this thesis is to record in detail the procedure for characterizing/modeling the physical properties of the membrane resonator, the optical cavity, and their mutual interaction, as well as extraneous sources of noise related to multimode thermal motion of the oscillator, thermal motion

  15. High contrast all-optical diode based on direction-dependent optical bistability within asymmetric ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiu-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Qin; Xu, Jing-Ping; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple all-optical diode which is comprised of an asymmetric ring cavity containing a two-level atomic ensemble. Attributed to spatial symmetry breaking of the ring cavity, direction-dependent optical bistability is obtained in a classical bistable system. Therefore, a giant optical non-reciprocity is generated, which guarantees an all-optical diode with a high contrast up to 22 dB. Furthermore, its application as an all-optical logic AND gate is also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274242, 11474221, and 11574229), the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. U1330203), and the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922203 and 2013CB632701).

  16. High contrast all-optical diode based on direction-dependent optical bistability within asymmetric ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiu-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Qin; Xu, Jing-Ping; Yang, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    We propose a simple all-optical diode which is comprised of an asymmetric ring cavity containing a two-level atomic ensemble. Attributed to spatial symmetry breaking of the ring cavity, direction-dependent optical bistability is obtained in a classical bistable system. Therefore, a giant optical non-reciprocity is generated, which guarantees an all-optical diode with a high contrast up to 22 dB. Furthermore, its application as an all-optical logic AND gate is also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274242, 11474221, and 11574229), the Joint Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. U1330203), and the National Key Basic Research Special Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922203 and 2013CB632701).

  17. Laser-induced micro-plasmas in air for incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Albert; Dixneuf, Sophie; Orphal, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) is an experimentally straightforward absorption method where the intensity of light transmitted by an optically stable (high finesse) cavity is measured. The technique is realized using broadband incoherent sources of radiation and therefore the amount of light transmitted by a cavity consisting of high reflectance mirrors (typically R > 99.9%) can be low. In order to find an alternative to having an incoherent light source outside the cavity, an experiment was devised, where a laser-induced plasma in ambient air was generated inside a quasi-confocal cavity by a high-power femtosecond laser. The emission from the laser-induced plasma was utilized as pulsed broadband light source. The time-dependent spectra of the light leaking from the cavity were compared with those of the laser-induced plasma emission without the cavity. It was found that the light emission was sustained by the cavity despite the initially large optical losses caused by the laser-induced plasma in the cavity. The light sustained by the cavity was used to measure part of the S1 ← S0 absorption spectrum of gaseous azulene at its vapour pressure at room temperature in ambient air, as well as the strongly forbidden γ-band in molecular oxygen (b1Σ(2,0) ← X3Σ(0,0)).

  18. Extreme nonlinear response of ultranarrow optical transitions in cavity QED for laser stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M. J.; Meiser, D.; Ye Jun; Holland, M. J.; Thomsen, J. W.

    2011-12-15

    We explore the potential of direct spectroscopy of ultranarrow optical transitions of atoms localized in an optical cavity. In contrast to stabilization against a reference cavity, which is the approach currently used for the most highly stabilized lasers, stabilization against an atomic transition does not suffer from Brownian thermal noise. Spectroscopy of ultranarrow optical transitions in a cavity operates in a very highly saturated regime in which nonlinear effects such as bistability play an important role. From the universal behavior of the Jaynes-Cummings model with dissipation, we derive the fundamental limits for laser stabilization using direct spectroscopy of ultranarrow atomic lines. We find that, with current lattice clock experiments, laser linewidths of about 1 mHz can be achieved in principle, and the ultimate limitations of this technique are at the 1 {mu}Hz level.

  19. Single-shot optical readout of a quantum bit using cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shuo; Waks, Edo

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method to perform single-shot optical readout of a quantum bit (qubit) using cavity quantum electrodynamics. We selectively couple the optical transitions associated with different qubit basis states to the cavity and utilize the change in cavity transmissivity to generate a qubit readout signal composed of many photons. We show that this approach enables single-shot optical readout even when the qubit does not have a good cycling transition, which is required for standard resonance fluorescence measurements. We calculate the probability that the measurement detects the correct qubit state using the example of a quantum-dot spin under various experimental conditions and demonstrate that it can exceed 0.99.

  20. Thermal analysis of optical reference cavities for low sensitivity to environmental temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Yanyi; Hang, Chao; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2015-02-23

    The temperature stability of optical reference cavities is significant in state-of-the-art ultra-stable narrow-linewidth laser systems. In this paper, the thermal time constant and thermal sensitivity of reference cavities are analyzed when reference cavities respond to environmental perturbations via heat transfer of thermal conduction and thermal radiation separately. The analysis as well as simulation results indicate that a reference cavity enclosed in multiple layers of thermal shields with larger mass, higher thermal capacity and lower emissivity is found to have a larger thermal time constant and thus a smaller sensitivity to environmental temperature perturbations. The design of thermal shields for reference cavities may vary according to experimentally achievable temperature stability and the coefficient of thermal expansion of reference cavities. A temperature fluctuation-induced length instability of reference cavities as low as 6 × 10(-16) on a day timescale can be achieved if a two-layer thermal shield is inserted between a cavity with the coefficient of thermal expansion of 1 × 10(-10) /K and an outer vacuum chamber with temperature fluctuation amplitude of 1 mK and period of 24 hours.

  1. Stability improvements for the NIST Yb optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, R. J.; Schioppo, M.; McGrew, W. F.; Brown, R. C.; Hinkley, N.; Yoon, T. H.; Beloy, K.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2016-05-01

    To reach the fundamental limit given by quantum projection noise, optical lattice clocks require advanced laser stabilization techniques. The NIST ytterbium clock has benefited from several generations of extremely high finesse optical cavities, with cavity linewidths below 1 kHz. Characterization of the cavity drift rate has allowed compensation to the mHz/s level, improving the medium-term stability of the cavity. Based on recent measurements using Ramsey spectroscopy with synchronous interrogation, we report a fractional instability σy(1s) <=10-16 , dominated by atom number fluctuation noise. We also provide updates on our cryogenic sapphire cavity with a reduced thermal noise floor, which will improve our Dick-limited fractional instability at 1 s to below 10-16. Also at University of Colorado.

  2. Optical glucose monitoring using vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi Fard, Sahba; Hofmann, Werner; Talebi Fard, Pouria; Kwok, Ezra; Amann, Markus-Christian; Chrostowski, Lukas

    2009-08-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a common chronic disease that has become a public health issue. Continuous glucose monitoring improves patient health by stabilizing the glucose levels. Optical methods are one of the painless and promising methods that can be used for blood glucose predictions. However, having accuracies lower than what is acceptable clinically has been a major concern. Using lasers along with multivariate techniques such as Partial Least Square (PLS) can improve glucose predictions. This research involves investigations for developing a novel optical system for accurate glucose predictions, which leads to the development of a small, low power, implantable optical sensor for diabetes patients.

  3. Transportable cavity-stabilized laser system for optical carrier frequency transmission experiments.

    PubMed

    Parker, B; Marra, G; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Webster, S A; Wright, L; Lea, S N; Gill, P; Bayvel, P

    2014-12-10

    We report the design and performance of a transportable laser system at 1543 nm, together with its application as the source for a demonstration of optical carrier frequency transmission over 118 km of an installed dark fiber network. The laser system is based around an optical reference cavity featuring an elastic mounting that bonds the cavity to its support, enabling the cavity to be transported without additional clamping. The cavity exhibits passive fractional frequency insensitivity to vibration along the optical axis of 2.0×10(-11)  m(-1) s(2). With active fiber noise cancellation, the optical carrier frequency transmission achieves a fractional frequency instability, measured at the user end, of 2.6×10(-16) at 1 s, averaging down to below 3×10(-18) after 20,000 s. The fractional frequency accuracy of the transfer is better than 3×10(-18). This level of performance is sufficient for comparison of state-of-the-art optical frequency standards and is achieved in an urban fiber environment.

  4. Cavity-enhanced optical feedback-assisted photo-acoustic spectroscopy with a 10.4 μm external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachanov, A.; Koulikov, S.; Tittel, F. K.

    2013-01-01

    An ultra-sensitive photo-acoustic spectrometer using a 10.4 μm broadly tunable mid-IR external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) coupled with optical feedback to an optical power buildup cavity with high reflectivity mirrors was developed and tested. A laser optical power buildup factor of 181 was achieved, which corresponds to an intra-cavity power of 9.6 W at a wavelength of 10.4 μm. With a photo-acoustic resonance cell placed inside the cavity this resulted in the noise-equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.9 × 10-10 cm-1 Hz-1/2, and a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 1.1 × 10-11 cm-1 W Hz-1/2. A novel photo-acoustic signal normalization technique makes the photo-acoustic spectrometer's response immune to changes and drifts in the EC-QCL excitation power, EC-QCL to cavity coupling efficiency and cavity mirrors aging and contamination. An automatic lock of the EC-QCL to the cavity and optical feedback phase optimization permitted long wavelength scans within the entire EC-QCL spectral tuning range.

  5. Optical nonlinearities near single photon level with a quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Deepak

    Over the last decade, exponential increase of information bandwidth over the internet and other communication media has increased the total power consumed by the devices associated with information exchange. With ever increasing number of users, and packing of a higher number of devices onto a chip, there is a great need for reduction in not only the power consumption of the devices but also the costs associated with information transfer. Currently, the benchmark in the energy consumption per logic operation is at femtojoule level and is set by the CMOS industry. However, optical devices based on single photon emitters coupled to a microcavity have the potential to reduce the optical power dissipation down to attojoule levels wherein only few 10s of photons are consumed for a logic operation. This work presents our theoretical and experimental efforts towards realization of all optical device based on the enhanced nonlinearities of a single photon emitter in a photonic crystal cavity. We show that a single quantum dot coupled to a photonic crystal cavity can be used to route an incoming optical beam with optical power dissipation of 14 attojoules, corresponding to only 65 photons. This value is well below the operational level for current CMOS devices indicating the potential for chip based optical transistors for reduction in energy consumption. The single photon emitters that we use to create the nonlinearity are the quantum dots, which are semiconductor nanostructures that exhibit a discrete energy spectrum. The interaction of the quantum dot, with light confined inside a photonic crystal cavity, results in strong atom-photon interactions which can be used for ultra-low power all optical switching. The strong interactions between a quantum dot and photonic crystal cavity can be further utilized to realize quantum computation schemes on a chip. I also describe techniques for integrating this transistor into an optical circuit, and discuss methods for post

  6. An integrated quantum repeater at telecom wavelength with single atoms in optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Quantum repeaters promise to enable quantum networks over global distances by circumventing the exponential decrease in success probability inherent in direct photon transmission. We propose a realistic, functionally integrated quantum-repeater implementation based on single atoms in optical cavities. Entanglement is directly generated between the single-atom quantum memory and a photon at telecom wavelength. The latter is collected with high efficiency and adjustable temporal and spectral properties into a spatially well-defined cavity mode. It is heralded by a near-infrared photon emitted from a second, orthogonal cavity. Entanglement between two remote quantum memories can be generated via an optical Bell-state measurement, while we propose entanglement swapping based on a highly efficient, cavity-assisted atom-atom gate. Our quantum-repeater scheme eliminates any requirement for wavelength conversion such that only a single system is needed at each node. We investigate a particular implementation with rubidium and realistic parameters for Fabry-Perot cavities based on hbox {CO}_2 laser-machined optical fibers. We show that the scheme enables the implementation of a rather simple quantum repeater that outperforms direct entanglement generation over large distances and does not require any improvements in technology beyond the state of the art.

  7. Generating single-mode behavior in fiber-coupled optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Jonathan; Beige, Almut

    2010-11-15

    We propose to turn two resonant distant cavities effectively into one by coupling them via an optical fiber which is coated with two-level atoms [J. D. Franson et al., Phys. Rev. A 70, 062302 (2004)]. The purpose of the atoms is to destructively measure the evanescent electric field of the fiber on a time scale which is long compared to the time it takes a photon to travel from one cavity to the other. Moreover, the boundary conditions imposed by the setup should support a small range of standing waves inside the fiber, including one at the frequency of the cavities. In this way, the fiber provides an additional decay channel for one common cavity field mode but not for the other. If the corresponding decay rate is sufficiently large, this mode decouples effectively from the system dynamics. A single nonlocal resonator mode is created.

  8. Self-cavity lasing in optically pumped single crystals of p-sexiphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Hisao; Tamura, Kenji; Sasaki, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    Organic single-crystal self-cavities are prepared by solution growth of p-sexiphenyl (p-6P). Based on Fabry-Pérot feedback inside a quasi-lozenge-shaped platelet crystal, edge-emitting laser is obtained under optical pumping. The multimode lasing band appears at the 0-1 or 0-2 vibronic progressions depending on the excitation conditions which affect the self-absorption effect. Cavity-size dependence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is investigated with laser-etched single crystals of p-6P. As the cavity length of square-shaped crystal is reduced from 100 to 10 μm, ASE threshold fluence is decreased probably due to size-dependent light confinement in the crystal cavity.

  9. Proposal for a telecom quantum repeater with single atoms in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Niemietz, Dominik; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Quantum repeaters hold the promise to enable long-distance quantum communication via entanglement generation over arbitrary distances. Single atoms in optical cavities have been shown to be ideally suited for the experimental realization of many tasks in quantum communication. To utilize these systems for a quantum repeater, it would be desirable to operate them at telecom wavelengths. We propose to use a cascaded scheme employing transitions at telecom wavelengths between excited states of alkali atoms for entanglement generation between a single photon at telecom wavelength and a single atom at the crossing point of two cavity modes. A cavity-assisted quantum gate can be used for entanglement swapping. We estimate the performance of these systems using numerical simulations based on experimental parameters obtained for CO2 laser-machined fiber cavities in our laboratory. Finally, we show that a quantum repeater employing the aforementioned scheme and current technology could outperform corresponding schemes based on direct transmission.

  10. Controllable optical bistability in a cavity optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamideh Kazemi, Seyedeh; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    The optical bistability (OB) in a two-mode optomechanical system with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) is studied. By investigating the behavior of steady state solutions, we show that how OB develops in the system for a certain range of cavity-pump detunings and pump amplitudes. We then investigate the effects of the decay rate of the cavity photons and coupling strength between the cavity and the BEC as well as the pump-atom detuning on the optical behaviour of the system. We find that one can control the OB threshold and width of the bistability curve via adjusting properly the coupling strength and the detuning. By applying Routh-Hurwitz criterion, we then derive stability conditions for different branches of the OB curve. Moreover, by introducing an effective potential for the system, a simple physical interpretation is obtained.

  11. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrarymore » macropulse width and repetition rate.« less

  12. Entanglement of movable mirror and cavity field enhanced by an optical parametric amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai-yun, Zhang; Hu, Li; Gui-xia, Pan; Zong-qiang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    A scheme to generate entanglement in a cavity optomechanical system filled with an optical parametric amplifier is proposed. With the help of the optical parametric amplifier, the stationary macroscopic entanglement between the movable mirror and the cavity field can be notably enhanced, and the entanglement increases when the parametric gain increases. Moreover, for a given parametric gain, the degree of entanglement of the cavity optomechanical system increases with increasing input laser power. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11247001), the Scientific Research Foundation of the Higher Education Institutions of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. KJ2012A083), and the Doctor (Master) Fund of Anhui University of Science and Technology, China.

  13. Homoclinic orbits and chaos in a second-harmonic generating optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, D.; Kovacic, G., Timofeyev, I.

    1997-04-01

    We present two large families of Silnikov-type homoclinic orbits in a two mode-model that describes second-harmonic generation in a passive optical cavity. These families of homoclinic orbits give rise to chaotic dynamics in the model. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Observation of motion-dependent nonlinear dispersion with narrow-linewidth atoms in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Christensen, Bjarke T R; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-03-01

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilization using ultrastable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the nonlinear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here, we have constructed such a system and observed nonlinear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by a strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multiphoton scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intracavity power, we systematically study this nonlinear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub-100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow-line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation to ultranarrow clock transitions.

  15. Observation of motion-dependent nonlinear dispersion with narrow-linewidth atoms in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Christensen, Bjarke T R; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-03-01

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilization using ultrastable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the nonlinear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here, we have constructed such a system and observed nonlinear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by a strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multiphoton scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intracavity power, we systematically study this nonlinear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub-100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow-line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation to ultranarrow clock transitions. PMID:25793810

  16. Optical coherence tomography combined with confocal microscopy for investigation of interfaces in class V cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rominu, Mihai; Sinescu, Cosmin; Petrescu, Emanuela; Haiduc, Claudiu; Rominu, Roxana; Enescu, Marius; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-07-01

    Standardized class V cavities, prepared in human extracted teeth, were filled with Premise (Kerr) composite. The specimens were thermo cycled. The interfaces were examined using a system employing two simultaneous imaging channels, an en-face Optical Coherence Tomography channel and a confocal microscopy channel.

  17. Optical resonance modes in InGaN/GaN multiple-quantum-well microring cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, K.C.; Dai, L.; Lin, J.Y.; Jiang, H.X.

    1999-10-01

    Microrings of varying sizes have been fabricated from In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}N/GaN (x{approximately}0.15) multiple quantum wells (MQWs). Photolithography and dry etching techniques including both ion-beam and inductively coupled plasma etching were employed to pattern the III{endash}nitride MQW microrings. Individual microrings were optically pumped and optical resonance modes were observed. The observed mode spacings were consistent with those expected for whispering-gallery (WG) modes within a resonant cavity of cylindrical symmetry, refractive index, and dimensions of the rings under investigation. The results obtained from the microring cavities were compared with those of the III{endash}nitride MQW microdisk cavities. Our results have indicated that resonance modes corresponding to the radial and the WG modes are simultaneously present in microdisk cavities, but only WG modes are available from the microring cavities. Implications of our results on future GaN-based microcavity light emitters have been discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Resonant microwave cavity for 8.5-12 GHz optically detected electron spin resonance with simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, J. S.; Wienkes, L. R.

    2009-03-01

    We present a newly developed microwave resonant cavity for use in optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) experiments. The cylindrical quasi-TE011 mode cavity is designed to fit in a 1 in. magnet bore to allow the sample to be optically accessed and to have an adjustable resonant frequency between 8.5 and 12 GHz. The cavity uses cylinders of high dielectric material, so-called "dielectric resonators," in a double-stacked configuration to determine the resonant frequency. Wires in a pseudo-Helmholtz configuration are incorporated into the cavity to provide frequencies for simultaneous nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The system was tested by measuring cavity absorption as microwave frequencies were swept, by performing ODMR on a zinc-doped InP sample, and by performing optically detected NMR on a GaAs sample. The results confirm the suitability of the cavity for ODMR with simultaneous NMR.

  19. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-06-24

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness.

  20. Breakdown of the linear acousto-optic interaction regime in phoxonic cavities.

    PubMed

    Almpanis, Evangelos; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Stefanou, Nikolaos

    2014-12-29

    The limits of validity of the linear photoelastic model are investigated in a one-dimensional dual photonic-phononic cavity, formed by alternating layers of a chalcogenide glass and a polymer homogeneous and isotropic material, which supports both optical and acoustic resonant modes localized in the same region. It is shown that the linear-response regime breaks down when either the acoustic excitation increases or the first-order acousto-optic interaction coupling element vanishes by symmetry, giving rise to the manifestation of multiphonon absorption and emission processes by a photon. Our results provide a consistent interpretation of different aspects of the underlying physics relating to nonlinear acousto-optic interactions that can occur in such cavities. PMID:25607131

  1. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T; Little, Brent E; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness. PMID:27338250

  2. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness. PMID:27338250

  3. Dual-pump Kerr Micro-cavity Optical Frequency Comb with varying FSR spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiqiang; Chu, Sai T.; Little, Brent E.; Pasquazi, Alessia; Wang, Yishan; Wang, Leiran; Zhang, Wenfu; Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiaohong; Wang, Guoxi; Hu, Hui; Su, Yulong; Li, Feitao; Liu, Yuanshan; Zhao, Wei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel dual-pump approach to generate robust optical frequency comb with varying free spectral range (FSR) spacing in a CMOS-compatible high-Q micro-ring resonator (MRR). The frequency spacing of the comb can be tuned by an integer number FSR of the MRR freely in our dual-pump scheme. The dual pumps are self-oscillated in the laser cavity loop and their wavelengths can be tuned flexibly by programming the tunable filter embedded in the cavity. By tuning the pump wavelength, broadband OFC with the bandwidth of >180 nm and the frequency-spacing varying from 6 to 46-fold FSRs is realized at a low pump power. This approach could find potential and practical applications in many areas, such as optical metrology, optical communication, and signal processing systems, for its excellent flexibility and robustness.

  4. Thermal lens microscope sensitivity enhancement using a passive Fabry–Perot-type optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, H.; Cedeño, E.; Grima, P.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.; Delgado, O.

    2016-05-01

    We developed a thermal lens microscope equipped with a passive optical cavity, which provides an optical feedback for the multiple pass of the probe laser beam to enhance sensitivity. Considering the maximum absorption peak for Fe(II) at 532 nm wavelength, we have achieved a 6.6-fold decrease in the limit of detection (LOD) to a level of 0.077 μg · l‑1 without a cavity. The possibilities to use thermal lens detection combined with an optical resonator was proposed and a drastic thermal lens signal enhancement was achieved using very low excitation power. The corresponding LOD for Fe(II) was further decreased to the level of 0.006 μg · l‑1 which represents an 85-fold decrease of the LOD value. This setup is a promising device, which can be applied as a sensitive tool for detecting chemical traces in small volumes of solutions.

  5. High-quality-factor planar optical cavities with laterally stopped, slowed, or reversed light.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Steven J; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    In a planar optical cavity, the resonance frequencies increase as a function of in-plane wavevector according to a standard textbook formula. This has well-known consequences in many different areas of optics, from the shifts of etalon peaks at non-normal angles, to the properties of transverse modes in laser diodes, to the effective mass of microcavity photons, and so on. However, this standard formula is valid only when the reflection phase of each cavity mirror is approximately independent of angle. There is a certain type of mirror-a subwavelength dielectric grating near a guided mode resonance-with not only a strongly angle-dependent reflection phase, but also very high reflectance and low losses. Simulations show that by using such mirrors, high-quality-factor planar cavities can be designed that break all these textbook rules, leading to resonant modes that are slow, stopped or even backward-propagating in the in-plane direction. In particular, we demonstrate experimentally high-Q planar cavities whose resonance frequency is independent of in-plane wavevector-i.e., the resonant modes have zero in-plane group velocity, for one polarization but both in-plane directions. We discuss potential applications in various fields including lasers, quantum optics, and exciton-polariton condensation. PMID:27505803

  6. High precision optical cavity length and width measurements using double modulation.

    PubMed

    Staley, A; Hoak, D; Effler, A; Izumi, K; Dwyer, S; Kawabe, K; King, E J; Rakhmanov, M; Savage, R L; Sigg, D

    2015-07-27

    We use doubly phase modulated light to measure both the length and the linewidth of an optical resonator with high precision. The first modulation is at RF frequencies and is set near a multiple of the free spectral range, whereas the second modulation is at audio frequencies to eliminate offset errors at DC. The light in transmission or in reflection of the optical resonator is demodulated while sweeping the RF frequency over the optical resonance. We derive expressions for the demodulated power in transmission, and show that the zero crossings of the demodulated signal in transmission serve as a precise measure of the cavity linewidth at half maximum intensity. We demonstrate the technique on two resonant cavities, with lengths 16 m and a 4 km, and achieve an absolute length accuracy as low as 70 ppb. The cavity width for the 16 m cavity was determined with an accuracy of approximately 6000 ppm. Through an analysis of the systematic errors we show that this result could be substantially improved with the reduction of technical sources of uncertainty. PMID:26367601

  7. Large ion Coulomb crystals: A near-ideal medium for coupling optical cavity modes to matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantan, A.; Albert, M.; Marler, J. P.; Herskind, P. F.; Drewsen, M.

    2009-10-01

    We present an investigation of the coherent coupling of various transverse field modes of an optical cavity to ion Coulomb crystals. The obtained experimental results, which include the demonstration of identical collective coupling rates for different transverse modes of a cavity field to ions in the same large Coulomb crystal, are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. The results furthermore suggest that Coulomb crystals in the future may serve as near-ideal media for high-fidelity multimode quantum information processing and communication purposes, including the generation and storage of single-photon qubits encoded in different transverse modes.

  8. Electro-optic harmonic conversion to switch a laser beam out of a cavity

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Roger A.; Henesian, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a switch to permit a laser beam to escape a laser cavity through the use of an externally applied electric field across a harmonic conversion crystal. Amplification takes place in the laser cavity, and then the laser beam is switched out by the laser light being harmonically converted with dichroic or polarization sensitive elements present to alter the optical path of the harmonically converted laser light. Modulation of the laser beam can also be accomplished by varying the external electric field.

  9. Energy-efficient utilization of bipolar optical forces in nano-optomechanical cavities.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Zhou, Guangya; Du, Yu; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie; Tang, Xiaosong; Akkipeddi, Ramam

    2013-07-29

    Nanoscale all-optical circuits driven by optical forces have broad applications in future communication, computation, and sensing systems. Because human society faces huge challenges of energy saving and emission reduction, it is very important to develop energy-efficient nano-optomechanical devices. Due to their high quality (Q) factors, resonance modes of cavities are capable of generating much larger forces than waveguide modes. Here we experimentally demonstrate the use of resonance modes of double-coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities to generate bipolar optical forces. Attractive and repulsive forces of -6.2 nN and 1.9 nN were obtained with respective launching powers of 0.81 mW and 0.87 mW in the waveguide just before cavities. Supported by flexible nanosprings (spring constant 0.166 N/m), one cavity is pulled to (pushed away from) the other cavity by 37.1 nm (11.4 nm). The shifts of the selected resonance modes of the device are mechanically and thermally calibrated with an integrated nanoelectromechanical system actuator and a temperature-controlled testing platform respectively. Based on these experimentally-obtained relations, probe mode shifts due to the optomechanical effect are decoupled from those due to the thermo-optic effect. Actuated by the third-order even pump mode, the optomechanical shift of the second-order even probe mode is found to be about 2.5 times its thermal shift, indicating a highly efficient conversion of light energy to mechanical energy.

  10. Cryogenic spectroscopy of ultra-low density colloidal lead chalcogenide quantum dots on chip-scale optical cavities towards single quantum dot near-infrared cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Ranojoy; Gao, Feng; McMillan, James F.; Williams, Alex D.; Wong, Chee Wei

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence of cavity quantum electrodynamics from a sparse density of strongly quantum-confined Pb-chalcogenide nanocrystals (between 1 and 10) approaching single-dot levels on moderately high-Q mesoscopic silicon optical cavities. Operating at important near-infrared (1500-nm) wavelengths, large enhancements are observed from devices and strong modifications of the QD emission are achieved. Saturation spectroscopy of coupled QDs is observed at 77K, highlighting the modified nanocrystal dynamics for quantum information processing.

  11. Temporal characterization of FEL micropulses as function of cavity length detuning using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, B.A.; DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R.

    1995-12-31

    Results of frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) measurements on the Stanford mid-IR FEL system show the effect of FEL cavity length detuning on the micropulse temporal structure. The FROG technique enables the acquisition of complete and uniquely invertible amplitude and phase temporal dependence of optical pulses. Unambiguous phase and amplitude profiles are recovered from the data. The optical pulses are nearly transform limited, and the pulse length increases with cavity length detuning.

  12. Electro-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 megabits per sec. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 nano-sec. and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, the resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Mode matching into the bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  13. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics: A Universal Quantum Optics Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic resonators provide unparalleled capabilities in controlling the interaction between light and matter. The recently developed techniques for trapping and cooling atoms between closely spaced mirrors now open up new experimental avenues for genuine quantum-mechanical experiments. Particularly exciting possibilities concern long-distance quantum networking and scalable quantum computation. Recent achievements like the nondestructive detection of an optical photon, the realization of a quantum gate between a single atom and a single photon, and the heralded and efficient conversion of a flying qubit into a stationary qubit are past highlights. The longstanding dream of a quantum gate between individually addressable photonic qubits might become reality in the future. The talk will summarize recent experiments and give an outlook onto future directions.

  14. Quantum phases and dynamics of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments performed by R. Landig et al. (arXiv:1511.00007), we theoretically explore the behavior of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity in the presence of a two-dimensional optical lattice. As explained by arXiv:1511.00007, Rayleigh scattering of light from the lattice-inducing beams into the cavity produces infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions between the atoms, leading to competition between superfluid, supersolid, Mott insulating and charge density wave phases. We calculate the phase diagram for a uniform trap using a variation of the Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also calculate the spatial distribution of the different phases in the gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We explore hysteretic behavior when parameters of the system are changed.

  15. Optically pumped lasing from single-crystal cavity of p-phenylene oligomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, Hisao; Tamura, Kenji; Tanaka, Yosuke; Sasaki, Fumio

    2014-12-01

    Single-crystal cavities of p-sexiphenyl (p-6P) are prepared by precipitation from a solution phase. A typical p-6P crystal has a thin quasi-lozenge shape with a size of several hundreds of μm and a thickness of a few μm. Under optical pumping with a pulsed laser, blue fluorescence is gain-narrowed to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) due to light confinement inside the slab-type crystal cavity. With increasing excitation fluence, the time profiles of photoluminescence change from an exponential decay of spontaneous regime to a pulsed one typical for stimulated emission. Furthermore, multimode laser oscillations are obtained when a pair of parallel facets of the crystal cavity function as feedback mirrors.

  16. Monitoring the Evaporation of Fluids from Fiber-Optic Micro-Cell Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Preter, Eyal; Preloznik, Borut; Artel, Vlada; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Donlagic, Denis; Zadok, Avi

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors provide remote access, are readily embedded within structures, and can operate in harsh environments. Nevertheless, fiber-optic sensing of liquids has been largely restricted to measurements of refractive index and absorption spectroscopy. The temporal dynamics of fluid evaporation have potential applications in monitoring the quality of water, identification of fuel dilutions, mobile point-of-care diagnostics, climatography and more. In this work, the fiber-optic monitoring of fluids evaporation is proposed and demonstrated. Sub-nano-liter volumes of a liquid are applied to inline fiber-optic micro-cavities. As the liquid evaporates, light is refracted out of the cavity at the receding index boundary between the fluid and the ambient surroundings. A sharp transient attenuation in the transmission of light through the cavity, by as much as 50 dB and on a sub-second time scale, is observed. Numerical models for the transmission dynamics in terms of ray-tracing and wavefront propagation are provided. Experiments show that the temporal transmission profile can distinguish between different liquids. PMID:24212122

  17. Impurity-free quantum well intermixing for large optical cavity high-power laser diode structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Gür, Emre; Aydınlı, Atilla

    2016-08-01

    We report on the correlation of atomic concentration profiles of diffusing species with the blueshift of the quantum well luminescence from both as-grown and impurity free quantum wells intermixed on actual large optical cavity high power laser diode structures. Because it is critical to suppress catastrophic optical mirror damage, sputtered SiO2 and thermally evaporated SrF2 were used both to enhance and suppress quantum well intermixing, respectively, in these (Al)GaAs large optical cavity structures. A luminescence blueshift of 55 nm (130 meV) was obtained for samples with 400 nm thick sputtered SiO2. These layers were used to generate point defects by annealing the samples at 950 °C for 3 min. The ensuing Ga diffusion observed as a shifting front towards the surface at the interface of the GaAs cap and AlGaAs cladding, as well as Al diffusion into the GaAs cap layer, correlates well with the observed luminescence blue shift, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Although this technique is well-known, the correlation between the photoluminescence peak blue shift and diffusion of Ga and Al during impurity free quantum well intermixing on actual large optical cavity laser diode structures was demonstrated with both x ray photoelectron and photoluminescence spectroscopy, for the first time.

  18. Demonstration of a cavity coupler based on a resonant waveguide grating.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Frank; Friedrich, Daniel; Clausnitzer, Tina; Burmeister, Oliver; Britzger, Michael; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Danzmann, Karsten; Tünnermann, Andreas; Schnabel, Roman

    2009-01-01

    Thermal noise in multilayer optical coatings may not only limit the sensitivity of future gravitational wave detectors in their most sensitive frequency band but is also a major impediment for experiments that aim to reach the standard quantum limit or to cool mechanical systems to their quantum ground state. Here, we present the experimental realization and characterization of a cavity coupler, which is based on a surface relief guided ode resonant grating. Since the required thickness of the dielectric coating is dramatically decreased compared to conventional mirrors, it is expected to provide low mechanical loss and, thus, low thermal noise. The cavity coupler was incorporated into a Fabry-Perot resonator together with a conventional high quality mirror. The finesse of this cavity was measured to be F = 657, which corresponds to a coupler reflectivity of R = 99.08 %. PMID:19129884

  19. Concentrating partially entangled W-class states on nonlocal atoms using low- Q optical cavity and linear optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Chen, Xi; Duan, YuWen; Fan, Ling; Zhang, Ru; Wang, TieJun; Wang, Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Entanglement plays an important role in quantum information science, especially in quantum communications. Here we present an efficient entanglement concentration protocol (ECP) for nonlocal atom systems in the partially entangled W-class states, using the single-photon input-output process regarding low- Q cavity and linear optical elements. Compared with previously published ECPs for the concentration of non-maximally entangled atomic states, our protocol is much simpler and more efficient as it employs the Faraday rotation in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and the parameter-splitting method. The Faraday rotation requires the cavity with low- Q factor and weak coupling to the atom, which makes the requirement for entanglement concentration much less stringent than the previous methods, and achievable with current cavity QED techniques. The parameter-splitting method resorts to linear-optical elements only. This ECP has high efficiency and fidelity in realistic experiments, and some imperfections during the experiment can be avoided efficiently with currently available techniques.

  20. Cavity Self-Stabilization and Enhancement of Laser Gyroscopes by (Coupled) Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the modulation to determine the conditions for cavity self-stabilization and enhanced gyroscopic sensitivity. Hence, we model cavity rotation or instability by an arbitrary AM/FM modulation, and the dispersive element as a phase and amplitude filter. We find that anomalous dispersion may be used to self-stabilize a laser cavity, provided the magnitude of the group index of refraction is smaller than the phase index of refraction in the cavity. The optimal stabilization is found to occur when the group index is zero. Group indices with magnitudes larger than the phase index (both normal and anomalous dispersion) are found to enhance the sensitivity of a laser gyroscope to rotation. Furthermore, our results indicate that atomic media, even coherent superpositions in multilevel atoms, are not useful for these applications, because the amplitude and phase filters work against one another, i.e., decreasing the modulation frequency increases its amplitude and vice versa, with one exception: negative group indices whose magnitudes are larger than the phase index result in negative, but enhanced, beat frequencies. On the other hand, for optical resonators the dispersion reversal associated with critical coupling enables the amplitude and phase filters to work together under a greater variety of circumstances than for atomic media. We find that for single over-coupled resonators, or in the case of under-coupled coupled-resonator-induced absorption, the absorption and normal dispersion on-resonance increase the contrast and frequency of the beat-note, respectively, resulting in a substantial enhancement of the gyroscopic response. Moreover, for cavity self-stabilization, we propose the use of a variety of coupled-resonator induced transparency that is accompanied by anomalous dispersion.

  1. All-optical phase modulation in a cavity-polariton Mach–Zehnder interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, C.; Tanese, D.; Nguyen, H.S.; Flayac, H.; Galopin, E.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Solnyshkov, D.; Amo, A.; Malpuech, G.; Bloch, J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluids based on light is a highly developing research field, since they provide a nonlinear platform for developing optical functionalities and quantum simulators. An important issue in this context is the ability to coherently control the properties of the fluid. Here we propose an all-optical approach for controlling the phase of a flow of cavity-polaritons, making use of their strong interactions with localized excitons. Here we illustrate the potential of this method by implementing a compact exciton–polariton interferometer, which output intensity and polarization can be optically controlled. This interferometer is cascadable with already reported polariton devices and is promising for future polaritonic quantum optic experiments. Complex phase patterns could be also engineered using this optical method, providing a key tool to build photonic artificial gauge fields. PMID:24513781

  2. Localization transition in the presence of cavity backaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojan, Katharina; Kraus, Rebecca; Fogarty, Thomás; Habibian, Hessam; Minguzzi, Anna; Morigi, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    We study the localization transition of an atom confined by an external optical lattice in a high-finesse cavity. The atom-cavity coupling yields an effective secondary lattice potential, whose wavelength is incommensurate with the periodicity of the optical lattice. The cavity lattice can induce localization of the atomic wave function analogously to the Aubry-André localization transition. Starting from the master equation for the cavity and the atom we perform a mapping of the system dynamics to a Hubbard Hamiltonian, which can be reduced to the Harper's Hamiltonian in appropriate limits. We evaluate the phase diagram for the atom's ground state and show that the transition between extended and localized wave function is controlled by the strength of the cavity nonlinearity, which determines the size of the localized region and the behavior of the Lyapunov exponent. The Lyapunov exponent, in particular, exhibits resonancelike behavior in correspondence with the optomechanical resonances. Finally we discuss the experimental feasibility of these predictions.

  3. Scheme for generating the singlet state of three atoms trapped in distant cavities coupled by optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong-Yang; Wen, Jing-Ji; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-09-15

    An effective scheme is proposed to generate the singlet state with three four-level atoms trapped in three distant cavities connected with each other by three optical fibers, respectively. After a series of appropriate atom–cavity interactions, which can be arbitrarily controlled via the selective pairing of Raman transitions and corresponding optical switches, a three-atom singlet state can be successfully generated. The influence of atomic spontaneous decay, photon leakage of cavities and optical fibers on the fidelity of the state is numerically simulated showing that the three-atom singlet state can be generated with high fidelity by choosing the experimental parameters appropriately.

  4. Quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier/silicon external cavity laser for O-band high-speed optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuyu; Zhang, Yi; Li, Qi; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Bergman, Keren; Magill, Peter; Baehr-Jones, Thomas; Hochberg, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We report a hybrid integrated external cavity laser by butt coupling a quantum dot reflective semiconductor optical amplifier and a silicon-on-insulator chip. The device lasers at 1302 nm in the O-band, a wavelength regime critical to data communication systems. We measured 18 mW on-chip output power and over 50-dB side-mode suppression ratio. We also demonstrated open eye diagrams at 10 and 40 Gb/s.

  5. Surface plasmon polaritons in a topological insulator embedded in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-03-17

    Very recently, the surface plasmons in a topological insulator (TI) have been experimentally observed by exciting these collective modes with polarized light [P. Di Pietro, M. Ortolani, O. Limaj, A. Di Gaspare, V. Giliberti, F. Giorgianni, M. Brahlek, N. Bansal, N. Koirala, S. Oh, P. Calvani, and S. Lupi, Nat. Nanotechnol. 8, 556 (2013)]. Motivated by this experimental work, here we present a theoretical study on the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) induced by plasmon-photon interactions in a TI thin film embedded in an optical cavity. It is found that the frequencies of SPP modes are within the terahertz (THz) bandwidth and can be tuned effectively by adjusting the surface electron density and/or the optical cavity length. Since the surface electron density can be well controlled by the gate-voltage applied perpendicular to the TI surface, our theoretical results indicate that gated TI thin films may have potential applications in the electrically tunable THz plasmonic devices.

  6. Optical cavity characterization of the Tor Vergata Fabry-Pérot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannelli, Luca; Berrilli, Francesco; Del Moro, Dario; Greco, Vincenzo; Piazzesi, Roberto; Sordini, Andrea; Stangalini, Marco

    2014-08-01

    We report the first optical and control performances of the Tor Vergata Fabry-Ṕerot interferometer prototype designed and realized in the framework of the ADvanced Astronomy for HELIophysics (ADAHELI) solar mission project. The characterization of the the coated surfaces of the two plates defining the optical cavity has been carried out with a Zygo interferometer able to measure the microroughness and global curvature of the cavity. The peak-to-valley errors are compliant with the manufacturer specifications and correspond to λ/70 and λ/80 @632.8 nm respectively. In addition, we present a first estimate of the interferometer spectral stability in stable open-air condition. A spectral uncertainty equal to 0.95 pm is found as the typical RMS over one hour of the passband central wavelength position.

  7. Surface plasmon polaritons in a topological insulator embedded in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-03-01

    Very recently, the surface plasmons in a topological insulator (TI) have been experimentally observed by exciting these collective modes with polarized light [P. Di Pietro, M. Ortolani, O. Limaj, A. Di Gaspare, V. Giliberti, F. Giorgianni, M. Brahlek, N. Bansal, N. Koirala, S. Oh, P. Calvani, and S. Lupi, Nat. Nanotechnol. 8, 556 (2013)]. Motivated by this experimental work, here we present a theoretical study on the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) induced by plasmon-photon interactions in a TI thin film embedded in an optical cavity. It is found that the frequencies of SPP modes are within the terahertz (THz) bandwidth and can be tuned effectively by adjusting the surface electron density and/or the optical cavity length. Since the surface electron density can be well controlled by the gate-voltage applied perpendicular to the TI surface, our theoretical results indicate that gated TI thin films may have potential applications in the electrically tunable THz plasmonic devices.

  8. Performance scaling via passive pulse shaping in cavity-enhanced optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Aleem M; Moses, Jeffrey; Hong, Kyung-Han; Lai, Chien-Jen; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-15

    We show that an enhancement cavity seeded at the full repetition rate of the pump laser can automatically reshape small-signal gain across the interacting pulses in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for close-to-optimal operation, significantly increasing both the gain bandwidth and the conversion efficiency, in addition to boosting gain for high-repetition-rate amplification. Applied to a degenerate amplifier, the technique can provide an octave-spanning gain bandwidth.

  9. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  10. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  11. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength goldmore » disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.« less

  12. Direct measurement of optical force induced by near-field plasmonic cavity using dynamic mode AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marset, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Chan, Ho Bun; Chan, C. T.; Tong, Penger

    2015-11-20

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. Lastly, the experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures.

  13. Direct Measurement of Optical Force Induced by Near-Field Plasmonic Cavity Using Dynamic Mode AFM

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dongshi; Hang, Zhi Hong; Marcet, Zsolt; Liu, Hui; Kravchenko, I. I.; Chan, C. T.; Chan, H. B.; Tong, Penger

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have attracted much attention in recent years because of their potential applications in optical manipulation through near-field enhancement. Continuing experimental efforts have been made to develop accurate techniques to directly measure the near-field optical force induced by the plasmonic nanostructures in the visible frequency range. In this work, we report a new application of dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (DM-AFM) in the measurement of the enhanced optical force acting on a nano-structured plasmonic resonant cavity. The plasmonic cavity is made of an upper gold-coated glass sphere and a lower quartz substrate patterned with an array of subwavelength gold disks. In the near-field when the sphere is positioned close to the disk array, plasmonic resonance is excited in the cavity and the induced force by a 1550 nm infrared laser is found to be increased by an order of magnitude compared with the photon pressure generated by the same laser light. The experiment demonstrates that DM-AFM is a powerful tool for the study of light induced forces and their enhancement in plasmonic nanostructures. PMID:26586455

  14. Imaging of hard- and soft-tissue structure in the oral cavity by optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, Bill W.; Everett, Mathew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B. Otis, Linda L. Stroeve, Pieter Nathel, Howard

    1998-06-01

    We have developed a prototype optical coherent tomography (OCT) system for the imaging of hard and soft tissue in the oral cavity. High-resolution images of {ital in vitro} porcine periodontal tissues have been obtained with this system. The images clearly show the enamel{endash}cementum and the gingiva{endash}tooth interfaces, indicating OCT is a potentially useful technique for diagnosis of periodontal diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first application of OCT for imaging biologic hard tissue. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  15. Stacked optical antennas for plasmon propagation in a 5 nm-confined cavity.

    PubMed

    Saeed, A; Panaro, S; Zaccaria, R Proietti; Raja, W; Liberale, C; Dipalo, M; Messina, G C; Wang, H; De Angelis, F; Toma, A

    2015-06-09

    The sub-wavelength concentration and propagation of electromagnetic energy are two complementary aspects of plasmonics that are not necessarily co-present in a single nanosystem. Here we exploit the strong nanofocusing properties of stacked optical antennas in order to highly concentrate the electromagnetic energy into a 5 nm metal-insulator-metal (MIM) cavity and convert free radiation into guided modes. The proposed nano-architecture combines the concentration properties of optical nanoantennas with the propagation capability of MIM systems, paving the way to highly miniaturized on-chip plasmonic waveguiding.

  16. Mesoscale cavities in hollow-core waveguides for quantum optics with atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapamaki, C. M.; Flannery, J.; Bappi, G.; Al Maruf, R.; Bhaskara, S. V.; Alshehri, O.; Yoon, T.; Bajcsy, M.

    2016-08-01

    Single-mode hollow-core waveguides loaded with atomic ensembles offer an excellent platform for light-matter interactions and nonlinear optics at low photon levels. We review and discuss possible approaches for incorporating mirrors, cavities, and Bragg gratings into these waveguides without obstructing their hollow cores. With these additional features controlling the light propagation in the hollow-core waveguides, one could potentially achieve optical nonlinearities controllable by single photons in systems with small footprints that can be integrated on a chip. We propose possible applications such as single-photon transistors and superradiant lasers that could be implemented in these enhanced hollow-core waveguides.

  17. Bridging the Gap between RF and Optical Patch Antenna Analysis via the Cavity Model.

    PubMed

    Unal, G S; Aksun, M I

    2015-01-01

    Although optical antennas with a variety of shapes and for a variety of applications have been proposed and studied, they are still in their infancy compared to their radio frequency (rf) counterparts. Optical antennas have mainly utilized the geometrical attributes of rf antennas rather than the analysis tools that have been the source of intuition for antenna engineers in rf. This study intends to narrow the gap of experience and intuition in the design of optical patch antennas by introducing an easy-to-understand and easy-to-implement analysis tool in rf, namely, the cavity model, into the optical regime. The importance of this approach is not only its simplicity in understanding and implementation but also its applicability to a broad class of patch antennas and, more importantly, its ability to provide the intuition needed to predict the outcome without going through the trial-and-error simulations with no or little intuitive guidance by the user. PMID:26522889

  18. Bridging the Gap between RF and Optical Patch Antenna Analysis via the Cavity Model

    PubMed Central

    Unal, G. S.; Aksun, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    Although optical antennas with a variety of shapes and for a variety of applications have been proposed and studied, they are still in their infancy compared to their radio frequency (rf) counterparts. Optical antennas have mainly utilized the geometrical attributes of rf antennas rather than the analysis tools that have been the source of intuition for antenna engineers in rf. This study intends to narrow the gap of experience and intuition in the design of optical patch antennas by introducing an easy-to-understand and easy-to-implement analysis tool in rf, namely, the cavity model, into the optical regime. The importance of this approach is not only its simplicity in understanding and implementation but also its applicability to a broad class of patch antennas and, more importantly, its ability to provide the intuition needed to predict the outcome without going through the trial-and-error simulations with no or little intuitive guidance by the user. PMID:26522889

  19. Photon bunching and anti-bunching with two dipole-coupled atoms in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ya-Mei; Hu, Chang-Sheng; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Wu, Huai-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of the dipole-dipole interaction (DDI) on the photon statistics with two atoms trapped in an optical cavity driven by a laser field and subjected to cooperative emission. By means of the quantum trajectory analysis and the second-order correlation functions, we show that the photon statistics of the cavity transmission can be flexibly modulated by the DDI while the incoming coherent laser selectively excites the atom-cavity system’s nonlinear Jaynes-Cummings ladder of excited states. Finally, we find that the effect of the cooperatively atomic emission can also be revealed by the numerical simulations and can be explained with a simplified picture. The DDI induced nonlinearity gives rise to highly nonclassical photon emission from the cavity that is significant for quantum information processing and quantum communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305037, 11347114, and 11374054) and the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2013J01012).

  20. Asymmetric tunable Fabry-Perot cavity using switchable polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystal optical Bragg mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaye, Kedar S.; Dupont, Laurent; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, Jean-Louis

    2012-03-01

    Optical properties of an asymmetric Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity interferometer made up of a conventional metallic mirror and a polymer stabilized cholesteric liquid crystal (PSCLC) Bragg mirror have been investigated. The first FP cavity design comprises a gold mirror, an isotropic layer made up of the polymer glue, a quarter wave plate to convert the input linearly polarized modes into the circularly polarized modes inside the cavity, and the PSCLC Bragg mirror, all sandwiched between two indium tin oxide glass plates. The second FP cavity has a layer of conducting polymer deposited on the quarter-wave plate to apply the electric field only to the cholesteric stack. To have reflectivity above 95% in visible range we implement 30 layers of cholesteric liquid crystal in a planar Grandjean texture. The device compactness and the mirror parallelism due to the monolithic fabrication of FP are advantageous from the technical point of view. We test the FP tunability by shifting the resonance wavelength through an entire period; by applying electric field and/or by varying the temperature.

  1. Feasibility of fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for imaging of dental cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Che Ani, Adi Izhar; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Yasin, Moh.; Apsari, Retna; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of intensity modulated fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for the imaging of dental cavity. Here, we discuss our preliminary results in the imaging of cavities on various teeth surfaces, as well as measurement of the diameter of the cavities which are represented by drilled holes on the teeth surfaces. Based on the analysis of displacement measurement, the sensitivities and linear range for the molar, canine, hybrid composite resin, and acrylic surfaces are obtained at 0.09667 mV/mm and 0.45 mm 0.775 mV/mm and 0.4 mm 0.5109 mV/mm and 0.5 mm and 0.25 mV/mm and 0.5 mm, respectively, with a good linearity of more than 99%. The results also show a clear distinction between the cavity and surrounding tooth region. The stability, simplicity of design, and low cost of fabrication make it suitable for restorative dentistry.

  2. Thermal radiation from optically driven Kerr (χ{sup (3)}) photonic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Khandekar, Chinmay; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Lin, Zin

    2015-04-13

    We describe thermal radiation from nonlinear (χ{sup (3)}) photonic cavities coupled to external channels and subject to incident monochromatic light. Our work extends related work on nonlinear mechanical oscillators to the problem of thermal radiation, demonstrating that bistability can enhance thermal radiation by orders of magnitude and result in strong lineshape alternations, including “super-narrow spectral peaks” occurring at the onset of kinetic phase transitions. We show that when the cavities are designed to exhibit perfect linear emissivity (rate matching), such thermally activated transitions can be exploited to dramatically tune the output power and radiative properties of the cavity, leading to a kind of Kerr-mediated thermo-optic effect. Finally, we demonstrate that in certain parameter regimes, the output radiation exhibits Stokes and anti-Stokes side peaks whose relative magnitudes can be altered by tuning the internal temperature of the cavity relative to its surroundings, a consequence of strong correlations and interference between the emitted and reflected radiation.

  3. Bose–Einstein condensation versus Dicke–Hepp–Lieb transition in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, Francesco; Strack, Philipp; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2013-12-15

    We provide an exact solution for the interplay between Bose–Einstein condensation and the Dicke–Hepp–Lieb self-organization transition of an ideal Bose gas trapped inside a single-mode optical cavity and subject to a transverse laser drive. Based on an effective action approach, we determine the full phase diagram at arbitrary temperature, which features a bi-critical point where the transitions cross. We calculate the dynamically generated band structure of the atoms and the associated suppression of the critical temperature for Bose–Einstein condensation in the phase with a spontaneous periodic density modulation. Moreover, we determine the evolution of the polariton spectrum due to the coupling of the cavity photons and the atomic field near the self-organization transition, which is quite different above or below the Bose–Einstein condensation temperature. At low temperatures, the critical value of the Dicke–Hepp–Lieb transition decreases with temperature and thus thermal fluctuations can enhance the tendency to a periodic arrangement of the atoms. -- Highlights: •Atoms inside a driven cavity can undergo two transitions: self-organization and BEC. •The phase diagram has four phases which coexist at a bi-critical point. •Atom–cavity coupling creates a dynamical lattice for the atoms. •Finite temperature can enhance the tendency towards self-organization. •We calculate the detailed spectrum of the polaritonic excitations.

  4. FINESSE: Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer; Lim, Darlene; Colaprete, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and Phobos and Deimos. We follow the philosophy that "science enables exploration and exploration enables science." 1) FINESSE Science: Understand the effects of volcanism and impacts as dominant planetary processes on the Moon, NEAs, and Phobos & Deimos. 2) FINESSE Exploration: Understand which exploration concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities enable and enhance scientific return. To accomplish these objectives, we are conducting an integrated research program focused on scientifically-driven field exploration at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in Idaho and at the West Clearwater Lake Impact Structure in northern Canada. Field deployments aimed at reconnaissance geology and data acquisition were conducted in 2014 at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve. Targets for data acquisition included selected sites at Kings Bowl eruptive fissure, lava field and blowout crater, Inferno Chasm vent and outflow channel, North Crater lava flow and Highway lava flow. Field investigation included (1) differential GPS (dGPS) measurements of lava flows, channels (and ejecta block at Kings Bowl); (2) LiDAR imaging of lava flow margins, surfaces and other selected features; (3) digital photographic documentation; (4) sampling for geochemical and petrographic analysis; (5) UAV aerial imagery of Kings Bowl and Inferno Chasm features; and (6) geologic assessment of targets and potential new targets. Over the course of the 5-week field FINESSE campaign to the West Clearwater Impact Structure (WCIS) in 2014, the team focused on several WCIS research topics, including impactites, central uplift formation, the impact-generated hydrothermal system, multichronometer

  5. Pulsed semiconductor lasers with higher optical strength of cavity output mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Petrunov, A. N.; Podoskin, A. A.; Shashkin, I. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Pikhtin, N. A. Nalet, T. A.; Fetisova, N. V.; Vavilova, L. S.; Lyutetskiy, A. V.; Alekseev, P. A.; Titkov, A. N.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2010-06-15

    Asymmetric heterostructures with an ultrathick waveguide based on an AlGaAs/GaAs alloy system that allow lasing at a wavelength of 905 nm have been developed and fabricated by hydride metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The internal optical loss and internal quantum efficiency of semiconductor lasers based on such structures were 0.7 cm{sup -1} and 97%, respectively. It is shown that the highest output optical power of laser diodes with antireflecting (SiO{sub 2}) and reflecting (Si/SiO{sub 2}) coatings deposited on untreated Fabry-Perot cavity facets obtained by cleaving in an oxygen atmosphere reached 67 W in the pulsed mode and is limited by mirror damage. Treatment of Fabry-Perot cavity facets by etching in argon plasma and the formation of coatings with passivating and oxygen-blocking GaN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers allowed an increase in the maximum output optical power to 120 W. Mirror damage was not observed at the attained output optical power.

  6. Laser diode edge sensors for adaptive optics segmented arrays: Part 1--external cavity coupling and detector current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, John L.

    1994-05-01

    An analytical study of laser diode (LD) operation coupled to external cavity scattering elements, which function as variably coupling reflectors (VCRs), is carried out with the purpose of determining the interrelationship between cavity coupling and intracavity optical intensity which determine the current generated at the rear facet PIN detector. If the external cavity coupling is position sensitive it can allow the relative position between the LD and the external cavity to be determined from the PIN or other detector mounted with the LD. If the LD and external cavity element are placed on opposite edges of two adjacent adaptive optics segments they can provide the basis for a self aligning position sensor; the amount of current detected at the PIN or other detector will depend on the relative displacement between the LD and external coupling element. Schematics of the edge sensors, the basic electronic configuration, and the optics of the external cavity are given. The ratio of the internal cavity intensity, Ic, to the saturation intensity, Is, is plotted as a function of the external cavity coupling. When this ratio approaches one, large-signal output is not a linear function of large-signal output. For operation well below saturation, the PIN detector current is directly related to Ic and may serve as a reliable detector.

  7. T-shaped cavity dual-frequency Nd:YAG laser with electro-optical modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Junhong; Jiao, Mingxing; Liu, Yun

    2016-05-01

    A T-shaped cavity dual-frequency Nd:YAG laser with electro-optical modulation is proposed, which consists of both p- and s-cavities sharing the same gain medium of Nd:YAG. Each cavity was not only able to select longitudinal mode but also tune frequency using an electro-optic birefringent filter polarization beam splitter + lithium niobate. The frequency difference of dual frequency was tuned through the whole gain bandwidth of Nd:YAG, which is far above the usually accepted free spectral range value in the case of a single-axis laser. As a result, the simultaneous operation of orthogonally and linearly polarized dual-frequency laser was obtained, which coincides with the theoretical analysis based on Jones matrices. The obtained frequency difference ranges from 0 to 132 GHz. This offers a simple and widely tunable source with potential for portable frequency reference applications in terahertz-wave generation and absolute-distance interferometry measurement areas.

  8. Nonlinear optical effects and Hong-Ou-Mandel interference in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran M.; van Enk, Steven J.

    Pure quantum interference among single photons is one of the key ingredients to perform linear optics quantum computation (LOQC). The Hong-Ou-Mandel interference (HOMI) [C. K. Hong, Z. Y. Ou and L. Mandel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, (18), 2044-2046 (1987)] i.e. complete destructive interference between two identical and indistinguishable photons simultaneously entering input ports of a 50/50 beam splitter, is a well-known example in this context. In this talk, I'll present our theoretical study of HOMI in a coupled Jaynes-Cummings array. In particular and by applying quantum jump/trajectory formalism, I'll focus on how partial quantum interference between two photons survive both non-linearities produced by two-level emitter and spectral filtering due to optical cavities in our coupled cavity array setup [Imran M. Mirza and Steven J. van Enk, Opt. Comm. 343, 172-177 (2015)]. Along with LOQC, this work is crucial from the perspective of exploiting coupled cavity arrays to store single photons reliably (without altering their temporal and spectral traits) [Imran M. Mirza, Steven J. van Enk and Jeff Kimble, JOSA B, 10, 2640-2649, (2013)].

  9. Quantum-Noise Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy in the Mid-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleisher, Adam J.; Long, David A.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    We report a highly sensitive mid-infrared spectrometer capable of recording cavity ring-down events in the quantum (shot) noise limit. A linear optical cavity of finesse 31,000 was pumped by a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) operating at 4.5 μm until a cavity transmission threshold was reached. A fast optical switch then extinguished optical pumping and initiated a cavity decay which exhibited root-mean-square noise proportional to the square root of optical power (quantum noise) for several cavity time constants until a detector noise floor was reached. This spectrometer has achieved a noise-equivalent absorption of NEA = 2.6×10-11 wn Hz-1/2 and a minimum absorption coefficient of α = 2.3×10-11 wn in 3 seconds. Applications for such a highly sensitive spectrometer operating in the mid-infrared region, including ultra-trace molecular spectroscopy of CO_2 isotopologues and the direct interrogation of weak mirror birefringence and polarization-dependent losses, will be discussed.

  10. Quantum simulation of 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Li, Chuan-Feng; Xu, Jin-Shi; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2015-07-06

    Orbital angular momentum of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom characterized by unlimited number of available angular momentum states. Although this unique property has proved invaluable in diverse recent studies ranging from optical communication to quantum information, it has not been considered useful or even relevant for simulating nontrivial physics problems such as topological phenomena. Contrary to this misconception, we demonstrate the incredible value of orbital angular momentum of light for quantum simulation by showing theoretically how it allows to study a variety of important 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities. This application for orbital angular momentum of light not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation, and thus makes it possible to investigate important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition in a small simulator ready for immediate experimental exploration.

  11. Tunable Optical Performances on a Periodic Array of Plasmonic Bowtie Nanoantennas with Hollow Cavities.

    PubMed

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Chou Chao, Chung-Ting; Rao, Jhin-Yu; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Lim, Chee Ming; Lim, Ren Chong; Voo, Nyuk Yoong

    2016-12-01

    We propose a design method to tune the near-field intensities and absorption spectra of a periodic array of plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas (PBNAs) by introducing the hollow cavities inside the metal nanostructures. The numerical method is performed by finite element method that demonstrates the engineered hollow PBNAs can tune the optical spectrum in the range of 400-3000 nm. Simulation results show the hollow number is a key factor for enhancing the cavity plasmon resonance with respect to the hotspot region in PBNAs. The design efforts primarily concentrate on shifting the operation wavelength and enhancing the local fields by manipulating the filling dielectric medium, outline film thickness, and hollow number in PBNAs. Such characteristics indicate that the proposed hollow PBNAs can be a potential candidate for plasmonic enhancers and absorbers in multifunctional opto-electronic biosensors.

  12. Tunable Optical Performances on a Periodic Array of Plasmonic Bowtie Nanoantennas with Hollow Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Chou Chao, Chung-Ting; Rao, Jhin-Yu; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Lim, Chee Ming; Lim, Ren Chong; Voo, Nyuk Yoong

    2016-09-01

    We propose a design method to tune the near-field intensities and absorption spectra of a periodic array of plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas (PBNAs) by introducing the hollow cavities inside the metal nanostructures. The numerical method is performed by finite element method that demonstrates the engineered hollow PBNAs can tune the optical spectrum in the range of 400-3000 nm. Simulation results show the hollow number is a key factor for enhancing the cavity plasmon resonance with respect to the hotspot region in PBNAs. The design efforts primarily concentrate on shifting the operation wavelength and enhancing the local fields by manipulating the filling dielectric medium, outline film thickness, and hollow number in PBNAs. Such characteristics indicate that the proposed hollow PBNAs can be a potential candidate for plasmonic enhancers and absorbers in multifunctional opto-electronic biosensors.

  13. Cavity quantum optomechanics of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice: Normal-mode splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.

    2009-10-15

    We consider the dynamics of a movable mirror (cantilever) of a cavity coupled through radiation pressure to the light scattered from ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Scattering from different atomic quantum states creates different quantum states of the scattered light, which can be distinguished by measurements of the displacement spectrum of the cantilever. We show that for large pump intensities the steady-state displacement of the cantilever shows bistable behavior. Due to atomic back action, the displacement spectrum of the cantilever is modified and depends on the position of the condensate in the Brillouin zone. We further analyze the occurrence of splitting of the normal mode into three modes due to mixing of the mechanical motion with the fluctuations of the cavity field and the fluctuations of the condensate with finite atomic two-body interaction.

  14. Tuning all-Optical Analog to Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in nanobeam cavities using nanoelectromechanical system

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peng; Zhou, Guangya; deng, Jie; Tian, Feng; Chau, Fook Siong

    2015-01-01

    We report the observations of all-optical electromagnetically induced transparency in nanostructures using waveguide side-coupled with photonic crystal nanobeam cavities, which has measured linewidths much narrower than individual resonances. The quality factor of transparency resonance can be 30 times larger than those of measured individual resonances. When the gap between cavity and waveguide is reduced to 10 nm, the bandwidth of destructive interference region can reach 10 nm while the width of transparency resonance is 0.3 nm. Subsequently, a comb-drive actuator is introduced to tune the line shape of the transparency resonance. The width of the peak is reduced to 15 pm and the resulting quality factor exceeds 105. PMID:26415907

  15. Cavity-dumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator based on periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, E.; Joo, T.

    2016-03-01

    A synchronously pumped cavity-dumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on a periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (PPSLT) crystal is reported. The OPO runs in positive group velocity dispersion (GVD) mode to deliver high pulse energy at high repetition rate. It delivers pulse energy over 130 nJ up to 500 kHz and 70 nJ at 1 MHz of repetition rate at 1100 nm. Pulse duration is as short as 42 fs, and the OPO is tunable in the near infrared region from 1050 to 1200 nm. Dispersion property of the OPO was also explored. The cavity-dumped output carries a positive GVD, which can be compensated easily by an external prism pair, and large negative third order dispersion (TOD), which results in a pedestal in the pulse shape. Approaches to obtain clean pulse shape by reducing the large TOD are proposed.

  16. A tunable optical cavity for an x-ray free-electron laser oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.-J.; Shvyd'ko, Y.

    2009-03-01

    An x-ray free-electron laser oscillator proposed recently for hard x rays [K. Kim, Y. Shvydko, and S. Reiche, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 244802 (2008)] can be made tunable by using an x-ray cavity composed of four crystals, instead of two. The tunability of x-ray energy will significantly enhance the usefulness of an x-ray free-electron laser oscillator. We present a detailed analysis of the four-crystal optical cavity and choice of crystals for several applications: inelastic x-ray scattering, nuclear resonant scattering, bulk-sensitive hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, other high-energy-resolution ({le} 1 meV) spectroscopic probes, and for imaging with hard x rays at near-atomic resolution ({approx} 1 nm).

  17. Tunable Optical Performances on a Periodic Array of Plasmonic Bowtie Nanoantennas with Hollow Cavities.

    PubMed

    Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Chou Chao, Chung-Ting; Rao, Jhin-Yu; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Lim, Chee Ming; Lim, Ren Chong; Voo, Nyuk Yoong

    2016-12-01

    We propose a design method to tune the near-field intensities and absorption spectra of a periodic array of plasmonic bowtie nanoantennas (PBNAs) by introducing the hollow cavities inside the metal nanostructures. The numerical method is performed by finite element method that demonstrates the engineered hollow PBNAs can tune the optical spectrum in the range of 400-3000 nm. Simulation results show the hollow number is a key factor for enhancing the cavity plasmon resonance with respect to the hotspot region in PBNAs. The design efforts primarily concentrate on shifting the operation wavelength and enhancing the local fields by manipulating the filling dielectric medium, outline film thickness, and hollow number in PBNAs. Such characteristics indicate that the proposed hollow PBNAs can be a potential candidate for plasmonic enhancers and absorbers in multifunctional opto-electronic biosensors. PMID:27644237

  18. Design and analysis of photonic crystal micro-cavity based optical sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Amit Kumar; Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the design of a two-dimensional photonic crystal micro-cavity based integrated-optic sensor platform is proposed. The behaviour of designed cavity is analyzed using two-dimensional Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. The structure is designed by deliberately inserting some defects in a photonic crystal waveguide structure. Proposed structure shows a quality factor (Q) of about 1e5 and the average sensitivity of 500nm/RIU in the wavelength range of 1450 - 1580 nm. Sensing technique is based on the detection of shift in upper-edge cut-off wavelength for a reference signal strength of -10 dB in accordance with the change in refractive index of analyte.

  19. Direct generation of optical frequency combs in χ(2) nonlinear cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, Simona; Ricciardi, Iolanda; Parisi, Maria; Maddaloni, Pasquale; Santamaria, Luigi; De Natale, Paolo; De Rosa, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    Quadratic nonlinear processes are currently exploited for frequency comb transfer and extension from the visible and near infrared regions to other spectral ranges where direct comb generation cannot be accomplished. However, frequency comb generation has been directly observed in continuously pumped quadratic nonlinear crystals placed inside an optical cavity. At the same time, an introductory theoretical description of the phenomenon has been provided, showing a remarkable analogy with the dynamics of third-order Kerr microresonators. Here, we give an overview of our recent work on χ(2) frequency comb generation. Furthermore, we generalize the preliminary three-wave spectral model to a many-mode comb and present a stability analysis of different cavity field regimes. Although our work is a very early stage, it lays the groundwork for a novel class of highly efficient and versatile frequency comb synthesizers based on second-order nonlinear materials.

  20. High-Q silicon photonic crystal cavity for enhanced optical nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Dharanipathy, Ulagalandha Perumal; Tonin, Mario; Houdré, Romuald; Minkov, Momchil Savona, Vincenzo

    2014-09-08

    We fabricate and experimentally characterize an H0 photonic crystal slab nanocavity with a design optimized for maximal quality factor, Q = 1.7 × 10{sup 6}. The cavity, fabricated from a silicon slab, has a resonant mode at λ = 1.59 μm and a measured Q-factor of 400 000. It displays nonlinear effects, including high-contrast optical bistability, at a threshold power among the lowest ever reported for a silicon device. With a theoretical modal volume as small as V = 0.34(λ/n){sup 3}, this cavity ranks among those with the highest Q/V ratios ever demonstrated, while having a small footprint suited for integration in photonic circuits.

  1. Mirror Birefringence in a Fabry-Perot Cavity and the Detection of Vacuum Birefringence in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, T. C. P.; Shao, M.; Redding, D.; Gursel, Y.; Boden, A.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the effect of mirror birefringence in two optical schemes designed to detect the quantum-electrodynamics (QED) predictions of vacuum birefringence under the influence of a strong magnetic field, B. Both schemes make use of a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity (F-P) to increase the average path length of the light in the magnetic field. The first scheme, which we called the frequency scheme, is based on measurement of the beat frequency of two orthogonal polarized laser beams in the cavity. We show that mirror birefringence contributes to the detection uncertainties in first order, resulting in a high susceptibility to small thermal disturbances. We estimate that an unreasonably high thermal stability of 10-9 K is required to resolve the effect to 0.1%. In the second scheme, which we called the polarization rotation scheme, laser polarized at 45 relative to the B field is injected into the cavity.

  2. Electric-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 Mbps. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 ns and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. Experimentally, the resonant cavity can be maintained on resonance with respect to the input laser signal by monitoring the fluctuation of output intensity as the cavity is switched. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of additional dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Furthermore, mode matching into a bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. On the other hand, unlike waveguide modulators which are essentially traveling wave devices, the resonant cavity modulator requires that the cavity be maintained in resonance with respect to the incoming laser signal. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  3. Optical Phased Array Antennas using Coupled Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl H.; Rojas, Roberto A.; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    High data rate communication links are needed to meet the needs of NASA as well as other organizations to develop space-based optical communication systems. These systems must be robust to high radiation environments, reliable, and operate over a wide temperature range. Highly desirable features include beam steering capability, reconfigurability, low power consumption, and small aperture size. Optical communication links, using coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser radiating elements are promising candidates for the transmit portion of these communication links. In this talk we describe a mission scenario, and how the antenna requirements are derived from the mission needs. We describe a potential architecture for this type of antenna, and outline the advantages and drawbacks of this approach relative to competing technologies. The technology we are proposing used coupled arrays of 1550 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for transmission. The feasibility of coupling these arrays together, to form coherent high-power beams that can be modulated at data rates exceeding 1 Gbps, will be explored. We will propose an architecture that enables electronic beam steering, thus mitigating the need for ancillary acquisition, tracking and beam pointing equipment such as needed for current optical communicatin systems. The beam-steering capability we are proposing also opens the possibility of using this technology for inter-satellite communicatin links, and satellite-to-surface links.

  4. Chiral symmetry breaking in a microring optical cavity by engineered dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Fang-Jie; Zou, Chang-Ling; Zou, Xu-Bo; Yang, Lan

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method to break the chiral symmetry of light in traveling wave resonators by coupling the optical modes to a lossy channel. Through the engineered dissipation, an indirect dissipative coupling between two oppositely propagating modes can be realized. Combined with reactive coupling, it can break the chiral symmetry of the resonator, allowing light propagating only in one direction. The chiral symmetry breaking is numerically verified by the simulation of an electromagnetic field in a microring cavity, with proper refractive index distributions. This work provokes us to emphasize the dissipation engineering in photonics, and that the generalized idea can also be applied to other systems.

  5. All-optical flip-flop operation based on bistability in V-cavity laser.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchen; Zhu, Yu; Liao, Xiaolu; Meng, Jianjun; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-06-13

    We theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated an injection-locking based all-optical flip-flop memory using a simple and compact tunable V-cavity laser (VCL). A bistable region in the tuning characteristics of the VCL is employed for the flip-flop operation. The state of the VCL can be set and reset by injecting signal pulses at two different wavelengths. The pulse power for both set and reset signal is only about 1 pJ. Short response times of about 150 ps are measured for storing and erasing. PMID:27410271

  6. Tunable semiconductor laser with an acousto-optic filter in an external fibre cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, E V; Mamedov, D S; Ruenkov, A A; Shramenko, M V; Magdich, L N; Yakubovich, S D

    2006-04-30

    A tunable semiconductor laser with a laser amplifier based on a double-pass superluminescent diode as an active element and an acousto-optic filter in an external fibre cavity as a selective element is investigated. A continuous spectral tuning is achieved in a band of width 60 nm centered at a wavelength of 845 nm and the 'instant' linewidth below 0.05 nm is obtained. The sweep frequency within the tuning range achieves 200 Hz. The cw power at the output of a single-mode fibre was automatically maintained constant at the level up to 1.5 mW. (lasers and amplifiers)

  7. Photon Statistics of a Two-Level Atom in a Driven Optical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, James; Rice, Perry

    1997-10-01

    We consider the second-order intensity correlation function g^(τ ) for a single two-level atom in an optical cavity driven by a classical field. Previous results are extended beyond the weak-field limit, using a quantum trajectory method. Manifestly quantum behavior is observed, and we compare our results to recent experiments by Mielke et. al. ( S. L. Mielke, G. T. Foster, and L. A. Orozco, submitted to Physical Review Letters.) More information can be found at http://muohio.edu/ ~ ricepr/research.htm.

  8. Half-period Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in disordered rotating optical ring cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huanan; Kottos, Tsampikos; Shapiro, Boris

    2016-09-01

    There exists an analogy between Maxwell equations in a rotating frame and the Schrödinger equation for a charged particle in the presence of a magnetic field. We exploit this analogy to point out that electromagnetic phenomena in the rotating frame, under appropriate conditions, can exhibit periodicity with respect to the angular velocity of rotation. In particular, in disordered ring cavities one finds the optical analog of the Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect well known in mesoscopic physics of disordered metals.

  9. Optical detection of the quantization of collective atomic motion.

    PubMed

    Brahms, Nathan; Botter, Thierry; Schreppler, Sydney; Brooks, Daniel W C; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2012-03-30

    We directly measure the quantized collective motion of a gas of thousands of ultracold atoms, coupled to light in a high-finesse optical cavity. We detect strong asymmetries, as high as 3:1, in the intensity of light scattered into low- and high-energy motional sidebands. Owing to high cavity-atom cooperativity, the optical output of the cavity contains a spectroscopic record of the energy exchanged between light and motion, directly quantifying the heat deposited by a quantum position measurement's backaction. Such backaction selectively causes the phonon occupation of the observed collective modes to increase with the measurement rate. These results, in addition to providing a method for calibrating the motion of low-occupation mechanical systems, offer new possibilities for investigating collective modes of degenerate gases and for diagnosing optomechanical measurement backaction.

  10. Acousto-optical interaction of surface acoustic and optical waves in a two-dimensional phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian-Xue; Zou, Kui; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Su, Xiao-Xing

    2014-11-17

    Phoxonic crystal is a promising material for manipulating sound and light simultaneously. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the propagation of acoustic and optical waves along the truncated surface of a two-dimensional square-latticed phoxonic crystal. Further, a phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity is proposed, which can simultaneously confine surface acoustic and optical waves. The interface motion and photoelastic effects are taken into account in the acousto-optical coupling. The results show obvious shifts in eigenfrequencies of the photonic cavity modes induced by different phononic cavity modes. The symmetry of the phononic cavity modes plays a more important role in the single-phonon exchange process than in the case of the multi-phonon exchange. Under the same deformation, the frequency shift of the photonic transverse electric mode is larger than that of the transverse magnetic mode. PMID:25402086

  11. Acousto-optical interaction of surface acoustic and optical waves in a two-dimensional phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian-Xue; Zou, Kui; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Zhang, Chuanzeng; Su, Xiao-Xing

    2014-11-17

    Phoxonic crystal is a promising material for manipulating sound and light simultaneously. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate the propagation of acoustic and optical waves along the truncated surface of a two-dimensional square-latticed phoxonic crystal. Further, a phoxonic crystal hetero-structure cavity is proposed, which can simultaneously confine surface acoustic and optical waves. The interface motion and photoelastic effects are taken into account in the acousto-optical coupling. The results show obvious shifts in eigenfrequencies of the photonic cavity modes induced by different phononic cavity modes. The symmetry of the phononic cavity modes plays a more important role in the single-phonon exchange process than in the case of the multi-phonon exchange. Under the same deformation, the frequency shift of the photonic transverse electric mode is larger than that of the transverse magnetic mode.

  12. Numerical studies of the fluid and optical fields associated with complex cavity flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical solutions for the flowfield about several cavity configurations have been computed using the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are made in two dimensions for free shear layers and a rectangular cavity, and in three dimensions for the transonic aero-window problem of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Results show that dominant acoustic frequencies and magnitudes of the self excited resonant cavity flows compare well with the experiment. In addition, solution sensitivity to artificial dissipation and grid resolution levels are determined. Optical path distortion due to the flow field is modelled geometrically and is found to match the experiment. The fluid field was computed using a diagonalized scheme within an overset mesh framework. An existing code, OVERFLOW, was utilized with the additions of characteristic boundary condition and output routines required for reduction of the unsteady data. The newly developed code is directly applicable to a generalized three dimensional structured grid zone. Details are provided in a paper included in Appendix A.

  13. Classical stochastic measurement trajectories: Bosonic atomic gases in an optical cavity and quantum measurement backaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mark D.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2014-08-01

    We formulate computationally efficient classical stochastic measurement trajectories for a multimode quantum system under continuous observation. Specifically, we consider the nonlinear dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate contained within an optical cavity subject to continuous monitoring of the light leaking out of the cavity. The classical trajectories encode within a classical phase-space representation a continuous quantum measurement process conditioned on a given detection record. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the quasiprobability distribution of the combined condensate-cavity system. We unravel the dynamics into stochastic classical trajectories that are conditioned on the quantum measurement process of the continuously monitored system. Since the dynamics of a continuously measured observable in a many-atom system can be closely approximated by classical dynamics, the method provides a numerically efficient and accurate approach to calculate the measurement record of a large multimode quantum system. Numerical simulations of the continuously monitored dynamics of a large atom cloud reveal considerably fluctuating phase profiles between different measurement trajectories, while ensemble averages exhibit local spatially varying phase decoherence. Individual measurement trajectories lead to spatial pattern formation and optomechanical motion that solely result from the measurement backaction. The backaction of the continuous quantum measurement process, conditioned on the detection record of the photons, spontaneously breaks the symmetry of the spatial profile of the condensate and can be tailored to selectively excite collective modes.

  14. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T. Peter

    2014-10-01

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 105 cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >103) to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high-finesse cavity

  15. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Avino, Saverio; D’Avino, Vittoria; Giorgini, Antonio; Pacelli, Roberto; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cella, Laura; De Natale, Paolo; Gagliardi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR) is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable. PMID:25686311

  16. Transverse-mode dynamics in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with optical feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Torre, M.S.; Masoller, C.; Mandel, Paul

    2002-11-01

    We study the transverse-mode dynamics of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with weak optical feedback. We use a model that takes into account the spatial dependence of the transverse modes and of two carrier density profiles, associated with confined carriers in the quantum well region of the laser and unconfined carriers in the barrier region. Optical feedback is included as in the Lang-Kobayashi model. We find that for adequate parameter values antiphase dynamics occurs. As the injection current varies, the antiphase dynamics is destroyed through a sequence of periodic mixed states leading to in-phase dynamics. In these mixed states there are time intervals in which the modes are in phase, followed by time intervals in which they are in antiphase. We study the origin of the antiphase dynamics, assessing the role of the different spatial profiles. We show that the competition between the different profiles leads to the observed antiphase behavior.

  17. Dynamic optical sampling by cavity tuning and its application in lidar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Nie, Jinsong; Duan, Lingze

    2013-02-11

    Optical sampling by cavity tuning (OSCAT) enables cost-effective realization of fast tunable optical delay using a single femtosecond laser. We report here a dynamic model of OSCAT, taking into account the continuous modulation of laser repetition rates. This allows us to evaluate the delay scan depth under high interferometer imbalance and high scan rates, which cannot be described by the previous static model. We also report the demonstration of remote motion tracking based on fast OSCAT. Target vibration as small as 15 µm peak to peak and as fast as 50 Hz along line-of-sight has been successfully detected at an equivalent free-space distance of more than 2 km. PMID:23481841

  18. [Research on trace gas spectral measurement on intra-cavity fiber optic laser].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Kun; Jia, Da-Gong; Liu, Tie-Gen; Peng, Gang-Ding; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Mo

    2011-08-01

    Due to the advantages of immunity of electrical/electronic, high performance cost ratio, remote detection and multiplexing capability, intra-cavity fiber optic gas measurement has aroused wide concern. The trace gas measurement system has been developed based on the elaborated gas cell and reflector. The wavelength sweeping technique (WST) is realized when the Fabry-Perot type tunable optical filter is applied by the sawtooth driver voltage. Multi absorption lines can be obtained and one scanning measurement with WST is equal to multiple independent detections, so the gas measurement sensitivity is improved remarkably. The experimental results show that the acetylene detection sensitivity is reduced to less than 100 ppm and the relative measurement error is less than 3% of practical gas concentration. PMID:22007380

  19. Experiments in two-mode cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, David Glenn

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) allows the study of light-matter interactions at the most basic level, through precise identification of the coherent and incoherent (dissipative) parts of the system evolution. We present measurements of light from a cavity QED system consisting of a high-finesse optical resonator coupled to a beam of cold Rb atoms. The novelty of the design lies in the interplay of two degenerate and orthogonal polarization modes. One mode (driven) behaves as the canonical cavity mode of the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian, coherently exciting the atoms with a modest coupling strength; the other mode (undriven) collects a small fraction of spontaneously emitted light and provides a probe of the dissipative processes. We first demonstrate the ability to detect individual atoms passing through the cavity modes in real time by coincidence detection of photons from the undriven mode. Calculation of statistics and correlation functions from the complete photon detection record allows the determination of detection probabilities and the reconstruction of atomic trajectories. We next present evidence of quantum coherence that is created, modified, and measured in the excitation-spontaneous emission cycle. The coherence appears as a long-lived quantum beat at the ground-state Larmor frequency, visible in the intensity autocorrelation function of the undriven mode. Quantum jumps of the atomic state, occurring in between the detections of photons from the cavity, result in substantial changes in the frequency and spectral width of the beats. We present the results of a full quantum Monte Carlo calculation in order to quantitatively explain the measurements.

  20. Spectrally resolved measurement of small optical losses by cavity enhanced spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeuner, T.; Paa, W.; Schmidl, G.; Mühlig, Ch.

    2011-05-01

    In general losses of optical of less than 1 % cannot be measured precisely with the best-established techniques (e.q. two-beam spectroscopy). However, it is possible to measure losses in the 0.0001 - 0.5 % range with high accuracy using cavity enhanced spectroscopy (CES) methods. Such low losses can be measured with CES, due to an increased interaction path way with the object. The Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) technique takes advantage of the CES method and transforms the optical loss information into the time domain. Two types of CRD setups for spectrally resolved loss measurement of laser mirrors will be presented. The first setup uses a tunable laser system for serial detection of the reflectivity spectra. The second method determines the spectral losses using a super continuum source. Here, simultaneous excitation and a spectrometer based camera system for separate detection of several wavelengths is used. Results will be shown and compared with direct absorption measurements of the same sample.

  1. Numerical analysis of an optical nanoscale particles trapping device based on a slotted nanobeam cavity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Senlin; Yong, Zhengdong; Shi, Yaocheng; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A slotted nanobeam cavity (SNC) is utilized to trap a polystyrene (PS) particle with a radius of only 2 nm. The carefully designed SNC shows an ultrahigh Q factor of 4.5 × 107 while maintaining a small mode volume of 0.067(λ/nwater)3. Strongly enhanced optical trapping force is numerically demonstrated when the 2 nm PS particle is introduced into the central, slotted part of the SNC. In the vertical direction, the numerical calculation results show that a trapping stiffness of 0.4 pN/(nm · mW) around the equilibrium position and a trapping potential barrier of ~2000 kBT/mW can be reached. To our best knowledge, the trapping capability (trapping stiffness and trapping potential barrier) of the proposed structure significantly outperforms the theoretical results of those in previously reported work. In addition, the SNC system does not suffer from the metal induced heat issue that restricts the performance of state-of-the-art optical trapping systems involving plasmonic enhancement. Based on the proposed cavity, applications such as lab-on-a-chip platforms for nanoscale particle trapping and analysis can be expected in future. PMID:27786248

  2. Bistability characteristics of different types of optical modes amplified by quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasaimeh, Omar

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the characteristics of optical bistability of different types of optical modes amplified by small-size quantum dot vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers operated in reflection. Our analysis reveals that TE01 mode exhibits stronger intensity-dependent non-linearity in small radius devices, which results in stronger optical phase modulation and therefore larger hysteresis width compared with the other modes. The effect of the wavelength detuning of the input signal on the shape of the hysteresis loop is studied. We find that butterfly hysteresis loop exhibits the largest hysteresis width compared with clockwise and counterclockwise loops. Our analysis reveals that doping the quantum dots with p-type doping slightly reduces the hysteresis width while doping the dots with n-type doping clearly increases the hysteresis width for any wavelength detuning. We estimate that the hysteresis width of quantum dot active layer will exhibit higher hysteresis width compared with quantum well active layer having the same threshold gain.

  3. CFD-based aero-optical analysis of flow fields over two-dimensional cavities with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan

    Prediction and control of optical wave front distortions and aberrations in a high energy laser beam due to interaction with an unsteady highly non-uniform flow field is of great importance in the development of directed energy weapon systems for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV). The unsteady shear layer over the weapons bay cavity is the primary cause of this distortion of the optical wave front. The large scale vortical structure of the shear layer over the cavity can be significantly reduced by employing an active flow control technique combined with passive flow control. This dissertation explores various active and passive control methods to suppress the cavity oscillations and thereby improve the aero-optics of cavity flow. In active flow control technique, a steady or a pulsed jet is applied at the sharp leading edge of cavities of different aspect ratios L/D (=2, 4, 15), where L and D are the width and the depth of a cavity respectively. In the passive flow control approach, the sharp leading or trailing edge of the cavity is modified into a round edge of different radii. Both of these active and passive flow control approaches are studied independently and in combination. Numerical simulations are performed, with and without active flow control for subsonic free stream flow past two-dimensional sharp and round leading or trailing edge cavities using Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model or a hybrid SST/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Aero-optical analysis is developed and applied to all the simulation cases. Index of refraction and Optical Path Difference (OPD) are compared for flow fields without and with active flow control. Root-Mean-Square (RMS) value of OPD is calculated and compared with the experimental data, where available. The effect of steady and pulsed blowing on buffet loading on the downstream face of the cavity is also computed. Using the numerical

  4. Achieving an ultra-narrow multiband light absorption meta-surface via coupling with an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengqi; Liu, Guiqiang; Liu, Xiaoshan; Huang, Shan; Wang, Yan; Pan, Pingping; Liu, Mulin

    2015-06-12

    Resonant plasmonic and metamaterial absorbers are of particular interest for applications in a wide variety of nanotechnologies including thermophotovoltaics, photothermal therapy, hot-electron collection and biosensing. However, it is rather challenging to realize ultra-narrow absorbers using plasmonic materials due to large optical losses in metals that inevitably decrease the quality of optical resonators. Here, we theoretically report methods to achieve an ultra-narrow light absorption meta-surface by using photonic modes of the optical cavities, which strongly couple with the plasmon resonances of the metallic nanostructures. Multispectral light absorption with absorption amplitude exceeding 99% and a bandwidth approaching 10 nm is achieved at the optical frequencies. Moreover, by introducing a thick dielectric coupling cavity, the number of absorption bands can be strongly increased and the bandwidth can even be narrowed to less than 5 nm due to the resonant spectrum splitting enabled by strong coupling between the plasmon resonances and the optical cavity modes. Designing such optical cavity-coupled meta-surface structures is a promising route for achieving ultra-narrow multiband absorbers, which can be used in absorption filters, narrow-band multispectral thermal emitters and thermophotovoltaics.

  5. Optical Injection Locking of Vertical Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers: Digital and Analog Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Devang

    With the rise of mobile (cellphones, tablets, notebooks, etc.) and broadband wireline communications (Fiber to the Home), there are increasing demands being placed on transmitters for moving data from device to device and around the world. Digital and analog fiber-optic communications have been the key technology to meet this challenge, ushering in ubiquitous Internet and cable TV over the past 20 years. At the physical layer, high-volume low-cost manufacturing of semiconductor optoelectronic devices has played an integral role in allowing for deployment of high-speed communication links. In particular, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) have revolutionized short reach communications and are poised to enter more markets due to their low cost, small size, and performance. However, VCSELs have disadvantages such as limited modulation performance and large frequency chirp which limits fiber transmission speed and distance, key parameters for many fiber-optic communication systems. Optical injection locking is one method to overcome these limitations without re-engineering the VCSEL at the device level. By locking the frequency and phase of the VCSEL by the direct injection of light from another laser oscillator, improved device performance is achieved in a post-fabrication method. In this dissertation, optical injection locking of VCSELs is investigated from an applications perspective. Optical injection locking of VCSELs can be used as a pathway to reduce complexity, cost, and size of both digital and analog fiber-optic communications. On the digital front, reduction of frequency chirp via bit pattern inversion for large-signal modulation is experimentally demonstrated showing up to 10 times reduction in frequency chirp and over 90 times increase in fiber transmission distance. Based on these results, a new reflection-based interferometric model for optical injection locking was established to explain this phenomenon. On the analog side, the resonance

  6. Engineering Strong Interactions Between mm-wave and Optical Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Mark; Suleymanzade, Aziza; Estes, Jeremy; Eustice, Scott; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We propose an atomic interface of Rydberg atoms as a means of engineering effective strong interactions between single mm-wave and optical photons. The atomic sample resides at the intersection of a high-finesse optical cavity and a superconducting mm-wave cavity, where it can coherently interact with photons of both regimes. The use of mm-wave (100 GHz) frequencies allows strong coupling at higher temperatures and with less sensitivity to stray electric fields. A hybrid cryogenic vacuum chamber at 4 Kelvin enables access to superconductivity as well as a UHV environment with optical access necessary for cold atom experiments. Strong interactions between these separate quantum degrees of freedom has important applications in quantum computing as well as simulation of many-body interacting systems.

  7. Development of the High Field Magneto-Optical Measurement System with a Rotational Cavity for the Study of Organic Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, M.; Ohta, H.; Koyama, K.; Oshima, Y.; Motokawa, M.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Kato, R.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a new magneto-optical measurement system with a rotational cavity. It consists of a millimeter vector network analyzer and a 15T solenoid type superconducting magnet and it can go down to 1.5 K. The rotational cavity can be used in the transmission configuration and the rotation can be performed up to almost 360 degrees in 1 degree precision. We will show the magneto-optical measurement results of β"-(BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ) using our new system. We observe the quasi-two-dimensional periodic orbit resonance (POR) in β"-(BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ). The Fermi surfaces of this system will be discussed.

  8. Development of the High Field Magneto-Optical Measurement System with a Rotational Cavity for the Study of Organic Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, M.; Ohta, H.; Koyama, K.; Oshima, Y.; Motokawa, M.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Kato, R.

    We have developed a new magneto-optical measurement system with a rotational cavity. It consists of a millimeter vector network analyzer and a 15T solenoid type superconducting magnet and it can go down to 1.5 K. The rotational cavity can be used in the transmission configuration and the rotation can be performed up to almost 360 degrees in 1 degree precision. We will show the magneto-optical measurement results of β"-(BEDT-TTF)(TCNQ) using our new system. We observe the quasi-two-dimensional periodic orbit resonance (POR) in β"-(BEDT-TTF) (TCNQ). The Fermi surfaces of this system will be discussed.

  9. Optical generation of tunable microwave and millimeter waves by using asymmetric fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot cavity fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cong; Wang, Meng; Li, Qi; Huang, Kaiqiang; Chen, Haiyan

    2014-10-01

    In this presentation, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel optical generation of microwave and millimeter wave signals by using asymmetric fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot cavity fiber laser, dual-wavelength emission can be achieved with wavelength separation of 0.68nm corresponding to the millimeter wave signal at 85GHz. By appropriately adjusting the operation temperature of intracavity fiber Bragg grating, the frequency of millimeter wave signal generated can be tunable. Our experimental results demonstrate the new concept of optical generation of microwave and millimeter wave signals by using asymmetric fiber Bragg grating Fabry-Perot cavity dual-wavelength fiber laser and the technical feasibility.

  10. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  11. RF-wave generation using external cavity laser diodes frequency-stabilized to single optical cavity by using orthogonal polarized modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Tomoyuki; Hagiwara, Kohei; Tanigaki, Hidetoshi; Tsuji, Kenichiro; Onodera, Noriaki

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel stabilization technique for two 1550-nm band external cavity laser diodes (ECLDs) used in optical generation of microwave and millimeter wave signals. Using FM sideband technique, those two ECLDs are simultaneously locked to two resonant modes of a single Fabry-Perot cavity. In the scheme, a new Υ-type optical configuration is used for simultaneous phase modulation of orthogonally polarized two wavelengths transmitted through slow and fast axis of polarization maintaining fiber. The Υ-type optical configuration, which consists of a phase modulator and a Faraday rotator mirror combined with an optical circulator, is a simple and compact apparatus to achieve double-pass phase modulation with the same modulation index . In this paper, we show the results of frequency stabilization of two ECLDs using Υ-type configuration, and compare with the results obtained in conventional non-Υ-type configuration. Short-term stability of 200 kHz at an averaging of 10 ms is achieved in the simple Υ-type configuration.

  12. Low loss optomechanical cavities based on silicon oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrielli, A.; Pontin, A.; Cataliotti, F. S.; Marconi, L.; Marin, F.; Marino, F.; Pandraud, G.; Prodi, G. A.; Serra, E.; Bonaldi, M.

    2015-05-01

    In an optomechanical cavity the optical and mechanical degree of freedom are strongly coupled by the radiation pressure of the light. This field of research has been gathering a lot of momentum during the last couple of years, driven by the technological advances in microfabrication and the first observation of quantum phenomena. These results open new perspectives in a wide range of applications, including high sensitivity measurements of position, acceleration, force, mass, and for fundamental research. We are working on low frequency pondero-motive light squeezing as a tool for improving the sensitivity of audio frequency measuring devices such as magnetic resonance force microscopes and gravitational-wave detectors. It is well known that experiments aiming to produce and manipulate non-classical (squeezed) light by effect of optomechanical interaction need a mechanical oscillator with low optical and mechanical losses. These technological requirements permit to maximize the force per incoming photon exerted by the cavity field on the mechanical element and to improve the element's response to the radiation pressure force and, at the same time, to decrease the influence of the thermal bath. In this contribution we describe a class of mechanical devices for which we measured a mechanical quality factor up to 1.2 × 106 and with which it was possible to build a Fabry-Perot cavity with optical finesse up to 9 × 104. From our estimations, these characteristics meet the requirements for the generation of radiation squeezing and quantum correlations in the ˜ 100kHz region. Moreover our devices are characterized by high reproducibility to allow inclusion in integrated systems. We show the results of the characterization realized with a Michelson interferometer down to 4.2K and measurements in optical cavities performed at cryogenic temperature with input optical powers up to a few mW. We also report on the dynamical stability and the thermal response of the system.

  13. Design verification of large time constant thermal shields for optical reference cavities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wu, W; Shi, X H; Zeng, X Y; Deng, K; Lu, Z H

    2016-02-01

    In order to achieve high frequency stability in ultra-stable lasers, the Fabry-Pérot reference cavities shall be put inside vacuum chambers with large thermal time constants to reduce the sensitivity to external temperature fluctuations. Currently, the determination of thermal time constants of vacuum chambers is based either on theoretical calculation or time-consuming experiments. The first method can only apply to simple system, while the second method will take a lot of time to try out different designs. To overcome these limitations, we present thermal time constant simulation using finite element analysis (FEA) based on complete vacuum chamber models and verify the results with measured time constants. We measure the thermal time constants using ultrastable laser systems and a frequency comb. The thermal expansion coefficients of optical reference cavities are precisely measured to reduce the measurement error of time constants. The simulation results and the experimental results agree very well. With this knowledge, we simulate several simplified design models using FEA to obtain larger vacuum thermal time constants at room temperature, taking into account vacuum pressure, shielding layers, and support structure. We adopt the Taguchi method for shielding layer optimization and demonstrate that layer material and layer number dominate the contributions to the thermal time constant, compared with layer thickness and layer spacing. PMID:26931831

  14. Laser Frequency Stabilization and Control through Offset Sideband Locking to Optical Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James I.; Livas, J.; Numata, K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a class of techniques whereby a laser frequency can be stabilized to a fixed optical cavity resonance with an adjustable offset, providing a wide tuning range for the central frequency. These techniques require only minor modifications to the standard Pound-Drever-Hall locking techniques and have the advantage of not altering the intrinsic stability of the frequency reference. In a laboratory investigation the sideband techniques were found to perform equally well as the standard, non-tunable Pound-Drever-Hall technique, each providing more than four decades of frequency noise suppression over the free-running noise. An application of a tunable system as a pre-stabilization stage in a phase-lock loop is also presented with the combined system achieving a frequency noise suppression of nearly twelve orders of magnitude.

  15. Probing dark energy with an atom interferometer in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Matthew; Haslinger, Philipp; Hamilton, Paul; Mueller, Holger; Khoury, Justin; Elder, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    If dark energy -- which drives the accelerated expansion of the universe -- consists of a light scalar field, it might be detectable as a ``fifth force'' between normal-matter objects, in potential conflict with precision tests of gravity. Chameleon fields and other theories with screening mechanisms can evade such tests by suppressing this force in regions of high density, such as the laboratory. Our experiments constrain these dark energy models using atoms in an ultrahigh-vacuum chamber as probes to expose the screened fields. Using a cesium matter wave interferometer in an optical cavity, we set stringent bounds on coupling screened theories to matter. A further 4 to 5 orders of magnitude would completely rule out chameleon and f(R) theories. I will describe this first tabletop dark energy search, and present the hundredfold boost in sensitivity we have since achieved.

  16. External cavity quantum cascade lasers with ultra rapid acousto-optic tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakh, A.; Barron-Jimenez, R.; Dunayevskiy, I.; Go, R.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2015-04-01

    We report operation of tunable external cavity quantum cascade lasers with emission wavelength controlled by an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). A long-wave infrared quantum cascade laser wavelength tuned from ˜8.5 μm to ˜9.8 μm when the AOM frequency was changed from ˜41MHz to ˜49 MHz. The laser delivered over 350 mW of average power at the center of the tuning curve in a linewidth of ˜4.7 cm-1. Measured wavelength switching time between any two wavelengths within the tuning range of the QCL was less than 1 μs. Spectral measurements of infrared absorption features of Freon demonstrated a capability of obtaining complete spectral data in less than 20 μs.

  17. External cavity quantum cascade lasers with ultra rapid acousto-optic tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Lyakh, A. Barron-Jimenez, R.; Dunayevskiy, I.; Go, R.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2015-04-06

    We report operation of tunable external cavity quantum cascade lasers with emission wavelength controlled by an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). A long-wave infrared quantum cascade laser wavelength tuned from ∼8.5 μm to ∼9.8 μm when the AOM frequency was changed from ∼41MHz to ∼49 MHz. The laser delivered over 350 mW of average power at the center of the tuning curve in a linewidth of ∼4.7 cm{sup −1}. Measured wavelength switching time between any two wavelengths within the tuning range of the QCL was less than 1 μs. Spectral measurements of infrared absorption features of Freon demonstrated a capability of obtaining complete spectral data in less than 20 μs.

  18. Self-assembled InAs quantum dots within a vertical cavity structure for all-optical switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C. Y.; Kojima, O.; Inoue, T.; Kita, T.; Wada, O.; Hopkinson, M.; Akahane, K.

    2010-02-01

    An all-optical switching device has been proposed by using self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) within a vertical cavity structure for ultrafast optical communications. This device has several desirable properties, such as the ultra-low power consumption, the micrometre size, and the polarization insensitive operation. Due to the threedimensional confined carrier state and the broad size distribution of self-assembled InAs/GaAs QDs, it is crucial to enhance the interaction between QDs and the cavity with appropriately designed 1D periodic structure. Significant QD/cavity nonlinearity is theoretically observed by increasing the GaAs/AlAs pair number of the bottom mirror. By this consideration, we have fabricated vertical-reflection type QD switches with 12 periods of GaAs/Al0.8Ga0.2As for the top mirror and 25 periods for the bottom mirror to give an asymmetric vertical cavity. Optical switching via the QD excited state exhibits a fast switching process with a time constant down to 23 ps, confirming that the fast intersubband relaxation of carriers inside QDs is an effective means to speed up the switching process. A technique by changing the light incident angle realizes wavelength tunability over 30 nm for the QD/cavity switch.

  19. Cavity and quartz enhanced photo-acoustic mid-IR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patimisco, P.; Borri, S.; Scamarcio, G.; Spagnolo, V.; Galli, I.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.

    2013-12-01

    We report on a novel intracavity quartz enhanced photoacoustic (I-QEPAS) gas sensing technique taking advantage from both the high Q-factor of standard tuning forks and the power build-up of a high-finesse optical resonator. This first prototype employs a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser operating at 4.3 μm. CO2 has been selected as gas target. Preliminary results demonstrate an improved sensitivity, close to the cavity enhancement factor (˜500) times the optical coupling efficiency (about 0.5), with respect to standard QEPAS technique. The detection limit was pulled from 7 ppm (obtained with standard QEPAS) down to 32 ppb, corresponding to normalized noise-equivalent absorption in the 10-9 W•cm-1•Hz-1/2 range.

  20. Polarization and modal dynamics of multimode vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers subject to optical feedback and current modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Khurram, Aliza; Black-Ingersoll, Myles D.; Valle, Angel

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of a multi-transverse mode vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is studied experimentally in a wide parameter range of optical feedback and current modulation. While the orthogonal polarizations manifest anticorrelated feedback dynamics, dynamics of different transverse modes with orthogonal polarizations do not exhibit a clear correlation property. This may be attributed to spatial hole burning effect. As the current modulation becomes strong, both polarization and modal dynamics are modulation dominated. When the modulation frequency is close to the external cavity resonance frequency or its harmonics, feedback dynamics is enhanced. For the modulation frequency close to half integer multiples of the external cavity resonance frequency, feedback feature can be suppressed. The minimum modulation amplitude for suppressing feedback dynamics is measured for each polarization and one of the transverse modes in the polarization, and the results are discussed. Interplay of relaxation oscillation, optical feedback, and current modulation is observed and measured. Our results are compared to the theoretical predictions.

  1. A theoretical study on using a fictional mirror to simplify the behavior of a volume Bragg grating in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yu-Hua; Huang, Ching-Hsun; Chung, Te-yuan; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2016-11-01

    A fictional mirror was proposed to describe the reflective behaviors of a volume Bragg grating (VBG) in an optical cavity. When a finite beam interacts with a VBG, the analytical forms of the location and the radius of curvature of the fictional mirror are derived. In addition, the longitudinal mode spacing of an optical cavity using a VBG as the cavity mirror is investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  2. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  3. Millimeter-long fiber Fabry-Perot cavities.

    PubMed

    Ott, Konstantin; Garcia, Sebastien; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5 mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem.

  4. Millimeter-long fiber Fabry-Perot cavities.

    PubMed

    Ott, Konstantin; Garcia, Sebastien; Kohlhaas, Ralf; Schüppert, Klemens; Rosenbusch, Peter; Long, Romain; Reichel, Jakob

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) cavities with concave mirrors that can be operated at cavity lengths as large as 1.5 mm without significant deterioration of the finesse. This is achieved by using a laser dot machining technique to shape spherical mirrors with ultralow roughness and employing single-mode fibers with large mode area for good mode matching to the cavity. Additionally, in contrast to previous FFPs, these cavities can be used over an octave-spanning frequency range with adequate coatings. We also show directly that shape deviations caused by the fiber's index profile lead to a finesse decrease as observed in earlier attempts to build long FFP cavities, and show a way to overcome this problem. PMID:27137597

  5. Cavity-based quantum networks with single atoms and optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiserer, Andreas; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    Distributed quantum networks will allow users to perform tasks and to interact in ways which are not possible with present-day technology. Their implementation is a key challenge for quantum science and requires the development of stationary quantum nodes that can send and receive as well as store and process quantum information locally. The nodes are connected by quantum channels for flying information carriers, i.e., photons. These channels serve both to directly exchange quantum information between nodes and to distribute entanglement over the whole network. In order to scale such networks to many particles and long distances, an efficient interface between the nodes and the channels is required. This article describes the cavity-based approach to this goal, with an emphasis on experimental systems in which single atoms are trapped in and coupled to optical resonators. Besides being conceptually appealing, this approach is promising for quantum networks on larger scales, as it gives access to long qubit coherence times and high light-matter coupling efficiencies. Thus, it allows one to generate entangled photons on the push of a button, to reversibly map the quantum state of a photon onto an atom, to transfer and teleport quantum states between remote atoms, to entangle distant atoms, to detect optical photons nondestructively, to perform entangling quantum gates between an atom and one or several photons, and even provides a route toward efficient heralded quantum memories for future repeaters. The presented general protocols and the identification of key parameters are applicable to other experimental systems.

  6. Adhesive improvement in optical coherence tomography combined with confocal microscopy for class V cavities investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rominu, Mihai; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Rominu, Roxana O.; Pop, Daniela M.; Topala, Florin; Stoia, Adelina; Petrescu, Emanuela; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a non invasive method for the marginal adaptation evaluation in class V composite restorations. Standardized class V cavities prepared in human extracted teeth were filled with composite resin (Premise, Kerr). The specimens were thermocycled. The interfaces were examined by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) combined with confocal microscopy and fluorescence. The optical configuration uses two single mode directional couplers with a superluminiscent diode as the source at 1300 nm. The scanning procedure is similar to that used in any confocal microscope, where the fast scanning is en-face (line rate) and the depth scanning is much slower (at the frame rate). Gaps at the interfaces as well as on the inside of the composite resin were identified. OCT has numerous advantages that justify its in vivo and in vitro use compared to conventional techniques. One of the main concerns was the fact that at the adhesive layer site it was very hard to tell the adhesive apart from material defects. For this reason the adhesive was optimized in order to be more scattering. This way we could make a difference between the adhesive layer and the material defects that could lead to microleakages.

  7. Selection of Optical Cavity Surface Coatings for 1micron Laser Based Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgeland, Randy J.; Straka, Sharon; Matsumura, Mark; Hammerbacher, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The particulate surface cleanliness level on several coatings for aluminum and beryllium substrates were examined for use in the optical cavities of high pulse energy Nd:YAG Q-switched, diode-pumped lasers for space flight applications. Because of the high intensity of the lasers, any contaminants in the laser beam path could damage optical coatings and limit the instrument mission objectives at the operating wavelength of 1 micron (micrometer). Our goal was to achieve an EST-STD-CC1246D Level 100 particulate distribution or better to ensure particulate redistribution during launch would not adversely affect the performance objectives. Tapelifts were performed to quantify the amount of particles using in-house developed procedures. The primary candidate coatings included chromate conversion coating aluminum (Al), uncoated Al electroless Nickel (Ni) on Al, Ni-gold (Au) on Al, anodized Al, and gold (Au)/Ni on Beryllium (Be). The results indicate that there were advantages in Ni and Au coating applications for the two major substrates, Al and Be, when considering applications that need to meet launch environments.

  8. Subkilohertz comparison of the single-ion optical-clock 2S1/2-2D5/2 transition in two 88Sr+ traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwood, G. P.; Huang, G.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.; Clarke, R. B. M.

    1999-05-01

    A simultaneous observation of the optical-clock 2S1/2-2D5/2 transition at 674 nm, in two separately trapped single 88Sr+ ions, is reported. Two nominally identical miniature rf Paul traps were used together with a 674-nm sideband-injection-locked extended-cavity diode laser. This ``slave'' laser was optically phase locked about 650 MHz away from a ``master'' diode laser, which was itself locked to a high-finesse, ultra-low-expansion (ULE) cavity. The ULE cavity was temperature-stabilized and suspended in an evacuated enclosure, and provided an ``optical flywheel'' reference standard with a relative drift rate of better than 1 part in 1011 per hour. The difference between center frequencies of the single 88Sr+-ion 674-nm (445-THz) transition multiplet in two traps was 120(90) Hz (one standard uncertainty). Thus the two trap center frequencies agree to 3 parts in 1013.

  9. Phase-Sensitive Detection of Bragg Scattering at 1D Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Slama, S.; Cube, C. von; Deh, B.; Ludewig, A.; Zimmermann, C.; Courteille, Ph.W.

    2005-05-20

    We report on the observation of Bragg scattering at 1D atomic lattices. Cold atoms are confined by optical dipole forces at the antinodes of a standing wave generated by the two counterpropagating modes of a laser-driven high-finesse ring cavity. By heterodyning the Bragg-scattered light with a reference beam, we obtain detailed information on phase shifts imparted by the Bragg scattering process. Being deep in the Lamb-Dicke regime, the scattered light is not broadened by the motion of individual atoms.

  10. Frequency stability measurement of a transfer-cavity-stabilized diode laser by using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetake, S.; Matsubara, K.; Ito, H.; Hayasaka, K.; Hosokawa, M.

    2009-10-01

    We report results of frequency stability measurements of an extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) whose frequency is stabilized by a non-evacuated scanning transfer cavity. The transfer cavity is locked to a commercial frequency stabilized helium-neon laser. Frequency stability is measured by use of an optical frequency comb. The environmental perturbations (variations of temperature, air pressure, and humidity) are also simultaneously measured. The observed frequency drift of the ECDL is well explained by environmental perturbations. An atmospheric pressure variation, which is difficult to control with a non-evacuated cavity, is mainly affected to the frequency stability. Thus we put the cavity into a simple O-ring sealed (non-evacuated) tube. With this simple O-ring sealed tube, the frequency drift is reduced by a factor of 3, and the Allan variance reaches a value of 2.4×10-10, corresponds to the frequency stability of 83 kHz, at the average time of 3000 s. Since the actual frequency drift is well estimated by simultaneous measurement of the ambient temperature, pressure, and humidity, a feed-forward compensation of frequency drifts is also feasible in order to achieve a higher frequency stability with a simple non-evacuated transfer cavity.

  11. Real-time detection of lipid bilayer assembly and detergent-initiated solubilization using optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, V.; Armani, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    The cellular membrane governs numerous fundamental biological processes. Therefore, developing a comprehensive understanding of its structure and function is critical. However, its inherent biological complexity gives rise to numerous inter-dependent physical phenomena. In an attempt to develop a model, two different experimental approaches are being pursued in parallel: performing single cell experiments (top down) and using biomimetic structures (bottom up), such as lipid bilayers. One challenge in many of these experiments is the reliance on fluorescent probes for detection which can create confounds in this already complex system. In the present work, a label-free detection method based on an optical resonant cavity is used to detect one of the fundamental physical phenomena in the system: assembly and solubilization of the lipid bilayer. The evanescent field of the cavity strongly interacts with the lipid bilayer, enabling the detection of the bilayer behavior in real-time. Two independent detection mechanisms confirm the formation and detergent-assisted solubilization of the lipid bilayers: (1) a refractive index change and (2) a material loss change. Both mechanisms can be monitored in parallel, on the same device, thus allowing for cross-confirmation of the results. To verify the proposed method, we have detected the formation of self-assembled phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers from small unilamellar vesicles on the device surface in real-time. Subsequently, we exposed the bilayers to two different detergents (non-ionic Triton X-100 and anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate) to initiate solubilization, and this process was also detected in real-time. After the bilayer solubilization, the device returned to its initial state, exhibiting minimal hysteresis. The experimental wash-off was also collected and analyzed using dynamic light scattering.

  12. FINESSE Spaceward Bound - Teacher Engagement in NASA Science and Exploration Field Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. J. P.; Heldmann, J. L.; Sheely, T.; Karlin, J.; Johnson, S.; Rosemore, A.; Hughes, S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Lim, D. S. S.; Garry, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids, and the moons of Mars. The FINESSE science program is infused with leading edge exploration concepts since "science enables exploration and exploration enables science." The FINESSE education and public outreach program leverages the team's field investigations and educational partnerships to share the excitement of lunar, Near Earth Asteroid, and martian moon science and exploration locally, nationally, and internationally. The FINESSE education plan is in line with all of NASA's Science Mission Directorate science education objectives, particularly to enable STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education and leverage efforts through partnerships.

  13. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.

    2015-10-12

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and refractive index using focused ion beam milled Fabry-Perot cavities in optical fiber micro-tips.

    PubMed

    André, Ricardo M; Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Becker, Martin; Dellith, Jan; Rothhardt, Manfred; Zibaii, M I; Latifi, H; Marques, Manuel B; Bartelt, Hartmut; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-06-27

    Optical fiber micro-tips are promising devices for sensing applications in small volume and difficult to access locations, such as biological and biomedical settings. The tapered fiber tips are prepared by dynamic chemical etching, reducing the size from 125 μm to just a few μm. Focused ion beam milling is then used to create cavity structures on the tapered fiber tips. Two different Fabry-Perot micro-cavities have been prepared and characterized: a solid silica cavity created by milling two thin slots and a gap cavity. A third multi-cavity structure is fabricated by combining the concepts of solid silica cavity and gap cavity. This micro-tip structure is analyzed using a fast Fourier transform method to demultiplex the signals of each cavity. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and external refractive index is then demonstrated, presenting sensitivities of - 15.8 pm/K and -1316 nm/RIU, respectively.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and refractive index using focused ion beam milled Fabry-Perot cavities in optical fiber micro-tips.

    PubMed

    André, Ricardo M; Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Becker, Martin; Dellith, Jan; Rothhardt, Manfred; Zibaii, M I; Latifi, H; Marques, Manuel B; Bartelt, Hartmut; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-06-27

    Optical fiber micro-tips are promising devices for sensing applications in small volume and difficult to access locations, such as biological and biomedical settings. The tapered fiber tips are prepared by dynamic chemical etching, reducing the size from 125 μm to just a few μm. Focused ion beam milling is then used to create cavity structures on the tapered fiber tips. Two different Fabry-Perot micro-cavities have been prepared and characterized: a solid silica cavity created by milling two thin slots and a gap cavity. A third multi-cavity structure is fabricated by combining the concepts of solid silica cavity and gap cavity. This micro-tip structure is analyzed using a fast Fourier transform method to demultiplex the signals of each cavity. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and external refractive index is then demonstrated, presenting sensitivities of - 15.8 pm/K and -1316 nm/RIU, respectively. PMID:27410566

  16. Preparation and properties of magneto-optical micro-cavities composed of Co thin film and dielectric multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, M.; Matsumoto, K.; Arai, K. I.; Fujii, T.; Abe, M.

    1999-05-01

    Magneto-optical (MO) Kerr effect of micro-cavities composed of a Co thin film and SiO 2/SiN multilayer films was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The micro-cavity structure was found to be very effective for enhancing the MO Kerr effect: the MO Kerr rotation angle exceeding 10° at a designated wavelength of light was obtained, the value of which is more than 100 times larger than that of a Co single-layer film. The large MO Kerr effect is caused by the localization of light originating from the multilayer structure.

  17. Multi-normal mode-splitting for an optical cavity with electromagnetically induced transparency medium.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xudong; Zhang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We theoretically study the cavity transmission spectra with three-level atoms coupled by a coherent external control field in the superstrong coupling regime (atoms-cavity coupling strength g [square root] N is near or larger than the cavity free-spectral range DeltaFSR). When satisfying the superstrong coupling condition by increasing the number of the interaction atoms, more than one FSR cavity modes interact with atoms and each mode will split three peaks, which can be well explained by the linear dispersion enhancement of electromagnetically induced transparency medium due to the largely increased atomic density in the cavity.

  18. Developments of Optical Resonators and Optical Recirculators for Compton X/γ Ray Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, A.; , Mightylaser, Thomx Collaboration; Eurogammas Association

    2015-10-01

    Optical resonators and optical recirculators are key elements of Compton X/γ ray machines. With regard to their use in laser physics or in time-frequency metrology, these devices have to obey severe constraints when implemented in the vaccum of an electron accelerator. Our group has developed both types of devices. In this proceedings an original recirculator design, that was developed within the European proposal to the ELI-NP γ ray source call for tender, is described. This is an aberration free device which allows reciculating 32 times a short and high intensity laser pulse. It also allows synchronizing each of the 32 passes with the electron RF cavities within 100 fs. The second topic of these proceedings is a description of our R & D on optical resonators dedicated to laser-electron interactions. We have locked two different picosecond laser oscillators to the highest cavity finesse F=30000 ever reached in pulsed regime. We also designed and build a new kind of non-planar cavity, tetrahedron shape, providing circularly polarized eigen modes. This cavity was installed in the ATF accelerator of KEK and successfully used to produce a high gamma ray flux. Thanks to an original fibre amplifier, we succeed in stacking 100 kW of average power inside the cavity.

  19. Phase noise and squeezing spectra of the output field of an optical cavity containing an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafi, A.; Naderi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of the phase noise, intensity and quadrature squeezing power spectra of the transmitted field of a driven optical cavity containing an interacting one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate. We show how the pattern of the output power spectrum of the cavity changes due to the nonlinear effect of atomic collisions. Furthermore, it is shown that due to a one-to-one correspondence between the splitting of the peaks in the phase noise power spectrum of the cavity output field and the s-wave scattering frequency of the atom-atom interaction, one can measure the strength of interatomic interaction. In addition, we show how the atomic collisions affect the squeezing behavior of the output field.

  20. Optical pressure/acoustic sensor with precise Fabry-Perot cavity length control using angle polished fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhui; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Xingwei; Niezrecki, Christopher; Chen, Julie

    2009-09-14

    This paper presents a novel Fabry-Perot (FP) optical fiber pressure/acoustic sensor. It consists of two V-shaped grooves having different sized widths, a diaphragm on the surface of the larger V-groove, and a 45 degrees angle-polished fiber. The precision of FP cavity length is determined by the fabrication process of photolithography and anisotropic etching of a silicon crystal. Therefore, the cavity length can be controlled on the order of ten nm. Sensors were fabricated and tested. Test results indicate that the sensors' cavity lengths have been controlled precisely. The packaged sensor has demonstrated very good static and dynamic responses compared to a commercially available pressure sensor and a microphone. PMID:19770876

  1. Phase noise and squeezing spectra of the output field of an optical cavity containing an interacting Bose–Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafi, A.; Naderi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of the phase noise, intensity and quadrature squeezing power spectra of the transmitted field of a driven optical cavity containing an interacting one-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensate. We show how the pattern of the output power spectrum of the cavity changes due to the nonlinear effect of atomic collisions. Furthermore, it is shown that due to a one-to-one correspondence between the splitting of the peaks in the phase noise power spectrum of the cavity output field and the s-wave scattering frequency of the atom–atom interaction, one can measure the strength of interatomic interaction. In addition, we show how the atomic collisions affect the squeezing behavior of the output field.

  2. Metal-optic cavity for a high efficiency sub-fF germanium photodiode on a silicon waveguide.

    PubMed

    Going, Ryan; Kim, Myung-Ki; Wu, Ming C

    2013-09-23

    We propose two designs of nanoscale sub-fF germanium photodiodes which are efficiently integrated with silicon waveguides. The metal-optic cavities are simulated with the finite difference time domain method and optimized using critical coupling concepts. One design is for a metal semiconductor metal photodiode with <200 aF capacitance, 39% external quantum efficiency, and 0.588 (λ/n)³ cavity volume at 1.5 µm wavelength. The second design is for a vertical p-i-n photodiode with <100 aF capacitance, 51% external quantum efficiency, and 0.804 (λ/n)³ cavity volume. Both designs make use of CMOS compatible materials germanium and aluminum metal for potential future monolithic integration with silicon photonics.

  3. Two-dimensional pseudo-random optical phased array based on tandem optical injection locking of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Sayyah, Keyvan; Efimov, Oleg; Patterson, Pamela; Schaffner, James; White, Carson; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, a pseudo-random, two-dimensional optical phased array (OPA) concept based on tandem injection locking of 64-element vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays. A low cavity-Q VCSEL design resulted in an injection locking optical power of less than 1 μW per VCSEL, providing large OPA scaling potential. Tandem injection locking of two VCSEL arrays resulted in measured controllable optical phase change of 0-1.6π. A high quality beam formed with suppressed grating lobes due to the pseudo-random array design was demonstrated with performance close to simulated results. A preliminary 2.2° x 1.2° beam steering example using the tandem arrays was also demonstrated.

  4. Coaxial multishell nanowires with high-quality electronic interfaces and tunable optical cavities for ultrathin photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Kempa, Thomas J.; Cahoon, James F.; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Day, Robert W.; Bell, David C.; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanowires (NWs) could enable low-cost and efficient photovoltaics, though their performance has been limited by nonideal electrical characteristics and an inability to tune absorption properties. We overcome these limitations through controlled synthesis of a series of polymorphic core/multishell NWs with highly crystalline, hexagonally-faceted shells, and well-defined coaxial (p/n) and p/intrinsic/n (p/i/n) diode junctions. Designed 200–300 nm diameter p/i/n NW diodes exhibit ultralow leakage currents of approximately 1 fA, and open-circuit voltages and fill-factors up to 0.5 V and 73%, respectively, under one-sun illumination. Single-NW wavelength-dependent photocurrent measurements reveal size-tunable optical resonances, external quantum efficiencies greater than unity, and current densities double those for silicon films of comparable thickness. In addition, finite-difference-time-domain simulations for the measured NW structures agree quantitatively with the photocurrent measurements, and demonstrate that the optical resonances are due to Fabry-Perot and whispering-gallery cavity modes supported in the high-quality faceted nanostructures. Synthetically optimized NW devices achieve current densities of 17 mA/cm2 and power-conversion efficiencies of 6%. Horizontal integration of multiple NWs demonstrates linear scaling of the absolute photocurrent with number of NWs, as well as retention of the high open-circuit voltages and short-circuit current densities measured for single NW devices. Notably, assembly of 2 NW elements into vertical stacks yields short-circuit current densities of 25 mA/cm2 with a backside reflector, and simulations further show that such stacking represents an attractive approach for further enhancing performance with projected efficiencies of > 15% for 1.2 μm thick 5 NW stacks. PMID:22307592

  5. Coaxial multishell nanowires with high-quality electronic interfaces and tunable optical cavities for ultrathin photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Kempa, Thomas J; Cahoon, James F; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Day, Robert W; Bell, David C; Park, Hong-Gyu; Lieber, Charles M

    2012-01-31

    Silicon nanowires (NWs) could enable low-cost and efficient photovoltaics, though their performance has been limited by nonideal electrical characteristics and an inability to tune absorption properties. We overcome these limitations through controlled synthesis of a series of polymorphic core/multishell NWs with highly crystalline, hexagonally-faceted shells, and well-defined coaxial (p/n) and p/intrinsic/n (p/i/n) diode junctions. Designed 200-300 nm diameter p/i/n NW diodes exhibit ultralow leakage currents of approximately 1 fA, and open-circuit voltages and fill-factors up to 0.5 V and 73%, respectively, under one-sun illumination. Single-NW wavelength-dependent photocurrent measurements reveal size-tunable optical resonances, external quantum efficiencies greater than unity, and current densities double those for silicon films of comparable thickness. In addition, finite-difference-time-domain simulations for the measured NW structures agree quantitatively with the photocurrent measurements, and demonstrate that the optical resonances are due to Fabry-Perot and whispering-gallery cavity modes supported in the high-quality faceted nanostructures. Synthetically optimized NW devices achieve current densities of 17 mA/cm(2) and power-conversion efficiencies of 6%. Horizontal integration of multiple NWs demonstrates linear scaling of the absolute photocurrent with number of NWs, as well as retention of the high open-circuit voltages and short-circuit current densities measured for single NW devices. Notably, assembly of 2 NW elements into vertical stacks yields short-circuit current densities of 25 mA/cm(2) with a backside reflector, and simulations further show that such stacking represents an attractive approach for further enhancing performance with projected efficiencies of > 15% for 1.2 μm thick 5 NW stacks.

  6. A selective optical sensor based on [9]mercuracarborand-3, a new type of ionophore with a chloride complexing cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badr, I. H.; Johnson, R. D.; Diaz, M.; Hawthorne, M. F.; Bachas, L. G.; Daunert, S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A highly selective optical sensor for chloride, based on the multidentate Lewis acid ionophore [9]mercuracarborand-3, is described herein. This sensor is constructed by embedding the mercuracarborand ionophore, a suitable pH-sensitive lipophilic dye, and lipophilic cationic sites in a plasticized polymeric membrane. The multiple complementary interactions offered by the preorganized complexing cavity of [9]mercuracarborand-3 is shown to control the anion selectivity pattern of the optical film. The film exhibits a significantly enhanced selectivity for chloride over a variety of lipophilic anions such as perchlorate, nitrate, salicylate, and thiocyanate. Furthermore, the optical selectivity coefficients obtained for chloride over other biologically relevant anions are shown to meet the selectivity requirements for the determination of chloride in physiological fluids, unlike previously reported chloride optical sensors. In addition, the optical film responds to chloride reversibly over a wide dynamic range (16 microM-136 mM) with fast response and recovery times.

  7. Energy-efficiency of optical network units with vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Elaine; Mueller, Michael; Dias, Maluge P I; Chan, Chien Aun; Amann, Markus C

    2012-07-01

    The energy savings of 10 Gbps vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) for use in energy-efficient optical network units (ONUs) is critically examined in this work. We experimentally characterize and analytically show that the fast settling time and low power consumption during active and power-saving modes allow the VCSEL-ONU to achieve significant energy savings over the distributed feedback laser (DFB) based ONU. The power consumption per customer using VCSEL-ONUs and DFB-ONUs, is compared through an illustrative example of 10G-EPON for Video-on-Demand delivery. Using energy consumption models and numerical analyses in sleep and doze mode operations, we present an impact study of network and protocol parameters, e.g. polling cycle time, network load, and upstream access scheme used, on the achievable energy savings of VCSEL-ONUs over DFB-ONUs. Guidance on the specific power-saving mode to maximum energy savings throughout the day, is also presented. PMID:22772191

  8. Compact photonic crystal circulator with flat-top transmission band created by cascading magneto-optical resonance cavities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Ouyang, Zhengbiao; Lin, Mi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-11-20

    A new type of compact three-port circulator with flat-top transmission band (FTTB) in a two-dimensional photonic crystal has been proposed, through coupling the cascaded magneto-optical resonance cavities to waveguides. The coupled-mode theory is applied to investigate the coupled structure and analyze the condition to achieve FTTB. According to the theoretical analysis, the structure is further optimized to ensure that the condition for achieving FTTB can be satisfied for both cavity-cavity coupling and cavity-waveguide coupling. Through the finite-element method, it is demonstrated that the design can realize a high quality, nonreciprocal circulating propagation of waves with an insertion loss of 0.023 dB and an isolation of 23.3 dB, covering a wide range of operation frequency. Such a wideband circulator has potential applications in large-scale integrated photonic circuits for guiding or isolating harmful optical reflections from load elements.

  9. Preliminary measurement results of biotinylated BSA detection of a low cost optical cavity based biosensor using differential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Peter; Joy, Cody; Bujana, Antonio; Rho, DongGee; Kim, Seunghyun

    2016-03-01

    We report an optical cavity based biosensor using a novel differential detection method for point-of-care applications. Two laser diodes allow for multiplexing capability along with the ability to enhance the responsivity using differential detection. The laser wavelengths are chosen so that the optical intensities of two lasers change monotonically with opposite slopes upon the adsorption of desired biomarkers. The cavity width, PMMA thickness, and silver thickness have been optimized to achieve a large change in scaled differential value. We chose biotinylated BSA detection with Avidin as a receptor molecule to demonstrate the proposed design. Avidin is attached directly to the PMMA layer by physisorption. Then, biotinylated BSA is introduced to the sample and the intensities of the laser diodes are measured by a sCMOS camera. A change in the scaled differential value will correlate to the binding of biotinylated BSA. In this presentation, we will discuss simulation results, fabrication procedures, and preliminary measurement results.

  10. Sub-kilohertz linewidth narrowing of a mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator idler frequency by direct cavity stabilization.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, I; Mosca, S; Parisi, M; Maddaloni, P; Santamaria, L; De Natale, P; De Rosa, M

    2015-10-15

    We stabilize the idler frequency of a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator directly to the resonance of a mid-infrared Fabry-Perot reference cavity. This is accomplished by the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, controlling either the pump laser or the resonant signal frequency. A residual relative frequency noise power spectral density below 10(3)  Hz(2)/Hz is reached on average, with a Gaussian linewidth of 920 Hz over 100 ms, which reveals the potential for reaching spectral purity down to the hertz level by locking the optical parametric oscillator against a mid-infrared cavity with state-of-the-art superior performance. PMID:26469609

  11. Planar-waveguide external cavity laser stabilization for an optical link with 10(-19) frequency stability.

    PubMed

    Clivati, Cecilia; Mura, Alberto; Calonico, Davide; Levi, Filippo; Costanzo, Giovanni A; Calosso, Claudio E; Godone, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    We stabilized the frequency of a compact planar-waveguide external cavity laser (ECL) on a Fabry-Perot cavity (FPC) through a Pound-Drever-Hall scheme. The residual frequency stability of the ECL is 10(-14), comparable to the stability achievable with a fiber laser (FL) locked to an FPC through the same scheme. We set up an optical link of 100 km, based on fiber spools, that reaches 10(-19) relative stability, and we show that its performances using the ECL or FL are comparable. Thus ECLs could serve as an excellent replacement for FLs in optical links where cost-effectiveness and robustness are important considerations. PMID:23443694

  12. Multiphoton resonances for all-optical quantum logic with multiple cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, Mark S.; Garraway, Barry M.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a theory for the interaction of multilevel atoms with multimode cavities yielding cavity-enhanced multiphoton resonances. The locations of the resonances are predicted from the use of effective two- and three-level Hamiltonians. As an application we show that quantum gates can be realized when photonic qubits are encoded on the cavity modes in arrangements where ancilla atoms transit the cavity. The fidelity of operations is increased by conditional measurements on the atom and by the use of a selected, dual-rail, Hilbert space. A universal set of gates is proposed, including the Fredkin gate and iswap operation; the system seems promising for scalability.

  13. A novel approach to a PPM-modulated frequency-doubled electro-optic cavity-dumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    A technique which can provide frequency doubling, with high efficiency, while cavity dumping a laser for pulse position M-ary modulation while being used for an optical communication link is discussed. This approach uses a secondary cavity that provides feedback of the undoubled fundamental light, which is normally lost, into the primary cavity to be recirculated and frequency doubled. Specific operations of the electrooptic modulator and frequency-doubling crystal are described along with the overall modulation scheme and experimental setup.

  14. Cross-correlations and entanglement in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terraciano, Matthew L.

    Every quantum system subjected to measurements is an open quantum system. The cavity QED system is elegant in that it probes the interaction between two quantum systems, the atom and the field, while its loss mechanisms are well understood and can be externally monitored. The study of cross-correlations in cavity QED is important for understanding how entanglement evolves in open quantum systems. As quantum information science grows we need to learn more about entanglement and how it can be quantified and measured. Correlation functions have been used to compare an electromagnetic field (intensity) of one mode with the electromagnetic field (intensity) of the same mode at a later time or different spatial location. In quantum optics, correlation functions have been calculated and measured to probe the nonclassical field that results from the interaction of a single mode of the electromagnetic field and an ensemble of two-level atoms (the canonical cavity QED system). This field can exhibit antibunching, squeezing, and can violate inequalities required for a classical field. Entanglement in the steady state of a cavity QED system cannot be measured directly with traditional correlation functions (Hanbury-Brown and Twiss type experiments). Cross-correlations, however, interrogate directly both modes of the entangled pair, the transmitted (cavity) and the fluorescent (atom) intensities, and can act as an entanglement witness. This thesis presents the implementation of a cross-correlation measurement in a cavity QED system. The work has required the construction of an apparatus that incorporates laser cooling and trapping with quantum optics to carefully control both the external (center of mass motion) and internal (atomic state) degrees of freedom of a collection of atoms that interact with a single mode of a high finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. We examine theoretically and experimentally a new intensity cross-correlation function g2TF t which probes the evolution of the

  15. Optimizing the external optical cavity parameters for performance improvement of a fiber grating Fabry-Perot laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisham, Hisham Kadhum; Abas, Ahmad Fauzi; Amouzad Mahdiraji, Ghafour; Mahdi, Mohd Adzir; Mahamd Adikan, Faisal Rafiq

    2015-04-01

    The effects of the external optical cavity parameters (external optical cavity length ( L ext), amplitude coupling ( C o) and anti-reflection coating (ARC) reflectivity coefficients) on the noise and modulation spectra of a fiber grating Fabry-Perot laser are numerically analyzed for designing a laser that operates in strong feedback regime (Regime V). Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used as a wavelength selective element to control the properties of the laser output by controlling the external optical feedback (OFB) level. The study is performed by modifying a set of rate equations that are solved by considering the effects of external OFB and ambient temperature ( T) variations. We proposed a model to calculate the temperature dependence (TD) of laser characteristics according to the TD of laser parameters. An accurate analytical expression for the TD of threshold carrier density ( N th,fe) has been derived. The TD of N th,fe was calculated according to the TD of laser cavity parameters instead of using well-known empirical Pankove relationship via the use of characteristics temperature ( T o) and current ( I o). Results show that the optimum external fiber length ( L ext) is 3.1 cm. Also, it is shown that ARC with reflectivity value of 1 × 10-2 is sufficient for the laser to operate at low noise, good modulation response, and low fabrication complexity.

  16. Technique for locking a second-harmonic generation cavity with an electro-optic active nonlinear crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar, Claudio L.

    2001-08-01

    A new technique for generating an error signal for locking a second-harmonic generation (SHG) enhancement cavity is presented. The calculations are developed within a linear system framework treated with a Laplace transform. The error-signal generation is based on FM sidebands, but it differs from the Pound--Drever--Hall technique by performing the modulation on the (assumed) electro-optic active nonlinear crystal in the cavity. This new technique for generating the error signal has some advantages over the former one in that (i) the shape of the error signal is independent of the relative phase of the rf signal between the photodiode and the local oscillator; (ii) it provides a handy, high-bandwidth actuator to improve the cavity lock, which can improve the average SHG power; and (iii) it decreases cost and complexity by not requiring an external electro-optical modulator. The specific case of SHG in KNbO{sub 3} is treated as an example of the feasibility of the technique. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  17. Optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a 3.24 μm interband cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Manfred, K. M.; Ritchie, G. A. D.; Lang, N.; Röpcke, J.; Helden, J. H. van

    2015-06-01

    The development of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) has made the strong C-H transitions in the 3 μm spectral region increasingly accessible. We present the demonstration of a single mode distributed feedback ICL coupled to a V-shaped optical cavity in an optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) experiment. We achieved a minimum detectable absorption coefficient, α{sub min}, of (7.1±0.2)×10{sup −8} cm{sup −1} for a spectrum of CH{sub 4} at 3.24 μm with a two second acquisition time (100 scans averaged). This corresponds to a detection limit of 3 ppb CH{sub 4} at atmospheric pressure, which is comparable to previously reported OF-CEAS instruments with diode lasers or quantum cascade lasers. The ability to frequency lock an ICL source in the important 3 μm region to an optical cavity holds great promise for future spectroscopic applications.

  18. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  19. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  20. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  1. Evaluation of ultra-low expansion spacer in the Fabry-Perot cavity with optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šmíd, Radek; Čížek, Martin; Buchta, Zdeněk.; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2012-01-01

    The work presents measurements of the length stability of Zerodur glass ceramic with temperature change. Measurement of this thermal characteristic is necessary for determination of the optimal temperature at which the Zerodur glass ceramic has a coefficient of thermal expansion close to zero. The principle of the measurement is to monitor the length changes using an optical resonator with a cavity mirror spacer made from the Zerodur material to be studied. The resonator is placed inside a vacuum chamber with a temperature control. A tunable laser diode is locked to a certain optical mode of the resonator to monitor the optical frequency of this mode. A beat-note signal from optical mixing between the laser and a stabilized femtosecond frequency comb is detected and processed. The temperature dependence of the glass ceramics was determined and analyzed. The resolution of the length measurement of the experimental set-up is on the order of 0.1 nm.

  2. Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy using a Prism Cavity and Supercontinuum Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Kevin K.; Johnston, Paul S.

    2010-03-01

    The multiplex advantage of current cavity enhanced spectrometers is limited by the limited high reflectivity bandwidth of the dielectric mirrors used to construct the high finesse cavity. We report on our development of a spectrometer that uses Brewster's angle retroreflectors that is excited with supercontinuum radiation generated by a 1.06 μm pumped photonic crystal fiber, which covers the 500-1800 nm spectral range. Recent progress will be discussed including modeling of the prism cavity losses, alternative prism materials for use in the UV and mid-IR, and a new higher power source pumped by a mode-locked laser.

  3. Adiabatic transfer of light in a double cavity and the optical Landau-Zener problem

    SciTech Connect

    Miladinovic, N.; Hasan, F.; Linnington, I. E.; O'Dell, D. H. J.; Chisholm, N.; Hinds, E. A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the evolution of an electromagnetic field inside a double cavity when the difference in length between the two cavities is changed, e.g., by translating the common mirror. We find that this allows photons to be moved deterministically from one cavity to the other. We are able to obtain the conditions for adiabatic transfer by first mapping the Maxwell wave equation for the electric field onto a Schroedinger-like wave equation and then using the Landau-Zener result for the transition probability at an avoided crossing. Our analysis reveals that this mapping only rigorously holds when the two cavities are weakly coupled (i.e., in the regime of a highly reflective common mirror) and that, generally speaking, care is required when attempting a Hamiltonian description of cavity electrodynamics with time-dependent boundary conditions.

  4. Optical reflectance of pyrheliometer absorption cavities: progress toward SI-traceable measurements of solar irradiance.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Heather J; Germer, Thomas A; Zarobila, Clarence J; Cooksey, Catherine C; Yoon, Howard W

    2016-08-10

    We have accurately determined the absorptance of three pyrheliometer cavities at 532 nm by measuring the residual reflectance using an angle-resolved bidirectional reflectometer. Measurements were performed at a normal incidence as a function of the viewing angle and position on the cavity cone. By numerically integrating the measured angle-resolved scatter over both the direction and position and accounting for an obstructed view of the cavity, we determined that the effective cavity reflectance was between 8×10-4 and 9×10-4. Thus, the absorptance of the three cavities ranged from 0.99909±0.00014 to 0.99922±0.00012 (k=2 combined expanded uncertainties). These measurements, when extended over the spectral range of operation of the pyrheliometer, are required to establish SI traceability for absolute solar irradiance measurements. PMID:27534478

  5. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Castaneda, Rene; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas S.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5 M/m). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  6. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  7. MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity SOAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Garrett D.

    Vertical-cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (VCSOAs) are attractive as a low-cost alternative to existing amplifier technologies for use in fiber-optic communication systems such as metro and access networks. In contrast with in-plane SOAs, the surface-normal operation of vertical-cavity SOAs gives rise to a number of advantages including a high coupling efficiency to optical fiber, polarization insensitive gain, the potential to fabricate high fill-factor two-dimensional arrays, and the ability to test devices on wafer. Due to their narrow gain bandwidth, VCSOAs function as amplifying filters. In these devices the inherent spectral filtering of the high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity leads to the elimination of out-of-band noise and results in channel-selective amplification. For multi-wavelength communications systems, it is of great interest to develop widely tunable VCSOAs that can be dynamically adjusted to match the signal wavelength. A promising approach to achieve wide wavelength tuning in VCSOAs is micromechanical, or MEMS-based tuning. Here, mechanical alteration of the effective cavity length gives rise to tuning ranges greater than those that can be achieved via refractive index modulation. This dissertation outlines the development of three generations of MEMS-tunable VCSOAs (MT-VCSOAs), with the initial generation of devices being noteworthy as the first demonstration of a micromechanically-tunable VCSOA. In contrast with temperature tuning, the AlGaAs-based electrostatic actuator used in these devices allows for rapid, low power, and wide wavelength tuning. In the final generation, the MT-VCSOA utilizes a bottom-emitting configuration in which the MEMS-tuning element serves as the high-reflectivity back mirror. By suppressing the variation in reflectance with tuning, this configuration exhibits a two-fold increase in the effective tuning range as compared with the initial generation of devices---with a minimum of 5 dB fiber-to-fiber gain (12 dB on

  8. Efficient optical coupling into a single plasmonic nanostructure using a fiber-coupled microspherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Hideaki; Kitajima, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Yoshito; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    Toward complete coupling between propagating light (PL) and a single localized-surface-plasmon (LSP) nanostructure, we propose a tapered-fiber-coupled microspherical cavity system combining an Au-coated probe tip. This system possesses the unique characteristic of precise adjustability for the fiber-cavity coupling rate and the cavity-plasmon coupling rate, which is indispensable for achieving the critical coupling conditions. We successfully demonstrate the 93% PL coupling into the LSP antenna with an effective area of a 58 nm circle, exceeding the diffraction limit.

  9. A Miniature Fiber Optic Refractive Index Sensor Built in a MEMS-Based Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Wang, Wenhui; Wu, Nan; Zou, Xiaotian; Guthy, Charles; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-01-01

    A small, highly sensitive, and electromagnetic interference (EMI)-immune refractive index (RI) sensor based on the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer is presented. The sensor’s FP cavity was fabricated by aligning two metal-deposited, single-mode optical fiber endfaces inside a microchannel on a silicon chip. The mirrors on the fiber endfaces were made of thermal-deposited metal films, which provided the high finesse necessary to produce a highly sensitive sensor. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques, specifically photolithography and deep dry etching, were used to precisely control the profile and depth of the microchannel on the silicon chip with an accuracy of 2 μm. The RI change within the FP cavity was determined by demodulating the transmission spectrum phase shift. The sensitivity and finesse of the transmission spectrum were controlled by adjusting the cavity length and the thickness of the deposited metal. Our experimental results showed that the sensor’s sensitivity was 665.90 nm/RIU (RI Unit), and the limit of detection was 6 × 10−6 RIU. Using MEMS fabrication techniques to fabricate these sensors could make high yield mass production a real possibility. Multiple sensors could be integrated on a single small silicon chip to simultaneously measure RI, temperature, and biomolecule targets. PMID:22344393

  10. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-04-30

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  11. High-peak-power optically-pumped AlGaInAs eye-safe laser with a silicon wafer as an output coupler: comparison between the stack cavity and the separate cavity.

    PubMed

    Wen, C P; Tuan, P H; Liang, H C; Tsou, C H; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2015-11-30

    An intrinsic silicon wafer is exploited as an output coupler to develop a high-peak-power optically-pumped AlGaInAs laser at 1.52 μm. The gain chip is sandwiched with the diamond heat spreader and the silicon wafer to a stack cavity. It is experimentally confirmed that not only the output stability but also the conversion efficiency are considerably enhanced in comparison with the separate cavity in which the silicon wafer is separated from other components. The average output power obtained with the stack cavity was 2.02 W under 11.5 W average pump power, corresponding to an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 17.5%; the slope efficiency was 18.6%. The laser operated at 100 kHz repetition rate and the pulse peak power was 0.4 kW.

  12. High-peak-power optically-pumped AlGaInAs eye-safe laser with a silicon wafer as an output coupler: comparison between the stack cavity and the separate cavity.

    PubMed

    Wen, C P; Tuan, P H; Liang, H C; Tsou, C H; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2015-11-30

    An intrinsic silicon wafer is exploited as an output coupler to develop a high-peak-power optically-pumped AlGaInAs laser at 1.52 μm. The gain chip is sandwiched with the diamond heat spreader and the silicon wafer to a stack cavity. It is experimentally confirmed that not only the output stability but also the conversion efficiency are considerably enhanced in comparison with the separate cavity in which the silicon wafer is separated from other components. The average output power obtained with the stack cavity was 2.02 W under 11.5 W average pump power, corresponding to an overall optical-to-optical efficiency of 17.5%; the slope efficiency was 18.6%. The laser operated at 100 kHz repetition rate and the pulse peak power was 0.4 kW. PMID:26698707

  13. A novel active optical approach for acceleration measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guangzong; Long, Xingwu; Zhang, Bin; Jin, Shilong

    2012-03-01

    A novel active optical approach for acceleration measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is presented and demonstrated. Applied acceleration causes a change in the refractivity of sensing gas in one of the two cavities, resulting in a beat frequency variation between two orthogonal polarized lights. As a result, this approach produces a modulation of beat frequency strictly proportional to the input acceleration. Preliminary experiments with a 632.8 nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser confirm the validity of the laser sensor. The experimental results show that the laser sensor in this approach characterizes a nearly linear response to the input acceleration, which is a projection of gravitational acceleration. The experimental values of the scale factors are mostly in good agreement with theoretical ones. By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor, an acceleration measurement resolution of 10 -5-10 -6 gravitational acceleration (within ±5 g measurement range) could be expected. Furthermore, we investigate the principle about the sign of the scale factor in detail, and propose a simple but efficient method to distinguish the direction of the acceleration acted on the laser sensor.

  14. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of vibrational polaritons of molecules in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of molecular vibrations to an infrared cavity mode affects their nature by creating dressed polariton states. We show how the single and double vibrational polariton manifolds may be controlled by varying the cavity coupling strength and probed by a time domain two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) technique, double quantum coherence. Applications are made to the amide-I (CO) and amide-II (CN) bond vibrations of N-methylacetamide.

  15. Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of vibrational polaritons of molecules in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-03-28

    Strong coupling of molecular vibrations to an infrared cavity mode affects their nature by creating dressed polariton states. We show how the single and double vibrational polariton manifolds may be controlled by varying the cavity coupling strength and probed by a time domain two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) technique, double quantum coherence. Applications are made to the amide-I (CO) and amide-II (CN) bond vibrations of N-methylacetamide. PMID:27036435

  16. Controllable vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance using an all-optical dispersive cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Lu, Zhen-Kai; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liao, Wen-Te

    2016-10-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) has played a central role in demonstrating the fundamental principles of the quantum world, and in particular those of atom-light interactions. Developing fast, dynamical and non-mechanical control over a CQED system is particularly desirable for controlling atomic dynamics and building future quantum networks at high speed. However conventional mirrors do not allow for such flexible and fast controls over their coupling to intracavity atoms mediated by photons. Here we theoretically investigate a novel all-optical CQED system composed of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sandwiched by two atomic ensembles. The highly tunable atomic dispersion of the CQED system enables the medium to act as a versatile, all-optically controlled atomic mirror that can be employed to manipulate the vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance. Our study illustrates a innovative all-optical element of atomtroics and sheds new light on controlling light-matter interactions.

  17. Controllable vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance using an all-optical dispersive cavity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shih-Wei; Lu, Zhen-Kai; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liao, Wen-Te

    2016-01-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) has played a central role in demonstrating the fundamental principles of the quantum world, and in particular those of atom-light interactions. Developing fast, dynamical and non-mechanical control over a CQED system is particularly desirable for controlling atomic dynamics and building future quantum networks at high speed. However conventional mirrors do not allow for such flexible and fast controls over their coupling to intracavity atoms mediated by photons. Here we theoretically investigate a novel all-optical CQED system composed of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sandwiched by two atomic ensembles. The highly tunable atomic dispersion of the CQED system enables the medium to act as a versatile, all-optically controlled atomic mirror that can be employed to manipulate the vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance. Our study illustrates a innovative all-optical element of atomtroics and sheds new light on controlling light-matter interactions. PMID:27748413

  18. Implementing a quantum cloning machine in separate cavities via the optical coherent pulse as a quantum communication bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng-Zheng; Ye, Liu

    2015-04-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed to implement a quantum cloning machine in separate cavities based on a hybrid interaction between electron-spin systems placed in the cavities and an optical coherent pulse. The coefficient of the output state for the present cloning machine is just the direct product of two trigonometric functions, which ensures that different types of quantum cloning machine can be achieved readily in the same framework by appropriately adjusting the rotated angles. The present scheme can implement optimal one-to-two symmetric (asymmetric) universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) phase-covariant cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) real-state cloning, optimal one-to-three symmetric economical real-state cloning, and optimal symmetric cloning of qubits given by an arbitrary axisymmetric distribution. In addition, photon loss of the qubus beams during the transmission and decoherence effects caused by such a photon loss are investigated.

  19. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne detection of HO2 in the near-infrared range.

    PubMed

    Bell, Claire L; van Helden, Jean-Pierre H; Blaikie, Tom P J; Hancock, Gus; van Leeuwen, Nicola J; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2012-05-31

    Accurate measurements of the absolute concentrations of radical species present in the atmosphere are invaluable for better understanding atmospheric processes and their impact on Earth systems. One of the most interesting species is HO(2), the hydroperoxyl radical, whose atmospheric daytime levels are on the order of 10 ppt and whose observation therefore requires very sensitive detection techniques. In this work, we demonstrate the first steps toward the application of external-cavity diode-laser-based noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) to the detection of the HO(2) radical in the near-infrared range. Measurements of stable species and of HO(2) were made in a laboratory setting, and the possibilities of extending the sensitivity of the technique to atmospheric conditions are discussed. PMID:22591249

  20. Sensitive CH4 detection applying quantum cascade laser based optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lang, N; Macherius, U; Wiese, M; Zimmermann, H; Röpcke, J; van Helden, J H

    2016-03-21

    We report on sensitive detection of atmospheric methane employing quantum cascade laser based optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). An instrument has been built utilizing a continuous-wave distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (cw-QCL) with a V-shaped cavity, a common arrangement that reduces feedback to the laser from non-resonant reflections. The spectrometer has a noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 3.6 × 10-9 cm-1 Hz-1/2 for a spectral scan of CH4 at 7.39 μm. From an Allan-Werle analysis a detection limit of 39 parts per trillion of CH4 at atmospheric pressure within 50 s acquisition time was found.

  1. Striped-double cavity fabry-perot interferometers using both glass and air cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, S; Steinmetz, L

    1998-07-08

    We have used piezo-driven Fabry-Perot interferometers in the past far many continuous velocity-time measurements of fast moving surfaces. In order to avoid the annoying drift of some of these devices, we have developed and used inexpensive, solid glass, striped etalons with lengths up to 64 mm. Usable apertures are 35 mm by 80 mm with a finess of 25. A roundabout technique was devised for double cavity operation. We built a passive thermal housing for temperature stability, with tilt and height adjustments. We have also developed and used our first fixed etalon air-spaced cavity with a rotatable glass double- cavity insert. The rotation allows the referee cavity fractional order to be adjusted separately from that of the main cavity. It needs very little thermal protection, and eliminates the need for a roundabout scheme for double cavity operation, but is more costly than the solid glass version I

  2. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2014-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, we can robustly generate such entanglement and surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement. Supported by DARPA QUASAR and NSERC.

  3. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2015-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, it is possible to robustly generate such entanglement and therefore surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement.

  4. All-optical control of three-photon spectra and time asymmetry in a strongly coupled cavity polariton system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Li, R; Wu, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the nature of photons emission is one of the basic tasks in quantum optics and photonics. The ever growing list of quantum applications requires a robust means of controlling the strongly coupled coherent interaction of photons and matter. Here, we investigate three-photon transmission spectra in a strongly coupled cavity polariton system and show that the correlation functions and transmitted photon stream can be optically manipulated. The dynamics of single photons and photon pairs at the polariton resonances can be changed by light from a single external coupling laser. At the "dark-state polariton," three-photon transmission is a perfectly coherent field in contrast to the strong photon-bunching behavior of a typical cavity quantum electrodynamics system. When the detuned probe light is tuned to the "bright polariton," the light exhibits a dramatic photon antibunching effect. Remarkably, the Fano-resonant asymmetric three-photon transmission caused by the interference between the dressed states leads to a new quantum feature that is strongly nonclassical (the third-order correlation function g((3))(0, 0) ≪ 1) and has a wide and tunable bandwidth. The dependence of the intrinsic third-order correlation and time symmetry of the photon stream on the controlled parameters is also examined. Strongly nonclassical, all-optically controllable multi-photon dynamics are very important for future quantum devices and metrology. PMID:26936334

  5. All-optical control of three-photon spectra and time asymmetry in a strongly coupled cavity polariton system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X.; Li, R.; Wu, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the nature of photons emission is one of the basic tasks in quantum optics and photonics. The ever growing list of quantum applications requires a robust means of controlling the strongly coupled coherent interaction of photons and matter. Here, we investigate three-photon transmission spectra in a strongly coupled cavity polariton system and show that the correlation functions and transmitted photon stream can be optically manipulated. The dynamics of single photons and photon pairs at the polariton resonances can be changed by light from a single external coupling laser. At the “dark-state polariton,” three-photon transmission is a perfectly coherent field in contrast to the strong photon-bunching behavior of a typical cavity quantum electrodynamics system. When the detuned probe light is tuned to the “bright polariton,” the light exhibits a dramatic photon antibunching effect. Remarkably, the Fano-resonant asymmetric three-photon transmission caused by the interference between the dressed states leads to a new quantum feature that is strongly nonclassical (the third-order correlation function g(3)(0, 0) ≪ 1) and has a wide and tunable bandwidth. The dependence of the intrinsic third-order correlation and time symmetry of the photon stream on the controlled parameters is also examined. Strongly nonclassical, all-optically controllable multi-photon dynamics are very important for future quantum devices and metrology. PMID:26936334

  6. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  7. Quantum-enhanced metrology with the single-mode coherent states of an optical cavity inside a quantum feedback loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Lewis A.; Stokes, Adam; Beige, Almut

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we use the nonlinear generator of dynamics of the individual quantum trajectories of an optical cavity inside an instantaneous quantum feedback loop to measure the phase shift between two pathways of light with a precision above the standard quantum limit. The feedback laser provides a reference frame and constantly increases the dependence of the state of the resonator on the unknown phase. Since our quantum metrology scheme can be implemented with current technology and does not require highly efficient single photon detectors, it should be of practical interest until highly entangled many-photon states become more readily available.

  8. Bifurcation to polarization switching and locking in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gatare, I.; Sciamanna, M.; Nizette, M.; Panajotov, K.

    2007-09-15

    We unveil the bifurcations underlying polarization switching and injection locking in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser subject to optical injection. A Hopf bifurcation, not reported for conventional edge-emitting lasers, delimits the injection locking region and influences the polarization switching conditions. We furthermore theoretically show and experimentally observe periodic dynamics at the relaxation oscillation frequency in the noninjected mode together with wave-mixing dynamics in the injected mode. These dynamics precede the polarization switching leading to injection locking and are attributed to a torus bifurcation arising on a two-polarization mode solution.

  9. Fiber-optic ultrasonic hydrophone using short Fabry-Perot cavity with multilayer reflectors deposited on small stub.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Su; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic probe with dielectric multilayer films deposited on a small stub is studied for mega-hertz ultrasonic-wave detection in water. The small stub with a short Fabry-Perot cavity and distributed reflectors is attached on the fiber end. The structure is mechanically strong and withstands intense ultrasonic pressure. Ultrasonic waves at 1.56MHz are successfully detected in water with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The working principle and the characteristics are studied by comparing the ultrasonic sensitivity with that of a conventional piezoelectric hydrophone. The distance response and directional response are also investigated.

  10. Coupling slot-waveguide cavities for large-scale quantum optical devices.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Hiscocks, Mark P; Gibson, Brant C; Greentree, Andrew D; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Ladouceur, François

    2011-03-28

    By offering effective modal volumes significantly less than a cubic wavelength, slot-waveguide cavities offer a new in-road into strong atom-photon coupling in the visible regime. Here we explore two-dimensional arrays of coupled slot cavities which underpin designs for novel quantum emulators and polaritonic quantum phase transition devices. Specifically, we investigate the lateral coupling characteristics of diamond-air and GaP-air slot waveguides using numerically-assisted coupled-mode theory, and the longitudinal coupling properties via distributed Bragg reflectors using mode-propagation simulations. We find that slot-waveguide cavities in the Fabry-Perot arrangement can be coupled and effectively treated with a tight-binding description, and are a suitable platform for realizing Jaynes-Cummings-Hubbard physics.

  11. Evanescent-wave comb spectroscopy of liquids with strongly dispersive optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; Giorgini, A.; Salza, M.; Fabian, M.; Gagliardi, G.; De Natale, P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate evanescent-wave fiber cavity-enhanced spectroscopy in the liquid phase using a near-infrared frequency comb. Exploiting strong fiber-dispersion effects, we show that liquid absorption spectra can be recorded without any external dispersive element. The fiber cavity is used both as sensor and spectrometer. The resonance modes are frequency locked to the comb teeth while the cavity photon lifetime is measured over 155 nm, from 1515 nm to 1670 nm, where absorption bands of liquid polyamines are detected as a proof of concept. Our fiber spectrometer lends itself to in situ, real-time chemical analysis in environmental monitoring, biomedical assays, and micro-opto-fluidic systems.

  12. All-fiber optic endoscope probe distal end for disease diagnosis in body cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murukeshan, Vadakke M.; Sujatha, N.; Seah, Leong K.; Ong, Lin S.

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we present the design of an endoscope probe, which can image the inner cavity walls as well as collect fluorescence emission from the same cavity inner surfaces, for disease diagnosis in body cavities. The probe makes use of a single coherent laser illumination / excitation source for both modalities. An imaging lens at the probe end collects the fluorescence emission as well as the image from the test surface. Two types of imaging lens are used in the probe and their fluorescence collection efficiencies and imaging capabilities are compared with each other. An eyepiece at the end of the probe directs the transmitted light into a CCD camera / Monochromator through selected filters to display the image / analyze the emission spectrum. The developed probe has been tested in a phantom colon model, where cancerous growths and fluorophores are simulated, so as to illustrate the probe diagnostic efficiency.

  13. Compressible fiber optic micro-Fabry-Pérot cavity with ultra-high pressure sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, D N; Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianyi

    2013-06-17

    We propose and demonstrate a pressure sensor based on a micro air bubble at the end facet of a single mode fiber fusion spliced with a silica tube. When immersed into the liquid such as water, the air bubble essentially acts as a Fabry-Pérot interferometer cavity. Such a cavity can be compressed by the environmental pressure and the sensitivity obtained is >1000 nm/kPa, at least one order of magnitude higher than that of the diaphragm-based fiber-tip sensors reported so far. The compressible Fabry-Pérot interferometer cavity developed is expected to have potential applications in highly sensitive pressure and/or acoustic sensing.

  14. Electro-optic harmonic conversion to switch a laser beam out of a cavity

    DOEpatents

    Haas, R.A.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The present invention relates to switching laser beams out of laser cavities, and more particularly, it relates to the use of generating harmonics of the laser beam to accomplish the switching. When laser light is generatd in a laser cavity the problem arises of how to switch the laser light out of the cavity in order to make use of the resulting laser beam in a well known multitude of ways. These uses include range finding, communication, remote sensing, medical surgery, laser fusion applications and many more. The switch-out problem becomes more difficult as the size of the laser aperture grows such as in laser fusion applications. The final amplifier stages of the Nova and Novette lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are 46 centimeters with the laser beam expanded to 74 centimeters thereafter. Larger aperture lasers are planned.

  15. Geometry Effects on Multipole Components and Beam Optics in High-Velocity Multi-Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Deitrick, Kirsten E.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-12-01

    Velocity-of-light, multi-spoke cavities are being proposed to accelerate electrons in a compact light-source. There are strict requirements on the beam quality which require that the linac have only small non-uniformities in the accelerating field. Beam dynamics simulations have uncovered varying levels of focusing and defocusing in the proposed cavities, which is dependent on the geometry of the spoke in the vicinity of the beam path. Here we present results for the influence different spoke geometries have on the multipole components of the accelerating field and how these components, in turn, impact the simulated beam properties.

  16. An Optical Offgas Sensor Network Incorporating a HG Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer and IR Diode Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George P. Miller

    2007-12-30

    A multi-element cavity ringdown system was evaluated with the objective of developing an intelligent sensor network to be incorporated into the control systems for advanced coal combustion facilities. Using a combination of a YAG-pumped dye laser and a tunable NIR/IR laser a dual cavity was constructed and a labview program was developed to provide multi-channel, real-time data to permit the real-time monitoring of typical exhaust emission gases, (for example: CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and mercury) of concern to the next generation of coal-powered facilities.

  17. High efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2005-03-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803~nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency λ = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  18. High-efficiency intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Darrell Jewell; Smith, Arlee Virgil

    2005-02-01

    We have built and tested a highly efficient source of pulsed 320 nm light based on intra-cavity sum-frequency-generation in a self-injection-seeded image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. The four-mirror nonplanar ring optical cavity uses the RISTRA geometry, denoting rotated-image singly-resonant twisted rectangle. The cavity contains a type-II xz-cut KTP crystal pumped by the 532 nm second harmonic of Nd:YAG to generate an 803{approx}nm signal and 1576 nm idler, and a type-II BBO crystal to sum-frequency mix the 532 nm pump and cavity-resonant 803 nm signal to generate 320 nm light. The cavity is configured so pump light passes first through the BBO crystal and then through the KTP crystal with the 320 nm light exiting through the output coupler following the BBO sum-frequency crystal. The cavity output coupler is designed to be a high reflector at 532 nm, have high transmission at 320 nm, and reflect approximately 85% at 803 nm. With this configuration we've obtained 1064 nm to 320 nm optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24% and generated single-frequency {lambda} = 320 nm pulses with energies up to 140 mJ.

  19. Characterisation of energy response of Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters (OSLDs) using cavity theory

    PubMed Central

    Scarboro, S. B.; Kry, S. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) is a common material used in optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters (OSLDs). OSLDs have a known energy dependence, which can impact on the accuracy of dose measurements, especially for lower photon energies, where the dosemeter can overrespond by a factor of 3–4. The purpose of this work was to characterise the response of Al2O3:C using cavity theory and to evaluate the applicability of this approach for polyenergetic photon beams. The cavity theory energy response showed good agreement (within 2 %) with the corresponding measured values. A comparison with measured values reported in the literature for low-energy polyenergetic spectra showed more varied agreement (within 6 % on average). The discrepancy between these results is attributed to differences in the raw photon energy spectra used to calculate the energy response. Analysis of the impact of the photon energy spectra versus the mean photon energy showed improved accuracy if the energy response was determined using the entire photon spectrum rather than the mean photon energy. If not accounted for, the overresponse due to photon energy could introduce substantial inaccuracy in dose measurement using OSLDs, and the results of this study indicate that cavity theory may be used to determine the response with reasonable accuracy. PMID:22653437

  20. Optical coherence tomography based imaging of dental demineralisation and cavity restoration in 840 nm and 1310 nm wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodaran, Vani; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a study of in-house built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a wavelength of 840 nm for imaging of dental caries, progress in demineralisation and cavity restoration is presented. The caries when imaged with the 840 nm OCT system showed minute demineralisation in the order of 5 μm. The OCT system was also proposed to study the growth of lesion and this was demonstrated by artificially inducing caries with a demineralisation solution of pH 4.8. The progress of carious lesion to a depth of about 50-60 μm after 60 hours of demineralisation was clearly observed with the 840 nm OCT system. The tooth samples were subjected to accelerated demineralisation condition at pH of approximately 2.3 to study the adverse effects and the onset of cavity formation was clearly observed. The restoration of cavity was also studied by employing different restorative materials (filled and unfilled). In the case of restoration without filler material (unfilled), the restoration boundaries were clearly observed. Overall, results were comparable with that of the widely used 1310 nm OCT system. In the case of restoration with filler material, the 1310 nm OCT imaging displayed better imaging capacity due to lower scattering than 840 nm imaging.

  1. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy for ultrafast sensing with optical microresonators

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Serge; Lovsky, Yulia; Arazi, Lior; Vollmer, Frank; Dayan, Barak

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy of whispering-gallery mode microresonators has become a powerful scientific tool, enabling the detection of single viruses, nanoparticles and even single molecules. Yet the demonstrated timescale of these schemes has been limited so far to milliseconds or more. Here we introduce a scheme that is orders of magnitude faster, capable of capturing complete spectral snapshots at nanosecond timescales—cavity ring-up spectroscopy. Based on sharply rising detuned probe pulses, cavity ring-up spectroscopy combines the sensitivity of heterodyne measurements with the highest-possible, transform-limited acquisition rate. As a demonstration, we capture spectra of microtoroid resonators at time intervals as short as 16 ns, directly monitoring submicrosecond dynamics of their optomechanical vibrations, thermorefractive response and Kerr nonlinearity. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy holds promise for the study of fast biological processes such as enzyme kinetics, protein folding and light harvesting, with applications in other fields such as cavity quantum electrodynamics and pulsed optomechanics. PMID:25873232

  2. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy for ultrafast sensing with optical microresonators.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Serge; Lovsky, Yulia; Arazi, Lior; Vollmer, Frank; Dayan, Barak

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy of whispering-gallery mode microresonators has become a powerful scientific tool, enabling the detection of single viruses, nanoparticles and even single molecules. Yet the demonstrated timescale of these schemes has been limited so far to milliseconds or more. Here we introduce a scheme that is orders of magnitude faster, capable of capturing complete spectral snapshots at nanosecond timescales-cavity ring-up spectroscopy. Based on sharply rising detuned probe pulses, cavity ring-up spectroscopy combines the sensitivity of heterodyne measurements with the highest-possible, transform-limited acquisition rate. As a demonstration, we capture spectra of microtoroid resonators at time intervals as short as 16 ns, directly monitoring submicrosecond dynamics of their optomechanical vibrations, thermorefractive response and Kerr nonlinearity. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy holds promise for the study of fast biological processes such as enzyme kinetics, protein folding and light harvesting, with applications in other fields such as cavity quantum electrodynamics and pulsed optomechanics. PMID:25873232

  3. Analysis of an electro-optic modulator based on a graphene-silicon hybrid 1D photonic crystal nanobeam cavity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ting; Qiu, Ciyuan; Wu, Jiayang; Jiang, Xinhong; Liu, Boyu; Yang, Yuxing; Zhou, Huanying; Soref, Richard; Su, Yikai

    2015-09-01

    We propose and numerically study an on-chip graphene-silicon hybrid electro-optic (EO) modulator operating at the telecommunication band, which is implemented by a compact 1D photonic crystal nanobeam (PCN) cavity coupled to a bus waveguide with a graphene sheet on top. Through electrically tuning the Fermi level of the graphene, both the quality factor and the resonance wavelength can be significantly changed, thus the in-plane lightwave can be efficiently modulated. Based on finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation results, the proposed modulator can provide a large free spectral range (FSR) of 125.6 nm, a high modulation speed of 133 GHz, and a large modulation depth of ~12.5 dB in a small modal volume, promising a high performance EO modulator for wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) optical communication systems.

  4. Numerical analysis of optical bistability based on Fiber Bragg Grating cavity containing a high nonlinearity doped-fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a new optical bistability devise by using two Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG), in which an erbium-doped fiber (EDF) is inserted to form a nonlinear Fabry-Perot cavity (EDF FBG/F-P). The operation principle of this device is described by the resonant nonlinearity theory combining with the transfer matrix method. The optical bistability behaviors under different parameters are investigated. It shows that EDF FBG/F-P device has an evident merit in reducing the threshold switching power to 7 mW, resulting in a reduction about 6 orders, compared with that of single FBG device. Moreover, the ultra-fast response time about 35 ps is also confirmed.

  5. Circular polarization switching and bistability in an optically injected 1300 nm spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Hurtado, A.; Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M.

    2015-01-12

    We report the experimental observation of circular polarization switching (PS) and polarization bistability (PB) in a 1300 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). We demonstrate that the circularly polarized optical signal at 1300 nm can gradually or abruptly switch the polarization ellipticity of the spin-VCSEL from right-to-left circular polarization and vice versa. Moreover, different forms of PS and PB between right- and left-circular polarizations are observed by controlling the injection strength and the initial wavelength detuning. These results obtained at the telecom wavelength of 1300 nm open the door for novel uses of spin-VCSELs in polarization sensitive applications in future optical systems.

  6. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Cendejas, Richard A.; Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2010-11-30

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm-1 was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 s, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser

  7. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector.

    PubMed

    Cendejas, Richard A; Phillips, Mark C; Myers, Tanya L; Taubman, Matthew S

    2010-12-01

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm(-1) was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 seconds, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser.

  8. Trap-door optical buffering using a flat-top coupled microring filter: the superluminal cavity approach.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, Jacob; Shahriar, M S

    2013-09-15

    We propose and analyze theoretically a trap-door optical buffer based on a coupled microrings flat-top add/drop filter (ADF). By tuning one of the microrings into and out of resonance we can effectively open and close the buffer trap door and, consequently, trap and release optical pulses. To attain a maximally flat filter we present a new design approach utilizing the concept of a white light cavity to attain an ADF that resonates over a wide spectral band. We show that the resulting ADF exhibits superior performance in terms of bandwidth and flatness compared to previous design approaches. We also present a realistic silicon-on-insulator-based design and a performance analysis, taking into consideration the realistic properties and limitations of the materials and the fabrication process, leading to delays exceeding 5 ns for an 80 GHz bandwidth and a corresponding delay-bandwidth product of approximately 400.

  9. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2014-10-01

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 10(5) cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >10(3)); to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high-finesse

  10. Quantum metrology. Optically measuring force near the standard quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Schreppler, Sydney; Spethmann, Nicolas; Brahms, Nathan; Botter, Thierry; Barrios, Maryrose; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2014-06-27

    The Heisenberg uncertainty principle sets a lower bound on the noise in a force measurement based on continuously detecting a mechanical oscillator's position. This bound, the standard quantum limit, can be reached when the oscillator subjected to the force is unperturbed by its environment and when measurement imprecision from photon shot noise is balanced against disturbance from measurement back-action. We applied an external force to the center-of-mass motion of an ultracold atom cloud in a high-finesse optical cavity and measured the resulting motion optically. When the driving force is resonant with the cloud's oscillation frequency, we achieve a sensitivity that is a factor of 4 above the standard quantum limit and consistent with theoretical predictions given the atoms' residual thermal disturbance and the photodetection quantum efficiency.

  11. Lasic -Cavity-enhanced molecular iodine laser frequency stabilization for space projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turazza, Oscar; Acef, O.; Auger, G.; Halloin, H.; Duburck, F.; Plagnol, E.; Holleville, D.; Dimarcq, N.; Binetruy, P.; Brillet, A.; Lemonde, P.; Devismes, E.; Prat, P.; Lours, M.; Tuckey, P.; Argence, B.

    We present work in progress at SYRTE, APC and ARTEMIS aiming at stabilizing the frequency of a Nd:YAG laser using saturated absorption spectroscopy of molecular iodine 127I2. The novel design of the LASIC project allows for robustness and compacity while achieving high-performance phase noise suppression. The project is a follow-up of the laser stabilization work started at Artemis and continued at APC. The use of a low-finesse bow-tie optical cavity around the iodine absorber, combined with an adapted high-frequency modulation of the laser phase -NICE-OHMS technique-yields shot-noise limited saturated absorption signals with cavity-enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Residual fractional frequency instability in terms of Allan Std. Deviation is expected below 10-14 @1s integration time and down to 10-15 over several hours. The compact iodine / cavity design, and performance well above LISA requirements make this project an interesting candidate for the space-based Gravitational Waves detector. We discuss the scientific background and outline of this project within the LISA framework, as well as its potential impact on other stringent technical requirements of the LISA project (e.g. U.S.O. clock-stability, arm-length measurements. . . ). We also present other possible applications for space projects involving interferometry, laser ranging or onboard ultrastable oscillators.

  12. Design study of an optical cavity for a future photon collider at ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemz, G.; Mönig, K.; Will, I.

    2006-08-01

    Hard photons well above 100 GeV have to be generated in a future photon collider which essentially will be based on the infrastructure of the planned International Linear Collider (ILC). The energy of near-infrared laser photons will be boosted by Compton backscattering against a high-energy relativistic electron beam. For high effectiveness, a very powerful laser system is required that exceeds today's state-of-the-art capabilities. In this paper a design of an auxiliary passive cavity is discussed that resonantly enhances the peak-power of the laser. The properties and prospects of such a cavity are addressed on the basis of the specifications for the European TeV Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) proposal. Those of the ILC are expected to be similar.

  13. Simulation of Optical Resonators for Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers (vcsel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Mohy S.; Hassen, Mahmoud F. M.; El-Nozahey, Adel M.; Hafez, Alaa S.; Metry, Samer F.

    2010-04-01

    Simulation and modeling of the reflectivity and transmissivity of the multilayer DBR of VCSEL, as well as inside the active region quantum well are analyzed using the characteristic matrix method. The electric field intensity distributions inside such vertical-cavity structure are calculated. A software program under MATLAB environment is constructed for the simulation. This study was performed for two specific Bragg wavelengths 980 nm and 370 nm for achieving a resonant periodic gain (RPG)

  14. Harmonic distortion dependent on optical feedback, temperature and injection current in a vertical cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazhan, Salam; Ghassemlooy, Zabih; Busawon, Krishna

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, selective optical feedback is used to investigate the nonlinearity behaviours of a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with the modulation signal. A single mode VCSEL with both parallel and orthogonal optical feedback (OF) signals modulated at 1 MHz frequency over a range of modulation depth is investigated. We also investigate the nonlinear characteristics of the orthogonal polarization modes XP and YP of the VCSEL by changing the injection current and temperature. The results show an enhancement in the harmonic distortions (HDs) of both XP and YP modes with parallel OF, and the total suppression of HDs with orthogonal OF. We show that for the VCSEL with orthogonal OF, the second and third harmonic components of the XP and YP modes decrease and reach the noise floor level of the output power spectrum. Additionally, peaks of second and third harmonic components change radically when varying the bias current and temperature. The results reveal that orthogonal OF can be employed as a new tool to improve the linear dynamic range and to control the nonlinear characteristics of the VCSEL, thus making these devices a promising optical source in present and future optical communication applications.

  15. Giant enhancement of optical high-order sideband generation and their control in a dimer of two cavities with gain and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiahui; Li, Jiahua; Xiao, Qian; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Parity-time (PT ) symmetric systems, which rely on the balanced gain-loss condition and render the Hamiltonian non-Hermitian, have provided a new platform to engineer effective light-matter interactions in recent years. Here we explore the high-order sideband features of the output fields obtained from a PT -symmetric optical system consisting of a passive nonlinear cavity coupled to an active linear cavity. By employing a perturbation technique, we derive analytic formulas used to determine the nonlinear transmission coefficient of optical second-order sideband in this structure. Using experimentally achievable parameters, it is clearly shown that the efficiency of the second-order sideband generation can be greatly enhanced in the PT -symmetric dimer, extremely in the vicinity of the transition point from unbroken- to broken-PT regimes. Moreover, we further analyzed the influences of the system parameters, including the photon-tunneling rate between two cavities, Kerr nonlinearity strength, and optical detuning, on the second-order sideband generation. Subsequently we investigate the higher-order sideband output spectrum by numerical simulations, where the sideband amplitude also is largely enhanced in the PT -symmetric arrangement, compared with the passive-passive double-cavity system. Our obtained results provide a new avenue for acquiring optical high-order sidebands and operating light, which may inspire further applications in chip-scale optical communications and optical frequency combs.

  16. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  17. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  18. Overview of NASA Finesse (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) Science and Exploration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, J. L.; Lim, D.S.S.; Hughes, S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Garry, B.; Sears, D.; Neish, C.; Osinski, G. R.; Hodges, K.; Downs, M.; Busto, J.; Cohen, B.; Caldwell, B.; Jones, A. J. P.; Johnson, S.; Kobayashi, L.; Colaprete, A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) project was selected as a research team by NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI is a joint Institute supported by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD). As such, FINESSE is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program to generate strategic knowledge in preparation for human and robotic exploration of other planetary bodies including our Moon, Mars moons Phobos and Deimos, and near-Earth asteroids. FINESSE embodies the philosophy that "science enables exploration and exploration enables science".

  19. Toward a broadband astro-comb: effects of nonlinear spectral broadening in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guoqing; Li, Chih-Hao; Phillips, David F; Walsworth, Ronald L; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-01

    We propose and analyze a new approach to generate a broadband astro-comb by spectral broadening of a narrowband astro-comb inside a highly nonlinear optical fiber. Numerical modeling shows that cascaded four-wave-mixing dramatically degrades the input comb's side-mode suppression and causes side-mode amplitude asymmetry. These two detrimental effects can systematically shift the center-of-gravity of astro-comb spectral lines as measured by an astrophysical spectrograph with resolution approximately 100,000; and thus lead to wavelength calibration inaccuracy and instability. Our simulations indicate that this performance penalty, as a result of nonlinear spectral broadening, can be compensated by using a filtering cavity configured for double-pass. As an explicit example, we present a design based on an Yb-fiber source comb (with 1 GHz repetition rate) that is filtered by double-passing through a low finesse cavity (finesse = 208), and subsequent spectrally broadened in a 2-cm, SF6-glass photonic crystal fiber. Spanning more than 300 nm with 16 GHz line spacing, the resulting astro-comb is predicted to provide 1 cm/s (approximately 10 kHz) radial velocity calibration accuracy for an astrophysical spectrograph. Such extreme performance will be necessary for the search for and characterization of Earth-like extra-solar planets, and in direct measurements of the change of the rate of cosmological expansion.

  20. Toward a broadband astro-comb: effects of nonlinear spectral broadening in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guoqing; Li, Chih-Hao; Phillips, David F; Walsworth, Ronald L; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-06-01

    We propose and analyze a new approach to generate a broadband astro-comb by spectral broadening of a narrowband astro-comb inside a highly nonlinear optical fiber. Numerical modeling shows that cascaded four-wave-mixing dramatically degrades the input comb's side-mode suppression and causes side-mode amplitude asymmetry. These two detrimental effects can systematically shift the center-of-gravity of astro-comb spectral lines as measured by an astrophysical spectrograph with resolution approximately 100,000; and thus lead to wavelength calibration inaccuracy and instability. Our simulations indicate that this performance penalty, as a result of nonlinear spectral broadening, can be compensated by using a filtering cavity configured for double-pass. As an explicit example, we present a design based on an Yb-fiber source comb (with 1 GHz repetition rate) that is filtered by double-passing through a low finesse cavity (finesse = 208), and subsequent spectrally broadened in a 2-cm, SF6-glass photonic crystal fiber. Spanning more than 300 nm with 16 GHz line spacing, the resulting astro-comb is predicted to provide 1 cm/s (approximately 10 kHz) radial velocity calibration accuracy for an astrophysical spectrograph. Such extreme performance will be necessary for the search for and characterization of Earth-like extra-solar planets, and in direct measurements of the change of the rate of cosmological expansion. PMID:20588402

  1. Triple-Resonant Brillouin Light Scattering in Magneto-Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haigh, J. A.; Nunnenkamp, A.; Ramsay, A. J.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    An enhancement in Brillouin light scattering of optical photons with magnons is demonstrated in magneto-optical whispering gallery mode resonators tuned to a triple-resonance point. This occurs when both the input and output optical modes are resonant with those of the whispering gallery resonator, with a separation given by the ferromagnetic resonance frequency. The identification and excitation of specific optical modes allows us to gain a clear understanding of the mode-matching conditions. A selection rule due to wave vector matching leads to an intrinsic single-sideband excitation. Strong suppression of one sideband is essential for one-to-one frequency mapping in coherent optical-to-microwave conversion.

  2. Evaluation of the aero-optical properties of the SOFIA cavity by means of computional fluid dynamics and a super fast diagnostic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engfer, Christian; Pfüller, Enrico; Wiedemann, Manuel; Wolf, Jürgen; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5 m reflecting telescope housed in an open cavity on board of a Boeing 747SP. During observations, the cavity is exposed to transonic flow conditions. The oncoming boundary layer evolves into a free shear layer being responsible for optical aberrations and for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic disturbances within the cavity. While the aero-acoustical excitation of an airborne telescope can be minimized by using passive flow control devices, the aero-optical properties of the flow are difficult to improve. Hence it is important to know how much the image seen through the SOFIA telescope is perturbed by so called seeing effects. Prior to the SOFIA science fights Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations using URANS and DES methods were carried out to determine the flow field within and above the cavity and hence in the optical path in order to provide an assessment of the aero-optical properties under baseline conditions. In addition and for validation purposes, out of focus images have been taken during flight with a Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC). Depending on the binning factor and the sub-array size, the SFDC is able to take and to read out images at very high frame rates. The paper explains the numerical approach based on CFD to evaluate the aero-optical properties of SOFIA. The CFD data is then compared to the high speed images taken by the SFDC during flight.

  3. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  4. Compositional and Optical Properties of Titan Haze Analogs Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry, Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugelow, M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The organic haze that surrounds Saturn's moon Titan is formed through the photolysis and electron initiated dissociation of methane and nitrogen. The chemical pathways leading to haze formation and the resulting haze optical properties are still highly uncertain. Here we examine the compositional and optical properties of Titan haze aerosol analogs. By studying these properties together, the impact of haze on Titan's radiative balance can be better understood. The aerosol analogs studied are produced from different initial methane concentrations (0.1, 2 and 10% CH4) using spark discharge excitation. To determine the complex refractive index of the aerosol, we combine two spectroscopic techniques, one that measures absorption and one that measures extinction: photoacoustic spectroscopy coupled with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PASCaRD). This technique provides the benefit of a high precision determination of the imaginary component of the refractive index (k), along with the highly sensitive determination of the real component of the refractive index (n). The refractive indices are retrieved at two wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, using the PASCaRD system. To yield aerosol composition, quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry is used. Compositional information is obtained from a technique that uses isotopically labeled and unlabeled methane gas. I will present preliminary data on the complex refractive indices of Titan aerosol analogs at both wavelengths, in conjunction with the aerosol composition as a percent by weight of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The correlation of optical and chemical properties should be useful for remote sensing instruments probing Titan haze.

  5. Development of a portable carbon monoxide optical sensor based on an extended cavity diode laser at 1564 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Eva S.; Nic Chormaic, Sile G.

    2003-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a major trace gas pollutant with road traffic being responsible for most emissions. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy will be used to measure CO in vehicle emissions, thereby identifying offenders. A portable device will be constructed, which is capable of measuring CO at concentrations of 10 ppm. Design emphasis is on using low cost commercial components. An extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) will be used offering a narrow line width (¨ 350 kHz) and operated at 1564 nm (near infrared) to allow detection of the CO line R(13). This wavelength has been selected primarily because commercial optics components designed for the telecommunications industry at 1550 nm are readily available and relatively inexpensive. A potential tuning range of 20 nm about the central wavelength for the ECDL also offers potential for detection of other combustion related, gas species in this spectral region using the same diode laser. Novel optical arrangements allowing longer absorption path lengths and hence increased sensitivity of the CO sensor will be investigated. In addition to road traffic pollution measurements, the device will be adapted for use with fibre optic technology, to facilitate air quality measurements in remote locations e.g. stack emissions.

  6. Detection of aqueous glucose based on a cavity size- and optical-wavelength-independent continuous-wave photoacoustic technique.

    PubMed

    Camou, S; Haga, T; Tajima, T; Tamechika, E

    2012-06-01

    Toward the achievement of noninvasive and continuous monitoring of blood glucose level, we developed a new measurement method based on the continuous-wave photoacoustic (CW-PA) technique and performed the first validation in vitro with calibrated aqueous glucose solutions. The PA technique has been studied in the past but exclusively based on the pulse setup since the CW one exhibits dependence on the cavity dimensions, which is not compatible with the final application requirements. This paper describes a new strategy relying on the monitoring of the resonant-frequency relative shift induced by the change of glucose concentrations rather than amplitude signal levels at a fixed frequency. From in vitro results, we demonstrate a stable and reproducible response to glucose at various cavity dimensions and optical wavelengths, with a slope of 0.19 ±0.01%/g/dL. From theoretical considerations, this method is consistent with a relative acoustic velocity measurement, which also explains the aforementioned stability. The proposed method then resolves most of the issues usually associated with the CW-PA technique and makes it a potential alternative for the noninvasive and continuous monitoring of glycemia levels. However, experimental determination of sensor responses to albumin and temperature as two potential interferents shows similar levels, which points to the selectivity to glucose as a major issue we should deal with in future development.

  7. Prototype of an ultra-stable optical cavity for space applications.

    PubMed

    Argence, B; Prevost, E; Lévèque, T; Le Goff, R; Bize, S; Lemonde, P; Santarelli, G

    2012-11-01

    We report the main features and performances of a prototype of an ultra-stable cavity designed and realized by industry for space applications with the aim of space missions. The cavity is a 100 mm long cylinder rigidly held at its midplane by a engineered mechanical interface providing an efficient decoupling from thermal and vibration perturbations. Intensive finite element modeling was performed in order to optimize thermal and vibration sensitivities while getting a high fundamental resonance frequency. The system was designed to be transportable, acceleration tolerant (up to several g) and temperature range compliant [-33°C ; 73°C]. Thermal isolation is ensured by gold coated Aluminum shields inside a stainless steel enclosure for vacuum. The axial vibration sensitivity was evaluated at (4 ± 0.5) × 10(-11)/(m.s(-2)), while the transverse one is < 1 × 10(-11)/(m.s(-2)). The fractional frequency instability is

  8. Polarization switching and injection locking in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers subject to parallel optical injection.

    PubMed

    Quirce, Ana; Pérez, Pablo; Popp, Alexandra; Valle, Ángel; Pesquera, Luis; Hong, Yanhua; Thienpont, Hugo; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-06-01

    Polarization switching in a long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) under parallel optical injection is analyzed in a theoretical and experimental way. For the first time, to our knowledge, we report experimentally a state in which injection locking of the parallel polarization and excitation of the free-running orthogonal polarization of the VCSEL are simultaneously obtained. We obtain very simple analytical expressions that describe both linear polarizations. We show that the power of both linear polarizations depend linearly on the injected power in such a way that the total power emitted by the VCSEL is constant. We perform a linear stability analysis of this solution to characterize the region of parameters in which it can be observed. Our measurements qualitatively confirm the previous theoretical predictions. PMID:27244440

  9. Nonclassical Correlation Dynamics in a System of Mesoscopic Josephson Junction Coupled to Single-mode Optical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shao-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Xi-Xiang; Song, Ke-Hui

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the time evolutions of the continuous-variable entanglement and Gaussian quantum discord in a system consisting of a mesoscopic Josephson junction coupled to a single-mode optical cavity field. We can obtain the time-dependent covariance matrix using known symplectic operation and local canonical transformations. We compare the dynamics of Gaussian quantum discord with that of entanglement. It is shown that the entanglement dynamics of two-mode squeezed thermal state is richer and undergoes three different features: periodical oscillation, sudden death and revival, and no-creation of entanglement, conditioned on the average number of thermal photons in each mode, whereas the Gaussian quantum discord can only exhibit a periodical oscillation behavior during the evolution.

  10. Development of narrow linewidth, micro-integrated extended cavity diode lasers for quantum optics experiments in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luvsandamdin, E.; Spießberger, S.; Schiemangk, M.; Sahm, A.; Mura, G.; Wicht, A.; Peters, A.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2013-05-01

    We present a micro-integrated extended cavity diode laser module for experiments on rubidium Bose-Einstein condensates and atom interferometry at 780.24 nm onboard a sounding rocket. The micro-integration concept is optimized for space application. The laser chip, micro-lenses, a volume holographic Bragg grating, micro-temperature sensors and a micro-thermoelectric cooler are integrated on an aluminium nitride ceramic micro-optical bench with a foot print of only 50 × 10 mm2. Moveable parts are omitted to allow for a very compact and robust design. The laser module provides an output power of more than 120 mW at a short term (170 μs) linewidth of 54 kHz, both full-width-at-half-maximum. The laser can be coarsely tuned by 44 GHz with a continuous tuning range of 31 GHz. The micro-integration technology presented here can be transferred to other wavelengths.

  11. Effect of Pure Dephasing and Phonon Scattering on the Coupling of Semiconductor Quantum Dots to Optical Cavities.

    PubMed

    Jarlov, C; Wodey, É; Lyasota, A; Calic, M; Gallo, P; Dwir, B; Rudra, A; Kapon, E

    2016-08-12

    Using site-controlled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) free of multiexcitonic continuum states, integrated with photonic crystal membrane cavities, we clarify the effects of pure dephasing and phonon scattering on exciton-cavity coupling in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, the observed QD-cavity copolarization and cavity mode feeding versus QD-cavity detuning are explained quantitatively by a model of a two-level system embedded in a solid-state environment. PMID:27563983

  12. Effect of Pure Dephasing and Phonon Scattering on the Coupling of Semiconductor Quantum Dots to Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarlov, C.; Wodey, É.; Lyasota, A.; Calic, M.; Gallo, P.; Dwir, B.; Rudra, A.; Kapon, E.

    2016-08-01

    Using site-controlled semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) free of multiexcitonic continuum states, integrated with photonic crystal membrane cavities, we clarify the effects of pure dephasing and phonon scattering on exciton-cavity coupling in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, the observed QD-cavity copolarization and cavity mode feeding versus QD-cavity detuning are explained quantitatively by a model of a two-level system embedded in a solid-state environment.

  13. Low-photon-number optical switch and AND/OR logic gates based on quantum dot-bimodal cavity coupling system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shen; Ye, Han; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Zhang, Wen; Peng, Yi-Wei; Cheng, Xiang; Liu, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new scheme based on quantum dot-bimodal cavity coupling system to realize all-optical switch and logic gates in low-photon-number regime. Suppression of mode transmission due to the destructive interference effect is theoretically demonstrated by driving the cavity with two orthogonally polarized pulsed lasers at certain pulse delay. The transmitted mode can be selected by designing laser pulse sequence. The optical switch with high on-off ratio emerges when considering one driving laser as the control. Moreover, the AND/OR logic gates based on photon polarization are achieved by cascading the coupling system. Both proposed optical switch and logic gates work well in ultra-low energy magnitude. Our work may enable various applications of all-optical computing and quantum information processing. PMID:26750557

  14. Low-photon-number optical switch and AND/OR logic gates based on quantum dot-bimodal cavity coupling system

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shen; Ye, Han; Yu, Zhong-Yuan; Zhang, Wen; Peng, Yi-Wei; Cheng, Xiang; Liu, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new scheme based on quantum dot-bimodal cavity coupling system to realize all-optical switch and logic gates in low-photon-number regime. Suppression of mode transmission due to the destructive interference effect is theoretically demonstrated by driving the cavity with two orthogonally polarized pulsed lasers at certain pulse delay. The transmitted mode can be selected by designing laser pulse sequence. The optical switch with high on-off ratio emerges when considering one driving laser as the control. Moreover, the AND/OR logic gates based on photon polarization are achieved by cascading the coupling system. Both proposed optical switch and logic gates work well in ultra-low energy magnitude. Our work may enable various applications of all-optical computing and quantum information processing. PMID:26750557

  15. Miniature fiber-optic force sensor for vitreoretinal microsurgery based on low-coherence Fabry-Pérot interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Iordachita, Iulian I.; He, Xingchi; Taylor, Russell H.; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-01-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery requires delicate manipulation of retinal tissue. However, tool-to-tissue interaction forces in the order of sub-millinewton are usually below the human sensory threshold. A surgical force sensor (FS) compatible with conventional surgical tools may significantly improve the surgery outcome by preventing tissue damage. We have designed and built a miniature FS for vitreoretinal surgery using a fiber-optic common-path phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) system where the distal end of the fiber probe forms a low-finesse Fabry–Pérot (FP) cavity between the cleaved tip of the lead-in single mode fiber and the polished back surface of a stainless steel surgical tool tip. To accurately measure the change of the FP cavity length, the cavity is interrogated by the fiber-optic common-path phase-sensitive OCT. The FP cavity was illuminated with a broadband light source, and the interferometric signal was detected using a broadband spectrometer. The phase of the interferometric signal, which is proportional to the cavity length change as well as the exerted force, was extracted. We have conducted calibration experiments to characterize our one dimensional FS. Our result shows that the FS responses linearly to force in axial direction with force sensitivity better than 0.25 millinewton. PMID:24027611

  16. Miniature fiber-optic force sensor for vitreoretinal microsurgery based on low-coherence Fabry-Pérot interferometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Iordachita, Iulian I; He, Xingchi; Taylor, Russell H; Kang, Jin U

    2013-01-21

    Vitreoretinal surgery requires delicate manipulation of retinal tissue. However, tool-to-tissue interaction forces in the order of sub-millinewton are usually below the human sensory threshold. A surgical force sensor (FS) compatible with conventional surgical tools may significantly improve the surgery outcome by preventing tissue damage. We have designed and built a miniature FS for vitreoretinal surgery using a fiber-optic common-path phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) system where the distal end of the fiber probe forms a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity between the cleaved tip of the lead-in single mode fiber and the polished back surface of a stainless steel surgical tool tip. To accurately measure the change of the FP cavity length, the cavity is interrogated by the fiber-optic common-path phase-sensitive OCT. The FP cavity was illuminated with a broadband light source, and the interferometric signal was detected using a broadband spectrometer. The phase of the interferometric signal, which is proportional to the cavity length change as well as the exerted force, was extracted. We have conducted calibration experiments to characterize our one dimensional FS. Our result shows that the FS responses linearly to force in axial direction with force sensitivity better than 0.25 millinewton.

  17. High-finesse sub-GHz-resolution spectrometer employing VIPA etalons of different dispersion.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Kim; Zhang, Jitao; Yun, Seok H; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel configuration of a two-stage virtually imaged phased array spectrometer that enables high-throughput sub-GHz spectroscopy at a high finesse (>750). Two etalons with different free spectral range and different dispersion are arranged in an orthogonal direction and spread the spectrum across two dimensions, with a greatly improved rejection ratio of white-light background noise. A proof-of-concept application for Brillouin spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  18. Optical Measurements of 14CO2 Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David A.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of radiocarbon (14C) provide a unique platform in order to determine the age of a material or alternatively for source attribution between biogenic and petrochemical sources. We describe a cavity ring-down spectrometer which uses an infrared quantum cascade laser to probe the fundamental of 14CO2. This instrument offers one of the highest sensitivities which has been reported in the mid-infrared and has fully automated spectral scanning for continuous data acquisition. Despite the ultra-low abundance of 14CO2 in the atmosphere (1.2 pmol/mol relative to 12CO2) we have been able to rapidly record the 14CO2 transition and determine the origin of carbon dioxide samples. Our experimental approach and future improvements to the instrument will be discussed as well as selected measurement targets.

  19. Optical design and optimization of parabolic dish solar concentrator with a cavity hybrid receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blázquez, R.; Carballo, J.; Silva, M.

    2016-05-01

    One of the main goals of the BIOSTIRLING-4SKA project, funded by the European Commission, is the development of a hybrid Dish-Stirling system based on a hybrid solar-gas receiver, which has been designed by the Swedish company Cleanergy. A ray tracing study, which is part of the design of this parabolic dish system, is presented in this paper. The study pursues the optimization of the concentrator and receiver cavity geometry according to the requirements of flux distribution on the receiver walls set by the designer of the hybrid receiver. The ray-tracing analysis has been performed with the open source software Tonatiuh, a ray-tracing tool specifically oriented to the modeling of solar concentrators.

  20. Three-dimensional cavity cooling and trapping in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Murr, K.; Nussmann, S.; Puppe, T.; Hijlkema, M.; Weber, B.; Webster, S. C.; Kuhn, A.; Rempe, G.

    2006-06-15

    A robust scheme for trapping and cooling atoms is described. It combines a deep dipole-trap which localizes the atom in the center of a cavity with a laser directly exciting the atom. In that way one obtains three-dimensional cooling while the atom is dipole-trapped. In particular, we identify a cooling force along the large spatial modulations of the trap. A feature of this setup, with respect to a dipole trap alone, is that all cooling forces keep a constant amplitude if the trap depth is increased simultaneously with the intensity of the probe laser. No strong coupling is required, which makes such a technique experimentally attractive. Several analytical expressions for the cooling forces and heating rates are derived and interpreted by analogy to ordinary laser cooling.

  1. Interference and dynamics of light from a distance-controlled atom pair in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzner, A.; Körber, M.; Morin, O.; Ritter, S.; Rempe, G.

    2016-05-01

    Interference is central to quantum physics and occurs when indistinguishable paths exist, as in a double-slit experiment. Replacing the two slits with single atoms introduces optical nonlinearities for which non-trivial interference phenomena are predicted. Their observation, however, has been hampered by difficulties in preparing the required atomic distribution, controlling the optical phases and detecting the faint light. Here we overcome all of these experimental challenges by combining an optical lattice for atom localization, an imaging system with single-site resolution and an optical resonator for light steering. We observe resonator-induced saturation of resonance fluorescence for constructive interference and non-zero emission with huge photon bunching for destructive interference. The latter is explained by atomic saturation and photon-pair generation, similar to predictions for free-space atoms. Our experimental setting allows realization of the Tavis-Cummings model for any number of atoms and photons, exploration of fundamental aspects of light-matter interaction and implementation of new quantum information processing protocols.

  2. Design of high finesse, wideband Fabry-Perot filter based on chirped fiber Bragg grating by numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xindong; Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2000-07-01

    The spectral characteristics of a Fabry-Perot spectrometer (filter) formed by a pair of identical linearly chirped fiber Bragg gratings in optical fiber are studied numerically using the characteristic matrix method. The results indicate that based on available techniques and materials, one can fabricate such filters with a finesse as high as 104 and contrast as high as 109 by inscribing a pair of identical linearly chirped fiber gratings. Achieving such superfinesse and contrast in a conventional Fabry-Perot (FP) is very difficult because of fabrication complexities in achieving superflatness at ultrahigh reflectivities simultaneously and keeping them aligned. Our numerical solution also indicates that the spectral characteristics of the fiber FP (FFP) filter can be approximated by that of a classical plane mirror FP (PFP) with a mirror separation of L + (Delta) L, where L is the length of any one of the two gratings and (Delta) L is the separation between the two gratings. This analogous characteristic enables one to estimate time domain and other behavior of an FFP from already established PFP analysis. Thus, miniature FFPs can be used not only to achieve ultralow, crosstalk in wavelength division multiplexing, but they can also be integrated into miniature, hybrid, spectral sensors (such as Brillouin and Raman sensors) where ultrahigh contrast with superresolution is required.

  3. High-resolution and fast-response fiber-optic temperature sensor using silicon Fabry-Pérot cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guigen; Han, Ming; Hou, Weilin

    2015-03-23

    We report a fiber-optic sensor based on a silicon Fabry-Pérot cavity, fabricated by attaching a silicon pillar on the tip of a single-mode fiber, for high-resolution and high-speed temperature measurement. The large thermo-optic coefficient and thermal expansion coefficient of the silicon material give rise to an experimental sensitivity of 84.6 pm/°C. The excellent transparency and large refractive index of silicon over the infrared wavelength range result in a visibility of 33 dB for the reflection spectrum. A novel average wavelength tracking method has been proposed and demonstrated for sensor demodulation with improved signal-to-noise ratio, which leads to a temperature resolution of 6 × 10⁻⁴ °C. Due to the high thermal diffusivity of silicon, a response time as short as 0.51 ms for a sensor with an 80-µm-diameter and 200-µm-long silicon pillar has been experimentally achieved, suggesting a maximum frequency of ~2 kHz can be reached, to address the needs for highly dynamic environmental variations such as those found in the ocean. PMID:25837068

  4. Frequency-induced polarization bistability in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with orthogonal optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Gatare, I.; Panajotov, K.; Sciamanna, M.

    2007-02-15

    We report theoretically on a pure frequency-induced polarization bistability in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) subject to orthogonal optical injection, i.e., the master laser light polarization is orthogonal to that of the slave VCSEL. As the frequency detuning is scanned from negative to positive values and for a fixed injected power, the VCSEL exhibits two successive and possibly bistable polarization switchings. The first switching (from the slave laser polarization to the injected light polarization) exhibits a bistable region whose width is maximum for a given value of the injected power. Such a dependency of hysteresis width on the injected power is similar to that recently found experimentally by Hong et al.[Electron. Lett. 36, 2019 (2000)]. The bistability accompanying the second switching (from the injected light polarization back to the slave laser free-running polarization) exhibits, however, significantly different features related to the occurrence of optical chaos. Interestingly, the width of the bistable region can be tuned over a large range not only by modifying the injection parameters but also by modifying the device parameters, in particular the VCSEL linewidth enhancement factor.

  5. Cooling and manipulation of a levitated nanoparticle with an optical fiber trap

    SciTech Connect

    Mestres, Pau; Berthelot, Johann; Spasenović, Marko; Gieseler, Jan; Novotny, Lukas; Quidant, Romain

    2015-10-12

    Accurate delivery of small targets in high vacuum is a pivotal task in many branches of science and technology. Beyond the different strategies developed for atoms, proteins, macroscopic clusters, and pellets, the manipulation of neutral particles over macroscopic distances still poses a formidable challenge. Here, we report an approach based on a mobile optical trap operated under feedback control that enables cooling and long range 3D manipulation of a silica nanoparticle in high vacuum. We apply this technique to load a single nanoparticle into a high-finesse optical cavity through a load-lock vacuum system. We foresee our scheme to benefit the field of optomechanics with levitating nano-objects as well as ultrasensitive detection and monitoring.

  6. High sensitivity detection of NO2 employing off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy coupled with multiple line integrated spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Gottipaty N.; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    We report on the development of a new sensor for NO2 with ultrahigh sensitivity of detection. This has been accomplished by combining off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) (which can provide large path lengths of the order of several km in a small volume cell) with multiple line integrated absorption spectroscopy (MLIAS) (where we integrate the absorption spectra over a large number of rotational-vibrational transitions of the molecular species to further improve the sensitivity). Employing an external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser operating in the 1601 - 1670 cm-1 range and a high-finesse optical cavity, the absorption spectra of NO2 over 100 transitions in the R-band have been recorded. From the observed linear relationship between the integrated absorption vs. concentration of NO2, we report an effective sensitivity of detection of 10 ppt for NO2. To the best of our knowledge, this is among the most sensitive levels of detection of NO2 to date. A sensitive sensor for the detection of NO2 will be helpful to monitor the ambient air quality, combustion emissions from the automobiles, power plants, aircraft and for the detection of nitrate based explosives (which are commonly used in improvised explosives (IEDs)). Additionally such a sensor would be valuable for the study of complex chemical reactions that undergo in the atmosphere resulting in the formation of photochemical smog, tropospheric ozone and acid rain.

  7. Multistable particle-field dynamics in cavity-generated optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterauer, Dominik J.; Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Ritsch, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    Polarizable particles trapped in a resonator-sustained optical-lattice potential generate strong position-dependent backaction on the intracavity field. In the quantum regime, particles in different energy bands are connected to different intracavity light intensities and optical-lattice depths. This generates a highly nonlinear coupled particle-field dynamics. For a given pump strength and detuning, a factorizing mean-field approach predicts several self-consistent stationary solutions of strongly distinct photon numbers and motional states. Quantum Monte Carlo wave-function simulations of the master equation confirm these predictions and reveal complex multimodal photon-number and particle-momentum distributions. Using larger nanoparticles in such a setup thus constitutes a well-controllable playground to study nonlinear quantum dynamics and the buildup of macroscopic quantum superpositions at the quantum-classical boundary.

  8. Indium phosphide-lattice-matched, long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for optical fiber communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Shigeru

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to realize reliable and practical long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface- emitting lasers (VCSELs) for real optical fiber communications. The approach is to deploy all-lattice- matched structures on InP, which have been already proven to provide high performance, reliability, low cost, and high manufacturability by GaAs-based shorter-wavelength (850-980 nm) VCSELs. AlGaAsSb is a promising material to implement highly reflecting distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) which are lattice-matched to InP. However, the high operating voltage and high thermal impedance caused by the AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb DBRs result in the large temperature rise, preventing CW operation. The primary advance in this dissertation is a double- intracavity contacted structure. This structure allows generated heat and injected current to bypass the Sb- based mirrors, reducing the temperature increase. The device has demonstrated excellent performance such as high maximum output power (>1 mW at 20°C and >100 μW at 80°C) and high maximum operation temperature (88°C) for the 8 μm aperture. The InP-lattice- matched VCSEL fully benefits from the double-intracavity contacted structure in terms of the device temperature, since the measured operating voltage and thermal impedance are comparable with the GaAs-lattice-matched structures. There are several parameters to be improved for the higher temperature and higher output operation. The low injection efficiency results from the small overlap of optical mode and current density profile, which will be increased using two separate oxide apertures for current and optical confinements. The relatively low characteristic temperature of the injection efficiency and threshold current must be improved by optimizing the material quality of the active region.

  9. Phase shift multiplication effect of all-optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in two micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Boyun; Wang, Tao Tang, Jian; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Chuanbo

    2014-01-14

    We propose phase shift multiplication effect of all-optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in two photonic crystal micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system through external optical pump beams. With dynamically tuning the propagation phase of the line waveguide, the phase shift of the transmission spectrum in two micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system is doubled along with the phase shift of the line waveguide. π-phase shift and 2π-phase shift of the transmission spectrum are obtained when the propagation phase of the line waveguide is tuned to 0.5π-phase shift and π-phase shift, respectively. All observed schemes are analyzed rigorously through finite-difference time-domain simulations and the coupled-mode formalism. These results show a new direction to the miniaturization and the low power consumption of microstructure integration photonic devices in optical communication and quantum information processing.

  10. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  11. Narrow linewidth comb realized with a mode-locked fiber laser using an intra-cavity waveguide electro-optic modulator for high-speed control.

    PubMed

    Iwakuni, Kana; Inaba, Hajime; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Takumi; Hosaka, Kazumoto; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei

    2012-06-18

    We have developed an optical frequency comb using a mode-locked fiber ring laser with an intra-cavity waveguide electro-optic modulator controlling the optical length in the laser cavity. The mode-locking is achieved with a simple ring configuration and a nonlinear polarization rotation mechanism. The beat note between the laser and a reference laser and the carrier envelope offset frequency of the comb were simultaneously phase locked with servo bandwidths of 1.3 MHz and 900 kHz, respectively. We observed an out-of-loop beat between two identical combs, and obtained a coherent δ-function peak with a signal to noise ratio of 70 dB/Hz.

  12. Optically tunable Fano resonance in a grating-based Fabry-Perot cavity-coupled microring resonator on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Wangzhe; Yao, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    A grating-based Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity-coupled microring resonator on a silicon chip is reported to demonstrate an all-optically tunable Fano resonance. In the device, an add-drop microring resonator (MRR) is employed, and one of the two bus waveguides is replaced by an FP cavity consisting of two sidewall Bragg gratings. By choosing the parameters of the gratings, the resonant mode of the FP cavity is coupled to one of the resonant modes of the MRR. Due to the coupling between the resonant modes, a Fano resonance with an asymmetric line shape resulted. Measurement results show a Fano resonance with an extinction ratio of 22.54 dB, and a slope rate of 250.4 dB/nm is achieved. A further study of the effect of the coupling on the Fano resonance is performed numerically and experimentally. Thanks to the strong light-confinement capacity of the MRR and the FP cavity, a strong two-photon absorption induced nonlinear thermal-optic effect resulted, which is used to tune the Fano resonance optically.

  13. Tracking Optical and Electronic Behaviour of Quantum Contacts in Sub-Nanometre Plasmonic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, A.; Bowman, R. W.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    Plasmonic interactions between two metallic tips are dynamically studied in a supercontinuum dark-field microscope and the transition between coupled and charge-transfer plasmons is directly observed in the sub-nm regime. Simultaneous measurement of the dc current, applied force, and optical scattering as the tips come together is used to determine the effects of conductive pathways within the plasmonic nano-gap. Critical conductances are experimentally identified for the first time, determining the points at which quantum tunnelling and conductive charge transport begin to influence plasmon coupling. These results advance our understanding of the relationship between conduction and plasmonics, and the fundamental quantum mechanical behaviours of plasmonic coupling.

  14. Precise optical dosimetry in low-level laser therapy of soft tissues in oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena V.; Sabotinov, O.

    2004-06-01

    The new low level laser therapy (LLLT) is widely applied for treatment of diseases of the oral mucosa and parodont. Depending on indication, different optical tips and light-guides are used to create beams with a required shape. However, to the best of our knowledge, the developed irradiation geometries are usually proposed assuming validity of Bouger-Lambert law. This hardly corresponds to the real situation because of the dominating multiple scattering within 600-1200 nm range that destroys correlation between the emitted laser beam and the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose inside the tissue. The aim of this work is to base the dosimetry of the LLLT procedures of periodontal tissues on radiation transfer theory using a flexible Monte-Carlo code. We studied quantitatively the influence of tissue optical parameters (absorption and scattering coefficients, tissue refraction index, anisotropy factor) on decreasing of correlation between the emitted beam and the energy deposition for converging or diverging beams. We evaluated energy deposition for the developed by us LLLT system in a 3-D model of periodontal tissues created using a cross-sectional image of this region with internal structural information on the gingival and the tooth. The laser source is a CW diode laser emitting elliptical beam within 650-675 nm at output power 5-30 mW. To determine the geometry of the irradiating beam we used CCD camera Spiricon LBA 300.

  15. Effects of the reaction cavity on metastable optical excitation in ruthenium-sulfur dioxide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Anthony E.; D'Almeida, Thierry; Low, Kian Sing; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2010-10-15

    We report photoexcited-state crystal structures for two new members of the [Ru(SO{sub 2})(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}X]Y family: 1:X=H{sub 2}O, Y=({+-})-camphorsulfonate{sub 2}; 2:X=isonicotinamide, Y=tosylate{sub 2}. The excited states are metastable at 100 K, with a photoconversion fraction of 11.1(7)% achieved in 1, and 22.1(10)% and 26.9(10)% at the two distinct sites in 2. We further show using solid-state density-functional-theory calculations that the excited-state geometries achieved are strongly influenced by the local crystal environment. This result is relevant to attempts to rationally design related photoexcitation systems for optical data-storage applications.

  16. Tracking Optical and Electronic Behaviour of Quantum Contacts in Sub-Nanometre Plasmonic Cavities.

    PubMed

    Sanders, A; Bowman, R W; Baumberg, J J

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic interactions between two metallic tips are dynamically studied in a supercontinuum dark-field microscope and the transition between coupled and charge-transfer plasmons is directly observed in the sub-nm regime. Simultaneous measurement of the dc current, applied force, and optical scattering as the tips come together is used to determine the effects of conductive pathways within the plasmonic nano-gap. Critical conductances are experimentally identified for the first time, determining the points at which quantum tunnelling and conductive charge transport begin to influence plasmon coupling. These results advance our understanding of the relationship between conduction and plasmonics, and the fundamental quantum mechanical behaviours of plasmonic coupling. PMID:27608825

  17. Tracking Optical and Electronic Behaviour of Quantum Contacts in Sub-Nanometre Plasmonic Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, A.; Bowman, R. W.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmonic interactions between two metallic tips are dynamically studied in a supercontinuum dark-field microscope and the transition between coupled and charge-transfer plasmons is directly observed in the sub-nm regime. Simultaneous measurement of the dc current, applied force, and optical scattering as the tips come together is used to determine the effects of conductive pathways within the plasmonic nano-gap. Critical conductances are experimentally identified for the first time, determining the points at which quantum tunnelling and conductive charge transport begin to influence plasmon coupling. These results advance our understanding of the relationship between conduction and plasmonics, and the fundamental quantum mechanical behaviours of plasmonic coupling. PMID:27608825

  18. Optical nonlinearity for few-photon pulses on a quantum dot-pillar cavity device.

    PubMed

    Loo, V; Arnold, C; Gazzano, O; Lemaître, A; Sagnes, I; Krebs, O; Voisin, P; Senellart, P; Lanco, L

    2012-10-19

    Giant optical nonlinearity is observed under both continuous wave and pulsed excitation in a deterministically coupled quantum dot-micropillar system, in a pronounced strong-coupling regime. Using absolute reflectivity measurements we determine the critical intracavity photon number as well as the input and output coupling efficiencies of the device. Thanks to a near-unity input-coupling efficiency, we demonstrate a record nonlinearity threshold of only 8 incident photons per pulse. The output-coupling efficiency is found to strongly influence this nonlinearity threshold. We show how the fundamental limit of single-photon nonlinearity can be attained in realistic devices, which would provide an effective interaction between two coincident single-photons.

  19. Image-rotating cavity designs for improved beam quality in nanosecond optical parametric oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Arlee V.; Bowers, Mark S.

    2001-05-01

    We show by computer simulation that high beam quality can be achieved in high-energy, nanosecond optical parametric oscillators by use of image-rotating resonators. Lateral walk-off between the signal and the idler beams in a nonlinear crystal creates correlations across the beams in the walk off direction, or equivalently, creates a restricted acceptance angle. These correlations can improve the beam quality in the walk-off plane. We show that image rotation or reflection can be used to improve beam quality in both planes. The lateral walk-off can be due to birefringent walk-off in type II mixing or to noncollinear mixing in type I or type II mixing.

  20. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  1. A simple fiber-optic humidity sensor based on extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity constructed by cellulose acetate butyrate film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Huang, Wo-Bin; Huang, Xu-Guang; Yu, Chang-yuan

    2013-12-01

    A fiber-optic relative humidity sensor with an extrinsic micro Fabry-Perot cavity constructed with a thin layer of cellulose acetate butyrate coated on a fiber end is presented. Its operational principle is based on the relative-humidity-dependent wavelength shift of the interference fringes formed by Fresnel reflections from both interfaces of the thin film. Both the experimental and theoretical analyses are investigated in detail. The experimental data for relative humidity ranging from 8.8% to 88.1% are measured in the both humidification and dehumidification processes, which fits the linear equation very well with a value of R2 = 0.9946. As observed, it shows a high sensitivity of 0.307 nm/%RH with a high resolution of 0.06%. The time-dependent response of the sensor is estimated. The long term stability of the sensor is also addressed with high precision of ±0.03% over 100 min. The proposed relative humidity sensor has a simple, solid, and compact structure.

  2. Spontaneous emission of “polarized” V-type three-level atoms strongly coupled with an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yan-Li; Zhu, Shi-Deng; Li, Jia-Fang; Ding, Wei; Feng, Bao-Hua; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Polarization, an intrinsic ingredient of photon, plays a critical role in its interaction with matter. A general polarization state can be an appropriate superposition of two basic polarization states, say, the vertical and horizontal linear polarized state. Here we study spontaneous emission of a V-type three-level atom (with two upper states close in energy level) strongly coupled with a single-mode damped optical cavity. By defining a general polarization state of atom as a specific superposition of the two upper quantum states, we can prepare atoms with linear polarization at arbitrary direction, left and right circular polarization, and left and right elliptical polarization, similar to photons. We find that the spontaneous emission of light from these “polarized” three-level atoms shows very different profiles of side and axis spectra. This means that the polarization state of three-level atoms can become an active ingredient to manipulate its interaction with light and control the quantum interference effect. Exploitation of the coherent superposition and interference of quantum states in “polarized” atoms would allow one to deeply explore new frontiers of light-matter interaction. Project supported by the National Basic Research Foundation of China (Grant No. 2011CB922002).

  3. Non-intrusive tunable resonant microwave cavity for optical detected magnetic resonance of NV centres in nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Bradac, Carlo; Volz, Thomas; Tobar, Michael E.; Castelletto, Stefania

    2013-12-01

    Optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres is usually achieved by applying a microwave field delivered by micron-size wires, strips or antennas directly positioned in very close proximity (~ μm) of the nanodiamond crystals. The microwave field couples evanescently with the ground state spin transition of the NV centre (2.87 GHz at zero magnetic field), which results in a reduction of the centre photoluminescence. We propose an alternative approach based on the construction of a dielectric resonator. We show that such a resonator allows for the efficient detection of NV spins in nanodiamonds without the constraints associated to the laborious positioning of the microwave antenna next to the nanodiamonds, providing therefore improved flexibility. The resonator is based on a tunable Transverse Electric Mode in a dielectric-loaded cavity, and we demonstrate that the resonator can detect single NV centre spins in nanodiamonds using less microwave power than alternative techniques in a non-intrusive manner. This method can achieve higher precision measurement of ODMR of paramagnetic defects spin transition in the micro to millimetre-wave frequency domain. Our approach would permit the tracking of NV centres in biological solutions rather than simply on the surface, which is desirable in light of the recently proposed applications of using nanodiamonds containing NV centres for spin labelling in biological systems with single spin and single particle resolution.

  4. Low cost, high performance white-light fiber-optic hydrophone system with a trackable working point.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinyu; Zhao, Meirong; Huang, Xinjing; Bae, Hyungdae; Chen, Yongyao; Yu, Miao

    2016-08-22

    A working-point trackable fiber-optic hydrophone with high acoustic resolution is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor is based on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cavity molded at the end of a single-mode fiber, acting as a low-finesse Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. The working point tracking is achieved by using a low cost white-light interferometric system with a simple tunable FP filter. By real-time adjusting the optical path difference of the FP filter, the sensor working point can be kept at its highest sensitivity point. This helps address the sensor working point drift due to hydrostatic pressure, water absorption, and/or temperature changes. It is demonstrated that the sensor system has a high resolution with a minimum detectable acoustic pressure of 148 Pa and superior stability compared to a system using a tunable laser. PMID:27557180

  5. Investigations of soft and hard tissues in oral cavity by spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjarova, Violeta Dimitrova; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Makita, Shuichi; Hori, Yasuaki; Voeffray, Jean-Baptiste; Itoh, Masahide; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Tamura, Masami; Nanbu, Toshiyuki

    2006-02-01

    Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) systems for dental measurements are demonstrated. Two systems have been developed. The first system is fiber based Michelson interferometer with super luminescent diodes at 1310 nm and 100 nm FWHM as a light source. The sensitivity of the system was 106 dB with depth measurement range in air of 2.5 mm. The second systems is a fiber based Mach-Zehnder interferometer with wavelength scanning laser as light source at center wavelength of 1310 nm, wavelength range of 110 nm and scanning rate of 20 KHz. The sensitivity of the system is 112 dB and depth measurement range in air is 6 mm. Both systems can acquire real-time three dimensional (3-D) images in the range of several second. The systems were applied for early caries detection in tooth, for diagnostics of tooth condition after operational tooth treatment, and for diagnostics of the alveolar bone structure. In-vivo measurements were performed on two volunteers. The systems were able to detect discontinuities in tooth and resin filling after tooth treatment. In addition early carries lesion was detected in one of the volunteers. The 3-D profile of the alveolar bone was acquired for first time with non-contact method.

  6. In vivo imaging of functional microvasculature within tissue beds of oral and nasal cavities by swept-source optical coherence tomography with a forward/side-viewing probe

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    We report three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microcirculation within human cavity tissues in vivo using a high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1300 nm with a modified probe interface. Volumetric structural OCT images of the inner tissues of oral and nasal cavities are acquired with a field of view of 2 mm × 2 mm. Two types of disposable and detachable probe attachments are devised and applied to the port of the imaging probe of OCT system, enabling forward and side imaging scans for selective and easy access to specific cavity tissue sites. Blood perfusion is mapped with OCT-based microangiography from 3D structural OCT images, in which a novel vessel extraction algorithm is used to decouple dynamic light scattering signals, due to moving blood cells, from the background scattering signals due to static tissue elements. Characteristic tissue anatomy and microvessel architectures of various cavity tissue regions of a healthy human volunteer are identified with the 3D OCT images and the corresponding 3D vascular perfusion maps at a level approaching capillary resolution. The initial finding suggests that the proposed method may be engineered into a promising tool for evaluating and monitoring tissue microcirculation and its alteration within a wide-range of cavity tissues in the patients with various pathological conditions. PMID:25136490

  7. In vivo microvascular imaging of human oral and nasal cavities using swept-source optical coherence tomography with a single forward/side viewing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    We report three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microcirculation within human cavity tissues in vivo using a high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1.3 μm with a modified probe interface. Volumetric structural OCT images of the inner tissues of oral and nasal cavities are acquired with a field of view of 2 mm x 2 mm. Two types of disposable and detachable probe attachments are devised and applied to the port of the imaging probe of OCT system, enabling forward and side imaging scans for selective and easy access to specific cavity tissue sites. Blood perfusion is mapped with OCT-based microangiography from 3D structural OCT images, in which a novel vessel extraction algorithm is used to decouple dynamic light scattering signals, due to moving blood cells, from the background scattering signals due to static tissue elements. Characteristic tissue anatomy and microvessel architectures of various cavity tissue regions of a healthy human volunteer are identified with the 3D OCT images and the corresponding 3D vascular perfusion maps at a level approaching capillary resolution. The initial finding suggests that the proposed method may be engineered into a promising tool for evaluating and monitoring tissue microcirculation and its alteration within a wide-range of cavity tissues in the patients with various pathological conditions.

  8. In vivo wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of human oral cavity with a forward-viewing probe.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeoreum; Jang, Won Hyuk; Xiao, Peng; Kim, Bumju; Wang, Taejun; Li, Qingyun; Lee, Ji Youl; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2015-02-01

    We report multimodal imaging of human oral cavity in vivo based on simultaneous wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) with a forward-viewing imaging probe. Wide-field reflectance/fluorescence imaging and PS-OCT were to provide both morphological and fluorescence information on the surface, and structural and birefringent information below the surface respectively. The forward-viewing probe was designed to access the oral cavity through the mouth with dimensions of approximately 10 mm in diameter and 180 mm in length. The probe had field of view (FOV) of approximately 5.5 mm in diameter, and adjustable depth of field (DOF) from 2 mm to 10 mm by controlling numerical aperture (NA) in the detection path. This adjustable DOF was to accommodate both requirements for image-based guiding with high DOF and high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging with low DOF. This multimodal imaging system was characterized by using a tissue phantom and a mouse model in vivo, and was applied to human oral cavity. Information of surface morphology and vasculature, and under-surface layered structure and birefringence of the oral cavity tissues was obtained. These results showed feasibility of this multimodal imaging system as a tool for studying oral cavity lesions in clinical applications. PMID:25780742

  9. Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy Using a Broadband Prism Cavity and a Supercontinuum Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Paul S.; Lehmann, Kevin K.

    2009-06-01

    The multiplex advantage of current cavity enhanced spectrometers is limited by the high reflectivity bandwidth of the mirrors used to construct the high finesse cavity. Previously, we reported the design and construction of a new spectrometer that circumvents this limitation by utilizing Brewster^{,}s angle prism retroreflectors. The prisms, made from fused silica and combined with a supercontinuum source generated by pumping a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber, yields a spectral window ranging from 500 nm to 1750 nm. Recent progress in the instruments development will be discussed, including work on modeling the prism cavity losses, alternative prism material for use in the UV and mid-IR spectral regions, and a new high power supercontinuum source based on mode-locked picosecond laser.

  10. Optical Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (OMUT)-- A New Approach for High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayon, Mohammad Amin

    Piezoelectric technology is the backbone of most medical ultrasound imaging arrays, however, in scaling the technology to sizes required for high frequency operation (> 20 MHz), it encounters substantial difficulties in fabrication and signal transduction efficiency. These limitations particularly affect the design of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging probes whose operating frequency can approach 60 MHz. Optical technology has been proposed and investigated for several decades as an alternative approach for high frequency ultrasound transducers. However, to apply this promising technology in guiding clinical operations such as in interventional cardiology, brain surgery, and laparoscopic surgery further raise in the sensitivity is required. Here, in order to achieve the required sensitivity for an intravascular ultrasound imaging probe, we introduce design changes making use of alternative receiver mechanisms. First, we present an air cavity detector that makes use of a polymer membrane for increased mechanical deflection. We have also significantly raised the thin film detector sensitivity by improving its optical characteristics. This can be achieved by inducing a refractive index feature inside the Fabry-Perot resonator that simply creates a waveguide between the two mirrors. This approach eliminates the loss in energy due to diffraction in the cavity, and therefore the Q-factor is only limited by mirror loss and absorption. To demonstrate this optical improvements, a waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator has been fabricated consisting of two dielectric Bragg reflectors with a layer of photosensitive polymer between them. The measured finesse of the fabricated resonator was 692, and the Q-factor was 55000. The fabrication process of this device has been modified to fabricate an ultrasonically testable waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator. By applying this method, we have achieved a noise equivalent pressure of 178 Pa over a bandwidth of 28 MHz or 0.03 Pa/Hz1/2 which

  11. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Thermal analysis of the cavity facet for an 808 nm semiconductor laser by using near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Rao; Guofeng, Song; Lianghui, Chen

    2010-10-01

    In order to analyze the thermal characteristics of the cavity facet of a semiconductor laser, a home-built near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is employed to probe the topography of the facet. By comparing the topographic images of two samples under different DC current injections, we can find that the thermal characteristic is related to its lifetime. We show that it is possible to predict the lifetime of the semiconductor laser diode with non-destructive tests.

  12. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  13. Optically pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at 374.9 nm with an electrically conducting n-type distributed Bragg reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuh-Shiuan; Saniul Haq, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Mehta, Karan; Kao, Tsung-Ting; Wang, Shuo; Xie, Hongen; Shen, Shyh-Chiang; Yoder, P. Douglas; Ponce, Fernando A.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2016-11-01

    An optically pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with an electrically conducting n-type distributed Bragg reflector was achieved at 374.9 nm. An epitaxially grown 40-pair n-type AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector was used as the bottom mirror, while the top mirror was formed by a dielectric distributed Bragg reflector composed of seven pairs of HfO2/SiO2. A numerical simulation for the optical mode clearly demonstrated that a high confinement factor was achieved and the threshold pumping power density at room temperature was measured as 1.64 MW/cm2. The achieved optically pumped laser demonstrates the potential of utilizing an n-type distributed Bragg reflector for surface-emitting optical devices.

  14. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  15. Quantum phases from competing short- and long-range interactions in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landig, Renate; Hruby, Lorenz; Dogra, Nishant; Landini, Manuele; Mottl, Rafael; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-04-01

    Insights into complex phenomena in quantum matter can be gained from simulation experiments with ultracold atoms, especially in cases where theoretical characterization is challenging. However, these experiments are mostly limited to short-range collisional interactions; recently observed perturbative effects of long-range interactions were too weak to reach new quantum phases. Here we experimentally realize a bosonic lattice model with competing short- and long-range interactions, and observe the appearance of four distinct quantum phases—a superfluid, a supersolid, a Mott insulator and a charge density wave. Our system is based on an atomic quantum gas trapped in an optical lattice inside a high-finesse optical cavity. The strength of the short-range on-site interactions is controlled by means of the optical lattice depth. The long (infinite)-range interaction potential is mediated by a vacuum mode of the cavity and is independently controlled by tuning the cavity resonance. When probing the phase transition between the Mott insulator and the charge density wave in real time, we observed a behaviour characteristic of a first-order phase transition. Our measurements have accessed a regime for quantum simulation of many-body systems where the physics is determined by the intricate competition between two different types of interactions and the zero point motion of the particles.

  16. Quantum phases from competing short- and long-range interactions in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Landig, Renate; Hruby, Lorenz; Dogra, Nishant; Landini, Manuele; Mottl, Rafael; Donner, Tobias; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-04-28

    Insights into complex phenomena in quantum matter can be gained from simulation experiments with ultracold atoms, especially in cases where theoretical characterization is challenging. However, these experiments are mostly limited to short-range collisional interactions; recently observed perturbative effects of long-range interactions were too weak to reach new quantum phases. Here we experimentally realize a bosonic lattice model with competing short- and long-range interactions, and observe the appearance of four distinct quantum phases--a superfluid, a supersolid, a Mott insulator and a charge density wave. Our system is based on an atomic quantum gas trapped in an optical lattice inside a high-finesse optical cavity. The strength of the short-range on-site interactions is controlled by means of the optical lattice depth. The long (infinite)-range interaction potential is mediated by a vacuum mode of the cavity and is independently controlled by tuning the cavity resonance. When probing the phase transition between the Mott insulator and the charge density wave in real time, we observed a behaviour characteristic of a first-order phase transition. Our measurements have accessed a regime for quantum simulation of many-body systems where the physics is determined by the intricate competition between two different types of interactions and the zero point motion of the particles. PMID:27064902

  17. A novel instrument for measurements of BrO with LED based Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, D. J.; Buxmann, J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Zetzsch, C.; Platt, U.

    2013-07-01

    The chemistry of the troposphere and specifically the global tropospheric ozone budget is affected by reactive halogen species like Bromine monoxide (BrO) or Chlorine monoxide (ClO). Especially BrO plays an important role in the processes of ozone destruction, disturbance of NOx and HOx chemistry, oxidation of DMS, and the deposition of elementary mercury. In the troposphere BrO has been detected in polar regions, at salt lakes, in volcanic plumes, and in the marine boundary layer. For a better understanding of these processes field measurements as well as reaction-chamber studies are performed. In both cases instruments with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity are necessary. A Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) instrument with an open path measurement cell was designed and applied. For the first time, a CE-DOAS instrument is presented using an UV-LED in the 325-365 nm wavelength range. In laboratory studies, BrO as well as HONO, HCHO, O3, and O4, could be reliable determined at detection limits of 20 ppt for BrO, 9.1 ppb for HCHO, 970 ppt for HONO, and 91 ppb for O3, for five minutes integration time, respectively. The best detection limits were achieved for BrO (11 ppt), HCHO (5.1 ppb), HONO (490 ppt), and O3 (59 ppb) for integration times of 81 min or less. Comparison with established White-System DOAS and O3 monitor demonstrate the reliability of the instrument.

  18. An instrument for measurements of BrO with LED-based Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, D. J.; Buxmann, J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Zetzsch, C.; Platt, U.

    2014-01-01

    The chemistry of the troposphere and specifically the global tropospheric ozone budget is affected by reactive halogen species such as bromine monoxide (BrO) or chlorine monoxide (ClO). Especially BrO plays an important role in the processes of ozone destruction, disturbance of NOx and HOx chemistry, oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and the deposition of elementary mercury. In the troposphere BrO has been detected in polar regions, at salt lakes, in volcanic plumes, and in the marine boundary layer. For a better understanding of these processes, field measurements as well as reaction chamber studies are performed. In both cases instruments with high spatial resolution and high sensitivity are necessary. A Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) instrument with an open path measurement cell was designed and applied. For the first time, a CE-DOAS instrument is presented using an UV LED in the 325-365 nm wavelength range. In laboratory studies, BrO as well as HONO, HCHO, O3, and O4 could be reliably determined at detection limits of 20 ppt for BrO, 9.1 ppb for HCHO, 970 ppt for HONO, and 91 ppb for O3, for five minutes integration time. The best detection limits were achieved for BrO (11 ppt), HCHO (5.1 ppb), HONO (490 ppt), and O3 (59 ppb) for integration times of 81 minutes or less. Comparison with established White system (WS) DOAS and O3 monitor measurements demonstrate the reliability of the instrument.

  19. Quantum correlations of pulses of optical parametric oscillator synchronously pumped above threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averchenko, V. A.; Golubev, Yu. M.; Filonenko, K. V.; Fabre, C.; Treps, N.

    2011-06-01

    The quantum analysis of radiation from a degenerate optical parametric oscillator synchronously pumped above its oscillation threshold is presented. It is shown that pulses of signal and pump fields at the output of the oscillator have the following properties: quantum fluctuations of the fields are independent in each individual pulse, but correlated in pulses of the pulse train with a temporal step multiple of the pulse period. The number of essentially correlated pulses is on the order of the oscillator cavity finesse. Cross-correlations between the pump and signal pulses are established above the oscillation threshold. These correlations lead to a significant quantum effect in the integral characteristics of the fields. A theoretical analysis revealed that the spectrum of field fluctuations measured using a balanced homodyne detection technique of phase quadratures of the fields with a pulsed local oscillator reveals quantum noise suppression in the vicinity of frequencies that are multiples of the pulse repetition rate.

  20. Gain chip design, power scaling and intra-cavity frequency doubling with LBO of optically pumped red-emitting AlGaInP-VECSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Hermann; Mateo, Cherry M. N.; Brauch, Uwe; Bek, Roman; Schwarzbäck, Thomas; Jetter, Michael; Graf, Thomas; Michler, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The wide range of applications in biophotonics, television or projectors, spectroscopy and lithography made the optically-pumped semiconductor (OPS) vertical external cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) an important category of power scalable lasers. The possibility of bandgap engineering, inserting frequency selective and converting elements into the open laser cavity and laser emission in the fundamental Gaussian mode leads to ongoing growth of the area of applications for tuneable laser sources. We present an AlGaInP-VECSEL system with a multi quantum well structure consisting of compressively strained GaInP quantum wells in an AlxGa1-xInP separate confinement heterostructure with an emission wavelength around 665 nm. The VECSEL chip with its n-λ cavity is pumped by a 532nm Nd:YAG laser under an angle to the normal incidence of 50°. In comparison, a gain chip design for high absorption values at pump wavelengths around 640nm with the use of quantum dot layers as active material is also presented. Frequency doubling is now realized with an antireflection coated lithium borate crystal, while a birefringent filter, placed inside the laser cavity under Brewster's angle, is used for frequency tuning. Further, power-scaling methods like in-well pumping as well as embedding the active region of a VECSEL between two transparent ic heaspreaders are under investigation.

  1. Generation of an optical Schrödinger-cat-like state in a nonideal cavity by injecting opposite-phase atomic dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Daeho; Kim, Junki; Lee, Moonjoo; Chough, Young-Tak; An, Kyungwon

    2016-08-01

    We propose a method for generating an optical Schrödinger-cat-like state in a cavity in a substantial decoherence regime. Even when the cavity decay rate is considerably large, a cat-like state can be generated in a laser-like setting if the gain for the field is larger than the loss. Under the condition that opposite-phase atomic dipoles repeatedly traverse the cavity, the cavity field converges to a squeezed vacuum state in a steady state. A Schrödinger-cat-like state is then generated when a single photon decay occurs. The phase-space distribution of the cat state can be revealed in homodyne detection by using the decaying photon as a herald event. Quantum trajectory simulation was used to identify the conditions for the Schrödinger-cat-like state formation as well as to analyze the properties of those states. Based on these simulations, possible experiments are proposed within the reach of the current technology.

  2. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, B.; McClung, A.; Schüppert, K.; Casabone, B.; Friebe, K.; Stute, A.; Schmidt, P. O.; Deutsch, C.; Reichel, J.; Blatt, R.; Northup, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  3. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Brandstätter, B. Schüppert, K.; Casabone, B.; Friebe, K.; Stute, A.; Northup, T. E.; McClung, A.; Schmidt, P. O.; Deutsch, C.; Reichel, J.

    2013-12-15

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  4. Pulsed blue laser at 491 nm by nonlinear cavity dumping.

    PubMed

    Herault, Emilie; Lelek, Mickaël; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2008-11-24

    A nonlinear cavity dumping process is applied for the first time to generate kW peak power pulses at 491 nm. The system is based on efficient sum-frequency mixing of 1063 nm and 912 nm radiations in a BiBO nonlinear crystal placed inside a Nd:GdVO4 laser oscillator with a high finesse cavity at 912 nm. The nonlinear cavity dumping process is triggered by high peak power nanosecond pulses from a 1063 nm Q-switched Nd:GdVO4 laser operating at 10 kHz. To reach the kW range at 491 nm a key point is to Q-switch the high finesse 912 nm cavity instead of continuous wave operation. Thus, the peak power (9.3 kW for 3 ns pulses) and the average power (280 mW) obtained at 491 nm are 14 times higher than the one obtained when the 912 nm laser operated in continuous wave. PMID:19030029

  5. Analytical theory for the nonlinear optical response of a Kerr-type standing-wave cavity side-coupling to a MIM waveguide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhou, Fei; Mao, Qinghe

    2013-10-01

    In this article, an analytical theory to describe the nonlinear dynamic response characteristics of a typical SPP waveguide-cavity structure formed by a Kerr-type standing-wave cavity side-coupling to a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide is proposed by combining the temporal coupled mode theory and the Kerr nonlinearity. With the analytical theory, the optical bistability with the hysteresis behavior is successfully predicted, and the optical bistability evolutions and its dynamic physical mechanism are also phenomenologically analyzed. Moreover, the influence of the quality factors Q₀ and Q₁ on the first-turnning point (FTP) power of optical bistability and the bistable region width, the approaches to decrease the FTP power and to broaden the bistable region are also discussed in detail with our analytical theory. This work can help us understand the physical mechanism of the nonlinear dynamical response at nanoscale, and may be useful to design nonlinear nanophotonic systems for applications in ultra-compact all-optical devices and storages.

  6. Cavity mode frequencies and strong optomechanical coupling in two-membrane cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Xuereb, André; Malossi, Nicola; Vitali, David

    2016-08-01

    We study the cavity mode frequencies of a Fabry-Pérot cavity containing two vibrating dielectric membranes. We derive the equations for the mode resonances and provide approximate analytical solutions for them as a function of the membrane positions, which act as an excellent approximation when the relative and center-of-mass position of the two membranes are much smaller than the cavity length. With these analytical solutions, one finds that extremely large optomechanical coupling of the membrane relative motion can be achieved in the limit of highly reflective membranes when the two membranes are placed very close to a resonance of the inner cavity formed by them. We also study the cavity finesse of the system and verify that, under the conditions of large coupling, it is not appreciably affected by the presence of the two membranes. The achievable large values of the ratio between the optomechanical coupling and the cavity decay rate, g/κ , make this two-membrane system the simplest promising platform for implementing cavity optomechanics in the strong coupling regime.

  7. Diffraction loss analysis of a plane-parallel optical cavity with a phase step and a slit aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalviste, Erko

    2012-06-01

    A model for calculating the round trip diffraction loss in a plane-mirror cavity with an intracavity phase step and an infinite slit aperture is developed. The round trip remaining intensity fraction for the low order transverse cavity modes can be calculated for any given location of the slit aperture and the phase step along the cavity and for any given phase delay on the phase step. The diffraction loss on the slit aperture is found to be a periodic function of the phase delay on the phase step. Transformation of the lasing spectrum emitted from a broadband pulsed dye laser on moving the phase step along the oscillator cavity is reproduced theoretically. The lasing spectrum affected by the phase step is interpreted as the wavelength dependence of the remaining intensity fraction for the principal transverse mode.

  8. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  9. AFM-based measurement of the mechanical properties of thin polymer films and determination of the optical path length of nearly index-matched cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieland, Christopher F.

    2008-10-01

    Two technologies, immersion and imprint lithography, represent important stepping stones for the development of the next generation of lithography tools. However, although the two approaches offer important advantages, both pose many significant technological challenges that must be overcome before they can be successfully implemented. For imprint lithography, special care must be taken when choosing an etch barrier because studies have indicated that some physical material properties may be size dependent. Additionally, regarding immersion lithography, proper image focus requires that the optical path length between the lens and substrate be maintained during the entire writing process. The work described in this document was undertaken to address the two challenges described above. A new mathematical model was developed and used in conjunction with AFM nano-indentation techniques to measure the elastic modulus of adhesive, thin polymer films as a function of the film thickness. It was found that the elastic modulus of the polymer tested did not change appreciably from the value determined using bulk measurement techniques in the thickness range probed. Additionally, a method for monitoring and controlling the optical path length within the gap of a nearly index-matching cavity based on coherent broadband interference was developed. In this method, the spectrum reflected for a cavity illuminated with a modelocked Ti:Sapphire laser was collected and analyzed using Fourier techniques. It was found that this method could determine the optical path length of the cavity, quickly and accurately enough to control a servo-based feedback system to correct deviations in the optical path length in real time when coupled with special computation techniques that minimized unnecessary operations.

  10. Control of emitted light polarization in a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-vertical cavity surface emitting laser subject to circularly polarized optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Alharthi, S. S. Hurtado, A.; Al Seyab, R. K.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.; Korpijarvi, V.-M.; Guina, M.

    2014-11-03

    We experimentally demonstrate the control of the light polarization emitted by a 1310 nm dilute nitride spin-Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) at room temperature. This is achieved by means of a combination of polarized optical pumping and polarized optical injection. Without external injection, the polarization of the optical pump controls that of the spin-VCSEL. However, the addition of the externally injected signal polarized with either left- (LCP) or right-circular polarization (RCP) is able to control the polarization of the spin-VCSEL switching it at will to left- or right-circular polarization. A numerical model has been developed showing a very high degree of agreement with the experimental findings.

  11. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Measurements of Electric Propulsion Device Life Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalin, Azer

    2004-11-01

    For many electric propulsion devices, wear due to sputter erosion is the primary determinant of device lifetime. As progressively longer electric propulsion missions are being considered, the need for accelerated lifetime assessments is becoming increasingly acute. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) is an ultra-sensitive laser based absorption technique capable of measuring very low particle number densities, and is thus potentially well suited to this need. In CRDS, the absorbing sample (in this case sputtered material) is housed within a high finesse optical cavity, and the decay rate of light within the cavity is recorded, from which the sample number density can be inferred. We have recently developed CRDS as a diagnostic to quantify sputter erosion. Initial demonstrations of the technique have involved measuring the number density of sputtered molybdenum and titanium. In terms of assessing erosion, a very germane quantity is the flux of sputtered particles, which requires knowledge of both particle number density and velocity. The latter may be found from sputter modeling or other measurement techniques such as laser induced fluorescence, but we are also exploring the use of CRDS to infer particle velocity. Our CRDS velocity measurement approach is based on Doppler effects (shifts and broadenings) in the measured spectral lineshape. In this submission we detail the status of our recent CRDS research to study wear erosion by sputtering. We present results of number density measurements of sputtered particles, including comparisons with a simple sputter model. We discuss progress on velocity measurements. In order to address implementation strategies for using CRDS to study actual EP devices, we also present proposed testing schemes for thrusters including numerical modeling of expected signals for various materials of interest.

  12. Coherent coupling between a molecular vibration and Fabry-Perot optical cavity to give hybridized states in the strong coupling limit (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, James P.; Owrutsky, Jeff C.; Fears, Kenan P.; Dressick, Walter J.; Dunkelberger, Adam D.; Compton, Ryan; Spann, Bryan; Simpkins, Blake S.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent coupling between an optical-transition and confined optical mode, when sufficiently strong, gives rise to new modes separated by the vacuum Rabi splitting. Such systems have been investigated for electronic-state transitions, however, only very recently have vibrational transitions been considered. Here, we bring strong polaritonic-coupling in cavities from the visible into the infrared where a new range of static and dynamic vibrational processes await investigation. First, we experimentally and numerically describe coupling between a Fabry-Perot cavity and carbonyl stretch (~1730 cm 1) in poly-methylmethacrylate. As is requisite for "strong coupling", the measured vacuum Rabi splitting of 132 cm 1 is much larger than the full width of the cavity (34 cm-1) and the inhomogeneously broadened carbonyl-stretch (24 cm-1). Agreement with classical theories providea evidence that the mixed-states are relatively immune to inhomogeneous broadening. Next, we investigate strong and weak coupling regimes through examination of cavities loaded with varying concentrations of urethane. Rabi splittings increases from 0 to ~104 cm-1 with concentrations from 0-20 vol% and are in excellent agreement to an analytical description using no fitting parameters. Ultra-fast pump-probe measurements reveal transient absorption signals over a frequency range well-separated from the vibrational band as well as modifications of energy relaxation times. Finally, we demonstrate coupling to liquids using the C-O stretching band (~1985 cm-1) of Mo(CO)6 in an aqueous solution. Opening the field of polaritonic coupling to vibrational species promises to be a rich arena amenable to a wide variety of infrared-active bonds that can be studied statically and dynamically.

  13. Optical cavity and electron beam requirements for the operation of a 1.5 {angstrom} LCLS in a regenerative amplifier mode

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.

    1995-12-31

    Current conceptual designs for Linac Coherent Light Sources (LCLSs) in the 100-1 {angstrom} wavelength range are based on Free Electron Lasers (FELs) that are designed to saturate in a single pass of the electron beam through the undulator. This, in practice, leads to insertion devices several tens of meters in length, which greatly dominates the component costs of the overall LCLS system. Although it is well known that amplification within a cavity would enable much shorter and more economical undulators to be employed, two major practical problems are currently adduced to discount the use of such configurations in the sub-100 {angstrom} wavelength regime: (1) the temporal jitter of the (sub-picosecond) electron bunches required for such FELs can be comparable to or larger that the durations of the bunches themselves, rendering reliable synchronization extremely difficult, and (2) the lack of optical elements of sufficient reflectivity and bandwidth out of which adequately efficient optical cavities can be constructed. In this paper we reasssess the requirements associated with these two aspects of x-ray optics as a possible approach to resolving or making more tractable the resolution of some of the basic problems involved.

  14. Time-delay signatures in multi-transverse mode VCSELs subject to double-cavity polarization-rotated optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Khurram, Aliza; Hong, Yanhua

    2016-10-01

    Time delay (TD) signatures are studied experimentally in orthogonal polarizations and in individual transverse modes respectively in a VCSEL operating with three transverse modes. Different types of concealment of the TD signatures are observed when the polarization of feedback is rotated through large angles. Effects of feedback strength and external cavity length on the TD signatures are investigated. Weak feedback leads to better concealment of the TD signatures in the dominant polarization. When the round-trip time difference between the two external cavities is close to a half of the relaxation oscillation period, the TD signatures are minimized.

  15. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms.

    PubMed

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B R; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single ^{87}Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics.

  16. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms.

    PubMed

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B R; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single ^{87}Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics. PMID:27447506

  17. Quantum Logic with Cavity Photons From Single Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleczek, Annemarie; Barter, Oliver; Rubenok, Allison; Dilley, Jerome; Nisbet-Jones, Peter B. R.; Langfahl-Klabes, Gunnar; Marshall, Graham D.; Sparrow, Chris; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Poulios, Konstantinos; Kuhn, Axel; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate quantum logic using narrow linewidth photons that are produced with an a priori nonprobabilistic scheme from a single 87Rb atom strongly coupled to a high-finesse cavity. We use a controlled-not gate integrated into a photonic chip to entangle these photons, and we observe nonclassical correlations between photon detection events separated by periods exceeding the travel time across the chip by 3 orders of magnitude. This enables quantum technology that will use the properties of both narrow-band single photon sources and integrated quantum photonics.

  18. Characterization of cavity wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, James A.

    Scope and Method of Study. This research focused on flow over deep cavities at subsonic speeds with emphasis on the wake downstream of the cavity. Cavity wake behaviors have not been studied in detail and are a major concern for air vehicles with cavities and in particular for optical sensor systems installed in cavities. Other key behaviors for sensor survival and performance are cavity resonance and turbulence scales in the shear layer. A wind tunnel test apparatus was developed to explore cavity and wake characteristics. It consisted of a test section insert for the OSU Indraft Wind Tunnel with an additional contraction cone for significantly increased speed. The test section included a variable depth cavity in a boundary layer splitter plate/fairing assembly, a Y-Z traverse and pitot rake with in-situ pressure transducers for high frequency response. Flows were measured over clean cavities with length to depth (L/D) ratios of 4 to 1/2 and on cavities with a porous fence for resonance suppression. Measurements were taken in streamwise and cross-stream sections to three cavity lengths downstream of the cavity trailing edge. Flow visualization using laser sheet and smoke injection was also used. Findings and Conclusions. The high speed insert demonstrated a significant new capability for the OSU wind tunnel, reaching speeds of 0.35 Mach (390 feet/second) in a 14"x14" test section. Inlet room flow was found to be quite unsteady and recommendations are made for improved flow and quantitative visualization. Key findings for cavity wake flow include its highly three dimensional nature with asymmetric peaks in cross section with boundary layer thicknesses and integral length scales several times that of a normal flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Turbulent intensities (TI) of 35% to 55% of freestream speeds were measured for the clean configuration. Fence configuration TI's were 20% to 35% of free stream and, in both configurations, TI's decayed to

  19. External cavity laser using a InAs quantum dot gain chip and an arrayed-waveguide grating for T-band optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibutani, Hideki; Tomomatsu, Yasunori; Sawado, Yoshinori; Yoshizawa, Katsumi; Asakura, Hideaki; Idris, Nazirul Afham; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    Utilizing T-band (1000 nm to 1260 nm) for optical communications is promising for short reach, and large capacity networks, such as data centers or access networks. It is feasible to use this with low-cost coarse wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). However, a tunable wavelength light source is necessary for such applications. In this paper, we propose a new configuration for an external cavity laser, which uses a silica-based arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) for the wavelength selecting element. The external cavity laser consists of a gain chip with high reflection (HR) and anti-reflection (AR) coated facets, coupling lenses, an AWG with AR/HR coatings, and an output fiber. The AWG has 17 connection ports, which correspond to 17 wavelengths with a channel spacing of 1.67 nm. The width of the connection port waveguides was optimized to achieve high coupling efficiency. The AWG chip size is 15 mm x 30 mm. The active layer in the gain chip has InAs quantum dots. The spontaneous emission 3-dB bandwidth was 48 nm (1108 nm to 1156 nm) when a current of 150 mA was injected into the gain chip. The lasing wavelength of the external cavity laser was successfully tuned from 1129.9 nm to 1154.4 nm by selecting the connection ports of the AWG. The typical threshold current was about 130 mA.

  20. High-precision, high-accuracy ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography using vertical cavity surface emitting laser light source.

    PubMed

    Grulkowski, Ireneusz; Liu, Jonathan J; Potsaid, Benjamin; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Jiang, James; Fujimoto, James G; Cable, Alex E

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using vertical cavity surface emitting laser technology. The ability to adjust laser parameters and high-speed acquisition enables imaging ranges from a few centimeters up to meters using the same instrument. We discuss the challenges of long-range OCT imaging. In vivo human-eye imaging and optical component characterization are presented. The precision and accuracy of OCT-based measurements are assessed and are important for ocular biometry and reproducible intraocular distance measurement before cataract surgery. Additionally, meter-range measurement of fiber length and multicentimeter-range imaging are reported. 3D visualization supports a class of industrial imaging applications of OCT.