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Sample records for finger gene dnmt3l

  1. Dnmt3L antagonizes DNA methylation at bivalent promoters and favors DNA methylation at gene bodies in ESCs.

    PubMed

    Neri, Francesco; Krepelova, Anna; Incarnato, Danny; Maldotti, Mara; Parlato, Caterina; Galvagni, Federico; Matarese, Filomena; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2013-09-26

    The de novo DNA methyltransferase 3-like (Dnmt3L) is a catalytically inactive DNA methyltransferase that cooperates with Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b to methylate DNA. Dnmt3L is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but its function in these cells is unknown. Through genome-wide analysis of Dnmt3L knockdown in ESCs, we found that Dnmt3L is a positive regulator of methylation at the gene bodies of housekeeping genes and, more surprisingly, is also a negative regulator of methylation at promoters of bivalent genes. Dnmt3L is required for the differentiation of ESCs into primordial germ cells (PGCs) through the activation of the homeotic gene Rhox5. We demonstrate that Dnmt3L interacts with the Polycomb PRC2 complex in competition with the DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b to maintain low methylation levels at the H3K27me3 regions. Thus, in ESCs, Dnmt3L counteracts the activity of de novo DNA methylases to maintain hypomethylation at promoters of bivalent developmental genes.

  2. The CpG island encompassing the promoter and first exon of human DNMT3L gene is a PcG/TrX response element (PRE).

    PubMed

    Basu, Amitava; Dasari, Vasanthi; Mishra, Rakesh K; Khosla, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    DNMT3L, a member of DNA methyltransferases family, is present only in mammals. As it provides specificity to the action of de novo methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B and interacts with histone H3, DNMT3L has been invoked as the molecule that can read the histone code and translate it into DNA methylation. It plays an important role in the initiation of genomic imprints during gametogenesis and in nuclear reprogramming. With important functions attributed to it, it is imperative that the DNMT3L expression is tightly controlled. Previously, we had identified a CpG island within the human DNMT3L promoter and first exon that showed loss of DNA methylation in cancer samples. Here we show that this Differentially Methylated CpG island within DNMT3L (DNMT3L DMC) acts to repress transcription, is a Polycomb/Trithorax Response Element (PRE) and interacts with both PRC1 and PRC2 Polycomb repressive complexes. In addition, it adopts inactive chromatin conformation and is associated with other inactive chromatin-specific proteins like SUV39H1 and HP1. The presence of DNMT3L DMC also influences the adjacent promoter to adopt repressive histone post-translational modifications. Due to its association with multiple layers of repressive epigenetic modifications, we believe that PRE within the DNMT3L DMC is responsible for the tight regulation of DNMT3L expression and the aberrant epigenetic modifications of this region leading to DNMT3L overexpression could be the reason of nuclear programming during carcinogenesis.

  3. DNMT3L enables accumulation and inheritance of epimutations in transgenic Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amitava; Tomar, Archana; Dasari, Vasanthi; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Khosla, Sanjeev

    2016-01-22

    DNMT3L is an important epigenetic regulator in mammals, integrating DNA methylation and histone modification based epigenetic circuits. Here we show DNMT3L to be a part of the machinery that enables inheritance of epigenetic modifications from one generation to the next. Ectopic expression of DNMT3L in Drosophila, which lacks DNMT3L and its normal interacting partners DNMT3A and DNMT3B, lead to nuclear reprogramming that was gradual and progressive, resulting in melanotic tumors that were observed only when these flies were maintained for five generations. This global gene expression misregulation was accompanied by aberrations in the levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3, globally as well as at specific gene promoters. The levels of these epigenetic aberrations (epimutations) also increased progressively across successive generations. The accumulation and inheritance of epimutations across multiple generations recapitulates the important role of DNMT3L in intergenerational epigenetic inheritance in mammals.

  4. DNMT3L enables accumulation and inheritance of epimutations in transgenic Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Amitava; Tomar, Archana; Dasari, Vasanthi; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar; Khosla, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    DNMT3L is an important epigenetic regulator in mammals, integrating DNA methylation and histone modification based epigenetic circuits. Here we show DNMT3L to be a part of the machinery that enables inheritance of epigenetic modifications from one generation to the next. Ectopic expression of DNMT3L in Drosophila, which lacks DNMT3L and its normal interacting partners DNMT3A and DNMT3B, lead to nuclear reprogramming that was gradual and progressive, resulting in melanotic tumors that were observed only when these flies were maintained for five generations. This global gene expression misregulation was accompanied by aberrations in the levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3, globally as well as at specific gene promoters. The levels of these epigenetic aberrations (epimutations) also increased progressively across successive generations. The accumulation and inheritance of epimutations across multiple generations recapitulates the important role of DNMT3L in intergenerational epigenetic inheritance in mammals. PMID:26795243

  5. Sirt1 Regulates DNA Methylation and Differentiation Potential of Embryonic Stem Cells by Antagonizing Dnmt3l.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinbeom; Lim, Jisun; Lee, Seungun; Jeong, Jaeho; Kang, Hyunsook; Kim, YongHwan; Kang, Jeong Wook; Yu, Hwan Yeul; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, Kyunggon; Kucia, Magda; Waigel, Sabine J; Zacharias, Wolfgang; Chen, Yinlu; Kim, In-Gyu; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2017-02-21

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) abnormalities in genome methylation hamper the utility of their therapeutic derivatives; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, we show that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase, Sirt1, selectively prevents abnormal DNA methylation of some developmental genes in murine ESCs by antagonizing Dnmt3l. Transcriptome and DNA methylome analyses demonstrated that Sirt1-null (Sirt1(-/-)) ESCs repress expression of a subset of imprinted and germline genes concomitant with increased DNA methylation of regulatory elements. Dnmt3l was highly expressed in Sirt1(-/-) ESCs, and knockdown partially rescued abnormal DNA methylation of the Sirt1 target genes. The Sirt1 protein suppressed transcription of Dnmt3l and physically interacted with the Dnmt3l protein, deacetylating and destabilizing Dnmt3l protein. Sirt1 deficiency delayed neurogenesis and spermatogenesis. These differentiation delays were significantly or partially abolished by reintroduction of Sirt1 cDNA or Dnmt3l knockdown. This study sheds light on mechanisms that restrain DNA methylation of developmentally vital genes operating in ESCs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dnmt3l-knockout donor cells improve somatic cell nuclear transfer reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hung-Fu; Mo, Chu-Fan; Wu, Shinn-Chih; Cheng, Dai-Han; Yu, Chih-Yun; Chang, Kai-Wei; Kao, Tzu-Hao; Lu, Chia-Wei; Pinskaya, Marina; Morillon, Antonin; Lin, Shih-Shun; Cheng, Winston T K; Bourc'his, Déborah; Bestor, Timothy; Sung, Li-Ying; Lin, Shau-Ping

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear transfer (NT) is a technique used to investigate the development and reprogramming potential of a single cell. DNA methyltransferase-3-like, which has been characterized as a repressive transcriptional regulator, is expressed in naturally fertilized egg and morula/blastocyst at pre-implantation stages. In this study, we demonstrate that the use of Dnmt3l-knockout (Dnmt3l-KO) donor cells in combination with Trichostatin A treatment improved the developmental efficiency and quality of the cloned embryos. Compared with the WT group, Dnmt3l-KO donor cell-derived cloned embryos exhibited increased cell numbers as well as restricted OCT4 expression in the inner cell mass (ICM) and silencing of transposable elements at the blastocyst stage. In addition, our results indicate that zygotic Dnmt3l is dispensable for cloned embryo development at pre-implantation stages. In Dnmt3l-KO mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we observed reduced nuclear localization of HDAC1, increased levels of the active histone mark H3K27ac and decreased accumulation of the repressive histone marks H3K27me3 and H3K9me3, suggesting that Dnmt3l-KO donor cells may offer a more permissive epigenetic state that is beneficial for NT reprogramming.

  7. CG dinucleotide periodicities recognized by the Dnmt3a-Dnmt3L complex are distinctive at retroelements and imprinted domains.

    PubMed

    Glass, Jacob L; Fazzari, Melissa J; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Greally, John M

    2009-01-01

    The Dnmt3a and Dnmt3L genes are critical mediators of cytosine methylation during gametogenesis, with major actions noted at transposable elements and imprinted loci. The Dnmt3a-Dnmt3L complex was recently described to have preferential activity at CG dinucleotides located 8-10 bp apart. Because cytosine methylation is heterogeneously distributed in the genome, we tested whether this relative sequence preference explains the effects of mutation of the Dnmt3a and Dnmt3L genes using bioinformatic analysis. We found that the human and mouse genomes are significantly enriched in a CG dinucleotide periodicity of 2 bp, leading to an increased frequency of CGs spaced 8 bp apart that represent widespread targets for this protein complex. When we broke down the human and mouse genomes by annotation, we found that this significant 2-bp periodicity and increased 8-bp periodicity are maintained in Alu SINEs in both species. The 8-bp periodicity was mapped genome-wide, identifying enrichment at the promoters of both paternally and maternally methylated imprinted genes and at CG dinucleotide-enriched sequences. We conclude that CG dinucleotide periodicity helps to explain some but not all of the relative sequence specificity of mutations of Dnmt3a or Dnmt3L in the establishment of germline cytosine methylation patterns.

  8. Ectopic DNMT3L triggers assembly of a repressive complex for retroviral silencing in somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tzu-Hao; Liao, Hung-Fu; Wolf, Daniel; Tai, Kang-Yu; Chuang, Ching-Yu; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Hata, Kenichiro; Zhang, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong; Goff, Stephen P; Ooi, Steen K T; Bestor, Timothy H; Lin, Shau-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Mammalian genomes are replete with retrotransposable elements, including endogenous retroviruses. DNA methyltransferase 3-like (DNMT3L) is an epigenetic regulator expressed in prospermatogonia, growing oocytes, and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we demonstrate that DNMT3L enhances the interaction of repressive epigenetic modifiers, including histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), SET domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1), DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), and tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28; also known as TIF1β and KAP1) in ES cells and orchestrates retroviral silencing activity with TRIM28 through mechanisms including, but not limited to, de novo DNA methylation. Ectopic expression of DNMT3L in somatic cells causes methylation-independent retroviral silencing activity by recruitment of the TRIM28/HDAC1/SETDB1/DNMT3A/DNMT3L complex to newly integrated Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) proviral DNA. Concurrent with this recruitment, we also observed the accumulation of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and heterochromatin protein 1 gamma (HP1γ), as well as reduced H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation at Mo-MuLV proviral sequences. Ectopic expression of DNMT3L in late-passage mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) recruited cytoplasmically localized HDAC1 to the nucleus. The formation of this epigenetic modifying complex requires interaction of DNMT3L with DNMT3A as well as with histone H3. In fetal testes at embryonic day 17.5, endogenous DNMT3L also enhanced the binding among TRIM28, DNMT3A, SETDB1, and HDAC1. We propose that DNMT3L may be involved in initiating a cascade of repressive epigenetic modifications by assisting in the preparation of a chromatin context that further attracts DNMT3A-DNMT3L binding and installs longer-term DNA methylation marks at newly integrated retroviruses. Almost half of the mammalian genome is composed of endogenous retroviruses and other retrotransposable elements that threaten genomic integrity. These elements are usually

  9. Efficient targeted DNA methylation with chimeric dCas9–Dnmt3a–Dnmt3L methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Stepper, Peter; Kungulovski, Goran; Jurkowska, Renata Z.; Chandra, Tamir; Krueger, Felix; Reinhardt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Abstract DNA methylation plays a critical role in the regulation and maintenance of cell-type specific transcriptional programs. Targeted epigenome editing is an emerging technology to specifically regulate cellular gene expression in order to modulate cell phenotypes or dissect the epigenetic mechanisms involved in their control. In this work, we employed a DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a–Dnmt3L construct fused to the nuclease-inactivated dCas9 programmable targeting domain to introduce DNA methylation into the human genome specifically at the EpCAM, CXCR4 and TFRC gene promoters. We show that targeting of these loci with single gRNAs leads to efficient and widespread methylation of the promoters. Multiplexing of several guide RNAs does not increase the efficiency of methylation. Peaks of targeted methylation were observed around 25 bp upstream and 40 bp downstream of the PAM site, while 20–30 bp of the binding site itself are protected against methylation. Potent methylation is dependent on the multimerization of Dnmt3a/Dnmt3L complexes on the DNA. Furthermore, the introduced methylation causes transcriptional repression of the targeted genes. These new programmable epigenetic editors allow unprecedented control of the DNA methylation status in cells and will lead to further advances in the understanding of epigenetic signaling. PMID:27899645

  10. Plasticity in Dnmt3L-dependent and -independent modes of de novo methylation in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Guenatri, Mounia; Duffié, Rachel; Iranzo, Julian; Fauque, Patricia; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2013-02-01

    A stimulatory DNA methyltransferase co-factor, Dnmt3L, has evolved in mammals to assist the process of de novo methylation, as genetically demonstrated in the germline. The function of Dnmt3L in the early embryo remains unresolved. By combining developmental and genetic approaches, we find that mouse embryos begin development with a maternal store of Dnmt3L, which is rapidly degraded and does not participate in embryonic de novo methylation. A zygotic-specific promoter of Dnmt3l is activated following gametic methylation loss and the potential recruitment of pluripotency factors just before implantation. Importantly, we find that zygotic Dnmt3L deficiency slows down the rate of de novo methylation in the embryo by affecting methylation density at some, but not all, genomic sequences. Dnmt3L is not strictly required, however, as methylation patterns are eventually established in its absence, in the context of increased Dnmt3A protein availability. This study proves that the postimplantation embryo is more plastic than the germline in terms of DNA methylation mechanistic choices and, importantly, that de novo methylation can be achieved in vivo without Dnmt3L.

  11. DNMT3L interacts with transcription factors to target DNMT3L/DNMT3B to specific DNA sequences: role of the DNMT3L/DNMT3B/p65-NFκB complex in the (de-)methylation of TRAF1.

    PubMed

    Pacaud, Romain; Sery, Quentin; Oliver, Lisa; Vallette, François M; Tost, Jörg; Cartron, Pierre-François

    2014-09-01

    DNMT3L i.e. DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3-like protein, is devoid of cytosine methyltransferase activity, despite clear homology to DNMT3A and DNMT3B, due to the mutation of key catalytic residues. However, DNMT3L participates in de novo methylation reactions through its direct interaction with DNMT3A and DNMT3B. In the present study, we investigated if DNMT3L interacts also directly with transcription factors (TFs). Using TF arrays, we identified 73 TFs that interacted with DNMT3L, 13 of which (ASH2L, ATF1, ATF3, BLZF1, CDX2, CERM, E2F3, E2F4, GCNF, GTF2I, GTF3C5, NFkB-p65 and RXRα) interacted only with DNMT3L, but not with DNMT3A/B. By focusing on the interaction with NFkB-p65, we demonstrate that DNMT3L forms a complex with DNMT3B and NFkB-p65 and that this complex is required for the control of DNA methylation at the TRAF1 promoter in the T98G glioma cell line. In addition, our experiments describe the DNA methylation at TRAF1 as being dynamic with a demethylation phase involving TET3. Thus, our data suggests that DNMT3L can address DNMT3A/B to specific sites by directly interacting with TFs that do not directly interact with DNMT3A/B. In summary, our data provide a new avenue for the direction of site-specific de novo DNA methylation catalyzed by DNMT3A/B.

  12. DNMT3L Modulates Significant and Distinct Flanking Sequence Preference for DNA Methylation by DNMT3A and DNMT3B In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wienholz, Bethany L.; Kareta, Michael S.; Moarefi, Amir H.; Gordon, Catherine A.; Ginno, Paul A.; Chédin, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The DNTM3A and DNMT3B de novo DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are responsible for setting genomic DNA methylation patterns, a key layer of epigenetic information. Here, using an in vivo episomal methylation assay and extensive bisulfite methylation sequencing, we show that human DNMT3A and DNMT3B possess significant and distinct flanking sequence preferences for target CpG sites. Selection for high or low efficiency sites is mediated by the base composition at the −2 and +2 positions flanking the CpG site for DNMT3A, and at the −1 and +1 positions for DNMT3B. This intrinsic preference reproducibly leads to the formation of specific de novo methylation patterns characterized by up to 34-fold variations in the efficiency of DNA methylation at individual sites. Furthermore, analysis of the distribution of signature methylation hotspot and coldspot motifs suggests that DNMT flanking sequence preference has contributed to shaping the composition of CpG islands in the human genome. Our results also show that the DNMT3L stimulatory factor modulates the formation of de novo methylation patterns in two ways. First, DNMT3L selectively focuses the DNA methylation machinery on properly chromatinized DNA templates. Second, DNMT3L attenuates the impact of the intrinsic DNMT flanking sequence preference by providing a much greater boost to the methylation of poorly methylated sites, thus promoting the formation of broader and more uniform methylation patterns. This study offers insights into the manner by which DNA methylation patterns are deposited and reveals a new level of interplay between members of the de novo DNMT family. PMID:20838592

  13. Modulation of Dnmt3b function in vitro by interactions with Dnmt3L, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b splice variants.

    PubMed

    Van Emburgh, Beth O; Robertson, Keith D

    2011-07-01

    DNA methylation, an essential regulator of transcription and chromatin structure, is established and maintained by the coordinated action of three DNA methyltransferases: DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B, and the inactive accessory factor DNMT3L. Disruptions in DNMT3B function are linked to carcinogenesis and genetic disease. DNMT3B is also highly alternatively spliced in a tissue- and disease-specific manner. The impact of intra-DNMT3 interactions and alternative splicing on the function of DNMT3 family members remains unclear. In the present work, we focused on DNMT3B. Using a panel of in vitro assays, we examined the consequences of DNMT3B splicing and mutations on its ability to bind DNA, interact with itself and other DNMT3's, and methylate DNA. Our results show that, while the C-terminal catalytic domain is critical for most DNMT3B functions, parts of the N-terminal region, including the PWWP domain, are also important. Alternative splicing and domain deletions also influence DNMT3B's cellular localization. Furthermore, our data reveal the existence of extensive DNMT3B self-interactions that differentially impact on its activity. Finally, we show that catalytically inactive isoforms of DNMT3B are capable of modulating the activity of DNMT3A-DNMT3L complexes. Our studies therefore suggest that seemingly 'inactive' DNMT3B isoforms may influence genomic methylation patterns in vivo.

  14. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a novel human gene encoding a zinc finger protein with 25 fingers.

    PubMed

    Li, X A; Kokame, K; Okubo, K; Shimokado, K; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyata, T; Kato, H; Yutani, C

    1999-12-23

    This study reports cloning and characterization of a human cDNA encoding a novel human zinc finger protein, ZFD25. ZFD25 cDNA is 6118 bp long and has an open reading frame of 2352 bp that encodes a 783 amino acid protein with 25 C2H2-type zinc fingers. The ZFD25 cDNA also contains a region with high sequence similarity to the Krüppel-associated box A and B domain in the 5'-untranslated region, suggesting that ZFD25 belongs to the Krüppel-associated box zinc finger protein family. The ZFD25 gene was localized to chromosome 7q11.2. Northern blot analysis showed that ZFD25 was expressed in a wide range of human organs. In cultured endothelial cells, the mRNA level was decreased upon serum starvation.

  16. Characterization and mapping of human genes encoding zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, P; Lichter, P; Thiesen, H J; Ward, D C; Dawid, I B

    1991-01-01

    The zinc finger motif, exemplified by a segment of the Drosophila gap gene Krüppel, is a nucleic acid-binding domain present in many transcription factors. To investigate the gene family encoding this motif in the human genome, a placental genomic library was screened at moderate stringency with a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide probe designed to hybridize to the His/Cys (H/C) link region between adjoining zinc fingers. Over 200 phage clones were obtained and are being sorted into groups by partial sequencing, cross-hybridization with oligodeoxynucleotide probes, and PCR amplification. Further, the genomic clones were cross-hybridized with a set of 30 zinc finger-encoding cDNAs (Kox1-Kox30) isolated from a human T-cell cDNA library. Four cDNAs (Kox4, Kox7, Kox12, and Kox15) were identified that match one or more genomic clones; these matches were confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis. One or more clones from each locus were mapped onto human metaphase chromosomes by chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization with fluorescent probe detection. We mapped ZNF7/Kox4 to chromosome 8qter, ZNF19/Kox12 to 16q22, ZNF22/Kox15 to 10q11, and ZNF44/Kox7 to 16p11. The results of these analyses support the conclusion that the human genome contains many, probably several hundred, zinc finger genes with consensus H/C link regions. Images PMID:1946370

  17. Light-Inducible Gene Regulation with Engineered Zinc Finger Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Polstein, Lauren R.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of light-inducible protein-protein interactions with gene regulation systems has enabled the control of gene expression with light. In particular, heterodimer protein pairs from plants can be used to engineer a gene regulation system in mammalian cells that is reversible, repeatable, tunable, controllable in a spatiotemporal manner, and targetable to any DNA sequence. This system, Light-Inducible Transcription using Engineered Zinc finger proteins (LITEZ), is based on the blue light-induced interaction of GIGANTEA and the LOV domain of FKF1 that drives the localization of a transcriptional activator to the DNA-binding site of a highly customizable engineered zinc finger protein. This chapter provides methods for modifying LITEZ to target new DNA sequences, engineering a programmable LED array to illuminate cell cultures, and using the modified LITEZ system to achieve spatiotemporal control of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24718797

  18. Genome-wide identification, evolution and expression analysis of RING finger protein genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Intikhab; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Yong; Zhu, Mei-Lan; Wang, Heng-Bo; Chalhoub, Boulos; Lu, Yun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    More and more RING finger genes were found to be implicated in various important biological processes. In the present study, a total of 731 RING domains in 715 predicted proteins were identified in Brassica rapa genome (AA, 2n = 20), which were further divided into eight types: RING-H2 (371), RING-HCa (215), RING-HCb (47), RING-v (44), RING-C2 (38), RING-D (10), RING-S/T (5) and RING-G (1). The 715 RING finger proteins were further classified into 51 groups according to the presence of additional domains. 700 RING finger protein genes were mapped to the 10 chromosomes of B. rapa with a range of 47 to 111 genes for each chromosome. 667 RING finger protein genes were expressed in at least one of the six tissues examined, indicating their involvement in various physiological and developmental processes in B. rapa. Hierarchical clustering analysis of RNA-seq data divided them into seven major groups, one of which includes 231 members preferentially expressed in leaf, and constitutes then a panel of gene candidates for studying the genetic and molecular mechanisms of leafy head traits in Brassica crops. Our results lay the foundation for further studies on the classification, evolution and putative functions of RING finger protein genes in Brassica species. PMID:28094809

  19. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    PubMed

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  20. Stable expression of mtlD gene imparts multiple stress tolerance in finger millet.

    PubMed

    Hema, Ramanna; Vemanna, Ramu S; Sreeramulu, Shivakumar; Reddy, Chandrasekhara P; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Udayakumar, Makarla

    2014-01-01

    Finger millet is susceptible to abiotic stresses, especially drought and salinity stress, in the field during seed germination and early stages of seedling development. Therefore developing stress tolerant finger millet plants combating drought, salinity and associated oxidative stress in these two growth stages is important. Cellular protection through osmotic adjustment and efficient free radical scavenging ability during abiotic stress are important components of stress tolerance mechanisms in plants. Mannitol, an osmolyte, is known to scavenge hydroxyl radicals generated during various abiotic stresses and thereby minimize stress damage in several plant species. In this study transgenic finger millet plants expressing the mannitol biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria, mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (mtlD), were developed through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. mtlD gene integration in the putative transgenic plants was confirmed by Southern blot. Further, performance of transgenic finger millet under drought, salinity and oxidative stress was studied at plant level in T1 generation and in T1 and T2 generation seedlings. Results from these experiments showed that transgenic finger millet had better growth under drought and salinity stress compared to wild-type. At plant level, transgenic plants showed better osmotic adjustment and chlorophyll retention under drought stress compared to the wild-type. However, the overall increase in stress tolerance of transgenics for the three stresses, especially for oxidative stress, was only marginal compared to other mtlD gene expressing plant species reported in the literature. Moreover, the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation protocol developed for finger millet in this study can be used to introduce diverse traits of agronomic importance in finger millet.

  1. Isolation of a zinc finger gene consistently deleted in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aubry, M; Demczuk, S; Desmaze, C; Aikem, M; Aurias, A; Julien, J P; Rouleau, G A

    1993-10-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is a human developmental disorder resulting in hypoplasia of the thymus and parathyroids, and conotruncal heart defects. We recently isolated four genes with zinc finger DNA binding motifs mapping to chromosome 22q11.2 DiGeorge critical region. We now report that one of them, ZNF74 gene, is hemizygously deleted in 23 out of 24 DiGeorge syndrome patients tested. ZNF74 mRNA transcripts are detected in human and mouse embryos but not in adult tissues. Sequence analysis of a corresponding cDNA reveals an an open reading frame encoding 12 zinc finger motifs of the Kruppel/TFIIIA type as well as N-terminal and C-terminal non-zinc finger domains. These results suggest that changes in the dosage of a putative transcription factor through ZNF74 hemizygous deletion may be critical for DiGeorge developmental anomalies.

  2. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  3. Protein Interactions of the MLL PHD Fingers Modulate MLL Target Gene Regulation in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Keri; Anderson, Melanie; Bulanova, Elena; Mi, Huaifeng; Tropschug, Maximilian; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2001-01-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes. PMID:11313484

  4. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  5. Identification and localization of a novel zinc finger gene in developing chick skin and feather buds.

    PubMed

    Padanilam, B J; Solursh, M

    1996-03-07

    We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding a novel zinc finger protein (Fzf-1) containing two tandem repeats of zinc finger motifs of the C2H2 type. The cDNA is 3.0 Kb long and has an open reading frame which codes for a protein of 789 amino acids. The expression pattern of the zinc finger gene was studied in chick embryonic skin and feathers by in situ hybridization. The expression of the gene is found to be temporally and spatially regulated. In stage 38 chick embryos, the transcripts are localized to the epidermis but in 10-day-old embryos, the signal is localized to the forming dermis. In 12-day-old chick, the transcripts are localized to the mesenchymal region of the elongated feather buds. Reverse transcription followed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) did not detect the transcripts in any other tissues.

  6. Transgenic mice expressing an artificial zinc finger regulator targeting an endogenous gene.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Claudio; Corbi, Nicoletta; Onori, Annalisa; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Mattei, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    Zinc finger (ZF) proteins belonging to the Cys2-His2 class provide a simple and versatile framework to design novel artificial transcription factors (ATFs) targeted to the desired genes. Our work is based on ZF ATFs engineered to up-regulate the expression level of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In particular, on the basis of the "recognition code" that defines specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA-binding sites we engineered and selected a new family of artificial transcription factors, whose DNA-binding domain consists in a three zinc finger peptide called "Jazz." Jazz protein binds specifically the 9 bp DNA sequence (5(')-GCT-GCT-GCG-3(')) present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. We generated a transgenic mouse expressing Jazz protein fused to the strong transcriptional activation domain VP16 and under the control of the muscle specific promoter of the myosin light chain gene. Vp16-Jazz mice display a strong up-regulation of the utrophin at both mRNA and protein levels. To our knowledge, this represents the first example of a transgenic mouse expressing an artificial gene coding for a zinc finger-based transcription factor.

  7. Three hormone receptor-like Drosophila genes encode an identical DNA-binding finger.

    PubMed

    Rothe, M; Nauber, U; Jäckle, H

    1989-10-01

    The putative finger domain of knirps (kni), a member of the gap class of segmentation genes, was used to isolate two sequence-related genes of Drosophila melanogaster under reduced stringency hybridization conditions. The two kni homologous genes map close to kni in the proximal portion of the third chromosome. One of them is the previously identified gene knirps-related (knrl), kni and knrl are spatially co-regulated in both early and late stages of embryogenesis. Their posterior domains of expression at blastoderm stage are under the control of the maternal pattern organizer gene nanos. In contrast, the expression of the second kni homologous gene is restricted to the late embryonic gonads. Due to its site of expression, we termed this gene 'embryonic gonad' (egon). In addition to the conserved DNA-binding domain, these three genes share an additional sequence of 19 amino acids, the kni-box, adjacent to the finger region. The identical N-terminal Cys/Cys finger encoded by each of the three genes suggests that they code for DNA-binding proteins which might bind to similar (or even identical) target sequences.

  8. Three hormone receptor-like Drosophila genes encode an identical DNA-binding finger.

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, M; Nauber, U; Jäckle, H

    1989-01-01

    The putative finger domain of knirps (kni), a member of the gap class of segmentation genes, was used to isolate two sequence-related genes of Drosophila melanogaster under reduced stringency hybridization conditions. The two kni homologous genes map close to kni in the proximal portion of the third chromosome. One of them is the previously identified gene knirps-related (knrl), kni and knrl are spatially co-regulated in both early and late stages of embryogenesis. Their posterior domains of expression at blastoderm stage are under the control of the maternal pattern organizer gene nanos. In contrast, the expression of the second kni homologous gene is restricted to the late embryonic gonads. Due to its site of expression, we termed this gene 'embryonic gonad' (egon). In addition to the conserved DNA-binding domain, these three genes share an additional sequence of 19 amino acids, the kni-box, adjacent to the finger region. The identical N-terminal Cys/Cys finger encoded by each of the three genes suggests that they code for DNA-binding proteins which might bind to similar (or even identical) target sequences. Images PMID:2555153

  9. A cluster of related zinc finger protein genes is deleted in the mouse embryonic lethal mutation tw18.

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, P H; Little, P F

    1991-01-01

    We report that a number of related zinc finger protein genes are closely linked on mouse chromosome 17. At least four of these genes are transcribed in the 8.5-day postcoitum embryo and are deleted in the t complex early acting embryonic lethal mutation tw18. We have evidence that additional finger protein genes are located in this region. These findings demonstrate that related finger protein genes can be clustered in the murine genome and identify genes that may be considered as candidates for the tw18 mutation. Images PMID:1680234

  10. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus 1 gene expression by designer zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Papworth, Monika; Moore, Michael; Isalan, Mark; Minczuk, Michal; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) replicative cycle begins by binding of the viral activator, VP16, to a set of sequences in the immediate-early (IE) gene promoters. With the aim of inhibiting this cycle, we have constructed a number of synthetic zinc-finger DNA-binding peptides by using recently reported methods. Peptides containing either three or six fingers, targeted to a viral promoter, were engineered as fusions with a KOX-1 transcription repression domain. These proteins bound to the HSV-1 IE175k (ICP4) promoter, in vitro, with nanomolar or subnanomolar binding affinity. However, in a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system, only the six-finger protein was found to repress VP16-activated transcription significantly. Thus the longer array of zinc fingers is required to compete successfully against VP16, one of the most powerful natural activators known. We found that the HSV-1 replication cycle can be partially repressed by the six-finger peptide with the viral titer reduced by 90%. PMID:12574501

  11. Members of the zinc finger protein gene family sharing a conserved N-terminal module.

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, M; Marino, M; Franzè, A; Tramontano, A; Grimaldi, G

    1991-01-01

    We report the isolation of human members of a sub-family of structurally related finger protein genes. These potentially encode polypeptides containing finger motifs of the Krüppel type at the C-terminus, and a conserved amino acid module at the N-terminus; because of its invariant location the latter is referred to as finger preceding box (FPB). The FPB, detected also in previously described finger proteins from human, mouse and Xenopus, extends over approximately 65 amino acids and appears to be composed of two contiguous modules: FPB-A (residues 1-42) and FPB-B (residues 43-65). The latter is absent in some of the members analyzed. Elements A and B and the zinc finger domain are encoded by separate exons in the ZNF2 gene, a human member of this sub-family. The positioning of introns within this gene is remarkable. One intron flanks and a second interrupts the first codon of the FPB-A and FPB-B modules, respectively. A third intron occurs a few nucleotides downstream of FPB-B marking its separation from the remainder of the coding sequences. This organization, together with the absence of FPB-B in some cDNAs, supports the hypothesis that mRNAs encoding polypeptides that include one, both or none of the FPB-A and FPB-B modules may be assembled through alternative splicing pathways. Northern analyses showed that members of this sub-family are expressed as multiple transcripts in several cell lines. The sequences of distinct cDNAs homologous to the ZNF2 gene indicate that alternative splicing events adjoin either coding or non coding exons to the FPB sequences. Images PMID:1945843

  12. Disruption of a novel imprinted zinc-finger gene, ZNF215, in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Alders, M; Ryan, A; Hodges, M; Bliek, J; Feinberg, A P; Privitera, O; Westerveld, A; Little, P F; Mannens, M

    2000-01-01

    The genetics of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is complex and is thought to involve multiple genes. It is known that three regions on chromosome 11p15 (BWSCR1, BWSCR2, and BWSCR3) may play a role in the development of BWS. BWSCR2 is defined by two BWS breakpoints. Here we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of 73 kb containing BWSCR2. Within this region, we detected a novel zinc-finger gene, ZNF215. We show that two of its five alternatively spliced transcripts are disrupted by both BWSCR2 breakpoints. Parts of the 3' end of these splice forms are transcribed from the antisense strand of a second zinc-finger gene, ZNF214. We show that ZNF215 is imprinted in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:10762538

  13. Effect of the linkers between the zinc fingers in zinc finger protein 809 on gene silencing and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Ichida, Yu Utsunomiya, Yuko; Onodera, Masafumi

    2016-03-18

    Zinc finger protein 809 (ZFP809) belongs to the Kruppel-associated box-containing zinc finger protein (KRAB-ZFP) family and functions in repressing the expression of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV). ZFP809 binds to the primer-binding site (PBS)located downstream of the MoMLV-long terminal repeat (LTR) and induces epigenetic modifications at integration sites, such as repressive histone modifications and de novo DNA methylation. KRAB-ZFPs contain consensus TGEKP linkers between C2H2 zinc fingers. The phosphorylation of threonine residues within linkers leads to the inactivation of zinc finger binding to target sequences. ZFP809 also contains consensus linkers between zinc fingers. However, the function of ZFP809 linkers remains unknown. In the present study, we constructed ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers and examined their ability to silence transgene expression driven by MLV, binding ability to MLV PBS, and cellular localization. The results of the present study revealed that the linkers affected the ability of ZFP809 to silence transgene expression. Furthermore, this effect could be partly attributed to changes in the localization of ZFP809 proteins containing mutated linkers. Further characterization of ZFP809 linkers is required for understanding the functions and features of KRAB-ZFP-containing linkers. - Highlights: • ZFP809 has three consensus linkers between the zinc fingers. • Linkers are required for ZFP809 to silence transgene expression driven by MLV-LTR. • Linkers affect the precise nuclear localization of ZFP809.

  14. Tandem zinc-finger gene families in mammals: insights and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M; Kim, J; Ashworth, L; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    1998-01-01

    Evidence for the remarkable conservation of mammalian genomes, in both content and organization of resident genes, is rapidly emerging from comparative mapping studies. The frequent occurrence of familial gene clustering, presumably reflecting a history of tandem in situ duplications starting from a single ancestral gene, is also apparent from these analyses. Genes encoding Kruppel-type zinc-finger (ZNF) proteins, including those containing Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) motifs, are particularly prone to such clustered organization. Existing data suggest that genes in KRAB-ZNF gene clusters have diverged in sequence and expression patterns, possibly yielding families of proteins with distinct, yet related, functions. Comparative mapping studies indicate that at least some of the genes within these clusters in mammals were elaborated prior to the divergence of mammalian orders and, subsequently, have been conserved. These data suggest a possible role for these tandem KRAB-ZNF gene families in mammalian evolution.

  15. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-04-11

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined.

  16. The KUP gene, located on human chromosome 14, encodes a protein with two distant zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Chardin, P; Courtois, G; Mattei, M G; Gisselbrecht, S

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a human cDNA (kup), encoding a new protein with two distantly spaced zinc fingers of the C2H2 type. This gene is highly conserved in mammals and is expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells and testis. Its expression was not higher in the various transformed cells tested than in the normal corresponding tissues. The kup gene is located in region q23-q24 of the long arm of human chromosome 14. The kup protein is 433 a.a. long, has a M.W. close to 50 kD and binds to DNA. Although the structure of the kup protein is unusual, the isolated fingers resemble closely those of the Krüppel family, suggesting that this protein is also a transcription factor. The precise function and DNA motif recognized by the kup protein remain to be determined. Images PMID:2027750

  17. Identification of genes encoding zinc finger motifs in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Hwang, D M; Cukerman, E; Liew, C C

    1997-01-01

    The Zn2+-finger DNA-binding domain has been identified in several developmental control proteins, transcription factors and gene products associated with diseases, as well as in several RNA-binding proteins. We applied library screening, expressed sequence tagging (EST sequencing), Zn2+-binding assays and Northern blot hybridization, in order to characterize novel cDNA clones of the human cardiovascular system which contain Zn2+-finger motifs. An embryonic (8-10 weeks gestation) heart lambda ZAP Express cDNA library was screened with an oligonucleotide probe deduced from a consensus amino acid sequence which is highly conserved for Zn2+-finger proteins, and approximately 350 positive clones were isolated from 1 x 10(4) plaque-forming units (pfu) initially plated. The isolated clones were classified as known and novel following single pass automated DNA sequencing. Analysis of Northern blot hybridization delineated the tissue specificity of these clones, as well as their association with cardiac growth and development. Existence of Zn2+-finger motifs in the novel clones was confirmed by Zn2+-binding assay. In this report, we present the characterization of eight novel clones, including the complete cDNA sequences of one of these clones (HHZ-123).

  18. Comparative Genomics and Association Mapping Approaches for Blast Resistant Genes in Finger Millet Using SSRs

    PubMed Central

    Babu, B. Kalyana; Dinesh, Pandey; Agrawal, Pawan K.; Sood, S.; Chandrashekara, C.; Bhatt, Jagadish C.; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    The major limiting factor for production and productivity of finger millet crop is blast disease caused by Magnaporthe grisea. Since, the genome sequence information available in finger millet crop is scarce, comparative genomics plays a very important role in identification of genes/QTLs linked to the blast resistance genes using SSR markers. In the present study, a total of 58 genic SSRs were developed for use in genetic analysis of a global collection of 190 finger millet genotypes. The 58 SSRs yielded ninety five scorable alleles and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.186 to 0.677 at an average of 0.385. The gene diversity was in the range of 0.208 to 0.726 with an average of 0.487. Association mapping for blast resistance was done using 104 SSR markers which identified four QTLs for finger blast and one QTL for neck blast resistance. The genomic marker RM262 and genic marker FMBLEST32 were linked to finger blast disease at a P value of 0.007 and explained phenotypic variance (R2) of 10% and 8% respectively. The genomic marker UGEP81 was associated to finger blast at a P value of 0.009 and explained 7.5% of R2. The QTLs for neck blast was associated with the genomic SSR marker UGEP18 at a P value of 0.01, which explained 11% of R2. Three QTLs for blast resistance were found common by using both GLM and MLM approaches. The resistant alleles were found to be present mostly in the exotic genotypes. Among the genotypes of NW Himalayan region of India, VHC3997, VHC3996 and VHC3930 were found highly resistant, which may be effectively used as parents for developing blast resistant cultivars in the NW Himalayan region of India. The markers linked to the QTLs for blast resistance in the present study can be further used for cloning of the full length gene, fine mapping and their further use in the marker assisted breeding programmes for introgression of blast resistant alleles into locally adapted cultivars. PMID:24915067

  19. Engineered Zinc Finger Nuclease–Mediated Homologous Recombination of the Human Rhodopsin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, David L.; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Methods. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Results. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. Conclusions. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. PMID:20671268

  20. Transcripts from a novel human KRAB zinc finger gene contain spliced Alu and endogenous retroviral segments

    SciTech Connect

    Baban, S.; Freeman, J.D.; Mager, D.L.

    1996-05-01

    During the course of an investigation into the potential effects of endogenous retroviruses on adjacent gene expression, we isolated two cDNA clones containing a small sequence segment belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus family, HERV-H. Characterization of the clones revealed that they represent transcripts from a novel KRAB zinc finger gene termed ZNF177. The two cDNA clones differ at their 5{prime} termini and in the presence of a 559-bp internal exon. The clone containing this internal exon has six imperfect zinc finger motifs followed by seven perfect copies of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} type but has a frame shift between the KRAB domain and the downstream zinc finger region. The smaller clone lacks the six imperfect motifs and has an intact ORF. The 5{prime} putative untranslated regions of both cDNAs contain an 86-bp HERV-H env segment and a segment of an Alu repeat, both in the antisense orientation, that have been incorporated by splicing. RT-PCR experiments show evidence of alternative splicing but the majority of transcripts appear to contain the Alu and env segments. Genomic PCR and hybridization experiments suggest that a partial HERV-H element is integrated within the ZNF177 locus, which Southern analysis has shown to be a single-copy gene. Northern and RT-PCR analyses suggest that ZNF177 is transcribed at a low level in a variety of cell types. 41 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Engineered zinc finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination of the human rhodopsin gene.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, David L; Cashman, Siobhan M; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2010-12-01

    Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination.

  2. The brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger family, maps within the Smith-Magenis syndrome region at 17p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Inazawa, Johji

    1997-03-31

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SAIS) is caused by a microdeletion of 17p11.2 and comprises developmental and growth delay, facial abnormalities, unusual behavior and sleep problems. This phenotype may be due to haploinsufficiency of several contiguous genes. The human brain finger protein gene (ZNF179), a member of the RING finger protein family, has been isolated and mapped to l7p11.2. FISH analyses of metaphase or interphase chromosomes of 6 patients with SMS show that ZNF179 was deleted in one of the 2 homologs (17p11.2), indicating a possible association of the defect of this gene with the pathogenesis of SMS. Furthermore, using a prophase FISH ordering system, we sublocalized ZNF179 proximally to LLGL which lies on the critical region for SMS. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Synthetic zinc finger proteins: the advent of targeted gene regulation and genome modification technologies.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Gaj, Thomas; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-08-19

    The understanding of gene regulation and the structure and function of the human genome increased dramatically at the end of the 20th century. Yet the technologies for manipulating the genome have been slower to develop. For instance, the field of gene therapy has been focused on correcting genetic diseases and augmenting tissue repair for more than 40 years. However, with the exception of a few very low efficiency approaches, conventional genetic engineering methods have only been able to add auxiliary genes to cells. This has been a substantial obstacle to the clinical success of gene therapies and has also led to severe unintended consequences in several cases. Therefore, technologies that facilitate the precise modification of cellular genomes have diverse and significant implications in many facets of research and are essential for translating the products of the Genomic Revolution into tangible benefits for medicine and biotechnology. To address this need, in the 1990s, we embarked on a mission to develop technologies for engineering protein-DNA interactions with the aim of creating custom tools capable of targeting any DNA sequence. Our goal has been to allow researchers to reach into genomes to specifically regulate, knock out, or replace any gene. To realize these goals, we initially focused on understanding and manipulating zinc finger proteins. In particular, we sought to create a simple and straightforward method that enables unspecialized laboratories to engineer custom DNA-modifying proteins using only defined modular components, a web-based utility, and standard recombinant DNA technology. Two significant challenges we faced were (i) the development of zinc finger domains that target sequences not recognized by naturally occurring zinc finger proteins and (ii) determining how individual zinc finger domains could be tethered together as polydactyl proteins to recognize unique locations within complex genomes. We and others have since used this modular

  4. Systematic Analysis of the Maize PHD-Finger Gene Family Reveals a Subfamily Involved in Abiotic Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Liu, Jinyang; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Yang; Jiang, Haiyang; Cheng, Beijiu

    2015-09-30

    Plant homeodomain (PHD)-finger proteins were found universally in eukaryotes and known as key players in regulating transcription and chromatin structure. Many PHD-finger proteins have been well studied on structure and function in animals. Whereas, only a few of plant PHD-finger factors had been characterized, and majority of PHD-finger proteins were functionally unclear. In this study, a complete comprehensive analysis of maize PHD family is presented. Sixty-seven PHD-finger genes in maize were identified and further divided into ten groups according to phylogenetic analysis that was supported by motif and intron/exon analysis. These genes were unevenly distributed on ten chromosomes and contained 12 segmental duplication events, suggesting that segmental duplications were the major contributors in expansion of the maize PHD family. The paralogous genes mainly experienced purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events on the basis of the Ka/Ks ratio. Gene digital expression analysis showed that the PHD family had a wide expression profile in maize development. In addition, 15 potential stress response genes were detected by promoter cis-element and expression analysis. Two proteins ZmPHD14 and ZmPHD19 were located in the nucleus. These results provided a solid base for future functional genome study of the PHD-finger family in maize and afforded important clues for characterizing and cloning potentially important candidates in response to abiotic stresses.

  5. Multiple roles of the gene zinc finger homeodomain-2 in the development of the Drosophila wing.

    PubMed

    Perea, Daniel; Molohon, Katie; Edwards, Kevin; Díaz-Benjumea, Fernando J

    2013-01-01

    The gene zfh2 and its human homolog Atbf1 encode huge molecules with several homeo- and zinc finger domains. It has been reported that they play important roles in neural differentiation and promotion of apoptosis in several tissues of both humans and flies. In the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, Zfh2 is expressed in a dynamic pattern and previous results suggest that it is involved is proximal-distal patterning. In this report we go further in the analysis of the function of this gene in wing development, performing ectopic expression experiments and studying its effects in genes involved in wing development. Our results suggest that Zfh2 plays an important role controlling the expression of several wing genes and in the specification of those cellular properties that define the differences in cell proliferation between proximal and distal domains of the wing disc. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. The Embryonically Active Gene, Unkempt, of Drosophila Encodes a Cys(3)his Finger Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mohler, J.; Weiss, N.; Murli, S.; Mohammadi, S.; Vani, K.; Vasilakis, G.; Song, C. H.; Epstein, A.; Kuang, T.; English, J.; Cherdak, D.

    1992-01-01

    The unkempt gene of Drosophila encodes a set of embryonic RNAs, which are abundant during early stages of embryogenesis and are present ubiquitously in most somatic tissues from the syncytial embryo through stage 15 of embryogenesis. Expression of unkempt RNAs becomes restricted predominantly to the central nervous system in stages 16 and early 17. Analysis of cDNAs from this locus reveals the presence of five Cys(3)His fingers in the protein product. Isolation and analysis of mutations affecting the unkempt gene, including complete deletions of this gene, indicate that there is no zygotic requirement for unkempt during embryogenesis, presumably due to the contribution of maternally supplied RNA, although the gene is essential during post-embryonic development. PMID:1339381

  7. Targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells by using engineered zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Yolanda; Chan, Edmond; Liu, Pei-Qi; Orlando, Salvatore; Zhang, Lin; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Guschin, Dmitry; Waite, Adam; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Klug, Aaron; Collingwood, Trevor N.

    2008-01-01

    Gene knockout is the most powerful tool for determining gene function or permanently modifying the phenotypic characteristics of a cell. Existing methods for gene disruption are limited by their efficiency, time to completion, and/or the potential for confounding off-target effects. Here, we demonstrate a rapid single-step approach to targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells, using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs can be designed to target a chosen locus with high specificity. Upon transient expression of these nucleases the target gene is first cleaved by the ZFNs and then repaired by a natural—but imperfect—DNA repair process, nonhomologous end joining. This often results in the generation of mutant (null) alleles. As proof of concept for this approach we designed ZFNs to target the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. We observed biallelic gene disruption at frequencies >1%, thus obviating the need for selection markers. Three new genetically distinct DHFR−/− cell lines were generated. Each new line exhibited growth and functional properties consistent with the specific knockout of the DHFR gene. Importantly, target gene disruption is complete within 2–3 days of transient ZFN delivery, thus enabling the isolation of the resultant DHFR−/− cell lines within 1 month. These data demonstrate further the utility of ZFNs for rapid mammalian cell line engineering and establish a new method for gene knockout with application to reverse genetics, functional genomics, drug discovery, and therapeutic recombinant protein production. PMID:18359850

  8. Identification and disruption of an Arabidopsis zinc finger gene controlling seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Papi, Maura; Sabatini, Sabrina; Bouchez, David; Camilleri, Christine; Costantino, Paolo; Vittorioso, Paola

    2000-01-01

    We describe here the Arabidopsis gene DAG1, encoding a zinc finger transcription factor of the Dof family, and show that it is involved in the control of seed germination. By a reverse genetics approach, we isolated an Arabidopsis mutant line with one T-DNA insertion in DAG1. Seeds from homozygous knockout dag1-1 plants do not develop dormancy and germinate also in the absence of light. Segregation analysis indicates that the effect of the mutation is maternal. Accordingly, in situ mRNA hybridizations reveal expression of DAG1 in the vascular tissue of the flower and maturing fruit but not in the seed. PMID:10640273

  9. Phenotypic alteration and target gene identification using combinatorial libraries of zinc finger proteins in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Soon; Jang, Young-Soon; Lee, Horim; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method with prokaryotic organisms that uses randomized libraries of zinc finger-containing artificial transcription factors to induce phenotypic variations and to identify genes involved in the generation of a specific phenotype of interest. Combining chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments and in silico prediction of target DNA binding sequences for the artificial transcription factors, we identified ubiX, whose down-regulation correlates with the thermotolerance phenotype in Escherichia coli. Our results show that randomized libraries of artificial transcription factors are powerful tools for functional genomic studies.

  10. Disruption of the myostatin gene in porcine primary fibroblasts and embryos using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian-Ju; Zhang, Hong-Xiao; Wang, Huili; Xiong, Kai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Honglin

    2014-04-01

    Myostatin represses muscle growth by negatively regulating the number and size of muscle fibers. Myostatin lossof- function can result in the double-muscling phenotype and increased muscle mass. Thus, knockout of myostatin gene could improve the quality of meat from mammals. In the present study, zinc finger nucleases, a useful tool for generating gene knockout animals, were designed to target exon 1 of the myostatin gene. The designed ZFNs were introduced into porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos via electroporation and microinjection, respectively. Mutations around the ZFNs target site were detected in both primary fibroblasts and blastocysts. The proportion of mutant fibroblast cells and blastocyst was 4.81% and 5.31%, respectively. Thus, ZFNs can be used to knockout myostatin in porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos.

  11. Targeted disruption of exogenous EGFP gene in medaka using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Kanie, Yuta; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Gou, Yuki; Kitano, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masato

    2012-06-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are artificial enzymes that create site-specific double-strand breaks and thereby induce targeted genome editing. Here, we demonstrated successful gene disruption in somatic and germ cells of medaka (Oryzias latipes) using ZFN to target exogenous EGFP genes. Embryos that were injected with an RNA sequence pair coding for ZFNs showed mosaic loss of green fluorescent protein fluorescence in skeletal muscle. A number of mutations that included both deletions and insertions were identified within the ZFN target site in each embryo, whereas no mutations were found at the non-targeted sites. In addition, ZFN-induced mutations were introduced in germ cells and efficiently transmitted to the next generation. The mutation frequency varied (6-100%) in the germ cells from each founder, and a founder carried more than two types of mutation in germ cells. Our results have introduced the possibility of targeted gene disruption and reverse genetics in medaka.

  12. Disruption of the Myostatin Gene in Porcine Primary Fibroblasts and Embryos Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian-Ju; Zhang, Hong-Xiao; Wang, Huili; Xiong, Kai; Qin, Ling; Liu, Honglin

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin represses muscle growth by negatively regulating the number and size of muscle fibers. Myostatin loss-of-function can result in the double-muscling phenotype and increased muscle mass. Thus, knockout of myostatin gene could improve the quality of meat from mammals. In the present study, zinc finger nucleases, a useful tool for generating gene knockout animals, were designed to target exon 1 of the myostatin gene. The designed ZFNs were introduced into porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos via electroporation and microinjection, respectively. Mutations around the ZFNs target site were detected in both primary fibroblasts and blastocysts. The proportion of mutant fibroblast cells and blastocyst was 4.81% and 5.31%, respectively. Thus, ZFNs can be used to knockout myostatin in porcine primary fibroblasts and early implantation embryos. PMID:24802055

  13. Apoptosis-related genes confer resistance to Fusarium wilt in transgenic 'Lady Finger' bananas.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jean-Yves; Becker, Douglas K; Dickman, Martin B; Harding, Robert M; Khanna, Harjeet K; Dale, James L

    2011-12-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc), is one of the most devastating diseases of banana (Musa spp.). Apart from resistant cultivars, there are no effective control measures for the disease. We investigated whether the transgenic expression of apoptosis-inhibition-related genes in banana could be used to confer disease resistance. Embryogenic cell suspensions of the banana cultivar, 'Lady Finger', were stably transformed with animal genes that negatively regulate apoptosis, namely Bcl-xL, Ced-9 and Bcl-2 3' UTR, and independently transformed plant lines were regenerated for testing. Following a 12-week exposure to Foc race 1 in small-plant glasshouse bioassays, seven transgenic lines (2 × Bcl-xL, 3 × Ced-9 and 2 × Bcl-2 3' UTR) showed significantly less internal and external disease symptoms than the wild-type susceptible 'Lady Finger' banana plants used as positive controls. Of these, one Bcl-2 3' UTR line showed resistance that was equivalent to that of wild-type Cavendish bananas that were included as resistant negative controls. Further, the resistance of this line continued for 23-week postinoculation at which time the experiment was terminated. Using TUNEL assays, Foc race 1 was shown to induce apoptosis-like features in the roots of wild-type 'Lady Finger' plants consistent with a necrotrophic phase in the life cycle of this pathogen. This was further supported by the observed reduction in these effects in the roots of the resistant Bcl-2 3' UTR-transgenic line. This is the first report on the generation of transgenic banana plants with resistance to Fusarium wilt. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Antisense oligonucleotides from the stage-specific myeloid zinc finger gene MZF-1 inhibit granulopoiesis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins are transcriptional regulators of other genes, often controlling developmental cascades of gene expression. A recently cloned zinc finger gene, MZF-1, was found to be preferentially expressed in myeloid cells. Using complementary radiolabeled MZF-1 RNA hybridized to human bone marrow smears in situ, it was discovered that the expression of MZF-1 is essentially limited to the myelocyte and metamyelocyte stages of granulopoiesis. Antisense but not sense oligonucleotides from MZF-1 significantly inhibited granulocyte colony- stimulating factor-driven granulocyte colony formation in vitro. PMID:1719120

  15. Identification of a KRAB-zinc finger protein binding to the Rpe65 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongjian; Poliakov, Eugenia; Redmond, T Michael

    2006-05-01

    We wish to identify transcriptional factors involved in regulation binding to the proximal promoter region of the RPE65 gene that confers RPE-specific expression. We incubated human D407 RPE cell nuclear extract with double-stranded (sense 5-prime biotinylated) oligonucleotides, based on the RPE65 proximal gene promoter, bound to streptavidin-Dynabeads. Bound nuclear proteins were eluted, separated on SDS-PAGE, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Peptide sequence was used to identify cDNA clones that were subcloned into pCDNA3.1 for expression and co-transfection into D407 cells to assess transcriptional activation of mouse Rpe65 gene promoter/reporter constructs. SiRNA interference was used to suppress ZNF492 expression. We identified a D407 nuclear protein binding to biotinylated-DNA/streptavidin beads as the product of clone KIAA1473 encoding a protein named ZNF492. ZNF492 has an open reading frame of 531 amino acids with a truncated N-terminus and lacks the usual Krüppel-associated box-A (KRAB-A) while KRAB-B remains intact and has 12 C2H2 zinc-fingers in tandem arrangement. Co-expression in D407 cells of ZNF492 protein did not activate TR1, a mouse Rpe65 gene promoter/reporter construct with 49-bp 5-prime flanking sequence, but did activate construct TR2, containing 188-bp 5-prime flanking sequence, by 2.5-fold, and the longer constructs TR4, containing 655-bp 5-prime flanking sequence, and TR5, containing 1240-bp 5-prime flanking sequence, by about 2-fold. SiRNA-mediated suppression of ZNF492 in D407 resulted in decreased Rpe65 promoter activity. We have identified ZNF492, a KRAB-zinc finger protein, by its interaction with immobilized RPE65 promoter DNA sequence. This KRAB-zinc finger protein serves as a moderate transcriptional factor for Rpe65 gene upregulation. In ZNF492, absence of KRAB-A might reduce or prevent co-repressor binding to account for the modest upregulation of Rpe65 gene expression.

  16. Requiem: a novel zinc finger gene essential for apoptosis in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Mantel, P L; Rosli, R; Crean, C D

    1994-11-25

    To identify genes mediating programmed cell death triggered by interleukin 3 (IL-3)-deprivation of myeloid cells, the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell line FDCP-1 was used to screen a mammalian cell expression library for cDNAs that would promote survival following withdrawal of IL-3. A unique 892-base pair cDNA was cloned that prevented the programmed cell death response following IL-3 deprivation by causing antisense suppression of an endogenous 2.4-kilobase (kb) mRNA. A 2.3-kb cDNA containing the identical 892-base pair over-lapping sequence was cloned that encoded a deduced 371-amino acid protein containing a single Kruppel-type zinc finger and a cluster of 4 cysteine/histidine-rich repeats resembling atypical zinc fingers. The 2.4-kb mRNA was found to be ubiquitously expressed in murine tissues and its abundance in FDCP-1 cells was not altered in response to IL-3 deprivation. Since expression of this 2.4-kb mRNA was a prerequisite for the apoptosis response following IL-3 deprivation, the gene encoding it was named requiem. Requiem is likely to encode a transcription factor required for the apoptosis response following survival factor withdrawal from myeloid cells.

  17. Gene Discovery and Advances in Finger Millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.] Genomics—An Important Nutri-Cereal of Future

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Salej; Kumar, Anil; Babu, B. Kalyana; Gaur, Vikram S.; Pandey, Dinesh; Kant, Lakshmi; Pattnayak, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    The rapid strides in molecular marker technologies followed by genomics, and next generation sequencing advancements in three major crops (rice, maize and wheat) of the world have given opportunities for their use in the orphan, but highly valuable future crops, including finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.]. Finger millet has many special agronomic and nutritional characteristics, which make it an indispensable crop in arid, semi-arid, hilly and tribal areas of India and Africa. The crop has proven its adaptability in harsh conditions and has shown resilience to climate change. The adaptability traits of finger millet have shown the advantage over major cereal grains under stress conditions, revealing it as a storehouse of important genomic resources for crop improvement. Although new technologies for genomic studies are now available, progress in identifying and tapping these important alleles or genes is lacking. RAPDs were the default choice for genetic diversity studies in the crop until the last decade, but the subsequent development of SSRs and comparative genomics paved the way for the marker assisted selection in finger millet. Resistance gene homologs from NBS-LRR region of finger millet for blast and sequence variants for nutritional traits from other cereals have been developed and used invariably. Population structure analysis studies exhibit 2–4 sub-populations in the finger millet gene pool with separate grouping of Indian and exotic genotypes. Recently, the omics technologies have been efficiently applied to understand the nutritional variation, drought tolerance and gene mining. Progress has also occurred with respect to transgenics development. This review presents the current biotechnological advancements along with research gaps and future perspective of genomic research in finger millet. PMID:27881984

  18. Gene Discovery and Advances in Finger Millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.] Genomics-An Important Nutri-Cereal of Future.

    PubMed

    Sood, Salej; Kumar, Anil; Babu, B Kalyana; Gaur, Vikram S; Pandey, Dinesh; Kant, Lakshmi; Pattnayak, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    The rapid strides in molecular marker technologies followed by genomics, and next generation sequencing advancements in three major crops (rice, maize and wheat) of the world have given opportunities for their use in the orphan, but highly valuable future crops, including finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L.) Gaertn.]. Finger millet has many special agronomic and nutritional characteristics, which make it an indispensable crop in arid, semi-arid, hilly and tribal areas of India and Africa. The crop has proven its adaptability in harsh conditions and has shown resilience to climate change. The adaptability traits of finger millet have shown the advantage over major cereal grains under stress conditions, revealing it as a storehouse of important genomic resources for crop improvement. Although new technologies for genomic studies are now available, progress in identifying and tapping these important alleles or genes is lacking. RAPDs were the default choice for genetic diversity studies in the crop until the last decade, but the subsequent development of SSRs and comparative genomics paved the way for the marker assisted selection in finger millet. Resistance gene homologs from NBS-LRR region of finger millet for blast and sequence variants for nutritional traits from other cereals have been developed and used invariably. Population structure analysis studies exhibit 2-4 sub-populations in the finger millet gene pool with separate grouping of Indian and exotic genotypes. Recently, the omics technologies have been efficiently applied to understand the nutritional variation, drought tolerance and gene mining. Progress has also occurred with respect to transgenics development. This review presents the current biotechnological advancements along with research gaps and future perspective of genomic research in finger millet.

  19. Chromosomal mapping and genomic organization of an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger gene ZNF277.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Guo, W; Nagarajan, L

    2000-06-01

    A novel C2H2 zinc finger gene, ZNF277, has been localized to human chromosome 7q31.1. The gene is encoded by 12 exons in a genomic fragment of >100 kb between the microsatellite markers D7S523 and D7S471, deleted in a number of malignancies. The predicted open reading frame (ORF) of 438 amino acids shows an overall homology of 50% to the putative ORF F46B6.7 of Caenorhabditis elegans. The presence of a 30-amino-acid coiled-coil domain in both the C. elegans ORF F46B6.7 and ZNF277 is suggestive of functional similarities. ESTs for the murine orthologue ZFP277 are found in early embryonic stem cells, 16-cell stage embryo, and blastocysts. The evolutionary conservation and the expression profile suggest ZNF277 to be a critical regulator of development and differentiation. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. DNMT3B isoforms without catalytic activity stimulate gene body methylation as accessory proteins in somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Duymich, Christopher E; Charlet, Jessica; Yang, Xiaojing; Jones, Peter A; Liang, Gangning

    2016-04-28

    Promoter DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism for stable gene silencing, but is correlated with expression when located in gene bodies. Maintenance and de novo DNA methylation by catalytically active DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3A/B) require accessory proteins such as UHRF1 and DNMT3L. DNMT3B isoforms are widely expressed, although some do not have active catalytic domains and their expression can be altered during cell development and tumourigenesis, questioning their biological roles. Here, we show that DNMT3B isoforms stimulate gene body methylation and re-methylation after methylation-inhibitor treatment. This occurs independently of the isoforms' catalytic activity, demonstrating a similar functional role to the accessory protein DNMT3L, which is only expressed in undifferentiated cells and recruits DNMT3A to initiate DNA methylation. This unexpected role for DNMT3B suggests that it might substitute for the absent accessory protein DNMT3L to recruit DNMT3A in somatic cells.

  1. The putative zinc finger of a caulimovirus is essential for infectivity but does not influence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Kiernan, J M; Shepherd, R J

    1993-04-01

    Plant pararetroviruses, such as caulimoviruses, and animal retroviruses have in common the presence of a highly conserved arrangement of cysteines and a histidine in the precursor of the capsid protein. The composition of these amino acids resembles a zinc finger element, a structure that is common to a class of eukaryotic proteins that regulate gene expression. The role of the putative zinc finger in the life-cycle of caulimoviruses was investigated by introducing specific mutations in the coat protein coding region of a cloned and infectious form of figwort mosaic virus, a caulimovirus. This mutated viral genome, which no longer encoded the conserved cysteine and histidine residues, was not infectious in plants. Transient expression assays in protoplasts showed that expression of a reporter gene inserted at different places in the genome was not detectably influenced by the coat protein or its putative zinc finger. It appears that the zinc finger-like element of caulimoviruses is not involved in the regulation of gene expression. These observations support a model which predicts a function of the zinc finger in specific recognition and packaging of viral RNA into virions prior to reverse transcription.

  2. Accelerated exchange of exon segments in Viperid three-finger toxin genes (Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii; Desert Massasauga)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Snake venoms consist primarily of proteins and peptides showing a myriad of potent biological activities which have been shaped by both adaptive and neutral selective forces. Venom proteins are encoded by multigene families that have evolved through a process of gene duplication followed by accelerated evolution in the protein coding region. Results Here we report five gene structures of three-finger toxins from a viperid snake, Sistrurus catenatus edwardsii. These toxin genes are structured similarly to elapid and hydrophiid three-finger toxin genes, with two introns and three exons. Both introns and exons show distinct patterns of segmentation, and the insertion/deletion of segments may define their evolutionary history. The segments in introns, when present, are highly similar to their corresponding segments in other members of the gene family. In contrast, some segments in the exons show high similarity, while others are often distinctly different among corresponding regions of the isoforms. Conclusion Ordered, conserved exon structure strongly suggests that segments in corresponding regions in exons have been exchanged with distinctly different ones during the evolution of these genes. Such a "switching" of segments in exons may result in drastically altering the molecular surface topology and charge, and hence the molecular targets of these three-finger toxins. Thus the phenomenon of accelerated segment switch in exons to alter targeting (ASSET) may play an important role in the evolution of three-finger toxins, resulting in a family of toxins with a highly conserved structural fold but widely varying biological activities. PMID:18606022

  3. Selection-Independent Generation of Gene Knockout Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10−6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells. PMID:22194948

  4. Selection-independent generation of gene knockout mouse embryonic stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10(-6). In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells.

  5. p53 Gene Repair with Zinc Finger Nucleases Optimised by Yeast 1-Hybrid and Validated by Solexa Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Frank; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Baumstark, Rebecca; Fajardo-Sanchez, Emmanuel; Cotterell, James; Minoche, André; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Isalan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt) p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs). We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation ‘hotspots’. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci. PMID:21695267

  6. ZNF307, a novel zinc finger gene suppresses p53 and p21 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Wang Yuequn; Fan Xiongwei; Mo Xiaoyang; Wang Zequn; Li Yongqing; Yin Zhaochu; Deng Yun; Luo Na; Zhu Chuanbing; Liu Mingyao; Ma Qian; Ocorr, Karen Yuan Wuzhou Wu Xiushan

    2007-11-30

    We have cloned a novel KRAB-related zinc finger gene, ZNF307, encoding a protein of 545 aa. ZNF307 is conserved across species in evolution and is differentially expressed in human adult and fetal tissues. The fusion protein of EGFP-ZNF307 localizes in the nucleus. Transcriptional activity assays show ZNF307 suppresses transcriptional activity of L8G5-luciferase. Overexpressing ZNF307 in different cell lines also inhibits the transcriptional activities of p53 and p21. Moreover, ZNF307 works by reducing the p53 protein level and p53 protein reduction is achieved by increasing transcription of MDM2 and EP300. ZNF307 might suppress p53-p21 pathway through activating MDM2 and EP300 expression and inducing p53 degradation.

  7. The zinc finger gene Xblimp1 controls anterior endomesodermal cell fate in Spemann's organizer.

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, F S; Gawantka, V; Gómez, A P; Delius, H; Ang, S L; Niehrs, C

    1999-01-01

    The anterior endomesoderm of the early Xenopus gastrula is a part of Spemann's organizer and is important for head induction. Here we describe Xblimp1, which encodes a zinc finger transcriptional repressor expressed in the anterior endomesoderm. Xblimp1 represses trunk mesoderm and induces anterior endomesoderm in a cooperative manner with the pan-endodermal gene Mix.1. Furthermore, Xblimp1 can cooperate with the BMP inhibitor chordin to induce ectopic heads, while a dominant-negative Xblimp1 inhibits head formation. The head inducer cerberus is positively regulated by Xblimp1 and is able to rescue microcephalic embryos caused by dominant-negative Xblimp1. Our results indicate that Xblimp1 is required for anterior endomesodermal cell fate and head induction. PMID:10545117

  8. The zinc finger gene Xblimp1 controls anterior endomesodermal cell fate in Spemann's organizer.

    PubMed

    de Souza, F S; Gawantka, V; Gómez, A P; Delius, H; Ang, S L; Niehrs, C

    1999-11-01

    The anterior endomesoderm of the early Xenopus gastrula is a part of Spemann's organizer and is important for head induction. Here we describe Xblimp1, which encodes a zinc finger transcriptional repressor expressed in the anterior endomesoderm. Xblimp1 represses trunk mesoderm and induces anterior endomesoderm in a cooperative manner with the pan-endodermal gene Mix.1. Furthermore, Xblimp1 can cooperate with the BMP inhibitor chordin to induce ectopic heads, while a dominant-negative Xblimp1 inhibits head formation. The head inducer cerberus is positively regulated by Xblimp1 and is able to rescue microcephalic embryos caused by dominant-negative Xblimp1. Our results indicate that Xblimp1 is required for anterior endomesodermal cell fate and head induction.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis during Human Trophectoderm Specification Suggests New Roles of Metabolic and Epigenetic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Haouzi, Delphine; Monzo, Cécile; Dechaud, Hervé; Kadoch, Issac-Jacques; Hamamah, Samir

    2012-01-01

    In humans, successful pregnancy depends on a cascade of dynamic events during early embryonic development. Unfortunately, molecular data on these critical events is scarce. To improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern the specification/development of the trophoblast cell lineage, the transcriptome of human trophectoderm (TE) cells from day 5 blastocysts was compared to that of single day 3 embryos from our in vitro fertilization program by using Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Some of the microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. The TE molecular signature included 2,196 transcripts, among which were genes already known to be TE-specific (GATA2, GATA3 and GCM1) but also genes involved in trophoblast invasion (MUC15), chromatin remodeling (specifically the DNA methyltransferase DNMT3L) and steroid metabolism (HSD3B1, HSD17B1 and FDX1). In day 3 human embryos 1,714 transcripts were specifically up-regulated. Besides stemness genes such as NANOG and DPPA2, this signature included genes belonging to the NLR family (NALP4, 5, 9, 11 and 13), Ret finger protein-like family (RFPL1, 2 and 3), Melanoma Antigen family (MAGEA1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 12) and previously unreported transcripts, such as MBD3L2 and ZSCAN4. This study provides a comprehensive outlook of the genes that are expressed during the initial embryo-trophectoderm transition in humans. Further understanding of the biological functions of the key genes involved in steroidogenesis and epigenetic regulation of transcription that are up-regulated in TE cells may clarify their contribution to TE specification and might also provide new biomarkers for the selection of viable and competent blastocysts. PMID:22761758

  10. Deleterious Mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene Cause Brittle Cornea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Almogit; Frydman, Moshe; Marek, Dina; Pras, Eran; Nir, Uri; Reznik-Wolf, Haike; Pras, Elon

    2008-01-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a thin cornea that tends to perforate, causing progressive visual loss and blindness. Additional systemic symptoms such as joint hypermotility, hyperlaxity of the skin, and kyphoscoliosis place BCS among the connective-tissue disorders. Previously, we assigned the disease gene to a 4.7 Mb interval on chromosome 16q24. In order to clone the BCS gene, we first narrowed the disease locus to a 2.8 Mb interval and systematically sequenced genes expressed in connective tissue in this chromosomal segment. We have identified two frameshift mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 gene (ZNF469). In five unrelated patients of Tunisian Jewish ancestry, we found a 1 bp deletion at position 5943 (5943 delA), and in an inbred Palestinian family we detected a single-nucleotide deletion at position 9527 (9527 delG). The function of ZNF469 is unknown. However, a 30% homology to a number of collagens suggests that it could act as a transcription factor involved in the synthesis and/or organization of collagen fibers. PMID:18452888

  11. Heritable Targeted Inactivation of Myostatin Gene in Yellow Catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) Using Engineered Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kui; Xu, Zhiqiang; Liang, Dong; Li, Jingyun; Li, Junbo; Jia, Wenshuang; Li, Yuehua; Dong, Xiaohua; Cao, Shasha; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2011-01-01

    Yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) is one of the most important freshwater aquaculture species in China. However, its small size and lower meat yield limit its edible value. Myostatin (MSTN) is a negative regulator of mammalian muscle growth. But, the function of Mstn in fish remains elusive. To explore roles of mstn gene in fish growth and create a strain of yellow catfish with high amount of muscle mass, we performed targeted disruption of mstn in yellow catfish using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Employing zebrafish embryos as a screening system to identify ZFN activity, we obtained one pair of ZFNs that can edit mstn in yellow catfish genome. Using the ZFNs, we successfully obtained two founders (Founder July29-7 and Founder July29-8) carrying mutated mstn gene in their germ cells. The mutated mstn allele inherited from Founder July29-7 was a null allele (mstnnju6) containing a 4 bp insertion, predicted to encode function null Mstn. The mutated mstn inherited from Founder July29-8 was a complex type of mutation (mstnnju7), predicted to encode a protein lacking two amino acids in the N-terminal secretory signal of Mstn. Totally, we obtained 6 mstnnju6/+ and 14 mstnnju7/+ yellow catfish. To our best knowledge, this is the first endogenous gene knockout in aquaculture fish. Our result will help in understanding the roles of mstn gene in fish. PMID:22194943

  12. [Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a SUPERMAN-like zinc finger protein gene in upland cotton].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Wen; Ni, Wan-Chao; Zhang, Bao-Long; Shen, Xin-Lian; Zhang, Xiang-Gui; Xu, Ying-Jun; Yao, Shu

    2006-04-01

    The zinc finger proteins belong to the largest family of regulatory transcription factors, which play an important role in growth and development in animal and plant systems. SUPERMAN-like zinc finger protein gene has only one "finger like" motif. A pair of degenerate primers was designed according to the conserved regions, and 3 kinds of EST of this family were isolated from cotton through RT-PCR. The full length of one SUPERMAN-like zinc finger protein also has been acquired. The entire coding region is 744 bp and encodes a polypeptide of 248 amino acids with 40% homology to RBE protein of Arabidopsis deposited in the GenBank. This gene was designated as GZFP. It has the conserved zinc finger domain and the leucine rich region at the carboxyl terminus but no intron in the coding region. GZFP also has the plant nuclear localization signal. GZFP shows a more expression pattern in floral buds, ovaries, petals and roots than in phloem, xylem, fibers, leaves and seeds of cotton by RT-PCR, although it has a very low detection level and there is not any homologous ESTs found in the GenBank. Analysis of the 5' flanking sequence shows there are several regulatory elements responsible for pollen and root expression, four core sites required for binding of Dof proteins and four light-regulated elements.

  13. Wheat VIN3-like PHD finger genes are up-regulated by vernalization.

    PubMed

    Fu, Daolin; Dunbar, Mignon; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2007-03-01

    The term 'vernalization' describes the acceleration of the transition between the vegetative and reproductive stages after exposing plants to an extended period of low temperature. In Arabidopsis, vernalization promotes flowering by silencing the flowering repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Mitotically stable repression of FLC is the result of chromatin modifications mediated by the Vernalization-INsensitive 3 (VIN3) and VIN3-Like (VIL) proteins. In this study, we identified and characterized three VIL genes in diploid wheat (Triticum monococcum L.), named TmVIL1, TmVIL2, and TmVIL3. Similar to Arabidopsis VIN3, all three wheat VIL proteins carry three conserved domains including a plant homeodomain finger motif (PHD), a fibronectin type III domain (FNIII), and a VIN3 interacting domain (VID). Genetic mapping placed TmVIL1, TmVIL2, and TmVIL3 loci in the centromeric regions of chromosome 5, 6, and 1, respectively. The chromosome location of TmVIL1 is close to that of the vernalization gene VRN-D5, but more precise mapping information is required to validate this relationship. Transcription of the wheat VIL genes was up-regulated by vernalization, with a peak after 4-6 weeks of cold treatment. When transferred back to warm conditions, transcript levels of the wheat VIL genes returned to pre-vernalization levels. In addition, the transcript levels of wheat VIL genes are affected by photoperiod. This study indicates that wheat VIL genes have retained a similar structure and transcriptional regulation as their Arabidopsis VIN3/VIL homologues, suggesting that they might have retained some of their functions.

  14. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masahito; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Matsunari, Hitomi; Takayanagi, Shuko; Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; and others

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. {yields} ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. {yields} Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  15. The C2H2 zinc finger genes of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and their expression in embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Materna, Stefan C; Howard-Ashby, Meredith; Gray, Rachel F; Davidson, Eric H

    2006-12-01

    The C2H2 zinc finger is one of the most abundant protein domains and is thought to have been extensively replicated in diverse animal clades. Some well-studied proteins that contain this domain are transcriptional regulators. As part of an attempt to delineate all transcription factors encoded in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, we identified the C2H2 zinc finger genes indicated in the sequence, and examined their involvement in embryonic development. We found 377 zinc finger genes in the sea urchin genome, about half the number found in mice or humans. Their expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Up to the end of gastrulation less than a third of these genes is expressed, and about 75% of the expressed genes are maternal; both parameters distinguish these from all other classes of regulatory genes as measured in other studies. Spatial expression pattern was determined by whole mount in situ hybridization for 43 genes transcribed at a sufficient level, and localized expression was observed in diverse embryonic tissues. These genes may execute important regulatory functions in development. However, the functional meaning of the majority of this large gene family remains undefined.

  16. SCAN domain-containing 2 gene (SCAND2) is a novel nuclear protein derived from the zinc finger family by exon shuffling.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Denis; Dupérat, Véronique Guyonnet; Arveiler, Benoît

    2002-05-01

    The SCAN domain is a recently recognized protein domain that characterizes a subfamily of the Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins. We have previously described a novel SCAN domain-containing 2 gene (SCAND2) that does not belong to the zinc finger family. We report structural and sequence analyzes of all known members of the SCAN family and use these data to illustrate a model of gene family evolution. Most of the SCAN containing genes share common gene organization features that support the proposed origin for SCAND2 by disruption of an ancestral SCAN-zinc finger gene by a retroposition event and subsequent exon shuffling.

  17. Nuclear gene targeting in Chlamydomonas using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Irina; Greiner, Andre; Awasthi, Mayanka; Kateriya, Suneel; Hegemann, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a versatile model for fundamental and biotechnological research. A wide range of tools for genetic manipulation have been developed for this alga, but specific modification of nuclear genes is still not routinely possible. Here, we present a nuclear gene targeting strategy for Chlamydomonas that is based on the application of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Our approach includes (i) design of gene-specific ZFNs using available online tools, (ii) evaluation of the designed ZFNs in a Chlamydomonas in situ model system, (iii) optimization of ZFN activity by modification of the nuclease domain, and (iv) application of the most suitable enzymes for mutagenesis of an endogenous gene. Initially, we designed a set of ZFNs to target the COP3 gene that encodes the light-activated ion channel channelrhodopsin-1. To evaluate the designed ZFNs, we constructed a model strain by inserting a non-functional aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase VIII (aphVIII) selection marker interspaced with a short COP3 target sequence into the nuclear genome. Upon co-transformation of this recipient strain with the engineered ZFNs and an aphVIII DNA template, we were able to restore marker activity and select paromomycin-resistant (Pm-R) clones with expressing nucleases. Of these Pm-R clones, 1% also contained a modified COP3 locus. In cases where cells were co-transformed with a modified COP3 template, the COP3 locus was specifically modified by homologous recombination between COP3 and the supplied template DNA. We anticipate that this ZFN technology will be useful for studying the functions of individual genes in Chlamydomonas.

  18. Zinc finger transcription factor Slug is a novel target gene of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, Togo; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2006-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor. We previously showed that AhR localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm under high cell densities of a keratinocytes cell line, HaCaT, but accumulates in the nucleus at low cell densities. In the current report, we show that the Slug, which is a member of the snail/slug family of zinc finger transcriptional repressors critical for induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT), is activated transcriptionally in accordance with nuclear accumulation of AhR. By reporter assay of the promoter of the Slug gene, gel shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed AhR directly binds to xenobiotic responsive element 5 at - 0.7 kb of the gene. AhR-targeted gene silencing by small interfering RNA duplexes led to the abolishment of not only CYP1A1 but also Slug induction by 3-methycholanthrene. The Slug was co-localized to the AhR at the wound margins of HaCaT cells, where apparent nuclear distribution of AhR and Slug was observed. The induced Slug was associated with reduction of an epithelial marker of cytokeratin-18 and with an increase in the mesenchymal marker, fibronectin. Taken together, these findings suggest that AhR participated in Slug induction, which, in turn, regulates cellular physiology including cell adhesion and migration.

  19. Heritable Targeted Gene Disruption in Zebrafish Using Designed Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Yannick; McCammon, Jasmine M; Miller, Jeffrey C; Faraji, Farhoud; Ngo, Catherine; Katibah, George E; Amora, Rainier; Hocking, Toby D; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Amacher, Sharon L

    2009-01-01

    We describe here the use of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for somatic and germline disruption of genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio), where targeted mutagenesis was previously intractable. ZFNs induce a targeted double-strand break in the genome that is repaired to generate small insertions and deletions. We designed ZFNs targeting the zebrafish golden and no tail/Brachyury genes. In both cases, injection of ZFN-encoding mRNA into 1-cell embryos yielded a high percentage of animals carrying distinct mutations at the ZFN-specified position and exhibiting expected loss-of-function phenotypes. Disrupted ntl alleles were transmitted from ZFN mRNA-injected founder animals in over half the adults tested at frequencies averaging 20%. The frequency and precision of gene disruption events observed, in combination with the ability to design ZFNs against any locus, open fundamentally novel avenues of experimentation, and suggest that ZFN technology may be widely applied to many organisms that allow mRNA delivery into the fertilized egg. PMID:18500334

  20. Heritable targeted gene disruption in zebrafish using designed zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Yannick; McCammon, Jasmine M; Miller, Jeffrey C; Faraji, Farhoud; Ngo, Catherine; Katibah, George E; Amora, Rainier; Hocking, Toby D; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Amacher, Sharon L

    2008-06-01

    We describe the use of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) for somatic and germline disruption of genes in zebrafish (Danio rerio), in which targeted mutagenesis was previously intractable. ZFNs induce a targeted double-strand break in the genome that is repaired to generate small insertions and deletions. We designed ZFNs targeting the zebrafish golden and no tail/Brachyury (ntl) genes and developed a budding yeast-based assay to identify the most active ZFNs for use in vivo. Injection of ZFN-encoding mRNA into one-cell embryos yielded a high percentage of animals carrying distinct mutations at the ZFN-specified position and exhibiting expected loss-of-function phenotypes. Over half the ZFN mRNA-injected founder animals transmitted disrupted ntl alleles at frequencies averaging 20%. The frequency and precision of gene-disruption events observed suggest that this approach should be applicable to any loci in zebrafish or in other organisms that allow mRNA delivery into the fertilized egg.

  1. A zinc finger transcription factor ART1 regulates multiple genes implicated in aluminum tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Naoki; Huang, Chao Feng; Nagao, Sakiko; Yano, Masahiro; Sato, Yutaka; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Ma, Jian Feng

    2009-10-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is the major limiting factor of crop production on acid soils, but some plant species have evolved ways of detoxifying Al. Here, we report a C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factor ART1 (for Al resistance transcription factor 1), which specifically regulates the expression of genes related to Al tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa). ART1 is constitutively expressed in the root, and the expression level is not affected by Al treatment. ART1 is localized in the nucleus of all root cells. A yeast one-hybrid assay showed that ART1 has a transcriptional activation potential and interacts with the promoter region of STAR1, an important factor in rice Al tolerance. Microarray analysis revealed 31 downstream transcripts regulated by ART1, including STAR1 and 2 and a couple of homologs of Al tolerance genes in other plants. Some of these genes were implicated in both internal and external detoxification of Al at different cellular levels. Our findings shed light on comprehensively understanding how plants detoxify aluminum to survive in an acidic environment.

  2. Highly efficient gene targeting of expressed and silent genes in human ESCs and iPSCs using zinc finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Soldner, Frank; Beard, Caroline; Gao, Qing; Mitalipova, Maisam; DeKelver, Russell C.; Katibah, George E.; Amora, Ranier; Boydston, Elizabeth A.; Zeitler, Bryan; Meng, Xiangdong; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs) are powerful tools for biomedical research. Realizing the full potential of these cells requires efficient genetic modification. However, techniques to generate cell type specific lineage reporters as well as reliable tools to disrupt, repair or overexpress genes by gene targeting are inefficient at best and thus are not routinely used. Here we report the highly efficient targeting of three genes in human pluripotent cells using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) mediated genome editing. First, using ZFNs specific for the OCT4 locus we generated OCT4-eGFP reporter cells to monitor the pluripotent state of hESCs. Secondly, we inserted a transgene into the AAVS1 locus to generate a robust drug-inducible overexpression system in hESCs. Finally, we targeted the PITX3 gene, demonstrating that ZFNs can be used to generate reporter cells by targeting non-expressed genes in hESCs and hiPSCs. PMID:19680244

  3. Zinc-finger nickase-mediated insertion of the lysostaphin gene into the beta-casein locus in cloned cows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Yongsheng; Guo, Wenjiang; Chang, Bohao; Liu, Jun; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc-finger nickases (ZFNickases) are a type of programmable nuclease that can be engineered from zinc-finger nucleases to induce site-specific single-strand breaks or nicks in genomic DNA, which result in homology-directed repair. Although zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene disruption has been demonstrated in pigs and cattle, they have not been used to target gene addition into an endogenous gene locus in any large domestic species. Here we show in bovine fetal fibroblasts that targeting ZFNickases to the endogenous β-casein (CSN2) locus stimulates lysostaphin gene addition by homology-directed repair. We find that ZFNickase-treated cells can be successfully used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in live-born gene-targeted cows. Furthermore, the gene-targeted cows secrete lysostaphin in their milk and in vitro assays demonstrate the milk's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus. Our success with this strategy will facilitate new transgenic technologies beneficial to both agriculture and biomedicine.

  4. Artificial zinc finger DNA binding domains: versatile tools for genome engineering and modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mir A; Barrow, Joeva J; Shen, Yong; Haq, Md Imdadul; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Genome editing and alteration of gene expression by synthetic DNA binding activities gained a lot of momentum over the last decade. This is due to the development of new DNA binding molecules with enhanced binding specificity. The most commonly used DNA binding modules are zinc fingers (ZFs), TALE-domains, and the RNA component of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These binding modules are fused or linked to either nucleases that cut the DNA and induce DNA repair processes, or to protein domains that activate or repress transcription of genes close to the targeted site in the genome. This review focuses on the structure, design, and applications of ZF DNA binding domains (ZFDBDs). ZFDBDs are relatively small and have been shown to penetrate the cell membrane without additional tags suggesting that they could be delivered to cells without a DNA or RNA intermediate. Advanced algorithms that are based on extensive knowledge of the mode of ZF/DNA interactions are used to design the amino acid composition of ZFDBDs so that they bind to unique sites in the genome. Off-target binding has been a concern for all synthetic DNA binding molecules. Thus, increasing the specificity and affinity of ZFDBDs will have a significant impact on their use in analytical or therapeutic settings.

  5. Establishment of transgenic mice carrying gene encoding human zinc finger protein 191

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xia; Yang, Hua; Wang, Shui-Liang; Gong, Xue-Lian; Feng, Hao; Guo, Bao-Yu; Yu, Long; Wang, Zhu-Gang; Fu, Ji-Liang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Human zinc finger protein 191 (ZNF191) was cloned and characterized as a Krüppel-like transcription factor, which might be relevant to many diseases such as liver cancer, neuropsychiatric and cardiovascular diseases. Although progress has been made recently, the biological function of ZNF191 remains largely unidentified. The aim of this study was to establish a ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model, which would promote the functional study of ZNF191. METHODS: Transgene fragments were microinjected into fertilized eggs of mice. The manipulated embryos were transferred into the oviducts of pseudo-pregnant female mice. The offsprings were identified by PCR and Southern blot analysis. ZNF 191 gene expression was analyzed by RT-PCR. Transgenic founder mice were used to establish transgenic mouse lineages. The first generation (F1) and the second generation (F2) mice were identified by PCR analysis. Ten-week transgenic mice were used for pathological examination. RESULTS: Four mice were identified as carrying copies of ZNF191 gene. The results of RT-PCR showed that ZNF 191 gene was expressed in the liver, testis and brain in one of the transgenic mouse lineages. Genetic analysis of transgenic mice demonstrated that ZNF 191 gene was integrated into the chromosome at a single site and could be transmitted stably. Pathological analysis showed that the expression of ZNF 191 did not cause obvious pathological changes in multiple tissues of transgenic mice. CONCLUSION: ZNF 191 transgenic mouse model would facilitate the investigation of biological functions of ZNF191 in vivo. PMID:14716836

  6. Efficient immunoglobulin gene disruption and targeted replacement in rabbit using zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Flisikowska, Tatiana; Thorey, Irmgard S; Offner, Sonja; Ros, Francesca; Lifke, Valeria; Zeitler, Bryan; Rottmann, Oswald; Vincent, Anna; Zhang, Lei; Jenkins, Shirin; Niersbach, Helmut; Kind, Alexander J; Gregory, Philip D; Schnieke, Angelika E; Platzer, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM) locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM(+) and IgG(+) B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields.

  7. Expression patterns of ethylene biosynthesis genes from bananas during fruit ripening and in relationship with finger drop

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Olivier; Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Banana finger drop is defined as dislodgement of individual fruits from the hand at the pedicel rupture area. For some banana varieties, this is a major feature of the ripening process, in addition to ethylene production and sugar metabolism. The few studies devoted to assessing the physiological and molecular basis of this process revealed (i) the similarity between this process and softening, (ii) the early onset of related molecular events, between the first and fourth day after ripening induction, and (iii) the putative involvement of ethylene as a regulatory factor. This study was conducted with the aim of identifying, through a candidate gene approach, a quality-related marker that could be used as a tool in breeding programmes. Here we examined the relationship between ripening ethylene biosynthesis (EB) and finger drop in order to gain further insight into the upstream regulatory steps of the banana finger drop process and to identify putative related candidate genes. Methods Postharvest ripening of green banana fruit was induced by acetylene treatment and fruit taken at 1–4 days after ripening induction, and total RNA extracted from the median area [control zone (CZ)] and the pedicel rupture area [drop zone (DZ)] of peel tissue. Then the expression patterns of EB genes (MaACO1, MaACO2, MaACS1, MaACS2, MaACS3 and MaACS4) were comparatively examined in CZ and DZ via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Principal results Differential expression of EB gene was observed in CZ and DZ during the postharvest period examined in this study. MaACO1, MaACS2 and MaACS1 were more highly induced in DZ than in the control, while a slight induction of the MaACS4 gene was observed. No marked differences between the two zones were observed for the MaACO2 gene. Conclusions The finger drop process enhanced EB gene expression including developmental- and ripening-induced genes (MaACO1), specific ripening-induced genes (MaACS1) and wound

  8. trans Repression of the Human Metallothionein IIA Gene Promoter by PZ120, a Novel 120-Kilodalton Zinc Finger Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chih-Min; Westling, Jennifer; Seto, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Metallothioneins are small, highly conserved, cysteine-rich proteins that bind a variety of metal ions. They are found in virtually all eukaryotic organisms and are regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. In humans, the predominant metallothionein gene is hMTIIA, which accounts for 50% of all metallothioneins expressed in cultured human cells. The hMTIIA promoter is quite complex. In addition to cis-acting DNA sequences that serve as binding sites for trans-acting factors such as Sp1, AP1, AP2, AP4, and the glucocorticoid receptor, the hMTIIA promoter contains eight consensus metal response element sequences. We report here the cloning of a novel zinc finger protein with a molecular mass of 120 kDa (PZ120) that interacts specifically with the hMTIIA transcription initiation site. The PZ120 protein is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and possesses a conserved poxvirus and zinc finger (POZ) motif previously found in several zinc finger transcription factors. Intriguingly, we found that a region of PZ120 outside of the zinc finger domain can bind specifically to the hMTIIA DNA. Using transient-transfection analysis, we found that PZ120 repressed transcription of the hMTIIA promoter. These results suggest that the hMTIIA gene is regulated by an additional negative regulator that has not been previously described. PMID:9858591

  9. Targeted gene addition into a specified location in the human genome using designed zinc finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Moehle, Erica A.; Rock, Jeremy M.; Lee, Ya-Li; Jouvenot, Yann; DeKelver, Russell C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient incorporation of novel DNA sequences into a specific site in the genome of living human cells remains a challenge despite its potential utility to genetic medicine, biotechnology, and basic research. We find that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can stimulate integration of long DNA stretches into a predetermined genomic location, resulting in high-efficiency site-specific gene addition. Using an extrachromosomal DNA donor carrying a 12-bp tag, a 900-bp ORF, or a 1.5-kb promoter-transcription unit flanked by locus-specific homology arms, we find targeted integration frequencies of 15%, 6%, and 5%, respectively, within 72 h of treatment, and with no selection for the desired event. Importantly, we find that the integration event occurs in a homology-directed manner and leads to the accurate reconstruction of the donor-specified genotype at the endogenous chromosomal locus, and hence presumably results from synthesis-dependent strand annealing repair of the break using the donor DNA as a template. This site-specific gene addition occurs with no measurable increase in the rate of random integration. Remarkably, we also find that ZFNs can drive the addition of an 8-kb sequence carrying three distinct promoter-transcription units into an endogenous locus at a frequency of 6%, also in the absence of any selection. These data reveal the surprising versatility of the specialized polymerase machinery involved in double-strand break repair, illuminate a powerful approach to mammalian cell engineering, and open the possibility of ZFN-driven gene addition therapy for human genetic disease. PMID:17360608

  10. Deletion of the RING-finger peroxin 2 gene in Aspergillus nidulans does not affect meiotic development.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Michael J; Murray, Sandra L; Kahn, Freya K

    2010-05-01

    Peroxins are required for protein import into peroxisomes as well as for peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation. Loss-of-function mutations in genes for the RING-finger peroxins Pex2, Pex10 and Pex12 lead to a specific block in meiosis in the ascomycete Podospora anserina. However, loss of protein import into peroxisomes does not result in this meiotic defect. Therefore, it has been suggested that these peroxins have a specific function required for meiosis. To determine whether this role is conserved in other filamentous fungi, we have deleted the gene encoding Pex2 in Aspergillus nidulans. The phenotypes resulting from this deletion are no different from those of previously isolated pex mutants affected in peroxisomal protein import, and viable ascospores are produced in selfed crosses. Therefore, the role of the RING-finger peroxins in meiosis is not conserved in filamentous ascomycetes.

  11. Mutations in the zinc finger protein gene, ZNF469, contribute to the pathogenesis of keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Andrea L; Jordan, Charlotte A; Cadzow, Murray J; Merriman, Tony R; McGhee, Charles N

    2014-08-05

    Mutations in the zinc finger protein gene ZNF469 cause recessive brittle cornea syndrome, characterized by spontaneous corneal perforations. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated common variants in this gene as a determinant for central corneal thickness (CCT). We investigated the contribution of ZNF469 in a sample set of keratoconus patients. Forty-three patients with keratoconus (49% Māori or Pacific [Polynesian]) were recruited. If a family history was present, family members were recruited. Participants underwent comprehensive examination, and a DNA sample was collected. Mutational analysis of ZNF469 was undertaken using Sanger sequencing, including an ancestrally matched Polynesian control population. Bioinformatic databases of exome variation and protein prediction software were used to determine presence and frequency and the pathogenicity for each observed change. Fourteen nonsynonymous missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were observed in ZNF469. Of the 43 probands, at least one probable disease-causing variant was detected in 20 (46%) (16/32 sporadic, 4/11 familial) and two variants in 5 (11.6%) (3/32 sporadic, 2/11 familial). Only heterozygous changes segregated with disease. Three "deleterious" changes observed in the Polynesian controls were removed from analysis; therefore pathogenic variants occurred in 10/43 (23.3%). Rare missense mutations in ZNF469, predicted to be pathogenic, occurred heterozygously, at a frequency of 23% in a keratoconus population. ZNF469 is associated with CCT in GWAS and is therefore likely to play a role in the synthesis and/or organization of corneal collagen fibers. The pathogenic changes observed either genetically predispose toward a "thin" cornea, which then becomes keratoconic, or are directly pathogenic. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  12. Identification of a gene in Leishmania infantum encoding a protein that contains a SP-RING/MIZ zinc finger domain.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Reguera, Rosa M; Villa, Héctor; Requena, José María; Müller, Stefan; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael; Ordóñez, David

    2003-10-01

    The SP-RING or Miz zinc finger domain that is related to the classical RING-finger motif, defines a class of proteins that can act as E3-like factors in the pathway of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) conjugation. This family includes the mammalian protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) proteins and related proteins from lower eukaryotes. Here we report the existence of a gene in Leishmania infantum, present as two identical copies placed upstream of each MAT2 gene copy, and transcribed as a single approximately 2.2 kb mRNA both in the logarithmic and stationary phases of the promastigote stage. This gene encodes a 47 kDa protein that has been named LORIEN. LORIEN is circumscribed to the cell periphery and it is antigenic during L. infantum infection of dogs and hamsters. Strikingly, this novel protein contains a highly conserved SP-RING/Miz zinc finger domain, raising the possibility that a SUMO or ubiquitin-like system may exist in this microorganism.

  13. Expression patterns of cell wall-modifying genes from banana during fruit ripening and in relationship with finger drop

    PubMed Central

    Mbéguié-A-Mbéguié, D.; Hubert, O.; Baurens, F. C.; Matsumoto, T.; Chillet, M.; Fils-Lycaon, B.; Sidibé-Bocs, S.

    2009-01-01

    Few molecular studies have been devoted to the finger drop process that occurs during banana fruit ripening. Recent studies revealed the involvement of changes in the properties of cell wall polysaccharides in the pedicel rupture area. In this study, the expression of cell-wall modifying genes was monitored in peel tissue during post-harvest ripening of Cavendish banana fruit, at median area (control zone) and compared with that in the pedicel rupture area (drop zone). To this end, three pectin methylesterase (PME) and seven xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) genes were isolated. The accumulation of their mRNAs and those of polygalaturonase, expansin, and pectate lyase genes already isolated from banana were examined. During post-harvest ripening, transcripts of all genes were detected in both zones, but accumulated differentially. MaPME1, MaPG1, and MaXTH4 mRNA levels did not change in either zone. Levels of MaPME3 and MaPG3 mRNAs increased greatly only in the control zone and at the late ripening stages. For other genes, the main molecular changes occurred 1–4 d after ripening induction. MaPME2, MaPEL1, MaPEL2, MaPG4, MaXTH6, MaXTH8, MaXTH9, MaEXP1, MaEXP4, and MaEXP5 accumulated highly in the drop zone, contrary to MaXTH3 and MaXTH5, and MaEXP2 throughout ripening. For MaPG2, MaXET1, and MaXET2 genes, high accumulation in the drop zone was transient. The transcriptional data obtained from all genes examined suggested that finger drop and peel softening involved similar mechanisms. These findings also led to the proposal of a sequence of molecular events leading to finger drop and to suggest some candidates. PMID:19357434

  14. Zinc finger protein Loz1 is required for zinc-responsive regulation of gene expression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Corkins, Mark E.; May, Margot; Ehrensberger, Kate M.; Hu, Ya-Mei; Liu, Yi-Hsuan; Bloor, Sean D.; Jenkins, Blair; Runge, Kurt W.; Bird, Amanda J.

    2013-01-01

    In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) is an abundant zinc-requiring enzyme that catalyses the conversion of acetaldehyde to ethanol during fermentation. In a zinc-replete cell, adh1 is highly expressed. However, in zinc-limited cells, adh1 gene expression is repressed, and cells induce the expression of an alternative alcohol dehydrogenase encoded by the adh4 gene. In our studies examining this zinc-dependent switch in alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression, we isolated an adh1Δ strain containing a partial loss of function mutation that resulted in higher levels of adh4 transcripts in zinc-replete cells. This mutation also led to the aberrant expression of other genes that are typically regulated by zinc. Using linkage analysis, we have mapped the position of this mutation to a single gene called Loss Of Zinc sensing 1 (loz1). Loz1 is a 55-kDa protein that contains a double C2H2-type zinc finger domain. The mapped mutation that disrupts Loz1 function leads to an arginine to glycine substitution in the second zinc finger domain, suggesting that the double zinc finger domain is important for Loz1 function. We show that loz1Δ cells hyperaccumulate zinc and that Loz1 is required for gene repression in zinc-replete cells. We also have found that Loz1 negatively autoregulates its own expression. We propose that Loz1 is a unique metalloregulatory factor that plays a central role in zinc homeostasis in S. pombe. PMID:24003116

  15. The equine herpesvirus 1 gene 63 RING finger protein partially complements Vmw110, its herpes simplex virus type 1 counterpart.

    PubMed

    Everett, R; Orr, A; Elliott, M

    1995-09-01

    All alpha herpesviruses of known DNA sequence have been found to encode a protein with similarities to immediate early protein Vmw110 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The conserved portion of this family of proteins is a characteristic zinc binding module, known as a RING finger or C3HC4 domain. Examples of RING finger domains occur in many other proteins of diverse evolutionary origin and function. Recently, the solution structure of the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) RING finger protein, encoded by gene 63, has been solved. To investigate whether this structure could be considered to be a paradigm of herpesvirus RING domains, we have constructed a recombinant HSV-1 which expresses the EHV-1 gene 63 protein (EHVg63) in place of Vmw110. Comparison of the growth properties of the recombinant with those of wild-type and Vmw110-defective viruses indicates that EHVg63 is able to fulfil partially, but not completely, the roles of Vmw110 during virus growth in tissue culture.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuhong; Sun, Chao; Hu, Yuanlei; Lin, Zhongping

    2008-03-01

    A RING zinc finger ankyrin protein gene,designated AdZFP1, was isolated from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum Spreng by mRNA differential display and RACE. Its cDNA was 1723 bp and encoded a putative protein of 445 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 47.9 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.49. A typical C3HC4- type RING finger domain was found at the C-terminal region of the AdZFP1 protein,and several groups of ankyrin repeats were found at the N-terminal region. Alignments of amino acid sequence showed that AdZFP1 was 66% identical to the Arabidopsis thaliana putative RING zinc finger ankyrin protein AAN31869. Transcriptional analysis showed that AdZFP1 was inducible under drought stress in root,stem and leaf of the plant.Semi-quantitative reverse- transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the transcript of AdZFP1 was strongly induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and also by salinity,cold and heat to some extent. Overexpression of the AdZFP1 gene in transgenic tobacco enhanced their tolerance to drought stress.

  17. Evolutionary expansion and divergence in a large family of primate-specific zinc finger transcription factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, A T; Huntley, S; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Baggott, D; Gordon, L; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-28

    Although most genes are conserved as one-to-one orthologs in different mammalian orders, certain gene families have evolved to comprise different numbers and types of protein-coding genes through independent series of gene duplications, divergence and gene loss in each evolutionary lineage. One such family encodes KRAB-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) genes, which are likely to function as transcriptional repressors. One KRAB-ZNF subfamily, the ZNF91 clade, has expanded specifically in primates to comprise more than 110 loci in the human genome, yielding large gene clusters in human chromosomes 19 and 7 and smaller clusters or isolated copies at other chromosomal locations. Although phylogenetic analysis indicates that many of these genes arose before the split between old world monkeys and new world monkeys, the ZNF91 subfamily has continued to expand and diversify throughout the evolution of apes and humans. The paralogous loci are distinguished by sequence divergence within their zinc finger arrays indicating a selection for proteins with different DNA binding specificities. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization data show that some of these ZNF genes can have tissue-specific expression patterns, however many KRAB-ZNFs that are near-ubiquitous could also be playing very specific roles in halting target pathways in all tissues except for a few, where the target is released by the absence of its repressor. The number of variant KRAB-ZNF proteins is increased not only because of the large number of loci, but also because many loci can produce multiple splice variants, which because of the modular structure of these genes may have separate and perhaps even conflicting regulatory roles. The lineage-specific duplication and rapid divergence of this family of transcription factor genes suggests a role in determining species-specific biological differences and the evolution of novel primate traits.

  18. Biallelic loss of function of the promyelocytic leukaemia zinc finger (PLZF) gene causes severe skeletal defects and genital hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fischer, S; Kohlhase, J; Böhm, D; Schweiger, B; Hoffmann, D; Heitmann, M; Horsthemke, B; Wieczorek, D

    2008-11-01

    Deletions of 11q23 are associated with mental retardation, craniofacial dysmorphism, microcephaly and short stature. We present a patient with similar clinical findings, in addition to absence of the thumbs, hypoplasia of the radii and ulnae, additional vertebrae and ribs, retarded bone age and genital hypoplasia. Genomic DNA from the patient was screened for chromosomal imbalances by array-based comparative genomic hybridisation. DNA sequence analyses and reporter gene assays were performed in order to identify candidate gene mutations. The patient has an approximately 8 Mbp de novo deletion on the paternal chromosome 11, which includes the promyelocytic leukaemia zinc-finger gene (PLZF, ZBTB16; OMIM 176797). The maternal PLZF allele harbours a recessive missense mutation (c.1849A-->G), which leads to the substitution of a highly conserved methionine by valine (p.Met617Val) within a zinc-finger motif. Taking into account specific alpha-helical propensities of Val and Met, this mutation is likely to destabilise the alpha helix of the zinc finger that forms the contact with the DNA duplex, thus affecting the biological function as shown by reporter-gene assays. The PLZF gene is one of five partners fused to the retinoic acid receptor alpha in acute promyelocytic leukaemia. We describe the first patient, to our knowledge, with a germline mutation of PLZF. Our findings as well as observations in Plzf-deficient mice indicate that PLZF is a key regulator of skeletal and male germline development. Furthermore, this case highlights the importance of searching for a recessive mutation on the non-deleted chromosome in patients with a microdeletion and atypical clinical findings.

  19. Transcriptional expression analysis of genes involved in regulation of calcium translocation and storage in finger millet (Eleusine coracana L. Gartn.).

    PubMed

    Mirza, Neelofar; Taj, Gohar; Arora, Sandeep; Kumar, Anil

    2014-10-25

    Finger millet (Eleusine coracana) variably accumulates calcium in different tissues, due to differential expression of genes involved in uptake, translocation and accumulation of calcium. Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter (CAX1), two pore channel (TPC1), CaM-stimulated type IIB Ca(2+) ATPase and two CaM dependent protein kinase (CaMK1 and 2) homologs were studied in finger millet. Two genotypes GP-45 and GP-1 (high and low calcium accumulating, respectively) were used to understand the role of these genes in differential calcium accumulation. For most of the genes higher expression was found in the high calcium accumulating genotype. CAX1 was strongly expressed in the late stages of spike development and could be responsible for accumulating high concentrations of calcium in seeds. TPC1 and Ca(2+) ATPase homologs recorded strong expression in the root, stem and developing spike and signify their role in calcium uptake and translocation, respectively. Calmodulin showed strong expression and a similar expression pattern to the type IIB ATPase in the developing spike only and indicating developing spike or even seed specific isoform of CaM affecting the activity of downstream target of calcium transportation. Interestingly, CaMK1 and CaMK2 had expression patterns similar to ATPase and TPC1 in various tissues raising a possibility of their respective regulation via CaM kinase. Expression pattern of 14-3-3 gene was observed to be similar to CAX1 gene in leaf and developing spike inferring a surprising possibility of CAX1 regulation through 14-3-3 protein. Our results provide a molecular insight for explaining the mechanism of calcium accumulation in finger millet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of the zinc finger gene EVI-1 in ovarian and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D J; Woodward, S; Thompson, F H; Dos Santos, B; Russell, M; Yang, J M; Guan, X Y; Trent, J; Alberts, D S; Taetle, R

    1996-11-01

    The EVI-1 gene was originally detected as an ectopic viral insertion site and encodes a nuclear zinc finger DNA-binding protein. Previous studies showed restricted EVI-1 RNA or protein expression during ontogeny; in a kidney and an endometrial carcinoma cell line; and in normal murine oocytes and kidney cells. EVI-1 expression was also detected in a subset of acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs) and myelodysplasia. Because EVI-1 is expressed in the urogenital tract during development, we examined ovarian cancers and normal ovaries for EVI-1 RNA expression using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNAase protection. Chromosome abnormalities were examined using karyotypes and whole chromosome 3 and 3q26 fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). RNA from six primary ovarian tumours, five normal ovaries and 47 tumour cell lines (25 ovarian, seven melanoma, three prostate, seven breast and one each of bladder, endometrial, lung, epidermoid and histiocytic lymphoma) was studied. Five of six primary ovarian tumours, three of five normal ovaries and 22 of 25 ovarian cell lines expressed EVI-1 RNA. A variety of other non-haematological cancers also expressed EVI-1 RNA. Immunostaining of ovarian cancer cell lines revealed nuclear EVI-1 protein. In contrast, normal ovary stained primarily within oocytes and faintly in stroma. Primary ovarian tumours showed nuclear and intense, diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Quantitation of EVI-1 RNA, performed using RNAase protection, showed ovarian carcinoma cells expressed 0 to 40 times the EVI-1 RNA in normal ovary, and 0-6 times the levels in leukaemia cell lines. Southern analyses of ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no amplification or rearrangements involving EVI-1. In some acute leukaemias, activation of EVI-1 transcription is associated with translocations involving 3q26, the site of the EVI-1 gene. Ovarian carcinoma karyotypes showed one line with quadruplication 3(q24q27), but no other clonal structural

  1. Expression of the zinc finger gene EVI-1 in ovarian and other cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, D. J.; Woodward, S.; Thompson, F. H.; Dos Santos, B.; Russell, M.; Yang, J. M.; Guan, X. Y.; Trent, J.; Alberts, D. S.; Taetle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The EVI-1 gene was originally detected as an ectopic viral insertion site and encodes a nuclear zinc finger DNA-binding protein. Previous studies showed restricted EVI-1 RNA or protein expression during ontogeny; in a kidney and an endometrial carcinoma cell line; and in normal murine oocytes and kidney cells. EVI-1 expression was also detected in a subset of acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs) and myelodysplasia. Because EVI-1 is expressed in the urogenital tract during development, we examined ovarian cancers and normal ovaries for EVI-1 RNA expression using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNAase protection. Chromosome abnormalities were examined using karyotypes and whole chromosome 3 and 3q26 fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). RNA from six primary ovarian tumours, five normal ovaries and 47 tumour cell lines (25 ovarian, seven melanoma, three prostate, seven breast and one each of bladder, endometrial, lung, epidermoid and histiocytic lymphoma) was studied. Five of six primary ovarian tumours, three of five normal ovaries and 22 of 25 ovarian cell lines expressed EVI-1 RNA. A variety of other non-haematological cancers also expressed EVI-1 RNA. Immunostaining of ovarian cancer cell lines revealed nuclear EVI-1 protein. In contrast, normal ovary stained primarily within oocytes and faintly in stroma. Primary ovarian tumours showed nuclear and intense, diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Quantitation of EVI-1 RNA, performed using RNAase protection, showed ovarian carcinoma cells expressed 0 to 40 times the EVI-1 RNA in normal ovary, and 0-6 times the levels in leukaemia cell lines. Southern analyses of ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no amplification or rearrangements involving EVI-1. In some acute leukaemias, activation of EVI-1 transcription is associated with translocations involving 3q26, the site of the EVI-1 gene. Ovarian carcinoma karyotypes showed one line with quadruplication 3(q24q27), but no other clonal structural

  2. Identification of a novel zinc finger protein gene (ZNF298) in the GAP2 of human chromosome 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Kazunori; Kudoh, Jun; Okui, Michiyo; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi . E-mail: shimizu@dmb.med.keio.ac.jp

    2005-07-01

    We have isolated a novel zinc finger protein gene, designated ZNF298, as a candidate gene for a particular phenotype of Down syndrome or bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) which maps to human chromosome 21q22.3. ZNF298 gene consists of 25 exons spanning approximately 80 kb in a direction from the telomere to centromere. There are four kinds of transcripts that harbor three types of 3' UTR. These four transcripts (ZNF298a, ZNF298b, ZNF298c, and ZNF298d) contain putative open reading frames encoding 1178, 1198, 555, and 515 amino acids, respectively. ZNF298 gene was ubiquitously expressed in various tissues at very low level. The protein motif analysis revealed that ZNF298 proteins contain a SET [Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax] domain, multiple C2H2-type zinc finger (ZnF{sub C}2H2) domains, several nuclear localization signals (NLSs), and PEST sequences. Nuclear localization of ZNF298 protein was confirmed by transfection of expression vector of GFP-tagged protein into two human cell lines. Interestingly, this gene crosses over a clone gap (GAP2) remaining in the band 21q22.3. We obtained the DNA fragments corresponding to GAP2 using ZNF298 cDNA sequence as anchor primers for PCR and determined its genomic DNA sequence.

  3. Expression of a subset of the Arabidopsis Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger protein gene family under water stress.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, H; Araki, T; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    2000-05-02

    The genes encoding Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger proteins constitute a large family in higher plants. To elucidate the functional roles of these types of protein, four different members of the gene family were cloned from Arabidopsis by PCR-aided methods. One was identical to the already reported gene STZ/ZAT10 and three were as yet unidentified genes, then designated AZF1 (Arabidopsis zinc-finger protein 1), AZF2 and AZF3. The AZF- and STZ-encoded proteins contain two canonical Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger motifs, separated by a long spacer. Three conserved regions, named B-box, L-box, and DNL-box, were also recognized outside the zinc-finger motifs, as in other members of the two-fingered Cys(2)/His(2)-type zinc-finger protein family. These four genes were positioned on the same branch of a phylogenetic tree constructed based on the zinc-finger motif sequences, suggesting their structural and functional relationship. RNA blot analysis showed that all four genes were mainly expressed in roots and at different levels in other organs. Expression of the four genes responded to water stress. High-salt treatment resulted in elevated levels of expression of all of these genes. Low-temperature treatment increased the expression levels of AZF1, AZF3, and STZ, but not AZF2. Only AZF2 expression was strongly induced by ABA treatment, where the time course of the induction was similar to that caused by high salinity. In situ localization showed that AZF2 mRNA accumulated in the elongation zone of the roots under the salt-stress condition. These results suggest that AZF1, AZF2, AZF3, and STZ are all involved in the water-stress response in an ABA-dependent or -independent pathway to regulate downstream genes.

  4. STP1, a gene involved in pre-tRNA processing, encodes a nuclear protein containing zinc finger motifs.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S S; Stanford, D R; Silvers, C D; Hopper, A K

    1992-01-01

    STP1 is an unessential yeast gene involved in the removal of intervening sequences from some, but not all, families of intervening sequence-containing pre-tRNAs. Previously, we proposed that STP1 might encode a product that generates pre-tRNA conformations efficiently recognized by tRNA-splicing endonuclease. To test the predictions of this model, we have undertaken a molecular analysis of the STP1 gene and its products. The STP1 locus is located on chromosome IV close to at least two other genes involved in RNA splicing: PRP3 and SPP41. The STP1 open reading frame (ORF) could encode a peptide of 64,827 Da; however, inspection of putative transcriptional and translational regulatory signals and mapping of the 5' ends of mRNA provide evidence that translation of the STP1 ORF usually initiates at a second AUG to generate a protein of 58,081 Da. The STP1 ORF contains three putative zinc fingers. The first of these closely resembles both the DNA transcription factor consensus and the Xenopus laevis p43 RNA-binding protein consensus. The third motif more closely resembles the fingers found in spliceosomal proteins. Employing antisera to the endogenous STP1 protein and to STP1-LacZ fusion proteins, we show that the STP1 protein is localized to nuclei. The presence of zinc finger motifs and the nuclear location of the STP1 protein support the model that this gene product is involved directly in pre-tRNA splicing. Images PMID:1588961

  5. A Soybean C2H2-Type Zinc Finger Gene GmZF1 Enhanced Cold Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Liu, Meng-Meng; Shan, Shu-Guang; Cheng, Xian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins were involved in response to different environmental stresses in plant species. A typical Cys2/His2-type (C2H2-type) zinc finger gene GmZF1 from soybean was isolated and was composed of 172 amino acids containing two conserved C2H2-type zinc finger domains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that GmZF1 was clustered on the same branch with six C2H2-type ZFPs from dicotyledonous plants excepting for GsZFP1, and distinguished those from monocotyledon species. The GmZF1 protein was localized at the nucleus, and has specific binding activity with EP1S core sequence, and nucleotide mutation in the core sequence of EPSPS promoter changed the binding ability between GmZF1 protein and core DNA element, implying that two amino acid residues, G and C boxed in core sequence TGACAGTGTCA possibly play positive regulation role in recognizing DNA-binding sites in GmZF1 proteins. High accumulation of GmZF1 mRNA induced by exogenous ABA suggested that GmZF1 was involved in an ABA-dependent signal transduction pathway. Over-expression of GmZF1 significantly improved the contents of proline and soluble sugar and decreased the MDA contents in the transgenic lines exposed to cold stress, indicating that transgenic Arabidopsis carrying GmZF1 gene have adaptive mechanisms to cold stress. Over-expression of GmZF1 also increased the expression of cold-regulated cor6.6 gene by probably recognizing protein-DNA binding sites, suggesting that GmZF1 from soybean could enhance the tolerance of Arabidopsis to cold stress by regulating expression of cold-regulation gene in the transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:25286048

  6. The rice B-box zinc finger gene family: genomic identification, characterization, expression profiling and diurnal analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianyan; Zhao, Xiaobo; Weng, Xiaoyu; Wang, Lei; Xie, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    The B-box (BBX) -containing proteins are a class of zinc finger proteins that contain one or two B-box domains and play important roles in plant growth and development. The Arabidopsis BBX gene family has recently been re-identified and renamed. However, there has not been a genome-wide survey of the rice BBX (OsBBX) gene family until now. In this study, we identified 30 rice BBX genes through a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis. Each gene was assigned a uniform nomenclature. We described the chromosome localizations, gene structures, protein domains, phylogenetic relationship, whole life-cycle expression profile and diurnal expression patterns of the OsBBX family members. Based on the phylogeny and domain constitution, the OsBBX gene family was classified into five subfamilies. The gene duplication analysis revealed that only chromosomal segmental duplication contributed to the expansion of the OsBBX gene family. The expression profile of the OsBBX genes was analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays throughout the entire life-cycle of rice cultivar Zhenshan 97 (ZS97). In addition, microarray analysis was performed to obtain the expression patterns of these genes under light/dark conditions and after three phytohormone treatments. This analysis revealed that the expression patterns of the OsBBX genes could be classified into eight groups. Eight genes were regulated under the light/dark treatments, and eleven genes showed differential expression under at least one phytohormone treatment. Moreover, we verified the diurnal expression of the OsBBX genes using the data obtained from the Diurnal Project and qPCR analysis, and the results indicated that many of these genes had a diurnal expression pattern. The combination of the genome-wide identification and the expression and diurnal analysis of the OsBBX gene family should facilitate additional functional studies of the OsBBX genes.

  7. The mouse genome displays highly dynamic populations of KRAB-zinc finger protein genes and related genetic units

    PubMed Central

    Kauzlaric, Annamaria; Ecco, Gabriela; Cassano, Marco; Duc, Julien; Imbeault, Michael; Trono, Didier

    2017-01-01

    KRAB-containing poly-zinc finger proteins (KZFPs) constitute the largest family of transcription factors encoded by mammalian genomes, and growing evidence indicates that they fulfill functions critical to both embryonic development and maintenance of adult homeostasis. KZFP genes underwent broad and independent waves of expansion in many higher vertebrates lineages, yet comprehensive studies of members harbored by a given species are scarce. Here we present a thorough analysis of KZFP genes and related units in the murine genome. We first identified about twice as many elements than previously annotated as either KZFP genes or pseudogenes, notably by assigning to this family an entity formerly considered as a large group of Satellite repeats. We then could delineate an organization in clusters distributed throughout the genome, with signs of recombination, translocation, duplication and seeding of new sites by retrotransposition of KZFP genes and related genetic units (KZFP/rGUs). Moreover, we harvested evidence indicating that closely related paralogs had evolved through both drifting and shifting of sequences encoding for zinc finger arrays. Finally, we could demonstrate that the KAP1-SETDB1 repressor complex tames the expression of KZFP/rGUs within clusters, yet that the primary targets of this regulation are not the KZFP/rGUs themselves but enhancers contained in neighboring endogenous retroelements and that, underneath, KZFPs conserve highly individualized patterns of expression. PMID:28334004

  8. The mouse genome displays highly dynamic populations of KRAB-zinc finger protein genes and related genetic units.

    PubMed

    Kauzlaric, Annamaria; Ecco, Gabriela; Cassano, Marco; Duc, Julien; Imbeault, Michael; Trono, Didier

    2017-01-01

    KRAB-containing poly-zinc finger proteins (KZFPs) constitute the largest family of transcription factors encoded by mammalian genomes, and growing evidence indicates that they fulfill functions critical to both embryonic development and maintenance of adult homeostasis. KZFP genes underwent broad and independent waves of expansion in many higher vertebrates lineages, yet comprehensive studies of members harbored by a given species are scarce. Here we present a thorough analysis of KZFP genes and related units in the murine genome. We first identified about twice as many elements than previously annotated as either KZFP genes or pseudogenes, notably by assigning to this family an entity formerly considered as a large group of Satellite repeats. We then could delineate an organization in clusters distributed throughout the genome, with signs of recombination, translocation, duplication and seeding of new sites by retrotransposition of KZFP genes and related genetic units (KZFP/rGUs). Moreover, we harvested evidence indicating that closely related paralogs had evolved through both drifting and shifting of sequences encoding for zinc finger arrays. Finally, we could demonstrate that the KAP1-SETDB1 repressor complex tames the expression of KZFP/rGUs within clusters, yet that the primary targets of this regulation are not the KZFP/rGUs themselves but enhancers contained in neighboring endogenous retroelements and that, underneath, KZFPs conserve highly individualized patterns of expression.

  9. Zinc finger protein STOP1 is critical for proton tolerance in Arabidopsis and coregulates a key gene in aluminum tolerance.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Satoshi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Iuchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Kitabayashi, Sadako; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Ikka, Takashi; Hirayama, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Masatomo

    2007-06-05

    Acid soil syndrome causes severe yield losses in various crop plants because of the rhizotoxicities of ions, such as aluminum (Al(3+)). Although protons (H(+)) could be also major rhizotoxicants in some soil types, molecular mechanisms of their tolerance have not been identified yet. One mutant that was hypersensitive to H(+) rhizotoxicity was isolated from ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenized seeds, and a single recessive mutation was found on chromosome 1. Positional cloning followed by genomic sequence analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the zinc finger domain in a predicted Cys(2)His(2)-type zinc finger protein, namely sensitive to proton rhizotoxicity (STOP)1, is the cause of hypersensitivity to H(+) rhizotoxicity. The STOP1 protein belongs to a functionally unidentified subfamily of zinc finger proteins, which consists of two members in Arabidopsis based on a Blast search. The stop1 mutation resulted in no effects on cadmium, copper, lanthanum, manganese and sodium chloride sensitivitities, whereas it caused hypersensitivity to Al(3+) rhizotoxicity. This stop1 mutant lacked the induction of the AtALMT1 gene encoding a malate transporter, which is concomitant with Al-induced malate exudation. There was no induction of AtALMT1 by Al(3+) treatment in the stop1 mutant. These results indicate that STOP1 plays a critical role in Arabidopsis tolerance to major stress factors in acid soils.

  10. Characterization of CsSEF1 gene encoding putative CCCH-type zinc finger protein expressed during cucumber somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Agnieszka; Wisniewska, Anita; Tagashira, Norikazu; Malepszy, Stefan; Filipecki, Marcin

    2009-02-15

    Somatic embryos obtained in vitro are a form of vegetative reproduction that can be used in artificial seed technology, as well as a model to study the principles of plant development. In order to isolate the genes involved in somatic embryogenesis of the cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), we utilized the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). One of the obtained sequences was the CsSEF1 clone (Cucumis sativus Somatic Embryogenesis Zinc Finger 1), with a level of expression that sharply increased with the induction of embryogenesis. The full length cDNA of CsSEF1 encodes the putative 307 amino acid long protein containing three zinc finger motifs, two with CCCH and one with the atypical CHCH pattern. The CsSEF1 protein shows significant similarity to other proteins from plants, in which the zinc fingers arrangement and patterns are very similar. Transcripts of CsSEF1 were localized in the apical part of somatic embryos, starting as early as the polarity was visible and in later developmental stages marking the cotyledon primordia and procambium tissues. As a result of transferring an antisense fragment of CsSEF1 into Arabidopsis thaliana abnormalities in zygotic embryos and also in cotyledons and root development were observed.

  11. Mode of interaction of the zinc finger protein TFIIIA with a 5S RNA gene of Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, M E; Tullius, T D; Klug, A

    1990-01-01

    The zinc finger protein TFIIIA, a positive transcription factor of the 5S RNA gene, binds to an internal control region of 50 nucleotides. Two modes of binding have been considered for the TFIIIA-DNA complex, one of which has been proposed on the basis of nuclease and chemical protection experiments and the other on model building. Since then, evidence has accumulated on the structures of individual components of the complex--for example, zinc finger polypeptides studied by NMR and a segment of the binding site analyzed by x-ray crystallography, but no high-resolution structural data on the TFIIIA-DNA complex itself are available. Probes used previously to study the TFIIIA-DNA complex do not react with every nucleotide of DNA, unlike hydroxyl radical, which cleaves DNA at every backbone position. We describe here the quantitative analysis of high-resolution hydroxyl radical footprints and suggest how the array of zinc fingers might interact with the double helix. Images PMID:2164687

  12. MZF6D, a novel KRAB zinc-finger gene expressed exclusively in meiotic male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Looman, Camilla; Mark, Charlotta; Abrink, Magnus; Hellman, Lars

    2003-08-01

    Spermatogenesis takes place in the seminiferous tubule in the testes and culminates in the production of spermatozoa (male gametes). Here we report the identification of a novel mouse zinc-finger gene, MZF6D, which is selectively expressed in meiotic spermatocytes. The MZF6D protein contains an N-terminally located repressor domain, a KRAB domain, followed by at least seven successive Krüppel zinc-finger motifs. The KRAB domain of MZF6D, which consists of a KRAB A box and the newly identified KRAB C box, has previously been shown to interact with TIF1beta, which is the common corepressor of all KRAB zinc-finger proteins. Northern blot analysis shows that the expression of MZF6D is restricted to testes. This was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of a panel of mouse tissues. In situ hybridization of sections from adult mouse testes localizes the expression to meiotic spermatocytes, suggesting a specific role for MZF6D in the regulation of spermatogenesis.

  13. Tailor-Made Zinc-Finger Transcription Factors Activate FLO11 Gene Expression with Phenotypic Consequences in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jia-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Che; Su, Mao-Chang; Moore, Michael; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Cys2His2 zinc fingers are eukaryotic DNA-binding motifs, capable of distinguishing different DNA sequences, and are suitable for engineering artificial transcription factors. In this work, we used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the ability of tailor-made zinc finger proteins to activate the expression of the FLO11 gene, with phenotypic consequences. Two three-finger peptides were identified, recognizing sites from the 5′ UTR of the FLO11 gene with nanomolar DNA-binding affinity. The three-finger domains and their combined six-finger motif, recognizing an 18-bp site, were fused to the activation domain of VP16 or VP64. These transcription factor constructs retained their DNA-binding ability, with the six-finger ones being the highest in affinity. However, when expressed in haploid yeast cells, only one three-finger recombinant transcription factor was able to activate the expression of FLO11 efficiently. Unlike in the wild-type, cells with such transcriptional activation displayed invasive growth and biofilm formation, without any requirement for glucose depletion. The VP16 and VP64 domains appeared to act equally well in the activation of FLO11 expression, with comparable effects in phenotypic alteration. We conclude that the functional activity of tailor-made transcription factors in cells is not easily predicted by the in vitro DNA-binding activity. PMID:17710146

  14. A survey of well conserved families of C2H2 zinc-finger genes in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A recent comparative genomic analysis tentatively identified roughly 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 Zinc-finger proteins that are well conserved in "bilaterians" (i.e. worms, flies, and humans). Here we extend that analysis to include a second arthropod genome from the crustacean, Daphnia pulex. Results Most of the 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are represented by just one or two proteins within each of the previously surveyed species. Likewise, Daphnia were found to possess a similar number of orthologs for all of these small orthology groups. In contrast, the number of Sp/KLF homologs tends to be greater and to vary between species. Like the corresponding mammalian Sp/KLF proteins, most of the Drosophila and Daphnia homologs can be placed into one of three sub-groups: Class I-III. Daphnia were found to have three Class I proteins that roughly correspond to their Drosophila counterparts, dSP1, btd, CG5669, and three Class II proteins that roughly correspond to Luna, CG12029, CG9895. However, Daphnia have four additional KLF-Class II proteins that are most similar to the vertebrate KLF1/2/4 proteins, a subset not found in Drosophila. Two of these four proteins are encoded by genes linked in tandem. Daphnia also have three KLF-Class III members, one more than Drosophila. One of these is a likely Bteb2 homolog, while the other two correspond to Cabot and KLF13, a vertebrate homolog of Cabot. Conclusion Consistent with their likely roles as fundamental determinants of bilaterian form and function, most of the 40 groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are conserved in kind and number in Daphnia. However, the KLF family includes several additional genes that are most similar to genes present in vertebrates but missing in Drosophila. PMID:20433734

  15. Molecular cloning of six novel Krüppel-like zinc finger genes from hematopoietic cells and identification of a novel transregulatory domain KRNB.

    PubMed

    Han, Z G; Zhang, Q H; Ye, M; Kan, L X; Gu, B W; He, K L; Shi, S L; Zhou, J; Fu, G; Mao, M; Chen, S J; Yu, L; Chen, Z

    1999-12-10

    To clone zinc finger genes expressed in hematopoietic system, we designed primers based on conserved Cys(2)/His(2) zinc finger sequences to amplify corresponding domains from mRNA of normal bone marrow and leukemia cell line NB4. DNA fragments of novel zinc finger genes were chosen and used as probe pool to screen cDNA libraries or subject to rapid amplification of cDNA ends in order to obtain full-length cDNA. Six cDNAs including whole open reading frame of zinc finger proteins, named as ZNF191, ZNF253 (BMZF-1), ZNF255 (BMZF-2), ZNF256 (BMZF-3), ZNF257 (BMZF-4), and ZNF254 (BMZF-5) were obtained. All six belong to the Krüppel-like zinc finger gene family, and typical transcriptional regulatory motifs exist in the N-terminal moiety, such as the SCAN box in ZNF191, and the KRAB domains in ZNF253, ZNF254, ZNF256, and ZNF257. A previously undefined sequence nominated as Krüppel-related novel box, which may represent a new transregulatory motif, was revealed at the N terminus of ZNF255. The transregulatory function of non-zinc finger regions of ZNF191, ZNF253, and ZNF255 were addressed in yeast and mammalian cells. The results indicated that ZNF255 might be a conditional transactivator, whereas ZNF253 and ZNF191 displayed a suppressive effect on the transcription in yeast and/or mammalian systems.

  16. Characterization of a novel putative zinc finger gene MIF1: involvement in multiple hormonal regulation of Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Ma, Hong

    2006-02-01

    Phytohormones play crucial roles in regulating many aspects of plant development. Although much has been learned about the effects of individual hormones, cross-talk between and integration of different hormonal signals are still not well understood. We present a study of MINI ZINC FINGER 1 (MIF1), a putative zinc finger protein from Arabidopsis, and suggest that it may be involved in integrating signals from multiple hormones. MIF1 homologs are highly conserved among seed plants, each characterized by a very short sequence containing a central putative zinc finger domain. Constitutive overexpression of MIF1 caused dramatic developmental defects, including dwarfism, reduced apical dominance, extreme longevity, dark-green leaves, altered flower morphology, poor fertility, reduced hypocotyl length, spoon-like cotyledons, reduced root growth, and ectopic root hairs on hypocotyls and cotyledons. In addition, 35S::MIF1 seedlings underwent constitutive photomorphogenesis in the dark, with root growth similar to that in the light. Furthermore, 35S::MIF1 seedlings were demonstrated to be non-responsive to gibberellin (GA) for cell elongation, hypersensitive to the GA synthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol (PAC) and abscisic acid (ABA), and hyposensitive to auxin, brassinosteroid and cytokinin, but normally responsive to ethylene. The de-etiolation defect could not be rescued by the hormones tested. Consistent with these observations, genome-scale expression profiling revealed that 35S::MIF1 seedlings exhibited decreased expression of genes involved in GA, auxin and brassinosteroid signaling as well as cell elongation/expansion, and increased expression of ABA-responsive genes. We propose that MIF1, or the protein(s) with which MIF1 interacts, is involved in mediating the control of plant development by multiple hormones.

  17. Comparative analysis of a conserved zinc finger gene cluster on human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M; Ashworth, L K; Mucenski, M L; Lamerdin, J E; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    1996-04-01

    Several lines of evidence now suggest that many of the zinc-finger-containing (ZNF) genes in the human genome are arranged in clusters. However, little is known about the structure or function of the clusters or about their conservation throughout evolution. Here, we report the analysis of a conserved ZNF gene cluster located in human chromosome 19q13.2 and mouse chromosome 7. Our results indicate that the human cluster consists of at least 10 related Kruppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing ZNF genes organized in tandem over a distance of 350-450 kb. Two cDNA clones representing genes in the murine cluster have been studied in detail. The KRAB A domains of these genes are nearly identical and are highly similar to human 19q13.2-derived KRAB sequences, but DNA-binding ZNF domains and other portions of the genes differ considerably. The two murine genes display distinct expression patterns, but are coexpressed in some adult tissues. These studies pave the way for a systematic analysis of the evolution of structure and function of genes within the numerous clustered ZNF families located on human chromosome 19 and elsewhere in the human and mouse genomes.

  18. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the mouse zinc finger gene Krox-20: multiple gene products and coregulation with the proto-oncogene c-fos.

    PubMed Central

    Chavrier, P; Janssen-Timmen, U; Mattéi, M G; Zerial, M; Bravo, R; Charnay, P

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure and the regulation of Krox-20, a mouse zinc finger-encoding gene which is transiently activated following serum stimulation of quiescent fibroblast cells in culture. The gene is localized on chromosome 10, band B5, in the mouse, and the homologous human gene also maps to chromosome 10 (region q21.1 to q22.1). Alternative splicing of the 5'-most intron of the Krox-20 gene gives rise to mRNAs encoding putative zinc finger proteins with different N termini. The first exon contains a sequence element with strong similarity to the c-fos proto-oncogene serum response element (SRE). This element can functionally substitute for the c-fos SRE, and it binds the same nuclear protein. It is probably responsible for the serum induction of Krox-20, possibly in combination with a weaker SRE located in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Our findings suggest that c-fos, Krox-20, and a number of immediate-early serum response genes are coregulated and that the SRE and its cognate protein are essential components of this regulatory pathway. Images PMID:2496302

  19. scratch, a pan-neural gene encoding a zinc finger protein related to snail, promotes neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Roark, M; Sturtevant, M A; Emery, J; Vaessin, H; Grell, E; Bier, E

    1995-10-01

    The Drosophila scratch (scrt) gene is expressed in most or all neuronal precursor cells and encodes a predicted zinc finger transcription factor closely related to the product of the mesoderm determination gene snail (sna). Adult flies homozygous for scrt null alleles have a reduced number of photoreceptors in the eye, and embryos lacking the function of both scrt and the pan-neural gene deadpan (dpn), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, exhibit a significant loss of neurons. Conversely, ectopic expression of a scrt transgene during embryonic and adult development leads to the production of supernumerary neurons. Consistent with scrt functioning as a transcription factor, various genes are more broadly expressed than normal in scrt null mutants. Reciprocally, these same genes are expressed at reduced levels in response to ectopic scrt expression. We propose that scrt promotes neuronal cell fates by suppressing expression of genes promoting non-neuronal cell fates. We discuss the similarities between the roles of the ancestrally related scrt, sna, and escargot (esc) genes in regulating cell fate choices.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolution and Expression Analysis of the Grape (Vitis vinifera L.) Zinc Finger-Homeodomain Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Yin, Xiangjing; Li, Xiaoqin; Wang, Li; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Xiaozhao; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping

    2014-01-01

    Plant zinc finger-homeodomain (ZHD) genes encode a family of transcription factors that have been demonstrated to play an important role in the regulation of plant growth and development. In this study, we identified a total of 13 ZHD genes (VvZHD) in the grape genome that were further classified into at least seven groups. Genome synteny analysis revealed that a number of VvZHD genes were present in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, indicating that they arose before the divergence of these two species. Gene expression analysis showed that the identified VvZHD genes displayed distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns, and were differentially regulated under various stress conditions and hormone treatments, suggesting that the grape VvZHDs might be also involved in plant response to a variety of biotic and abiotic insults. Our work provides insightful information and knowledge about the ZHD genes in grape, which provides a framework for further characterization of their roles in regulation of stress tolerance as well as other aspects of grape productivity. PMID:24705465

  1. PEI1, an embryo-specific zinc finger protein gene required for heart-stage embryo formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Thomas, T L

    1998-01-01

    We used virtual subtraction, a new gene isolation strategy, to isolate several genes of interest that are expressed in Arabidopsis embryos. These genes have demonstrated biological properties or have the potential to be involved in important biological processes. One gene isolated by virtual subtraction is PEI. It encodes a protein containing a Cys3His zinc finger domain associated with a number of animal and fungal transcription factors. In situ hybridization results showed that PEI1 is expressed throughout the embryo from globular to late cotyledon stage. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a PEI1 antisense gene produced white seeds in which embryo development did not progress through heart stage. Aberrant embryos failed to form cotyledons, but the embryonic root appeared to be normal. Aberrant embryos did not turn green, and the expression of genes involved in photomorphogenesis was drastically attenuated. In culture, aberrant embryos did not form true leaves, but root formation was apparently normal. These results suggest that PEI1 is an embryo-specific transcription factor that plays an important role during Arabidopsis embryogenesis, functioning primarily in the apical domain of the embryo. PMID:9501112

  2. Genome-wide identification, evolution and expression analysis of the grape (Vitis vinifera L.) zinc finger-homeodomain gene family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Yin, Xiangjing; Li, Xiaoqin; Wang, Li; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Xiaozhao; Zhang, Yucheng; Wang, Xiping

    2014-04-03

    Plant zinc finger-homeodomain (ZHD) genes encode a family of transcription factors that have been demonstrated to play an important role in the regulation of plant growth and development. In this study, we identified a total of 13 ZHD genes (VvZHD) in the grape genome that were further classified into at least seven groups. Genome synteny analysis revealed that a number of VvZHD genes were present in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, indicating that they arose before the divergence of these two species. Gene expression analysis showed that the identified VvZHD genes displayed distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns, and were differentially regulated under various stress conditions and hormone treatments, suggesting that the grape VvZHDs might be also involved in plant response to a variety of biotic and abiotic insults. Our work provides insightful information and knowledge about the ZHD genes in grape, which provides a framework for further characterization of their roles in regulation of stress tolerance as well as other aspects of grape productivity.

  3. Comprehensive analysis of CCCH-type zinc finger gene family in citrus (Clementine mandarin) by genome-wide characterization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengrui; Khan, Muhammad Rehman Gul; Li, Yongping; Zhang, Jinzhi; Hu, Chungen

    2014-10-01

    The CCCH-type zinc finger proteins comprise a large gene family of regulatory proteins and are widely distributed in eukaryotic organisms. The CCCH proteins have been implicated in multiple biological processes and environmental responses in plants. Little information is available, however, about CCCH genes in plants, especially in woody plants such as citrus. The release of the whole-genome sequence of citrus allowed us to perform a genome-wide analysis of CCCH genes and to compare the identified proteins with their orthologs in model plants. In this study, 62 CCCH genes and a total of 132 CCCH motifs were identified, and a comprehensive analysis including the chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, functional annotations, gene structures and conserved motifs was performed. Distribution mapping revealed that 54 of the 62 CCCH genes are unevenly dispersed on the nine citrus chromosomes. Based on phylogenetic analysis and gene structural features, we constructed 5 subfamilies of 62 CCCH members and integrative subfamilies from citrus, Arabidopsis, and rice, respectively. Importantly, large numbers of SNPs and InDels in 26 CCCH genes were identified from Poncirus trifoliata and Fortunella japonica using whole-genome deep re-sequencing. Furthermore, citrus CCCH genes showed distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns in different developmental processes and in response to various stress conditions. Our comprehensive analysis of CleC3Hs is a valuable resource that further elucidates the roles of CCCH family members in plant growth and development. In addition, variants and comparative genomics analyses deepen our understanding of the evolution of the CCCH gene family and will contribute to further genetics and genomics studies of citrus and other plant species.

  4. Finger stick blood collection for gene expression profiling and storage of tempus blood RNA tubes

    PubMed Central

    Rinchai, Darawan; Anguiano, Esperanza; Nguyen, Phuong; Chaussabel, Damien

    2017-01-01

    With this report we aim to make available a standard operating procedure (SOP) developed for RNA stabilization of small blood volumes collected via a finger stick. The anticipation that this procedure may be improved through peer-review and/or readers public comments is another element motivating the publication of this SOP. Procuring blood samples from human subjects can, among other uses, enable assessment of the immune status of an individual subject via the profiling of RNA abundance using technologies such as real time PCR, NanoString, microarrays or RNA-sequencing. It is often desirable to minimize blood volumes and employ methods that are the least invasive and can be practically implemented outside of clinical settings. Finger stick blood samples are increasingly used for measurement of levels of pharmacological drugs and biological analytes. It is a simple and convenient procedure amenable for instance to field use or self-collection at home using a blood sample collection kit. Such methodologies should also enable the procurement of blood samples at high frequency for health or disease monitoring applications. PMID:28357036

  5. Human KZNF Gene Catalog - A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D. M.; Hamilton, A. T.; Tran-Gyamfi, M.; Yang, S.; Kim, J.; Gordon, L.; Branscomb, E.; Stubbs, L.

    Kruppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. [This abstract was copied from: S Huntley, DM Baggott, AT Hamilton, M Tran-Gyamfi, S Yang, J Kim, L Gordon, E Branscomb, and L Stubbs. 2006. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors, Genome Research 16(5):669 - 677] The website provides the

  6. Investigating the Potential Role of Genetic and Epigenetic Variation of DNA Methyltransferase Genes in Hyperplastic Polyposis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Drini, Musa; Wong, Nicholas C.; Scott, Hamish S.; Craig, Jeffrey M.; Dobrovic, Alexander; Hewitt, Chelsee A.; Dow, Christofer; Young, Joanne P.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Saffery, Richard; Macrae, Finlay A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hyperplastic Polyposis Syndrome (HPS) is a condition associated with multiple serrated polyps, and an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). At least half of CRCs arising in HPS show a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), potentially linked to aberrant DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity. CIMP is associated with methylation of tumor suppressor genes including regulators of DNA mismatch repair (such as MLH1, MGMT), and negative regulators of Wnt signaling (such as WIF1). In this study, we investigated the potential for interaction of genetic and epigenetic variation in DNMT genes, in the aetiology of HPS. Methods We utilized high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to screen 45 cases with HPS for novel sequence variants in DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and DNMT3L. 21 polyps from 13 patients were screened for BRAF and KRAS mutations, with assessment of promoter methylation in the DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, DNMT3L MLH1, MGMT, and WIF1 gene promoters. Results No pathologic germline mutations were observed in any DNA-methyltransferase gene. However, the T allele of rs62106244 (intron 10 of DNMT1 gene) was over-represented in cases with HPS (p<0.01) compared with population controls. The DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B promoters were unmethylated in all instances. Interestingly, the DNMT3L promoter showed low levels of methylation in polyps and normal colonic mucosa relative to matched disease free cells with methylation level negatively correlated to expression level in normal colonic tissue. DNMT3L promoter hypomethylation was more often found in polyps harbouring KRAS mutations (p = 0.0053). BRAF mutations were common (11 out of 21 polyps), whilst KRAS mutations were identified in 4 of 21 polyps. Conclusions Genetic or epigenetic alterations in DNMT genes do not appear to be associated with HPS, but further investigation of genetic variation at rs62106244 is justified given the high frequency of the minor allele in this case series. PMID:21347319

  7. The pro1(+) gene from Sordaria macrospora encodes a C6 zinc finger transcription factor required for fruiting body development.

    PubMed

    Masloff, S; Pöggeler, S; Kück, U

    1999-05-01

    During sexual morphogenesis, the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora differentiates into multicellular fruiting bodies called perithecia. Previously it has been shown that this developmental process is under polygenic control. To further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in fruiting body formation, we generated the protoperithecia forming mutant pro1, in which the normal development of protoperithecia into perithecia has been disrupted. We succeeded in isolating a cosmid clone from an indexed cosmid library, which was able to complement the pro1(-) mutation. Deletion analysis, followed by DNA sequencing, subsequently demonstrated that fertility was restored to the pro1 mutant by an open reading frame encoding a 689-amino-acid polypeptide, which we named PRO1. A region from this polypeptide shares significant homology with the DNA-binding domains found in fungal C6 zinc finger transcription factors, such as the GAL4 protein from yeast. However, other typical regions of C6 zinc finger proteins, such as dimerization elements, are absent in PRO1. The involvement of the pro1(+) gene in fruiting body development was further confirmed by trying to complement the mutant phenotype with in vitro mutagenized and truncated versions of the pro1 open reading frame. Southern hybridization experiments also indicated that pro1(+) homologues are present in other sexually propagating filamentous ascomycetes.

  8. The pro1(+) gene from Sordaria macrospora encodes a C6 zinc finger transcription factor required for fruiting body development.

    PubMed Central

    Masloff, S; Pöggeler, S; Kück, U

    1999-01-01

    During sexual morphogenesis, the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora differentiates into multicellular fruiting bodies called perithecia. Previously it has been shown that this developmental process is under polygenic control. To further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in fruiting body formation, we generated the protoperithecia forming mutant pro1, in which the normal development of protoperithecia into perithecia has been disrupted. We succeeded in isolating a cosmid clone from an indexed cosmid library, which was able to complement the pro1(-) mutation. Deletion analysis, followed by DNA sequencing, subsequently demonstrated that fertility was restored to the pro1 mutant by an open reading frame encoding a 689-amino-acid polypeptide, which we named PRO1. A region from this polypeptide shares significant homology with the DNA-binding domains found in fungal C6 zinc finger transcription factors, such as the GAL4 protein from yeast. However, other typical regions of C6 zinc finger proteins, such as dimerization elements, are absent in PRO1. The involvement of the pro1(+) gene in fruiting body development was further confirmed by trying to complement the mutant phenotype with in vitro mutagenized and truncated versions of the pro1 open reading frame. Southern hybridization experiments also indicated that pro1(+) homologues are present in other sexually propagating filamentous ascomycetes. PMID:10224253

  9. Gain, Loss and Divergence in Primate Zinc-Finger Genes: A Rich Resource for Evolution of Gene Regulatory Differences between Species

    PubMed Central

    Nowick, Katja; Fields, Christopher; Gernat, Tim; Caetano-Anolles, Derek; Kholina, Nadezda; Stubbs, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The molecular changes underlying major phenotypic differences between humans and other primates are not well understood, but alterations in gene regulation are likely to play a major role. Here we performed a thorough evolutionary analysis of the largest family of primate transcription factors, the Krüppel-type zinc finger (KZNF) gene family. We identified and curated gene and pseudogene models for KZNFs in three primate species, chimpanzee, orangutan and rhesus macaque, to allow for a comparison with the curated set of human KZNFs. We show that the recent evolutionary history of primate KZNFs has been complex, including many lineage-specific duplications and deletions. We found 213 species-specific KZNFs, among them 7 human-specific and 23 chimpanzee-specific genes. Two human-specific genes were validated experimentally. Ten genes have been lost in humans and 13 in chimpanzees, either through deletion or pseudogenization. We also identified 30 KZNF orthologs with human-specific and 42 with chimpanzee-specific sequence changes that are predicted to affect DNA binding properties of the proteins. Eleven of these genes show signatures of accelerated evolution, suggesting positive selection between humans and chimpanzees. During primate evolution the most extensive re-shaping of the KZNF repertoire, including most gene additions, pseudogenizations, and structural changes occurred within the subfamily homininae. Using zinc finger (ZNF) binding predictions, we suggest potential impact these changes have had on human gene regulatory networks. The large species differences in this family of TFs stands in stark contrast to the overall high conservation of primate genomes and potentially represents a potent driver of primate evolution. PMID:21738707

  10. Efficient targeting of expressed and silent genes in human ESCs and iPSCs using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Soldner, Frank; Beard, Caroline; Gao, Qing; Mitalipova, Maisam; DeKelver, Russell C; Katibah, George E; Amora, Ranier; Boydston, Elizabeth A; Zeitler, Bryan; Meng, Xiangdong; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2009-09-01

    Realizing the full potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) requires efficient methods for genetic modification. However, techniques to generate cell type-specific lineage reporters, as well as reliable tools to disrupt, repair or overexpress genes by gene targeting, are inefficient at best and thus are not routinely used. Here we report the highly efficient targeting of three genes in human pluripotent cells using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated genome editing. First, using ZFNs specific for the OCT4 (POU5F1) locus, we generated OCT4-eGFP reporter cells to monitor the pluripotent state of hESCs. Second, we inserted a transgene into the AAVS1 locus to generate a robust drug-inducible overexpression system in hESCs. Finally, we targeted the PITX3 gene, demonstrating that ZFNs can be used to generate reporter cells by targeting non-expressed genes in hESCs and hiPSCs.

  11. Assignment of the human ZNF83 (HPF1) zinc finger gene to chromosome 19q13. 3-q13. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, J.C.; Lecoq, P.J.; Poncelet, D.A.; Martial, J.A. ); Bellefroid, E.J.; Bourguignon, C. ); Riviere, M.; Szpirer, J.; Szpirer, C. )

    1994-05-01

    The authors have isolated a collection of human ZFPs encoding cDNAs (HPF1 to -9) by hybridization with a finger motif oligonucleotide probe. Here, they describe the localization of a chromosome 19-linked human ZFP gene (HPF1/ZNF83). They first assigned the ZNF83 gene on chromosome 19 by the screening of a human x rodent hybrid panel by DNA hybridization with a fragment of a previously cloned cDNA (data not shown). To further localize the gene within chromosome 19, the regional assignment of the ZNF83 gene was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization and digital imaging microscopy as described elsewhere. Human metaphase spreads were hybridized with biotinylated ZNF83 cDNA, and hybridization was detected with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated avidin-DCS. Chromosomes were identified by staining with 4,6-diamino-2-phenylindol dihydrochloride. The fractional length (Flpter) distance of the signal to the p arm terminus relative to the total chromosome length gave a Flpter value between 82.8 and 89.9, which is consistent with an assignment of the ZNF83 gene in ISCN region 19q13.3-q13.4. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  13. Expression of Arabidopsis FCS-Like Zinc finger genes is differentially regulated by sugars, cellular energy level, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer K, Muhammed; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Cellular energy status is an important regulator of plant growth, development, and stress mitigation. Environmental stresses ultimately lead to energy deficit in the cell which activates the SNF1-RELATED KINASE 1 (SnRK1) signaling cascade which eventually triggering a massive reprogramming of transcription to enable the plant to survive under low-energy conditions. The role of Arabidopsis thaliana FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) gene family in energy and stress signaling is recently come to highlight after their interaction with kinase subunits of SnRK1 were identified. In a detailed expression analysis in different sugars, energy starvation, and replenishment series, we identified that the expression of most of the FLZ genes is differentially modulated by cellular energy level. It was found that FLZ gene family contains genes which are both positively and negatively regulated by energy deficit as well as energy-rich conditions. Genetic and pharmacological studies identified the role of HEXOKINASE 1- dependent and energy signaling pathways in the sugar-induced expression of FLZ genes. Further, these genes were also found to be highly responsive to different stresses as well as abscisic acid. In over-expression of kinase subunit of SnRK1, FLZ genes were found to be differentially regulated in accordance with their response toward energy fluctuation suggesting that these genes may work downstream to the established SnRK1 signaling under low-energy stress. Taken together, the present study provides a conceptual framework for further studies related to SnRK1-FLZ interaction in relation to sugar and energy signaling and stress response.

  14. A novel zinc-finger-like gene from Tamarix hispida is involved in salt and osmotic tolerance.

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Wang, Yucheng; Lou, Lingling; Zheng, Tangchun; Qu, Guan-Zheng

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, a zinc-finger-like cDNA (ThZFL) was cloned from the Tamarix hispida. Northern blot analysis showed that the expression of ThZFL can be induced by salt, osmotic stress and ABA treatment. Overexpression of the ThZFL confers salt and osmotic stress tolerance in both yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and tobacco. Furthermore, MDA levels in ThZFL transformed tobacco were significantly decreased compared with control plants under salt and osmotic stress, suggesting ThZFL may confer stress tolerance by decreasing membrane lipid peroxidation. Subcellular localization analysis showed the ThZFL protein is localized in the cell wall. Our results indicated the ThZFL gene is an excellent candidate for genetic engineering to improve salt and osmotic tolerance in agricultural plants.

  15. The regulatory gene areA mediating nitrogen metabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutations affecting specificity of gene activation alter a loop residue of a putative zinc finger.

    PubMed Central

    Kudla, B; Caddick, M X; Langdon, T; Martinez-Rossi, N M; Bennett, C F; Sibley, S; Davies, R W; Arst, H N

    1990-01-01

    The regulatory gene areA mediating nitrogen metabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans has been sequenced and its transcript mapped and orientated. A single ORF can encode a protein of 719 amino acids. A 52 amino acid region including a putative 'zinc finger' strongly resembles putative DNA binding regions of the major regulatory protein of erythroid cells. The derived protein sequence also contains a highly acidic region possibly involved in gene activation and 22 copies of the motif S(T)PXX, abundant in DNA binding proteins. Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements and transformation with deletion clones identified 342 N-terminal and 124 C-terminal residues as inessential and localized a C-terminal region required for nitrogen metabolite repressibility. A -1 frameshift eliminating the inessential 122 C-terminal amino acids is a surprising loss-of-function mutation. Extraordinary basicity of the replacement C terminus might explain its phenotype. Mutant sequencing also identified a polypeptide chain termination and several missense mutations, but most interesting are sequence changes associated with specificity mutations. A mutation elevating expression of some structural genes under areA control whilst reducing or not affecting expression of others is a leucine to valine change in the zinc finger loop. It reverts to a partly reciprocal phenotype by replacing the mutant valine by methionine. Images Fig.2 Fig.4 Fig.5 Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:1970293

  16. Global Analysis of Ankyrin Repeat Domain C3HC4-Type RING Finger Gene Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shiyang; Yu, Mingli; Su, Hongyan; Shu, Huairui; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat (ANK) C3HC4-type RING finger (RF) genes comprise a large family in plants and play important roles in various physiological processes of plant life. In this study, we identified 187 ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins from 29 species with complete genomes and named the ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins the XB3-like proteins because they are structurally related to the rice (Oryza sativa) XB3. A phylogenetic relationship analysis suggested that the XB3-like genes originated from ferns, and the encoded proteins fell into 3 major groups. Among these groups, we found that the spacing between the metal ligand position 6 and 7, and the conserved residues, which was in addition to the metal ligand amino acids, in the C3HC4-type RF were different. Using a wide range of protein structural analyses, protein models were established, and all XB3-like proteins were found to contain two to seven ANKs and a C3HC4-type RF. The microarray data for the XB3-like genes of Arabidopsis, Oryza sative, Zea mays and Glycine max revealed that the expression of XB3-like genes was in different tissues and during different life stages. The preferential expression of XB3-like genes in specified tissues and the response to phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments of Arabidopsis and Zea mays not only confirmed the microarray analysis data but also demonstrated that the XB3-like proteins play roles in plant growth and development as well as in stress responses. Our data provide a very useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of members of this gene family and also provide a new method for the genome-wide analysis of gene families. PMID:23516424

  17. Targeting of Photoreceptor Genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii via Zinc-finger Nucleases and CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Andre; Kelterborn, Simon; Evers, Heide; Kreimer, Georg; Sizova, Irina; Hegemann, Peter

    2017-10-04

    The fast-growing biflagellated single celled chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most widely used alga in basic research. The physiological functions of the 18 sensory photoreceptors are of particular interest with respect to C. reinhardtii development and behavior. Despite the demonstration of gene editing in C. reinhardtii in 1995, the isolation of mutants lacking easily ascertained newly acquired phenotypes remains problematic due to low DNA recombination efficiency. We optimized gene-editing protocols for several Chlamydomonas strains (including wild-type CC-125) using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), genetically encoded CRISPR/associated protein 9 (Cas9) from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and recombinant Cas9 and developed protocols for rapidly isolating non-selectable gene mutants. Using this technique, we disrupted the photoreceptor genes COP½, COP3 (encoding channelrhodopsin-1 [ChR1]), COP4 (encoding ChR2), COP5, PHOT, UVR8, VGCC, MAT3 and aCRY and created the chr1 chr2 and uvr8 phot double mutants. Characterization of the chr1, chr2 and mat3 mutants confirmed the value of photoreceptor mutants for physiological studies. Genes of interest were disrupted in 5-15% of preselected clones (~1 out of 4000 initial cells). Using ZFNs, genes were edited in a reliable, predictable manner via homologous recombination, whereas Cas9 primarily caused gene disruption via the insertion of co-transformed DNA. These methods should be widely applicable to research involving green algae. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. Global analysis of ankyrin repeat domain C3HC4-type RING finger gene family in plants.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Shiyang; Yu, Mingli; Su, Hongyan; Shu, Huairui; Li, Xinzheng

    2013-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat (ANK) C3HC4-type RING finger (RF) genes comprise a large family in plants and play important roles in various physiological processes of plant life. In this study, we identified 187 ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins from 29 species with complete genomes and named the ANK C3HC4-type RF proteins the XB3-like proteins because they are structurally related to the rice (Oryza sativa) XB3. A phylogenetic relationship analysis suggested that the XB3-like genes originated from ferns, and the encoded proteins fell into 3 major groups. Among these groups, we found that the spacing between the metal ligand position 6 and 7, and the conserved residues, which was in addition to the metal ligand amino acids, in the C3HC4-type RF were different. Using a wide range of protein structural analyses, protein models were established, and all XB3-like proteins were found to contain two to seven ANKs and a C3HC4-type RF. The microarray data for the XB3-like genes of Arabidopsis, Oryza sative, Zea mays and Glycine max revealed that the expression of XB3-like genes was in different tissues and during different life stages. The preferential expression of XB3-like genes in specified tissues and the response to phytohormone and abiotic stress treatments of Arabidopsis and Zea mays not only confirmed the microarray analysis data but also demonstrated that the XB3-like proteins play roles in plant growth and development as well as in stress responses. Our data provide a very useful reference for the identification and functional analysis of members of this gene family and also provide a new method for the genome-wide analysis of gene families.

  19. Functional roles of the pepper RING finger protein gene, CaRING1, in abscisic acid signaling and dehydration tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, which include pathogens and conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate the defense response of plants to abiotic stress. Previously, we isolated Ring finger protein gene (CaRING1) from pepper (Capsicum annuum), which is associated with resistance to bacterial pathogens, accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Here, we report a new function of the CaRING1 gene product in the ABA-mediated defense responses of plants to dehydration stress. The expression of the CaRING1 gene was induced in pepper leaves treated with ABA or exposed to dehydration or NaCl. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 in pepper plants exhibited low degree of ABA-induced stomatal closure and high levels of transpirational water loss in dehydrated leaves. These led to be more vulnerable to dehydration stress in CaRING1-silenced pepper than in the control pepper, accompanied by reduction of ABA-regulated gene expression and low accumulation of ABA and H2O2. In contrast, CaRING1-overexpressing transgenic plants showed enhanced sensitivity to ABA during the seedling growth and establishment. These plants were also more tolerant to dehydration stress than the wild-type plants because of high ABA accumulation, enhanced stomatal closure and increased expression of stress-responsive genes. Together, these results suggest that the CaRING1 acts as positive factor for dehydration tolerance in Arabidopsis by modulating ABA biosynthesis and ABA-mediated stomatal closing and gene expression.

  20. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  1. The ZNF75 zinc finger gene subfamily: Isolation and mapping of the four members in humans and great apes

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, A.; Strina, D.; Frattini, A.

    1996-07-15

    We have previously reported the characterization of the human ZNF75 gene located on Xq26, which has only limited homology (less than 65%) to other ZF genes in the databases. Here, we describe three human zinc finger genes with 86 to 95% homology to ZNF75 at the nucleotide level, which represent all the members of the human ZNF75 subfamily. One of these, ZNF75B, is a pseudogene mapped to chromosome 12q13. The other two, ZNF75A and ZNF75C, maintain on ORF in the sequenced region, and at least the latter is expressed in the U937 cell line. They were mapped to chromosomes 16 and 11, respectively. All these genes are conserved in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. The ZNF75B homologue is a pseudogene in all three great apes, and in chimpanzee it is located on chromosome 10 (phylogenetic XII), at p13 (corresponding to the human 12q13). The chimpanzee homologue of ZNF75 is also located on the Xq26 chromosome, in the same region, as detected by in situ hybridization. As expected, nucleotide changes were clearly more abundant between human and organutan than between human and chimpanzee or gorilla homologues. Members of the same class were more similar to each other than to the other homologues within the same species. This suggests that the duplication and/or retrotranscription events occurred in a common ancestor long before great ape speciation. This, together with the existance of at least two genes in cows and horses, suggests a relatively high conservation of this gene family. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The human homolog of a mouse-imprinted gene, Peg3, maps to a zinc finger gene-rich region of human chromosome 19q13.4.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Ashworth, L; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    1997-05-01

    Peg3 (paternally expressed gene 3) is the first imprinted gene detected in the proximal region of mouse chromosome 7. Because imprinting is a trait that is generally conserved among mammals, and imprinted domains generally encompass several adjacent genes, expression patterns and chromosomal environment of the human counterpart of Peg3 are of special interest. In this study we have localized human PEG3 approximately 2 Mb proximal of the telomere of chromosome 19q, within a region known to carry large numbers of tandemly clustered Krüppel-type zinc finger-containing (ZNF) genes. Peg3 also encodes a Krüppel-type ZNF protein but one that is distinguished from other ZNF gene products by the fact that it carries two novel proline-rich motifs. Comparison between mouse Peg3 and partial human PEG3 gene sequences revealed a high level of conservation between the two species, despite the fact that one of the two proline-rich repeats is absent from the human gene. Our data demonstrate that the human gene is expressed at highest levels in ovary and placenta; mouse Peg3, by contrast, is transcribed at highest levels in the adult brain. These comparative mapping, sequencing, and expression data provide the first clues to the potential activities of PEG3, and generate new tools to aid in the analysis of structure and function of a potentially new imprinted domain located in human chromosome 19q13.4 and mouse chromosome 7.

  3. The Fruitless gene in Nasonia displays complex sex-specific splicing and contains new zinc finger domains.

    PubMed

    Bertossa, Rinaldo C; van de Zande, Louis; Beukeboom, Leo W

    2009-07-01

    The transcription factor Fruitless exerts a broad range of functions during Drosophila development, the most apparent of which is the determination of sexual behavior in males. Although fruitless sequences are found in other insect orders, little is known about fruitless structure and function outside Diptera. We have performed a thorough analysis of fruitless transcripts in the haplo-diploid wasp Nasonia vitripennis and found both sex-specific and non-sex-specific transcripts similar to those found in Drosophila. In Nasonia, however, a novel, large fruitless transcript is present in females only. Putative binding sites for sex-specific splicing factors found in Nasonia fruitless and doublesex as well as Apis mellifera doublesex transcripts were sufficient to identify a corresponding female-specific fruitless exon in A. mellifera, suggesting that similar factors in both hymenopteran species could be responsible for sex-specific splicing of both genes. Furthermore, new C(2)H(2) zinc finger domains found in Nasonia fruitless transcripts were also identified in the fruitless locus of major holometabolous insect species but not in drosophilids. Conservation of important domains and sex-specific splicing in Diptera and Hymenoptera support the hypothesis that fruitless is an ancient gene and has conserved functions in insects. Considerable divergences in other parts of the gene are expected to underlie species-specific differences and may help to explain diversity observed in insect sexual behaviors.

  4. Whole exome sequencing identified a novel zinc-finger gene ZNF141 associated with autosomal recessive postaxial polydactyly type A.

    PubMed

    Kalsoom, Umm-e-; Klopocki, Eva; Wasif, Naveed; Tariq, Muhammad; Khan, Saadullah; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Mundlos, Stefan; Ahmad, Wasim

    2013-01-01

    Postaxial polydactyly (PAP) type A is characterised by well-formed functionally developed 5th digit duplication in hands and/or feet. It is genetically heterogeneous condition, inherited both in autosomal recessive and dominant manners. To date one autosomal recessive and four autosomal dominant loci have been mapped on human chromosomes. In the present study we have investigated a consanguineous Pakistani family segregating autosomal recessive PAP type A to identify the gene responsible for this phenotype. Whole exome sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping and array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) analysis was used to search for a genetic cause of PAP type A in the present study. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation (c.1420C>T; p.Thr474Ile) in all the affected individuals of the family, in the gene ZNF141, mapped to the telomeric region on chromosome 4p16.3. This study revealed involvement of a zinc finger gene ZNF141 in causing autosomal recessive PAP type A, which may open up interesting perspectives into the function of this protein in limb development.

  5. Site-specific host gene modification by zinc finger nucleases: pointing the way to drug free control of HIV-1?

    PubMed Central

    Sasson, Sarah C; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2014-01-01

    Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection has transformed its clinical course with spectacular reductions in morbidity and mortality, turning this once fatal diagnosis into a manageable chronic infection. However, ART has its limitations. Current ART does not eliminate the virus. Interruption of therapy results in rapid rebound of the virus, and such rebounds are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. This means that therapy once started is for life. This raises the issues of drug resistance due to suboptimal compliance, cumulative toxicities and mounting costs. Efforts to control the virus through novel interventions, particularly through cell or gene therapy have had a resurgence of interest as a single patient was apparently cured by an allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a donor who carried homozygous mutations that disable expression of the HIV-1 co-receptor CCR5. This paper reviews the state of play of gene therapy for HIV infection in the context of a recent paper showing the safety and feasibility of an approach that involves the ex vivo disruption of the ccr5 gene in autologous CD4 T cells using a virally delivered zinc finger nuclease, before their expansion and reinfusion. Although there are still considerable challenges, this approach may point towards a future drug free therapy for HIV-1 infection. PMID:25505967

  6. Isolation and expression analysis of EcbZIP17 from different finger millet genotypes shows conserved nature of the gene.

    PubMed

    Chopperla, Ramakrishna; Singh, Sonam; Mohanty, Sasmita; Reddy, Nanja; Padaria, Jasdeep C; Solanke, Amolkumar U

    2017-10-01

    Basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors comprise one of the largest gene families in plants. They play a key role in almost every aspect of plant growth and development and also in biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, we report isolation and characterization of EcbZIP17, a group B bZIP transcription factor from a climate smart cereal, finger millet (Eleusine coracana L.). The genomic sequence of EcbZIP17 is 2662 bp long encompassing two exons and one intron with ORF of 1722 bp and peptide length of 573 aa. This gene is homologous to AtbZIP17 (Arabidopsis), ZmbZIP17 (maize) and OsbZIP60 (rice) which play a key role in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. In silico analysis confirmed the presence of basic leucine zipper (bZIP) and transmembrane (TM) domains in the EcbZIP17 protein. Allele mining of this gene in 16 different genotypes by Sanger sequencing revealed no variation in nucleotide sequence, including the 618 bp long intron. Expression analysis of EcbZIP17 under heat stress exhibited similar pattern of expression in all the genotypes across time intervals with highest upregulation after 4 h. The present study established the conserved nature of EcbZIP17 at nucleotide and expression level.

  7. The zinc finger proteins ZNF644 and WIZ regulate the G9a/GLP complex for gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Chunjing; Chen, Qiang; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    The G9a/GLP complex mediates mono- and dimethylation of Lys9 of histone H3 at specific gene loci, which is associated with transcriptional repression. However, the molecular mechanism by which the G9a/GLP complex is targeted to the specific gene loci for H3K9 methylation is unclear. In this study, with unbiased protein affinity purification, we found ZNF644 and WIZ as two core subunits in the G9a/GLP complex. ZNF644 and WIZ interact with the transcription activation domain of G9a and GLP, respectively. Moreover, both ZNF644 and WIZ contain multiple zinc finger motifs that recognize consensus DNA sequences. ZNF644 and WIZ target G9a and GLP to the chromatin and mediate the G9a/GLP complex-dependent H3K9 methylation as well as gene repression. Thus, our studies reveal two key subunits in the G9a/GLP complex that regulate the function of this histone methyltransferase complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05606.001 PMID:25789554

  8. Expression, purification and characterization of zinc-finger nuclease to knockout the goat beta-lactoglobulin gene.

    PubMed

    Song, Yujie; Cui, Chenchen; Zhu, Hongmei; Li, Qian; Zhao, Fan; Jin, Yaping

    2015-08-01

    Engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been widely used for precise genome editing. ZFNs can induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations and drive the introduction of an insertion or deletion of base pairs at the targeted region, consequently resulting in a loss-of-function mutation. In this study, we investigated the cloning, expression and purification of ZFN fusion proteins targeting the goat beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene and detected the cleavage activities of these ZFN proteins in vitro and in cells, respectively. The results showed that the pET-BLG-LFN and pET-BLG-RFN prokaryotic expression plasmids can be constructed correctly and expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells to produce the 6× His-tagged ZFN proteins that can be purified by Ni-IDA-Sefinose Column. The predetermined sequence of BLG can be recognized and excised both in vitro and in goat fibroblasts by the purified ZFN fusion proteins, which demonstrated that the purified ZFN fusion proteins can be used as gene modification tools to knock out the BLG gene. Furthermore, these results lay the foundation for eliminating allergen BLG from goat milk and improving the quality of goat milk products.

  9. Targeted gene addition in human epithelial stem cells by zinc-finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Coluccio, Andrea; Miselli, Francesca; Lombardo, Angelo; Marconi, Alessandra; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Pincelli, Carlo; Maruggi, Giulietta; Del Rio, Marcela; Naldini, Luigi; Larcher, Fernando; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies showed that autologous transplantation of epidermis derived from genetically modified epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) leads to long-term correction of inherited skin adhesion defects. These studies were based on potentially genotoxic retroviral vectors. We developed an alternative gene transfer strategy aimed at targeting a "safe harbor" locus, the adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), by zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced homologous recombination (HR). Delivery of AAVS1-specific ZFNs and a GFP-expressing HR cassette by integration-defective lentiviral (LV) vectors (IDLVs) or adenoviral (Ad) vectors resulted in targeted gene addition with an efficiency of > 20% in a human keratinocyte cell line, > 10% in immortalized keratinocytes, and < 1% in primary keratinocytes. Deep sequencing of the AAVS1 locus showed that ZFN-induced double-strand breaks are mostly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in primary cells, indicating that poor induction of the HR-dependent DNA repair pathway may be a significant limitation for targeted gene integration. Skin equivalents derived from unselected keratinocyte cultures coinfected with a GFP-IDLV and a ZFN-Ad vector were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. GFP-positive clones were observed in all grafts up to 18 weeks post-transplantation. By histological and molecular analysis, we were able to demonstrate highly efficient targeting of the AAVS1 locus in human repopulating EpSCs.

  10. Targeted Gene Addition in Human Epithelial Stem Cells by Zinc-finger Nuclease-mediated Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Coluccio, Andrea; Miselli, Francesca; Lombardo, Angelo; Marconi, Alessandra; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Pincelli, Carlo; Maruggi, Giulietta; Del Rio, Marcela; Naldini, Luigi; Larcher, Fernando; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies showed that autologous transplantation of epidermis derived from genetically modified epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) leads to long-term correction of inherited skin adhesion defects. These studies were based on potentially genotoxic retroviral vectors. We developed an alternative gene transfer strategy aimed at targeting a “safe harbor” locus, the adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), by zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced homologous recombination (HR). Delivery of AAVS1-specific ZFNs and a GFP-expressing HR cassette by integration-defective lentiviral (LV) vectors (IDLVs) or adenoviral (Ad) vectors resulted in targeted gene addition with an efficiency of >20% in a human keratinocyte cell line, >10% in immortalized keratinocytes, and <1% in primary keratinocytes. Deep sequencing of the AAVS1 locus showed that ZFN-induced double-strand breaks are mostly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in primary cells, indicating that poor induction of the HR-dependent DNA repair pathway may be a significant limitation for targeted gene integration. Skin equivalents derived from unselected keratinocyte cultures coinfected with a GFP-IDLV and a ZFN-Ad vector were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. GFP-positive clones were observed in all grafts up to 18 weeks post-transplantation. By histological and molecular analysis, we were able to demonstrate highly efficient targeting of the AAVS1 locus in human repopulating EpSCs. PMID:23760447

  11. A study on the distribution of 37 well conserved families of C2H2 zinc finger genes in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, Arun; Stuart, Gary W

    2013-06-24

    The C2H2 zinc-finger (ZNF) containing gene family is one of the largest and most complex gene families in metazoan genomes. These genes are known to exist in almost all eukaryotes, and they constitute a major subset of eukaryotic transcription factors. The genes of this family usually occur as clusters in genomes and are thought to have undergone a massive expansion in vertebrates by multiple tandem duplication events (BMC Evol Biol 8:176, 2008). In this study, we combined two popular approaches for homolog detection, Reciprocal Best Hit (RBH) (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 95:6239-6244, 1998) and Hidden-Markov model (HMM) profiles search (Bioinformatics 14:755-763, 1998), on a diverse set of complete genomes of 124 eukaryotic species ranging from excavates to humans to identify all detectable members of 37 C2H2 ZNF gene families. We succeeded in identifying 3,890 genes as distinct members of 37 C2H2 gene families. These 37 families are distributed among the eukaryotes as progressive additions of gene blocks with increasing complexity of the organisms. The first block featuring the protists had 7 families, the second block featuring plants had 2 families, the third block featuring the fungi had 2 families (one of which was also present in plants) and the final block consisted of metazoans with 25 families. Among the metazoans, the simpler unicellular metazoans had just 15 of the 25 families while most of the bilaterians had all 25 families making up a total of 37 families. Multiple potential examples of lineage-specific gene duplications and gene losses were also observed. Our hybrid approach combines features of the both RBH and HMM methods for homolog detection. This largely automated technique is much faster than manual methods and is able to detect homologs accurately and efficiently among a diverse set of organisms. Our analysis of the 37 evolutionarily conserved C2H2 ZNF gene families revealed a stepwise appearance of ZNF families, agreeing well with the

  12. Structural polymorphism in the major groove of a 5S RNA gene complements the zinc finger domains of transcription factor IIIA.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, P W; Morii, T; Mei, H Y; Barton, J K

    1991-01-01

    Metal complexes that bind to DNA on the basis of shape-selection have been used to map the conformational features of the DNA binding site for transcription factor IIIA. Conformationally distinct segments are detected on the 5S rRNA gene that correspond closely to the binding sites identified for the individual zinc finger domains of the protein. The local conformations are characterized by a major groove opened because of a change in base pair inclination and/or displacement at a central 5'-pyrimidine-purine-3' step, flanked by a widened minor groove, as would arise at the junctions between alternating B- and A-like DNA segments. Docking experiments with a consensus structure of a zinc finger reveal that the mixed A-B binding site accommodates the peptide domain better than either canonical B- or A-DNA helices. The close structural matching of the conformational variations in the 5S rDNA both to the proposed sites of zinc finger binding and to the shape of an individual zinc finger domain points to DNA structural polymorphism as providing an important determinant in recognition. In particular, shape selection in the 5' half of the internal control region may orient the multiple finger domains. Images PMID:1961749

  13. Treatment of traumatic brain injury using zinc-finger protein gene therapy targeting VEGF-A.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Ishita; Park, Eugene; Liu, Elaine; Spratt, S Kaye; Surosky, Richard; Lee, Gary; Ando, Dale; Giedlin, Marty; Hare, Gregory M T; Fehlings, Michael G; Baker, Andrew J

    2012-11-20

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a role in angiogenesis and has been shown to be neuroprotective following central nervous system trauma. In the present study we evaluated the pro-angiogenic and neuroprotective effects of an engineered zinc-finger protein transcription factor transactivator targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-ZFP). We used two virus delivery systems, adeno-virus and adeno-associated virus, to examine the effects of early and delayed VEGF-A upregulation after brain trauma, respectively. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subject to a unilateral fluid percussion injury (FPI) of moderate severity (2.2-2.5 atm) followed by intracerebral microinjection of either adenovirus vector (Adv) or an adeno-associated vector (AAV) carrying the VEGF-ZFP construct. Adv-VEGF-ZFP-treated animals had significantly fewer TUNEL positive cells in the injured penumbra of the cortex (p<0.001) and hippocampus (p=0.001) relative to untreated rats at 72 h post-injury. Adv-VEGF-ZFP treatment significantly improved fEPSP values (p=0.007) in the CA1 region relative to injury alone. Treatment with AAV2-VEGF-ZFP resulted in improved post-injury microvascular diameter and improved functional recovery on the balance beam and rotarod task at 30 days post-injury. Collectively, the results provide supportive evidence for the concept of acute and delayed treatment following TBI using VEGF-ZFP to induce angiogenesis, reduce cell death, and enhance functional recovery.

  14. Sequences homologous to the human x- and y-borne zinc finger protein genes (ZFX/Y) are autosomal in monotreme mannals

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.M.; Frost, C.; Graves, M.J.A. ); Spencer, J.A. )

    1993-02-01

    The human zinc finger protein genes (ZFX/Y) were identified as a result of a systematic search for the testis-determining factor gene on the human Y chromosome. Although they play no direct role in sex determination, they are of particular interest because they are highly conserved among mammals, birds, and amphibians and because, in eutherian mammals at least, they have active alleles on both the X and the Y chromosomes outside the pseudoautosomal region. We used in situ hybridization to localize the homologues of the zinc finger protein gene to chromosome 1 of the Australian echidna and to an equivalent position on chromosomes 1 and 2 of the playtpus. The localization to platypus chromosome 1 was confirmed by Southern analysis of a Chinese hamster [times] platypus cell hybrid retaining most of platypus chromosome 1. This localization is consistent with the cytological homology of chromosome 1 between the two species. The zinc finger protein gene homologues were localized to regions of platypus chromosomes 1 and 2 that included a number of other genes situated near ZFX on the short arm of the human X chromosome. These results support the hypothesis that many of the genes located on the short arm of the human X were originally autosomal and have been translocated to the X chromosome since the eutherian-metatherian divergence. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Rajakumara, Eerappa; Wang, Zhentian; Ma, Honghui; Hu, Lulu; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan; Guo, Rui; Wu, Feizhen; Li, Haitao; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Shi, Yang

    2011-08-29

    Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

  16. [Cloning and expression pattern of a zinc finger protein gene ShSAP1 in Saccharum officinarum].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojun; Cai, Wenwei; Zhang, Shuzhen; Xu, Liping; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jungang

    2011-06-01

    In plants, proteins with A20/AN1 zinc finger domain are involved in stress responses, named as "Stress Associated Protein" (SAP) gene family. Based on Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) sequences information in Badila Saccharum officinarum mature related cDNA library, we cloned an SAP gene from sugarcane full length cDNA library, named ShSAP1 (GenBank: Accession No. HM991960). To characterize ShSAP1, we analyzed its genome structure and expression pattern. Southern blot analysis showed ShSAP1 was present as one or two copy in the genome of Badila. Comparison of ShSAP1 1 008 bp full length cDNA with a genomic frangment (2 241 bp) generated by PCR amplification and sequencing, revealed the presence of two introns (202 bp and 1 052 bp) located in the 5'UTR region. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis found ShSAP1 expressed in leaves, roots and stalk in mature sugarcane. Compared with immature stems, ShSAP1 expressed higher in mature stalk. ShSAP1 was induced by different types of treatments, such as salt (200 mmol/L NaCl), drought (10% PEG 6 000), GA3 (200 mg/L), ABA (100 micromol/L) and ET (1 mmol/L) during sugarcane seedling stage. These results indicated that ShSAP1 may function in sugarcane maturation and abiotic stress response processes.

  17. The Arabidopsis Gene zinc finger protein 3(ZFP3) Is Involved in Salt Stress and Osmotic Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aidong; Liu, Dongdong; Hua, Changmei; Yan, An; Liu, Bohan; Wu, Minjie; Liu, Yihua; Huang, Linli; Ali, Imran; Gan, Yinbo

    2016-01-01

    Plants are continuously challenged by various abiotic and biotic stresses. To tide over these adversities, plants evolved intricate regulatory networks to adapt these unfavorable environments. So far, many researchers have clarified the molecular and genetic pathways involved in regulation of stress responses. However, the mechanism through which these regulatory networks operate is largely unknown. In this study, we cloned a C2H2-type zinc finger protein gene ZFP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana and investigated its function in salt and osmotic stress response. Our results showed that the expression level of ZFP3 was highly suppressed by NaCl, mannitol and sucrose. Constitutive expression of ZFP3 enhanced tolerance of plants to salt and osmotic stress while the zfp3 mutant plants displays reduced tolerance in Arabidopsis. Gain- and Loss-of-function studies of ZFP3 showed that ZFP3 significantly changes proline accumulation and chlorophyll content. Furthermore, over-expression of ZFP3 induced the expressions of stress-related gene KIN1, RD22, RD29B and AtP5CS1. These results suggest that ZFP3 is involved in salt and osmotic stress response. PMID:27977750

  18. PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    E Rajakumara; Z Wang; H Ma; L Hu; H Chen; Y Lin; R Guo; F Wu; H Li; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

  19. Dissection of splicing regulation at an endogenous locus by zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene editing.

    PubMed

    Cristea, Sandra; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Cost, Gregory J

    2011-02-08

    Sequences governing RNA splicing are difficult to study in situ due to the great difficulty of traditional targeted mutagenesis. Zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology allows for the rapid and efficient introduction of site-specific mutations into mammalian chromosomes. Using a ZFN pair along with a donor plasmid to manipulate the outcomes of DNA repair, we introduced several discrete, targeted mutations into the fourth intron of the endogenous BAX gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Putative lariat branch points, the polypyrimidine tract, and the splice acceptor site were targeted. We recovered numerous otherwise isogenic clones carrying the intended mutations and analyzed the effect of each on BAX pre-mRNA splicing. Mutation of one of three possible branch points, the polypyrimidine tract, and the splice acceptor site all caused exclusion of exon five from BAX mRNA. Interestingly, these exon-skipping mutations allowed usage of cryptic splice acceptor sites within intron four. These data demonstrate that ZFN-mediated gene editing is a highly effective tool for dissection of pre-mRNA splicing regulatory sequences in their endogenous context.

  20. PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Honghui; Hu, Lulu; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan; Guo, Rui; Wu, Feizhen; Li, Haitao; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHDUHRF1), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHDUHRF1 bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHDUHRF1 binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function. PMID:21777816

  1. Zinc-finger nuclease-mediated targeted insertion of reporter genes for quantitative imaging of gene expression in sea urchin embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoaki; Fujita, Kazumasa; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Ken-ichi; Matsuura, Shinya; Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Shibata, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    To understand complex biological systems, such as the development of multicellular organisms, it is important to characterize the gene expression dynamics. However, there is currently no universal technique for targeted insertion of reporter genes and quantitative imaging in multicellular model systems. Recently, genome editing using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) has been reported in several models. ZFNs consist of a zinc-finger DNA-binding array with the nuclease domain of the restriction enzyme FokI and facilitate targeted transgene insertion. In this study, we successfully inserted a GFP reporter cassette into the HpEts1 gene locus of the sea urchin, Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus. We achieved this insertion by injecting eggs with a pair of ZFNs for HpEts1 with a targeting donor construct that contained ∼1-kb homology arms and a 2A-histone H2B–GFP cassette. We increased the efficiency of the ZFN-mediated targeted transgene insertion by in situ linearization of the targeting donor construct and cointroduction of an mRNA for a dominant-negative form of HpLig4, which encodes the H. pulcherrimus homolog of DNA ligase IV required for error-prone nonhomologous end joining. We measured the fluorescence intensity of GFP at the single-cell level in living embryos during development and found that there was variation in HpEts1 expression among the primary mesenchyme cells. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of ZFN-mediated targeted transgene insertion to enable quantification of the expression levels of endogenous genes during development in living sea urchin embryos. PMID:22711830

  2. Transcriptome Wide Identification and Validation of Calcium Sensor Gene Family in the Developing Spikes of Finger Millet Genotypes for Elucidating Its Role in Grain Calcium Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Uma M.; Chandra, Muktesh; Shankhdhar, Shailesh C.; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Background In finger millet, calcium is one of the important and abundant mineral elements. The molecular mechanisms involved in calcium accumulation in plants remains poorly understood. Transcriptome sequencing of genetically diverse genotypes of finger millet differing in grain calcium content will help in understanding the trait. Principal Finding In this study, the transcriptome sequencing of spike tissues of two genotypes of finger millet differing in their grain calcium content, were performed for the first time. Out of 109,218 contigs, 78 contigs in case of GP-1 (Low Ca genotype) and out of 120,130 contigs 76 contigs in case of GP-45 (High Ca genotype), were identified as calcium sensor genes. Through in silico analysis all 82 unique calcium sensor genes were classified into eight calcium sensor gene family viz., CaM & CaMLs, CBLs, CIPKs, CRKs, PEPRKs, CDPKs, CaMKs and CCaMK. Out of 82 genes, 12 were found diverse from the rice orthologs. The differential expression analysis on the basis of FPKM value resulted in 24 genes highly expressed in GP-45 and 11 genes highly expressed in GP-1. Ten of the 35 differentially expressed genes could be assigned to three documented pathways involved mainly in stress responses. Furthermore, validation of selected calcium sensor responder genes was also performed by qPCR, in developing spikes of both genotypes grown on different concentration of exogenous calcium. Conclusion Through de novo transcriptome data assembly and analysis, we reported the comprehensive identification and functional characterization of calcium sensor gene family. The calcium sensor gene family identified and characterized in this study will facilitate in understanding the molecular basis of calcium accumulation and development of calcium biofortified crops. Moreover, this study also supported that identification and characterization of gene family through Illumina paired-end sequencing is a potential tool for generating the genomic information of

  3. Isolation and gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with constitutive expression of ATL2, an early elicitor-response RING-H2 zinc-finger gene.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mario; Guzmán, Plinio

    2004-01-01

    Genes with unstable transcripts often encode proteins that play important regulatory roles. ATL2 is a member of a multigene family coding highly related RING-H2 zinc-finger proteins that may function as E3 ubiquitin ligases. ATL2 mRNA accumulation occurs rapidly and transiently after incubation with elicitors of pathogen response. We screened 50,000 M(2) families from a line that carries a fusion of pATL2 to the GUS reporter gene and isolated five mutants, which we named eca (expresión constitutiva de ATL2), that showed constitutive expression of the reporter gene. One mutant exhibits a drastic stunted phenotype while the other four grow similarly to wild type. Two early chitin-induced genes and known pathogenesis-related genes such as NPR1, PAL, and CHS are activated in all the mutants whereas members of the ATL family and PR-1 and PDF2.1, which are markers of the salicylic acid (SA) jasmonate (JA) defense-response pathways, display differential expression between the mutants. These observations indicate that the ECA gene products may function in the early steps of an elicitor-response pathway, although some of them may function at other stages on the SA or JA defense-response pathways. Likewise, the fact that ATL2 and other members of the ATL family are activated in eca mutants links the induction of this putative class of ubiquitin ligases to plant defense signaling pathways. PMID:15238540

  4. The Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib Is a Potent Inducer of Zinc Finger AN1-type Domain 2a Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Antonio; Riccio, Anna; Coccia, Marta; Trotta, Edoardo; La Frazia, Simone; Santoro, M. Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The zinc finger AN1-type domain 2a gene, also known as arsenite-inducible RNA-associated protein (AIRAP), was recently identified as a novel human canonical heat shock gene strictly controlled by heat shock factor (HSF) 1. Little is known about AIRAP gene regulation in human cells. Here we report that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor with anticancer and antiangiogenic properties used in the clinic for treatment of multiple myeloma, is a potent inducer of AIRAP expression in human cells. Using endothelial cells as a model, we unraveled the molecular mechanism regulating AIRAP expression during proteasome inhibition. Bortezomib induces AIRAP expression at the transcriptional level early after treatment, concomitantly with polyubiquitinated protein accumulation and HSF activation. AIRAP protein is detected at high levels for at least 48 h after bortezomib exposure, together with the accumulation of HSF2, a factor implicated in differentiation and development regulation. Different from heat-mediated induction, in bortezomib-treated cells, HSF1 and HSF2 interact directly, forming HSF1-HSF2 heterotrimeric complexes recruited to a specific heat shock element in the AIRAP promoter. Interestingly, whereas HSF1 has been confirmed to be critical for AIRAP gene transcription, HSF2 was found to negatively regulate AIRAP expression after bortezomib treatment, further emphasizing an important modulatory role of this transcription factor under stress conditions. AIRAP function is still not defined. However, the fact that AIRAP is expressed abundantly in primary human cells at bortezomib concentrations comparable with plasma levels in treated patients suggests that AIRAP may participate in the regulatory network controlling proteotoxic stress during bortezomib treatment. PMID:24619424

  5. Identification of a novel gene product, Sertoli cell gene with a zinc finger domain, that is important for FSH activation of testicular Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Jaideep; Skinner, Michael K

    2002-02-01

    Sertoli cells provide the cytoarchitectural support and microenvironment necessary for the process of spermatogenesis. A novel, ubiquitously expressed cDNA clone was isolated from Sertoli cells and termed Sertoli cell gene with a zinc finger domain (SERZ). A significant homology of SERZ was found with a mouse genomic sequence that suggested the presence of at least 10 exons. An open reading frame at the 5'-end of the cDNA, termed SERZ-alpha, had a cryptic basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain, but no start codon. When a start codon was engineered into the 5'-end of the cDNA, an in vitro translation product of SERZ-alpha was obtained. The longest second open reading frame with an ATG start site at 304 bp from the 5'-end coded for a 308-amino acid SERZ-beta polypeptide. Motif analysis and BLAST search of SERZ-beta showed significant homology to the DHHC domain of conserved zinc finger proteins. A number of potential phosphorylation sites were observed in the SERZ-beta polypeptide sequence. The long 5'-untranslated region of SERZ-beta prompted an investigation of both potential alternate polypeptide products, SERZ-alpha and SERZ-beta. Both SERZ-alpha and SERZ-beta proteins were detected with specific antibodies to SERZ-beta and the 5'-end open reading frame SERZ-alpha in a Western blot analysis of total Sertoli cell proteins. The presence of the SERZ-beta polypeptide was also confirmed by in vitro translation of the cDNA, but SERZ-alpha was not translated in vitro in the absence of an engineered start codon. The expression pattern of SERZ mRNA was observed in all tissues examined. The transcript size of SERZ as determined by Northern blot analysis is approximately 2.7 kb. An antisense oligonucleotide to SERZ was found not to influence basal levels of transferrin promoter activation, but significantly blocked FSH-induced transferrin promoter activation. SERZ mRNA expression was not regulated by FSH treatment of Sertoli cell cultures. In summary, a novel gene product

  6. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of environmental stress-responsive SAP gene family encoding A20/AN1 zinc finger proteins in tomato.

    PubMed

    Solanke, Amolkumar U; Sharma, Manoj K; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2009-08-01

    Characterization of genes responsive to stress is important for efforts on improving stress tolerance of plants. To address components involved in stress tolerance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a stress-responsive gene family encoding A20/AN1 zinc finger proteins was characterized. In the present study, 13 members of this gene family were cloned from tomato cultivar Pusa Ruby and named as Stress Associated Protein (SAP) genes. Out of 13 genes, 12 have been mapped on their respective chromosomes. Expression of these genes in response to cold, heat, salt, desiccation, wounding, abscisic acid, oxidative and submergence stresses was analysed. All tomato SAP genes were found to be responsive to one or other type of environmental stress. The phylogenetic analysis of these genes, along with their orthologs from Solanaceae species suggests the presence of a common set of SAP genes in the studied Solanaceae species. The present study characterizes a SAP gene family, which encodes A20/AN1 zinc finger containing proteins from tomato for the first time. Genes showing high expression in response to a particular stress can be exploited for improving stress tolerance of tomato and other Solanaceae members.

  7. Plant architecture and grain yield are regulated by the novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Lin, Jian Zhong; Peng, Dan; Yang, Yuan Zhu; Guo, Ming; Tang, Dong Ying; Tan, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xuan Ming

    2017-01-01

    In many plants, architecture and grain yield are affected by both the environment and genetics. In rice, the tiller is a vital factor impacting plant architecture and regulated by many genes. In this study, we cloned a novel DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene Os02g0819100 and its alternative splice variant OsDHHC1 from the cDNA of rice (Oryza sativa L.), which regulate plant architecture by altering the tiller in rice. The tillers increased by about 40% when this type of DHHC-type zinc finger protein gene was over-expressed in Zhong Hua 11 (ZH11) rice plants. Moreover, the grain yield of transgenic rice increased approximately by 10% compared with wild-type ZH11. These findings provide an important genetic engineering approach for increasing rice yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Zinc finger protein 407 overexpression upregulates PPAR target gene expression and improves glucose homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Alyssa; Wang, Li; Stephenson, Erin J; Ghanta, Siddharth V; Ko, Chih-Wei; Croniger, Colleen M; Bridges, Dave; Buchner, David A

    2016-11-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) family of nuclear receptors is central to the pathophysiology and treatment of metabolic disease through the receptors' ability to regulate the expression of genes involved in glucose homeostasis, adipogenesis, and lipid metabolism. However, the mechanism by which PPAR is regulated remains incompletely understood. We generated a transgenic mouse strain (ZFP-TG) that overexpressed Zfp407 primarily in muscle and heart. Transcriptome analysis by RNA-Seq identified 1,300 differentially expressed genes in the muscle of ZFP-TG mice, among which PPAR target genes were significantly enriched. Among the physiologically important PPARγ target genes, Glucose transporter (Glut)-4 mRNA and protein levels were increased in heart and muscle. The increase in Glut4 and other transcriptional effects of Zfp407 overexpression together decreased body weight and lowered plasma glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR scores relative to control littermates. When placed on high-fat diet, ZFP-TG mice remained more glucose tolerant than their wild-type counterparts. Cell-based assays demonstrated that Zfp407 synergistically increased the transcriptional activity of all PPAR subtypes, PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARδ. The increased PPAR activity was not associated with increased PPAR mRNA or protein levels, suggesting that Zfp407 posttranslationally regulates PPAR activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Zfp407 overexpression improved glucose homeostasis. Thus, Zfp407 represents a new drug target for treating metabolic disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. P16-specific DNA methylation by engineered zinc finger methyltransferase inactivates gene transcription and promotes cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chenghua; Gan, Ying; Gu, Liankun; Wilson, James; Liu, Zhaojun; Zhang, Baozhen; Deng, Dajun

    2015-11-23

    P16 DNA methylation is well known to be the most frequent event in cancer development. It has been reported that genetic inactivation of P16 drives cancer growth and metastasis, however, whether P16 DNA methylation is truly a driver in cancer metastasis remains unknown. A P16-specific DNA methyltransferase (P16-dnmt) expression vector is designed using a P16 promoter-specific engineered zinc finger protein fused with the catalytic domain of dnmt3a. P16-dnmt transfection significantly decreases P16 promoter activity, induces complete methylation of P16 CpG islands, and inactivates P16 transcription in the HEK293T cell line. The P16-Dnmt coding fragment is integrated into an expression controllable vector and used to induce P16-specific DNA methylation in GES-1 and BGC823 cell lines. Transwell assays show enhanced migration and invasion of these cancer cells following P16-specific DNA methylation. Such effects are not observed in the P16 mutant A549 cell line. These results are confirmed using an experimental mouse pneumonic metastasis model. Moreover, enforced overexpression of P16 in these cells reverses the migration phenotype. Increased levels of RB phosphorylation and NFκB subunit P65 expression are also seen following P16-specific methylation and might further contribute to cancer metastasis. P16 methylation could directly inactivate gene transcription and drive cancer metastasis.

  10. Waking up dormant tumor suppressor genes with zinc fingers, TALEs and the CRISPR/dCas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Bloj, Benjamin; Moses, Colette; Sgro, Agustin; Plani-Lam, Janice; Arooj, Mahira; Duffy, Ciara; Thiruvengadam, Shreyas; Sorolla, Anabel; Rashwan, Rabab; Mancera, Ricardo L.; Leisewitz, Andrea; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Corvalan, Alejandro H.; Blancafort, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) plays a major role during carcinogenesis and regaining these dormant functions by engineering of sequence-specific epigenome editing tools offers a unique opportunity for targeted therapies. However, effectively normalizing the expression and regaining tumor suppressive functions of silenced TSGs by artificial transcription factors (ATFs) still remains a major challenge. Herein we describe novel combinatorial strategies for the potent reactivation of two class II TSGs, MASPIN and REPRIMO, in cell lines with varying epigenetic states, using the CRISPR/dCas9 associated system linked to a panel of effector domains (VP64, p300, VPR and SAM complex), as well as with protein-based ATFs, Zinc Fingers and TALEs. We found that co-delivery of multiple effector domains using a combination of CRISPR/dCas9 and TALEs or SAM complex maximized activation in highly methylated promoters. In particular, CRISPR/dCas9 VPR with SAM upregulated MASPIN mRNA (22,145-fold change) in H157 lung cancer cells, with accompanying re-expression of MASPIN protein, which led to a concomitant inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death. Consistently, CRISPR/dCas9 VP64 with SAM upregulated REPRIMO (680-fold change), which led to phenotypic reprogramming in AGS gastric cancer cells. Altogether, our results outlined novel sequence-specific, combinatorial epigenome editing approaches to reactivate highly methylated TSGs as a promising therapy for cancer and other diseases. PMID:27528034

  11. Waking up dormant tumor suppressor genes with zinc fingers, TALEs and the CRISPR/dCas9 system.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Bloj, Benjamin; Moses, Colette; Sgro, Agustin; Plani-Lam, Janice; Arooj, Mahira; Duffy, Ciara; Thiruvengadam, Shreyas; Sorolla, Anabel; Rashwan, Rabab; Mancera, Ricardo L; Leisewitz, Andrea; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa; Corvalan, Alejandro H; Blancafort, Pilar

    2016-09-13

    The aberrant epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) plays a major role during carcinogenesis and regaining these dormant functions by engineering of sequence-specific epigenome editing tools offers a unique opportunity for targeted therapies. However, effectively normalizing the expression and regaining tumor suppressive functions of silenced TSGs by artificial transcription factors (ATFs) still remains a major challenge. Herein we describe novel combinatorial strategies for the potent reactivation of two class II TSGs, MASPIN and REPRIMO, in cell lines with varying epigenetic states, using the CRISPR/dCas9 associated system linked to a panel of effector domains (VP64, p300, VPR and SAM complex), as well as with protein-based ATFs, Zinc Fingers and TALEs. We found that co-delivery of multiple effector domains using a combination of CRISPR/dCas9 and TALEs or SAM complex maximized activation in highly methylated promoters. In particular, CRISPR/dCas9 VPR with SAM upregulated MASPIN mRNA (22,145-fold change) in H157 lung cancer cells, with accompanying re-expression of MASPIN protein, which led to a concomitant inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptotic cell death. Consistently, CRISPR/dCas9 VP64 with SAM upregulated REPRIMO (680-fold change), which led to phenotypic reprogramming in AGS gastric cancer cells. Altogether, our results outlined novel sequence-specific, combinatorial epigenome editing approaches to reactivate highly methylated TSGs as a promising therapy for cancer and other diseases.

  12. Gene- and protein-delivered zinc finger-staphylococcal nuclease hybrid for inhibition of DNA replication of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Mino, Takashi; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs) inhibited virus DNA replication in planta and in mammalian cells by blocking binding of a viral replication protein to its replication origin. However, the replication mechanisms of viruses of interest need to be disentangled for the application. To develop more widely applicable methods for antiviral therapy, we explored the feasibility of inhibition of HPV-18 replication as a model system by cleaving its viral genome. To this end, we fused the staphylococcal nuclease cleaving DNA as a monomer to an AZP that binds to the viral genome. The resulting hybrid nuclease (designated AZP-SNase) cleaved its target DNA plasmid efficiently and sequence-specifically in vitro. Then, we confirmed that transfection with a plasmid expressing AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication in transient replication assays using mammalian cells. Linker-mediated PCR analysis revealed that the AZP-SNase cleaved an HPV-18 ori plasmid around its binding site. Finally, we demonstrated that the protein-delivered AZP-SNase inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication as well and did not show any significant cytotoxicity. Thus, both gene- and protein-delivered hybrid nucleases efficiently inhibited HPV-18 DNA replication, leading to development of a more universal antiviral therapy for human DNA viruses.

  13. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Sophiya; Li, Melody M H; Schoggins, John W; Tian, Suyan; Rice, Charles M; MacDonald, Margaret R

    2012-01-01

    The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV), the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  14. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Finger Foods for Babies KidsHealth > For Parents > Finger Foods for ... will accept a new food. previous continue Finger Foods to Avoid Finger feeding is fun and rewarding ...

  15. Homoclinic finger-rings in RN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changrong; Zhang, Weinian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we investigate bifurcations of a degenerate homoclinic loop in RN. We prove that a homoclinic finger-ring, an invariant manifold of a definite dimension textured with homoclinic orbits, arises from the degenerate homoclinic orbit. The size of the homoclinic finger-ring is decided by not only its dimension of manifold but also its width. For the rise of homoclinic finger-rings of different dimensions we give conditions, which are proved to form bifurcation manifolds in the parameter space. We further estimate the width for the homoclinic finger-ring and give a method to compute the bifurcation manifolds approximately.

  16. Comprehensive Evolutionary and Expression Analysis of FCS-Like Zinc finger Gene Family Yields Insights into Their Origin, Expansion and Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Jamsheer K, Muhammed; Mannully, Chanchal Thomas; Gopan, Nandu; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Plant evolution is characterized by frequent genome duplication events. Expansion of habitat resulted in the origin of many novel genes and genome duplication events which in turn resulted in the expansion of many regulatory gene families. The plant-specific FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) gene family is characterized by the presence of a FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain which mediates the protein-protein interaction. In this study, we identified that the expansion of FLZ gene family size in different species is correlated with ancestral and lineage-specific whole genome duplication events. The subsequent gene loss found to have a greater role in determining the size of this gene family in many species. However, genomic block duplications played the significant role in the expansion of FLZ gene family in some species. Comparison of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa FLZ gene family revealed monocot and dicot specific evolutionary trends. The FLZ genes were found to be under high purifying selection. The spatiotemporal expression analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana FLZ gene family revealed that majority of the members are highly expressed in reproductive organs. FLZ genes were also found to be highly expressed during vegetative-to-reproductive phase transition which is correlated with the proposed role of this gene family in sugar signaling. The comparison of sequence, structural and expression features of duplicated genes identified lineage-specific redundancy and divergence. This extensive evolutionary analysis and expression analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana FLZ genes will pave the way for further functional analysis of FLZ genes. PMID:26252898

  17. Emergence of the ZNF91 Krüppel-associated box-containing zinc finger gene family in the last common ancestor of anthropoidea.

    PubMed Central

    Bellefroid, E J; Marine, J C; Matera, A G; Bourguignon, C; Desai, T; Healy, K C; Bray-Ward, P; Martial, J A; Ihle, J N; Ward, D C

    1995-01-01

    The ZNF91 gene family, a subset of the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing group of zinc finger genes, comprises more than 40 loci; most reside on human chromosome 19p12-p13.1. We have examined the emergence and evolutionary conservation of the ZNF91 family. ZNF91 family members were detected in all species of great apes, gibbons, Old World monkeys, and New World monkeys examined but were not found in prosimians or rodents. In each species containing the ZNF91 family, the genes were clustered at one major site, on the chromosome(s) syntenic to human chromosome 19. To identify a putative "founder" gene, > 20 murine KRAB-containing zinc finger protein (ZFP) cDNAs were randomly cloned, but none showed sequence similarity to the ZNF91 genes. These observations suggest that the ZNF91 gene cluster is a derived character specific to Anthropoidea, resulting from a duplication and amplification event some 55 million years ago in the common ancestor of simians. Although the ZNF91 gene cluster is present in all simian species, the sequences of the human ZNF91 gene that confer DNA-binding specificity were conserved only in great apes, suggesting that there is not a high selective pressure to maintain the DNA targets of these proteins during evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7479878

  18. Factor-induced Reprogramming and Zinc Finger Nuclease-aided Gene Targeting Cause Different Genome Instability in β-Thalassemia Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs)*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Shan, Yongli; Liao, Baojian; Kong, Guanyi; Wang, Cheng; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Xiujuan; Chen, Shubin; Pei, Duanqing; Chen, Nansheng; Pan, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    The generation of personalized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) followed by targeted genome editing provides an opportunity for developing customized effective cellular therapies for genetic disorders. However, it is critical to ascertain whether edited iPSCs harbor unfavorable genomic variations before their clinical application. To examine the mutation status of the edited iPSC genome and trace the origin of possible mutations at different steps, we have generated virus-free iPSCs from amniotic cells carrying homozygous point mutations in β-hemoglobin gene (HBB) that cause severe β-thalassemia (β-Thal), corrected the mutations in both HBB alleles by zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting, and obtained the final HBB gene-corrected iPSCs by excising the exogenous drug resistance gene with Cre recombinase. Through comparative genomic hybridization and whole-exome sequencing, we uncovered seven copy number variations, five small insertions/deletions, and 64 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in β-Thal iPSCs before the gene targeting step and found a single small copy number variation, 19 insertions/deletions, and 340 single nucleotide variations in the final gene-corrected β-Thal iPSCs. Our data revealed that substantial but different genomic variations occurred at factor-induced somatic cell reprogramming and zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting steps, suggesting that stringent genomic monitoring and selection are needed both at the time of iPSC derivation and after gene targeting. PMID:25795783

  19. Novel genes encoding six kinds of three-finger toxins in Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) and function characterization of two recombinant long-chain neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Huayuan; Liu, Jing; Xu, Kangsen

    2006-09-01

    Three-finger toxins are a family of low-molecular-mass toxins (<10 kDa) having very similar three-dimensional structures. In the present study, 19 novel cDNAs coding three-finger toxins were cloned from the venom gland of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra). Alignment analysis showed that the putative peptides could be divided into six kinds of three-finger toxins: LNTXs (long-chain neurotoxins), short-chain neurotoxins, cardiotoxins (CTXs), weak neurotoxins, muscarinic toxins and a toxin with a free SH group. Furthermore, a phylogenetic tree was established on the basis of the toxin cDNAs and the previously reported similar nucleotide sequences from the same source venom. It indicated that three-finger-toxin genes in O. hannah diverged early in the course of evolution by long- and short-type pathways. Two LNTXs, namely rLNTX1 (recombinant LNTX1) and rLNTX3, were expressed and showed cytolytic activity in addition to their neurotoxic function. By comparing the functional residues, we offer some possible explanations for the differences in their neurotoxic function. Moreover, a plausible elucidation of the additonal cytolytic activity was achieved by hydropathy-profile analysis. This, to our knowledge, is the first observation that recombinant long chain alpha-neurotoxins have a CTX-like cytolytic activity.

  20. Association of a genetic variant of the ZPR1 zinc finger gene with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tokoro, Fumitaka; Matsuoka, Reiko; Abe, Shintaro; Arai, Masazumi; Noda, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Sachiro; Horibe, Hideki; Fujimaki, Tetsuo; Oguri, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Kimihiko; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2015-01-01

    Various loci and genes that confer susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD) have been identified in Caucasian populations by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). As type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for CHD, we hypothesized that certain polymorphisms may contribute to the genetic susceptibility to CHD through affecting the susceptibility to type 2 DM. The purpose of the present study was to examine a possible association of type 2 DM in Japanese individuals with 29 polymorphisms identified as susceptibility loci for CHD by meta-analyses of the GWASs. The study subjects comprised of 3,757 individuals (1,444 subjects with type 2 DM and 2,313 controls). The polymorphism genotypes were determined by the multiplex bead-based Luminex assay, which combines the polymerase chain reaction and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes with suspension array technology. To compensate for multiple comparisons of genotypes, the criterion of a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.05 was adopted for testing the statistical significance of the association. The comparisons of allele frequencies by the χ(2) test revealed that the rs964184 (C→G) of the ZPR1 zinc finger gene (ZPR1) was significantly associated (P=0.0017; FDR=0.050) with type 2 DM. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender and body mass index revealed that rs964184 of ZPR1 was significantly associated (P=0.0012; odds ratio, 1.25; dominant model) with type 2 DM with the minor G allele representing a risk factor for this condition. Fasting plasma glucose levels (P=0.0076) and blood glycosylated hemoglobin contents (P=0.0132) significantly differed among ZPR1 genotypes with the G allele associated with increases in these parameters. ZPR1 may thus be a susceptibility locus for type 2 DM in Japanese individuals.

  1. spalt encodes an evolutionarily conserved zinc finger protein of novel structure which provides homeotic gene function in the head and tail region of the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Kühnlein, R P; Frommer, G; Friedrich, M; Gonzalez-Gaitan, M; Weber, A; Wagner-Bernholz, J F; Gehring, W J; Jäckle, H; Schuh, R

    1994-01-01

    The region specific homeotic gene spalt (sal) of Drosophila melanogaster promotes the specification of terminal pattern elements as opposed to segments in the trunk. Our results show that the previously reported sal transcription unit was misidentified. Based on P-element mediated germ line transformation and DNA sequence analysis of sal mutant alleles, we identified the transcription unit that carries sal function. sal is located close to the misidentified transcription unit, and it is expressed in similar temporal and spatial patterns during embryogenesis. The sal gene encodes a zinc finger protein of novel structure composed of three widely spaced 'double zinc finger' motifs of internally conserved sequences and a single zinc finger motif of different sequence. Antibodies produced against the sal protein show that sal is first expressed at the blastoderm stage and later in restricted areas of the embryonic nervous system as well as in the developing trachea. The antibodies detect sal homologous proteins in corresponding spatial and temporal patterns in the embryos of related insect species. Sequence analysis of the sal gene of Drosophila virilis, a species which is phylogenetically separated by approximately 60 million years, suggests that the sal function is conserved during evolution, consistent with its proposed role in head formation during arthropod evolution. Images PMID:7905822

  2. Analysis of illegitimate genomic integration mediated by zinc-finger nucleases: implications for specificity of targeted gene correction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Formation of site specific genomic double strand breaks (DSBs), induced by the expression of a pair of engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), dramatically increases the rates of homologous recombination (HR) between a specific genomic target and a donor plasmid. However, for the safe use of ZFN induced HR in practical applications, possible adverse effects of the technology such as cytotoxicity and genotoxicity need to be well understood. In this work, off-target activity of a pair of ZFNs has been examined by measuring the ratio between HR and illegitimate genomic integration in cells that are growing exponentially, and in cells that have been arrested in the G2/M phase. Results A reporter cell line that contained consensus ZFN binding sites in an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene was used to measure ratios between HR and non-homologous integration of a plasmid template. Both in human cells (HEK 293) containing the consensus ZFN binding sites and in cells lacking the ZFN binding sites, a 3.5 fold increase in the level of illegitimate integration was observed upon ZFN expression. Since the reporter gene containing the consensus ZFN target sites was found to be intact in cells where illegitimate integration had occurred, increased rates of illegitimate integration most likely resulted from the formation of off-target genomic DSBs. Additionally, in a fraction of the ZFN treated cells the co-occurrence of both specific HR and illegitimate integration was observed. As a mean to minimize unspecific effects, cell cycle manipulation of the target cells by induction of a transient G2/M cell cycle arrest was shown to stimulate the activity of HR while having little effect on the levels of illegitimate integration, thus resulting in a nearly eight fold increase in the ratio between the two processes. Conclusions The demonstration that ZFN expression, in addition to stimulating specific gene targeting by HR, leads to increased rates of

  3. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Rescues Gene Knockout Levels Achieved with Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors Encoding Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Pelascini, Laetitia P.L.; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Holkers, Maarten; Cathomen, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) work as dimers to induce double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) at predefined chromosomal positions. In doing so, they constitute powerful triggers to edit and to interrogate the function of genomic sequences in higher eukaryotes. A preferred route to introduce ZFNs into somatic cells relies on their cotransduction with two integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) each encoding a monomer of a functional heterodimeric pair. The episomal nature of IDLVs diminishes the risk of genotoxicity and ensures the strict transient expression profile necessary to minimize deleterious effects associated with long-term ZFN activity. However, by deploying IDLVs and conventional lentiviral vectors encoding HPRT1- or eGFP-specific ZFNs, we report that DSB formation at target alleles is limited after IDLV-mediated ZFN transfer. This IDLV-specific underperformance stems, to a great extent, from the activity of chromatin-remodeling histone deacetylases (HDACs). Importantly, the prototypic and U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved inhibitors of metal-dependent HDACs, trichostatin A and vorinostat, respectively, did not hinder illegitimate recombination-mediated repair of targeted chromosomal DSBs. This allowed rescuing IDLV-mediated site-directed mutagenesis to levels approaching those achieved by using their isogenic chromosomally integrating counterparts. Hence, HDAC inhibition constitutes an efficacious expedient to incorporate in genome-editing strategies based on transient IDLV-mediated ZFN expression. Finally, we compared two of the most commonly used readout systems to measure targeted gene knockout activities based on restriction and mismatch-sensitive endonucleases. These experiments indicate that these enzymatic assays display a similar performance. PMID:24059449

  4. Creation of a six-fingered artificial transcription factor that represses the hepatitis B virus HBx gene integrated into a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinghui; Zhao, Zhanzhong; Guo, Junwei; Huang, Peitang; Zhu, Xudong; Zhou, Xiaowei; Yang, Zhixin; Zhao, Lixia; Xu, Long; Xu, Junjie; Fu, Ling; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Dong, Yunzhu; Huang, Gang; Wang, Qianfei; Li, Bo; Song, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuxu; Liu, Shuling; Yi, Shaoqiong; Yu, Ting; Yu, Changming; Hou, Lihua; Li, Jianmin; Chen, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an independent risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV HBx gene is frequently identified as an integrant in the chromosomal DNA of patients with HCC. HBx encodes the X protein (HBx), a putative viral oncoprotein that affects transcriptional regulation of several cellular genes. Therefore, HBx may be an ideal target to impede the progression of HBV infection-related HCC. In this study, integrated HBx was transcriptionally downregulated using an artificial transcription factor (ATF). Two three-fingered Cys2-His2 zinc finger (ZF) motifs that specifically recognized two 9-bp DNA sequences regulating HBx expression were identified from a phage-display library. The ZF domains were linked into a six-fingered protein that specified an 18-bp DNA target in the Enhancer I region upstream of HBx. This DNA-binding domain was fused with a Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) transcriptional repression domain to produce an ATF designed to downregulate HBx integrated into the Hep3B HCC cell line. The ATF significantly repressed HBx in a luciferase reporter assay. Stably expressing the ATF in Hep3B cells resulted in significant growth arrest, whereas stably expressing the ATF in an HCC cell line lacking integrated HBx (HepG2) had virtually no effect. The targeted downregulation of integrated HBx is a promising novel approach to inhibiting the progression of HBV infection-related HCC.

  5. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species. PMID:27203728

  6. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species.

  7. The PsCZF1 gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein is required for growth, development and pathogenesis in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonglin; Dou, Daolong; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Aining; Sheng, Yuting; Hua, Chenlei; Cheng, Binyan; Chen, Xiaoren; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2009-08-01

    The C(2)H(2) zinc finger proteins form one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in eukaryotes. We identified a Phytophthora sojae C(2)H(2) zinc finger (PsCZF1), that is highly conserved in sequenced oomycete pathogens. In transformants of P. sojae containing the PsCZF1 promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, GUS activity was highly induced in the P. sojae oospore stage and upregulated after infection. To elucidate the function of PsCZF1, its expression was silenced by introducing anti-sense constructs into P sojae. PsCZF1-silenced transformants did not exhibit altered cell size or morphology of sporangia and hyphae; however, hyphal growth rate was reduced by around 50% in the mutants. PsCZF1-deficient mutants were also impaired in production of oospores, swimming zoospores and germinating cysts, indicating that the gene is involved in various stages of the life cycle. Furthermore, we found that PsCZF1-deficient mutants lost virulence on host soybean cultivars. Our results suggest that this oomycete-specific C(2)H(2)-type zinc finger protein plays an important role in growth, development, and pathogenesis; therefore, PsCZF1 might be an attractive oomycete-specific target for chemical fungicide screening.

  8. Zinc finger arrays binding human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 genomic DNA: precursors of gene-therapeutics for in-situ reversal of associated cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Wayengera, Misaki

    2012-07-28

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are the high-risk, sexually transmitted infectious causes of most cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) or cancers. While efficacious vaccines to reduce the sexual acquisition of these high-risk HPVs have recently been introduced, no virus-targeted therapies exist for those already exposed and infected. Considering the oncogenic role of the transforming (E6 and E7) genes of high-risk HPVs in the slow pathogenesis of cervical cancer, we hypothesize that timely disruption or abolition of HPV genome expression within pre-cancerous lesions identified at screening may reverse neoplasia. We aimed to derive model zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for mutagenesis of the genomes of two high-risk HPV (types 16 & 18). Using ZiFiT software and the complete genomes of HPV types16 and 18, we computationally generated the consensus amino acid sequences of the DNA-binding domains (F1, F2, & F3) of (i) 296 & 327 contextually unpaired (or single) three zinc-finger arrays (sZFAs) and (ii) 9 & 13 contextually paired (left and right) three- zinc-finger arrays (pZFAs) that bind genomic DNA of HPV-types 16 and 18 respectively, inclusive of the E7 gene (s/pZFAHpV/E7). In the absence of contextually paired three-zinc-finger arrays (pZFAs) that bind DNA corresponding to the genomic context of the E6 gene of either HPV type, we derived the DNA binding domains of another set of 9 & 14 contextually unpaired E6 gene-binding ZFAs (sZFAE6) to aid the future quest for paired ZFAs to target E6 gene sequences in both HPV types studied (pZFAE6). This paper presents models for (i) synthesis of hybrid ZFNs that cleave within the genomic DNA of either HPV type, by linking the gene sequences of the DNA-cleavage domain of the FokI endonuclease FN to the gene sequences of a member of the paired-HPV-binding ZFAs (pZFAHpV/E7 + FN), and (ii) delivery of the same into precancerous lesions using HPV-derived viral plasmids or vectors. With further optimization, these

  9. A Comprehensive Catalog of Human KRAB-associated Zinc Finger Genes: Insights into the Evolutionary History of a Large Family of Transcriptional Repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D M; Hamilton, A T; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Yang, S; Kim, J; Gordon, L; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-30

    Krueppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotic species. In mammals, most ZNF proteins comprise a single class of transcriptional repressors in which a chromatin interaction domain, called the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB) is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs. KRAB-ZNF loci are specific to tetrapod vertebrates, but have expanded dramatically in numbers through repeated rounds of segmental duplication to create a gene family with hundreds of members in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the human genome for key motifs and used them to construct and manually curate gene models. The resulting KRAB-ZNF gene catalog includes 326 known genes, 243 of which were structurally corrected by manual annotation, and 97 novel KRAB-ZNF genes; this single family therefore comprises 20% of all predicted human transcription factor genes. Many of the genes are alternatively spliced, yielding a total of 743 distinct predicted proteins. Although many human KRAB-ZNF genes are conserved in mammals, at least 136 and potentially more than 200 genes of this type are primate-specific including many recent segmental duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are active in a wide variety of human tissues suggesting roles in many key biological processes, but most member genes remain completely uncharacterized. Because of their sheer numbers, wide-ranging tissue-specific expression patterns, and remarkable evolutionary divergence we predict that KRAB-ZNF transcription factors have played critical roles in crafting many aspects of human biology, including both deeply conserved and primate-specific traits.

  10. Molecular Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Stably Expressing Human PET Reporter Genes After Zinc Finger Nuclease-Mediated Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Esther; Holvoet, Bryan; Ordovas, Laura; Breuls, Natacha; Helsen, Nicky; Schönberger, Matthias; Raitano, Susanna; Struys, Tom; Vanbilloen, Bert; Casteels, Cindy; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Van Laere, Koen; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Deroose, Christophe M

    2017-10-01

    Molecular imaging is indispensable for determining the fate and persistence of engrafted stem cells. Standard strategies for transgene induction involve the use of viral vectors prone to silencing and insertional mutagenesis or the use of nonhuman genes. Methods: We used zinc finger nucleases to induce stable expression of human imaging reporter genes into the safe-harbor locus adeno-associated virus integration site 1 in human embryonic stem cells. Plasmids were generated carrying reporter genes for fluorescence, bioluminescence imaging, and human PET reporter genes. Results: In vitro assays confirmed their functionality, and embryonic stem cells retained differentiation capacity. Teratoma formation assays were performed, and tumors were imaged over time with PET and bioluminescence imaging. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the application of genome editing for targeted integration of human imaging reporter genes in human embryonic stem cells for long-term molecular imaging. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  11. Negative protein 1, which is required for function of the chicken lysozyme gene silencer in conjunction with hormone receptors, is identical to the multivalent zinc finger repressor CTCF.

    PubMed Central

    Burcin, M; Arnold, R; Lutz, M; Kaiser, B; Runge, D; Lottspeich, F; Filippova, G N; Lobanenkov, V V; Renkawitz, R

    1997-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor negative protein 1 (NeP1) binds specifically to the F1 element of the chicken lysozyme gene silencer and mediates synergistic repression by v-ERBA, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor. Another protein, CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), specifically binds to 50-bp-long sequences that contain repetitive CCCTC elements in the vicinity of vertebrate c-myc genes. Previously cloned chicken, mouse, and human CTCF cDNAs encode a highly conserved 11-Zn-finger protein. Here, NeP1 was purified and DNA bases critical for NeP1-F1 interaction were determined. NeP1 is found to bind a 50-bp stretch of nucleotides without any obvious sequence similarity to known CTCF binding sequences. Despite this remarkable difference, these two proteins are identical. They have the same molecular weight, and NeP1 contains peptide sequences which are identical to sequences in CTCF. Moreover, NeP1 and CTCF specifically recognize each other's binding DNA sequence and induce identical conformational alterations in the F1 DNA. Therefore, we propose to replace the name NeP1 with CTCF. To analyze the puzzling sequence divergence in CTCF binding sites, we studied the DNA binding of 12 CTCF deletions with serially truncated Zn fingers. While fingers 4 to 11 are indispensable for CTCF binding to the human c-myc P2 promoter site A, a completely different combination of fingers, namely, 1 to 8 or 5 to 11, was sufficient to bind the lysozyme silencer site F1. Thus, CTCF is a true multivalent factor with multiple repressive functions and multiple sequence specificities. PMID:9032255

  12. The Kruppel-like zinc finger protein ZNF224 recruits the arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 on the transcriptional repressor complex of the aldolase A gene.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Elena; De Cegli, Rossella; Medugno, Lina; Florio, Francesca; Grosso, Michela; Lupo, Angelo; Izzo, Paola; Costanzo, Paola

    2009-11-20

    Gene transcription in eukaryotes is modulated by the coordinated recruitment of specific transcription factors and chromatin-modulating proteins. Indeed, gene activation and/or repression is/are regulated by histone methylation status at specific arginine or lysine residues. In this work, by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrate that PRMT5, a type II protein arginine methyltransferase that monomethylates and symmetrically dimethylates arginine residues, is physically associated with the Kruppel-like associated box-zinc finger protein ZNF224, the aldolase A gene repressor. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that PRMT5 is recruited to the L-type aldolase A promoter and that methylation of the nucleosomes that surround the L-type promoter region occurs in vivo on the arginine 3 of histone H4. Consistent with its association to the ZNF224 repressor complex, the decrease of PRMT5 expression produced by RNA interference positively affects L-type aldolase A promoter transcription. Finally, the alternating occupancy of the L-type aldolase A promoter by the ZNF224-PRMT5 repression complex in proliferating and growth-arrested cells suggests that these regulatory proteins play a significant role during the cell cycle modulation of human aldolase A gene expression. Our data represent the first experimental evidence that protein arginine methylation plays a role in ZNF224-mediated transcriptional repression and provide novel insight into the chromatin modifications required for repression of gene transcription by Kruppel-like associated box-zinc finger proteins.

  13. Constitutive flocculation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through overexpression of the GTS1 gene, coding for a 'Glo'-type Zn-finger-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Bossier, P; Goethals, P; Rodrigues-Pousada, C

    1997-06-30

    The product of the cloned GTS1 gene is characterized by structural features found in transcription factors. It contains one Zn-finger motif (CXXCX16CXXC) situated in the N-terminal end with a high degree of homology to the newly identified 'Glo' family of Zn-finger proteins (Ireland et al., 1994, EMBO J. 13, 3812-3821). The C-terminal end of the protein is characterized by poly (Ala-Gln) and poly-Gln stretches. Poly-Gln are part of trans-acting motifs in known transcription factors. Overexpression of the GTS1 gene results in constitutive flocculation. Whole cell electrophoretic mobility and hydrophobicity of GTS1 overexpressing cells was respectively lower and higher relative to control cells. GTS1-induced flocculation is hardly sensitive to mannose in contrast to FLO1-determined flocculation. Overexpression of the GTS1 gene in a flo1 background does not abolish flocculation, suggesting that the FLO1 gene is not linked with the GTS1 gene in a 'flocculation pathway'.

  14. Duplications on human chromosome 22 reveal a novel Ret Finger Protein-like gene family with sense and endogenous antisense transcripts.

    PubMed

    Seroussi, E; Kedra, D; Pan, H Q; Peyrard, M; Schwartz, C; Scambler, P; Donnai, D; Roe, B A; Dumanski, J P

    1999-09-01

    Analysis of 600 kb of sequence encompassing the beta-prime adaptin (BAM22) gene on human chromosome 22 revealed intrachromosomal duplications within 22q12-13 resulting in three active RFPL genes, two RFPL pseudogenes, and two pseudogenes of BAM22. The genomic sequence of BAM22vartheta1 shows a remarkable similarity to that of BAM22. The cDNA sequence comparison of RFPL1, RFPL2, and RFPL3 showed 95%-96% identity between the genes, which were most similar to the Ret Finger Protein gene from human chromosome 6. The sense RFPL transcripts encode proteins with the tripartite structure, composed of RING finger, coiled-coil, and B30-2 domains, which are characteristic of the RING-B30 family. Each of these domains are thought to mediate protein-protein interactions by promoting homo- or heterodimerization. The MID1 gene on Xp22 is also a member of the RING-B30 family and is mutated in Opitz syndrome (OS). The autosomal dominant form of OS shows linkage to 22q11-q12. We detected a polymorphic protein-truncating allele of RFPL1 in 8% of the population, which was not associated with the OS phenotype. We identified 6-kb and 1.2-kb noncoding antisense mRNAs of RFPL1S and RFPL3S antisense genes, respectively. The RFPL1S and RFPL3S genes cover substantial portions of their sense counterparts, which suggests that the function of RFPL1S and RFPL3S is a post-transcriptional regulation of the sense RFPL genes. We illustrate the role of intrachromosomal duplications in the generation of RFPL genes, which were created by a series of duplications and share an ancestor with the RING-B30 domain containing genes from the major histocompatibility complex region on human chromosome 6.

  15. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: Insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, Stuart; Baggott, Daniel M.; Hamilton, Aaron T.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Yang, Shan; Kim, Joomyeong; Gordon, Laurie; Branscomb, Elbert; Stubbs, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Krüppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. PMID:16606702

  16. Robotic hand and fingers

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  17. Phylogenic analysis revealed an expanded C₂H₂-homeobox subfamily and expression profiles of C₂H₂ zinc finger gene family in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dianguang; Wang, Yonglin; Deng, Chenglin; Hu, Ruowen; Tian, Chengming

    2015-05-15

    C2H2 zinc finger (CZF) proteins are a major class of transcription factors that play crucial roles in fungal growth, development, various stress responses, and virulence. Little genome-wide data is available regarding the roles of CZF proteins in Verticillium dahliae, a destructive pathogen that causes vascular wilt disease in more than 200 plant species. We identified a total of 79 typical CZF genes in V. dahliae. Comparative analysis revealed that four plant pathogenic fungi, V. dahliae, Fusarium oxysporum, Magnaporthe oryzae, and Botrytis cinerea, have comparable numbers of predicted CZF genes with similar characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis identified a C2H2-homeobox subfamily in V. dahliae containing seven genes with similar gene structures. V. dahliae and F. oxysporum (Hypocreomycetidae) have more genes of this subfamily than M. oryzae (Sordariomycetidae) and B. cinerea (Leotiomycetes). Furthermore, gene-expression analysis of the smoke tree wilt fungus V. dahliae strain XS11 using digital gene-expression profiling and RT-qPCR revealed that a number of CZF genes were differentially expressed during microsclerotia formation, nutritional starvation, and simulated in planta conditions. Furthermore, the expression profiles revealed that some CZF genes were overrepresented during multiple stages, indicating that they might play diverse roles. Our results provide useful information concerning the functions of CZF genes in microsclerotia formation, nutritional stress responses, and pathogenicity in V. dahliae, and form a basis for future functional studies of these genes.

  18. ZNF536, a Novel Zinc Finger Protein Specifically Expressed in the Brain, Negatively Regulates Neuron Differentiation by Repressing Retinoic Acid-Induced Gene Transcription▿

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Ren, Fangli; Xu, Xialian; Ren, Yongming; Li, Hongge; Wang, Yinyin; Zhai, Yonggong; Chang, Zhijie

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation is tightly regulated by a variety of factors. In a search for neuron-specific genes, we identified a highly conserved novel zinc finger protein, ZNF536. We observed that ZNF536 is most abundant in the brain and, in particular, is expressed in the developing central nervous system and dorsal root ganglia and localized in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamic area. During neuronal differentiation of P19 cells induced by retinoic acid (RA), ZNF536 expression is increased at an early stage, and it is maintained at a constant level in later stages. Overexpression of ZNF536 results in an inhibition of RA-induced neuronal differentiation, while depletion or mutation of the ZNF536 gene results in an enhancement of differentiation. We further demonstrated that ZNF536 inhibits expression of neuron-specific marker genes, possibly through the inhibition of RA response element-mediated transcriptional activity, as overexpression of RA receptor α can rescue the inhibitory role of ZNF536 in neuronal differentiation and neuron-specific gene expression. Our studies have identified a novel zinc finger protein that negatively regulates neuron differentiation. PMID:19398580

  19. The human zinc-finger protein-7 gene is located 90 kb 3' of MYC and is not expressed in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Gallego, M I; Lazo, P A

    1994-09-15

    The zinc-finger gene-7 (ZNF7) was located 90 kb 3' of MYC on human chromosome 8 band q24 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). This position lies between the MLV14 and BVR1 loci, 2 variant translocation breakpoints in Burkitt lymphomas. The structure of the ZNF7 gene was not altered by translocations in Burkitt-lymphoma cell lines as shown by its germline-restriction map configuration. The chromosomal region surrounding the ZNF7 gene was extensively methylated. The ZNF7 gene was not expressed in 19 BL cell lines. Expression was detected only in the BL41 and BL47 cell lines and in the SW756 cervical-carcinoma cell line. The RNA in each was of a different size. We postulate that the lack of ZNF7 expression in Burkitt lymphomas might contribute to the tumor phenotype.

  20. The PR/SET domain zinc finger protein Prdm4 regulates gene expression in embryonic stem cells but plays a nonessential role in the developing mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A J; Nelson, Andrew C; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Bikoff, Elizabeth K

    2013-10-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal.

  1. Isolation, characterization, and mapping of a zinc finger gene, ZFP95, containing both a SCAN box and an alternatively spliced KRAB A domain.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, S D; Zheng, Q; Zabel, B; Winterpacht, A; Lee, B

    1999-11-15

    A new zinc finger gene of the Krüppel family was identified by screening a human fetal cartilage cDNA library with degenerate oligonucleotides. Sequence analysis indicates that ZFP95 contains 12 highly conserved zinc finger motifs at the C-terminus and a SCAN box as well as a KRAB A domain at the N-terminus of the protein. ZFP95 represents a member of a new subclass of Krüppel zinc finger proteins containing both a SCAN box and a KRAB domain. Sequence comparison revealed that ZFP95 is the human ortholog of murine Zfp95, which is differentially expressed during spermatogenesis. We demonstrate that ZFP95 is ubiquitously expressed in adult and fetal tissues with the strongest expression in testis. Two transcripts, 4. 2 and 4.6 kb, were detected in all tissues tested. In testis, a third transcript of 3.8 kb was present. RT-PCR analysis confirmed alternative splicing for the KRAB A domain and an upstream exon leading to three transcripts of ZFP95 with and without this transcriptional repressor domain. Finally, we show that ZFP95 maps on human chromosome 7q22 between the markers D7S651 and WI-5853. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. The ancient source of a distinct gene family encoding proteins featuring RING and C(3)H zinc-finger motifs with abundant expression in developing brain and nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gray, T A; Hernandez, L; Carey, A H; Schaldach, M A; Smithwick, M J; Rus, K; Marshall Graves, J A; Stewart, C L; Nicholls, R D

    2000-05-15

    Intronless genes can arise by germline retrotransposition of a cDNA originating as mRNA from an intron-containing source gene. Previously, we described several members of a family of intronless mammalian genes encoding a novel class of zinc-finger proteins, including one that shows imprinted expression and one that escapes X-inactivation. We report here the identification and characterization of the Makorin ring finger protein 1 gene (MKRN1), a highly transcribed, intron-containing source for this family of genes. Phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that the MKRN1 gene is the ancestral founder of this gene family. We have identified MKRN1 orthologs from human, mouse, wallaby, chicken, fruitfly, and nematode, underscoring the age and conservation of this gene. The MKRN gene family encodes putative ribonucleoproteins with a distinctive array of zinc-finger motifs, including two to four C(3)H zinc-fingers, an unusual Cys/His arrangement that may represent a novel zinc-finger structure, and a highly conserved RING zinc-finger. To date, we have identified nine MKRN family loci distributed throughout the human genome. The human and mouse MKRN1 loci map to a conserved syntenic group near the T-cell receptor beta cluster (TCRB) in chromosome 7q34-q35 and chromosome 6A, respectively. MKRN1 is widely transcribed in mammals, with high levels in murine embryonic nervous system and adult testis. The ancient origin of MKRN1, high degree of conservation, and expression pattern suggest important developmental and functional roles for this gene and its expressed family members.

  3. Isolation and fine mapping of 16 novel human zinc finger-encoding cDNAs identify putative candidate genes for developmental and malignant disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Tommerup, N.; Vissing, H.

    1995-05-20

    The authors have isolated and chromosomally fine-mapped 16 novel genes belonging to the human zinc finger Krueppel family (ZNF131-140, 142, 143, 148, 151, 154, and 155), including 1 of the GLI type (ZNF143) and 3 containing a KRAB (Krueppel-associated box) segment (ZNF133, 136, and 140). Based on their map position, several of these ZNF genes are putative candidate genes for both developmental and malignant disorders: ZNF138, ZNF139, and ZNF143 were localized to 7q11.2, 7q21.3-q22.1, and 11p15.3-p15.4, regions involved in deletions and/or translocations associated with Williams syndrome, split hand and foot disease (SHFD1), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, respectively. ZNF133 was localized to 20p11.2, close to, but probably distinct from, the region deleted in Alagille syndrome. Zinc finger genes mapping to regions commonly deleted in solid tumors included ZNF132, 134, 135, 137, 154, and 155, all located on 19q13 (thyroid adenoma), and ZNF151, at 1p36.1-p36.2 (neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and other tumors). In addition, several of the ZNFs mapped to regions implicated in recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in hematological malignancies (ZNF139, 7q21.3-q22.1; ZNF148, 3q21-q22; ZNF151, 1p36.1-p36.2). The study indicates that the number of ZNF genes in human is large and that systematic isolation and mapping of ZNF genes is a straightforward approach for the identification of novel candidate disease genes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Isolation and fine mapping of 16 novel human zinc finger-encoding cDNAs identify putative candidate genes for developmental and malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Tommerup, N; Vissing, H

    1995-05-20

    We have isolated and chromosomally fine-mapped 16 novel genes belonging to the human zinc finger Krüppel family (ZNF131-140, 142, 143, 148, 151, 154, and 155), including 1 of the GLI type (ZNF143) and 3 containing a KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) segment (ZNF133, 136, and 140). Based on their map position, several of these ZNF genes are putative candidate genes for both developmental and malignant disorders: ZNF138, ZNF139, and ZNF143 were localized to 7q11.2, 7q21.3-q22.1, and 11p15.3-p15.4, regions involved in deletions and/or translocations associated with Williams syndrome, split hand and foot disease (SHFD1), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, respectively. ZNF133 was localized to 20p11.2, close to, but probably distinct from, the region deleted in Alagille syndrome. Zinc finger genes mapping to regions commonly deleted in solid tumors included ZNF132, 134, 135, 137, 154, and 155, all located on 19q13 (thyroid adenoma), and ZNF151, at 1p36.1-p36.2 (neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and other tumors). In addition, several of the ZNFs mapped to regions implicated in recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in hematological malignancies (ZNF139, 7q21.3-q22.1; ZNF148, 3q21-q22; ZNF151, 1p36.1-p36.2). The study indicates that the number of ZNF genes in human is large and that systematic isolation and mapping of ZNF genes is a straightforward approach for the identification of novel candidate disease genes.

  5. The Aspergillus PacC zinc finger transcription factor mediates regulation of both acid- and alkaline-expressed genes by ambient pH.

    PubMed Central

    Tilburn, J; Sarkar, S; Widdick, D A; Espeso, E A; Orejas, M; Mungroo, J; Peñalva, M A; Arst, H N

    1995-01-01

    The pH regulation of gene expression in Aspergillus nidulans is mediated by pacC, whose 678 residue-derived protein contains three putative Cys2His2 zinc fingers. Ten pacCc mutations mimicking growth at alkaline pH remove between 100 and 214 C-terminal residues, including a highly acidic region containing an acidic glutamine repeat. Nine pacC+/- mutations mimicking acidic growth conditions remove between 299 and 505 C-terminal residues. Deletion of the entire pacC coding region mimics acidity but leads additionally to poor growth and conidiation. A PacC fusion protein binds DNA with the core consensus GCCARG. At alkaline ambient pH, PacC activates transcription of alkaline-expressed genes (including pacC itself) and represses transcription of acid-expressed genes. pacCc mutations obviate the need for pH signal transduction. Images PMID:7882981

  6. A mutation in the Zn-finger of the GAL4 homolog LAC9 results in glucose repression of its target genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kuger, P; Gödecke, A; Breunig, K D

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional activator LAC9, a GAL4 homolog of Kluyveromyces lactis which mediates lactose and galactose-dependent activation of genes involved in the utilization of these sugars can also confer glucose repression to those genes. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of LAC9-2, an allele which encodes a glucose-sensitive activator in contrast to the one previously cloned. A single amino acid exchange of leu-104 to tryptophan is responsible for the glucose-insensitive phenotype. The mutation is located within the Zn-finger-like DNA binding domain which is highly conserved between LAC9 and GAL4. Glucose repression is also eliminated by duplication of the LAC9-2 allele. The data indicate that LAC9 is a limiting factor for beta-galactosidase gene expression under all growth conditions and that glucose reduces the activity of the activator. Images PMID:2107531

  7. Efficient targeted gene disruption in the soma and germ line of the frog Xenopus tropicalis using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Young, John J; Cherone, Jennifer M; Doyon, Yannick; Ankoudinova, Irina; Faraji, Farhoud M; Lee, Andrew H; Ngo, Catherine; Guschin, Dmitry Y; Paschon, David E; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Harland, Richard M; Zeitler, Bryan

    2011-04-26

    The frog Xenopus, an important research organism in cell and developmental biology, currently lacks tools for targeted mutagenesis. Here, we address this problem by genome editing with zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs directed against an eGFP transgene in Xenopus tropicalis induced mutations consistent with nonhomologous end joining at the target site, resulting in mosaic loss of the fluorescence phenotype at high frequencies. ZFNs directed against the noggin gene produced tadpoles and adult animals carrying up to 47% disrupted alleles, and founder animals yielded progeny carrying insertions and deletions in the noggin gene with no indication of off-target effects. Furthermore, functional tests demonstrated an allelic series of activity between three germ-line mutant alleles. Because ZFNs can be designed against any locus, our data provide a generally applicable protocol for gene disruption in Xenopus.

  8. Salt tolerance and activity of antioxidative enzymes of transgenic finger millet overexpressing a vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase gene (SbVPPase) from Sorghum bicolor.

    PubMed

    Anjaneyulu, Ediga; Reddy, Palle Surender; Sunita, Merla Srilakshmi; Kishor, Polavarapu B Kavi; Meriga, Balaji

    2014-06-15

    A vacuolar proton pyrophosphatase cDNA clone was isolated from Sorghum bicolor (SbVPPase) using end-to-end gene-specific primer amplification. It showed 80-90% homology at the nucleotide and 85-95% homology at the amino acid level with other VPPases. The gene was introduced into expression vector pCAMBIA1301 under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter and transformed into Agrobacterium tumifaciens strain LBA4404 to infect embryogenic calli of finger millet (Eleusine coracana). Successful transfer of SbVPPase was confirmed by a GUS histochemical assay and PCR analysis. Both, controls and transgenic plants were subjected to 100 and 200mM NaCl and certain biochemical and physiological parameters were studied. Relative water content (RWC), plant height, leaf expansion, finger length and width and grain weight were severely reduced (50-70%), and the flowering period was delayed by 20% in control plants compared to transgenic plants under salinity stress. With increasing salt stress, the proline and chlorophyll contents as well as the enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR) increased by 25-100% in transgenics, while malondialdehyde (MDA) showed a 2-4-fold decrease. The increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and the reduction in the MDA content suggest efficient scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in transgenics and, as a consequence, probably alleviation of salt stress. Also, the leaf tissues of the transgenics accumulated 1.5-2.5-fold higher Na(+) and 0.4-0.8-fold higher K(+) levels. Together, these results clearly demonstrate that overexpression of SbVPPase in transgenic finger millet enhances the plant's performance under salt stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Zinc finger transcription factors as molecular targets for nitric oxide-mediated immunosuppression: inhibition of IL-2 gene expression in murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Berendji, D; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Zipfel, P F; Skerka, C; Carlberg, C; Kröncke, K D

    1999-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has frequently been shown to display immunosuppressive activities. We describe here a molecular mechanism contributing to this effect. Murine T cell lymphoma EL4-6.1 cells were activated with the physiological stimulus interleukin (IL)-1beta to express IL-2 mRNA in the presence or absence of subtoxic concentrations of the physiological spontaneous NO donor S-nitrosocysteine (SNOC). Subsequently, semiquantitative RT-PCR and gel shift assays with nuclear extracts were performed to analyze the effects of NO on IL-2 mRNA expression and on the activity of the dominant regulating transcription factors Sp1, EGR-1, and NFATc. NO inhibits IL-1beta-induced IL-2 mRNA expression in EL4-6.1 cells. The suppressive activity of NO was concentration dependent and found to be completely reversible. Importantly, NO at the concentrations used induced neither apoptosis nor necrosis. Dominant regulation of IL-2 gene expression is known to reside in the zinc finger transcription factors Sp1 or EGR-1 and in the non-zinc finger protein NFAT. NO abrogates the DNA binding activities of recombinant Sp1 and EGR-1. More importantly, gel shift assays also showed a lack of DNA binding of native Sp1 derived from NO-treated nuclear extracts and that from NO-treated viable lymphocytes. This effect is selective, as the DNA binding activity of recombinant NFATc was not affected by NO. Inactivation of zinc finger transcription factors by NO appears to be a molecular mechanism in the immunosuppressive activity of NO in mammals, thus contributing to NO-mediated inhibition of IL-2 gene expression after physiological stimuli. The exact understanding of the molecular mechanism leading to NO-mediated, fully reversible suppression of immune reactions may lead to use of this naturally occurring tool as an aid in inflammatory diseases.

  10. The KRAB Zinc Finger Protein RSL1 Modulates Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Liver and Adipose Tissue To Maintain Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Christopher J.; Zhang, Deqiang; Yin, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-associated box zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) are a huge family of vertebrate-specific repressors that modify gene expression in an epigenetic manner. Despite a well-defined repression mechanism, few biological roles or gene targets of KRAB-ZFP are known. Regulator of sex-limitation 1 (RSL1) is a mouse KRAB-ZFP that enforces male-predominant expression in the liver, affecting body mass and pubertal timing. Here we show that female but not male Rsl1−/− mice gain more weight than wild-type mice on a high-fat diet (HFD) and that key liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) metabolic genes are altered in both Rsl1−/− sexes in response to dietary stress. Expression profiling of Rsl1-sensitive genes in liver and WAT indicates that RSL1 accentuates sex-biased gene expression in liver but greatly diminishes it in WAT. RSL1 expression solely in liver is sufficient to limit diet-induced weight gain and suppress lipogenic genes in WAT, indicating that RSL1 balances metabolism via liver-to-adipose-tissue communication. RSL1's effects on adult physiology exemplify a significant modulatory capacity of KRAB-ZFPs, in the absence of which there is widespread metabolic dysregulation. This ability to buffer against gene expression noise, coupled with extensive individual genetic variation, highlights the enormous potential of KRAB-Zfp genes as candidate risk factors for complex diseases. PMID:24190968

  11. Gene correction by homologous recombination with zinc finger nucleases in primary cells from a mouse model of a generic recessive genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Jon P; Barker, Jenny C; Pruett-Miller, Shondra; Porteus, Matthew H

    2010-06-01

    Zinc Finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been used to create precise genome modifications at frequencies that might be therapeutically useful in gene therapy. We created a mouse model of a generic recessive genetic disease to establish a preclinical system to develop the use of ZFN-mediated gene correction for gene therapy. We knocked a mutated GFP gene into the ROSA26 locus in murine embryonic stem (ES) cells and used these cells to create a transgenic mouse. We used ZFNs to determine the frequency of gene correction by gene targeting in different primary cells from this model. We achieved targeting frequencies from 0.17 to 6% in different cell types, including primary fibroblasts and astrocytes. We demonstrate that ex vivo gene-corrected fibroblasts can be transplanted back into a mouse where they retained the corrected phenotype. In addition, we achieved targeting frequencies of over 1% in ES cells, and the targeted ES cells retained the ability to differentiate into cell types from all three germline lineages. In summary, potentially therapeutically relevant frequencies of ZFN-mediated gene targeting can be achieved in a variety of primary cells and these cells can then be transplanted back into a recipient.

  12. Expression of CsSEF1 gene encoding putative CCCH zinc finger protein is induced by defoliation and prolonged darkness in cucumber fruit.

    PubMed

    Tazuke, Akio; Asayama, Munehiko

    2013-03-01

    To find a marker gene for photoassimilate limitation in cucumber fruit, genes induced in young fruit by total defoliation were cloned using the subtraction method. Almost every clone matched perfectly to a member of cucumber unigene ver. 3 of the Cucurbit Genomics Database. From the clones obtained, six genes were selected and the effect of defoliation on their expression was analyzed. In particular, expression of a gene that is highly homologous to the cucumber gene CsSEF1 (CAI30889) encoding putative CCCH zinc finger protein, which is reported to be induced at somatic embryogenesis in suspension culture, was enhanced by the treatment by about 50 times. The sequencing of the full-length cDNA and BLAST search in the Cucurbit Genomics Database indicated that our cloned gene is identical to CsSEF1. In control fruit, the expression of CsSEF1 did not change markedly in terms of development. By contrast, the expression of CsSEF1 was enhanced by prolonged darkness at the transcript level. This increase in the expression of CsSEF1 was temporally correlated with the decline in the fruit respiration rate. In mature leaves under prolonged darkness, enhanced expression was observed in the asparagine synthetase gene, but not in CsSEF1. These results suggest that the asparagine synthetase gene can be a good marker for sugar starvation and that CsSEF1 might be involved in the signal transduction pathway from photoassimilate limitation to growth cessation in cucumber fruit.

  13. A Zinc-Finger-Family Transcription Factor, AbVf19, Is Required for the Induction of a Gene Subset Important for Virulence in Alternaria brassicicola

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Akhil; Ohm, Robin A.; Oxiles, Lindsay; Brooks, Fred; Lawrence, Christopher B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Cho, Yangrae

    2011-10-26

    Alternaria brassicicola is a successful saprophyte and necrotrophic plant pathogen with a broad host range within the family Brassicaceae. It produces secondary metabolites that marginally affect virulence. Cell wall degrading enzymes (CDWE) have been considered important for pathogenesis but none of them individually have been identified as significant virulence factors in A. brassicicola. In this study, knockout mutants of a gene, AbVf19, were created and produced considerably smaller lesions than the wild type on inoculated host plants. The presence of tandem zinc-finger domains in the predicted amino acid sequence and nuclear localization of AbVf19- reporter protein suggested that it was a transcription factor. Gene expression comparisons using RNA-seq identified 74 genes being downregulated in the mutant during a late stage of infection. Among the 74 downregulated genes, 28 were putative CWDE genes. These were hydrolytic enzyme genes that composed a small fraction of genes within each family of cellulases, pectinases, cutinases, and proteinases. The mutants grew slower than the wild type on an axenic medium with pectin as a major carbon source. This study demonstrated the existence and the importance of a transcription factor that regulates a suite of genes that are important for decomposing and utilizing plant material during the late stage of plant infection.

  14. Clinical Scale Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Gene Editing of PD-1 in Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Beane, Joal D; Lee, Gary; Zheng, Zhili; Mendel, Matthew; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Bharathan, Mini; Black, Mary; Gandhi, Nimisha; Yu, Zhiya; Chandran, Smita; Giedlin, Martin; Ando, Dale; Miller, Jeff; Paschon, David; Guschin, Dmitry; Rebar, Edward J; Reik, Andreas; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is expressed on activated T cells and represents an attractive target for gene-editing of tumor targeted T cells prior to adoptive cell transfer (ACT). We used zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) directed against the gene encoding human PD-1 (PDCD-1) to gene-edit melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). We show that our clinical scale TIL production process yielded efficient modification of the PD-1 gene locus, with an average modification frequency of 74.8% (n = 3, range 69.9–84.1%) of the alleles in a bulk TIL population, which resulted in a 76% reduction in PD-1 surface-expression. Forty to 48% of PD-1 gene-edited cells had biallelic PD-1 modification. Importantly, the PD-1 gene-edited TIL product showed improved in vitro effector function and a significantly increased polyfunctional cytokine profile (TNFα, GM-CSF, and IFNγ) compared to unmodified TIL in two of the three donors tested. In addition, all donor cells displayed an effector memory phenotype and expanded approximately 500–2,000-fold in vitro. Thus, further study to determine the efficiency and safety of adoptive cell transfer using PD-1 gene-edited TIL for the treatment of metastatic melanoma is warranted. PMID:25939491

  15. Speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein gene deletion in ovarian cancer: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of a tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhu; Zeng, Manman; Liu, Y I; Yang, Xiaotao; Li, Yanan; Li, X U; Yu, Qiubo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein (SPOP) gene located on chromosome 17q21 in ovarian cancer (OC). The present study evaluated a tissue microarray, which contained 90 samples of ovarian cancer and 10 samples of normal ovarian tissue, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH is a method where a SPOP-specific DNA red fluorescence probe was used for the experimental group and a centromere-specific DNA green fluorescence probe for chromosome 17 was used for the control group. The present study demonstrated that a deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in 52.27% (46/88) of the ovarian cancer tissues, but was not identified in normal ovarian tissues. Simultaneously, monosomy 17 was frequently identified in the ovarian cancer tissues, but not in the normal ovarian tissues. Furthermore, the present data revealed that the ovarian cancer histological subtype and grade were significantly associated with a deletion of the SPOP gene, which was assessed by the appearance of monosomy 17 in the ovarian cancer samples; the deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in a large proportion of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (41/61; 67.21%), particularly in grade 3 (31/37; 83.78%). In conclusion, deletion of the SPOP gene on chromosome 17 in ovarian cancer samples, which results from monosomy 17, indicates that the SPOP gene may serve as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer.

  16. Clinical Scale Zinc Finger Nuclease-mediated Gene Editing of PD-1 in Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Beane, Joal D; Lee, Gary; Zheng, Zhili; Mendel, Matthew; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Bharathan, Mini; Black, Mary; Gandhi, Nimisha; Yu, Zhiya; Chandran, Smita; Giedlin, Martin; Ando, Dale; Miller, Jeff; Paschon, David; Guschin, Dmitry; Rebar, Edward J; Reik, Andreas; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is expressed on activated T cells and represents an attractive target for gene-editing of tumor targeted T cells prior to adoptive cell transfer (ACT). We used zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) directed against the gene encoding human PD-1 (PDCD-1) to gene-edit melanoma tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). We show that our clinical scale TIL production process yielded efficient modification of the PD-1 gene locus, with an average modification frequency of 74.8% (n = 3, range 69.9-84.1%) of the alleles in a bulk TIL population, which resulted in a 76% reduction in PD-1 surface-expression. Forty to 48% of PD-1 gene-edited cells had biallelic PD-1 modification. Importantly, the PD-1 gene-edited TIL product showed improved in vitro effector function and a significantly increased polyfunctional cytokine profile (TNFα, GM-CSF, and IFNγ) compared to unmodified TIL in two of the three donors tested. In addition, all donor cells displayed an effector memory phenotype and expanded approximately 500-2,000-fold in vitro. Thus, further study to determine the efficiency and safety of adoptive cell transfer using PD-1 gene-edited TIL for the treatment of metastatic melanoma is warranted.

  17. Structured exploratory data analysis (SEDA) of finger ridge-count inheritance: I. Major gene index, midparental correlation, and offspring-between-parents function in 125 south Indian families.

    PubMed

    Karlin, S; Chakraborty, R; Williams, P T; Mathew, S

    1983-12-01

    Fourteen dermatoglyphic traits measured on 125 Velanadu Brahmin families were analyzed for mode of inheritance using three Structured Exploratory Data Analysis (SEDA) statistics: the major gene index, the offspring between parents function, and the traditional midparental correlation coefficient. Since the traits are integer valued with restricted ranges of variation, we simulated various transmission models with discrete expression to better understand the nature of the SEDA statistics for such variables. In addition, permutation procedures were employed to aid the interpretation of the SEDA results. These analyses suggest that corresponding homologous fingers on the left and right hands exhibit similar transmission characteristics. The relationship of the parent and child total ridge-counts of the two hands separately, as well as their combined total, virtually simulate complete Galtonian blending inheritance. Results for the individual digital ridge-counts as well as the pattern-intensity-index variable also suggest a multifactorial mode of transmission or possibly one involving several genes.

  18. ZNF75: Isolation of a cDNA clone of the KRAB zinc finger gene subfamily mapped in YACs 1 Mb telomeric of HPRT

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, A.; Zucchi, I.; Susani, L.; Morali, F.; Patrosso, C.; Frattini, A.; Lucchini, F.; Repetto, M.; Sacco, M.G.; Zoppe, M. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have previously mapped a zinc finger genomic motif (ZNF75) to the Xq26 cytogenetic band by using a hybrid panel. Here, they report the isolation of the transcribed counterpart in a cDNA clone and its further localization. The cDNA clone, from a lung fibroblast library, is assembled from three exons, including a 289 amino acid (AA) long open reading frame containing a recently described motif, the Kruppel-associated box, 42 AA long, in exon 2. By comparison with other reported members of the subfamily, the exon-intron boundaries also appear to be very well conserved. Further analysis allowed mapping of this gene 1 Mb downstream from the HPRT gene in the published YAC contig that extends across Xq26. Two other motifs, 87 and 78% homologous to ZNF75 at the amino acid level, were identified by PCR on total human DNA, but map outside Xq24-qter. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Regulation of transcription of meiotic cell cycle and terminal differentiation genes by the testis-specific Zn-finger protein matotopetli.

    PubMed

    Perezgasga, Lucia; Jiang, JianQiao; Bolival, Benjamin; Hiller, Mark; Benson, Elizabeth; Fuller, Margaret T; White-Cooper, Helen

    2004-04-01

    A robust developmentally regulated and cell type specific transcriptional programme is activated in primary spermatocytes in preparation for differentiation of the male gametes during spermatogenesis. Work in Drosophila is beginning to reveal the genetic networks that regulate this gene expression. The Drosophila aly-class meiotic arrest loci are essential for activation of transcription of many differentiation-specific genes, as well as several genes important for meiotic cell cycle progression, thus linking meiotic cell cycle progression to cellular differentiation during spermatogenesis. The three previously described aly-class proteins (aly, comr and achi/vis) form a complex and are associated with chromatin in primary spermatocytes. We identify, clone and characterize a new aly-class meiotic arrest gene, matotopetli (topi), which encodes a testis-specific Zn-finger protein that physically interacts with Comr. The topi mutant phenotype is most like achi/vis in that topi function is not required for the nuclear localization of Aly or Comr, but is required for their accumulation on chromatin. Most target genes in the transcriptional programme depend on both topi and achi/vis; however, a small subset of target genes are differentially sensitive to loss of topi or achi/vis, suggesting that these aly-class predicted DNA binding proteins can act independently in some contexts.

  20. Generation of mastitis resistance in cows by targeting human lysozyme gene to β-casein locus using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Yongsheng; Tian, Yuchen; Yu, Yuan; Gao, Mingqing; Hu, Guangdong; Su, Feng; Pan, Shaohui; Luo, Yan; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-04-07

    Mastitis costs the dairy industry billions of dollars annually and is the most consequential disease of dairy cattle. Transgenic cows secreting an antimicrobial peptide demonstrated resistance to mastitis. The combination of somatic cell gene targeting and nuclear transfer provides a powerful method to produce transgenic animals. Recent studies found that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) stimulated the integration of exogenous DNA stretches into a pre-determined genomic location, resulting in high-efficiency site-specific gene addition. Here, we used ZFNs to target human lysozyme (hLYZ) gene to bovine β-casein locus, resulting in hLYZ knock-in of approximately 1% of ZFN-treated bovine fetal fibroblasts (BFFs). Gene-targeted fibroblast cell clones were screened by junction PCR amplification and Southern blot analysis. Gene-targeted BFFs were used in somatic cell nuclear transfer. In vitro assays demonstrated that the milk secreted by transgenic cows had the ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus. We report the production of cloned cows carrying human lysozyme gene knock-in β-casein locus using ZFNs. Our findings open a unique avenue for the creation of transgenic cows from genetic engineering by providing a viable tool for enhancing resistance to disease and improving the health and welfare of livestock.

  1. Sequence and expression of GLN3, a positive nitrogen regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoding a protein with a putative zinc finger DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Minehart, P L; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    The GLN3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the activation of transcription of a number of genes in response to the replacement of glutamine by glutamate as source of nitrogen. We cloned the GLN3 gene and constructed null alleles by gene disruption. GLN3 is not essential for growth, but increased copies of GLN3 lead to a drastic decrease in growth rate. The complete nucleotide sequence of the GLN3 gene was determined, revealing one open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 730 amino acids, with a molecular weight of approximately 80,000. The GLN3 protein contains a single putative Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger which has homology to the Neurospora crassa NIT2 protein, the Aspergillus nidulans AREA protein, and the erythroid-specific transcription factor GATA-1. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the GLN3 protein binds the nitrogen upstream activation sequence of GLN1, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase. Neither control of transcription nor control of initiation of translation of GLN3 is important for regulation in response to glutamine availability. Images PMID:1682800

  2. ATRX binds to atypical chromatin domains at the 3′ exons of zinc finger genes to preserve H3K9me3 enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Asif H.; Hasson, Dan; Dyer, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ATRX is a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler proposed to govern genomic stability through the regulation of repetitive sequences, such as rDNA, retrotransposons, and pericentromeric and telomeric repeats. However, few direct ATRX target genes have been identified and high-throughput genomic approaches are currently lacking for ATRX. Here we present a comprehensive ChIP-sequencing study of ATRX in multiple human cell lines, in which we identify the 3′ exons of zinc finger genes (ZNFs) as a new class of ATRX targets. These 3′ exonic regions encode the zinc finger motifs, which can range from 1–40 copies per ZNF gene and share large stretches of sequence similarity. These regions often contain an atypical chromatin signature: they are transcriptionally active, contain high levels of H3K36me3, and are paradoxically enriched in H3K9me3. We find that these ZNF 3′ exons are co-occupied by SETDB1, TRIM28, and ZNF274, which form a complex with ATRX. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated loss-of-function studies demonstrate (i) a reduction of H3K9me3 at the ZNF 3′ exons in the absence of ATRX and ZNF274 and, (ii) H3K9me3 levels at atypical chromatin regions are particularly sensitive to ATRX loss compared to other H3K9me3-occupied regions. As a consequence of ATRX or ZNF274 depletion, cells with reduced levels of H3K9me3 show increased levels of DNA damage, suggesting that ATRX binds to the 3′ exons of ZNFs to maintain their genomic stability through preservation of H3K9me3. PMID:27029610

  3. Current concepts: mallet finger.

    PubMed

    Alla, Sreenivasa R; Deal, Nicole D; Dempsey, Ian J

    2014-06-01

    Loss of the extensor mechanism at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint leads to mallet finger also known as baseball finger or drop finger. This can be secondary to tendon substance disruption or to a bony avulsion. Soft tissue mallet finger is the result of a rupture of the extensor tendon in Zone 1, and a bony mallet finger is the result of an avulsion of the extensor tendon from the distal phalanx with a small fragment of bone attached to the avulsed tendon. Mallet finger leads to an imbalance in the distribution of the extensor force between the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and DIP joints. If left untreated, mallet finger leads to a swan neck deformity from PIP joint hyper extension and DIP joint flexion. Most mallet finger injuries can be managed non-surgically, but occasionally surgery is recommended for either an acute or a chronic mallet finger or for salvage of failed prior treatment.

  4. Zinc finger protein genes from Cucurbita pepo are promising tools for conferring non-Cucurbitaceae plants with ability to accumulate persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hideyuki; Hirota, Matashi; Goto, Junya; Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Kodama, Noriko; Matsui, Tomomi; Yamazaki, Kiyoshi; Eun, Heesoo

    2015-03-01

    Some cultivars of cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and zucchini, which are members of the Cucurbitaceae family, are uniquely subject to contamination by hydrophobic pollutants such as the organohalogen insecticides DDT. However, the molecular mechanisms for the accumulation of these pollutants in cucurbits have not been determined. Here, cDNA subtraction analysis of Cucurbita pepo cultivars that are low and high accumulators of hydrophobic contaminants revealed that a gene for zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) are preferentially expressed in high accumulators. The cloned CpZFP genes were classified into 2 types: (1) the PBG type, which were expressed in C. pepo cultivars Patty Green, Black Beauty, and Gold Rush, and (2) the BG type, which were expressed in Black Beauty and Gold Rush. Expression of these CpZFP genes in transgenic tobacco plants carrying an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-based inducible gene expression system significantly induced β-glucuronidase activity when the plants were treated with a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compound, indicating that highly hydrophobic PCBs accumulated in the plants. In transgenic tobacco plants carrying CpZFPs, accumulation of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds increased in their aerial parts when they were cultivated in the dioxin-contaminated soil. In summary, we propose that addition of CpZFP genes is a promising tool for conferring noncucurbits with the ability to accumulate hydrophobic contaminants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. miR-762 promotes porcine immature Sertoli cell growth via the ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) gene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Changping; Song, Huibin; Yu, Lei; Guan, Kaifeng; Hu, Pandi; Li, Yang; Xia, Xuanyan; Li, Jialian; Jiang, Siwen; Li, Fenge

    2016-01-01

    A growing number of reports have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in spermatogenesis. Our previous study showed that miR-762 is differentially expressed in immature and mature testes of Large White boars. Our present data shows that miR-762 directly binds the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) and down-regulates RNF4 expression. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the RNF4 3′UTR that is significantly associated with porcine sperm quality traits leads to a change in the miR-762 binding ability. Moreover, miR-762 promotes the proliferation of and inhibits apoptosis in porcine immature Sertoli cells, partly by accelerating DNA damage repair and by reducing androgen receptor (AR) expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-762 may play a role in pig spermatogenesis by regulating immature Sertoli cell growth. PMID:27596571

  6. LOT1 is a growth suppressor gene down-regulated by the epidermal growth factor receptor ligands and encodes a nuclear zinc-finger protein.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, A; Bao, R; Hamilton, T C

    1999-11-11

    We previously reported cloning the rLot1 gene, and its human homolog (hLOT1), through analysis of differential gene expression in normal and malignant rat ovarian surface epithelial cells. Both human and rat ovarian carcinoma cell lines exhibited lost or decreased expression of this gene. Interestingly, the LOT1 gene localized at band q25 of human chromosome 6 which is a frequent site for LOH in many solid tumors including ovarian cancer. In this report we have further characterized the potential role of LOT1 in malignant transformation and developed evidence that the gene is a novel target of growth factor signaling pathway. Assays using transient transfections showed that LOT1 is a nuclear protein and may act as a transcription factor. In vitro and in vivo studies involving ovarian cancer cell lines revealed that expression of LOT1 is directly associated with inhibition of cellular proliferation and induction of morphological transformations. Additionally, we show that in normal rat ovarian surface epithelial cells Lot1 gene expression is responsive to growth factor stimulation. Its mRNA is strongly down-regulated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands, namely EGF and TGF-alpha. Blocking the ligand-activated EGFR signal transduction pathway by the specific EGF receptor inhibitor, tyrphostin AG1478, and the MEK inhibitor, PD098059, restores the normal level of Lot1 gene expression. It appears that the regulation of Lot1 gene is unique to these ligands, as well as the growth promoting agent TPA, since other factors either did not affect Lot1 expression, or the effect was modest and transient. Altogether, the results suggest that Lot1 expression is primarily mediated via EGF receptor or a related pathway and it may regulate the growth promoting signals as a zinc-finger motif containing nuclear transcription factor.

  7. Altered carbohydrate metabolism in the storage roots of sweet potato plants overexpressing the SRF1 gene, which encodes a Dof zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masaru; Takahata, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Hiroki; Nakatani, Makoto; Tahara, Makoto

    2009-09-01

    In order to characterize the functions of the sweetpotato SRF1 gene, which encodes a Dof zinc finger transcriptional factor preferentially expressed in the storage roots, we isolated its full length cDNA and produced transgenic sweetpotato plants with altered SRF1 expression levels. The isolated cDNA of SRF1 encoded a polypeptide of 497 amino acids and was closely related to the cyclic Dof factors of Arabidopsis and the ascorbate oxidase binding protein of pumpkin. SRF1 was most highly expressed in storage roots, although some expression was also observed in other vegetative tissue. Transgenic plants overexpressing SRF1 showed significantly higher storage root dry matter content compared to the original cultivar Kokei No. 14 or control transgenic plants. In these plants, the starch content per fresh weight of the storage roots was also higher than that of the wild-type plants, while the glucose and fructose content drastically decreased. Among the enzymes involved in the sugar metabolism, soluble acid invertase showed a decreased activity in the transgenic plants. Gene expression analysis showed that the expression of Ibbetafruct2, which encodes an isoform of vacuolar invertase, was suppressed in the transgenic plants overexpressing the SRF1 gene. These data suggest that SRF1 modulates the carbohydrate metabolism in the storage roots through negative regulation of a vacuolar invertase gene.

  8. The Arabidopsis Zinc Finger-Homeodomain Genes Encode Proteins with Unique Biochemical Properties That Are Coordinately Expressed during Floral Development1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Queenie K.-G.; Irish, Vivian F.

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains approximately 100 homeobox genes, many of which have been shown to play critical roles in various developmental processes. Here we characterize the zinc finger-homeodomain (ZF-HD) subfamily of homeobox genes, consisting of 14 members in Arabidopsis. We demonstrate that the HDs of the ZF-HD proteins share some similarities with other known HDs in Arabidopsis, but they contain distinct features that cluster them as a unique class of plant HD-containing proteins. We have carried out mutational analyses to show that the noncanonical residues present in the HDs of this family of proteins are important for function. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid matrix analyses of the ZF-HD proteins reveal that these proteins both homo- and heterodimerize, which may contribute to greater selectivity in DNA binding. These assays also show that most of these proteins do not contain an intrinsic activation domain, suggesting that interactions with other factors are required for transcriptional activation. We also show that the family members are all expressed predominantly or exclusively in floral tissue, indicating a likely regulatory role during floral development. Furthermore, we have identified loss-of-function mutations for six of these genes that individually show no obvious phenotype, supporting the idea that the encoded proteins have common roles in floral development. Based on these results, we propose the ZF-HD gene family encodes a group of transcriptional regulators with unique biochemical activities that play overlapping regulatory roles in Arabidopsis floral development. PMID:16428600

  9. The Drosophila Ash1 Gene Product, Which Is Localized at Specific Sites on Polytene Chromosomes, Contains a Set Domain and a Phd Finger

    PubMed Central

    Tripoulas, N.; LaJeunesse, D.; Gildea, J.; Shearn, A.

    1996-01-01

    The determined state of Drosophila imaginal discs depends on stable patterns of homeotic gene expression. The stability of these patterns requires the function of the ash1 gene, a member of the trithorax group. The primary translation product of the 7.5-kb ash1 transcript is predicted to be a basic protein of 2144 amino acids. The ASH1 protein contains a SET domain and a PHD finger. Both of these motifs are found in the products of some trithorax group and Polycomb group genes. We have determined the nucleotide sequence alterations in 10 ash1 mutant alleles and have examined their mutant phenotype. The best candidate for a null allele is ash1(22). The truncated protein product of this mutant allele is predicted to contain only 47 amino acids. The ASH1 protein is localized on polytene chromosomes of larval salivary glands at >100 sites. The chromosomal localization of ASH1 implies that it functions at the transcriptional level to maintain the expression pattern of homeotic selector genes. PMID:8725238

  10. Zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene correction using single AAV vector transduction and enhancement by Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, BL; Hirsch, ML; Porter, SN; Samulski, RJ; Porteus, MH

    2016-01-01

    An emerging strategy for the treatment of monogenic diseases uses genetic engineering to precisely correct the mutation(s) at the genome level. Recent advancements in this technology have demonstrated therapeutic levels of gene correction using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced DNA double-strand break in conjunction with an exogenous DNA donor substrate. This strategy requires efficient nucleic acid delivery and among viral vectors, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) has demonstrated clinical success without pathology. However, a major limitation of rAAV is the small DNA packaging capacity and to date, the use of rAAV for ZFN gene delivery has yet to be reported. Theoretically, an ideal situation is to deliver both ZFNs and the repair substrate in a single vector to avoid inefficient gene targeting and unwanted mutagenesis, both complications of a rAAV co-transduction strategy. Therefore, a rAAV format was generated in which a single polypeptide encodes the ZFN monomers connected by a ribosome skipping 2A peptide and furin cleavage sequence. On the basis of this arrangement, a DNA repair substrate of 750 nucleotides was also included in this vector. Efficient polypeptide processing to discrete ZFNs is demonstrated, as well as the ability of this single vector format to stimulate efficient gene targeting in a human cell line and mouse model derived fibroblasts. Additionally, we increased rAAV-mediated gene correction up to sixfold using a combination of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, which act at the level of AAV vector transduction. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the ability to deliver ZFNs and a repair substrate by a single AAV vector and offer insights for the optimization of rAAV-mediated gene correction using drug therapy. PMID:22257934

  11. Zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 interacts with histones, DNA repair proteins and recruits NuRD complex to regulate gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihui; Lam, Norris; Thiele, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 has been found to control neural fate-determination in flies, regulate murine and frog cardiac development, control murine retinal cell progenitor expansion and function as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which CASZ1 regulates gene transcription to exert these diverse biological functions has not been described. Here we identify co-factors that are recruited by CASZ1b to regulate gene transcription using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and mass spectrometry assays. We find that CASZ1b binds to the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, histones and DNA repair proteins. Mutagenesis of the CASZ1b protein assay demonstrates that the N-terminus of CASZ1b is required for NuRD binding, and a poly(ADP-ribose) binding motif in the CASZ1b protein is required for histone H3 and DNA repair proteins binding. The N-terminus of CASZ1b fused to an artificial DNA-binding domain (GAL4DBD) causes a significant repression of transcription (5xUAS-luciferase assay), which could be blocked by treatment with an HDAC inhibitor. Realtime PCR results show that the transcriptional activity of CASZ1b mutants that abrogate NuRD or histone H3/DNA binding is significantly decreased. This indicates a model in which CASZ1b binds to chromatin and recruits NuRD complexes to orchestrate epigenetic-mediated transcriptional programs. PMID:26296975

  12. Structure of the human zinc finger protein HIVEP3: molecular cloning, expression, exon-intron structure, and comparison with paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2.

    PubMed

    Hicar, M D; Liu, Y; Allen, C E; Wu, L C

    2001-01-01

    Here we report the cloning and characterization of HIVEP3, the newest member in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer-binding protein family that encodes large zinc finger proteins and regulates transcription via the kappaB enhancer motif. The largest open reading frame of HIVEP3 contains 2406 aa. and is approximately 80% identical to the mouse counterpart. The HIVEP3 gene is located in the chromosomal region 1p34 and is at least 300 kb with 10 exons. RNA studies show that multiple HIVEP3 transcripts are differentially expressed and regulated. Additionally, transcription termination occurs in the ultimate exon, exon 10, or in exon 6. Therefore, HIVEP3 may produce protein isoforms that contain or exclude the carboxyl DNA binding domain and the leucine zipper by alternative RNA splicing and differential polyadenylation. Sequence homologous to HIVEP3 exon 6 is not found in mouse nor are the paralogous genes HIVEP1 and HIVEP2. Zoo-blot analysis suggests that sequences homologous to the human exon 6 are present only in primates and cow. Therefore, a foreign DNA harboring a termination exon likely was inserted into the HIVEP3 locus relatively recently in evolution, resulting in the acquisition of novel gene regulatory mechanisms as well as the generation of structural and functional diversity. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  13. Engineering drought tolerant tomato plants over-expressing BcZAT12 gene encoding a C₂H₂ zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Rai, Avinash Chandra; Singh, Major; Shah, Kavita

    2013-01-01

    Efficient genetic transformation of cotyledonary explants of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cv. H-86, Kashi vishesh) was obtained. Disarmed Agrobacterium tumifaciens strain GV 3101 was used in conjugation with binary vector pBinAR containing a construct consisting of the coding sequence of the BcZAT12 gene under the regulatory control of the stress inducible Bclea1a promoter. ZAT12 encodes a C₂H₂ zinc finger protein which confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance to plants. Integration of ZAT12 gene into nuclear genome of individual kanamycin resistant transformed T₀ tomato lines was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization with segregation analysis of T(1) plants showing Mendelian inheritance of the transgene. Expression of ZAT12 in drought-stressed transformed tomato lines was verified in T₂ generation plants using RT-PCR. Of the six transformed tomato lines (ZT1-ZT6) the transformants ZT1 and ZT5 showed maximum expression of BcZAT12 gene transcripts when exposed to 7 days drought stress. Analysis of relative water content (RWC), electrolyte leakage (EL), chlorophyll colour index (CCI), H₂O₂ level and catalase activity suggested that tomato BcZAT12 transformants ZT1 and ZT5 have significantly increased levels of drought tolerance. These results suggest that BcZAT12 transformed tomato cv. H-86 has real potential for molecular breeding programs aimed at augmenting yield of tomato in regions affected with drought stress.

  14. Promoter swapping between the genes for a novel zinc finger protein and beta-catenin in pleiomorphic adenomas with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations.

    PubMed

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Röijer, E; Aström, A K; Meyen, E; Stenman, G; Van de Ven, W J

    1997-02-01

    Pleiomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands is a benign epithelial tumour occurring primarily in the major and minor salivary glands. It is by far the most common type of salivary gland tumour. Microscopically, pleiomorphic adenomas show a marked histological diversity with epithelial, myoepithelial and mesenchymal components in a variety of patterns. In addition to a cytogenetic subgroup with normal karyotypes, pleiomorphic adenomas are characterized by recurrent chromosome rearrangements, particularly reciprocal translocations, with breakpoints at 8q12, 3p21, and 12q13-15, in that order of frequency. The most common abnormality is a reciprocal t(3;8)(p21;q12). We here demonstrate that the t(3;8)(p21;q12) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1, a novel, developmentally regulated zinc finger gene at 8q12, and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), a protein interface functioning in the WG/WNT signalling pathway and specification of cell fate during embryogenesis. Fusions occur in the 5'-non-coding regions of both genes, exchanging regulatory control elements while preserving the coding sequences. Due to the t(3;8)(p21;q12), PLAG1 is activated and expression levels of CTNNB1 are reduced. Activation of PLAG1 was also observed in an adenoma with a variant translocation t(8;15)(q12;q14). Our results indicate that PLAG1 activation due to promoter swapping is a crucial event in salivary gland tumourigenesis.

  15. Zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 interacts with histones, DNA repair proteins and recruits NuRD complex to regulate gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihui; Lam, Norris; Thiele, Carol J

    2015-09-29

    The zinc finger transcription factor CASZ1 has been found to control neural fate-determination in flies, regulate murine and frog cardiac development, control murine retinal cell progenitor expansion and function as a tumor suppressor gene in humans. However, the molecular mechanism by which CASZ1 regulates gene transcription to exert these diverse biological functions has not been described. Here we identify co-factors that are recruited by CASZ1b to regulate gene transcription using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and mass spectrometry assays. We find that CASZ1b binds to the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, histones and DNA repair proteins. Mutagenesis of the CASZ1b protein assay demonstrates that the N-terminus of CASZ1b is required for NuRD binding, and a poly(ADP-ribose) binding motif in the CASZ1b protein is required for histone H3 and DNA repair proteins binding. The N-terminus of CASZ1b fused to an artificial DNA-binding domain (GAL4DBD) causes a significant repression of transcription (5xUAS-luciferase assay), which could be blocked by treatment with an HDAC inhibitor. Realtime PCR results show that the transcriptional activity of CASZ1b mutants that abrogate NuRD or histone H3/DNA binding is significantly decreased. This indicates a model in which CASZ1b binds to chromatin and recruits NuRD complexes to orchestrate epigenetic-mediated transcriptional programs.

  16. Human and mouse ZFY genes produce a conserved testis-specific transcript encoding a zinc finger protein with a short acidic domain and modified transactivation potential.

    PubMed

    Decarpentrie, Fanny; Vernet, Nadège; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Longepied, Guy; Streichemberger, Eric; Aknin-Seifer, Isabelle; Ojarikre, Obah A; Burgoyne, Paul S; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Mitchell, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    Mammalian ZFY genes are located on the Y chromosome, and code putative transcription factors with 12-13 zinc fingers preceded by a large acidic (activating) domain. In mice, there are two genes, Zfy1 and Zfy2, which are expressed mainly in the testis. Their transcription increases in germ cells as they enter meiosis, both are silenced by meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during pachytene, and Zfy2 is strongly reactivated later in spermatids. Recently, we have shown that mouse Zfy2, but not Zfy1, is involved in triggering the apoptotic elimination of specific types of sex chromosomally aberrant spermatocytes. In humans, there is a single widely transcribed ZFY gene, and there is no evidence for a specific role in the testis. Here, we characterize ZFY transcription during spermatogenesis in mice and humans. In mice, we define a variety of Zfy transcripts, among which is a Zfy2 transcript that predominates in spermatids, and a Zfy1 transcript, lacking an exon encoding approximately half of the acidic domain, which predominates prior to MSCI. In humans, we have identified a major testis-specific ZFY transcript that encodes a protein with the same short acidic domain. This represents the first evidence that ZFY has a conserved function during human spermatogenesis. We further show that, in contrast to the full acidic domain, the short domain does not activate transcription in yeast, and we hypothesize that this explains the functional difference observed between Zfy1 and Zfy2 during mouse meiosis.

  17. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu; Makaroff, Christopher; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2016-08-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation.

  18. Drosophila HP1c isoform interacts with the zinc-finger proteins WOC and Relative-of-WOC to regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Font-Burgada, Joan; Rossell, David; Auer, Herbert; Azorín, Fernando

    2008-11-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) proteins are conserved in eukaryotes, with most species containing several isoforms. Based on the properties of Drosophila HP1a, it was proposed that HP1s bind H3K9me2,3 and recruit factors involved in heterochromatin assembly and silencing. Yet, it is unclear whether this general picture applies to all HP1 isoforms and functional contexts. Here, we report that Drosophila HP1c regulates gene expression, as (1) it localizes to active chromatin domains, where it extensively colocalizes with the poised form of RNApolymerase II (RNApol II), Pol IIo(ser5), and H3K4me3, suggesting a contribution to transcriptional regulation; (2) its targeting to a reporter gene does not induce silencing but, on the contrary, increases its expression, and (3) it interacts with the zinc-finger proteins WOC (without children) and Relative-of-WOC (ROW), which are putative transcription factors. Here, we also show that, although HP1c efficiently binds H3K9me2,3 in vitro, its binding to chromatin strictly depends on both WOC and ROW. Moreover, expression profiling indicates that HP1c, WOC, and ROW regulate a common gene expression program that, in part, is executed in the context of the nervous system. From this study, which unveils the essential contribution of DNA-binding proteins to HP1c functionality and recruitment, HP1 proteins emerge as an increasingly diverse family of chromatin regulators.

  19. Overexpression of a novel chrysanthemum Cys2/His2-type zinc finger protein gene DgZFP3 confers drought tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Lin; Xu, Ke-Dong; Zhong, Ming; Pan, Yuan-Zhi; Jiang, Bei-Bei; Liu, Guang-Li; Jia, Yin; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2013-11-01

    A drought stress-responsive Cys2/His2-type zinc finger protein gene DgZFP3 was previously isolated (Liu et al., Afr J Biotechnol 11:7781-7788, 2012b) from chrysanthemum. To assess roles of DgZFP3 in plant drought stress responses, we performed gain-of-function experiment. The DgZFP3-overexpression tobacco plants showed significant drought tolerance over the wild type (WT). The transgenic lines exhibited less accumulation of H2O2 under drought stress, more accumulation of proline and greater activities of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase than the WT under both control conditions and drought stress. In addition, there was greater up-regulation of the ROS-related enzyme genes (NtSOD and NtPOD) and stress-related genes (NtLEA5 and NtDREB) in transgenic lines under normal or drought conditons. Thus DgZFP3 probably plays a positive regulatory role in drought stress response and has the potential to be utilized in transgenic breeding to improve drought stress tolerance in plants.

  20. Developmental and wound-, cold-, desiccation-, ultraviolet-B-stress-induced modulations in the expression of the petunia zinc finger transcription factor gene ZPT2-2

    PubMed

    van Der Krol AR; van Poecke RM; Vorst; Voogt; van Leeuwen W; Borst-Vrensen; Takatsuji; van Der Plas LH

    1999-12-01

    The ZPT2-2 gene belongs to the EPF gene family in petunia (Petunia hybrida), which encodes proteins with TFIIIA-type zinc-finger DNA-binding motifs. To elucidate a possible function for ZPT2-2, we analyzed its pattern of expression in relation to different developmental and physiological stress signals. The activity of the ZPT2-2 promoter was analyzed using a firefly luciferase (LUC) reporter gene, allowing for continuous measurements of transgene activity in planta. We show that ZPT2-2::LUC is active in all plant tissues, but is strongly modulated in cotyledons upon germination, in leaves in response to desiccation, cold treatment, wounding, or ultraviolet-B light, and in petal tissue in response to pollination of the stigma. Analysis of mRNA levels indicated that the modulations in ZPT2-2::LUC expression reflect modulations in endogenous ZPT2-2 gene expression. The change in ZPT2-2::LUC activity by cold treatment, wounding, desiccation, and ultraviolet-B light suggest that the phytohormones ethylene and jasmonic acid are involved in regulating the expression of ZPT2-2. Although up-regulation of expression of ZPT2-2 can be blocked by inhibitors of ethylene perception, expression in plants is not induced by exogenously applied ethylene. The application of jasmonic acid does result in an up-regulation of gene activity and, thus, ZPT2-2 may play a role in the realization of the jasmonic acid hormonal responses in petunia.

  1. Improved DNA binding specificity from polyzinc finger peptides by using strings of two-finger units

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Klug, Aaron; Choo, Yen

    2001-01-01

    Multizinc finger peptides are likely to reach increased prominence in the search for the “ideal” designer transcription factor for in vivo applications such as gene therapy. However, for these treatments to be effective and safe, the peptides must bind with high affinity and, more importantly, with great specificity. Our previous research has shown that zinc finger arrays can be made to bind 18 bp of DNA with picomolar affinity, but also has suggested that arrays of fingers also may bind tightly to related sequences. This work addresses the question of zinc finger DNA binding specificity. We show that by changing the way in which zinc finger arrays are constructed—by linking three two-finger domains rather than two three-finger units—far greater target specificity can be achieved through increased discrimination against mutated or closely related sequences. These new peptides have the added capability of being able to span two short gaps of unbound DNA, although still binding with picomolar affinity to their target sites. We believe that this new method of constructing zinc finger arrays will offer greater efficacy in the fields of gene therapy and in the production of transgenic organisms than previously reported zinc finger arrays. PMID:11171969

  2. Transient Expression of Fez Family Zinc Finger 2 Protein Regulates the Brn3b Gene in Developing Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chunsheng; Bian, Dandan; Li, Xue; Xiao, Jian; Wu, Chunping; Li, Yue; Jiang, Tian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2016-04-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are projection neurons in the neural retina that relay visual information from the environment to the central nervous system. The early expression of MATH5 endows the post-mitotic precursors with RGC competence and leads to the activation ofBrn3bthat marks committed RGCs. Nevertheless, this fate commitment process and, specifically, regulation ofBrn3bremain elusive. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying RGC generation in the mouse retina, we analyzed the expression and function of Fez family zinc finger 2 (FEZF2), a transcription factor critical for the development of projection neurons in the cerebral cortex.Fezf2mRNA and protein were transiently expressed at embryonic day 16.5 in the inner neuroblast layer and the prospective ganglion cell layer of the retina, respectively. Knockout ofFezf2in the developing retina reduced BRN3B+ cells and increased apoptotic cell markers.Fezf2knockdown by retinalin uteroelectroporation diminished BRN3B but not the coexpressed ISLET1 and BRN3A, indicating that the BRN3B decrease was the cause, not the result, of the overall reduction of BRN3B+ RGCs in theFezf2knockout retina. Moreover, the mRNA and promoter activity ofBrn3bwere increasedin vitroby FEZF2, which bound to a 5' regulatory fragment in theBrn3bgenomic locus. These results indicate that transient expression ofFezf2in the retina modulates the transcription ofBrn3band the survival of RGCs. This study improves our understanding of the transcriptional cascade required for the specification of RGCs and provides novel insights into the molecular basis of retinal development.

  3. A zinc-finger transcriptional activator designed to interact with the γ-globin gene promoters enhances fetal hemoglobin production in primary human adult erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Andrew; Tschulena, Ulrich; Hargrove, Phillip W.; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Persons, Derek A.; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is a potent genetic modifier of the severity of β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. We used an in vitro culture model of human erythropoiesis in which late-stage erythroblasts are derived directly from human CD34+ hematopoietic cells to evaluate HbF production. This system recapitulates expression of globin genes according to the developmental stage of the originating cell source. When cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells from adults were cultured, background levels of HbF were 2% or less. Cultured cells were readily transduced with lentiviral vectors when exposed to vector particles between 48 and 72 hours. Among the genetic elements that may enhance fetal hemoglobin production is an artificial zinc-finger transcription factor, GG1-VP64, designed to interact with the proximal γ-globin gene promoters. Our data show that lentiviral-mediated, enforced expression of GG1-VP64 under the control of relatively weak erythroid-specific promoters induced significant amounts of HbF (up to 20%) in erythroblasts derived from adult CD34+ cells without altering their capacity for erythroid maturation and only modestly reducing the total numbers of cells that accumulate in culture after transduction. These observations demonstrate the potential for sequence-specific enhancement of HbF in patients with β-thalassemia or sickle cell anemia. PMID:20190190

  4. Generation of Interleukin-2 Receptor Gamma Gene Knockout Pigs from Somatic Cells Genetically Modified by Zinc Finger Nuclease-Encoding mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahito; Nakano, Kazuaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Matsuda, Taisuke; Maehara, Miki; Kanai, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Mirina; Matsumura, Yukina; Sakai, Rieko; Kuramoto, Momoko; Hayashida, Gota; Asano, Yoshinori; Takayanagi, Shuko; Arai, Yoshikazu; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Nagaya, Masaki; Hanazono, Yutaka; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) is a powerful tool for genome editing. ZFN-encoding plasmid DNA expression systems have been recently employed for the generation of gene knockout (KO) pigs, although one major limitation of this technology is the use of potentially harmful genome-integrating plasmid DNAs. Here we describe a simple, non-integrating strategy for generating KO pigs using ZFN-encoding mRNA. The interleukin-2 receptor gamma (IL2RG) gene was knocked out in porcine fetal fibroblasts using ZFN-encoding mRNAs, and IL2RG KO pigs were subsequently generated using these KO cells through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The resulting IL2RG KO pigs completely lacked a thymus and were deficient in T and NK cells, similar to human X-linked SCID patients. Our findings demonstrate that the combination of ZFN-encoding mRNAs and SCNT provides a simple robust method for producing KO pigs without genomic integration. PMID:24130776

  5. Gene discovery in the finger leather coral Sinularia notanda by construction and sequencing of a normalized cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Kim, Seong Ho; Jung, Min-Min; Kim, Heung Soo; Han, Seock-Jung; Moon, Tae Seok; Kim, Bong-Seok; Nam, Bo-Hye; Park, Chan-Il

    2015-02-01

    The transplantation of coral fragments is one of methods that restore coral communities. To form coral colonies, the fragmented corals initiated skeletal extension from the cut-edge of fragment then success the settlement. In order to understand the molecular events underlying fragment adhesion and settlement, we constructed a normalized cDNA library and generated and annotated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the fragmented adult polyps of soft coral Sinularia notanda. We generated 3251 high-quality ESTs with an average length of 580 bp and the EST cluster and assembly analyses produced 2796 unigenes, including 2487 singletons and 309 contigs. Of the known genes, 55 genes were sel ected to be involved in polyp fragment adhesion and settlement based on Gene Ontology (GO) classification. Notably, two EST clones were identified to show homology with galaxin gene which was demonstrated as coral specific calcifying protein of organic matrix. These EST sequences can provide utility as molecular markers in molecular and genetic studies of S. notanda and other soft coral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tuberculate fruit gene Tu encodes a C2 H2 zinc finger protein that is required for the warty fruit phenotype in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuqin; Zhang, Weiwei; He, Huanle; Nie, Jingtao; Bie, Beibei; Zhao, Junlong; Ren, Guoliang; Li, Yue; Zhang, Dabing; Pan, Junsong; Cai, Run

    2014-06-01

    Cucumber fruits that have tubercules and spines (trichomes) are known to possess a warty (Wty) phenotype. In this study, the tuberculate fruit gene Tu was identified by map-based cloning, and was found to encode a transcription factor (TF) with a single C2 H2 zinc finger domain. Tu was identified in all 38 Wty lines examined, and was completely absent from all 56 non-warty (nWty) lines. Cucumber plants transgenic for Tu (TCP) revealed that Tu was required for the Wty fruit phenotype. Subcellular localization showed that the fusion protein GFP-Tu was localized mainly to the nucleus. Based on analyses of semi-quantitative and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and mRNA in situ hybridization, we found that Tu was expressed specifically in fruit spine cells during development of fruit tubercules. Moreover, cytokinin (CTK) content measurements and cytological observations in Wty and nWty fruits revealed that the Wty fruit phenotype correlated with high endogenous CTK concentrations. As a result of further analyses on the transcriptomic profile of the nWty fruit epidermis and TCP fruit warts, expression of CTK-associated genes, and hormone content in nWty fruit epidermis, Wty fruit warts and epidermis, and TCP fruit warts and epidermis, we found that Tu probably promoted CTK biosynthesis in fruit warts. Here we show that Tu could not be expressed in the glabrous and tubercule-free mutant line gl that contained Tu, this result that futher confirmed the epistatic effect of the trichome (spine) gene Gl over Tu. Taken together, these data led us to propose a genetic pathway for the Wty fruit trait that could guide future mechanistic studies.

  7. Positional cloning of zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69, a candidate gene for obesity-associated diabetes contributed by mouse locus Nidd/SJL.

    PubMed

    Scherneck, Stephan; Nestler, Matthias; Vogel, Heike; Blüher, Matthias; Block, Marcel-Dominique; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Herzig, Stephan; Schulz, Nadja; Teichert, Marko; Tischer, Sina; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Kluge, Reinhart; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2009-07-01

    Polygenic type 2 diabetes in mouse models is associated with obesity and results from a combination of adipogenic and diabetogenic alleles. Here we report the identification of a candidate gene for the diabetogenic effect of a QTL (Nidd/SJL, Nidd1) contributed by the SJL, NON, and NZB strains in outcross populations with New Zealand Obese (NZO) mice. A critical interval of distal chromosome 4 (2.1 Mbp) conferring the diabetic phenotype was identified by interval-specific congenic introgression of SJL into diabetes-resistant C57BL/6J, and subsequent reporter cross with NZO. Analysis of the 10 genes in the critical interval by sequencing, qRT-PCR, and RACE-PCR revealed a striking allelic variance of Zfp69 encoding zinc finger domain transcription factor 69. In NZO and C57BL/6J, a retrotransposon (IAPLTR1a) in intron 3 disrupted the gene by formation of a truncated mRNA that lacked the coding sequence for the KRAB (Krüppel-associated box) and Znf-C2H2 domains of Zfp69, whereas the diabetogenic SJL, NON, and NZB alleles generated a normal mRNA. When combined with the B6.V-Lep(ob) background, the diabetogenic Zfp69(SJL) allele produced hyperglycaemia, reduced gonadal fat, and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. mRNA levels of the human orthologue of Zfp69, ZNF642, were significantly increased in adipose tissue from patients with type 2 diabetes. We conclude that Zfp69 is the most likely candidate for the diabetogenic effect of Nidd/SJL, and that retrotransposon IAPLTR1a contributes substantially to the genetic heterogeneity of mouse strains. Expression of the transcription factor in adipose tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  8. A factor that regulates the class II major histocompatibility complex gene DPA is a member of a subfamily of zinc finger proteins that includes a Drosophila developmental control protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, M; Scholl, T; Ponath, P D; Strominger, J L

    1994-01-01

    A novel DNA sequence element termed the J element involved in the regulated expression of class II major histocompatibility complex genes was recently described. To study this element and its role in class II gene regulation further, a cDNA library was screened with oligonucleotide probes containing both the S element and the nearby J element of the human DPA gene. Several DNA clones were obtained by this procedure, one of which, clone 18, is reported and characterized here. It encodes a protein predicted to contain 688 amino acid residues, including 11 zinc finger motifs of the C2H2 type in the C-terminal region, that are Krüppel-like in the conservation of the H/C link sequence connecting them. The 160 N-terminal amino acids in the nonfinger region of clone 18 are highly homologous with similar regions of several other human, mouse, and Drosophila sequences, defining a subfamily of Krüppel-like zinc finger proteins termed TAB (tramtrack [ttk]-associated box) here. One of the Drosophila sequences, ttk, is a developmental control gene, while a second does not contain a zinc finger region but encodes a structure important in oocyte development. An acidic activation domain is located between the N-terminal conserved region of clone 18 and its zinc fingers. This protein appears to require both the S and J elements, which are separated by 10 bp for optimal binding. Antisense cDNA to clone 18 inhibited the expression of a reporter construct containing the DPA promoter, indicating its functional importance in the expression of this class II gene. Images PMID:7969177

  9. Convergent Evidence from Mouse and Human Studies Suggests the Involvement of Zinc Finger Protein 326 Gene in Antidepressant Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Ying-Jay; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Chih-Ya; Chen, Shiow-Yi; Chen, Tai-Jui; Yu, Younger W-Y; Nian, Fang-Shin; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hong, Chen-Jee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The forced swim test (FST) is a commonly used model to predict antidepressant efficacy. Uncovering the genetic basis of the model may unravel the mechanism of antidepressant treatment. Methods FVB/NJ (FVB) and C57BL/6J (B6) were first identified as the response and non-response strains to fluoxetine (a serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressant) treatment in the mouse FST. Simple-interval (SIM) and composite-interval (CIM) mappings were applied to map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of the anti-immobility effect of fluoxetine in FST (FSTFLX) in 865 male B6×FVB-F2 mice. The brain mRNA expressions of the gene with the maximum QTL-linkage signal for FSTFLX after the FST were compared between B6 and FVB mice and also compared between fluoxetine and saline treatment. The association of the variants in the human homologue of the mouse FSTFLX-QTL gene with major depressive disorder (MDD) and antidepressant response were investigated in 1080 human subjects (MDD/control = 582/498). Results One linkage signal for FSTFLX-QTL was detected at an intronic SNP (rs6215396) of the mouse Zfp326 gene (maximal CIM-LOD = 9.36). The Zfp326 mRNA expression in the FVB thalamus was significantly down-regulated by fluoxetine in the FST, and the higher FVB-to-B6 Zfp326 mRNA expressions in the frontal cortex, striatum and hypothalamus diminished after fluoxetine treatment. Two coding-synonymous SNPs (rs2816881 and rs10922744) in the human homologue of Zfp326, ZNF326, were significantly associated with the 8-week antidepressant treatment response in the MDD patients (Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.004–0.028). Conclusions The findings suggest the involvement of the Zfp326 and ZNF326 genes in antidepressant treatment response. PMID:22666313

  10. Outlier Analysis Defines Zinc Finger Gene Family DNA Methylation in Tumors and Saliva of Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Vatapalli, Rajita; Wei, Yingying; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Chi; Hennessey, Patrick T.; Guo, Theresa; Tan, Marietta; Li, Ryan; Ahn, Julie; Khan, Zubair; Westra, William H.; Bishop, Justin A.; Zaboli, David; Koch, Wayne M.; Khan, Tanbir; Ochs, Michael F.; Califano, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common cancer, annually affecting over half a million people worldwide. Presently, there are no accepted biomarkers for clinical detection and surveillance of HNSCC. In this work, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of epigenetic alterations in primary HNSCC tumors was employed in conjunction with cancer-specific outlier statistics to define novel biomarker genes which are differentially methylated in HNSCC. The 37 identified biomarker candidates were top-scoring outlier genes with prominent differential methylation in tumors, but with no signal in normal tissues. These putative candidates were validated in independent HNSCC cohorts from our institution and TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Using the top candidates, ZNF14, ZNF160, and ZNF420, an assay was developed for detection of HNSCC cancer in primary tissue and saliva samples with 100% specificity when compared to normal control samples. Given the high detection specificity, the analysis of ZNF DNA methylation in combination with other DNA methylation biomarkers may be useful in the clinical setting for HNSCC detection and surveillance, particularly in high-risk patients. Several additional candidates identified through this work can be further investigated toward future development of a multi-gene panel of biomarkers for the surveillance and detection of HNSCC. PMID:26544568

  11. Outlier Analysis Defines Zinc Finger Gene Family DNA Methylation in Tumors and Saliva of Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Gaykalova, Daria A; Vatapalli, Rajita; Wei, Yingying; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Chi; Hennessey, Patrick T; Guo, Theresa; Tan, Marietta; Li, Ryan; Ahn, Julie; Khan, Zubair; Westra, William H; Bishop, Justin A; Zaboli, David; Koch, Wayne M; Khan, Tanbir; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common cancer, annually affecting over half a million people worldwide. Presently, there are no accepted biomarkers for clinical detection and surveillance of HNSCC. In this work, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of epigenetic alterations in primary HNSCC tumors was employed in conjunction with cancer-specific outlier statistics to define novel biomarker genes which are differentially methylated in HNSCC. The 37 identified biomarker candidates were top-scoring outlier genes with prominent differential methylation in tumors, but with no signal in normal tissues. These putative candidates were validated in independent HNSCC cohorts from our institution and TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas). Using the top candidates, ZNF14, ZNF160, and ZNF420, an assay was developed for detection of HNSCC cancer in primary tissue and saliva samples with 100% specificity when compared to normal control samples. Given the high detection specificity, the analysis of ZNF DNA methylation in combination with other DNA methylation biomarkers may be useful in the clinical setting for HNSCC detection and surveillance, particularly in high-risk patients. Several additional candidates identified through this work can be further investigated toward future development of a multi-gene panel of biomarkers for the surveillance and detection of HNSCC.

  12. MusaSAP1, a A20/AN1 zinc finger gene from banana functions as a positive regulator in different stress responses.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, Shareena; Shekhawat, Upendra K Singh; Ganapathi, Thumballi R

    2012-11-01

    A20/AN1 zinc finger domain containing Stress Associated Proteins (SAP) are involved in diverse stress response pathways in plants. In the present study, a novel banana SAP gene, MusaSAP1, was identified from banana EST database and was subsequently characterized by overexpression in transgenic banana plants. Expression profiling in native banana plants showed that MusaSAP1 was up-regulated by drought, salt, cold, heat and oxidative stress as well as by treatment with abscisic acid. Cellular localization assay carried out by making a MusaSAP1::GFP fusion protein indicated that MusaSAP1 is incompletely translocated to nucleus. Copy number analysis performed using real time PCR and Southern blotting indicated that MusaSAP1 occurs in the banana genome in a single copy per 11 chromosome set. Transgenic banana plants constitutively overexpressing MusaSAP1 displayed better stress endurance characteristics as compared to controls in both in vitro and ex vivo assays. Lesser membrane damage as indicated by reduced malondialdehyde levels in transgenic leaves subjected to drought, salt or oxidative stress pointed towards significant role for MusaSAP1 in stress amelioration pathways of banana. Strong up-regulation of a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) coding transcript in MusaSAP1 overexpressing plants together with induction of MusaSAP1 by wounding and methyl jasmonate treatment indicated possible involvement of MusaSAP1 in biotic stress responses where PPOs perform major functions in multiple defense pathways.

  13. Exome Sequencing of a Pedigree Reveals S339L Mutation in the TLN2 Gene as a Cause of Fifth Finger Camptodactyly

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongbo; Deng, Han-Xiang; Chen, Yulan; Yuan, Lamei; Deng, Xiong; Yang, Shengbo; Guan, Liping; Zhang, Jianguo; Yuan, Hong; Guo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Camptodactyly is a digit deformity characterized by permanent flexion contracture of one or both fifth fingers at the proximal interphalangeal joints. Though over 60 distinct types of syndromic camptodactyly have been described, only one disease locus (3q11.2-q13.12) for nonsyndromic camptodactyly has been identified. To identify the genetic defect for camptodactyly in a four-generation Chinese Han family, exome and Sanger sequencings were conducted and a missense variant, c.1016C>T (p.S339L), in the talin 2 gene (TLN2) was identified. The variant co-segregated with disease in the family and was not observed in 12 unaffected family members or 1,000 normal controls, suggesting that p.S339L is a pathogenic mutation. Two asymptomatic carriers in the family indicated incomplete penetrance or more complicated compensated mechanism. Most of p.S339L carriers also have relatively benign cardiac phenotypes. Expression of wild and mutant TLN2 in HEK293 cells suggested the predominant localization in cytoplasm. Our data suggest a potential molecular link between TLN2 and camptodactyly pathogenesis. PMID:27223613

  14. Sexual orientation in Drosophila is altered by the satori mutation in the sex-determination gene fruitless that encodes a zinc finger protein with a BTB domain.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Fujitani, K; Usui, K; Shimizu-Nishikawa, K; Tanaka, S; Yamamoto, D

    1996-09-03

    We have isolated a new Drosophila mutant, satori (sat), the males of which do not court or copulate with female flies. The sat mutation comaps with fruitless (fru) at 91B and does not rescue the bisexual phenotype of fru, indicating that sat is allelic to fru (fru(sat)). The fru(sat) adult males lack a male-specific muscle, the muscle of Lawrence, as do adult males with other fru alleles. Molecular cloning and analyses of the genomic and complementary DNAs indicated that transcription of the fru locus yields several different transcripts. The sequence of fru cDNA clones revealed a long open reading frame that potentially encodes a putative transcription regulator with a BTB domain and two zinc finger motifs. In the 5' noncoding region, three putative transformer binding sites were identified in the female transcript but not in male transcripts. The fru gene is expressed in a population of brain cells, including those in the antennal lobe, that have been suggested to be involved in determination of male sexual orientation. We suggest that fru functions downstream of tra in the sex-determination cascade in some neural cells and that inappropriate sexual development of these cells in the fru mutants results in altered sexual orientation of the fly.

  15. Role of Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger (PLZF) in Cell Proliferation and Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (p21WAF/CDKN1A) Gene Repression*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Min-Young; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Yun, Chae-Ok; Li, Yan; Lee, Choong-Eun; Oh, Jiyoung; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is a transcription repressor that was initially isolated as a fusion protein with retinoic acid receptor α. PLZF is aberrantly overexpressed in various human solid tumors, such as clear cell renal carcinoma, glioblastoma, and seminoma. PLZF causes cellular transformation of NIH3T3 cells and increases cell proliferation in several cell types. PLZF also increases tumor growth in the mouse xenograft tumor model. PLZF may stimulate cell proliferation by controlling expression of the genes of the p53 pathway (ARF, TP53, and CDKN1A). We found that PLZF can directly repress transcription of CDKN1A encoding p21, a negative regulator of cell cycle progression. PLZF binds to the proximal Sp1-binding GC-box 5/6 and the distal p53-responsive elements of the CDKN1A promoter to repress transcription. Interestingly, PLZF interacts with Sp1 or p53 and competes with Sp1 or p53. PLZF interacts with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylates Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the CDKN1A promoter, which indicated the involvement of the corepressor·HDACs complex in transcription repression by PLZF. Also, PLZF represses transcription of TP53 and also decreases p53 protein stability by ubiquitination. PLZF may act as a potential proto-oncoprotein in various cell types. PMID:24821727

  16. A large protein containing zinc finger domains binds to related sequence elements in the enhancers of the class I major histocompatibility complex and kappa immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, A S; LeClair, K P; Singh, H; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA from a B-cell library was previously isolated that encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein with affinities for related sites in a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and kappa immunoglobulin gene enhancers. We report here approximately 6.5 kilobases of sequence of the MBP-1 (MHC enhancer binding protein 1) cDNA. MBP-1 protein has a molecular weight predicted to be greater than 200,000. A DNA-binding domain with high affinity for the MHC enhancer sequence TGGGGATTCCCCA was localized to an 118-amino-acid protein fragment containing two zinc fingers of the class Cys2-X12-His2. Analysis of expression of MBP-1 mRNA revealed relatively high expression in HeLa cells and in a human retinal cell line, with lower levels in Jurkat T cells and in two B-cell lines. Interestingly, expression of MBP-1 mRNA was inducible by mitogen and phorbol ester treatment of Jurkat T cells and by serum treatment of confluent serum-deprived human fibroblasts. Images PMID:2108316

  17. Rearrangements of the retinoic acid receptor alpha and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger genes resulting from t(11;17)(q23;q21) in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S J; Zelent, A; Tong, J H; Yu, H Q; Wang, Z Y; Derré, J; Berger, R; Waxman, S; Chen, Z

    1993-01-01

    Cytogenetic study of a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) showed an unusual karyotype 46,xy,t(11;17) (q23;21) without apparent rearrangement of chromosome 15. Molecular studies showed rearrangements of the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) gene but no rearrangement of the promyelocytic leukemia gene consistent with the cytogenetic data. Similar to t(15;17) APL, all-trans retinoic acid treatment in this patient produced an early leukocytosis which was followed by a myeloid maturation, but the patient died too early to achieve remission. Further molecular analysis of this patient showed a rearrangement between the RAR alpha gene and a newly discovered zinc finger gene named PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger). The fusion PLZF-RAR alpha gene found in this case, was not found in DNA obtained from the bone marrow of normals, APL with t(15;17) and in one patient with AML-M2 with a t(11;17). Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a PLZF specific probe localized the PLZF gene to chromosomal band 11q23.1. Partial exon/intron structure of the PLZF gene flanking the break point on chromosome 11 was also established and the breakpoint within the RAR alpha gene was mapped approximately 2 kb downstream of the exon encoding the 5' untranslated region and the unique A2 domain of the RAR alpha 2 isoform. Images PMID:8387545

  18. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  19. Effects of HAb18G/CD147 knockout on hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro using a novel zinc-finger nuclease-targeted gene knockout approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Wei; Yang, Xiang-Min; Tang, Juan; Wang, Shi-Jie; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2015-03-01

    HAb18G/CD147 belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily and predominantly functions as an inducer of matrix metalloproteinase secretion for tumor invasion and metastasis. This study was designed to investigate the effects of HAb18G/CD147 knockout on hepatocellular carcinoma cells using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFNs)-targeted gene knockout approach. The HCC cell line SMMC-7721 was used for ZFNs-targeted cleavage of the HAb18G/CD147 gene. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were used to detect HAb18G/CD147 expression. HAb18G phenotypic changes following HAb18G/CD147 knockout in SMMC-K7721 cells were assessed using tumor cell adhesion, invasion, migration and colony formation and flow cytometric assays. These data demonstrated that tumor cell adhesion, invasion, migration, and colony formation capabilities of SMMC-K7721 were significantly reduced compared to parental cells or SMMC-7721 with re-expression of HAb18G/CD147 protein transfected with HAb18G/CD147 cDNA. Moreover, knockout of HAb18G/CD147 expression also induced SMMC-K7721 cells to undergo apoptosis compared to SMMC-7721 and SMMC-R7721 (P < 0.01). Molecularly, protein expression of p53 was induced in these cells, but re-expression of HAb18G/CD147 reduced p53 levels in SMMC-R7721 cells, possibly through inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-MDM2 signaling pathway. The findings provide a novel insight into the mechanisms underlying HAb18G/CD147-induced progression of HCC cells.

  20. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  1. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  2. The zinc finger gene ZIC2 has features of an oncogene and its over- expression correlates strongly with the clinical course of epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Sergio; Poynor, Elizabeth; Barakat, Richard R; Clivio, Luca; Cinquini, Michela; Fruscio, Robert; Porcu, Luca; Bussani, Cecilia; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Erba, Eugenio; Romano, Michela; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Koff, Andrew; Luzzatto, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Epithelial ovarian tumors (EOTs) are amongst the most lethal of malignancies in women. We have previously identified ZIC2 as expressed at a higher level in samples of a malignant form (MAL) of EOT than in samples of a form with low malignant potential (LMP). We have now investigated the role of ZIC2 in driving tumor growth and its association with clinical outcomes. Experimental Design ZIC2 expression levels were analysed in two independent tumor tissue collections of LMP and MAL. In vitro experiments aimed to test the role of ZIC2 as a transforming gene. Cox models were used to correlate ZIC2 expression with clinical endpoints. Results ZIC2 expression was about 40-fold in terms of mRNA and about 17-fold in terms of protein in MAL (n = 193) versus LMP (n = 39) tumors. ZIC2 mRNA levels were high in MAL cell lines, but undetectable in LMP cell lines. Over-expression of ZIC2 was localized to the nucleus. ZIC2 over-expression increases the growth rate and foci formation of NIH 3T3 cells, and stimulates anchorage-independent colony formation; down-regulation of ZIC2 decreases the growth rate of MAL cell lines. Zinc finger domains 1 and 2 are required for transforming activity. In stage I MAL ZIC2 expression was significantly associated with overall survival in both univariate (p = 0.046), and multivariate model (p = 0.049). Conclusions ZIC2, a transcription factor related to the sonic hedgehog pathway, is a strong discriminant between MAL and LMP tumors: it may be a major determinant of outcome of EOT. PMID:22733541

  3. Central Precocious Puberty That Appears to Be Sporadic Caused by Paternally Inherited Mutations in the Imprinted Gene Makorin Ring Finger 3

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Delanie B.; Abreu, Ana Paula; Reis, Ana Claudia S.; Montenegro, Luciana R.; Dauber, Andrew; Beneduzzi, Daiane; Cukier, Priscilla; Silveira, Leticia F. G.; Teles, Milena G.; Carroll, Rona S.; Junior, Gil Guerra; Filho, Guilherme Guaragna; Gucev, Zoran; Arnhold, Ivo J. P.; de Castro, Margaret; Moreira, Ayrton C.; Martinelli, Carlos Eduardo; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Brito, Vinicius N.; Antonini, Sonir R.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Loss-of-function mutations in makorin ring finger 3 (MKRN3), an imprinted gene located on the long arm of chromosome 15, have been recognized recently as a cause of familial central precocious puberty (CPP) in humans. MKRN3 has a potential inhibitory effect on GnRH secretion. Objectives: The objective of the study was to investigate potential MKRN3 sequence variations as well as copy number and methylation abnormalities of the 15q11 locus in patients with apparently sporadic CPP. Setting and Participants: We studied 215 unrelated children (207 girls and eight boys) from three university medical centers with a diagnosis of CPP. All but two of these patients (213 cases) reported no family history of premature sexual development. First-degree relatives of patients with identified MKRN3 variants were included for genetic analysis. Main Outcome Measures: All 215 CPP patients were screened for MKRN3 mutations by automatic sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed in a partially overlapping cohort of 52 patients. Results: We identified five novel heterozygous mutations in MKRN3 in eight unrelated girls with CPP. Four were frame shift mutations predicted to encode truncated proteins and one was a missense mutation, which was suggested to be deleterious by in silico analysis. All patients with MKRN3 mutations had classical features of CPP with a median age of onset at 6 years. Copy number and methylation abnormalities at the 15q11 locus were not detected in the patients tested for these abnormalities. Segregation analysis was possible in five of the eight girls with MKRN3 mutations; in all cases, the mutation was inherited on the paternal allele. Conclusions: We have identified novel inherited MKRN3 defects in children with apparently sporadic CPP, supporting a fundamental role of this peptide in the suppression of the reproductive axis. PMID:24628548

  4. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients.

  5. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... textures. No longer are baby purees and mushy cereals the only things on the menu. By the ... ll still be helping out by spoon-feeding cereal and other important dietary elements. Encouraging finger feeding ...

  6. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    PubMed

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  7. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... each fingertip. Repeat ____ times for ____ seconds.  Bend the end joint of your finger, keeping the base and middle joints straight. Hold this position. Relax and then straighten the end joint. Hold this position. Repeat ____ times for ____ seconds.  ...

  8. Use of zinc-finger nucleases to knock out the WAS gene in K562 cells: a human cellular model for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Miguel G.; Anderson, Per; Muñoz, Pilar; Lucena, Gema; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Martin, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations in the WAS gene cause Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), which is characterized by eczema, immunodeficiency and microthrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASP in lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role on megakaryocyte (MK) development is poorly understood. In order to develop a human cellular model that mimics the megakaryocytic-derived defects observed in WAS patients we used K562 cells, a well-known model for study of megakaryocytic development. We knocked out the WAS gene in K562 cells using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) pair targeting the WAS intron 1 and a homologous donor DNA that disrupted WASP expression. Knockout of WASP on K562 cells (K562WASKO cells) resulted in several megakaryocytic-related defects such as morphological alterations, lower expression of CD41ɑ, lower increments in F-actin polymerization upon stimulation, reduced CD43 expression and increased phosphatidylserine exposure. All these defects have been previously described either in WAS-knockout mice or in WAS patients, validating K562WASKO as a cell model for WAS. However, K562WASPKO cells showed also increased basal F-actin and adhesion, increased expression of CD61 and reduced expression of TGFβ and Factor VIII, defects that have never been described before for WAS-deficient cells. Interestingly, these phenotypic alterations correlate with different roles for WASP in megakaryocytic differentiation. All phenotypic alterations observed in K562WASKO cells were alleviated upon expression of WAS following lentiviral transduction, confirming the role of WASP in these phenotypes. In summary, in this work we have validated a human cellular model, K562WASPKO, that mimics the megakaryocytic-related defects found in WAS-knockout mice and have found evidences for a role of WASP as regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation. We propose the use of K562WASPKO cells as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the megakaryocytic-related defects observed

  9. Use of zinc-finger nucleases to knock out the WAS gene in K562 cells: a human cellular model for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel G; Anderson, Per; Muñoz, Pilar; Lucena, Gema; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Martin, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the WAS gene cause Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), which is characterized by eczema, immunodeficiency and microthrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASP in lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role on megakaryocyte (MK) development is poorly understood. In order to develop a human cellular model that mimics the megakaryocytic-derived defects observed in WAS patients we used K562 cells, a well-known model for study of megakaryocytic development. We knocked out the WAS gene in K562 cells using a zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) pair targeting the WAS intron 1 and a homologous donor DNA that disrupted WASP expression. Knockout of WASP on K562 cells (K562WASKO cells) resulted in several megakaryocytic-related defects such as morphological alterations, lower expression of CD41, lower increments in F-actin polymerization upon stimulation, reduced CD43 expression and increased phosphatidylserine exposure. All these defects have been previously described either in WAS-knockout mice or in WAS patients, validating K562WASKO as a cell model for WAS. However, K562WASPKO cells showed also increased basal F-actin and adhesion, increased expression of CD61 and reduced expression of TGFβ and Factor VIII, defects that have never been described before for WAS-deficient cells. Interestingly, these phenotypic alterations correlate with different roles for WASP in megakaryocytic differentiation. All phenotypic alterations observed in K562WASKO cells were alleviated upon expression of WAS following lentiviral transduction, confirming the role of WASP in these phenotypes. In summary, in this work we have validated a human cellular model, K562WASPKO, that mimics the megakaryocytic-related defects found in WAS-knockout mice and have found evidences for a role of WASP as regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation. We propose the use of K562WASPKO cells as a tool to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the megakaryocytic-related defects observed in WAS

  10. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  11. Finger and toenail onycholysis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, N; Escovar, S X; Zaiac, M N

    2015-05-01

    Onycholysis - the separation of the nail plate from the nail bed occurs in fingers and toenails. It is diagnosed by the whitish appearance of the separated nail plate from the nail bed. In fingers, the majority is caused by trauma, manicuring, occupational or self-induced behavior. The most common disease producing fingernail onycholysis is psoriasis and pustular psoriasis. Phototoxic dermatitis, due to drugs can also produce finger onycholysis. Once the separation occurs, the environmental flora sets up temporary colonization in the available space. Finger onycholysis is most common in women. Candida albicans is often recovered from the onycholytic space. Many reports, want to associate the yeast as cause and effect, but the data are lacking and the treatment of the candida does not improve finger onycholysis. A reasonable explanation for the frequent isolation of Candida and Pseudomonas in fingernail onycholysis in women, is the close proximity the fingers have to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract. Fifty per cent of humans harbour C. albicans in the GI tract and it is frequently carried to the vagina during hygienic practices. Finger onycholysis is best treated by drying the nail 'lytic' area with a hair blower, since all colonizing biota are moisture loving and perish in a dry environment. Toenail onycholysis has a very different etiology. It is mechanical, the result of pressure on the toes from the closed shoes, while walking, because of the ubiquitous uneven flat feet producing an asymmetric gait with more pressure on the foot with the flatter sole. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Delayed Administration of a Bio-Engineered Zinc-Finger VEGF-A Gene Therapy Is Neuroprotective and Attenuates Allodynia Following Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Figley, Sarah A.; Liu, Yang; Karadimas, Spyridon K.; Satkunendrarajah, Kajana; Fettes, Peter; Spratt, S. Kaye; Lee, Gary; Ando, Dale; Surosky, Richard; Giedlin, Martin; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI) there are drastic changes that occur in the spinal microvasculature, including ischemia, hemorrhage, endothelial cell death and blood-spinal cord barrier disruption. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is a pleiotropic factor recognized for its pro-angiogenic properties; however, VEGF has recently been shown to provide neuroprotection. We hypothesized that delivery of AdV-ZFP-VEGF – an adenovirally delivered bio-engineered zinc-finger transcription factor that promotes endogenous VEGF-A expression – would result in angiogenesis, neuroprotection and functional recovery following SCI. This novel VEGF gene therapy induces the endogenous production of multiple VEGF-A isoforms; a critical factor for proper vascular development and repair. Briefly, female Wistar rats – under cyclosporin immunosuppression – received a 35 g clip-compression injury and were administered AdV-ZFP-VEGF or AdV-eGFP at 24 hours post-SCI. qRT-PCR and Western Blot analysis of VEGF-A mRNA and protein, showed significant increases in VEGF-A expression in AdV-ZFP-VEGF treated animals (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively). Analysis of NF200, TUNEL, and RECA-1 indicated that AdV-ZFP-VEGF increased axonal preservation (p<0.05), reduced cell death (p<0.01), and increased blood vessels (p<0.01), respectively. Moreover, AdV-ZFP-VEGF resulted in a 10% increase in blood vessel proliferation (p<0.001). Catwalk™ analysis showed AdV-ZFP-VEGF treatment dramatically improves hindlimb weight support (p<0.05) and increases hindlimb swing speed (p<0.02) when compared to control animals. Finally, AdV-ZFP-VEGF administration provided a significant reduction in allodynia (p<0.01). Overall, the results of this study indicate that AdV-ZFP-VEGF administration can be delivered in a clinically relevant time-window following SCI (24 hours) and provide significant molecular and functional benefits. PMID:24846143

  13. [Effects of zinc-finger proteins and artificial zinc-finger proteins on microbial metabolisms--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Zhang, Fei; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Zinc-finger proteins have been widely studied due to their highly conserved structures and DNA-binding specificity of zinc-finger domains. However, researches on the zinc-finger proteins from microorganisms, especially those from prokaryotes, are still very limited. This review focuses on the latest progress on microbial zinc-finger proteins, especially those from prokaryotes and the application of artificial zinc-finger proteins in the breeding of robust strains. Artificial zinc-finger proteins with transcriptional activation or repression domain can regulate the global gene transcription of microbial cells to acquire improved phenotypes, such as stress tolerance to heat, ethanol, butanol, and osmotic pressure. Using the zinc-finger domain as DNA scaffold in the construction of enzymatic system can enhance the catalytic efficiency and subsequently the production of specific metabolites. Currently, zinc-finger domains used in the construction of artificial transcription factor are usually isolated from mammalian cells. In the near future, novel transcription factors can be designed for strain development based on the natural zinc-finger domains from different microbes, which may be used to regulate the global gene expression of microbial cells more efficiently.

  14. Role of a novel pathogen-induced pepper C3-H-C4 type RING-finger protein gene, CaRFPI, in disease susceptibility and osmotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeum Kyu; Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2007-03-01

    Limited information is available about the roles of RING-finger proteins in plant defense. A pepper CaRFP1 encoding the C3-H-C4 type RING-finger protein that physically interacted with the basic PR-1 protein CABPR1 was isolated from pepper leaves infected by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The CaRFP1 protein has VWFA domain, and N-terminal serine-rich and C-terminal cysteine-rich regions. The CaRFP1 transcripts accumulated earlier than did those of the basic PR-1 gene CABPR1 during the incompatible interaction of pepper leaves with X. campestris pv. vesicatoria, as well as in the systemic, uninoculated pepper leaf tissues. The CaRFP1 gene also was induced in pepper leaf tissues infected by Colletotrichum coccodes. The CaRFP1 gene was strongly induced much earlier by salicylic acid, ethylene and methyl jasmonate treatments, as well as environmental stresses including methyl viologen, mannitol and NaCl treatments. Overexpression of the CaRFP1 gene in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants conferred disease susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato infection, accompanied by reduced PR-2 and PR-5 gene expression, suggesting that the CaRFP1 acts as an E3 ligase for polyubiquitination of target PR proteins. Exogenous salicylic acid treatment also abolished PR-2 and PR-5 gene expression in the transgenic plants. Differential osmotic stress tolerance was induced by high salt and drought in the CaRFPI-overexpressing plants during germination and seedling development, which was closely correlated with abscisic acid sensitivity of Arabidopsis plants. These results suggest that the CaRFP1 gene functions as an early defense regulator controlling bacterial disease susceptibility and osmotic stress tolerance.

  15. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  16. Design of polyzinc finger peptides with structured linkers

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2001-01-01

    Zinc finger domains are perhaps the most versatile of all known DNA binding domains. By fusing up to six zinc finger modules, which normally recognize up to 18 bp of DNA, designer transcription factors can be produced to target unique sequences within large genomes. However, not all continuous DNA sequences make good zinc finger binding sites. To avoid having to target unfavorable DNA sequences, we designed multizinc finger peptides with linkers capable of spanning long stretches of nonbound DNA. Two three-finger domains were fused by using either transcription factor IIIA for the Xenopus 5S RNA gene (TFIIIA) finger 4 or a non-sequence-specific zinc finger as a “structured” linker. Our gel-shift results demonstrate that these peptides are able to bind with picomolar affinities to target sequences containing 0–10 bp of nonbound DNA. Furthermore, these peptides display greater sequence selectivity and bind with higher affinity than similar six-finger peptides containing long, flexible linkers. These peptides are likely to be of use in understanding the behavior of polydactyl proteins in nature and in the targeting of human, animal, or plant genomes for numerous applications. We also suggest that in certain polydactyl peptides an individual finger can “flip” out of the major groove to allow its neighbors to bind shorter, nontarget DNA sequences. PMID:11171968

  17. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  18. Finger agnosia in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Shenal, Brian V; Jackson, Melissa D; Crucian, Gregory P; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn if a deficit of finger naming (finger agnosia or anomia) is a sensitive test for Alzheimer disease (AD) and the best means of testing for finger agnosia. The subjects were 38 patients with AD and 10 matched normal controls. All subjects were asked to name the thumb, index, and pinky fingers. No control subject had trouble naming any of these fingers, but 37% of the AD subjects did. When AD patients had difficulty with finger naming, they always had trouble naming the index finger. In the absence of stroke, the inability to name the index finger seems as an indicator of dementia. Although brief, this test is not extremely sensitive test for AD.

  19. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  20. Spiral viscous fingering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2006-11-01

    When a less-viscous fluid displaces a more-viscous fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell, viscous fingering pattern is believed to develop in a radial direction. We performed experiments on viscous fingering in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a polymer solution, a sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution is used as the more-viscous fluid and the trivalent iron (Fe^3+) solution is as the less-viscous fluid. The experiment was done by varying the concentration of Fe^3+, cFe3+. We have found that viscous fingering pattern develops spirally when cFe3+ is larger than a threshold value, while the pattern develops in a radial direction for small cFe3+. We confirmed from different experiments that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between SPA solution and Fe^3+ solution. The chemical reaction produces precipitation and significantly reduces the viscosity of the SPA solution. The quantity of the precipitation is increased with cFe3+. We will make a discussion on the relationship between the formation of spiral viscous fingering and the chemical reaction taking place between the two fluids.

  1. Finger Lakes LPG

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Finger Lakes LPG Storage, LLC; Two Brush Creek Blvd, Suite 200; Kansas City; Missouri 64112 (Applicant) has applied to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f et. seq (the Act), for

  2. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  3. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed. © 2013 The Author Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  4. Three zinc finger nuclear proteins, Sp1, Sp3, and a ZBP-89 homologue, bind to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive sequence of the bovine adrenodoxin gene and regulate transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheng, P Y; Kagawa, N; Takahashi, Y; Waterman, M R

    2000-04-18

    Adrenocorticotropin acting through cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates transcription of the bovine adrenodoxin (Adx) gene in the adrenal cortex. The bovine Adx cAMP-responsive transcription sequence (CRS) has previously been found to contain two consensus GC boxes. By use of nuclear extracts from adrenocortical cells, Sp1 and Sp3 are shown here to bind to CRS. Mutations designed to enhance the identification of additional CRS binding proteins by reducing Sp protein binding showed the presence of an additional DNA-binding protein (Adx factor). Adx factor binding is inhibited by the zinc-chelating agent, 1,10-o-phenanthroline, suggesting it might be a zinc finger protein. By a fractionation/renaturation technique the Adx factor in mouse Y1 adrenocortical cells was found to be in the size range of 106-115 kDa by gel mobility shift assay. On the basis of size, the CRS sequence to which it binds, and its tentative identification as a zinc finger protein, Adx factor has been identified as a Krüppel-like zinc finger protein (a mouse ZBP-89 homologue). Further mutagenesis of CRS demonstrates that it can further be divided into two similar cAMP-responsive elements, and elimination of ZBP-89 binding does not affect cAMP responsiveness of either. Expression of these three nuclear proteins in Drosophila SL2 cells has been used to decipher the role of Adx CRS binding proteins in regulating transcription. Sp1 and Sp3 confer basal transcriptional activities, yet only Sp1 confers cAMP-responsive activity. ZBP-89 represses basal transcriptional activity.

  5. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result.

  6. Hemangioma of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Kodachi, K; Kojima, T; Shimbashi, T; Furusato, M

    1990-01-01

    Fingers often suffer trauma and the clinician is continuously faced with the difficult task of clarifying the distinction between a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion. This study was undertaken to examine ten cases in which a small skin mass located on a finger had been diagnosed preoperatively as hemangioma. Our results showed that seven masses were confirmed pathologically as hemangioma (five cavernous hemangiomas and two capillary hemangiomas), two as traumatic thrombosis and one varix. The clinical manifestations of the two cases of traumatic thrombosis were related to those of hemangioma. In the varix, endothelial proliferation was observed in the area of the thrombosis. This phenomenon is called "intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia", and can confuse the differential diagnosis between a vascular neoplasm and a traumatic thrombosis. Our findings demonstrate that since the traumatic lesions were firmer than the hemangiomas, hardness on physical examination may be a helpful indicator in the differential diagnosis of a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion.

  7. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-12-20

    Meiosis is a germ-cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction. Before the initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps, including the global erasure of DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) in CpG-rich DNA. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l and the histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be crucial for meiosis, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss-of-function approach in mice, here we show that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 has an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ-cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double-strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in primordial germ cells, but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells.

  8. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is a germ cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction1. Prior to initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps2,3, including global erasure of DNA methylation on the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) at CpG4,5. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l, histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be critical for meiosis6, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss of function approach, here we demonstrate that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 plays an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in PGCs but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells. PMID:23151479

  9. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  10. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  11. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  12. Fibonacci-compliant finger design.

    PubMed

    El-Sheikh, Mogeeb A

    2016-11-11

    This work presents the mechanical design of 4 configurations of compliant fingers in order to address the need for commercially feasible prosthetic and robotic hands. The fingers consist of a single part and utilize a compliant mechanism to reduce the cost and control complexity. The geometric parameters of the compliant finger designs follow the Fibonacci series. The first and second compliant fingers have 2 joints and 2 degrees of freedom. The others have 3 joints and 3 degrees of freedom. The type of flexure hinges of the compliant finger are single and multiple nonsymmetrical circular hinges. The finite element method (FEM) was used to verify the range of motion of the joints in the compliant finger. In addition, the study defines the finger tip trajectory of these configurations. The multiple flexure hinges have minimum stress. This study presents affordable, single-element, compliant finger designs and their presumable hypothetical design variables are defined by the Fibonacci series. This method is faster and simpler than optimization. The study identifies the application of each finger design for either prosthetic or robotic purposes.

  13. Finger Injuries in Ball Sports.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Pham, Dang T; Staines, Kimberly Goldie

    2017-02-01

    Finger injuries are common in athletes playing in professional ball sports. Understanding the intricate anatomy of the digit is necessary to properly diagnose and manage finger injuries. Unrecognized or poorly managed finger injuries can lead to chronic deformities that can affect an athlete's performance. Multiple factors and treatment options should be considered to provide the best functional outcome and rapid return to play for an athlete. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play recommendations for common finger injuries in ball sports.

  14. Repair of webbed fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin grafts Stiffness of the fingers or toes Injuries to the blood vessels, tendons, or bones in the fingers Call your provider if you notice the following: Fever Fingers that tingle, are numb, or have a bluish ... fingers or toes to protect the repaired area from injury. Small children who had webbed finger repair may ...

  15. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  16. Differences in finger localisation performance of patients with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Kessels, Roy P C; de Haan, Edward H F; Kappelle, L Jaap; Leijten, Frans S; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2008-09-17

    Several neuropsychological studies have suggested parallel processing of somatosensory input when localising a tactile stimulus on one's own by pointing towards it (body schema) and when localising this touched location by pointing to it on a map of a hand (body image). Usually these reports describe patients with impaired detection, but intact sensorimotor localisation. This study examined three patients with a lesion of the angular gyrus with intact somatosensory processing, but with selectively disturbed finger identification (finger agnosia). These patients performed normally when pointing towards the touched finger on their own hand but failed to indicate this finger on a drawing of a hand or to name it. Similar defects in the perception of other body parts were not observed. The findings provide converging evidence for the dissociation between body image and body schema and, more importantly, reveal for the first time that this distinction is also present in higher-order cognitive processes selectively for the fingers.

  17. Structure based design of protein linkers for zinc finger nuclease.

    PubMed

    Anand, Priya; Schug, Alexander; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2013-10-01

    Zinc finger nucleases are a promising tool to edit DNA in many biological applications, in particular for gene knockout. Despite many efforts the number of genes that can be effectively targeted with ZFNs remains severely limited, as available constructs cannot address arbitrary gene sequences. Here, we develop a novel concept to significantly enhance the number of DNA sequences that can be targeted by ZFN. Using an efficient computational model, we provide an extensive library of possible linker molecules between individual zinc finger motifs in the construct that can skip up to 10 base pairs between adjacent zinc finger recognition sites in the DNA sequence, which increases the number of genes that can be efficiently targeted by more than an order of magnitude.

  18. The PHD Finger Protein MMD1/DUET Ensures the Progression of Male Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Directly Regulates the Expression of the Condensin Gene CAP-D3[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Niu, Baixiao; Huang, Jiyue; Wang, Hongkuan; Yang, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiwu

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome condensation, a process mediated by the condensin complex, is essential for proper chromosome segregation during cell division. Unlike rapid mitotic chromosome condensation, meiotic chromosome condensation occurs over a relatively long prophase I and is unusually complex due to the coordination with chromosome axis formation and homolog interaction. The molecular mechanisms that regulate meiotic chromosome condensation progression from prophase I to metaphase I are unclear. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic PHD-finger protein MMD1/DUET is required for progressive compaction of prophase I chromosomes to metaphase I bivalents. The MMD1 PHD domain is required for its function in chromosome condensation and binds to methylated histone tails. Transcriptome analysis and qRT-PCR showed that several condensin genes exhibit significantly reduced expression in mmd1 meiocytes. Furthermore, MMD1 specifically binds to the promoter region of the condensin subunit gene CAP-D3 to enhance its expression. Moreover, cap-d3 mutants exhibit similar chromosome condensation defects, revealing an MMD1-dependent mechanism for regulating meiotic chromosome condensation, which functions in part by promoting condensin gene expression. Together, these discoveries provide strong evidence that the histone reader MMD1/DUET defines an important step for regulating the progression of meiotic prophase I chromosome condensation. PMID:27385818

  19. FILAMENTOUS FLOWER, a meristem and organ identity gene of Arabidopsis, encodes a protein with a zinc finger and HMG-related domains.

    PubMed

    Sawa, S; Watanabe, K; Goto, K; Liu, Y G; Shibata, D; Kanaya, E; Morita, E H; Okada, K

    1999-05-01

    Distinctive from that of the animal system, the basic plan of the plant body is the continuous formation of a structural unit, composed of a stem with a meristem at the top and lateral organs continuously forming at the meristem. Therefore, mechanisms controlling the formation, maintenance, and development of a meristem will be a key to understanding the body plan of higher plants. Genetic analyses of filamentous flower (fil) mutants have indicated that FIL is required for the maintenance and growth of inflorescence and floral meristems, and of floral organs of Arabidopsis thaliana. FIL encodes a protein carrying a zinc finger and a HMG box-like domain, which is known to work as a transcription regulator. As expected, the FIL protein was shown to have a nuclear location. In situ hybridization clearly demonstrated that FIL is expressed only at the abaxial side of primordia of leaves and floral organs. Transgenic plants, ectopically expressing FIL, formed filament-like leaves with randomly arranged cells at the leaf margin. Our results indicate that cells at the abaxial side of the lateral organs are responsible for the normal development of the organs as well as for maintaining the activity of meristems.

  20. Finger Movements in Transcription Typing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-07

    learned motor movements.- DD , , 1473 00f n,.. ofo I. OV.o 95c ’ ~ 15 O,/BSOL."ETE, .[ -. 4 a/ 11L 1.5U NTARF~ SO. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ECRT AUSTRAC ...fingers. Sensory information and proprioceptive feedback from the mus- cles controlling the fingers could play a role . Neural impulses take about 70

  1. Skilled Finger Movements in Typing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Donald R.

    Six skilled typists were studied while they transcribed English text. The typists showed stable patterns of performance, but with significant individual differences among themselves. Inter-keypress latencies for two-finger digraphs (typed by two fingers on the same hand) were particularly variable among typists. Two typists showed large…

  2. Gert Finger Becomes Emeritus Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Lucuix, C.; Péron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Gert Finger has retired after almost 33 years service and he has been made the first Emeritus Physicist at ESO. An appreciation of some of his many achievements in the development of infrared instrumentation and detector controllers is given. A retirement party for Gert Finger was held in February 2016.

  3. Competition between anisotropic viscous fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecelerowicz, M.; Budek, A.; Szymczak, P.

    2014-09-01

    We consider viscous fingers created by injection of low viscosity fluid into the network of capillaries initially filled with a more viscous fluid (motor oil). Due to the anisotropy of the system and its geometry, such a setup promotes the formation of long-and-thin fingers which then grow and compete for the available flow, interacting through the pressure field. The interaction between the fingers is analyzed using the branched growth formalism of Halsey and Leibig (Phys. Rev. A 46, 7723, 1992) using a number of simple, analytically tractable models. It is shown that as soon as the fingers are allowed to capture the flow from one another, the fixed point appears in the phase space, corresponding to the asymptotic state in which the growth of one of the fingers in hindered by the other. The properties of phase space flows in such systems are shown to be remarkably insensitive to the details of the dynamics.

  4. Optimal three finger grasps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, J.; Lafferriere, G.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of optimal force distribution among three point fingers holding a planar object. A scheme that reduces the nonlinear optimization problem to an easily solved generalized eigenvalue problem is proposed. This scheme generalizes and simplifies results of Ji and Roth (1988). The generalizations include all possible geometric arrangements and extensions to three dimensions and to the case of variable coefficients of friction. For the two-dimensional case with constant coefficients of friction, it is proved that, except for some special cases, the optimal grasping forces (in the sense of minimizing the dependence on friction) are those for which the angles with the corresponding normals are all equal (in absolute value).

  5. Association between the MLX Interacting Protein-Like, BUD13 Homolog and Zinc Finger Protein 259 Gene Polymorphisms and Serum Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Lynn-Htet-Htet; Yin, Rui-Xing; Wu, Jin-Zhen; Wu, Dong-Feng; Wang, Wei; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the association between the MLX interacting protein-like (MLXIPL), BUD13 homolog (BUD13) and zinc finger protein 259 (ZNF259) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and serum lipid levels in the Chinese Mulao and Han populations. Genotyping of 9 SNPs was performed in 825 Mulao and 781 Han participants. The genotype and allele frequencies of ZNF259 rs2075290 and rs964184, and BUD13 rs10790162 SNPs were different between the Mulao and Han populations (P < 0.001). The SNPs of ZNF259 rs2075290 and BUD13 rs10790162 were associated with serum total cholesterol levels; ZNF259 rs2075290 and rs964184, BUD13 rs10790162, and MLXIPL rs3812316 and rs13235543 were associated with triglyceride (TG); and MLXIPL rs35332062 was associated with apolipoprotein (Apo) A1 in the Mulaos (P < 0.006–0.001). However, in the Hans, the SNPs of ZNF259 rs2075290 and BUD13 rs10790162 were associated with serum TG levels; ZNF259 rs2075290 was associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the ApoA1/ApoB ratio (P < 0.006–0.001). Significant linkage disequilibria were noted among ZNF259 rs2075290 and rs964184 and BUD13 rs10790162, and between MLXIPL rs3812316 and rs13235543 (r2 > 0.05, P < 0.001). The haplotypes of A-C-G-A-C (rs2075290A-rs964184C-rs10790162G-rs17119975A-rs11556024C) and C-C-C-C (rs799161C-rs35332062C-rs3812316C-rs13235543C) accounted for over half of the % haplotype of each ethnic group. PMID:24989072

  6. Gene therapy for traumatic central nervous system injury and stroke using an engineered zinc finger protein that upregulates VEGF-A.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Philippe M; Thayapararajah, Mahinthan; Lysko, Meghan D; Magharious, Mark; Spratt, S Kaye; Lee, Gary; Ando, Dale; Surosky, Richard; Fehlings, Michael G; Koeberle, Paulo D

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies have identified anti-apoptotic functions for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the central nervous system (CNS). However, VEGF therapy has been hampered by a tendency to promote vascular permeability, edema, and inflammation. Recently, engineered zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) that upregulate multiple forms of VEGF in their natural biological ratios, have been developed to overcome these negative side effects. We used retinal trauma and ischemia models, and a cortical pial strip ischemia model to determine if VEGF upregulating ZFPs are neuroprotective in the adult CNS. Optic nerve transection and ophthalmic artery ligation lead to the apoptotic degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and are, respectively, two highly reproducible models for CNS trauma or ischemia. Adeno-associated vectors (AAV) vectors encoding VEGF-ZFPs (AAV-VEGF-ZFP) significantly increased RGC survival by ∼twofold at 14 days after optic nerve transection or ophthalmic artery ligation. Furthermore, AAV-VEGF-ZFP enhanced recovery of the pupillary light reflex. RECA-1 immunostaining demonstrated no appreciable differences between retinas treated with AAV-VEGF-ZFP and controls, suggesting that AAV-VEGF-ZFP treatment did not affect retinal vasculature. Following pial strip of the forelimb motor cortex, brains treated with an adenovirus encoding VEGF ZFPs (AdV-ZFP) showed higher neuronal survival, accelerated wound contraction, and reduced lesion volume between 1 and 6 weeks after injury. Behavioral testing using the cylinder test for vertical exploration showed that AdV-VEGF-ZFP treatment enhanced contralateral forelimb function within the first 2 weeks after injury. Our results indicate that VEGF ZFP therapy is neuroprotective following traumatic injury or stroke in the adult mammalian CNS.

  7. Decreased cellulase and xylanase production in the fungus Talaromyces cellulolyticus by disruption of tacA and tctA genes, encoding putative zinc finger transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-01

    Talaromyces cellulolyticus (formerly Acremonium cellulolyticus) is one of the important strains for industrial cellulase production. An understanding of the control of cellulase gene expression in T. cellulolyticus is insufficient because only a few transcriptional factors related to cellulase gene expression have been identified. In the present study, we disrupted seven putative transcription regulator genes that showed similarity with cellulase or hemicellulase regulator genes in other filamentous fungi and investigated whether these genes are related to cellulase and xylanase production. Among the seven genes, five (tclA, tbgA, tlaA, tmcA, tclB2) had a smaller effect on cellulase and xylanase activities when culturing with cellulose. On the other hand, disruption of tacA and tctA, which are respectively homologues of ace1 (repressor of cellulase) and ctf1 (inducer of cutinase), led to a decrease in cellulase and hemicellulase production due to effects at both the enzymatic and transcriptional levels, indicating that tacA and tctA have positive roles in cellulase and xylanase production in T. cellulolyticus. These results suggest that cellulase and xylanase gene regulation in T. cellulolyticus differs from that in other filamentous fungi and imply that unknown transcriptional mechanisms function in T. cellulolyticus.

  8. Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger-Retinoic Acid Receptor α (PLZF-RARα), an Oncogenic Transcriptional Repressor of Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (p21WAF/CDKN1A) and Tumor Protein p53 (TP53) Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Koh, Dong-In; Licht, Jonathan D.; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα) is an oncogene transcriptional repressor that is generated by a chromosomal translocation between the PLZF and RARα genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL-type) patients. The molecular interaction between PLZF-RARα and the histone deacetylase corepressor was proposed to be important in leukemogenesis. We found that PLZF-RARα can repress transcription of the p21WAF/CDKN1A gene, which encodes the negative cell cycle regulator p21 by binding to its proximal promoter Sp1-binding GC-boxes 3, 4, 5/6, a retinoic acid response element (RARE), and distal p53-responsive elements (p53REs). PLZF-RARα also acts as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53, RARα, and Sp1. PLZF-RARα interacts with co-repressors such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the CDKN1A promoter. PLZF-RARα also interacts with the MBD3-NuRD complex, leading to epigenetic silencing of CDKN1A through DNA methylation. Furthermore, PLZF-RARα represses TP53 and increases p53 protein degradation by ubiquitination, further repressing p21 expression. Resultantly, PLZF-RARα promotes cell proliferation and significantly increases the number of cells in S-phase. PMID:24821728

  9. Targeted Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Customized Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Jonathan E.; Maeder, Morgan L.; Pearlberg, Joseph; Joung, J. Keith; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey J.

    2009-01-01

    Zebrafish mutants have traditionally been obtained using random mutagenesis or retroviral insertions, methods that cannot be targeted to a specific gene and require laborious gene mapping and sequencing. Recently, we and others have shown that customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can introduce targeted frame-shift mutations with high efficiency, thereby enabling directed creation of zebrafish gene mutations. Here we describe a detailed protocol for constructing ZFN expression vectors, for generating and introducing ZFN-encoding RNAs into zebrafish embryos, and for identifying ZFN-generated mutations in targeted genomic sites. All of our vectors and methods are compatible with previously described Zinc Finger Consortium reagents for constructing engineered zinc finger arrays. Using these methods, zebrafish founders carrying targeted mutations can be identified within four months. PMID:20010934

  10. Synthetic zinc finger peptides: old and novel applications.

    PubMed

    Corbi, Nicoletta; Libri, Valentina; Onori, Annalisa; Passananti, Claudio

    2004-08-01

    In the last decade, the efforts in clarifying the interaction between zinc finger proteins and DNA targets strongly stimulated the creativity of scientists in the field of protein engineering. In particular, the versatility and the modularity of zinc finger (ZF) motives make these domains optimal building blocks for generating artificial zinc finger peptides (ZFPs). ZFPs can act as transcription modulators potentially able to control the expression of any desired gene, when fused to an appropriate effector domain. Artificial ZFPs open the possibility to re-program the expression of specific genes at will and can represent a powerful tool in basic science, biotechnology and gene therapy. In this review we will focus on old, novel and possible future applications of artificial ZFPs.

  11. Paternal Low Protein Diet Programs Preimplantation Embryo Gene Expression, Fetal Growth and Skeletal Development in Mice.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Adam J; Sirovica, Slobodan; Stokes, Ben; Isaacs, Mark; Addison, Owen; Martin, Richard A

    2017-02-08

    Defining the mechanisms underlying the programming of early life growth is fundamental for improving adult health and wellbeing. While the association between maternal diet, offspring growth and adult disease risk is well-established, the effect of father's diet on offspring development are largely unknown. Therefore, we fed male mice an imbalanced low protein diet (LPD) to determine the impact on post-fertilisation development and fetal growth. We observed that in preimplantation embryos derived from LPD fed males, expression of multiple genes within the central metabolic AMPK pathway was reduced. In late gestation, paternal LPD programmed increased fetal weight, however, placental weight was reduced, resulting in an elevated fetal:placental weight ratio. Analysis of gene expression patterns revealed increased levels of transporters for calcium, amino acids and glucose within LPD placentas. Furthermore, placental expression of the epigenetic regulators Dnmt1 and Dnmt3L were increased also, coinciding with altered patterns of maternal and paternal imprinted genes. More strikingly, we observed fetal skeletal development was perturbed in response to paternal LPD. Here, while offspring of LPD fed males possessed larger skeletons, their bones comprised lower volumes of high mineral density in combination with reduced maturity of bone apatite. These data offer new insight in the underlying programming mechanisms linking poor paternal diet at the time of conception with the development and growth of his offspring.

  12. The t(11;14)(p15;q11) in a T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line activates multiple transcripts, including Ttg-1, a gene encoding a potential zinc finger protein.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, E A; Hockett, R D; Pollock, K M; Bartholdi, M F; O'Brien, S J; Korsmeyer, S J

    1989-01-01

    Interchromosomal translocations within lymphoid neoplasms frequently involve the antigen receptor genes. We cloned the breakpoints of the t(11;14)(p15;q11) in a CD3-negative T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (RPMI 8402) in order to identify new genes potentially involved in T-cell neoplasia. An extensive comparison of both breakpoints and their germ line counterparts indicated that an inadvertant recombinase-mediated break at chromosome segment 11p15 recombined with the delta T-cell receptor at 14q11. The derivative 11 breakpoint resembles a coding joint in which 11p15 rather than a variable region was introduced 5' to a D delta 1 D delta 2 J delta 1 intermediate rearrangement. Conversely, the derivative 14 breakpoint corresponds to a signal joint between the 5' heptamer-spacer-nonamer recombinational signal of D delta 1 and an isolated heptamer at 11p15. Multiple, apparently distinct transcripts were found flanking both breakpoints of 8402. RNAs of 3.5, 4.4, 1.4, and 8.0 kilobases originating from either side of the derivative 14 breakpoint were highly expressed in 8402 compared with other cells. This suggests that this translocation deregulated multiple genes and provides the opportunity to assess any multifactorial contribution they may have to malignancy. We cloned and sequenced several cDNAs representing the 1.4-kilobase transcript (termed Ttg-1 [T-cell translocation gene 1]) from an 8402 library. The predicted protein of 156 amino acids contained two internal repeats which could potentially form zinc fingers. Images PMID:2501659

  13. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  14. [Multiple finger geodes in children].

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, J C; Oprisescu, B; Bresson, A; Ploier, R; Vidailhet, M

    1993-06-01

    Three pediatric patients with multiple geodes in the fingers are reported. This condition occurs mainly between one and three years and at seven years of age and is more common in winter. Affected fingers are swollen. Roentgenograms disclose several small lucent defects which are usually located in the middle phalanx. Several fingers are usually involved. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is increased in virtually every case. Resolution occurs spontaneously within a few weeks or months. There is no tendency towards recurrence. Although the condition is inflammatory, exposure to cold is probably a precipitating factor.

  15. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  16. The zinc finger protein PtaZFP2 negatively controls stem growth and gene expression responsiveness to external mechanical loads in poplar.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ludovic; Decourteix, Mélanie; Badel, Eric; Huguet, Stéphanie; Moulia, Bruno; Julien, Jean-Louis; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical cues are essential signals regulating plant growth and development. In response to wind, trees develop a thigmomorphogenetic response characterized by a reduction in longitudinal growth, an increase in diameter growth, and changes in mechanical properties. The molecular mechanisms behind these processes are poorly understood. In poplar, PtaZFP2, a C2H2 transcription factor, is rapidly up-regulated after stem bending. To investigate the function of PtaZFP2, we analyzed PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars (Populus tremula × Populus alba). To unravel the genes downstream PtaZFP2, a transcriptomic analysis was performed. PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars showed longitudinal and cambial growth reductions together with an increase in the tangent and hardening plastic moduli. The regulation level of mechanoresponsive genes was much weaker after stem bending in PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars than in wild-type plants, showing that PtaZFP2 negatively modulates plant responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. Microarray analysis revealed a high proportion of down-regulated genes in PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars. Among these genes, several were also shown to be regulated by mechanical stimulation. Our results confirmed the important role of PtaZFP2 during plant acclimation to mechanical load, in particular through a negative control of plant molecular responsiveness. This desensitization process could modulate the amplitude and duration of the plant response during recurrent stimuli.

  17. Neural correlates of finger gnosis.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Tamè, Luigi; Furlan, Michele; Haggard, Patrick; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Adriani, Michela; Ferrari, Paolo; Braun, Christoph; Schwarzbach, Jens

    2014-07-02

    Neuropsychological studies have described patients with a selective impairment of finger identification in association with posterior parietal lesions. However, evidence of the role of these areas in finger gnosis from studies of the healthy human brain is still scarce. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the brain network engaged in a novel finger gnosis task, the intermanual in-between task (IIBT), in healthy participants. Several brain regions exhibited a stronger blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in IIBT than in a control task that did not explicitly rely on finger gnosis but used identical stimuli and motor responses as the IIBT. The IIBT involved stronger signal in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), bilateral precuneus (PCN), bilateral premotor cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. In all regions, stimulation of nonhomologous fingers of the two hands elicited higher BOLD signal than stimulation of homologous fingers. Only in the left anteromedial IPL (a-mIPL) and left PCN did signal strength decrease parametrically from nonhomology, through partial homology, to total homology with stimulation delivered synchronously to the two hands. With asynchronous stimulation, the signal was stronger in the left a-mIPL than in any other region, possibly indicating retention of task-relevant information. We suggest that the left PCN may contribute a supporting visuospatial representation via its functional connection to the right PCN. The a-mIPL may instead provide the core substrate of an explicit bilateral body structure representation for the fingers that when disrupted can produce the typical symptoms of finger agnosia.

  18. Multimodal biometric authentication based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Jun; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new multimodal biometric recognition based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry. This research shows three novelties compared to previous works. First, this is the first approach to combine the finger vein and finger geometry information at the same time. Second, the proposed method includes a new finger geometry recognition based on the sequential deviation values of finger thickness extracted from a single finger. Third, we integrate finger vein and finger geometry by a score-level fusion method based on a support vector machine. Results show that recognition accuracy is significantly enhanced using the proposed method.

  19. The hematopoietic tumor suppressor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is upregulated by the antimetabolite cytarabine in leukemic cells involving the zinc finger protein ZNF224, acting as a cofactor of the Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) protein.

    PubMed

    Montano, Giorgia; Ullmark, Tove; Jernmark-Nilsson, Helena; Sodaro, Gaetano; Drott, Kristina; Costanzo, Paola; Vidovic, Karina; Gullberg, Urban

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF8) is highly expressed in myeloid progenitors, while most myeloid leukemias show low or absent expression. Loss of IRF8 in mice leads to a myeloproliferative disorder, indicating a tumor-suppressive role of IRF8. The Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) protein represses the IRF8-promoter. The zinc finger protein ZNF224 can act as a transcriptional co-factor of WT1 and potentiate the cytotoxic response to the cytostatic drug cytarabine. We hypothesized that cytarabine upregulates IRF8 and that transcriptional control of IRF8 involves WT1 and ZNF224. Treatment of leukemic K562 cells with cytarabine upregulated IRF8 protein and mRNA, which was correlated to increased expression of ZNF224. Knock down of ZNF224 with shRNA suppressed both basal and cytarabine-induced IRF8 expression. While ZNF224 alone did not affect IRF8 promoter activity, ZNF224 partially reversed the suppressive effect of WT1 on the IRF8 promoter, as judged by luciferase reporter experiments. Coprecipitation revealed nuclear binding of WT1 and ZNF224, and by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments it was demonstrated that WT1 recruits ZNF224 to the IRF8 promoter. We conclude that cytarabine-induced upregulation of the IRF8 in leukemic cells involves increased levels of ZNF224, which can counteract the repressive activity of WT1 on the IRF8-promoter.

  20. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  1. New redesigned zinc-finger proteins: design strategy and its application.

    PubMed

    Negi, Shigeru; Imanishi, Miki; Matsumoto, Makoto; Sugiura, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    The design of DNA-binding proteins for the specific control of the gene expression is one of the big challenges for several research laboratories in the post-genomic era. An artificial transcription factor with the desired DNA binding specificity could work as a powerful tool and drug to regulate the target gene. The zinc-finger proteins, which typically contain many fingers linked in a tandem fashion, are some of the most intensively studied DNA-binding proteins. In particular, the Cys(2)His(2)-type zinc finger is one of the most common DNA-binding motifs in eukaryotes. A simple mode of DNA recognition by the Cys(2)His(2)-type zinc-finger domain provides an ideal framework for designing proteins with new functions. Our laboratory has utilized several design strategies to create new zinc-finger peptides/proteins by redesigning the Cys(2)His(2)-type zinc-finger motif. This review focuses on the aspects of design strategies, mainly from our recent results, for the creation of artificial zinc-finger proteins, and discusses the possible application of zinc-finger technology for gene regulation and gene therapy.

  2. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression analysis of the PHD-finger protein family in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengnan; Wu, Min; Dong, Qing; Jiang, Haiyang; Cai, Ronghao; Xiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The plant homeobox domain (PHD) proteins are widespread in eukaryotes, and play important roles in regulating chromatin and transcription. Comprehensive analyses of PHD-finger proteins have been performed in animals, but few plant PHD-finger proteins involved in growth and development have been characterized functionally. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide survey of PHD-finger proteins in Populus trichocarpa by describing the phylogenetic relationship, gene structure, and chromosomal location and microarray analyses of each predicted PHD-finger family member. We identified 73 PHD-finger genes (PtPHD1-73) and classified them into eleven subfamilies (A-K) by phylogenetic analysis. Seventy-two of the 73 genes were unevenly distributed on all 19 chromosomes, with seven segmental duplication events. Analysis of the Ka (non-synonymous substitution rate)/Ks (synonymous substitution rate) ratios suggested that the duplicated genes of the PHD-finger family mainly underwent purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events. Expression profiles analysis indicated that 67 PHD-finger genes were differentially expressed in various tissues. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses of nine selected PtPHD genes under high salinity, drought and cold stresses were also performed to explore their stress-related expression patterns. The results of this study provide a thorough overview of poplar PHD-finger proteins and will be valuable for further functional research of poplar PHD-finger genes to unravel their biological roles.

  3. DNA methylation patterns in human tissues of uniparental origin using a zinc-Finger gene (ZNF127) from the Angelman/Prader-Willi region

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Locker, J.

    1996-01-11

    In order to further our understanding of the epigenetic modification of DNA and its role in imprinting, we examined DNA methylation patterns of human tissues of uniparental origin. We used complete hydatidiform moles (CHM), which are totally androgenetic conceptions, to examine the paternal methylation pattern in the absence of a maternal contribution and we used ovarian teratomas to represent the maternal counterpart. We carried out an analysis of DNA methylation of a gene which has been shown to contain sites which are differentially methylated in a parent-specific fashion. The gene, ZNF127, is located on chromosome 15q11-q13 in the region associated with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The parent-of-origin DNA methylation has been postulated to reflect the presence of an imprint and recent studies have confirmed that ZNF127 is differentially expressed only from the paternal chromosome. We identified a unique pattern of hyper- and hypomethylated sites in androgenetic conceptions which was nearly identical to the paternal pattern found in sperm. This may represent the paternal germ-line methylation imprint. We also studied partial hydatidiform moles, non-molar triploid conceptions, normal chorionic villi, and somatic tissue. These all demonstrated a modified DNA methylation pattern characteristic of normal chorionic villi with only limited findings of the imprint. Our results suggest that human androgenetic conceptions may provide an excellent model to analyze epigenetic DNA modifications, such as methylation, in imprinted genes. The paternal allele-specific methylation imprint will also be useful clinically to confirm the androgenetic nature of suspected molar conceptions in which parental blood samples may not be available. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  4. The mei-P26 Gene Encodes a RING Finger B-box Coiled-Coil-NHL Protein That Regulates Seizure Susceptibility in Drosophilia

    PubMed Central

    Glasscock, Edward; Singhania, Ayush; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Seizure-suppressor mutations provide unique insight into the genes and mechanisms involved in regulating nervous system excitability. Drosophila bang-sensitive (BS) mutants present a useful tool for identifying seizure suppressors since they are a well-characterized epilepsy model. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a new Drosophila seizure-suppressor mutant that results from disruption of the meiotic gene mei-P26, which belongs to the RBCC-NHL family of proteins. The mei-P26 mutation reduces seizures in easily shocked (eas) and slamdance (sda) epileptic flies following mechanical stimulation and electroconvulsive shock. In addition, mutant mei-P26 flies exhibit seizure thresholds at least threefold greater than those of wild type. The mei-P26 phenotypes appear to result from missense mutation of a critical residue in the NHL protein-protein interaction domain of the protein. These results reveal a surprising role for mei-P26 outside of the germline as a regulator of seizure susceptibility, possibly by affecting synaptic development as a ubiquitin ligase. PMID:15937125

  5. The mei-P26 gene encodes a RING finger B-box coiled-coil-NHL protein that regulates seizure susceptibility in Drosophilia.

    PubMed

    Glasscock, Edward; Singhania, Ayush; Tanouye, Mark A

    2005-08-01

    Seizure-suppressor mutations provide unique insight into the genes and mechanisms involved in regulating nervous system excitability. Drosophila bang-sensitive (BS) mutants present a useful tool for identifying seizure suppressors since they are a well-characterized epilepsy model. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a new Drosophila seizure-suppressor mutant that results from disruption of the meiotic gene mei-P26, which belongs to the RBCC-NHL family of proteins. The mei-P26 mutation reduces seizures in easily shocked (eas) and slamdance (sda) epileptic flies following mechanical stimulation and electroconvulsive shock. In addition, mutant mei-P26 flies exhibit seizure thresholds at least threefold greater than those of wild type. The mei-P26 phenotypes appear to result from missense mutation of a critical residue in the NHL protein-protein interaction domain of the protein. These results reveal a surprising role for mei-P26 outside of the germline as a regulator of seizure susceptibility, possibly by affecting synaptic development as a ubiquitin ligase.

  6. Novel splice variants associated with one of the zebrafish dnmt3 genes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tamara HL; Dueck, Christine C; Mhanni, Aizeddin A; McGowan, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    Background DNA methylation and the methyltransferases are known to be important in vertebrate development and this may be particularly true for the Dnmt3 family of enzymes because they are thought to be the de novo methyltransferases. Mammals have three Dnmt3 genes; Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, and Dnmt3L, two of which encode active enzymes and one of which produces an inactive but necessary cofactor. However, due to multiple promoter use and alternative splicing there are actually a number of dnmt3 isoforms present. Six different dnmt3 genes have recently been identified in zebrafish. Results We have examined two of the dnmt3 genes in zebrafish that are located in close proximity in the same linkage group and we find that the two genes are more similar to each other than they are to the other zebrafish dnmt3 genes. We have found evidence for the existence of several different splice variants and alternative splice sites associated with one of the two genes and have examined the relative expression of these genes/variants in a number of zebrafish developmental stages and tissues. Conclusion The similarity of the dnmt3-1 and dnmt3-2 genes suggests that they arose due to a relatively recent gene duplication event. The presence of alternative splice and start sites, reminiscent of what is seen with the human DNMT3s, demonstrates strong parallels between the control/function of these genes across vertebrate species. The dynamic expression levels of these genes/variants suggest that they may well play a role in early development and this is particularly true for dnmt3-2-1 and dnmt3-1. dnmt3-2-1 is the predominantly expressed form prior to zygotic gene activation whereas dnmt3-1 predominates post zygotic gene activation suggesting a distinct developmental role for each. PMID:16236173

  7. Expression pattern of three-finger toxin and phospholipase A2 genes in the venom glands of two sea snakes, Lapemis curtus and Acalyptophis peronii: comparison of evolution of these toxins in land snakes, sea kraits and sea snakes.

    PubMed

    Pahari, Susanta; Bickford, David; Fry, Bryan G; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2007-09-27

    Snake venom composition varies widely both among closely related species and within the same species, based on ecological variables. In terrestrial snakes, such variation has been proposed to be due to snakes' diet. Land snakes target various prey species including insects (arthropods), lizards (reptiles), frogs and toads (amphibians), birds (aves), and rodents (mammals), whereas sea snakes target a single vertebrate class (fishes) and often specialize on specific types of fish. It is therefore interesting to examine the evolution of toxins in sea snake venoms compared to that of land snakes. Here we describe the expression of toxin genes in the venom glands of two sea snakes, Lapemis curtus (Spine-bellied Sea Snake) and Acalyptophis peronii (Horned Sea Snake), two members of a large adaptive radiation which occupy very different ecological niches. We constructed cDNA libraries from their venom glands and sequenced 214 and 192 clones, respectively. Our data show that despite their explosive evolutionary radiation, there is very little variability in the three-finger toxin (3FTx) as well as the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes, the two main constituents of Lapemis curtus and Acalyptophis peronii venom. To understand the evolutionary trends among land snakes, sea snakes and sea kraits, pairwise genetic distances (intraspecific and interspecific) of 3FTx and PLA2 sequences were calculated. Results show that these proteins appear to be highly conserved in sea snakes in contrast to land snakes or sea kraits, despite their extremely divergent and adaptive ecological radiation. Based on these results, we suggest that streamlining in habitat and diet in sea snakes has possibly kept their toxin genes conserved, suggesting the idea that prey composition and diet breadth may contribute to the diversity and evolution of venom components.

  8. Expression pattern of three-finger toxin and phospholipase A2 genes in the venom glands of two sea snakes, Lapemis curtus and Acalyptophis peronii: comparison of evolution of these toxins in land snakes, sea kraits and sea snakes

    PubMed Central

    Pahari, Susanta; Bickford, David; Fry, Bryan G; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2007-01-01

    Background Snake venom composition varies widely both among closely related species and within the same species, based on ecological variables. In terrestrial snakes, such variation has been proposed to be due to snakes' diet. Land snakes target various prey species including insects (arthropods), lizards (reptiles), frogs and toads (amphibians), birds (aves), and rodents (mammals), whereas sea snakes target a single vertebrate class (fishes) and often specialize on specific types of fish. It is therefore interesting to examine the evolution of toxins in sea snake venoms compared to that of land snakes. Results Here we describe the expression of toxin genes in the venom glands of two sea snakes, Lapemis curtus (Spine-bellied Sea Snake) and Acalyptophis peronii (Horned Sea Snake), two members of a large adaptive radiation which occupy very different ecological niches. We constructed cDNA libraries from their venom glands and sequenced 214 and 192 clones, respectively. Our data show that despite their explosive evolutionary radiation, there is very little variability in the three-finger toxin (3FTx) as well as the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes, the two main constituents of Lapemis curtus and Acalyptophis peronii venom. To understand the evolutionary trends among land snakes, sea snakes and sea kraits, pairwise genetic distances (intraspecific and interspecific) of 3FTx and PLA2 sequences were calculated. Results show that these proteins appear to be highly conserved in sea snakes in contrast to land snakes or sea kraits, despite their extremely divergent and adaptive ecological radiation. Conclusion Based on these results, we suggest that streamlining in habitat and diet in sea snakes has possibly kept their toxin genes conserved, suggesting the idea that prey composition and diet breadth may contribute to the diversity and evolution of venom components. PMID:17900344

  9. A bacterial one-hybrid selection system for interrogating zinc finger-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Durai, Sundar; Bosley, Allen; Abulencia, Alice Bridgeman; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Ostermeier, Marc

    2006-05-01

    We have developed two bacterial one-hybrid systems for interrogating and selecting zinc finger-DNA interactions. Our systems utilize two plasmids: a zinc finger-plasmid containing the gene for the zinc finger fused to a fragment of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase and a reporter plasmid where the zinc finger-binding site is located upstream of a reporter gene-either the gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Binding of the zinc finger domain to the target binding site results in a 10-fold increase in chloramphenicol resistance with the CAT reporter and an 8- to 22-fold increase in total cell fluorescence with the GFP reporter. The CAT reporter allows for sequence specific zinc fingers to be isolated in a single selection step whereas the GFP reporter enables quantitative evaluation of libraries using flow cytometry and theoretically allows for both negative and positive selection. Both systems have been used to select for zinc fingers that have affinity for the motif 5'-GGGGCAGAA-3' from a library of approximately 2 x 10(5) variants. The systems have been engineered to report on zinc finger-DNA binding with dissociation constants less than about 1 microM in order to be most applicable for evaluating binding specificity in an in vivo setting.

  10. Review on mallet finger treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Fung, Boris; Ip, Wing Yuk

    2012-01-01

    Mallet finger is a common injury involving either an extensor tendon rupture at its insertion or an avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the terminal extensor tendon. It is usually caused by a forceful blow to the tip of the finger causing sudden flexion or a hyperextension injury. Fracture at the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanx is commonly associated with palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx. Most mallet finger injuries are recommended to be treated with immobilisation of the distal interphalangeal joint in extension by splints. There is no consensus on the type of splint and the duration of use. Most studies have shown comparable results with different splints. Surgical fixation is still indicated in certain conditions such as open injuries, avulsion fracture involving at least one third of the articular surface with or without palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx and also failed splinting treatment.

  11. A Novel Function of RING Finger Protein 10 in Transcriptional Regulation of the Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Gene and Myelin Formation in Schwann Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoshikawa, Shinya; Ogata, Toru; Fujiwara, Sayaka; Nakamura, Kozo; Tanaka, Sakae

    2008-01-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) has been detected in Schwann cells prior to the onset of myelination, suggesting its functions in the initiation of myelination. However, transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of MAG remain to be elucidated. Here, we analyzed the promoter of the MAG gene by using luciferase reporter systems in the primary rat Schwann cells. We identified a novel cis-acting element located 160 bp upstream from the MAG transcription initiation site. Using the identified cis-element as a bait, we performed yeast one-hybrid screening and isolated a cDNA encoding a RNF10 as a putative trans-acting protein. When overexpressed in Schwann cells, RNF10 enhanced the activity of the MAG promoter. When RNF10 expression in Schwann cells was knocked down by siRNA, endogenous MAG mRNA and protein expression decreased. Furthermore, we evaluated myelin synthesis using Schwann cell-DRG neuron cocultures. When Schwann cells were infected with retrovirus expressing RNF10 siRNA, myelin formation was inhibited. These data suggest that RNF10 regulates MAG expression and is required for myelin formation. PMID:18941509

  12. DNA methylation and targeted sequencing of methyltransferases family genes in canine acute myeloid leukaemia, modelling human myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Bronzini, I; Aresu, L; Paganin, M; Marchioretto, L; Comazzi, S; Cian, F; Riondato, F; Marconato, L; Martini, V; Te Kronnie, G

    2017-09-01

    Tumours shows aberrant DNA methylation patterns, being hypermethylated or hypomethylated compared with normal tissues. In human acute myeloid leukaemia (hAML) mutations in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT3A) are associated to a more aggressive tumour behaviour. As AML is lethal in dogs, we defined global DNA methylation content, and screened the C-terminal domain of DNMT3 family of genes for sequence variants in 39 canine acute myeloid leukaemia (cAML) cases. A heterogeneous pattern of DNA methylation was found among cAML samples, with subsets of cases being hypermethylated or hypomethylated compared with healthy controls; four recurrent single nucleotide variations (SNVs) were found in DNMT3L gene. Although SNVs were not directly correlated to whole genome DNA methylation levels, all hypomethylated cAML cases were homozygous for the deleterious mutation at p.Arg222Trp. This study contributes to understand genetic modifications of cAML, leading up to studies that will elucidate the role of methylome alterations in the pathogenesis of AML in dogs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  14. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  15. Cadmium down-regulation of kidney Sp1 binding to mouse SGLT1 and SGLT2 gene promoters: Possible reaction of cadmium with the zinc finger domain of Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Kothinti, Rajendra K.; Blodgett, Amy B.; Petering, David H.; Tabatabai, Niloofar M.

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) exposure causes glucosuria (glucose in the urine). Previously, it was shown that Cd exposure of primary cultures of mouse kidney cells (PMKC) decreased mRNA levels of the glucose transporters, SGLT1 and SGLT2 and that Sp1 from Cd-exposed cells displayed reduced binding to the GC boxes of the mouse SGLT1 promoter in vitro. Here, we identified a GC box upstream of mouse SGLT2 gene. ChIP assays on PMKC revealed that exposure to 5 μM Cd abolished Sp1 binding to SGLT1 GC box while it decreased Sp1 binding to SGLT2 GC sequence by 30% in vivo. The in vitro DNA binding assay, EMSA, demonstrated that binding of Sp1 from Cd (7.5 μM)-treated PMKC to the SGLT2 GC probe was 86% lower than in untreated cells. Sp1 is a zinc finger protein. Compared to PMKC exposed to 5 μM Cd alone, inclusion of 5 μM Zn restored SGLT1 and 2 mRNA levels by 15% and 30%, respectively. Cd (10 μM) decreased the binding of recombinant Sp1 (rhSp1) to SGLT1 and SGLT2 GC probes to 12% and 8% of untreated controls. Cd exerted no effect on GC-bound rhSp1. Co-treatment with Cd and Zn showed that added Zn significantly restored rhSp1 binding to the SGLT1 and SGLT2. Addition of Zn post Cd treatment was not stimulatory. We conclude Cd can replace Zn in Sp1 DNA binding domain to reduce its binding to GC sites in mouse SGLT1 and SGLT2 promoters. PMID:20060848

  16. Cadmium down-regulation of kidney Sp1 binding to mouse SGLT1 and SGLT2 gene promoters: possible reaction of cadmium with the zinc finger domain of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Kothinti, Rajendra K; Blodgett, Amy B; Petering, David H; Tabatabai, Niloofar M

    2010-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) exposure causes glucosuria (glucose in the urine). Previously, it was shown that Cd exposure of primary cultures of mouse kidney cells (PMKC) decreased mRNA levels of the glucose transporters, SGLT1 and SGLT2 and that Sp1 from Cd-exposed cells displayed reduced binding to the GC boxes of the mouse SGLT1 promoter in vitro. Here, we identified a GC box upstream of mouse SGLT2 gene. ChIP assays on PMKC revealed that exposure to 5 microM Cd abolished Sp1 binding to SGLT1 GC box while it decreased Sp1 binding to SGLT2 GC sequence by 30% in vivo. The in vitro DNA binding assay, EMSA, demonstrated that binding of Sp1 from Cd (7.5 microM)-treated PMKC to the SGLT2 GC probe was 86% lower than in untreated cells. Sp1 is a zinc finger protein. Compared to PMKC exposed to 5 microM Cd alone, inclusion of 5 microM Zn restored SGLT1 and 2 mRNA levels by 15% and 30%, respectively. Cd (10 microM) decreased the binding of recombinant Sp1 (rhSp1) to SGLT1 and SGLT2 GC probes to 12% and 8% of untreated controls. Cd exerted no effect on GC-bound rhSp1. Co-treatment with Cd and Zn showed that added Zn significantly restored rhSp1 binding to the SGLT1 and SGLT2. Addition of Zn post Cd treatment was not stimulatory. We conclude that Cd can replace Zn in Sp1 DNA binding domain to reduce its binding to GC sites in mouse SGLT1 and SGLT2 promoters. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cadmium down-regulation of kidney Sp1 binding to mouse SGLT1 and SGLT2 gene promoters: Possible reaction of cadmium with the zinc finger domain of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Kothinti, Rajendra K.; Blodgett, Amy B.; Petering, David H.; Tabatabai, Niloofar M.

    2010-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) exposure causes glucosuria (glucose in the urine). Previously, it was shown that Cd exposure of primary cultures of mouse kidney cells (PMKC) decreased mRNA levels of the glucose transporters, SGLT1 and SGLT2 and that Sp1 from Cd-exposed cells displayed reduced binding to the GC boxes of the mouse SGLT1 promoter in vitro. Here, we identified a GC box upstream of mouse SGLT2 gene. ChIP assays on PMKC revealed that exposure to 5 muM Cd abolished Sp1 binding to SGLT1 GC box while it decreased Sp1 binding to SGLT2 GC sequence by 30% in vivo. The in vitro DNA binding assay, EMSA, demonstrated that binding of Sp1 from Cd (7.5 muM)-treated PMKC to the SGLT2 GC probe was 86% lower than in untreated cells. Sp1 is a zinc finger protein. Compared to PMKC exposed to 5 muM Cd alone, inclusion of 5 muM Zn restored SGLT1 and 2 mRNA levels by 15% and 30%, respectively. Cd (10 muM) decreased the binding of recombinant Sp1 (rhSp1) to SGLT1 and SGLT2 GC probes to 12% and 8% of untreated controls. Cd exerted no effect on GC-bound rhSp1. Co-treatment with Cd and Zn showed that added Zn significantly restored rhSp1 binding to the SGLT1 and SGLT2. Addition of Zn post Cd treatment was not stimulatory. We conclude that Cd can replace Zn in Sp1 DNA binding domain to reduce its binding to GC sites in mouse SGLT1 and SGLT2 promoters.

  18. 'Frozen finger' in anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Chintamani; Tandon, Megha; Khandelwal, Rohan

    2009-10-01

    Acute anal fissures are usually managed by various invasive and non-invasive modalities ranging from simple lifestyle changes to chemical and surgical sphincterotomies. Frozen finger, prepared using a water-filled ordinary rubber glove, was successfully used in one hundred patients, thus providing a cost-effective and simple solution to the problem.

  19. Finger posture modulates structural body representations

    PubMed Central

    Tamè, Luigi; Dransfield, Elanah; Quettier, Thomas; Longo, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lesions of the left posterior parietal cortex commonly fail in identifying their fingers, a condition known as finger agnosia, yet are relatively unimpaired in sensation and skilled action. Such dissociations have traditionally been interpreted as evidence that structural body representations (BSR), such as the body structural description, are distinct from sensorimotor representations, such as the body schema. We investigated whether performance on tasks commonly used to assess finger agnosia is modulated by changes in hand posture. We used the ‘in between’ test in which participants estimate the number of unstimulated fingers between two touched fingers or a localization task in which participants judge which two fingers were stimulated. Across blocks, the fingers were placed in three levels of splay. Judged finger numerosity was analysed, in Exp. 1 by direct report and in Exp. 2 as the actual number of fingers between the fingers named. In both experiments, judgments were greater when non-adjacent stimulated fingers were positioned far apart compared to when they were close together or touching, whereas judgements were unaltered when adjacent fingers were stimulated. This demonstrates that BSRs are not fixed, but are modulated by the real-time physical distances between body parts. PMID:28223685

  20. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section... Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural area...

  1. Maternal Diets Trigger Sex-Specific Divergent Trajectories of Gene Expression and Epigenetic Systems in Mouse Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Gabory, Anne; Ferry, Laure; Fajardy, Isabelle; Jouneau, Luc; Gothié, Jean-David; Vigé, Alexandre; Fleur, Cécile; Mayeur, Sylvain; Gallou-Kabani, Catherine; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Attig, Linda; Vambergue, Anne; Lesage, Jean; Reusens, Brigitte; Vieau, Didier; Remacle, Claude; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Junien, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    Males and females responses to gestational overnutrition set the stage for subsequent sex-specific differences in adult onset non communicable diseases. Placenta, as a widely recognized programming agent, contibutes to the underlying processes. According to our previous findings, a high-fat diet during gestation triggers sex-specific epigenetic alterations within CpG and throughout the genome, together with the deregulation of clusters of imprinted genes. We further investigated the impact of diet and sex on placental histology, transcriptomic and epigenetic signatures in mice. Both basal gene expression and response to maternal high-fat diet were sexually dimorphic in whole placentas. Numerous genes showed sexually dimorphic expression, but only 11 genes regardless of the diet. In line with the key role of genes belonging to the sex chromosomes, 3 of these genes were Y-specific and 3 were X-specific. Amongst all the genes that were differentially expressed under a high-fat diet, only 16 genes were consistently affected in both males and females. The differences were not only quantitative but remarkably qualitative. The biological functions and networks of genes dysregulated differed markedly between the sexes. Seven genes of the epigenetic machinery were dysregulated, due to effects of diet, sex or both, including the Y- and X-linked histone demethylase paralogues Kdm5c and Kdm5d, which could mark differently male and female epigenomes. The DNA methyltransferase cofactor Dnmt3l gene expression was affected, reminiscent of our previous observation of changes in global DNA methylation. Overall, this striking sexual dimorphism of programming trajectories impose a considerable revision of the current dietary interventions protocols. PMID:23144842

  2. Maternal diets trigger sex-specific divergent trajectories of gene expression and epigenetic systems in mouse placenta.

    PubMed

    Gabory, Anne; Ferry, Laure; Fajardy, Isabelle; Jouneau, Luc; Gothié, Jean-David; Vigé, Alexandre; Fleur, Cécile; Mayeur, Sylvain; Gallou-Kabani, Catherine; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Attig, Linda; Vambergue, Anne; Lesage, Jean; Reusens, Brigitte; Vieau, Didier; Remacle, Claude; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Junien, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    Males and females responses to gestational overnutrition set the stage for subsequent sex-specific differences in adult onset non communicable diseases. Placenta, as a widely recognized programming agent, contibutes to the underlying processes. According to our previous findings, a high-fat diet during gestation triggers sex-specific epigenetic alterations within CpG and throughout the genome, together with the deregulation of clusters of imprinted genes. We further investigated the impact of diet and sex on placental histology, transcriptomic and epigenetic signatures in mice. Both basal gene expression and response to maternal high-fat diet were sexually dimorphic in whole placentas. Numerous genes showed sexually dimorphic expression, but only 11 genes regardless of the diet. In line with the key role of genes belonging to the sex chromosomes, 3 of these genes were Y-specific and 3 were X-specific. Amongst all the genes that were differentially expressed under a high-fat diet, only 16 genes were consistently affected in both males and females. The differences were not only quantitative but remarkably qualitative. The biological functions and networks of genes dysregulated differed markedly between the sexes. Seven genes of the epigenetic machinery were dysregulated, due to effects of diet, sex or both, including the Y- and X-linked histone demethylase paralogues Kdm5c and Kdm5d, which could mark differently male and female epigenomes. The DNA methyltransferase cofactor Dnmt3l gene expression was affected, reminiscent of our previous observation of changes in global DNA methylation. Overall, this striking sexual dimorphism of programming trajectories impose a considerable revision of the current dietary interventions protocols.

  3. Viscous fingering of a draining suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Malambri, Frank; Lee, Sungyon

    2016-11-01

    The Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering arises when a viscous oil is withdrawn from a Hele-Shaw cell that is filled with a less viscous fluid. When particles are introduced into the draining fluid, new behaviors emerge, which are unobserved in the well-established pure oil case. We experimentally investigate the particle-modified inward fingering for varying particle concentrations. In particular, the fingering growth rate and number of fingers are experimentally quantified and are shown to be directly affected by the presence of particles. The physical mechanism of the particle-modified fingering is also discussed.

  4. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  5. Acrylic Finger Prosthesis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bandela, Vinod; M, Bharathi; S V, Giridhar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Hands basic function is to grasp, hold and manipulate items. Hand gesture is perhaps the most blatant example of non-verbal communication. Finger and partial finger amputations are most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. Common causes are traumatic injuries, congenital absence or malformations present great clinical challenges. In addition to immediate loss of grasp strength, finger absence may cause marked psychological trauma. Individuals who desire finger replacement usually have high expectation for the appearance of prosthesis. This clinical report portrays simple method to retain acrylic finger prosthesis. PMID:25302271

  6. Sequence Discrimination by Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of a DNA Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogos, Joseph A.; Hsu, Tien; Bolton, Jesse; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    1992-09-01

    Two major developmentally regulated isoforms of the Drosophila chorion transcription factor CF2 differ by an extra zinc finger within the DNA binding domain. The preferred DNA binding sites were determined and are distinguished by an internal duplication of TAT in the site recognized by the isoform with the extra finger. The results are consistent with modular interactions between zinc fingers and trinucleotides and also suggest rules for recognition of AT-rich DNA sites by zinc finger proteins. The results show how modular finger interactions with trinucleotides can be used, in conjunction with alternative splicing, to alter the binding specificity and increase the spectrum of sites recognized by a DNA binding domain. Thus, CF2 may potentially regulate distinct sets of target genes during development.

  7. Impact of Finger Type in Fingerprint Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Bours, Patrick; Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph

    Nowadays fingerprint verification system is the most widespread and accepted biometric technology that explores various features of the human fingers for this purpose. In general, every normal person has 10 fingers with different size. Although it is claimed that recognition performance with little fingers can be less accurate compared to other finger types, to our best knowledge, this has not been investigated yet. This paper presents our study on the topic of influence of the finger type into fingerprint recognition performance. For analysis we employ two fingerprint verification software packages (one public and one commercial). We conduct test on GUC100 multi sensor fingerprint database which contains fingerprint images of all 10 fingers from 100 subjects. Our analysis indeed confirms that performance with small fingers is less accurate than performance with the others fingers of the hand. It also appears that best performance is being obtained with thumb or index fingers. For example, performance deterioration from the best finger (i.e. index or thumb) to the worst fingers (i.e. small ones) can be in the range of 184%-1352%.

  8. Integration of tactile input across fingers in a patient with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Overvliet, Krista E; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Brenner, Eli; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2011-01-01

    Finger agnosia has been described as an inability to explicitly individuate between the fingers, which is possibly due to fused neural representations of these fingers. Hence, are patients with finger agnosia unable to keep tactile information perceived over several fingers separate? Here, we tested a finger agnosic patient (GO) on two tasks that measured the ability to keep tactile information simultaneously perceived by individual fingers separate. In experiment 1 GO performed a haptic search task, in which a target (the absence of a protruded line) needed to be identified among distracters (protruded lines). The lines were presented simultaneously to the fingertips of both hands. Similarly to the controls, her reaction time decreased when her fingers were aligned as compared to when her fingers were stretched and in an unaligned position. This suggests that she can keep tactile input from different fingers separate. In experiment two, GO was required to judge the position of a target tactile stimulus to the index finger, relatively to a reference tactile stimulus to the middle finger, both in fingers uncrossed and crossed position. GO was able to indicate the relative position of the target stimulus as well as healthy controls, which indicates that she was able to keep tactile information perceived by two neighbouring fingers separate. Interestingly, GO performed better as compared to the healthy controls in the finger crossed condition. Together, these results suggest the GO is able to implicitly distinguish between tactile information perceived by multiple fingers. We therefore conclude that finger agnosia is not caused by minor disruptions of low-level somatosensory processing. These findings further underpin the idea of a selective impaired higher order body representation restricted to the fingers as underlying cause of finger agnosia.

  9. Systematic Characterization of the Zinc-Finger-Containing Proteins in the Mouse Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Ravasi, Timothy; Huber, Thomas; Zavolan, Mihaela; Forrest, Alistair; Gaasterland, Terry; Grimmond, Sean; Hume, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Zinc-finger-containing proteins can be classified into evolutionary and functionally divergent protein families that share one or more domains in which a zinc ion is tetrahedrally coordinated by cysteines and histidines. The zinc finger domain defines one of the largest protein superfamilies in mammalian genomes;46 different conserved zinc finger domains are listed in InterPro (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/InterPro). Zinc finger proteins can bind to DNA, RNA, other proteins, or lipids as a modular domain in combination with other conserved structures. Owing to this combinatorial diversity, different members of zinc finger superfamilies contribute to many distinct cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, mRNA stability and processing, and protein turnover. Accordingly, mutations of zinc finger genes lead to aberrations in a broad spectrum of biological processes such as development, differentiation, apoptosis, and immunological responses. This study provides the first comprehensive classification of zinc finger proteins in a mammalian transcriptome. Specific detailed analysis of the SP/Krüppel-like factors and the E3 ubiquitin-ligase RING-H2 families illustrates the importance of such an analysis for a more comprehensive functional classification of large protein families. We describe the characterization of a new family of C2H2 zinc-finger-containing proteins and a new conserved domain characteristic of this family, the identification and characterization of Sp8, a new member of the Sp family of transcriptional regulators, and the identification of five new RING-H2 proteins. PMID:12819142

  10. Viscous fingering in an elastic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, Andrew L.; Ducloué, Lucie; Juel, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the fingering instability of a flat, steadily propagating interface in a Hele-Shaw channel, where the top boundary has been replaced by an elastic membrane. In order to create a steadily propagating flat front, we exploit the reopening modes of fluid-filled elasto-rigid channels. The collapsed upper boundary reopens through the steady propagation of a wide finger, when air is injected from one end at a constant flow rate. For high levels of collapse and high finger speed, the tip of the finger becomes flat, creating a leading edge normal to the direction of propagation, which in turn is subject to a smaller scale viscous fingering instability. By modifying the cross-sectional geometry of the channel, we can actuate the finger shape to observe a variety of small-scale fingering phenomena including growth in a direction normal to the propagation and dendrite formation. The instability of the flat front exhibits constant-length fingers, very similar to the stubby fingers observed in radial compliant Hele-Shaw cells, and reminiscent of the printer's instability travel with the front. We investigate the geometry of those fingers in terms of the speed of the front, and the geometry of the reopening region. The financial support of the Leverhulme Trust is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. ZNF435, a novel human SCAN-containing zinc finger protein, inhibits AP-1-mediated transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xing; Zheng, Mei; Fei, Xiangwei; Yang, Zhenxing; Li, Fan; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2007-06-30

    Zinc finger transcription factor genes are a significant fraction of the genes in the vertebrate genome. Here we report the isolation and characterization of a human zinc finger-containing gene, ZNF435, from a fetal brain cDNA library. ZNF435 cDNA is 1290 base pairs in length and contains an open reading frame encoding 349 amino acids with four C2H2-type zinc fingers at its carboxyl terminus and a SCAN motif at its amino terminus. RT-PCR results showed that ZNF435 was expressed in all tested tissues. A ZNF435-GFP fusion protein was located in the nucleus and the four zinc fingers acted as nuclear localization signals (NLSs). ZNF435 was found to be capable of homo-association, and this effect was independent of its zinc fingers. Furthermore, ZNF435 proved to be a transcription repressor as its overexpression in AD293 cells inhibited the transcriptional activities of AP-1.

  12. Global analysis of Drosophila Cys₂-His₂ zinc finger proteins reveals a multitude of novel recognition motifs and binding determinants.

    PubMed

    Enuameh, Metewo Selase; Asriyan, Yuna; Richards, Adam; Christensen, Ryan G; Hall, Victoria L; Kazemian, Majid; Zhu, Cong; Pham, Hannah; Cheng, Qiong; Blatti, Charles; Brasefield, Jessie A; Basciotta, Matthew D; Ou, Jianhong; McNulty, Joseph C; Zhu, Lihua J; Celniker, Susan E; Sinha, Saurabh; Stormo, Gary D; Brodsky, Michael H; Wolfe, Scot A

    2013-06-01

    Cys2-His2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) are the largest group of transcription factors in higher metazoans. A complete characterization of these ZFPs and their associated target sequences is pivotal to fully annotate transcriptional regulatory networks in metazoan genomes. As a first step in this process, we have characterized the DNA-binding specificities of 129 zinc finger sets from Drosophila using a bacterial one-hybrid system. This data set contains the DNA-binding specificities for at least one encoded ZFP from 70 unique genes and 23 alternate splice isoforms representing the largest set of characterized ZFPs from any organism described to date. These recognition motifs can be used to predict genomic binding sites for these factors within the fruit fly genome. Subsets of fingers from these ZFPs were characterized to define their orientation and register on their recognition sequences, thereby allowing us to define the recognition diversity within this finger set. We find that the characterized fingers can specify 47 of the 64 possible DNA triplets. To confirm the utility of our finger recognition models, we employed subsets of Drosophila fingers in combination with an existing archive of artificial zinc finger modules to create ZFPs with novel DNA-binding specificity. These hybrids of natural and artificial fingers can be used to create functional zinc finger nucleases for editing vertebrate genomes.

  13. [Breeding of robust industrial ethanol-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain by artificial zinc finger protein library].

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Zhao, Xinqing; Li, Qian; Zhang, Mingming; Kim, Jin Soo; Bai, Fengwu

    2013-05-01

    Breeding of robust industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with high ethanol tolerance is of great significance for efficient fuel ethanol production. Zinc finger proteins play important roles in gene transcription and translation, and exerting control on the regulation of multiple genes. The sequence and localization of the zinc finger motif can be designed and engineered, and the artificial zinc finger protein can be used to regulate celluar metabolism. Stress tolerance of microbial strains is related to multiple genes. Therefore, it is possible to use artificially-designed zinc finger proteins to breed stress tolerant strains. In this study, a library containing artificial zinc finger protein encoding genes was transformed into the model yeast strain S288c. A recombinant strain named M01 with improved ethanol tolerance was obtained. The plasmid in M01 was isolated, and then transformed into the industrial yeast strain Sc4126. Ethanol tolerance of the recombinant strain of Sc4126 were significantly improved. When high gravity ethanol fermentation using 250 g/L glucose was performed, comparing with the wild-type strain, fermentation time of the recombinant strain was decreased by 24 h and the final ethanol concentration was enhanced by 6.3%. The results of this study demonstrate that artificial zinc finger proteins are able to exert control on stress tolerance of yeast strains, and these results provide basis to construct robust industrial yeast strains for efficient ethanol fermentation.

  14. Identification of a Novel Mycoplasma Species in a Patient With Septic Arthritis of the Hip and Seal Finger.

    PubMed

    Westley, Benjamin P; Horazdovsky, Ryan D; Michaels, Dina L; Brown, Daniel R

    2016-02-15

    An Alaska Native hunter developed fever, swollen finger, and septic hips after harvesting seals. Evaluation of hip tissue by 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction and sequencing revealed a putative novel mycoplasma species. We report the identification of this organism and describe the first known case of disseminated seal finger mycoplasmosis.

  15. Novel fungal transcriptional activators, Cmr1p of Colletotrichum lagenarium and pig1p of Magnaporthe grisea, contain Cys2His2 zinc finger and Zn(II)2Cys6 binuclear cluster DNA-binding motifs and regulate transcription of melanin biosynthesis genes in a developmentally specific manner.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, G; Kenmochi, Y; Takano, Y; Sweigard, J; Farrall, L; Furusawa, I; Horino, O; Kubo, Y

    2000-12-01

    Colletotrichum lagenarium and Magnaporthe grisea are plant pathogenic fungi that produce melanin during the appressorial differentiation stage of conidial germination and during the late stationary phase of mycelial growth. Here, we report the identification of genes for two unique transcription factors, CMR1 (Colletotrichum melanin regulation) and PIG1 (pigment of Magnaporthe), that are involved in melanin biosynthesis. Both Cmr1p and Pig1p contain two distinct DNA-binding motifs, a Cys2His2 zinc finger motif and a Zn(II)2Cys6 binuclear cluster motif. The presence of both these motifs in a single transcriptional regulatory protein is unique among known eukaryotic transcription factors. Deletion of CMR1 in C. lagenarium caused a defect in mycelial melanization, but not in appressorial melanization. Also, cmr1Delta mutants do not express the melanin biosynthetic structural genes SCD1 and THR1 during mycelial melanization, although the expression of these two genes was not affected during appressorial melanization.

  16. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  17. Finger-Jointed Wood Products.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    long enough to be useful (14, 36, 38, 59, 124). Nonstructural finger joints are primarily found in molding stock, trim, siding, fascia boards, door...all beams but two in series 7 and 8 to the grain. The average modulus of be slightly higher than that for apparently was related to the joints, rupture ...inch, and a tip thickness of combinations laminated by the plant . (a)A bolt hole on tensile strength 0.031 inch. The other was classified Straight-bevel

  18. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  19. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  20. Pediatric finger fractures: which ones turn ugly?

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Roger

    2012-06-01

    The majority of pediatric finger fractures can be treated by closed means with expected excellent outcomes. However, a subset of fractures can turn "ugly," with complications such as growth arrest, malunion, and joint dysfunction if not recognized and treated appropriately. The present paper discusses several fractures in a child's fingers that can cause substantial problems if not recognized promptly, highlighting important themes in the evaluation and treatment of a child's injured finger.

  1. Structural Analyses of Zinc Finger Domains for Specific Interactions with DNA.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ki Seong; Cheong, Jin Sung; Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-12-28

    Zinc finger proteins are among the most extensively applied metalloproteins in the field of biotechnology owing to their unique structural and functional aspects as transcriptional and translational regulators. The classical zinc fingers are the largest family of zinc proteins and they provide critical roles in physiological systems from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Two cysteine and two histidine residues (Cys₂His₂) coordinate to the zinc ion for the structural functions to generate a ββα fold, and this secondary structure supports specific interactions with their binding partners, including DNA, RNA, lipids, proteins, and small molecules. In this account, the structural similarity and differences of well-known Cys₂His₂-type zinc fingers such as zinc interaction factor 268 (ZIF268), transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), GAGA, and Ros will be explained. These proteins perform their specific roles in species from archaea to eukaryotes and they show significant structural similarity; however, their aligned amino acids present low sequence homology. These zinc finger proteins have different numbers of domains for their structural roles to maintain biological progress through transcriptional regulations from exogenous stresses. The superimposed structures of these finger domains provide interesting details when these fingers are applied to specific gene binding and editing. The structural information in this study will aid in the selection of unique types of zinc finger applications in vivo and in vitro approaches, because biophysical backgrounds including complex structures and binding affinities aid in the protein design area.

  2. Error compensation during finger force production after oneand four-finger voluntarily fatiguing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Eric S.; Hoopes, Josh A.; Cordial, Rory J.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The effect of muscle fatigue on error compensation strategies during multi-finger ramp force production tasks was investigated. Thirteen young, healthy subjects were instructed to produce a total force with four fingers of the right hand to accurately match a visually displayed template. The template consisted of a 3-s waiting period, a 3-s ramp force production (from 0 to 30% maximal voluntary contraction, MVC), and a 3-s constant force production. A series of twelve ramp trials was performed before and after fatigue. Fatigue was induced by a 60-s maximal isometric force production with either the index finger only or with all four fingers during two separate testing sessions. The average percent of drop was 38.2% in the MVC of the index finger after index-finger fatiguing exercise and 38.3% in the MVC of all fingers after four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ability of individual fingers to compensate for each other's errors in order for the total force to match the preset template was quantified as the error compensation index (ECI), i.e. the ratio of the sum of variances of individual finger forces and the variance of the total force. By comparing pre- and post-fatigue performance during four-finger ramp force production, we observed that the variance of the total force was not significantly changed after one- or four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ECI significantly decreased after four-finger fatiguing exercise, especially during the last second of the ramp; while the ECI remained unchanged after index finger single-finger fatiguing exercise. These results suggest that the central nervous system is able to utilize the abundant degrees of freedom to compensate for partial impairment of the motor apparatus induced by muscle fatigue to maintain the desired performance. However, this ability is significantly decreased when all elements of the motor apparatus are impaired. PMID:17443316

  3. Conservation, diversification and expansion of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome

    PubMed Central

    Englbrecht, Claudia C; Schoof, Heiko; Böhm, Siegfried

    2004-01-01

    Background The classical C2H2 zinc finger domain is involved in a wide range of functions and can bind to DNA, RNA and proteins. The comparison of zinc finger proteins in several eukaryotes has shown that there is a lot of lineage specific diversification and expansion. Although the number of characterized plant proteins that carry the classical C2H2 zinc finger motifs is growing, a systematic classification and analysis of a plant genome zinc finger gene set is lacking. Results We found through in silico analysis 176 zinc finger proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana that hence constitute the most abundant family of putative transcriptional regulators in this plant. Only a minority of 33 A. thaliana zinc finger proteins are conserved in other eukaryotes. In contrast, the majority of these proteins (81%) are plant specific. They are derived from extensive duplication events and form expanded families. We assigned the proteins to different subgroups and families and focused specifically on the two largest and evolutionarily youngest families (A1 and C1) that are suggested to be primarily involved in transcriptional regulation. The newly defined family A1 (24 members) comprises proteins with tandemly arranged zinc finger domains. Family C1 (64 members), earlier described as the EPF-family in Petunia, comprises proteins with one isolated or two to five dispersed fingers and a mostly invariant QALGGH motif in the zinc finger helices. Based on the amino acid pattern in these helices we could describe five different signature sequences prevalent in C1 zinc finger domains. We also found a number of non-finger domains that are conserved in these families. Conclusions Our analysis of the few evolutionarily conserved zinc finger proteins of A. thaliana suggests that most of them could be involved in ancient biological processes like RNA metabolism and chromatin-remodeling. In contrast, the majority of the unique A. thaliana zinc finger proteins are known or suggested to be

  4. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  5. Correcting Finger Counting to Snellen Acuity.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, Rustum; Hwang, Tiffany Jean; Chen, Alexander Francis; Pouw, Andrew; Tian, Jack J; Chu, Edward R; Wang, Michelle Y; Tran, Jeffrey Show; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an online tool with which to convert and thus quantify count finger measurements of visual acuity into Snellen equivalents. It is hoped that this tool allows for the re-interpretation of retrospectively collected data that provide visual acuity in terms of qualitative count finger measurements.

  6. Correcting Finger Counting to Snellen Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Karanjia, Rustum; Hwang, Tiffany Jean; Chen, Alexander Francis; Pouw, Andrew; Tian, Jack J.; Chu, Edward R.; Wang, Michelle Y.; Tran, Jeffrey Show; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this paper, the authors describe an online tool with which to convert and thus quantify count finger measurements of visual acuity into Snellen equivalents. It is hoped that this tool allows for the re-interpretation of retrospectively collected data that provide visual acuity in terms of qualitative count finger measurements. PMID:27928408

  7. Finger Mathematics: A Method for All Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Chavez, Maria

    The instruction of finger counting and finger calculation, also known as Chisanbop, is promoted as a natural method of introducing and teaching the basic processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to children, particularly to those who are mentally and physically handicapped. The sequential process for teaching finger…

  8. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  9. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  10. Laplacian trees - fingered growth in channel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.; Gubiec, T.

    2009-04-01

    A variety of natural growth processes, including viscous fingering, electrodeposition, or solidification can be modeled in terms of Laplacian growth. Laplacian growth patterns are formed when the boundary of a domain moves with a velocity proportional to the gradient of a field Ψ, which satisfies the Laplace equation, ‡2Ψ = 0, outside the domain. A simple model of Laplacian growth is considered, in which the growth takes place only at the tips of long, thin fingers [1]. The evolution of the fingers is studied by conformal mapping techniques. Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for different domains and boundary conditions. In particular, a screening process is analyzed, when longer fingers suppress growth of the shorter ones. Possible geophysical applications of the model are discussed, including formation and evolution of the channels in a dissolving rock fracture. [1] T. Gubiec, P. Szymczak, Fingered growth in channel geometry: A Loewner equation approach , Phys. Rev. E, 77 , 041602, 2008

  11. Elastic fingering patterns in confined lifting flows.

    PubMed

    Fontana, João V; Miranda, José A

    2016-09-01

    The elastic fingering phenomenon occurs when two confined fluids are brought into contact, and due to a chemical reaction, the interface separating them becomes elastic. We study elastic fingering pattern formation in Newtonian fluids flowing in a lifting (time-dependent gap) Hele-Shaw cell. Using a mode-coupling approach, nonlinear effects induced by the interplay between viscous and elastic forces are investigated and the weakly nonlinear behavior of the fluid-fluid interfacial patterns is analyzed. Our results indicate that the existence of the elastic interface allows the development of unexpected morphological behaviors in such Newtonian fluid flow systems. More specifically, we show that depending on the values of the governing physical parameters, the observed elastic fingering structures are characterized by the occurrence of either finger tip splitting or side branching. The impact of the elastic interface on finger-competition events is also discussed.

  12. Use of twin dorsal middle phalangeal finger flaps for thumb or index finger reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Qi, W; Chen, K J

    2013-05-01

    Amputation or degloving injuries of the thumb or index finger are highly disabling. We describe the use of twin dorsal middle finger flaps harvested from the dorsal aspects of the middle and ring fingers, and based on one palmar proper digital artery, its venae comitantes, and the dorsal branches of the palmar digital nerves of the middle and ring fingers, respectively. These flaps offer advantages when large soft tissue defects of the thumb or index finger are present. In this study, twin dorsal middle finger flaps were used in nine patients (six thumbs, three index fingers). All flaps completely survived. At the mean follow-up of 20 months, the appearance of the reconstructed thumbs or index fingers was acceptable, the length was maintained, and the mean static 2-point discrimination values were 10 mm in the palmar flap and 13 mm in the dorsal flap of the reconstructed digit. All patients were satisfied with the appearance and mobility of the donor fingers. All but one donor finger showed normal finger pulp sensibility, with a static 2-point discrimination between 3 and 6 mm.

  13. Fingering in Stochastic Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Aristotelous, Andreas C.; Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread use of hybrid-discrete cellular automata in modeling cancer, two simple growth models are studied on the two dimensional lattice that incorporate a nutrient, assumed to be oxygen. In the first model the oxygen concentration u(x, t) is computed based on the geometry of the growing blob, while in the second one u(x, t) satisfies a reaction-diffusion equation. A threshold θ value exists such that cells give birth at rate β(u(x, t) − θ)+ and die at rate δ(θ − u(x, t)+. In the first model, a phase transition was found between growth as a solid blob and “fingering” at a threshold θc = 0.5, while in the second case fingering always occurs, i.e., θc = 0. PMID:26430353

  14. Elastic Suppression of Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gunnar; Lister, John

    2016-11-01

    Consider peeling an elastic tape or beam away from a rigid base to which it is stuck by a film of viscous liquid. The peeling motion requires air to invade the viscous liquid and is thus susceptible to the Saffman-Taylor fingering instability. We analyse the fundamental travelling-wave solution and show that the advancing air-liquid interface remains linearly stable at higher capillary numbers than in a standard Hele-Shaw cell. A short-wavelength expansion yields an analytical expression for the growth rate which is valid for all unstable modes throughout the parameter space, allowing us to identify and quantify four distinct physical mechanisms that each help suppress the instability. Applying our method to the experiments by Pihler-Puzovic et al. (2012) reveals that the radial geometry and time-variation stabilize the system further.

  15. Fingering instability of Bingham fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Shilpa; Myers, Tim

    2005-11-01

    Contact line instabilities have been extensively studied and many useful results obtained for industrial applications. Our research in this area is to explore these instabilities for non-Newtonian fluids which has wide scope in geological, biological as well as industrial areas. In this talk, we will present an analysis of fingering instability near a contact line of the thin sheet of fluid flowing down on a moderately inclined plane. This instability has been well studied for Newtonian fluids. We explore the effect of a yield strength of the fluid on this instability. We have conveniently assumed the presence of the precussor film of small thickness ahead of the fluid film to avoid some mathematical singularities. Using a lubrication-type approximation, we perform a linear stability analysis of a straight contact line. We will show comparison with some experimental results using suspensions of kaolin in silicone oil as a yield strength fluid.

  16. Finger tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lakie, M; Mutch, W J

    1989-03-01

    Finger tremor was investigated in 20 patients (age range 54-88 yr) diagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease and six controls of a similar age and no known neurological abnormality. In nine of the patients tremor was not clinically obvious. When the tremor of these patients was recorded immediately after voluntary movement and subjected to instrumental analysis there were consistently observable differences from the controls. Such analysis may have diagnostic potential when there is clinical uncertainty. Surface EMG recordings were obtained from four patients. One patient had a large resting tremor with obvious reciprocating activity in flexors and extensors; in the others who had no symptomatic tremor there was reciprocating activity only after movement, and this died away in a few seconds as the induced tremor disappeared.

  17. An effective preprocessing method for finger vein recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, JiaLiang; Li, Qiong; Wang, Ning; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2013-07-01

    The image preprocessing plays an important role in finger vein recognition system. However, previous preprocessing schemes remind weakness to be resolved for the high finger vein recongtion performance. In this paper, we propose a new finger vein preprocessing that includes finger region localization, alignment, finger vein ROI segmentation and enhancement. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme is capable of enhancing the quality of finger vein image effectively and reliably.

  18. Differing Dynamics of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Coordination: Two-finger and Four-Finger Tapping Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Kentaro; Furuyama, Nobuhiro; Inamura, Tetsunari

    2015-01-01

    Finger-tapping experiments were conducted to examine whether the dynamics of intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems can be described equally by the Haken—Kelso—Bunz model, which describes inter-limb coordination dynamics. This article reports the results of finger-tapping experiments conducted in both systems. Two within-subject factors were investigated: the phase mode and the number of fingers. In the intrapersonal experiment (Experiment 1), the participants were asked to tap, paced by a gradually hastening auditory metronome, looking at their fingers moving, using the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. In the interpersonal experiment (Experiment 2), pairs of participants performed the task while each participant used the outside hand, tapping with the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions. First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition. Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition. From these findings, different coordination dynamics were inferred between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems against prediction from the previous studies. Results were discussed according to differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems in the availability of perceptual information and the complexity in the interaction between limbs derived from a nested structure. PMID:26070119

  19. Diverse functions of PHD fingers of the MLL/KMT2 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Hom, Robert A; Blakeslee, Weston; Ikenouye, Larissa; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2014-02-01

    Five members of the KMT2 family of lysine methyltransferases, originally named the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL1-5) proteins, regulate gene expression during embryogenesis and development. Each KMT2A-E contains a catalytic SET domain that methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and one or several PHD fingers. Over the past few years a growing number of studies have uncovered diverse biological roles of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, implicating them in binding to methylated histones and other nuclear proteins, and in mediating the E3 ligase activity and dimerization. Mutations in the PHD fingers or deletion of these modules are linked to human diseases including cancer and Kabuki syndrome. In this work, we summarize recently identified biological functions of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, discuss mechanisms of their action, and examine preference of these domains for histone and non-histone ligands.

  20. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  1. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  2. The effect of enslaving on perception of finger forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Leonard, Charles T

    2006-07-01

    The primary purpose was to examine the effect of enslaving on finger force perception during isometric finger force production using an ipsilateral force-matching paradigm. Fourteen subjects were instructed to produce varying levels of reference forces [10, 20, 30, and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] force using one finger (index, I or little, L) and to reproduce these forces using the same finger (homo-finger tasks, I/I and L/L) or a different finger (hetero-finger tasks, I/L and L/I). Forces of all fingers were recorded. During homo-finger tasks, no differences were found in force magnitude or relative level of force (expressed as a proportion of MVC). The index finger matching force magnitudes were greater than the little finger reference force magnitudes, with significantly lower levels of relative force during L/I tasks; while the little finger matching forces underestimated the index finger reference forces with significantly higher levels of relative force during I/L tasks. The difference in the matching and reference forces by the instructed finger(s), i.e., matching error, was larger in hetero-finger tasks than in homo-finger tasks, particularly at high reference force levels (30, 40% MVC). When forces of all fingers were considered, enslaving (uninstructed finger forces) significantly minimized matching errors of the total force during both I/L and L/I hetero-finger tasks, especially at high reference force levels. Our results show that there is a tendency to match the absolute magnitude of the total force during ipsilateral finger force-matching tasks. This tendency is likely related to enslaving effects. Our results provide evidence that all (instructed and uninstructed) finger forces are sensed, thus resulting in perception of the absolute magnitude of total finger force.

  3. Finger somatotopy in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Beisteiner, R; Windischberger, C; Lanzenberger, R; Edward, V; Cunnington, R; Erdler, M; Gartus, A; Streibl, B; Moser, E; Deecke, L

    2001-06-01

    Although qualitative reports about somatotopic representation of fingers in the human motor cortex exist, up to now no study could provide clear statistical evidence. The goal of the present study was to reinvestigate finger motor somatotopy by means of a thorough investigation of standardized movements of the index and little finger of the right hand. Using high resolution fMRI at 3 Tesla, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses in a group of 26 subjects were repeatedly measured to achieve reliable statistical results. The center of mass of all activated voxels within the primary motor cortex was calculated for each finger and each run. Results of all runs were averaged to yield an individual index and little finger representation for each subject. The mean center of mass localizations for all subjects were then submitted to a paired t test. Results show a highly significant though small scale somatotopy of fingerspecific activation patterns in the order indicated by Penfields motor homunculus. In addition, considerable overlap of finger specific BOLD responses was found. Comparing various methods of analysis, the mean center of mass distance for the two fingers was 2--3 mm with overlapping voxels included and 4--5 mm with overlapping voxels excluded. Our data may be best understood in the context of the work of Schieber (1999) who recently described overlapping somatotopic gradients in lesion studies with humans. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. More efficient swimming by spreading your fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis; Breugem, Wim Paul; Westerweel, Jerry; Delfos, Rene; Grift, Ernst Jan

    2016-11-01

    A tantalizing question in free-style swimming is whether the stroke efficiency during the pull phase depends on spreading the fingers. It is a subtle effect-not more than a few percent-but it could make a big difference in a race. We measure the drag of arm models with increasing finger spreading in a wind tunnel and compare forces and moments to the results of immersed boundary simulations. Virtual arms were used in the simulations and their 3D-printed real versions in the experiment. We find an optimal finger spreading, accompanied by a marked increase of coherent vortex shedding. A simple actuator disk model explains this optimum.

  5. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  6. Generation of albino Xenopus tropicalis using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Keisuke; Nakajima, Taeko; Takase, Minoru; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2012-12-01

    To generate albino lines of Xenopus tropicalis, we injected fertilized eggs with mRNAs encoding zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) targeting the tyrosinase coding region. Surprisingly, vitiligo was observed on the skin of F0 frogs that had been injected with ZFN mRNAs, indicating that both tyrosinase genes in the genome were disrupted in all melanocytes within the vitiligo patches. Mutation analysis using genomic DNA from the skin revealed that two mosaic F0 frogs underwent spatially complex tyrosinase gene mutations. The data implies that the ZFN-induced tyrosinase gene ablations occurred randomly over space and time throughout the entire body, possibly until the young tadpole stage, and that melanocyte precursors lacking functional tyrosinase proliferated and formed vitiligo patches. Several albino X. tropicalis, which are compound heterozygotes for biallelic tyrosinase mutations, were obtained by mating the mosaic F0 frogs. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the albino vertebrates generated by the targeted gene knockout.

  7. Editing the Trypanosoma cruzi genome with zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Burle-Caldas, Gabriela Assis; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Soares-Simões, Melissa; Schumann Burkard, Gabriela; Roditi, Isabel; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte; Teixeira, Santuza M

    2017-03-01

    Gene function studies in Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, have been hindered by the lack of efficient genetic manipulation protocols. In most organisms, insertion and deletion of DNA fragments in the genome are dependent on the generation of double-stranded DNA break (DSB) and repair. By inducing a site-specific DSB, zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have proven to be useful to enhance gene editing in many cell types. Using a pair of ZFNs targeted to the T. cruzi gp72 gene, we were able to generate gp72 knockout parasites with improved efficiency compared to the conventional gene knockout protocol. We also provide evidence that, in T. cruzi, repair of DSBs generated by ZFNs occurs primarily by the homologous recombination pathway.

  8. Zinc finger nuclease technology: advances and obstacles in modelling and treating genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Jabalameli, Hamid Reza; Zahednasab, Hamid; Karimi-Moghaddam, Amin; Jabalameli, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are engineered restriction enzymes designed to target specific DNA sequences within the genome. Assembly of zinc finger DNA-binding domain to a DNA-cleavage domain enables the enzyme machinery to target unique locus in the genome and invoke endogenous DNA repair mechanisms. This machinery offers a versatile approach in allele editing and gene therapy. Here we discuss the architecture of ZFNs and strategies for generating targeted modifications within the genome. We review advances in gene therapy and modelling of the disease using these enzymes and finally, discuss the practical obstacles in using this technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gang G.; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L.; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David

    2009-07-21

    Histone H3 lysine4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  10. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang G; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J; Allis, C David

    2009-06-11

    Histone H3 lysine 4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities1. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  11. Finger blood flow in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Elkington, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. Finger blood flow was estimated, by strain-gauge plethysmography, before and during a 1 hr immersion in ice water, on twenty-five men throughout a year at Wilkes, Antarctica. A total of 121 satisfactory immersions were made. 2. Blood flow before and during immersion decreased significantly in the colder months of the year, and the increase caused by cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) became less as the year progressed. The time of onset, blood flow at onset, and frequency of the cycles of CIVD showed no significant relation to the coldness of the weather (as measured by mean monthly wind chill) or the time in months. Comparisons of blood flow before and after five field trips (average duration 42 days), on which cold exposure was more severe than at Wilkes station, gave similar results. 3. The results suggest that vasoconstrictor tone increased. This interpretation agrees with previous work on general acclimatization in Antarctica, but contrasts with work elsewhere on local acclimatization of the hands. PMID:5684034

  12. AIRE-PHD fingers are structural hubs to maintain the integrity of chromatin-associated interactome

    PubMed Central

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Matafora, Vittoria; Saare, Mario; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Mollica, Luca; Quilici, Giacomo; Chignola, Francesca; Mannella, Valeria; Zucchelli, Chiara; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the expression of peripheral-tissue antigens to mediate deletional tolerance, thereby preventing self-reactivity. AIRE contains two plant homeodomains (PHDs) which are sites of pathological mutations. AIRE-PHD fingers are important for AIRE transcriptional activity and presumably play a crucial role in the formation of multimeric protein complexes at chromatin level which ultimately control immunological tolerance. As a step forward the understanding of AIRE-PHD fingers in normal and pathological conditions, we investigated their structure and used a proteomic SILAC approach to assess the impact of patient mutations targeting AIRE-PHD fingers. Importantly, both AIRE-PHD fingers are structurally independent and mutually non-interacting domains. In contrast to D297A and V301M on AIRE-PHD1, the C446G mutation on AIRE-PHD2 destroys the structural fold, thus causing aberrant AIRE localization and reduction of AIRE target genes activation. Moreover, mutations targeting AIRE-PHD1 affect the formation of a multimeric protein complex at chromatin level. Overall our results reveal the importance of AIRE-PHD domains in the interaction with chromatin-associated nuclear partners and gene regulation confirming the role of PHD fingers as versatile protein interaction hubs for multiple binding events. PMID:23074189

  13. AIRE-PHD fingers are structural hubs to maintain the integrity of chromatin-associated interactome.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Matafora, Vittoria; Saare, Mario; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Mollica, Luca; Quilici, Giacomo; Chignola, Francesca; Mannella, Valeria; Zucchelli, Chiara; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    Mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the expression of peripheral-tissue antigens to mediate deletional tolerance, thereby preventing self-reactivity. AIRE contains two plant homeodomains (PHDs) which are sites of pathological mutations. AIRE-PHD fingers are important for AIRE transcriptional activity and presumably play a crucial role in the formation of multimeric protein complexes at chromatin level which ultimately control immunological tolerance. As a step forward the understanding of AIRE-PHD fingers in normal and pathological conditions, we investigated their structure and used a proteomic SILAC approach to assess the impact of patient mutations targeting AIRE-PHD fingers. Importantly, both AIRE-PHD fingers are structurally independent and mutually non-interacting domains. In contrast to D297A and V301M on AIRE-PHD1, the C446G mutation on AIRE-PHD2 destroys the structural fold, thus causing aberrant AIRE localization and reduction of AIRE target genes activation. Moreover, mutations targeting AIRE-PHD1 affect the formation of a multimeric protein complex at chromatin level. Overall our results reveal the importance of AIRE-PHD domains in the interaction with chromatin-associated nuclear partners and gene regulation confirming the role of PHD fingers as versatile protein interaction hubs for multiple binding events.

  14. Trajectory of the index finger during grasping.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jason; Flash, Tamar

    2009-07-01

    The trajectory of the index finger during grasping movements was compared to the trajectories predicted by three optimization-based models. The three models consisted of minimizing the integral of the weighted squared joint derivatives along the path (inertia-like cost), minimizing torque change, and minimizing angular jerk. Of the three models, it was observed that the path of the fingertip and the joint trajectories, were best described by the minimum angular jerk model. This model, which does not take into account the dynamics of the finger, performed equally well when the inertia of the finger was altered by adding a 20 g weight to the medial phalange. Thus, for the finger, it appears that trajectories are planned based primarily on kinematic considerations at a joint level.

  15. [Ligament injuries of fingers and thumbs].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic ligament lesions of the carpometacarpal joints frequently occur at the thumb ray, whereas the carpometacarpal amphiarthrosis of other finger rays are rarely affected. The metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the thumb and fingers are stabilized by bilaterally running collateral ligaments and palmar plates. At the base of the metacarpophalangeal joints, several ligaments of the extensor hoods guide the extensor tendons and coordinate the fine motoric skills of phalangeal flexing and extending. Several annular and cruciform ligaments hold the flexor tendons close to the finger skeleton. Other than at the wrist, differentiation between dynamic and static instability patterns is possible by physical examination. This review article presents the ligaments of the thumb and the fingers, the traumatic and degenerative lesions as well as the diagnostic capability of x‑rays, cinematography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography.

  16. Spreading and fingering in spin coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Kristi E.; Habdas, Piotr; Semsarillar, Naeim; Burfitt, Kim; de Bruyn, John R.

    2007-04-01

    We study the spreading and fingering of drops of silicone oil on a rotating substrate for a range of rotation speeds and drop volumes. The spreading of the drop prior to the onset of fingering is found to follow the theoretically predicted time dependence, but with a large shift in time scale. For the full range of experimental parameters studied, the contact line becomes unstable and fingers develop when the radius of the drop becomes sufficiently large. We study the growth of perturbations around the perimeter of the drop and find the growth rate of the most unstable mode to agree well with the predictions of lubrication theory. The number of fingers which form around the perimeter of the drop is found to be a function of both rotation speed and drop volume, and is also in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions.

  17. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  18. Repair of webbed fingers - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Syndactyly is the abnormal development of the hand, such that the fingers are fused. The number of ... second surgery, depending on the complexity of the syndactyly. Hospital stays of 1 or 2 days are ...

  19. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-01-01

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis. PMID:23988821

  20. Salt-finger convection under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to differential diffusion rates. Because of the fact that the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number (the ratio of thermal diffusivity to solute diffusivity) salt-finger convection can be generated at very much reduced gravity levels. This effect may be of importance in the directional solidification of binary alloys carried out in space. The transport of solute and heat by salt-finger convection at microgravity conditions is considered; instability arising from surface tension gradients, the Marangoni instability, is discussed, and the possible consequences of combined salt-finger and Marangoni instability are considered.

  1. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  2. Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative warning of wind chill. Indeed, guidance on the risk of finger freezing is important not only to safeguard the finger, but also because it pertains more closely to susceptible facial features, such as the nose, than if only the risk of cheek freezing was provided. The importance of blood flow to the finger and the modeling of vaso-constriction are demonstrated through cooling predictions that agree reasonably well with several reported observations. Differences in the prediction between the present physiologic-based model and the engineering model used to develop the wind chill index are also discussed. New wind chill charts are presented that tabulate the mean cooling rates and corresponding onset times to freezing of the finger for various combinations of air temperature and wind speed. Results indicate that the surface of the finger cools to its freezing point in approximately one-eighth of the time predicted for the cheek. For combinations that result in the same wind chill temperature (WCT), the rate of finger cooling is faster at the higher wind speed. This asymmetry was previously disclosed through the application of the model to cheek cooling, and it reiterates the ambiguity associated with the reporting of WCT. It is further emphasized that the reporting of onset times to freezing, or safe exposure limits, is a more logical and meaningful alternative to the WCT.

  3. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-04-02

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  4. Reverse Pressure Capable Finger Seal (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the typical solution for locations requiring reverse capable sealing are labyrinth seals which can exhibit significantly higher leakage...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0215 REVERSE PRESSURE CAPABLE FINGER SEAL (PREPRINT) Nathan Gibson and Joe Yanof Honeywell International, Inc...AND SUBTITLE REVERSE PRESSURE CAPABLE FINGER SEAL (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-09-D-2925-0003 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  5. Contributions and co-ordination of individual fingers in multiple finger prehension.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, H; Kawai, S; Ikuta, K

    1995-06-01

    The contributions and co-ordination of external finger grip forces were examined during a lifting task with a precision grip using multiple fingers. The subjects (n = 10) lifted a force transducer-equipped grip apparatus. Grip force from each of the five fingers was continuously measured under different object weight (200 g, 400 g and 800 g) and surface structure (plastic and sandpaper) conditions. The effect of five-, four-, and three-finger grip modes was also examined. It was found that variation of object weight or surface friction resulted in change of the total grip force magnitude; the largest change in finger force, was that for the index finger, followed by the middle, ring, and little fingers. Percentage contribution of static grip force to the total grip force for the index, middle, ring, and little fingers was 42.0%, 27.4%, 17.6% and 12.9%, respectively. These values were fairly constant for all object weight conditions, as well as for all surface friction conditions, suggesting that all individual finger force adjustments for light loads less than 800 g are controlled comprehensively simply by using a single common scaling value. A higher surface friction provided faster lifting initiation and required lesser grip force exertion, indicating advantageous effect of a non-slippery surface over a slippery surface. The results indicate that nearly 40% force reduction can be obtained when a non-slippery surface is used. Variation in grip mode changed the total grip force, i.e., the fewer the number of fingers, the greater the total grip force. The percent value of static grip force for the index, middle, and ring fingers in the four-finger grip mode was 42.7%, 32.5%, and 24.7%, respectively, and that for the index and middle fingers in the three-finger grip mode was 43.0% and 56.9%, respectively. Therefore, the grip mode was found to influence the force contributions of the middle and ring fingers, but not of the index finger.

  6. Viscous fingering in a microfluidic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budek, Agnieszka; Garstecki, Piotr; Samborski, Adam; Szymczak, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    We study experimentally and numerically two-phase flow in a rectangular network of microfluidic channels. If the pressure gradient is oriented along the lattice, growth of long and thin dendrites ('thin fingers') is promoted. The dynamics of thin finger growth is of interest due to their appearance in a variety of other pattern forming systems, such as the growth of dendrites in electrochemical deposition experiments, channeling in dissolving rocks or side-branches growth in crystallization. Due to their simplicity, thin finger models are also attractive for theoretical analysis. A characteristic feature of these systems is a strong competition between the fingers which is a reflection of Saffman-Taylor instability acting in a nonlinear regime. Surprisingly, the case of miscible fluids turns out to be different, with the competition between the fingers hindered due to the strong lateral currents of the displaced fluid, which eventually cut off the heads of the advancing fingers, thus preventing their further growth. The heads continue to move through the system, preserving their shapes, thus forming the 'miscible droplets'. In immiscible case this process is hindered by the presence of the surface tension. A detailed analysis of this phenomenon is given with a particular emphasis on the scaling properties of the system.

  7. In vitro selection of zinc fingers with altered DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, A C; Kim, S H; Wells, J A

    1994-05-17

    We have used random mutagenesis and phage display to alter the DNA-binding specificity of Zif268, a transcription factor that contains three zinc finger domains. Four residues in the helix of finger 1 of Zif268 that potentially mediate DNA binding were identified from an X-ray structure of the Zif268-DNA complex. A library was constructed in which these residues were randomly mutated and the Zif268 variants were fused to a truncated version of the gene III coat protein on the surface of M13 filamentous phage particles. The phage displayed the mutant proteins in a monovalent fashion and were sorted by repeated binding and elution from affinity matrices containing different DNA sequences. When the matrix contained the natural nine base pair operator sequence 5'-GCG-TGG-GCG-3', native-like zinc fingers were isolated. New finger 1 variants were found by sorting with two different operators in which the singly modified triplets, GTG and TCG, replaced the native finger 1 triplet, GCG. Overall, the selected finger 1 variants contained a preponderance of polar residues at the four sites. Interestingly, the net charge of the four residues in any selected finger never derived more that one unit from neutrality despite the fact that about half the variants contained three or four charged residues over the four sites. Measurements of the dissociation constants for two of these purified finger 1 variants by gel-shift assay showed their specificities to vary over a 10-fold range, with the greatest affinity being for the DNA binding site for which they were sorted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. New Finger Biometric Method Using Near Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eui Chul; Jung, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeoul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new finger biometric method. Infrared finger images are first captured, and then feature extraction is performed using a modified Gaussian high-pass filter through binarization, local binary pattern (LBP), and local derivative pattern (LDP) methods. Infrared finger images include the multimodal features of finger veins and finger geometries. Instead of extracting each feature using different methods, the modified Gaussian high-pass filter is fully convolved. Therefore, the extracted binary patterns of finger images include the multimodal features of veins and finger geometries. Experimental results show that the proposed method has an error rate of 0.13%. PMID:22163741

  9. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-01-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations. Images PMID:933109

  10. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-04-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations.

  11. Finger multibiometric cryptosystems: fusion strategy and template security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jialiang; Li, Qiong; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2014-03-01

    We address two critical issues in the design of a finger multibiometric system, i.e., fusion strategy and template security. First, three fusion strategies (feature-level, score-level, and decision-level fusions) with the corresponding template protection technique are proposed as the finger multibiometric cryptosystems to protect multiple finger biometric templates of fingerprint, finger vein, finger knuckle print, and finger shape modalities. Second, we theoretically analyze different fusion strategies for finger multibiometric cryptosystems with respect to their impact on security and recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of finger multibiometric cryptosystems at different fusion levels is investigated on a merged finger multimodal biometric database. The comparative results suggest that the proposed finger multibiometric cryptosystem at feature-level fusion outperforms other approaches in terms of verification performance and template security.

  12. Scattering Removal for Finger-Vein Image Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy. PMID:22737028

  13. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy.

  14. The Dof domain, a zinc finger DNA-binding domain conserved only in higher plants, truly functions as a Cys2/Cys2 Zn finger domain.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yoshimi; Ishiduka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Rie; Esaka, Muneharu

    2004-03-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are plant transcription factors that have a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, called the Dof domain. The Dof domain, which is composed of 52 amino acid residues, is similar to the Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain of GATA1 and steroid hormone receptors, but has a longer putative loop than that in the case of these zinc finger domains. The DNA-binding function of ascorbate oxidase gene binding protein (AOBP), a Dof protein, was investigated by gel retardation analysis. When Cys was replaced by His, the Dof domain could not function as a Cys3/His- or a Cys2/His2-type zinc finger. The characteristic longer loop was essential for DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, heavy metals such as Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the Dof domain. Manganese ion as well as zinc ion was coordinated by the Dof domain in vitro. On the other hand, the analysis using inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed that the Dof domain contained zinc ion but not manganese ion. Thus, the Dof domain was proved to function as a Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger domain.

  15. Krüppel-like factors: Three fingers in control

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Krüppel-like factors (KLFs), members of the zinc-finger family of transcription factors capable of binding GC-rich sequences, have emerged as critical regulators of important functions all over the body. They are characterised by a highly conserved C-terminal DNA-binding motif containing three C2H2 zinc-finger domains, with variable N-terminal regulatory domains. Currently, there are 17 KLFs annotated in the human genome. In spite of their structural similarity to one another, the genes encoding different KLFs are scattered all over the genome. By virtue of their ability to activate and/or repress the expression of a large number of genes, KLFs regulate a diverse array of developmental events and cellular processes, such as erythropoiesis, cardiac remodelling, adipogenesis, maintenance of stem cells, epithelial barrier formation, control of cell proliferation and neoplasia, flow-mediated endothelial gene expression, skeletal and smooth muscle development, gluconeogenesis, monocyte activation, intestinal and conjunctival goblet cell development, retinal neuronal regeneration and neonatal lung development. Characteristic features, nomenclature, evolution and functional diversities of the human KLFs are reviewed here. PMID:20511139

  16. Rehabilitation of single finger amputation with customized silicone prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Niharika; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Finger amputations are common in accidents at home, work, and play. Apart from trauma, congenital disease and deformity also leads to finger amputation. This results in loss of function, loss of sensation as well as loss of body image. Finger prosthesis offers psychological support and social acceptance in such cases. This clinical report describes a method to fabricate ring retained silicone finger prosthesis in a patient with partial finger loss. PMID:28163487

  17. Global analysis of Drosophila Cys2-His2 zinc finger proteins reveals a multitude of novel recognition motifs and binding determinants

    PubMed Central

    Enuameh, Metewo Selase; Asriyan, Yuna; Richards, Adam; Christensen, Ryan G.; Hall, Victoria L.; Kazemian, Majid; Zhu, Cong; Pham, Hannah; Cheng, Qiong; Blatti, Charles; Brasefield, Jessie A.; Basciotta, Matthew D.; Ou, Jianhong; McNulty, Joseph C.; Zhu, Lihua J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Sinha, Saurabh; Stormo, Gary D.; Brodsky, Michael H.; Wolfe, Scot A.

    2013-01-01

    Cys2-His2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) are the largest group of transcription factors in higher metazoans. A complete characterization of these ZFPs and their associated target sequences is pivotal to fully annotate transcriptional regulatory networks in metazoan genomes. As a first step in this process, we have characterized the DNA-binding specificities of 129 zinc finger sets from Drosophila using a bacterial one-hybrid system. This data set contains the DNA-binding specificities for at least one encoded ZFP from 70 unique genes and 23 alternate splice isoforms representing the largest set of characterized ZFPs from any organism described to date. These recognition motifs can be used to predict genomic binding sites for these factors within the fruit fly genome. Subsets of fingers from these ZFPs were characterized to define their orientation and register on their recognition sequences, thereby allowing us to define the recognition diversity within this finger set. We find that the characterized fingers can specify 47 of the 64 possible DNA triplets. To confirm the utility of our finger recognition models, we employed subsets of Drosophila fingers in combination with an existing archive of artificial zinc finger modules to create ZFPs with novel DNA-binding specificity. These hybrids of natural and artificial fingers can be used to create functional zinc finger nucleases for editing vertebrate genomes. PMID:23471540

  18. A zinc finger protein from Candida albicans is involved in sucrose utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, R; Kwon-Chung, K J

    1992-01-01

    A sucrose-inducible alpha-glucosidase activity that hydrolyzes sucrose in Candida albicans has been demonstrated previously. The enzyme is assayable in whole cells and was inhibited by both sucrose and maltose. A C. albicans gene (CASUC1) that affects sucrose utilization and alpha-glucosidase activity was cloned by expression in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae suc2 mutant (2102) devoid of invertase genes. CASUC1 enabled the S. cerevisiae mutant to utilize both sucrose and maltose. DNA sequence analysis revealed that CASUC1 encodes a putative zinc finger-containing protein with 28% identity to a maltose-regulatory gene (MAL63) of S. cerevisiae. The gene products of CASUC1 and MAL63 are approximately the same size (501 and 470 amino acids, respectively), and each contains a single zinc finger located at the N terminus. The zinc fingers of CASUC1 and MAL63 comprise six conserved cysteines (C6 zinc finger) and are of the general form Cys-Xaa2-Cys-Xaa6-Cys-Xaavariable-Cys-Xaa2-Cys-+ ++Xaa6-Cys (where Xaan indicates a stretch of the indicated number of any amino acids). Both contain five amino acids in the variable region. CASUC1 also complemented the maltose utilization defect of an S. cerevisiae mutant (TCY-137) containing a defined mutation in a maltose-regulatory gene. The sucrose utilization defect of type II Candida stellatoidea, a sucrase-negative mutant of C. albicans, was corrected by CASUC1. Determinations of alpha-glucosidase activity in whole cells revealed that activity was restored in transformants cultivated on either sucrose or maltose. To our knowledge, this is the first zinc finger-encoding gene, as well as the first putative regulatory gene, to be identified in C. albicans. Images PMID:1729210

  19. A syndrome of facial dysmorphism, cubital pterygium, short distal phalanges, swan neck deformity of fingers, and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Girisha, Katta M; Abdollahpour, Hengameh; Shah, Hitesh; Bhavani, Gandham Srilakshmi; Graham, John M; Boggula, Vijay Raju; Phadke, Shubha R; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2014-04-01

    We report on an adolescent girl with sparse scalp hair, wide columella extending below alae nasi, webbing at elbows, broad finger tips, short distal phalanx of fingers, swan neck deformity of fingers, scoliosis, tall vertebrae, short fibulae, short fourth metatarsal bone, abnormal distal humeri, and unilateral clubfoot at birth. The combination of these features represents a novel phenotype. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of the FLNA and FLNB genes and did not observe any pathogenic sequence variation. Chromosomal microarray revealed a de novo copy number variation of uncertain clinical significance on 7p22.3.

  20. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-08-20

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously.

  1. Exploring the DNA-binding specificities of zinc fingers with DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Huang, Xiaohua; Choo, Yen; Church, George M.

    2001-01-01

    A key step in the regulation of networks that control gene expression is the sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to their DNA recognition sites. A more complete understanding of these DNA–protein interactions will permit a more comprehensive and quantitative mapping of the regulatory pathways within cells, as well as a deeper understanding of the potential functions of individual genes regulated by newly identified DNA-binding sites. Here we describe a DNA microarray-based method to characterize sequence-specific DNA recognition by zinc-finger proteins. A phage display library, prepared by randomizing critical amino acid residues in the second of three fingers of the mouse Zif268 domain, provided a rich source of zinc-finger proteins with variant DNA-binding specificities. Microarrays containing all possible 3-bp binding sites for the variable zinc fingers permitted the quantitation of the binding site preferences of the entire library, pools of zinc fingers corresponding to different rounds of selection from this library, as well as individual Zif268 variants that were isolated from the library by using specific DNA sequences. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays for genome-wide identification of putative transcription factor-binding sites. PMID:11404456

  2. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  3. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record ‘three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals. PMID:25366032

  4. Individual variability in finger-to-finger transmission efficiency of Enterococcus faecium clones

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Sánchez-Díaz, Ana María; Zamora, Javier; Torres, Carmen; Cintas, Luis María; Franco, Elvira; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A fingertip-to-fingertip intraindividual transmission experiment was carried out in 30 healthy volunteers, using four MLST-typed Enterococcus faecium clones. Overall results showed an adequate fit goodness to a theoretical exponential model, whereas four volunteers (13%) exhibited a significantly higher finger-to-finger bacterial transmission efficiency. This observation might have deep consequences in nosocomial epidemiology. PMID:24382843

  5. Design and preliminary evaluation of the FINGER rehabilitation robot: controlling challenge and quantifying finger individuation during musical computer game play

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), a device for assisting in finger rehabilitation after neurologic injury. We developed FINGER to assist stroke patients in moving their fingers individually in a naturalistic curling motion while playing a game similar to Guitar Hero®a. The goal was to make FINGER capable of assisting with motions where precise timing is important. Methods FINGER consists of a pair of stacked single degree-of-freedom 8-bar mechanisms, one for the index and one for the middle finger. Each 8-bar mechanism was designed to control the angle and position of the proximal phalanx and the position of the middle phalanx. Target positions for the mechanism optimization were determined from trajectory data collected from 7 healthy subjects using color-based motion capture. The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths. For initial evaluation, we asked individuals with a stroke (n = 16) and without impairment (n = 4) to play a game similar to Guitar Hero® while connected to FINGER. Results Precision design, low friction bearings, and separate high speed linear actuators allowed FINGER to individually actuate the fingers with a high bandwidth of control (−3 dB at approximately 8 Hz). During the tests, we were able to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game by automatically adjusting the controller gains of FINGER. We also used FINGER to measure subjects’ effort and finger individuation while playing the game. Conclusions Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:24495432

  6. Loss of MLL PHD-finger-3 is necessary for MLL-ENL-induced hematopoietic stem cell immortalization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Santillan, Donna A.; Koonce, Mark; Wei, Wei; Luo, Roger; Thirman, Michael J.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2009-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations at the MLL gene locus result in expression of novel fusion proteins such as MLL-ENL associated with leukemia. The three PHD finger cassette, one of the highly conserved domains in MLL, is absent in all fusion proteins. This domain has been shown to interact with Cyp33, a cyclophilin which enhances the recruitment of HDACs to the MLL repression domain and mediates HOX gene repression. Insertion of the third PHD finger of MLL, into MLL-ENL allows the recruitment of Cyp33, and subsequently HDAC1, to the fusion protein. Furthermore, expression of the fusion protein with the PHD finger insertion mediates the down-regulation of the HOXC8 gene expression in a Cyp33 dependent manner. Finally, the addition of the PHD finger domain or the 3rd PHD finger alone, into MLL-ENL, blocks the hematopoietic-stem-cell immortalization potential of the fusion protein in serial plating colony assays. Insertion of only the 1st and 2nd PHD fingers has no such effect. These data support the hypothesis that the binding of Cyp33 to the MLL 3rd PHD finger switches the MLL function from trans-activation to repression. In the immortalizing MLL fusion protein, the loss of the PHD fingers, in combination with the gain of the activation domain of ENL, or of other partner proteins, makes the fusion protein a constitutive trans-activator. This leads to constitutive over expression of MLL target genes that block stem cell commitment and promote stem cell renewal, probably the first step in MLL-related leukemogenesis. PMID:18676843

  7. Loss of MLL PHD finger 3 is necessary for MLL-ENL-induced hematopoietic stem cell immortalization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Santillan, Donna A; Koonce, Mark; Wei, Wei; Luo, Roger; Thirman, Michael J; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J; Diaz, Manuel O

    2008-08-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations at the MLL gene locus result in expression of novel fusion proteins, such as MLL-ENL, associated with leukemia. The three PHD finger cassette, one of the highly conserved domains in MLL, is absent in all fusion proteins. This domain has been shown to interact with Cyp33, a cyclophilin which enhances the recruitment of histone deacetylases (HDAC) to the MLL repression domain and mediates HOX gene repression. Insertion of the third PHD finger of MLL into MLL-ENL allows the recruitment of Cyp33 and, subsequently, HDAC1 to the fusion protein. Furthermore, expression of the fusion protein with the PHD finger insertion mediates the down-regulation of the HOXC8 gene expression in a Cyp33-dependent manner. Finally, the addition of the PHD finger domain or the third PHD finger alone into MLL-ENL blocks the hematopoietic stem cell immortalization potential of the fusion protein in serial plating colony assays. Insertion of only the first and second PHD fingers has no such effect. These data support the hypothesis that the binding of Cyp33 to the MLL third PHD finger switches the MLL function from transactivation to repression. In the immortalizing MLL fusion protein, the loss of the PHD fingers, in combination with the gain of the activation domain of ENL or of other partner proteins, makes the fusion protein a constitutive transactivator. This leads to constitutive overexpression of MLL target genes that block stem cell commitment and promote stem cell renewal, probably the first step in MLL-related leukemogenesis.

  8. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  9. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    PubMed Central

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense. PMID:25852582

  10. Zinc transfer from transcription factor IIIA fingers to thionein clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, J; Vallee, B L; Kägi, J H

    1991-01-01

    The rapid induction of thionein (apometallothionein) by many endogenous stimuli such as steroid hormones, cytokines, and second messengers suggests that this cysteine-rich, metal binding protein participates in an as yet undefined role in cellular regulatory processes. This study demonstrates with DNA and RNA binding assays and in vitro transcription measurements that thionein suppresses the binding of the Xenopus laevis zinc finger transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) to 5S RNA and to the 5S RNA gene and abrogates the capacity of TFIIIA to initiate the RNA polymerase III-catalyzed synthesis of 5S RNA. The effect is reversed by the addition of zinc and is not observed in the TFIIIA-independent transcription of a tRNA gene by the same RNA polymerase. In view of the strong tendency of thionein to complex posttransition metals such as zinc, one effect of its enhanced synthesis in vivo could be to reduce the intracellular disposability of zinc and thus modulate the actions of zinc-dependent enzymes and proteins, most notably those of the zinc finger transcription factors. Images PMID:1835092

  11. Blood pressure measurement using finger cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choi, E; Jeong, H; Kim, K; Park, J

    2005-01-01

    Many research groups have studied blood pressure measurement in finger artery because of its convenience. But, low accuracy prohibits many hypertension patients from using this device. So, we suggest measurement algorithm that measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure in finger artery. And we also develop calibration method that decreases the error from difference of finger circumference by subjects. We apply our methods for 90 subjects (age form 20 to 49, 55 male, 35 female) to test feasibility of our method by AAMI SP10 standard. The mean difference of our system is ±4.7mmHg for systolic pressure, ±4.2mmHg for systolic pressure. It proved that the feasibility of our method is clinically acceptable.(under ±5mmHg).

  12. Association studies and gene expression analyses of the DISC1-interacting molecules, pericentrin 2 (PCNT2) and DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ), with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Anitha, Ayyappan; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Takei, Nori; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Kawai, Masayoshi; Thanseem, Ismail; Miyoshi, Ko; Katayama, Taiichi; Matsuzaki, Shinsuke; Baba, Kousuke; Honda, Akiko; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Shoko; Kumamoto, Natsuko; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Tohyama, Masaya; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Mori, Norio

    2009-10-05

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and its molecular cascade have been implicated in the pathophysiology of major psychoses. Previously, we identified pericentrin 2 (PCNT2) and DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ) as binding partners of DISC1; further, we observed elevated expression of PCNT2 in the postmortem brains and in the lymphocytes of bipolar disorder patients, compared to controls. Here, we examined the association of PCNT2 with schizophrenia in a case-control study of Japanese cohorts. We also examined the association of DBZ with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder, and compared the mRNA levels of DBZ in the postmortem brains of schizophrenia, bipolar and control samples. DNA from 180 schizophrenia patients 201 controls were used for the association study of PCNT2 and DBZ with schizophrenia. Association of DBZ with bipolar disorder was examined in DNA from 238 bipolar patients and 240 age- and gender-matched controls. We observed significant allelic and genotypic associations of the PCNT2 SNPs, rs2249057, rs2268524, and rs2073380 (Ser/Arg) with schizophrenia; the association of rs2249057 (P = 0.002) withstand multiple testing correction. Several two SNP- and three SNP-haplotypes showed significant associations; the associations of haplotypes involving rs2249057 withstand multiple testing correction. No associations were observed for DBZ with schizophrenia or with bipolar disorder; further, there was no significant difference between the DBZ mRNA levels of control, schizophrenia and bipolar postmortem brains. We suggest a possible role of PCNT2 in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Abnormalities of PCNT2, the centrosomal protein essential for microtubule organization, may be suggested to lead to neurodevelopmental abnormalities.

  13. Finger forces in fastball baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi; Nasu, Daiki; Kadota, Koji; Matsuo, Tomoyuki; Fleisig, Glenn S

    2017-08-01

    Forces imparted by the fingers onto a baseball are the final, critical aspects for pitching, however these forces have not been quantified previously as no biomechanical technology was available. In this study, an instrumented baseball was developed for direct measurement of ball reaction force by individual fingers and used to provide fundamental information on the forces during a fastball pitch. A tri-axial force transducer with a cable having an easily-detachable connector were installed in an official baseball. Data were collected from 11 pitchers who placed the fingertip of their index, middle, ring, or thumb on the transducer, and threw four-seam fastballs to a target cage from a flat mound. For the index and middle fingers, resultant ball reaction force exhibited a bimodal pattern with initial and second peaks at 38-39ms and 6-7ms before ball release, and their amplitudes were around 97N each. The ring finger and thumb produced single-peak forces of approximately 50 and 83N, respectively. Shear forces for the index and middle fingers formed distinct peak at 4-5ms before release, and the peaks summed to 102N; a kinetic source for backspin on the ball. An additional experiment with submaximal pitching effort showed a linear relationship of peak forces with ball velocity. The peak ball reaction force for fastballs exceeded 80% of maximum finger strength measured, suggesting that strengthening of the distal muscles is important both for enhancing performance and for avoiding injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Finger recognition and gesture imitation in Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moro, V; Pernigo, S; Urgesi, C; Zapparoli, P; Aglioti, S M

    2008-01-01

    We report the association between finger agnosia and gesture imitation deficits in a right-handed, right-hemisphere damaged patient with Gerstmann's syndrome (GS), a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by finger and toe agnosia, left-right disorientation and dyscalculia. No language deficits were found. The patient showed a gestural imitation deficit that specifically involved finger movements and postures. The association between finger recognition and imitation deficits suggests that both static and dynamic aspects of finger representations are impaired in GS. We suggest that GS is a disorder of body representation that involves hands and fingers, that is, the non-facial body parts most involved in social interactions.

  15. Solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in protein FON

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Umehara, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The zinc finger HIT domain is a sequence motif found in many proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 3 (TRIP-3), which is possibly involved in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Novel zinc finger motifs are suggested to play important roles in gene regulation and chromatin remodeling. Here, we determined the high-resolution solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in ZNHIT2 (protein FON) from Homo sapiens, by an NMR method based on 567 upper distance limits derived from NOE intensities measured in three-dimensional NOESY spectra. The structure yielded a backbone RMSD to the mean coordinates of 0.19 Å for the structured residues 12–48. The fold consists of two consecutive antiparallel β-sheets and two short C-terminal helices packed against the second β-sheet, and binds two zinc ions. Both zinc ions are coordinated tetrahedrally via a CCCC-CCHC motif to the ligand residues of the zf-HIT domain in an interleaved manner. The tertiary structure of the zinc finger HIT domain closely resembles the folds of the B-box, RING finger, and PHD domains with a cross-brace zinc coordination mode, but is distinct from them. The unique three-dimensional structure of the zinc finger HIT domain revealed a novel zinc-binding fold, as a new member of the treble clef domain family. On the basis of the structural data, we discuss the possible functional roles of the zinc finger HIT domain. PMID:17656577

  16. Finger tapping in musicians and nonmusicians.

    PubMed

    Franĕk, M; Mates, J; Radil, T; Beck, K; Pöppel, E

    1991-12-01

    Timing plays an important role in perceiving and performing music. Finger tapping has been successfully used for analyzing timing processes (Fraisse, 1966, Franĕk et al., 1987, 1988). The aim of this study is to determine differences between musically trained and untrained subjects in their ability to follow repetitive rhythmic tonal patterns by finger tapping. It has been found previously (Povel, 1981; Smith, 1983) that time estimation differs among musicians and nonmusicians under certain conditions. The results presented here show that motor timing revealed by tapping is more accurate in musicians than in nonmusicians.

  17. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  18. Fluctuation of biological rhythm in finger tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, H.; Miyazima, S.; Mitake, S.

    2000-06-01

    By analyzing biological rhythms obtained from finger tapping, we have investigated the differences of two biological rhythms between healthy and handicapped persons caused by Parkinson, brain infraction, car accident and so on. In this study, we have observed the motion of handedness of all subjects and obtained a slope a which characterizes a power-law relation between frequency and amplitude of finger-tapping rhythm. From our results, we have estimated that the slope a=0.06 is a rough criterion in order to distinguish healthy and handicapped persons.

  19. Density fingering of an exothermic autocatalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Bánsági, T; Horváth, D; Tóth, A; Yang, J; Kalliadasis, S; De Wit, A

    2003-11-01

    Density fingering of exothermic autocatalytic fronts in vertically oriented porous media and Hele-Shaw cells is studied theoretically for chemical reactions where the solutal and thermal contribution to density changes have opposite signs. The competition between these two effects leads to thermal plumes for ascending fronts. The descending fronts behave strikingly differently as they can feature, for some values of the parameters, fingers of constant amplitude and wavelength. The differences between up and down going fronts are discussed in terms of dispersion curves and nonlinear dynamics. The theoretically predicted dispersion curves are experimentally evidenced with the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction.

  20. Solitary plasmacytoma of the index finger.

    PubMed

    Daneshbod, Yahya; Nowshadi, Pooria Ali; Negahban, Shahrzad; Aledavood, Azita; Ramzi, Mani; Fanaie, Sara; Bedayat, Gholamreza; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Solitary osseous plasmacytoma rarely involves the distal extremities. We report a case and provide a brief review of the relevant literature. We report a 64-year-old man who presented with swelling, mild pain and a deformed right index finger. The workup led to the diagnosis of solitary osseous plasmacytoma and the patient eventually required amputation of his finger. With clinical follow-up, the disease spread to regional lymph nodes and subsequently the patient developed systemic involvement and received chemotherapy. Solitary osseous plasmacytoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of distal extremity neoplasms.

  1. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  2. EOR-2 is an obligate binding partner of the BTB-zinc finger protein EOR-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Howell, Kelly; Arur, Swathi; Schedl, Tim; Sundaram, Meera V

    2010-04-01

    BTB-zinc finger transcription factors play many important roles in metazoan development. In these proteins, the BTB domain is critical for dimerization and for recruiting cofactors to target genes. Identification of these cofactors is important for understanding how BTB-zinc finger proteins influence transcription. Here we show that the novel but conserved protein EOR-2 is an obligate binding partner of the BTB-zinc finger protein EOR-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans. EOR-1 and EOR-2 function together to promote multiple Ras/ERK-dependent cell fates during development, and we show that EOR-1 is a robust substrate of ERK in vitro. A point mutation (L81F) in the EOR-1 BTB domain reduces both ERK phosphorylation and EOR-2 binding and eliminates all detectable biological function without affecting EOR-1 expression levels, localization, or dimerization. This point mutation lies near the predicted charged pocket region of the EOR-1 BTB dimer, a region that, in other BTB-zinc finger proteins, has been proposed to interact with corepressors or coactivators. We also show that a conserved zinc finger-like motif in EOR-2 is required for binding to EOR-1, that the interaction between EOR-1 and EOR-2 is direct, and that EOR-2 can bind to the human BTB-zinc finger protein PLZF. We propose that EOR-2 defines a new family of cofactors for BTB-zinc finger transcription factors that may have conserved roles in other organisms.

  3. EOR-2 Is an Obligate Binding Partner of the BTB–Zinc Finger Protein EOR-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Howell , Kelly; Arur , Swathi; Schedl , Tim; Sundaram , Meera V.

    2010-01-01

    BTB-zinc finger transcription factors play many important roles in metazoan development. In these proteins, the BTB domain is critical for dimerization and for recruiting cofactors to target genes. Identification of these cofactors is important for understanding how BTB-zinc finger proteins influence transcription. Here we show that the novel but conserved protein EOR-2 is an obligate binding partner of the BTB-zinc finger protein EOR-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans. EOR-1 and EOR-2 function together to promote multiple Ras/ERK-dependent cell fates during development, and we show that EOR-1 is a robust substrate of ERK in vitro. A point mutation (L81F) in the EOR-1 BTB domain reduces both ERK phosphorylation and EOR-2 binding and eliminates all detectable biological function without affecting EOR-1 expression levels, localization, or dimerization. This point mutation lies near the predicted charged pocket region of the EOR-1 BTB dimer, a region that, in other BTB-zinc finger proteins, has been proposed to interact with corepressors or coactivators. We also show that a conserved zinc finger-like motif in EOR-2 is required for binding to EOR-1, that the interaction between EOR-1 and EOR-2 is direct, and that EOR-2 can bind to the human BTB-zinc finger protein PLZF. We propose that EOR-2 defines a new family of cofactors for BTB-zinc finger transcription factors that may have conserved roles in other organisms. PMID:20065070

  4. Double-V block fingers with cruciform recess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.

    1993-01-01

    In a robot having a gripper including a pair of fingers and a drive motor for driving the fingers toward and away from one another while the fingers remain parallel to each other, the fingers consist of finger pads, which interface with a handle on an object to be grasped, and a shank, which attaches the fingers to the robot gripper. The double-V finger has two orthogonal V-grooves forming in the center of the finger pads and recessed cruciform. The double-V finger is used with a handle on the object to be grasped which is the negative of the finger pads. The handle face consists of V-shaped pads capped with a rectangular cruciform. As the gripper is brought into place near the handle, the finger pads are lined up facing the handle pads. When the finger pad and the handle pad are in proper alignment, the rectangular ridges on the handle fall inside the rectangular grooves on the finger, and the grip is complete.

  5. Insights using the molecular model of Lipoxygenase from Finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L.))

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipoxygenase-1 (LOX-1) protein provides defense against pests and pathogens and its presence have been positively correlated with plant resistance against pathogens. Linoleate is a known substrate of lipoxygenase and it induces necrosis leading to the accumulation of isoflavonoid phytoalexins in plant leaves. Therefore, it is of interest to study the structural features of LOX-1 from Finger millet. However, the structure ofLOX-1 from Finger millet is not yet known. A homology model of LOX-1 from Finger millet is described. Domain architecture study suggested the presence of two domains namely PLAT (Phospho Lipid Acyl Transferase) and lipoxygenase. Molecular docking models of linoleate with lipoxygenase from finger millet, rice and sorghum are reported. The features of docked models showed that finger millet have higher pathogen resistance in comparison to other cereal crops. This data is useful for the molecular cloning of fulllength LOX-1 gene for validating its role in improving plant defense against pathogen infection and for various other biological processes. PMID:28149050

  6. High-frequency homologous recombination in plants mediated by zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wright, David A; Townsend, Jeffrey A; Winfrey, Ronnie Joe; Irwin, Phillip A; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Lonosky, Patricia M; Hall, Bradford D; Jondle, Michael D; Voytas, Daniel F

    2005-11-01

    Homologous recombination offers great promise for plant genome engineering. This promise has not been realized, however, because when DNA enters plant cells homologous recombination occurs infrequently and random integration predominates. Using a tobacco test system, we demonstrate that chromosome breaks created by zinc-finger nucleases greatly enhance the frequency of localized recombination. Homologous recombination was measured by restoring function to a defective GUS:NPTII reporter gene integrated at various chromosomal sites in 10 different transgenic tobacco lines. The reporter gene carried a recognition site for a zinc-finger nuclease, and protoplasts from each tobacco line were electroporated with both DNA encoding the nuclease and donor DNA to effect repair of the reporter. Homologous recombination occurred in more than 10% of the transformed protoplasts regardless of the reporter's chromosomal position. Approximately 20% of the GUS:NPTII reporter genes were repaired solely by homologous recombination, whereas the remainder had associated DNA insertions or deletions consistent with repair by both homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. The DNA-binding domain encoded by zinc-finger nucleases can be engineered to recognize a variety of chromosomal target sequences. This flexibility, coupled with the enhancement in homologous recombination conferred by double-strand breaks, suggests that plant genome engineering through homologous recombination can now be reliably accomplished using zinc-finger nucleases.

  7. DUF581 Is Plant Specific FCS-Like Zinc Finger Involved in Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction. PMID:24901469

  8. A small protein from the bop–brp intergenic region of Halobacterium salinarum contains a zinc finger motif and regulates bop and crtB1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Valery Y; Besir, Hüseyin; Schwaiger, Rita; Klee, Kathrin; Furtwängler, Katarina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, the photosynthetic protein of Halobacterium salinarum, is optimally expressed under anaerobic growth conditions. We identified Brz (OE3104F, bacteriorhodopsin-regulating zinc finger protein), a new regulator of the bop gene. It is a small protein with a zinc finger motif, encoded directly upstream of the bop gene in the same orientation. Deletion of the brz gene caused a large decrease of bop mRNA levels as shown by Northern blot and microarray analysis. A similar effect was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of Cys and His residues in the zinc finger motif, indicating the importance of this motif for the function of the protein. In silico analysis of the genomes from H. salinarum and other archaea revealed a large family of similar small zinc finger motif proteins, some of which may also be involved in transcription regulation of their adjacent genes. PMID:18179416

  9. A small protein from the bop-brp intergenic region of Halobacterium salinarum contains a zinc finger motif and regulates bop and crtB1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Valery Y; Besir, Hüseyin; Schwaiger, Rita; Klee, Kathrin; Furtwängler, Katarina; Pfeiffer, Friedhelm; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2008-02-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, the photosynthetic protein of Halobacterium salinarum, is optimally expressed under anaerobic growth conditions. We identified Brz (OE3104F, bacteriorhodopsin-regulating zinc finger protein), a new regulator of the bop gene. It is a small protein with a zinc finger motif, encoded directly upstream of the bop gene in the same orientation. Deletion of the brz gene caused a large decrease of bop mRNA levels as shown by Northern blot and microarray analysis. A similar effect was obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of Cys and His residues in the zinc finger motif, indicating the importance of this motif for the function of the protein. In silico analysis of the genomes from H. salinarum and other archaea revealed a large family of similar small zinc finger motif proteins, some of which may also be involved in transcription regulation of their adjacent genes.

  10. Compact Tactile Sensors for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.; Lussy, David; Gaudiano, Frank; Hulse, Aaron; Diftler, Myron A.; Rodriguez, Dagoberto; Bielski, Paul; Butzer, Melisa

    2004-01-01

    Compact transducer arrays that measure spatial distributions of force or pressure have been demonstrated as prototypes of tactile sensors to be mounted on fingers and palms of dexterous robot hands. The pressure- or force-distribution feedback provided by these sensors is essential for the further development and implementation of robot-control capabilities for humanlike grasping and manipulation.

  11. PN 2017-24: Finger Lakes LPG

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Finger Lakes LPG Storage, LLC; Two Brush Creek Blvd, Suite 200; Kansas City; Missouri 64112 (Applicant) has applied to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f et. seq (the Act), for

  12. Viscous fingering of HCI through gastric mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, K. Ramakrishnan; Garik, Peter; Turner, Bradley S.; Bradley, James Douglas; Bansil, Rama; Stanley, H. Eugene; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1992-12-01

    THE HCI in the mammalian stomach is concentrated enough to digest the stomach itself, yet the gastric epithelium remains undamaged. One protective factor is gastric mucus, which forms a protective layer over the surface epithelium1-4 and acts as a diffusion barrier5,6 Bicarbonate ions secreted by the gastric epithelium7 are trapped in the mucus gel, establishing a gradient from pH 1-2 at the lumen to pH 6-7 at the cell surface8-10. How does HCI, secreted at the base of gastric glands by parietal cells, traverse the mucus layer without acidifying it? Here we demonstrate that injection of HCI through solutions of pig gastric mucin produces viscous fingering patterns11-18 dependent on pH, mucin concentration and acid flow rate. Above pH 4, discrete fingers are observed, whereas below pH 4, HCI neither penetrates the mucin solution nor forms fingers. Our in vitro results suggest that HCI secreted by the gastric gland can penetrate the mucus gel layer (pH 5-7) through narrow fingers, whereas HC1 in the lumen (pH 2) is prevented from diffusing back to the epithelium by the high viscosity of gastric mucus gel on the luminal side.

  13. Fingering and fracturing in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Holtzman, R.; Szulczewski, M.

    2012-12-01

    Here, we describe the phenomenon of capillary fracturing in granular media. We study the displacement of immiscible fluids in deformable, non-cohesive granular media. Experimentally, we inject air into a thin bed of water-saturated glass beads and observe the invasion morphology. The control parameters are the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. We identify three invasion regimes: capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and "capillary fracturing", where capillary forces overcome frictional resistance and induce the opening of conduits. We derive two dimensionless numbers that govern the transition among the different regimes: a modified capillary number and a fracturing number. The experiments and analysis predict the emergence of fracturing in fine-grained media under low confining stress, a phenomenon that likely plays a fundamental role in many natural processes such as primary oil migration, methane venting from lake sediments, and the formation of desiccation cracks.Examples of experimentally observed patterns. We classify these patterns into three regimes: viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and fracturing.

  14. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  15. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  16. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  17. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  18. Prediction of zinc finger DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K

    1995-04-01

    Using the neural network algorithm with back-propagation training procedure, we analysed the zinc finger DNA binding protein sequences. We incorporated the characteristic patterns around the zinc finger motifs TFIIIA type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-13-His-X2-5-His) and the steroid hormone receptor type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-15-Cys-X2-5-Cys-X15-16-Cys-X4-5-Cys-X8-10- Cys-X2-3-Cys) in the neural network algorithm. The patterns used in the neural network were the amino acid pattern, the electric charge and polarity pattern, the side-chain chemical property and subproperty patterns, the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity patterns and the secondary structure propensity pattern. Two consecutive patterns were also considered. Each pattern was incorporated in the single layer perceptron algorithm and the combinations of patterns were considered in the two-layer perceptron algorithm. As for the TFIIIA type zinc finger DNA binding motifs, the prediction results of the two-layer perceptron algorithm reached up to 96.9% discrimination, and the prediction results of the discriminant analysis using the combination of several characters reached up to 97.0%. As for the steroid hormone receptor type zinc finger, the prediction results of neural network algorithm and the discriminant analyses reached up to 96.0%.

  19. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products.

  20. Transdermal anaesthesia for percutaneous trigger finger release.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transdermal anaesthesia using eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) in patients undergoing percutaneous trigger finger release and to compare it with lidocaine infiltration. In this prospective, randomised study percutaneous release of the A1 annular pulley was performed to treat stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger syndrome) in 50 patients (50 fingers). The procedure was performed either under transdermal anaesthesia using EMLA applied transcutaneously 120 minutes prior to the operation (Group A, n = 25) or using local infiltration anaesthesia using lidocaine (Group B, n = 25). Pain experienced during administration of anaesthesia and during the operation was assessed using a 10-point Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), while all patients rated the effectiveness of anaesthesia with a 5-point scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the VAPS during the operation (1.33 +/- 0.52 versus 1.59 +/- 0.87) and the satisfaction scores (4.6 +/- 0.2 versus 4.4 +/- 0.3). The VAPS score during the administration of anaesthesia was statistically significantly less in the EMLA group (0 versus 5.96 +/- 2.41). All patients were satisfied with the final result of the operation. Percutaneous trigger finger release can be performed as an office procedure with the use of EMLA avoiding the use of injectable local infiltration anaesthesia.

  1. Layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, J. F.; Garaud, P.; Alsinan, A.; Meiburg, E.

    2017-04-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at larger density ratios. It also gives rise to a new layering instability that exists in $\\gamma-$stable regimes. The former is likely quite ubiquitous in geophysical systems for sufficiently large settling velocities, while the latter probably grows too slowly to be relevant, at least in the context of sediments in water.

  2. Fingerspell: Let Your Fingers Do the Talking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarlatos, Tony; Nesterenko, Dmitri

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss an application that translates hand gestures of the American Sign Language (ASL) alphabet and converts them to text. The FingerSpell application addresses the communication barrier of the deaf and the hearing-impaired by eliminating the need for a third party with knowledge of the American Sign Language, allowing a user…

  3. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  4. Coriolis effects on fingering patterns under rotation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2008-08-01

    The development of immiscible viscous fingering patterns in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell is investigated. We focus on understanding how the time evolution and the resulting morphologies are affected by the action of the Coriolis force. The problem is approached analytically and numerically by employing a vortex sheet formalism. The vortex sheet strength and a linear dispersion relation are derived analytically, revealing that the most relevant Coriolis force contribution comes from the normal component of the averaged interfacial velocity. It is shown that this normal velocity, uniquely due to the presence of the Coriolis force, is responsible for the complex-valued nature of the linear dispersion relation making the linear phases vary with time. Fully nonlinear stages are studied through intensive numerical simulations. A suggestive interplay between inertial and viscous effects is found, which modifies the dynamics, leading to different pattern-forming structures. The inertial Coriolis contribution plays a characteristic role: it generates a phase drift by deviating the fingers in the sense opposite to the actual rotation of the cell. However, the direction and intensity of finger bending is predominantly determined by viscous effects, being sensitive to changes in the magnitude and sign of the viscosity contrast. The finger competition behavior at advanced time stages is also discussed.

  5. [Management of peripheral injuries of the finger].

    PubMed

    Wichelhaus, A

    2015-02-01

    The treatment of acute peripheral finger injuries is part of the daily routine of surgeons in emergency departments. This article presents the most common forms of peripheral finger injuries and the specific diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. The injuries include incision and tear injuries, injuries to the nailbed, distal extensor tendon injuries, severed flexor tendons of the distal joint, bite injuries, high-pressure injection injuries and amputation injuries of the distal phalanx of fingers. For the latter, the form, level and height of the amputation are decisive for therapy. Soft tissue defects on the extensor and flexor side of the finger are also common for emergency surgeons. The basic principles of the initial management of peripheral soft tissue injuries of the hand involve the reconstruction of tendons and nerves and soft tissue coverage. Pathogenic organisms are detectable in more than 80 % of bite wounds so that prophylaxis and therapy of infections are of special importance. An adjuvant antibiotic therapy is necessary for infections as well as for high-pressure injection injuries. It is also important for the treating physician to recognize when a hand surgeon must be involved.

  6. DELLA Proteins and Their Interacting RING Finger Proteins Repress Gibberellin Responses by Binding to the Promoters of a Subset of Gibberellin-Responsive Genes in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongmoo; Nguyen, Khoa Thi; Park, Eunae; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Choi, Giltsu

    2013-01-01

    DELLA proteins, consisting of GA INSENSITIVE, REPRESSOR OF GA1-3, RGA-LIKE1 (RGL1), RGL2, and RGL3, are central repressors of gibberellin (GA) responses, but their molecular functions are not fully understood. We isolated four DELLA-interacting RING domain proteins, previously designated as BOTRYTIS SUSCEPTIBLE1 INTERACTOR (BOI), BOI-RELATED GENE1 (BRG1), BRG2, and BRG3 (collectively referred to as BOIs). Single mutants of each BOI gene failed to significantly alter GA responses, but the boi quadruple mutant (boiQ) showed a higher seed germination frequency in the presence of paclobutrazol, precocious juvenile-to-adult phase transition, and early flowering, all of which are consistent with enhanced GA signaling. By contrast, BOI overexpression lines displayed phenotypes consistent with reduced GA signaling. Analysis of a gai-1 boiQ pentuple mutant further indicated that the GAI protein requires BOIs to inhibit a subset of GA responses. At the molecular level, BOIs did not significantly alter the stability of a DELLA protein. Instead, BOI and DELLA proteins are targeted to the promoters of a subset of GA-responsive genes and repress their expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the DELLA and BOI proteins inhibit GA responses by interacting with each other, binding to the same promoters of GA-responsive genes, and repressing these genes. PMID:23482857

  7. Robot-assisted Guitar Hero for finger rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (-3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n= 8) and without impairment (n= 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject's success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject's effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  10. Robot-Assisted Guitar Hero for Finger Rehabilitation after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B.; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Wolbrecht, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (−3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n = 8) and without impairment (n = 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject’s effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:23366783

  11. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  12. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  15. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  16. Targeted genome modification in mice using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Carbery, Iara D; Ji, Diana; Harrington, Anne; Brown, Victoria; Weinstein, Edward J; Liaw, Lucy; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2010-10-01

    Homologous recombination-based gene targeting using Mus musculus embryonic stem cells has greatly impacted biomedical research. This study presents a powerful new technology for more efficient and less time-consuming gene targeting in mice using embryonic injection of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which generate site-specific double strand breaks, leading to insertions or deletions via DNA repair by the nonhomologous end joining pathway. Three individual genes, multidrug resistant 1a (Mdr1a), jagged 1 (Jag1), and notch homolog 3 (Notch3), were targeted in FVB/N and C57BL/6 mice. Injection of ZFNs resulted in a range of specific gene deletions, from several nucleotides to >1000 bp in length, among 20-75% of live births. Modified alleles were efficiently transmitted through the germline, and animals homozygous for targeted modifications were obtained in as little as 4 months. In addition, the technology can be adapted to any genetic background, eliminating the need for generations of backcrossing to achieve congenic animals. We also validated the functional disruption of Mdr1a and demonstrated that the ZFN-mediated modifications lead to true knockouts. We conclude that ZFN technology is an efficient and convenient alternative to conventional gene targeting and will greatly facilitate the rapid creation of mouse models and functional genomics research.

  17. Targeted Genome Modification in Mice Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Carbery, Iara D.; Ji, Diana; Harrington, Anne; Brown, Victoria; Weinstein, Edward J.; Liaw, Lucy; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination-based gene targeting using Mus musculus embryonic stem cells has greatly impacted biomedical research. This study presents a powerful new technology for more efficient and less time-consuming gene targeting in mice using embryonic injection of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which generate site-specific double strand breaks, leading to insertions or deletions via DNA repair by the nonhomologous end joining pathway. Three individual genes, multidrug resistant 1a (Mdr1a), jagged 1 (Jag1), and notch homolog 3 (Notch3), were targeted in FVB/N and C57BL/6 mice. Injection of ZFNs resulted in a range of specific gene deletions, from several nucleotides to >1000 bp in length, among 20–75% of live births. Modified alleles were efficiently transmitted through the germline, and animals homozygous for targeted modifications were obtained in as little as 4 months. In addition, the technology can be adapted to any genetic background, eliminating the need for generations of backcrossing to achieve congenic animals. We also validated the functional disruption of Mdr1a and demonstrated that the ZFN-mediated modifications lead to true knockouts. We conclude that ZFN technology is an efficient and convenient alternative to conventional gene targeting and will greatly facilitate the rapid creation of mouse models and functional genomics research. PMID:20628038

  18. Targeting a truncated Ho-endonuclease of yeast to novel DNA sites with foreign zinc fingers.

    PubMed Central

    Nahon, E; Raveh, D

    1998-01-01

    Ho-endonuclease of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, initiates a mating type switch by making a site-specific double strand break in the mating type gene, MAT. Ho is a dodecamer endonuclease and shares six of the seven intein motifs with PI- Sce I endonuclease, an intein encod