Science.gov

Sample records for finger joint angle

  1. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Shrirao, Nikhil A; Reddy, Narender P; Kosuri, Durga R

    2009-01-01

    Background In virtual reality (VR) systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG together with the actual joint angle measurements were obtained while the subject was performing flexion-extension rotation of the index finger at three speeds. Several neural networks were trained to predict the joint angle from the parameters extracted from the SEMG signals. The best networks were selected to form six committees. The neural network committees were evaluated using data from new subjects. Results There was hysteresis in the measured SMEG signals during the flexion-extension cycle. However, neural network committees were able to predict the joint angle with reasonable accuracy. RMS errors ranged from 0.085 ± 0.036 for fast speed finger-extension to 0.147 ± 0.026 for slow speed finger extension, and from 0.098 ± 0.023 for the fast speed finger flexion to 0.163 ± 0.054 for slow speed finger flexion. Conclusion Although hysteresis was observed in the measured SEMG signals, the committees of neural networks were able to predict the finger joint angle from SEMG signals. PMID:19154615

  2. Finger-Jointed Wood Products.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    long enough to be useful (14, 36, 38, 59, 124). Nonstructural finger joints are primarily found in molding stock, trim, siding, fascia boards, door...all beams but two in series 7 and 8 to the grain. The average modulus of be slightly higher than that for apparently was related to the joints, rupture ...inch, and a tip thickness of combinations laminated by the plant . (a)A bolt hole on tensile strength 0.031 inch. The other was classified Straight-bevel

  3. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  9. [Periarthritis calcarea of the finger joints].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Goth, D

    1989-11-01

    Calcium deposits close to finger joints are seen very often and are common in systemic diseases. There are also calcium deposits with no relation to other symptoms and therefore diagnosis is difficult. Between 1984-1988 we have analysed twelve such cases and explained the differential diagnosis and therapy. It seems important that these cases with typical clinical and radiologic findings are self-limiting and restitutio ad integrum is common without any therapy.

  10. Experimental study of the optimal angle for arthrodesis of fingers based on kinematic analysis with tip-pinch manipulation.

    PubMed

    Arauz, Paul; Sisto, Sue Ann; Kao, Imin

    2016-12-08

    To evaluate the appropriate angle for arthrodesis of the index finger proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint, the functional range of motion (ROM) of the joints and manipulabilities at three selected tip-pinch manipulation postures of the finger were studied experimentally under imposed PIP joint arthrodesis angles. A kinematic model of the index finger was used in experiments which involved three postures. Experiments were conducted using seven healthy subjects in tip-pinch manipulation tasks to obtain the measurements of finger motions under imposed angles of joint constraint, including the functional ROM of the joints and the three criteria of kinematic manipulability. Data show that the functional ROM and the shape of the kinematic manipulability ellipses at the fingertip were influenced significantly by the imposed PIP joint constraint in the tip-pinch manipulation tests. Results suggest that a PIP arthrodesis angle between 40° and 60° led to the optimal performance of fingers in grasping and manipulation of fine objects. This theoretical and experimental study can help surgeons and clinicians to make more informed decisions on the appropriate constraint angles before the arthrodesis operation, and to customize this angle for individual patients in order to enhance not only the capability of manipulation of the finger but also the quality of life after such intervention.

  11. Raised-angle discrimination under passive finger movement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinglong; Yang, Jiajia; Ogasa, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of raised-line drawing discrimination can be defined as the sum of the discriminability of the length, curvature, and angles of the edges. The size of the angle between two edges constitutes an important feature of these tactile stimuli. In the first experiment, five standard angles (30 degrees, 60 degrees, 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 150 degrees) and twenty comparison angles for each standard angle were used to investigate the human capacity for tactile discrimination of raised angles by passive finger movement. The subjects in this study were asked to identify the larger angle of each pair by passive finger movement. We found that the threshold doubled when the standard angle was increased from 30 degrees to 90 degrees; however, the threshold remained unchanged when the standard angle was greater than 90 degrees. In the second experiment, to investigate the influence of the endpoints on angle discriminability, we used one standard angle (60 degrees) and seven comparison angles that changed in four bisector orientations. The results indicate that cutaneous feedback from the local apex and endpoints of the angle contributed to the discrimination of acute angles. Taken together, these results suggest that, when an acute angle is presented, both local apex and endpoint informations are used, while cutaneous mechanoreceptors rely more on apex information to discriminate the angle size when an obtuse angle is presented.

  12. Quantification of Finger-Tapping Angle Based on Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Djurić-Jovičić, Milica; Jovičić, Nenad S.; Roby-Brami, Agnes; Popović, Mirjana B.; Kostić, Vladimir S.; Djordjević, Antonije R.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel simple method for quantitative and qualitative finger-tapping assessment based on miniature inertial sensors (3D gyroscopes) placed on the thumb and index-finger. We propose a simplified description of the finger tapping by using a single angle, describing rotation around a dominant axis. The method was verified on twelve subjects, who performed various tapping tasks, mimicking impaired patterns. The obtained tapping angles were compared with results of a motion capture camera system, demonstrating excellent accuracy. The root-mean-square (RMS) error between the two sets of data is, on average, below 4°, and the intraclass correlation coefficient is, on average, greater than 0.972. Data obtained by the proposed method may be used together with scores from clinical tests to enable a better diagnostic. Along with hardware simplicity, this makes the proposed method a promising candidate for use in clinical practice. Furthermore, our definition of the tapping angle can be applied to all tapping assessment systems. PMID:28125051

  13. Quantification of Finger-Tapping Angle Based on Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Djurić-Jovičić, Milica; Jovičić, Nenad S; Roby-Brami, Agnes; Popović, Mirjana B; Kostić, Vladimir S; Djordjević, Antonije R

    2017-01-25

    We propose a novel simple method for quantitative and qualitative finger-tapping assessment based on miniature inertial sensors (3D gyroscopes) placed on the thumb and index-finger. We propose a simplified description of the finger tapping by using a single angle, describing rotation around a dominant axis. The method was verified on twelve subjects, who performed various tapping tasks, mimicking impaired patterns. The obtained tapping angles were compared with results of a motion capture camera system, demonstrating excellent accuracy. The root-mean-square (RMS) error between the two sets of data is, on average, below 4°, and the intraclass correlation coefficient is, on average, greater than 0.972. Data obtained by the proposed method may be used together with scores from clinical tests to enable a better diagnostic. Along with hardware simplicity, this makes the proposed method a promising candidate for use in clinical practice. Furthermore, our definition of the tapping angle can be applied to all tapping assessment systems.

  14. Sagittal laser optical tomography for imaging of rheumatoid finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Klose, Alexander D; Scheel, Alexander K; Moa-Anderson, Bryte; Backhaus, Marina; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2004-04-07

    We present a novel optical tomographic imaging system that was designed to determine two-dimensional spatial distribution of optical properties in a sagittal plane through finger joints. The system incorporates a single laser diode and a single silicon photodetector into a scanning device that records spatially resolved light intensities as they are transmitted through a finger. These data are input to a model-based iterative image reconstruction (MOBIIR) scheme, which uses the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) as a forward model for light propagation through tissue. We have used this system to obtain tomographic images of six proximal interphalangeal finger joints from two patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The optical images were compared to clinical symptoms and ultrasound images.

  15. Static hand gesture recognition based on finger root-center-angle and length weighted Mahalanobis distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinghao; Shi, Chenbo; Liu, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Static hand gesture recognition (HGR) has drawn increasing attention in computer vision and human-computer interaction (HCI) recently because of its great potential. However, HGR is a challenging problem due to the variations of gestures. In this paper, we present a new framework for static hand gesture recognition. Firstly, the key joints of the hand, including the palm center, the fingertips and finger roots, are located. Secondly, we propose novel and discriminative features called root-center-angles to alleviate the influence of the variations of gestures. Thirdly, we design a distance metric called finger length weighted Mahalanobis distance (FLWMD) to measure the dissimilarity of the hand gestures. Experiments demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and robustness of our proposed HGR framework.

  16. Automatic finger joint synovitis localization in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurzynska, Karolina; Smolka, Bogdan

    2016-04-01

    A long-lasting inflammation of joints results between others in many arthritis diseases. When not cured, it may influence other organs and general patients' health. Therefore, early detection and running proper medical treatment are of big value. The patients' organs are scanned with high frequency acoustic waves, which enable visualization of interior body structures through an ultrasound sonography (USG) image. However, the procedure is standardized, different projections result in a variety of possible data, which should be analyzed in short period of time by a physician, who is using medical atlases as a guidance. This work introduces an efficient framework based on statistical approach to the finger joint USG image, which enables automatic localization of skin and bone regions, which are then used for localization of the finger joint synovitis area. The processing pipeline realizes the task in real-time and proves high accuracy when compared to annotation prepared by the expert.

  17. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3220 - Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented... metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/polymer..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal... Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal... Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal... Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal... Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3200 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented... metal/metal constrained uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal... Administration on or before December 26, 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained uncemented...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3210 - Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented... metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint metal/metal constrained..., 1996 for any finger joint metal/metal constrained cemented prosthesis that was in...

  12. Frequency-domain optical tomographic imaging of arthritic finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Kim, Hyun Keol; Montejo, Ludguier D; Blaschke, Sabine; Netz, Uwe J; Zwaka, Paul A; Illing, Gerd; Muller, Gerhard A; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    We are presenting data from the largest clinical trial on optical tomographic imaging of finger joints to date. Overall we evaluated 99 fingers of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 120 fingers from healthy volunteers. Using frequency-domain imaging techniques we show that sensitivities and specificities of 0.85 and higher can be achieved in detecting RA. This is accomplished by deriving multiple optical parameters from the optical tomographic images and combining them for the statistical analysis. Parameters derived from the scattering coefficient perform slightly better than absorption derived parameters. Furthermore we found that data obtained at 600 MHz leads to better classification results than data obtained at 0 or 300 MHz.

  13. Globographic visualisation of three dimensional joint angles.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard

    2011-07-07

    Three different methods for describing three dimensional joint angles are commonly used in biomechanics. The joint coordinate system and Cardan/Euler angles are conceptually quite different but are known to represent the same underlying mathematics. More recently the globographic method has been suggested as an alternative and this has proved particularly attractive for the shoulder joint. All three methods can be implemented in a number of ways leading to a choice of angle definitions. Very recently Rab has demonstrated that the globographic method is equivalent to one implementation of the joint coordinate system. This paper presents a rigorous analysis of the three different methods and proves their mathematical equivalence. The well known sequence dependence of Cardan/Euler is presented as equivalent to configuration dependence of the joint coordinate system and orientation dependence of globographic angles. The precise definition of different angle sets can be easily visualised using the globographic method using analogues of longitude, latitude and surface bearings with which most users will already be familiar. The method implicitly requires one axis of the moving segment to be identified as its principal axis and this can be extremely useful in helping define the most appropriate angle set to describe the orientation of any particular joint. Using this technique different angle sets are considered to be most appropriate for different joints and examples of this for the hip, knee, ankle, pelvis and axial skeleton are outlined.

  14. Modeling the finger joint moments in a hand at the maximal isometric grip: the effects of friction.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Dong, Ren G; McDowell, Thomas W; Welcome, Daniel E

    2009-12-01

    The interaction between the handle and operator's hand affects the comfort and safety of tool and machine operations. In most of the previous studies, the investigators considered only the normal contact forces. The effect of friction on the joint moments in fingers has not been analyzed. Furthermore, the observed contact forces have not been linked to the internal musculoskeletal loading in the previous experimental studies. In the current study, we proposed a universal model of a hand to evaluate the joint moments in the fingers during grasping tasks. The hand model was developed on the platform of the commercial software package AnyBody. Only four fingers (index, long, ring, and little finger) were included in the model. The anatomical structure of each finger is comprised of four phalanges (distal, middle, proximal, and metacarpal phalange). The simulations were performed using an inverse dynamics technique. The joint angles and the normal contact forces on each finger section reported by previous researchers were used as inputs, while the joint moments of each finger were predicted. The predicted trends of the dependence of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint moments on the cylinder diameter agree with those of the contact forces on the fingers observed in the previous experimental study. Our results show that the DIP and PIP joint moments reach their maximums at a cylinder diameter of about 31mm, which is consistent with the trend of the finger contact forces measured in the experiments. The proposed approach will be useful for simulating musculoskeletal loading in the hand for occupational activities, thereby optimizing tool-handle design.

  15. Control and simulation of a three jointed finger

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, V.J.; Loucks, C.S.; Starr, G.P.; Steele, J.P.H.

    1986-01-01

    Improved dexterity is an area of current research in robotics. At Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico we are pursuing research in this area with the aid of a Stanford/JPL hand from Salisbury Robotics. In this paper we present some of the issues raised in studying the characteristics and control of a single finger of the dexterous hand. The issues we present are dynamic modeling, a friction model and its influence on joint control, and several approaches to controlling the hand including a model-based approach to decouple the joint dynamics and reduce the nonlinear frictional effects. We also discuss our present method for control and mention the direction of our future research.

  16. SU-E-T-171: Evaluation of the Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm in a Small Finger Joint Phantom Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J; Owrangi, A; Jiang, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the performance of the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) in dose calculation in radiotherapy concerning a small finger joint. Monte Carlo simulation (EGSnrc code) was used in this dosimetric evaluation. Methods: Heterogeneous finger joint phantom containing a vertical water layer (bone joint or cartilage) sandwiched by two bones with dimension 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3} was irradiated by the 6 MV photon beams (field size = 4 × 4 cm{sup 2}). The central beam axis was along the length of the bone joint and the isocenter was set to the center of the joint. The joint width and beam angle were varied from 0.5–2 mm and 0°–15°, respectively. Depth doses were calculated using the AAA and DOSXYZnrc. For dosimetric comparison and normalization, dose calculations were repeated in water phantom using the same beam geometry. Results: Our AAA and Monte Carlo results showed that the AAA underestimated the joint doses by 10%–20%, and could not predict joint dose variation with changes of joint width and beam angle. The calculated bone dose enhancement for the AAA was lower than Monte Carlo and the depth of maximum dose for the phantom was smaller than that for the water phantom. From Monte Carlo results, there was a decrease of joint dose as its width increased. This reflected the smaller the joint width, the more the bone scatter contributed to the depth dose. Moreover, the joint dose was found slightly decreased with an increase of beam angle. Conclusion: The AAA could not handle variations of joint dose well with changes of joint width and beam angle based on our finger joint phantom. Monte Carlo results showed that the joint dose decreased with increase of joint width and beam angle. This dosimetry comparison should be useful to radiation staff in radiotherapy related to small bone joint.

  17. Rubber hand illusion affects joint angle perception.

    PubMed

    Butz, Martin V; Kutter, Esther F; Lorenz, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    The Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) is a well-established experimental paradigm. It has been shown that the RHI can affect hand location estimates, arm and hand motion towards goals, the subjective visual appearance of the own hand, and the feeling of body ownership. Several studies also indicate that the peri-hand space is partially remapped around the rubber hand. Nonetheless, the question remains if and to what extent the RHI can affect the perception of other body parts. In this study we ask if the RHI can alter the perception of the elbow joint. Participants had to adjust an angular representation on a screen according to their proprioceptive perception of their own elbow joint angle. The results show that the RHI does indeed alter the elbow joint estimation, increasing the agreement with the position and orientation of the artificial hand. Thus, the results show that the brain does not only adjust the perception of the hand in body-relative space, but it also modifies the perception of other body parts. In conclusion, we propose that the brain continuously strives to maintain a consistent internal body image and that this image can be influenced by the available sensory information sources, which are mediated and mapped onto each other by means of a postural, kinematic body model.

  18. A Biomechanical Simulation of the Effect of the Extrinsic Flexor Muscles on Finger Joint Flexion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Ligaments will also contribute to stiffness as the joint approaches the limit of its range of motion. Synovial fluid surrounding the joint will...muscles cross the MCP joint than cross the DIP joint. Increases in damping may also be due to the larger amount of fluid in the larger joints that...damping is not dependent on the absolute fiber length and that synovial viscosity is independent of joint angle. Joint stiffness, however, had a

  19. Noninvasively measuring oxygen saturation of human finger-joint vessels by multi-transducer functional photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zijian; Li, Changhui

    2016-06-01

    Imaging small blood vessels and measuring their functional information in finger joint are still challenges for clinical imaging modalities. In this study, we developed a multi-transducer functional photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system and successfully imaged human finger-joint vessels from ˜1 mm to <0.2 mm in diameter. In addition, the oxygen saturation (SO2) values of these vessels were also measured. Our results demonstrate that PAT can provide both anatomical and functional information of individual finger-joint vessels with different sizes, which might help the study of finger-joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Menstrual cyclicity of finger joint size and grip strength in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, S R; Kowanko, I C; Drury, P L

    1983-01-01

    Daily measurements of finger joint size, grip strength, and body weight have been made throughout 2 complete menstrual cycles in 7 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 6 healthy female controls. Sine wave analysis showed significant individual cyclical rhythms (p less than 0.05) for finger joint size (5 patients, 4 controls), nude weight (5 patients, 3 controls), and grip strength (4 patients, 3 controls). In addition analysis of group data, on the assumption of a 28-day cycle, showed a significant cycle for grip strength in the rheumatoid patients, with a nadir at 28 days. In the normal subjects much of the cyclical variation in finger joint size could be explained by changes in weight (median 49.5%), but this was not so in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (median 2.8%). These findings suggest the existence of a cyclical variation in disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:6882039

  1. Automatic Quantification of Radiographic Finger Joint Space Width of Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yinghe; Vincken, Koen L; van der Heijde, Desiree; De Hair, Maria J H; Lafeber, Floris P; Viergever, Max A

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of joint space width (JSW) on hand X-ray images of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a time-consuming task. Manual assessment is semiquantitative and is observer dependent which hinders an accurate evaluation of joint damage, particularly in the early stages. Automated analysis of the JSW is an important step forward since it is observer independent and might improve the assessment sensitivity in the early RA stage. This study proposes a fully automatic method for both joint location and margin detection in RA hand radiographs. The location detection procedure is based on image features of the joint region and is aided by geometric relationship of finger joints. More than 99% of joint locations are detected with an error smaller than 3 mm with respect to the manually indicated gold standard. The joint margins are detected by combining intensity values and spatially constrained intensity derivatives, refined by an active contour model. More than 96% of the joints are successfully delineated. The JSW is calculated over the middle 60% of a landmark-defined joint span. The overall JSW error compared with the ground truth is 6.8%. In conclusion, the proposed method is able to automatically locate the finger joints in RA hand radiographs, and to quantify the JSW of these joints.

  2. Quantification of finger joint loadings using musculoskeletal modelling clarifies mechanical risk factors of hand osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Bendahan, David; Berton, Eric

    2014-02-01

    Owing to limited quantitative data related to the loadings (forces and pressures) acting upon finger joints, several clinical observations regarding mechanical risk factors of hand osteoarthritis remain misunderstood. To improve the knowledge of this pathology, the present study used musculoskeletal modelling to quantify the forces and pressures acting upon hand joints during two grasping tasks. Kinematic and grip force data were recorded during both a pinch and a power grip tasks. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging measurements were conducted to quantify joint contact areas. Using these datasets as input, a musculoskeletal model of the hand and wrist, including twenty-three degrees of freedom and forty-two muscles, has been developed to estimate joint forces and joint pressures. When compared with the power grip task, the pinch grip task resulted in two to eight times higher joint loadings whereas the grip forces exerted on each finger were twice lower. For both tasks, joint forces and pressures increased along a disto-proximal direction for each finger. The quantitative dataset provided by the present hand model clarified two clinical observations about osteoarthritis development which were not fully understood, i.e., the strong risk associated to pinch grip tasks and the high frequency of thumb-base osteoarthritis.

  3. Extending Energy Optimization in Goal-Directed Aiming from Movement Kinematics to Joint Angles.

    PubMed

    Burkitt, James J; Bongers, Raoul M; Elliott, Digby; Hansen, Steve; Lyons, James L

    2017-01-01

    Energy optimization in goal-directed aiming has been demonstrated as an undershoot bias in primary movement endpoint locations, especially in conditions where corrections to target overshoots must be made against gravity. Two-component models of upper limb movement have not yet considered how joint angles are organized to deal with the energy constraints associated with moving the upper limb in goal-directed aiming tasks. To address this limitation, participants performed aiming movements to targets in the up and down directions with the index finger and two types of rod extensions attached to the index finger. The rod extensions were expected to invoke different energy optimizing strategies in the up and down directions by allowing the distal joints the opportunity to contribute to end effector displacement. Primary movements undershot the farthest target to a greater extent in the downward direction compared to the upward direction, showing that movement kinematics optimize energy expenditure in consideration of the effects of gravity. As rod length increased, shoulder elevation was optimized in movements to the far-up target and elbow flexion was optimally minimized in movements to the far-down target. The results suggest energy optimization in the control of joint angles independent of the force of gravity.

  4. Comparison of two and three-dimensional optical tomographic image reconstructions of human finger joints.

    PubMed

    Song, Rong; Klose, Alexander D; Scheel, Alexander K; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jurgen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an images reconstruction algorithm to recover spatial distribution of optical properties in human finger joints for early diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An optimization method iteratively employs a light propagation and scattering coefficients distribution for near-infrared (NIR) light inside the joint tissue. We developed the differences in cross-sectional images obtained by using the reconstruction algorithms with 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional light propagation models. In particular we examined how these different approaches affect the discrimination between healthy and RA joints.

  5. Computer-aided classification of rheumatoid arthritis in finger joints using frequency domain optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, C. D.; Kim, H. K.; Netz, U.; Blaschke, S.; Zwaka, P. A.; Mueller, G. A.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2009-02-01

    Novel methods that can help in the diagnosis and monitoring of joint disease are essential for efficient use of novel arthritis therapies that are currently emerging. Building on previous studies that involved continuous wave imaging systems we present here first clinical data obtained with a new frequency-domain imaging system. Three-dimensional tomographic data sets of absorption and scattering coefficients were generated for 107 fingers. The data were analyzed using ANOVA, MANOVA, Discriminant Analysis DA, and a machine-learning algorithm that is based on self-organizing mapping (SOM) for clustering data in 2-dimensional parameter spaces. Overall we found that the SOM algorithm outperforms the more traditional analysis methods in terms of correctly classifying finger joints. Using SOM, healthy and affected joints can now be separated with a sensitivity of 0.97 and specificity of 0.91. Furthermore, preliminary results suggest that if a combination of multiple image properties is used, statistical significant differences can be found between RA-affected finger joints that show different clinical features (e.g. effusion, synovitis or erosion).

  6. Carry-over coarticulation in joint angles.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eva; Grimme, Britta; Reimann, Hendrik; Schöner, Gregor

    2015-09-01

    Coarticulation indicates a dependence of a movement segment on a preceding segment (carry-over coarticulation) or on the segment that follows (anticipatory coarticulation). Here we study coarticulation in multidegrees of freedom human arm movements. We asked participants to transport a cylinder from a starting position to a center target and on to a final target. In this naturalistic setting, the human arm has ten degrees of freedom and is thus comfortably redundant for the task. We studied coarticulation by comparing movements between the same spatial locations that were either preceded by different end-effector paths (carry-over coarticulation) or followed by different end-effector paths (anticipatory coarticulation). We found no evidence for coarticulation at the level of the end-effector. We found very clear evidence, however, for carry-over, not for anticipatory coarticulation at the joint level. We used the concept of the uncontrolled manifold to systematically establish coarticulation as a form of motor equivalence, in which most of the difference between different movement contexts lies within the uncontrolled manifold that leaves the end-effector invariant. The findings are consistent with movement planning occurring at the level of the end-effector, and those movement plans being transformed to the joint level by a form of inverse kinematics. The observation of massive self-motion excludes an account that is solely based on a kinematic pseudo-inverse.

  7. Development of a finger joint phantom for evaluation of frequency domain measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Netz, Uwe J; Scheel, Alexander K; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2006-01-01

    For development and test of new optical imaging devices, phantoms are widely used to emulate the tissue to be imaged. Phantom design gets more difficult the more complex the tissue is structured. We report on developing and testing a solid, stable finger joint phantom to simulate transillumination of finger joints in frequency-domain imaging systems. The phantom consists of the bone, capsule, skin, the capsule volume, and the joint gap. Silicone was used to build the solid parts and a glycerol-water solution for the fluid in the capsule volume and joint gap. The system to test the phantom is an optical frequency-domain scanning set-up. Different stages of joint inflammation as they occur in rheumatoid arthritis (BA) were emulated by assembling the phantom with capsule and fluid having different optical properties. Reliability of the phantom measurement was investigated by repeated assembling. The results show clear discrimination between different stages of joints within the signal deviation due to reassembling of the phantom.

  8. Photoacoustic tomography of the human finger: towards the assessment of inflammatory joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, P.; Biswas, S. K.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is often manifested in finger joints. The growth of new or withdrawal of old blood vessels can be a sensitive marker for these diseases. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has great potential in this respect since it allows the sensitive and highly resolved visualization of blood. We systematically investigated PA imaging of finger vasculature in healthy volunteers using a newly developed PA tomographic system. We present the PA results which show excellent detail of the vasculature. Vessels with diameters ranging between 100 μm and 1.5 mm are visible along with details of the skin, including the epidermis and the subpapillary plexus. The focus of all the studies is at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and in the context of ultimately visualizing the inflamed synovial membrane in patients. This work is important in laying the foundation for detailed research into PA imaging of the phalangeal vasculature in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. High resolution three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging of human finger joints in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-08-01

    We present a method for noninvasively imaging the hand joints using a three-dimensional (3D) photoacoustic imaging (PAI) system. This 3D PAI system utilizes cylindrical scanning in data collection and virtual-detector concept in image reconstruction. The maximum lateral and axial resolutions of the PAI system are 70 μm and 240 μm. The cross-sectional photoacoustic images of a healthy joint clearly exhibited major internal structures including phalanx and tendons, which are not available from the current photoacoustic imaging methods. The in vivo PAI results obtained are comparable with the corresponding 3.0 T MRI images of the finger joint. This study suggests that the proposed method has the potential to be used in early detection of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis.

  10. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  11. Multipixel system for gigahertz frequency-domain optical imaging of finger joints.

    PubMed

    Netz, Uwe J; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2008-03-01

    Frequency-domain optical imaging systems have shown great promise for characterizing blood oxygenation, hemodynamics, and other physiological parameters in human and animal tissues. However, most of the frequency domain systems presented so far operate with source modulation frequencies below 150 MHz. At these low frequencies, their ability to provide accurate data for small tissue geometries such as encountered in imaging of finger joints or rodents is limited. Here, we present a new system that can provide data up to 1 GHz using an intensity modulated charged coupled device camera. After data processing, the images show the two-dimensional distribution of amplitude and phase of the light modulation on the finger surface. The system performance was investigated and test measurements on optical tissue phantoms were taken to investigate whether higher frequencies yield better signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It could be shown that local changes in optical tissue properties, as they appear in the initial stages of rheumatoid arthritis in a finger joint, are detectable by simple image evaluation, with the range of modulation frequency around 500 MHz proving to yield the highest SNR.

  12. Applied Joint-Space Torque and Stiffness Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Wampler, Charles W.; Hargrave, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Existing tendon-driven fingers have applied force control through independent tension controllers on each tendon, i.e. in the tendon-space. The coupled kinematics of the tendons, however, cause such controllers to exhibit a transient coupling in their response. This problem can be resolved by alternatively framing the controllers in the joint-space of the manipulator. This work presents a joint-space torque control law that demonstrates both a decoupled and significantly faster response than an equivalent tendon-space formulation. The law also demonstrates greater speed and robustness than comparable PI controllers. In addition, a tension distribution algorithm is presented here to allocate forces from the joints to the tendons. It allocates the tensions so that they satisfy both an upper and lower bound, and it does so without requiring linear programming or open-ended iterations. The control law and tension distribution algorithm are implemented on the robotic hand of Robonaut-2.

  13. IMU-based joint angle measurement for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Seel, Thomas; Raisch, Jörg; Schauer, Thomas

    2014-04-16

    This contribution is concerned with joint angle calculation based on inertial measurement data in the context of human motion analysis. Unlike most robotic devices, the human body lacks even surfaces and right angles. Therefore, we focus on methods that avoid assuming certain orientations in which the sensors are mounted with respect to the body segments. After a review of available methods that may cope with this challenge, we present a set of new methods for: (1) joint axis and position identification; and (2) flexion/extension joint angle measurement. In particular, we propose methods that use only gyroscopes and accelerometers and, therefore, do not rely on a homogeneous magnetic field. We provide results from gait trials of a transfemoral amputee in which we compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU)-based methods to an optical 3D motion capture system. Unlike most authors, we place the optical markers on anatomical landmarks instead of attaching them to the IMUs. Root mean square errors of the knee flexion/extension angles are found to be less than 1° on the prosthesis and about 3° on the human leg. For the plantar/dorsiflexion of the ankle, both deviations are about 1°.

  14. Revisiting the Force-Joint Angle Relationship After Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Molly C; Allen, David L; Batliner, Matthew E; Byrnes, William C

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate force-angle curve fitting techniques pre-eccentric exercise, quantify changes in curve characteristics postexercise, and examine the relationship between curve changes and markers of muscle damage. Fourteen males unaccustomed to eccentric exercise performed 60 eccentric muscle actions of the elbow flexors. Maximal voluntary isometric force was measured throughout a range of angles pre- (Pre1 and Pre2), immediately post (IP), and 1, 2, 4, and 7 days postexercise. Force-angle curves for each visit were constructed using second-order polynomials. Changes in curve characteristics (optimal angle, peak force, curve height), range of motion, soreness, and creatine kinase activity were quantified. Optimal joint angle and force at optimal angle were significantly correlated from Pre1 to Pre2 (ICC = 0.821 and 0.979, respectively). Optimal angle was significantly right shifted (p = 0.035) by 10.4 ± 12.9° from Pre2 to IP and was restored by 1 day post exercise. Interestingly, the r value for curve fit was significantly decreased (p < 0.001) from Pre2 (r = 0.896) to IP (r = 0.802) and 1 day post exercise (r = 0.750). Curve height was significantly decreased (39%) IP and restored to pre-exercise height by 4 days postexercise. There was no correlation between optimal angle or curve height and other damage markers. In conclusion, force-angle relationships can be accurately described using second-order polynomials. After eccentric exercise, the force-angle curve is flattened and shifted (downward and rightward), but these changes are not correlated to other markers of muscle damage. Changes in the force-angle relationship are multifaceted, but determining the physiological significance of these changes requires further investigation.

  15. Screening for rheumatoid arthritis with finger joint power Doppler ultrasonography: quantification of conventional power Doppler ultrasonographic scoring.

    PubMed

    Fukae, Jun; Shimizu, Masato; Kon, Yujiro; Tanimura, Kazuhide; Matsuhashi, Megumi; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Koike, Takao

    2009-01-01

    Power Doppler ultrasonography (PD-US) has proved to be a useful technique to measure synovial vascularity due to its capability to provide data that can be used to evaluate the level of joint inflammation and assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We have developed a novel PD-US finger joint scoring method that introduces quantitative measurements into the conventional PD-US assessment method. A comparison of the two methods revealed that our novel PD-US method strongly correlates with the conventional method in terms of RA assessment. We performed finger joint PD-US on 69 patients with RA and 70 patients who had multiple joint pain but showed no evidence of inflammatory diseases (non-inflammatory disease, NI) and measured the synovial vascularity of the metacarpophalangeal joints 1-5 and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints 1-5 for each patient. We analyzed the data with receiver operating characteristic analysis and, based on the results for the total vascularity of 20 finger joints, defined a cut-off value of 36% as discriminating between RA and NI. This cut-off value was found to be a valuable tool in screening for RA. We conclude that our finger joint PD-US scoring system is both useful and applicable for diagnosing RA.

  16. Low Level Laser Therapy (Lllt) for Chronic Joint Pain of the Elbow, Wrist and Fingers

    PubMed Central

    Okuni, Ikuko; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musya, Yoshiro; Sekiguchi, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: In previous studies, we successfully applied Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) in patients with non-specific chronic pain of the shoulder joint and lower back. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of LLLT for chronic joint pain of the elbow, wrist, and fingers. Subjects and Methods: Nine male and 15 female patients with chronic joint pain of the elbow, wrist, or fingers, who were treated at the rehabilitation outpatient clinic at our hospital from April, 2007 to March, 2009 were enrolled in the study. We used a 1000 mW semiconductor laser device. Each tender point and three points around it were irradiated with laser energy. Each point was irradiated twice for 20 s per treatment, giving a total of three minutes for all 4 points. Patients visited the clinic twice a week, and were evaluated after four weeks of treatment. Pain was evaluated with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Statistical analysis of the VAS scores after laser irradiation was performed with Wilcoxon's signed rank sum test, using SPSS Ver.17. Results: All VAS scores were totaled and statistically analyzed. The average VAS score before irradiation was 59.2±12.9, and 33.1±12.2 after the irradiation, showing a significant improvement in VAS score (p<0.001) after treatment. The treatment effect lasted for about one and a half days in the case of wrist pain, epicondylitis lateralis (tennis elbow), and carpal tunnel syndrome. In other pain entities, it lasted for about three to fifteen hours. No change in the range of motion (ROM) was seen in any of the 24 subjects. Conclusion: We concluded that LLLT at the wavelength and parameters used in the present study was effective for chronic pain of the elbow, wrist, and fingers. PMID:24610977

  17. Design of splints based on the NiTi alloy for the correction of joint deformities in the fingers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The proximal interphalange joint (PIP) is fundamental for the functional nature of the hand. The contracture in flexion of the PIP, secondary to traumatisms or illnesses leads to an important functional loss. The use of correcting splints is the common procedure for treating this problem. Its functioning is based on the application of a small load and a prolonged stress which can be dynamic, static progressive or static serial. It is important that the therapist has a splint available which can release a constant and sufficient force to correct the contracture in flexion. Nowadays NiTi is commonly used in bio-engineering, due to its superelastical characteristics. The experience of the authors in the design of other devices based on the NiTi alloy, makes it possible to carry out a new design in this work - the production of a finger splint for the treatment of the contracture in flexion of the PIP joint. Methods Commercial orthosis have been characterized using a universal INSTRON 5565 machine. A computational simulation of the proposed design has been conducted, reproducing its performance and using a model "ad hoc" for the NiTi material. Once the parameters have been adjusted, the design is validated using the same type of test as those carried out on commercial orthosis. Results and Discussion For commercial splint the recovering force falls to excessively low values as the angle increases. Angle curves for different lengths and thicknesses of the proposed design have been obtained, with a practically constant recovering force value over a wide range of angles that vary between 30° and 150° in every case. Then the whole treatment is possible with only one splint, and without the need of progressive replacements as the joint recovers. Conclusions A new model of splint based on NiTi alloy has been designed, simulated and tested comparing its behaviour with two of the most regularly used splints. Its uses is recommended instead of other dynamic

  18. Kinematic evaluation of the finger's interphalangeal joints coupling mechanism--variability, flexion-extension differences, triggers, locking swanneck deformities, anthropometric correlations.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N A L; Quesada, P M; Spoor, C W

    2010-08-26

    The human finger contains tendon/ligament mechanisms essential for proper control. One mechanism couples the movements of the interphalangeal joints when the (unloaded) finger is flexed with active deep flexor. This study's aim was to accurately determine in a large finger sample the kinematics and variability of the coupled interphalangeal joint motions, for potential clinical and finger model validation applications. The data could also be applied to humanoid robotic hands. Sixty-eight fingers were measured in seventeen hands in nine subjects. Fingers exhibited great joint mobility variability, with passive proximal interphalangeal hyperextension ranging from zero to almost fifty degrees. Increased measurement accuracy was obtained by using marker frames to amplify finger segment motions. Gravitational forces on the marker frames were not found to invalidate measurements. The recorded interphalangeal joint trajectories were highly consistent, demonstrating the underlying coupling mechanism. The increased accuracy and large sample size allowed for evaluation of detailed trajectory variability, systematic differences between flexion and extension trajectories, and three trigger types, distinct from flexor tendon triggers, involving initial flexion deficits in either proximal or distal interphalangeal joint. The experimental methods, data and analysis should advance insight into normal and pathological finger biomechanics (e.g., swanneck deformities), and could help improve clinical differential diagnostics of trigger finger causes. The marker frame measuring method may be useful to quantify interphalangeal joints trajectories in surgical/rehabilitative outcome studies. The data as a whole provide the most comprehensive collection of interphalangeal joint trajectories for clinical reference and model validation known to us to date.

  19. Finger joint imaging by laser transillumination computed tomography based on coherent detection imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanosaki, Shinji; Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Takagi, Michiaki; Ishikawa, Akira; Suzuki, Jota; Emori, Ryota; Inage, Hiroki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao

    2003-07-01

    In this research, we investigate the imaging properties of tansillumination laser CT system based on the coherent detection imaging (CDI) method, for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, from the viewpoints of morphological and quantitative imaging. First, to investigate the morphological imaging ability, the index finger PIP joint of a healthy volunteer was imaged with the laser CT, X-ray CT, and MRI. By comparison of these images, we present that the laser CT delineates the bone region with high spatial resolution of sub-millimeters. Next, to investigate the quantitative imaging, three kinds of the physical phantoms simulating bone, made from polyurethane including different concentrations of CaCO3, were imaged. We present that quantitative measurement is possible by demonstrating a satisfactory linear relationship between the averaged pixel value of the reconstructed images and the actual concentrations. These results demonstrate the feasibility of early diagnosis for rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Finger motion capture from wrist-electrode contact resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shunsuke; Kawaguchi, Junki; Imura, Masataka; Oshiro, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Hand motion capture is an important yet challenging topic for biomechanics and human computer interaction. We proposed a novel electrical sensing technology for capturing the finger angles from the variation of the wrist shape. The proposed device detects the signal related to the wrist-electrode contact resistances, which change according to the variation of the wrist shape accompanying finger movements. The developed sensing device consists of a wrist band, sixteen electrodes and a sensing circuit of contact resistances. We investigated the relationships between the finger angles and the system outputs by using a glove-type joint angle sensor. As a result, we confirmed high correlations of the system outputs with the finger angles for several electrodes. Therefore, we conclude that the proposed system can be used for the estimation of the finger joint angles.

  1. A Multifunctional Joint Angle Sensor with Measurement Adaptability

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Wei; Wang, Hua; Liu, Datong

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a multifunctional joint sensor with measurement adaptability for biological engineering applications, such as gait analysis, gesture recognition, etc. The adaptability is embodied in both static and dynamic environment measurements, both of body pose and in motion capture. Its multifunctional capabilities lay in its ability of simultaneous measurement of multiple degrees of freedom (MDOF) with a single sensor to reduce system complexity. The basic working mode enables 2DOF spatial angle measurement over big ranges and stands out for its applications on different joints of different individuals without recalibration. The optional advanced working mode enables an additional DOF measurement for various applications. By employing corrugated tube as the main body, the sensor is also characterized as flexible and wearable with less restraints. MDOF variations are converted to linear displacements of the sensing elements. The simple reconstruction algorithm and small outputs volume are capable of providing real-time angles and long-term monitoring. The performance assessment of the built prototype is promising enough to indicate the feasibility of the sensor. PMID:24217353

  2. Upper limb joint angle measurement in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Diego; Alvarez, Juan C; González, Rafael C; López, Antonio M

    2016-01-01

    Usual human motion capture systems are designed to work in controlled laboratory conditions. For occupational health, instruments that can measure during normal daily life are essential, as the evaluation of the workers' movements is a key factor to reduce employee injury- and illness-related costs. In this paper, we present a method for joint angle measurement, combining inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) and magnetic sensors. This method estimates wrist flexion, wrist lateral deviation, elbow flexion, elbow pronation, shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction and shoulder internal rotation. The algorithms avoid numerical integration of the signals, which allows for long-time estimations without angle estimation drift. The system has been tested both under laboratory and field conditions. Controlled laboratory tests show mean estimation errors between 0.06° and of 1.05°, and standard deviation between 2.18° and 9.20°. Field tests seem to confirm these results when no ferromagnetic materials are close to the measurement system.

  3. Successful treatment of a guitarist with a finger joint injury using instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Terry Loghmani, M.; Bayliss, Amy J.; Clayton, Greg; Gundeck, Evelina

    2015-01-01

    Finger injuries are common and can greatly affect a musician’s quality of life. A 55-year-old man, who had injured the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left index finger 6 months prior to any intervention, was treated with a manual therapy approach incorporating instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM). Initial examination findings included self-reported pain and functional limitations and physical impairments that significantly impeded his ability to play the acoustic guitar. He was treated once a week for 6 weeks with IASTM, joint mobilization, therapeutic exercise, and ice massage. Additionally, a home exercise program and self-care instructions were provided. The patient gained positive outcomes with improvements in pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale while playing the guitar: initial 5/10, discharge 1/10) and function (Disability Arm Shoulder Hand Sports-Performing Arts Optional Module: initial 75; discharge 6·25), each reaching a minimum clinically important difference. Importantly, he was able to play the guitar with minimal to no pain as desired. Physical measures also improved, including an immediate gain in finger range of motion with IASTM alone. Manual therapy approaches integrating IASTM may provide an effective conservative treatment strategy for patients with finger/hand conditions in the performing arts and other patient populations. PMID:26952165

  4. Successful treatment of a guitarist with a finger joint injury using instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terry Loghmani, M; Bayliss, Amy J; Clayton, Greg; Gundeck, Evelina

    2015-12-01

    Finger injuries are common and can greatly affect a musician's quality of life. A 55-year-old man, who had injured the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left index finger 6 months prior to any intervention, was treated with a manual therapy approach incorporating instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM). Initial examination findings included self-reported pain and functional limitations and physical impairments that significantly impeded his ability to play the acoustic guitar. He was treated once a week for 6 weeks with IASTM, joint mobilization, therapeutic exercise, and ice massage. Additionally, a home exercise program and self-care instructions were provided. The patient gained positive outcomes with improvements in pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale while playing the guitar: initial 5/10, discharge 1/10) and function (Disability Arm Shoulder Hand Sports-Performing Arts Optional Module: initial 75; discharge 6·25), each reaching a minimum clinically important difference. Importantly, he was able to play the guitar with minimal to no pain as desired. Physical measures also improved, including an immediate gain in finger range of motion with IASTM alone. Manual therapy approaches integrating IASTM may provide an effective conservative treatment strategy for patients with finger/hand conditions in the performing arts and other patient populations.

  5. Pullout wire fixation together with distal interphalangeal joint Kirschner wire stabilization for acute combined tendon and bone (double level) mallet finger injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Shao, Xinzhong; Huang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    This article describes a previously unclassified type of combined tendon/bone mallet finger. This supplements the conventional Doyle classification. The article also describes the technique for surgical treatment of such mallet fingers, which involves the use of a pullout wire with K-wire stabilization of the distal interphalangeal joint.

  6. Assessing Finger Joint Biomechanics by Applying Equal Force to Flexor Tendons In Vitro Using a Novel Simultaneous Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tai-Hua; Lu, Szu-Ching; Lin, Wei-Jr; Zhao, Kristin; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Jou, I-Ming; Lee, Pei-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) are critical for finger flexion. Although research has recently focused on these tendons’ coactivity, their contributions in different tasks remain unclear. This study created a novel simultaneous approach to investigate the coactivity between the tendons and to clarify their contributions in different tasks. Methods Ten human cadaveric hands were mounted on our custom frame with the FDS and FDP of the third finger looped through a mechanical pulley connected to a force transducer. Joint range of motion, tendon excursion and loading force were recorded during individual joint motion and free joint movement from rest to maximal flexion. Each flexor tendon’s moment arm was then calculated. Results In individual motions, we found that the FDP contributed more than the FDS in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 1.34 and all FDP-to-FDS excursion (P/S) ratios greater than 1.0 with force increase. However, the FDP contributed less than the FDS in metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint motion, with an overall slope of 0.95 and P/S ratios smaller than 1.0 throughout the whole motion except between 1.9% and 13.1% force. In free joint movement, the FDP played a greater role than the FDS, with an overall ratio of 1.37 and all P/S ratios greater than 1.0. Conclusions The new findings include differences in finger performance and excursion amounts between the FDS and FDP throughout flexion. Such findings may provide the basis for new hand models and treatments. PMID:27513744

  7. Current concepts: mallet finger.

    PubMed

    Alla, Sreenivasa R; Deal, Nicole D; Dempsey, Ian J

    2014-06-01

    Loss of the extensor mechanism at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint leads to mallet finger also known as baseball finger or drop finger. This can be secondary to tendon substance disruption or to a bony avulsion. Soft tissue mallet finger is the result of a rupture of the extensor tendon in Zone 1, and a bony mallet finger is the result of an avulsion of the extensor tendon from the distal phalanx with a small fragment of bone attached to the avulsed tendon. Mallet finger leads to an imbalance in the distribution of the extensor force between the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and DIP joints. If left untreated, mallet finger leads to a swan neck deformity from PIP joint hyper extension and DIP joint flexion. Most mallet finger injuries can be managed non-surgically, but occasionally surgery is recommended for either an acute or a chronic mallet finger or for salvage of failed prior treatment.

  8. Accuracy Improvement on the Measurement of Human-Joint Angles.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dai; Shoepe, Todd; Vejarano, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    A measurement technique that decreases the root mean square error (RMSE) of measurements of human-joint angles using a personal wireless sensor network is reported. Its operation is based on virtual rotations of wireless sensors worn by the user, and it focuses on the arm, whose position is measured on 5 degree of freedom (DOF). The wireless sensors use inertial magnetic units that measure the alignment of the arm with the earth's gravity and magnetic fields. Due to the biomechanical properties of human tissue (e.g., skin's elasticity), the sensors' orientation is shifted, and this shift affects the accuracy of measurements. In the proposed technique, the change of orientation is first modeled from linear regressions of data collected from 15 participants at different arm positions. Then, out of eight body indices measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, the percentage of body fat is found to have the greatest correlation with the rate of change in sensors' orientation. This finding enables us to estimate the change in sensors' orientation from the user's body fat percentage. Finally, an algorithm virtually rotates the sensors using quaternion theory with the objective of reducing the error. The proposed technique is validated with experiments on five different participants. In the DOF, whose error decreased the most, the RMSE decreased from 2.20(°) to 0.87(°). This is an improvement of 60%, and in the DOF whose error decreased the least, the RMSE decreased from 1.64(°) to 1.37(°). This is an improvement of 16%. On an average, the RMSE improved by 44%.

  9. Goniometrie evaluation of standing extension and maximum flexion joint angles of llamas and alpacas.

    PubMed

    Walters, Amy L; Semevolos, Stacy A; Baker, Rose E

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine and compare mean standing extension and maximum flexion angles of various joints in healthy adult alpacas and llamas, and determine the reliability of goniometric data within and between 2 observers for each joint of interest. SAMPLE 6 healthy adult llamas and 6 healthy adult alpacas. PROCEDURES The shoulder joint, elbow joint, carpal, and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of the forelimbs and the hip joint, stifle joint, tarsal, and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of the hind limbs were investigated. Each articulation was measured with a universal goniometer by 2 observers, who each obtained 2 measurements when each joint was maintained in standing extension and in maximal passive flexion. Two sample (unpaired) t tests were performed for comparisons of mean standing extension and maximum passive flexion angles between alpacas and llamas. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for each articulation to assess interobserver and intra-observer reliability of measurements. RESULTS Llamas had larger mean standing extension angles than alpacas for the tarsal and elbow joint, but there were no significant differences between species for all other joints. For all joints, flexion measurements did not differ significantly between the 2 species. For most joints, the reliability of goniometric data between observers was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.6 to 0.95) CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Except for the elbow joint and tarsus in extension, the angle of limb articulations during flexion and extension can be considered similar for alpacas and llamas. These measurements have relevance for veterinary surgeons when assessing joint mobility and conformation and determining appropriate angles for arthrodesis.

  10. Abdominal muscle activity according to knee joint angle during sit-to-stand

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Juri; Rhee, Min-Hyung; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the activity of the abdominal muscles according to the angle of the knee joints during sit-to-stand. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy adult males participated in this study. Subjects initiated sit-to-stand at knee joint angles of 60°, 90°, or 120°. An electromyography system was used to measure the maximum voluntary isometric contraction of the rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique and transverse abdominis muscles. [Results] Percent contraction differed significantly among the three knee joint angles, most notably for the internal oblique and transverse abdominis muscles. [Conclusion] Wider knee joint angles more effectively activate the abdominal muscles, especially those in the deep abdomen, than do narrower angles. PMID:27390431

  11. The prevalence of monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in synovial fluid from wrist and finger joints.

    PubMed

    Galozzi, Paola; Oliviero, Francesca; Frallonardo, Paola; Favero, Marta; Hoxha, Ariela; Scanu, Anna; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Ortolan, Augusta; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals in synovial fluids (SFs) aspirated from wrist and finger joints of patients with previously diagnosed joint diseases. We reviewed the results of SF analysis of 1593 samples and identified 126 patients with effusions in the small joints of the hands and wrists. We reported from patients' medical files data about sex, age, diagnosis, disease duration and the microscopic SF results. The prevalence of CPP crystals in SF was 85.71% in CPP-crystals arthritis (CPP-CA), 19.35% in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13.89% in osteoarthritis (OA) and 0% in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), gout and miscellanea. The prevalence of MSU crystals in SF was 83.3% in gout, 10% in PsA, 2.8% in OA and 0% in RA, SpA, miscellanea and CPP-CA. Consistent with previously reported data concerning the big joints, microcrystals can be frequently found also in the small joints of patients with previous diagnosis. The finding underlines the importance of analyzing SF from the hand and wrist joints in the attempt to identify comorbidities associated with the presence of crystals and to develop targeted treatment strategies.

  12. An architecture for measuring joint angles using a long period fiber grating-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ramirez, Carlos A; Almanza-Ojeda, Dora L; Guerrero-Tavares, Jesus N; Mendoza-Galindo, Francisco J; Estudillo-Ayala, Julian M; Ibarra-Manzano, Mario A

    2014-12-19

    The implementation of signal filters in a real-time form requires a tradeoff between computation resources and the system performance. Therefore, taking advantage of low lag response and the reduced consumption of resources, in this article, the Recursive Least Square (RLS) algorithm is used to filter a signal acquired from a fiber-optics-based sensor. In particular, a Long-Period Fiber Grating (LPFG) sensor is used to measure the bending movement of a finger. After that, the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) technique allows us to classify the corresponding finger position along the motion range. For these measures to help in the development of an autonomous robotic hand, the proposed technique can be straightforwardly implemented on real time platforms such as Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) or Digital Signal Processors (DSP). Different angle measurements of the finger's motion are carried out by the prototype and a detailed analysis of the system performance is presented.

  13. An Architecture for Measuring Joint Angles Using a Long Period Fiber Grating-Based Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Ramirez, Carlos A.; Almanza-Ojeda, Dora L.; Guerrero-Tavares, Jesus N.; Mendoza-Galindo, Francisco J.; Estudillo-Ayala, Julian M.; Ibarra-Manzano, Mario A.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of signal filters in a real-time form requires a tradeoff between computation resources and the system performance. Therefore, taking advantage of low lag response and the reduced consumption of resources, in this article, the Recursive Least Square (RLS) algorithm is used to filter a signal acquired from a fiber-optics-based sensor. In particular, a Long-Period Fiber Grating (LPFG) sensor is used to measure the bending movement of a finger. After that, the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) technique allows us to classify the corresponding finger position along the motion range. For these measures to help in the development of an autonomous robotic hand, the proposed technique can be straightforwardly implemented on real time platforms such as Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) or Digital Signal Processors (DSP). Different angle measurements of the finger's motion are carried out by the prototype and a detailed analysis of the system performance is presented. PMID:25536002

  14. Dual-Modality Imaging of the Human Finger Joint Systems by Using Combined Multispectral Photoacoustic Computed Tomography and Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubin; Wang, Yating

    2016-01-01

    We developed a homemade dual-modality imaging system that combines multispectral photoacoustic computed tomography and ultrasound computed tomography for reconstructing the structural and functional information of human finger joint systems. The fused multispectral photoacoustic-ultrasound computed tomography (MPAUCT) system was examined by the phantom and in vivo experimental tests. The imaging results indicate that the hard tissues such as the bones and the soft tissues including the blood vessels, the tendon, the skins, and the subcutaneous tissues in the finger joints systems can be effectively recovered by using our multimodality MPAUCT system. The developed MPAUCT system is able to provide us with more comprehensive information of the human finger joints, which shows its potential for characterization and diagnosis of bone or joint diseases. PMID:27774453

  15. Fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity regulates central and peripheral coding of joint angles.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ning; He, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive afferents from muscle spindles encode information about peripheral joint movements for the central nervous system (CNS). The sensitivity of muscle spindle is nonlinearly dependent on the activation of gamma (γ) motoneurons in the spinal cord that receives inputs from the motor cortex. How fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity affects proprioceptive coding of joint position is not clear. Furthermore, what information is carried in the fusimotor signal from the motor cortex to the muscle spindle is largely unknown. In this study, we addressed the issue of communication between the central and peripheral sensorimotor systems using a computational approach based on the virtual arm (VA) model. In simulation experiments within the operational range of joint movements, the gamma static commands (γ(s)) to the spindles of both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles were hypothesized (1) to remain constant, (2) to be modulated with joint angles linearly, and (3) to be modulated with joint angles nonlinearly. Simulation results revealed a nonlinear landscape of Ia afferent with respect to both γ(s) activation and joint angle. Among the three hypotheses, the constant and linear strategies did not yield Ia responses that matched the experimental data, and therefore, were rejected as plausible strategies of spindle sensitivity control. However, if γ(s) commands were quadratically modulated with joint angles, a robust linear relation between Ia afferents and joint angles could be obtained in both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles. With the quadratic strategy of spindle sensitivity control, γ(s) commands may serve as the CNS outputs that inform the periphery of central coding of joint angles. The results suggest that the information of joint angles may be communicated between the CNS and muscles via the descending γ(s) efferent and Ia afferent signals.

  16. Effects of submaximal eccentric exercise on muscle activity at different elbow joint angles.

    PubMed

    Kisiel-Sajewicz, Katarzyna; Jaskólska, Anna; Janecki, Damian; Andrzejewska, Renata; Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólski, Artur

    2014-01-01

    Our study aimed to determine whether electrical and mechanical factors contributing to acute or long-term maximal torque reduction and muscle soreness due to submaximal eccentric exercise (ECC) are elbow-joint-angle specific and to what extent the joint angle affects the contribution of antagonist coactivation to this torque reduction. Maximal isometric torque (MIT), muscle soreness assessment, agonist electromechanical activities, and antagonist coactivation during the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured at elbow joint angles of 60°, 90°, and 150° before ECC, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, 72, and 120 hr after exercise. ECC causes an immediate decrease in MIT as well as increased antagonist coactivation at three angles. Antagonist coactivation returned to its baseline level at 24 hr regardless of joint angle. The most rapid torque recovery and the highest force level at which pain occurred were found after ECC at a joint angle of 60°. During the recovery period, no mechanomyographical changes were observed when measuring surface mechanomyography changes at three angles, while the electrical activity differed between angles.

  17. Joint angle sensors for closed-loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Wen H.; Miao, Chih-Lei

    In order to substitute braces that have built-in goniometers and to provide feedback signals for closed loop control of lower extremity Functional Neuromuscular System in paraplegics, a stretchable capacitive sensor was developed to accurately detect angular movement in joints. Promising clinical evaluations on the knee joints of a paraplegic and a volunteer were done. The evaluations show great promise for the possibility of implantation applications.

  18. A reliability study using computer-based analysis of finger joint space narrowing in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Katsuya; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Sutherland, Kenneth; Kato, Masaru; Nakagawa, Ikuma; Ichikawa, Shota; Kawauchi, Keisuke; Saitou, Shota; Mukai, Masaya

    2017-02-01

    The joint space difference index (JSDI) is a newly developed radiographic index which can quantitatively assess joint space narrowing progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients by using an image subtraction method on a computer. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of this method by non-experts utilizing RA image evaluation. Four non-experts assessed JSDI for radiographic images of 510 metacarpophalangeal joints from 51 RA patients twice with an interval of more than 2 weeks. Two rheumatologists and one radiologist as well as the four non-experts examined the joints by using the Sharp-van der Heijde Scoring (SHS) method. The radiologist and four non-experts repeated the scoring with an interval of more than 2 weeks. We calculated intra-/inter-observer reliability using the intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for JSDI and SHS scoring, respectively. The intra-/inter-observer reliabilities for the computer-based method were almost perfect (inter-observer ICC, 0.966-0.983; intra-observer ICC, 0.954-0.996). Contrary to this, intra-/inter-observer reliability for SHS by experts was moderate to almost perfect (inter-observer ICC, 0.556-0.849; intra-observer ICC, 0.589-0.839). The results suggest that our computer-based method has high reliability to detect finger joint space narrowing progression in RA patients.

  19. Development of a body joint angle measurement system using IMU sensors.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Saba; Mahoor, Mohammad H; Davidson, Bradley S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for measuring and monitoring human body joint angles using inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensors. This type of monitoring is beneficial for therapists and physicians because it facilitates remote assessment of patient activities. In our approach, two IMUs are mounted on the upper leg and the lower leg to measure the Euler angles of each segment. The Euler angles are sent via Bluetooth protocols to a pc for calculating the knee joint angle. In our experiments, we utilized a motion capture system to accurately measure the knee joint angle and used this as the ground truth to assess the accuracy of the IMU system. The range of average error of the system across a variety of motion trials was 0.08 to 3.06 degrees. In summary, the accuracy of the IMU measurement system currently outperforms existing wearable systems such as conductive fiber optic sensors and flex-sensors.

  20. [Jamming a child's finger: an experimental study to determine elastic resistance and the point of onset of bone/joint deformation].

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Pollinger, P; Burkhart, K; Prommersberger, K-J; Müller, L P

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the elastic properties of children's fingers is very important to understand the potential hazard for jamming injuries that exists in modern motor vehicles with automatic power-operated windows. This study determined the elastic resistance and the point of onset of bone/joint deformation at each of 5 different jam positions of a child's finger under continuous dorsal-palmar compression. An unembalmed finger that recently had been surgically removed from a polydactylic 8 month-old girl was jammed in a custom hydraulic test apparatus. A subminiature force sensor and an electrometric path sensor measured force and deflection values. To visualise the respective point of onset of bone/joint deformation, jamming of the finger was performed under fluoroscopy. The mean force at the point of onset of bone/joint deformation was 78.4 N. The current statutory limit of 100 N for the maximum closing force of an automatic power-operated motor vehicle window is thus well beyond the point at which finger injuries can occur in children. Assuming finger injuries in children can occur at a jamming force below approximately 80 N, a reduction of the statutory limit to us higher than 50 N is reasonable.

  1. A biomechanical study of the finger pulley system during repair.

    PubMed

    Amirouche, F; Gonzalez, M; Koldoff, J; Tioco, J; Ham, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the mechanics of the finger/pulley system when subjected to various excisions and repairs. Several cadaver hands were used to study the finger/pulley's function, finger joint dynamics, and the relationship between tendon excursion and finger joint angles of rotation. By using a method of continuous and simultaneous data acquisition of the entire finger joint's motion, a more detailed analysis was achieved. Our experimental investigation is based on the use of four micro-potentiometers inserted at the finger's joints and a pulley system to simulate tendon excursion. Using this procedure, a detailed kinematic analysis of the entire finger was performed. This included analysis of the intact hand, various pulley excisions, and reconstruction. In addition to introducing a new method of acquisition, a mathematical model was developed for the inverse dynamic analysis of the finger pulley system. From this model, the torques required at the joints for the motion were computed. The results provided new insight into possible ways of characterizing kinematic changes resulting from pulley damage and repair.

  2. Comparison of Children with Joint Angles in Spastic Diplegia with Those of Normal Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang Ju; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Dong Dae

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare joint angles between normal children and those with spastic diplegia using three-dimensional gait analysis. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were eight patients with spastic diplegia and eight normal children. Three-dimensional gait analysis was used for the survey. The measured gait variables were the joints of the lower extremity in the sagittal plane, frontal plane, and transverse planes and the maximum and minimum angles of their stance phase and swing phases. [Results] In the sagittal plane, the maximum angles of both the right and left pelvis and hip joint in the stance phase and swing phases were significantly greater for children with spastic diplegia than for normal children. In the stance phase of the right side of the hip joint, the maximum angles of the hip in the swing phase and the knee joint’s minimum angles in the stance phase differed significantly. In the transverse plane, there were a significant differences on the left side of the pelvis in the maximum angles in the swing and stance phases. There were also significant differences on the right side pelvis, in the maximum and minimum angles in the stance phase and minimum angles in the swing phase. [Conclusion] Children with spastic diplegia employ a different gait strategy and pattern from normal children. PMID:25276040

  3. Noninvasive imaging of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation for detection of osteoarthritis in the finger joints using multispectral three-dimensional quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-05-01

    We present quantitative imaging of hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in in vivo finger joints and evaluate the feasibility of detecting osteoarthritis (OA) in the hand using three-dimensional (3D) multispectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography (3D qPAT). The results show that both the anatomical structures and quantitative chromophore concentrations (oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin) of different joint tissues (hard phalanges and soft cartilage/synovial fluid between phalanges) can be imaged in vivo with the multispectral 3D qPAT. Enhanced hemoglobin concentrations and dropped oxygen saturations in osteoarthritic phalanges and soft joint tissues in joint cavities have been observed. This study indicates that the multispectral 3D qPAT is a promising approach to detect the angiogenesis and hypoxia associated with OA disease and a potential clinical tool for early OA detection in the finger joints.

  4. Joint-Angle Coordination Patterns Ensure Stabilization of a Body-Plus-Tool System in Point-to-Point Movements with a Rod.

    PubMed

    Valk, Tim A; Mouton, Leonora J; Bongers, Raoul M

    2016-01-01

    When performing a goal-directed action with a tool, it is generally assumed that the point of control of the action system is displaced from the hand to the tool, implying that body and tool function as one system. Studies of how actions with tools are performed have been limited to studying either end-effector kinematics or joint-angle coordination patterns. Because joint-angle coordination patterns affect end-effector kinematics, the current study examined them together, with the aim of revealing how body and tool function as one system. Seated participants made point-to-point movements with their index finger, and with rods of 10, 20, and 30 cm attached to their index finger. Start point and target were presented on a table in front of them, and in half of the conditions a participant displacement compensated for rod length. Results revealed that the kinematics of the rod's tip showed higher peak velocity, longer deceleration time, and more curvature with longer rods. End-effector movements were more curved in the horizontal plane when participants were not displaced. Joint-angle trajectories were similar across rod lengths when participants were displaced, whereas more extreme joint-angles were used with longer rods when participants were not displaced. Furthermore, in every condition the end-effector was stabilized to a similar extent; both variability in joint-angle coordination patterns that affected end-effector position and variability that did not affect end-effector position increased in a similar way vis-à-vis rod length. Moreover, the increase was higher in those conditions, in which participants were not displaced. This suggests that during tool use, body and tool are united in a single system so as to stabilize the end-effector kinematics in a similar way that is independent of tool length. In addition, the properties of the actual trajectory of the end-effector, as well as the actual joint-angles used, depend on the length of the tool and the

  5. A literature review on optimum and preferred joint angles in automotive sitting posture.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Amereller, Maximilian; Franz, Matthias; Kaiser, Ralf; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a survey of the scientific literature in the field of optimum and preferred human joint angles in automotive sitting posture was conducted by referring to thirty different sources published between 1940 and today. The strategy was to use only sources with numerical angle data in combination with keywords. The aim of the research was to detect commonly used joint angles in interior car design. The main analysis was on data measurement, usability and comparability of the different studies. In addition, the focus was on the reasons for the differently described results. It was found that there is still a lack of information in methodology and description of background. Due to these reasons published data is not always usable to design a modern ergonomic car environment. As a main result of our literature analysis we suggest undertaking further research in the field of biomechanics and ergonomics to work out scientific based and objectively determined "optimum" joint angles in automotive sitting position.

  6. Wear of cross-linked polyethylene against itself: a material suitable for surface replacement of the finger joint.

    PubMed

    Sibly, T F; Unsworth, A

    1991-05-01

    Cross-linking of polyethylene (XLPE) has dramatically improved its properties in industrial applications, and it may also have some application in the field of human joint replacement. Additionally it has the advantage of permitting a lower molecular weight base material to be used, so that components may be injection moulded rather than machined. This study therefore investigates the wear resistance of medical grade cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), cross-linked by a silane-grafting process, with a molecular weight between cross links of 5430 g mol(-1). This first report investigates the wear resistance of XLPE against itself, because for certain joints, such as the metacarpo-phalangeal joint, the material may have a high enough wear resistance to allow both bearing surfaces to be made from it. Tests were carried out both on a reciprocating pin and plate machine with pins loaded at 10 and 40 N and also on a new finger joint simulator, which simulates the loads applied to and the movements of, the metacarpo-phalangeal joint. An average wear rate of 1.8 x 10(-6) mm3 N-1 m-1 was found (range 0.9-2.75 x 10(-6) mm3 N-1 m-1). This is about six times greater than the wear rate of non-cross-linked ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against stainless steel, but for applications with low loading, such as the metacarpo-phalangeal joint, this material is shown to have adequate wear resistance. The coefficient of friction was 0.1, which is similar to that of UHMWPE on stainless steel.

  7. Quantitative three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography of the finger joints: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-11-01

    We present for the first time in vivo full three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of the distal interphalangeal joint in a human subject. Both absorbed energy density and absorption coefficient images of the joint are quantitatively obtained using our finite-element-based photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithm coupled with the photon diffusion equation. The results show that major anatomical features in the joint along with the side arteries can be imaged with a 1-MHz transducer in a spherical scanning geometry. In addition, the cartilages associated with the joint can be quantitatively differentiated from the phalanx. This in vivo study suggests that the 3-D PAT method described has the potential to be used for early diagnosis of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Knee joint angle affects EMG-force relationship in the vastus intermedius muscle.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    It is not understood how the knee joint angle affects the relationship between electromyography (EMG) and force of four individual quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the knee joint angle on the EMG-force relationship of the four individual QF muscles, particularly the vastus intermedius (VI), during isometric knee extensions. Eleven healthy men performed 20-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at knee joint angles of 90°, 120° and 150°. Surface EMG of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized by the root mean square during MVC. The normalized EMG of the four QF synergists at a knee joint angle of 150° was significantly lower than that at 90° and 120° (P < 0.05). Comparing the normalized EMG among the four QF synergists, a significantly lower normalized EMG was observed in the VI at 150° as compared with the other three QF muscles (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the EMG-force relationship of the four QF synergists shifted downward at an extended knee joint angle of 150°. Furthermore, the neuromuscular activation of the VI was the most sensitive to change in muscle length among the four QF synergistic muscles.

  9. Estimation of ankle joint angle from peroneal and tibial electroneurograms based on muscle spindle model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Chan, Ching-Chao

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a new method of estimating the angle of the passively stretched ankle joint, based on structural muscle spindle models of the tibial and peroneal electroneurograms (ENG). Passive ramp-and-hold and alternating stretches of the ankle joint were performed in a rabbit. Simultaneously, two cuff electrodes were used to record the ENGs of peroneal and tibial nerves. Based on the two ENGs and the joint angle trajectory, two muscle spindle models were constructed and their inverse models were integrated to compute angle estimates. The model parameters were optimized. The performance of our approach was compared with those of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and artificial neural network model. The results revealed that our model had a better performance of estimating the ankle joint angle in large-range movements and smaller tracking errors. This study provides a new estimation algorithm to extract the joint angle from the information conveyed in a nerve.

  10. The effect of angle and moment of the hip and knee joint on iliotibial band hardness.

    PubMed

    Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Shiratori, Sakiko; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2015-02-01

    Although several studies have described kinematic deviations such as excessive hip adduction in patients with iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome, the factors contributing to increased ITB hardness remains undetermined, owing to lack of direct in vivo measurement. The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors contributing to an increase in ITB hardness by comparing the ITB hardness between the conditions in which the angle, moment, and muscle activity of the hip and knee joint are changed. Sixteen healthy individuals performed the one-leg standing under five conditions in which the pelvic and trunk inclination were changed in the frontal plane. The shear elastic modulus in the ITB was measured as an indicator of the ITB hardness using shear wave elastography. The three-dimensional joint angle and external joint moment in the hip and knee joints, and muscle activities of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, tensor fasciae latae, and vastus lateralis, which anatomically connect to the ITB, were also measured. ITB hardness was significantly increased in the posture with pelvic and trunk inclination toward the contralateral side of the standing leg compared with that in all other conditions (increase of approximately 32% compared with that during normal one-leg standing). This posture increased both the hip adduction angle and external adduction moment at the hip and knee joint, although muscle activities were not increased. Our findings suggest that coexistence of an increased adduction moment at the hip and knee joints with an excessive hip adduction angle lead to an increase in ITB hardness.

  11. Morphology of the proximal and middle phalanx of fingers with regard to the Ascension PyroCarbon PIP total joint.

    PubMed

    Ries, C; Zhang, W; Burkhart, K J; Neiss, W F; Müller, L P; Hohendorff, B

    2014-07-01

    The Ascension PyroCarbon prosthesis has been used in proximal interphalangeal joint osteoarthritis. The dimensions of the intramedullary distal metadiaphyseal canal (isthmus) of the proximal phalanx and the base of the middle phalanx of cadaver fingers were investigated radiographically (n = 304) and macroscopically (n = 152). In up to 30% of the phalanges, the isthmus was smaller than the stem of the smallest proximal component size. The distal component head was always smaller than the middle phalanx base. Insertion and success of the Ascension PyroCarbon prosthesis is strongly dependent on bone morphology. A critical examination of the isthmus in radiographs is recommended in planning. If the isthmus is clearly smaller than the smallest proximal component, insertion of the prosthesis could be inadvisable. A clear mismatch between the distal component and the middle phalanx base should be avoided due to the potential risk for late subsidence and failure of the prosthesis.

  12. Differences between arms and legs on position sense and joint reaction angle.

    PubMed

    Paschalis, Vassilis; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Giakas, Giannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to compare the arms and legs in relation to position sense and joint reaction angle. Position sense at 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees flexion as well as joint reaction angle to release from 20 degrees, 40 degrees, and 60 degrees flexion of the elbow and knee joint were evaluated in 12 healthy men. The measurements were performed over 3 consecutive days to minimize the error attributable to the variability of the measured parameters. During the assessment of position sense, subjects had to place their limb as closely as possible to the reference angle. The joint reaction angle was measured by a new test in which the subjects had to stop the fall of their limb as soon as possible after it was released. All measurements were performed in a common isokinetic dynamometer. The results of position sense showed that the arms were placed closer to the reference angle compared with the legs (1.3 degrees vs. 3.1 degrees on average for 3 angles, respectively; p < 0.05). The arms also exhibited faster reaction angle to release compared with legs (3.4 degrees vs. 6.3 degrees on average for 3 angles, respectively; p < 0.05). In conclusion, the ability of arms to perform more accurate and faster movements than legs may mainly be attributed to the higher number of muscle spindles and the lower innervation ratio of arms. An imbalance of the determined relationship between arms and legs in position sense and reaction angle may indicate a neuromuscular disturbance.

  13. Erbium--169 versus triamcinolone hexacetonide in the treatment of rheumatoid finger joints.

    PubMed Central

    Ruotsi, A; Hypén, M; Rekonen, A; Oka, M

    1979-01-01

    Erbium--169 was compared with triamcinolone hexacetonide in the topical treatment of 32 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Erbium--169 was injected into 83 and triamcinolone hexacetonide into 54 proximal interphalangeal or metacarpophalangeal joints. Both treatments produced alleviation of joint pain and swelling and improvement of grip strength. At every check-up (1--18 months) the percentage of remissions was higher after triamcinolone hexacetonide injection than after erbium--169. The difference was significant at 1, 3, and 6 months. PMID:434946

  14. Comparison of sensitivity coefficients for joint angle trajectory between normal and pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Błażkiewicz, Michalina; Wit, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Gait recordings exhibit intra-subject, inter-subject, within-trial and between-trial variability as well as data analysis methods. In medicine, comparison of different measuring method results or quantifying changes due to specific treatment is required. The aim of this study was to compare a group homogeneity with respect to dispersion around the reference curve and to compare waveforms of normal and pathological gait data based on joint angle curves. Data files were tracked using APAS system. Our own model of lower limb was used to calculate the trajectories of joint angles for 5 groups: healthy men, women, children, persons with drop foot and Trendelenburg's sign. Waveform parameterizations, RMS, IAE and correlation coefficients were used to compare joint angles with reference curve. The sample scores obtained in this work provide an important information about closeness in the shape of two curves. Using multiple techniques of data analysis will benefit and give more accurate information.

  15. Hip rotation angle is associated with frontal plane knee joint mechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masanori; Shimizu, Norifumi; Yanai, Toshimasa; Stefanyshyn, Darren J; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    Inability to control lower extremity segments in the frontal and transverse planes resulting in large knee abduction angle and increased internal knee abduction impulse has been associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP). However, the influence of hip rotation angles on frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore how hip rotation angles are related to frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics during running. Seventy runners participated in this study. Three-dimensional marker positions and ground reaction forces were recorded with an 8-camera motion analysis system and a force plate while subjects ran along a 25-m runway at a speed of 4m/s. Knee abduction, hip rotation and toe-out angles, frontal plane lever arm at the knee, internal knee abduction moment and impulse, ground reaction forces and the medio-lateral distance from the ankle joint center to the center of pressure (AJC-CoP) were quantified. The findings of this study indicate that greater hip external rotation angles were associated with greater toe-out angles, longer AJC-CoP distances, smaller internal knee abduction impulses with shorter frontal plane lever arms and greater knee abduction angles. Thus, there appears to exist a conflict between kinematic and kinetic risk factors of PFP, and hip external rotation angle may be a key factor to control frontal plane knee joint kinematics and kinetics. These results may help provide an appropriate manipulation and/or intervention on running style to reduce the risk of PFP.

  16. The influence of elbow joint angle on different phases of force development during maximal voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Jaskólski, A; Kisiel, K; Adach, Z; Jaskólska, A

    2000-12-01

    The first aim of the study was to find an elbow joint angle at which muscle can produce maximum voluntary force (Lo(MVC)) and to compare that angle with an angle at which the fastest rates of force development occur (Lo). The second aim of the study was to find if changes in MVC and force development speed at an angle smaller (Ls) and larger (Ll) than the optimal angle depend on whether Ls and Ll were compared to Lo or Ls and Ll to Lo(MVC). Twenty-four male physical education students were tested four times using the BIODYNA dynamometer to measure torque versus time at an optimal length, as well as at lengths that were shorter (Ls = optimal -30 degrees) and longer (Ll = optimal +50 degrees). The average values of optimal angles for force development indices (Lo) were similar to the angle at which maximum force was produced (Lo(MVC)); however, there was a small (5-10 degrees) difference between Lo and Lo(MVC) in the majority of subjects. The results showed that during elbow flexion with the forearm in the midrange position, the difference between Lo and Lo(MVC) was small and did not affect MVC; however, it had a significant effect on the relation between joint angle and force development speed.

  17. Lower Extremity Joint Angle Tracking with Wireless Ultrasonic Sensors during a Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an unrestrained measurement system based on a wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network to track the lower extremity joint and trunk kinematics during a squat exercise with only one ultrasonic sensor attached to the trunk. The system consists of an ultrasound transmitter (mobile) and multiple receivers (anchors) whose positions are known. The proposed system measures the horizontal and vertical displacement, together with known joint constraints, to estimate joint flexion/extension angles using an inverse kinematic model based on the damped least-squares technique. The performance of the proposed ultrasonic measurement system was validated against a camera-based tracking system on eight healthy subjects performing a planar squat exercise. Joint angles estimated from the ultrasonic system showed a root mean square error (RMSE) of 2.85° ± 0.57° with the reference system. Statistical analysis indicated great agreements between these two systems with a Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) value larger than 0.99 for all joint angles' estimation. These results show that the proposed ultrasonic measurement system is useful for applications, such as rehabilitation and sports. PMID:25915589

  18. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  19. Glenohumeral joint reaction forces increase with critical shoulder angles representative of osteoarthritis-A biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Viehöfer, Arnd F; Snedeker, Jess G; Baumgartner, Daniel; Gerber, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the glenohumeral joint constitutes the most frequent indication for nontraumatic shoulder joint replacement. Recently, a small critical shoulder angle (CSA) was found to be associated with a high prevalence of OA. This study aims to verify the hypothesis that a small CSA leads to higher glenohumeral joint reaction forces during activities of daily living than a normal CSA. A shoulder simulator with simulated deltoid (DLT), supraspinatus (SSP), infraspinatus/teres minor (ISP/TM), and subscapularis (SSC) musculotendinous units was constructed. The DLT wrapping on the humerus was simulated using a pulley that could be horizontally adjusted to simulate the 28° CSA found in OA or the 33° CSA found in disease-free shoulders. Over a range of motion between 6° and 82° of thoracohumeral abduction joint forces were measured using a six-axis load cell. An OA-associated CSA yielded higher net joint reaction forces than a normal CSA over the entire range of motion. The maximum difference of 26.4 N (8.5%) was found at 55° of thoracohumeral abduction. Our model thus suggests that a CSA typical for OA predisposes the glenohumeral joint to higher joint reaction forces and could plausibly play a role in joint overloading and development of OA. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1047-1052, 2016.

  20. Fatigue affects peak joint torque angle in hamstrings but not in quadriceps.

    PubMed

    Coratella, Giuseppe; Bellin, Giuseppe; Beato, Marco; Schena, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Primary aim of this study was to investigate peak joint torque angle (i.e. the angle of peak torque) changes recorded during an isokinetic test before and after a fatiguing soccer match simulation. Secondarily we want to investigate functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratio changes due to fatigue. Before and after a standardised soccer match simulation, twenty-two healthy male amateur soccer players performed maximal isokinetic strength tests both for hamstrings and for quadriceps muscles at 1.05 rad · s(‒1), 3.14 rad · s(‒1) and 5.24 rad · s(‒1). Peak joint torque angle, peak torque and both functional Hecc:Qconc and conventional Hconc:Qconc ratios were examined. Both dominant and non-dominant limbs were tested. Peak joint torque angle significantly increased only in knee flexors. Both eccentric and concentric contractions resulted in such increment, which occurred in both limbs. No changes were found in quadriceps peak joint torque angle. Participants experienced a significant decrease in torque both in hamstrings and in quadriceps. Functional Hecc:Qconc ratio was lower only in dominant limb at higher velocities, while Hconc:Qconc did not change. This study showed after specific fatiguing task changes in hamstrings only torque/angle relationship. Hamstrings injury risk could depend on altered torque when knee is close to extension, coupled with a greater peak torque decrement compared to quadriceps. These results suggest the use eccentric based training to prevent hamstrings shift towards shorter length.

  1. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  2. Feasibility study of semi-automated measurements of finger joint space widths.

    PubMed

    Pfeil, Alexander; Sommerfeld, Julia; Fröber, Rosemarie; Lehmann, Gabriele; Malich, Ansgar; Hansch, Andreas; Wolf, Gunter; Böttcher, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate technical feasibility based on image capturing conditions (film-focus distance (FFD), film sensitivity, film brand, exposure level and tube voltage) that potentially alter radiographs and consequently may influence the semi-automated measurement of joint space distance (JSD) by computer-aided joint space analysis (CAJSA) in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The radiographs of a left hand (deceased man) were acquired under systematically changing image capturing conditions (exposure level: 4-8 mAs; FFD: 90-130 cm; film sensitivity: 200/400 and tube voltage: 40-52 kV with different image modalities: conventional radiographs, original digital radiographs, digital print-outs). All JSD-measurements were performed with the CAJSA-technology (Radiogrammetry Kit, Version 1.3.6; Sectra; Sweden) at the metacarpal-phalangeal articulation. JSD-analysis was not influenced by changes of FFD, exposure level, film sensitivity or film brand. JSD showed significant variation caused by tube voltage (conventional: CV = 1.913% for Agfa and CV = 2.448% for Kodak; digital: CV = 0.741% for Philips print-outs and CV = 0.620% with original digital images versus CV = 2.185% for Siemens print-outs and 0.951% with original digital images). Computer-aided joint space analysis for JSD-measurements is unaffected by the following image capturing parameters: film-focus distance, film sensitivity, film brand and exposure level. An influence of tube voltage was detected in a lesser extent for original digital images compared to the printed digital as well as conventional versions. Consequently, a standardized tube voltage is essential for accurate reproductions of CAJSA-measurements in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

  3. The effect of an active vibration stimulus according to different shoulder joint angles on functional reach and stability of the shoulder joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of an active vibration stimulus exercise according to shoulder joint angles on functional reach and stability of the shoulder joint. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy male students participated in this study. Upper limb length of each subject was measured to obtain normalized measurement values. The exercise groups were as follows: group I (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 90°), group II (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 130°), and group III (n=10, shoulder joint angle of 180°). After warm-up, an active vibration stimulus was applied to the subjects with a Flexi-Bar. The Functional Reach Test and Y-balance test were conducted for measurement of shoulder stability. [Results] Analysis of covariance was conducted with values before the intervention as covariates to analyze the differences among the groups in the two tests. There were significant differences among the groups. According to Bonferroni post hoc comparison, group I showed greater improvement than group III in the Functional Reach Test, and group II showed greater improvement than group I and group III in the Y-balance test. [Conclusion] The effect of the exercise with different shoulder joint angles revealed that the shoulder joint has a certain effective joint angle for its functionality and stability. In addition, application of an active vibration stimulus with a Flexi-Bar can be a very effective tool for improvement of functionality and stability of the shoulder joint. PMID:27134352

  4. Ankle Joint Angle and Lower Leg Musculotendinous Unit Responses to Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akehi, Kazuma; Long, Blaine C; Warren, Aric J; Goad, Carla L

    2016-09-01

    Akehi, K, Long, BC, Warren, AJ, and Goad, CL. Ankle joint angle and lower leg musculotendinous unit responses to cryotherapy. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2482-2492, 2016-The use of cold application has been debated for its influence on joint range of motion (ROM) and stiffness. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a 30-minute ice bag application to the plantarflexor muscles or ankle influences passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM and lower leg musculotendinous stiffness (MTS). Thirty-five recreationally active college-aged individuals with no history of lower leg injury 6 months before data collection volunteered. On each testing day, we measured maximum passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM (°) and plantarflexor torque (N·m) on an isokinetic dynamometer to calculate the passive plantarflexor MTS (N·m per degree) at 4 joint angles before, during, and after a treatment. Surface electromyography amplitudes (μV), and skin surface and ambient air temperature (°C) were also measured. Subjects received an ice bag to the posterior lower leg, ankle joint, or nothing for 30 minutes in different days. Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle did not influence passive ROM (F(12,396) = 0.67, p = 0.78). Passive torque increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.21, p = 0.011). Passive MTS at the initial joint angle increased after ice bag application to the lower leg (F(12,396) = 2.14, p = 0.014) but not at the other joint angles (p > 0.05). Surface electromyography amplitudes for gastrocnemius and soleus muscles increased after ice application to the lower leg (F(2,66) = 5.61, p = 0.006; F(12,396) = 3.60, p < 0.001). Ice bag application to the lower leg and ankle joint does not alter passive dorsiflexion ROM but increases passive ankle plantarflexor torque in addition to passive ankle plantarflexor MTS at the initial joint angle.

  5. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing.

  6. Intrinsic Foot Muscle Deterioration is Associated with Metatarsophalangeal Joint Angle in People with Diabetes and Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheuy, Victor A.; Hastings, Mary K.; Commean, Paul K.; Ward, Samuel R.; Mueller, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Metatarsophalangeal joint deformity is associated with skin breakdown and amputation. The aims of this study were to compare intrinsic foot muscle deterioration ratios (ratio of adipose to muscle volume), and physical performance in subjects with diabetic neuropathy to controls, and determine their associations with 1) metatarsophalangeal joint angle and 2) history of foot ulcer. Methods 23 diabetic, neuropathic subjects [59 (SD 10) years] and 12 age-matched controls [57 (SD 14) years] were studied. Radiographs and MRI were used to measure metatarsophalangeal joint angle and intrinsic foot muscle deterioration through tissue segmentation by image signal intensity. The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure evaluated physical performance. Findings The diabetic, neuropathic group had a higher muscle deterioration ratio [1.6 (SD 1.2) vs. 0.3 (SD 0.2), P < 0.001], and lower Foot and Ankle Ability Measure scores [65.1 (SD 24.4) vs. 98.3 (SD 3.3) %, P < 0.01]. The correlation between muscle deterioration ratio and metatarsophalangeal joint angle was r = −0.51 (P = 0.01) for all diabetic, neuropathic subjects, but increased to r = −0.81 (P < 0.01) when only subjects with muscle deterioration ratios >1.0 were included. Muscle deterioration ratios in individuals with diabetic neuropathy were higher for those with a history of ulcers. Interpretation Individuals with diabetic neuropathy had increased intrinsic foot muscle deterioration, which was associated with second metatarsophalangeal joint angle and history of ulceration. Additional research is required to understand how foot muscle deterioration interacts with other impairments leading to forefoot deformity and skin breakdown. PMID:24176198

  7. The Effect of Gap Angle on Tensile Strength of Preceramic Base Metal Solder Joints

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Farnaz; Hashemi Ardakani, Zahra; Hashemi Ardakani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Soldering is a process commonly used in fabricating dental prosthesis. Since most soldered prosthesis fail at the solder joints; the joint strength is of utmost importance. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gap angle on the tensile strength of base metal solder joints. Materials and Method A total number of 40 Ni-Cr samples were fabricated according to ADA/ISO 9693 specifications for tensile test. Samples were cut at the midpoint of the bar, and were placed at the considered angles by employing an explicitly designed device. They were divided into 4 groups regarding the gap angle; Group C (control group) with parallel gap on steady distance of 0.2mm, Group 1: 10°, Group 2: 20°, and Group3: 30° gap angles. When soldered, the specimens were all tested for tensile strength using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min with a preload of 10N. Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to compare tensile strength among the groups (p< 0.05). Results The mean tensile strength values obtained from the study groups were respectively 307.84, 391.50, 365.18, and 368.86 MPa. The tensile strength was not statistically different among the four groups in general (p≤ 0.490). Conclusion Making the gap angular at the solder joints and the subsequent unsteady increase of the gap distance would not change the tensile strength of the joint. PMID:26636118

  8. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

    PubMed Central

    Mourcou, Quentin; Fleury, Anthony; Diot, Bruno; Franco, Céline; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS). Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home. PMID:26583101

  9. Individual Optimal Frequency in Whole-Body Vibration: Effect of Protocol, Joint Angle, and Fatiguing Exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Flaminia; Felici, Francesco; Piccinini, Alberto; Haxhi, Jonida; Sacchetti, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Carlucci, F, Felici, F, Piccinini, A, Haxhi, J, and Sacchetti, M. Individual optimal frequency in whole-body vibration: effect of protocol, joint angle, and fatiguing exercise. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3503-3511, 2016-Recent studies have shown the importance of individualizing the vibration intervention to produce greater effects on the neuromuscular system in less time. The purpose of this study was to assess the individual optimal vibration frequency (OVF) corresponding to the highest muscle activation (RMSmax) during vibration at different frequencies, comparing different protocols. Twenty-nine university students underwent 3 continuous (C) and 2 random (R) different vibrating protocols, maintaining a squat position on a vibration platform. The C protocol lasted 50 seconds and involved the succession of ascending frequencies from 20 to 55 Hz, every 5 seconds. The same protocol was performed twice, having the knee angle at 120° (C) and 90° (C90), to assess the effect of joint angle and after a fatiguing squatting exercise (CF) to evaluate the influence of fatigue on OVF assessment. In the random protocols, vibration time was 20 seconds with a 2-minute (R2) and a 4-minute (R4) pauses between tested frequencies. Muscle activation and OVF values did not differ significantly in the C, R2, and R4 protocols. RMSmax was higher in C90 (p < 0.001) and in CF (p = 0.04) compared with the C protocol. Joint angle and fatiguing exercise had no effect on OVF. In conclusion, the shorter C protocol produced similar myoelectrical activity in the R2 and the R4 protocols, and therefore, it could be equally valid in identifying the OVF with considerable time efficiency. Knee joint angle and fatiguing exercise had an effect on surface electromyography response during vibration but did not affect OVF identification significantly.

  10. Infrared laser transillumination CT imaging system using parallel fiber arrays and optical switches for finger joint imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Emori, Ryota; Inage, Hiroki; Goto, Masaki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao

    2004-05-01

    The heterodyne detection technique, on which the coherent detection imaging (CDI) method founds, can discriminate and select very weak, highly directional forward scattered, and coherence retaining photons that emerge from scattering media in spite of their complex and highly scattering nature. That property enables us to reconstruct tomographic images using the same reconstruction technique as that of X-Ray CT, i.e., the filtered backprojection method. Our group had so far developed a transillumination laser CT imaging method based on the CDI method in the visible and near-infrared regions and reconstruction from projections, and reported a variety of tomographic images both in vitro and in vivo of biological objects to demonstrate the effectiveness to biomedical use. Since the previous system was not optimized, it took several hours to obtain a single image. For a practical use, we developed a prototype CDI-based imaging system using parallel fiber array and optical switches to reduce the measurement time significantly. Here, we describe a prototype transillumination laser CT imaging system using fiber-optic based on optical heterodyne detection for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), by demonstrating the tomographic imaging of acrylic phantom as well as the fundamental imaging properties. We expect that further refinements of the fiber-optic-based laser CT imaging system could lead to a novel and practical diagnostic tool for rheumatoid arthritis and other joint- and bone-related diseases in human finger.

  11. PARALIND-based blind joint angle and delay estimation for multipath signals with uniform linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Guang, Liang; Yang, Longxiang; Zhu, Hongbo

    2012-12-01

    A novel joint angle and delay estimation (JADE) algorithm for multipath signals, based on the PARAllel profiles with LINear Dependencies (PARALIND) model, is proposed. Capitalizing on the structure property of Vandermonde matrices, PARALIND model is proved to be unique. Angle and delay of multiple rays of sources can be estimated by PARALIND decomposition and an ESPRIT-like shift-invariance technique. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional JADE algorithm. It can automatically distinguish the estimated parameters between sources, and still be available when the number of rays is larger than the number of receiving antennae.

  12. The effects of finger extension on shoulder muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-Woo; Shin, Ju-Yong; Kim, Youn-Joung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to examine the effects of the extension of the fingers (distal upper limb) on the activity of the shoulder muscles (proximal upper limb). [Subjects and Methods] This study involved 14 healthy male adults with no musculoskeletal disorder or pain related to the shoulders and hands. The subjects in a sitting posture abducted the angle of the shoulder joints at 60° and had their palms in the front direction. Electromyography (EMG) was comparatively analyzed to look at the activities of the infraspinatus (IS) and rhomboid major (RM) when the fingers were extended and relaxed. [Results] The activity of the IS was statistically significantly higher when the fingers were extended than when they were relaxed. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, finger extension is considered to affect the muscles for connected shoulder joint stability. PMID:26504277

  13. The effect of the ankle joint angle in the level of soleus Ia afferent presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patikas, D A; Kotzamanidis, C; Robertson, C T; Koceja, D M

    2004-12-01

    The factors that are responsible for the relationship between motoneuron excitability and muscle length may have both mechanical and/or neurophysiologic origins. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in the level of presynaptic inhibition, as measured with a soleus H-reflex conditioning protocol, and muscle length. Ten healthy volunteers were measured at three different ankle angles: 30 degrees plantar flexion, neutral position (0 degrees) and 15 degrees dorsiflexion. At each position the soleus H-reflex and the maximum M-wave were measured while the limb was relaxed. The H-reflex was conditioned by a stimulation of the common peroneal nerve, 100 ms prior to the tibial nerve stimulation. The results revealed that the level of presynaptic inhibition was higher at the neutral position in comparison to the dorsiflexed or plantarflexed positions. Additionally, the HMAX/MMAX ratio was significantly decreased when the joint position was set at dorsiflexion. Further, there was a significant correlation, independent of ankle joint angle, between presynaptic inhibition levels and the HMAX/MMAX ratio. The above findings support the concept that peripheral feedback from passive, static modifications in the joint angle and consequently in muscle length, can modify the input/output threshold of the motoneurons on a presynaptic level.

  14. Residual force enhancement during multi-joint leg extensions at joint- angle configurations close to natural human motion.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Florian Kurt; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Hahn, Daniel; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2016-03-21

    The isometric steady-state forces following lengthening are greater than those produced at the same muscle length and activation level but without prior lengthening. Although residual force enhancement (RFE) has been investigated across a range of conditions, its relevance for daily human movement is still poorly understood. We aimed to study RFE in a setup imitating daily activity, i.e., submaximal activation of the lower extremity's muscles with slightly flexed knee joints comparable to human walking. A motor-driven leg press dynamometer was used for randomly arranged purely isometric and isometric-eccentric-isometric contractions. Thirteen subjects performed multi-joint leg extensions, which were feedback-controlled at 30% of maximum voluntary vastus lateralis activation. Isometric-eccentric-isometric contractions incorporated a stretch from 30° to 50° knee flexion, while isometric contractions were performed at 50° knee flexion. Isometric contractions following stretch and purely isometric reference contractions were performed at 50° knee flexion. Kinematics, forces, and muscular activity were measured using 3D optical motion tracking, force plates, and surface EMG of 9 lower limb muscles of the right leg and joint torques were calculated by inverse dynamics. Variables of standardization (EMG, joint angles) showed no differences between contraction conditions. Eight of 13 subjects showed RFE of up to 24.8±32.5% for external forces and joint torques. Because the remaining 5 non-responders failed to produce enhanced forces during the stretch, we believe that RFE is functionally relevant for muscle function comparable to everyday human motion but only if there is enhanced force during stretch that sufficiently triggers mechanisms underlying RFE.

  15. Ranges of the least uncomfortable joint angles for assessing automotive driving posture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junfeng; Wang, Xuguang; Denninger, Lisa

    2017-05-01

    Few investigations have been performed on how the ranges of preferred angles should be used for vehicle interior discomfort evaluation. This study investigated the ranges of the least uncomfortable joint angles considering both inter-individual and intra-individual variability. The driving postures of sixty-one subjects were collected using two multi-adjustable vehicle mock-ups under four test conditions by gradually adding the number of control parameters (constraints), from the "least-constrained" driving condition to the configurations close to currently existing vehicles. With help of subjective discomfort evaluation, the intra-and inter-individual variation ranges of least uncomfortable postural angles were quantified. Results show that intra-individual variation ranges of postural angles were much smaller than those of inter-individual variation as expected. An individual may not feel comfortable throughout the whole range of comfortable angles from all participants. Possible relationships between perceived discomfort and ranges of inter and inter individual variations in least uncomfortable angles were explored, suggesting that the inter ranges could be used to detect potential problems of postural discomfort and the intra ranges could be considered as optimum ranges. A three color model, based on the intra-and inter-individual variability ranges of comfortable driving postures, was proposed for ergonomics assessment of a vehicle configuration.

  16. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  17. Correction of joint angles from Kinect for balance exercising and assessment.

    PubMed

    De Rosario, Helios; Belda-Lois, Juan Manuel; Fos, Francisco; Medina, Enrique; Poveda-Puente, Rakel; Kroll, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The new generation of videogame interfaces such as Microsoft's Kinect opens the possibility of implementing exercise programs for physical training, and of evaluating and reducing the risks of elderly people falling. However, applications such as these might require measurements of joint kinematics that are more robust and accurate than the standard output given by the available middleware. This article presents a method based on particle filters for calculating joint angles from the positions of the anatomical points detected by PrimeSense's NITE software. The application of this method to the measurement of lower limb kinematics reduced the error by one order of magnitude, to less than 10°, except for hip axial rotation, and it was advantageous over inverse kinematic analysis, in ensuring a robust and smooth solution without singularities, when the limbs are out-stretched and anatomical landmarks are aligned.

  18. Impact of decline-board squat exercises and knee joint angles on the muscle activity of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to investigate how squat exercises on a decline board and how the knee joint angles affect the muscle activity of the lower limbs. [Subjects] The subjects were 26 normal adults. [Methods] A Tumble Forms wedge device was used as the decline board, and the knee joint angles were measured with a goniometer. To examine the muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior of the lower limbs, a comparison analysis with electromyography was conducted. [Results] The muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior increased with increased knee joint angles, both for squat exercises on the decline board and on a flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 45°, 60°, and 90°, the muscle activity of the rectus femoris was significantly higher and that of the tibialis anterior was significantly lower during squat exercises on the decline board than on the flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 90°, the muscle activity of the gastrocnemius lateralis was significantly lower. [Conclusion] Squat exercises on a decline board are an effective intervention to increase the muscle activity of the rectus femoris with increased knee joint angles.

  19. Maximum voluntary joint torque as a function of joint angle and angular velocity: model development and application to the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Dennis E; Madigan, Michael L; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of human strength can be important during analyses of physical activities. Such measurements have often taken the form of the maximum voluntary torque at a single joint angle and angular velocity. However, the available strength varies substantially with joint position and velocity. When examining dynamic activities, strength measurements should account for these variations. A model is presented of maximum voluntary joint torque as a function of joint angle and angular velocity. The model is based on well-known physiological relationships between muscle force and length and between muscle force and velocity and was tested by fitting it to maximum voluntary joint torque data from six different exertions in the lower limb. Isometric, concentric and eccentric maximum voluntary contractions were collected during hip extension, hip flexion, knee extension, knee flexion, ankle plantar flexion and dorsiflexion. Model parameters are reported for each of these exertion directions by gender and age group. This model provides an efficient method by which strength variations with joint angle and angular velocity may be incorporated into comparisons between joint torques calculated by inverse dynamics and the maximum available joint torques.

  20. The effects of elbow joint angle change on the elbow flexor muscle activation in pulley with weight exercise.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taewook; Seo, Youngjoon; Park, Jaehoon; Dong, Eunseok; Seo, Byungdo; Han, Dongwook

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] This research investigated the effect of angular variation of flexion of the elbow joint on the muscle activation of elbow flexor muscles. [Subjects] The research subjects were 24 male college students with a dominant right hand who had no surgical or neurological disorders and gave their prior written consent to participation with full knowledge of the method and purpose of this study. [Methods] The subjects' shoulder joints stayed in the resting position, and the elbow joint was positioned at angles of 55°, 70°, and 90°. The angle between the pulley with weights and forearm stayed at 90°. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activities. Three measurements were made at each elbow angle, and every time the angle changed, two minutes rest was given. [Result] The muscle activities of the elbow flexors showed significant changes with change in the elbow joint angle, except for the biceps brachii activities between the angles of 55° and 70° of elbow flexion. The muscle activities of the biceps brachii and brachioradialis showed angle-related changes in the order of 55°, which showed the biggest value, followed by 70° and 90°. [Conclusion] In order to improve muscle strength of the elbow flexor using a pulley system, it seems more effective to have a 90° angle between the pulley with weights and the forearm when the muscle is stretched to a length 20% greater than its resting position.

  1. The Effects of Elbow Joint Angle Change on the Elbow Flexor Muscle Activation in Pulley with Weight Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Taewook; Seo, Youngjoon; Park, Jaehoon; Dong, Eunseok; Seo, Byungdo; Han, Dongwook

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This research investigated the effect of angular variation of flexion of the elbow joint on the muscle activation of elbow flexor muscles. [Subjects] The research subjects were 24 male college students with a dominant right hand who had no surgical or neurological disorders and gave their prior written consent to participation with full knowledge of the method and purpose of this study. [Methods] The subjects' shoulder joints stayed in the resting position, and the elbow joint was positioned at angles of 55°, 70°, and 90°. The angle between the pulley with weights and forearm stayed at 90°. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activities. Three measurements were made at each elbow angle, and every time the angle changed, two minutes rest was given. [Result] The muscle activities of the elbow flexors showed significant changes with change in the elbow joint angle, except for the biceps brachii activities between the angles of 55° and 70° of elbow flexion. The muscle activities of the biceps brachii and brachioradialis showed angle-related changes in the order of 55°, which showed the biggest value, followed by 70° and 90°. [Conclusion] In order to improve muscle strength of the elbow flexor using a pulley system, it seems more effective to have a 90° angle between the pulley with weights and the forearm when the muscle is stretched to a length 20% greater than its resting position. PMID:24259930

  2. Intelligent algorithm tuning PID method of function electrical stimulation using knee joint angle.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuang; He, Feng; Tang, Jiabei; Xu, Jiapeng; Zhang, Lixin; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Xiaoman; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) could restore motor functions for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). By applying electric current pulses, FES system could produce muscle contractions, generate joint torques, and thus, achieve joint movements automatically. Since the muscle system is highly nonlinear and time-varying, feedback control is quite necessary for precision control of the preset action. In the present study, we applied two methods (Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) controller based on Back Propagation (BP) neural network and that based on Genetic Algorithm (GA)), to control the knee joint angle for the FES system, while the traditional Ziegler-Nichols method was used in the control group for comparison. They were tested using a muscle model of the quadriceps. The results showed that intelligent algorithm tuning PID controller displayed superior performance than classic Ziegler-Nichols method with constant parameters. More particularly, PID controller tuned by BP neural network was superior on controlling precision to make the feedback signal track the desired trajectory whose error was less than 1.2°±0.16°, while GA-PID controller, seeking the optimal parameters from multipoint simultaneity, resulted in shortened delay in the response. Both strategies showed promise in application of intelligent algorithm tuning PID methods in FES system.

  3. Model of soft tissue artifact propagation to joint angles in human movement analysis.

    PubMed

    Page, Álvaro; de Rosario, Helios; Mata, Vicente; Besa, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    This work describes the kinematic laws that govern the transmission of soft tissue artifact errors to kinematic variables in the analysis of human movements. Artifacts are described as relative translations and rotations of the marker cluster over the bone, and a set of explicit expressions is defined to account for the effect of that relative motion on different representations of rotations: the rotation around the screw axis, or rotation vector, and three Euler angle sequences (XY'Z, YX'Y″, ZX'Y″). Although the error transmission is nonlinear in all cases, the effect of artifacts is greater on Euler sequences than on the rotation vector. Specifically, there are crosstalk effects in Euler sequences that amplify the errors near singular configurations. This fact is an additional source of variability in studies that describe artifacts by comparing the Euler angles obtained from skin markers, with the angles of an artifact-free gold standard. The transmission of errors to rotation vector coordinates is less variable or dependent on the type of motion. This model has been tested in an experiment with a deformable mechanical model with a spherical joint.

  4. Hip and knee joints are more stabilized than driven during the stance phase of gait: an analysis of the 3D angle between joint moment and joint angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Dumas, R; Cheze, L

    2008-08-01

    Joint power is commonly used in orthopaedics, ergonomics or sports analysis but its clinical interpretation remains controversial. Some basic principles on muscle actions and energy transfer have been proposed in 2D. The decomposition of power on 3 axes, although questionable, allows the same analysis in 3D. However, these basic principles have been widely criticized, mainly because bi-articular muscles must be considered. This requires a more complex computation in order to determine how the individual muscle force contributes to drive the joint. Conversely, with simple 3D inverse dynamics, the analysis of both joint moment and angular velocity directions is essential to clarify when the joint moment can contribute or not to drive the joint. The present study evaluates the 3D angle between the joint moment and the joint angular velocity and investigates when the hip, knee and ankle joints are predominantly driven (angle close to 0 degrees and 180 degrees ) or stabilized (angle close to 90 degrees ) during gait. The 3D angle curves show that the three joints are never fully but only partially driven and that the hip and knee joints are mainly stabilized during the stance phase. The notion of stabilization should be further investigated, especially for subjects with motion disorders or prostheses.

  5. Prediction accuracy in estimating joint angle trajectories using a video posture coding method for sagittal lifting tasks.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Chi; McGorry, Raymond W; Lin, Jia-Hua; Xu, Xu; Hsiang, Simon M

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated prediction accuracy of a video posture coding method for lifting joint trajectory estimation. From three filming angles, the coder selected four key snapshots, identified joint angles and then a prediction program estimated the joint trajectories over the course of a lift. Results revealed a limited range of differences of joint angles (elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle) between the manual coding method and the electromagnetic motion tracking system approach. Lifting range significantly affected estimate accuracy for all joints and camcorder filming angle had a significant effect on all joints but the hip. Joint trajectory predictions were more accurate for knuckle-to-shoulder lifts than for floor-to-shoulder or floor-to-knuckle lifts with average root mean square errors (RMSE) of 8.65 degrees , 11.15 degrees and 11.93 degrees , respectively. Accuracy was also greater for the filming angles orthogonal to the participant's sagittal plane (RMSE = 9.97 degrees ) as compared to filming angles of 45 degrees (RMSE = 11.01 degrees ) or 135 degrees (10.71 degrees ). The effects of lifting speed and loading conditions were minimal. To further increase prediction accuracy, improved prediction algorithms and/or better posture matching methods should be investigated. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Observation and classification of postures are common steps in risk assessment of manual materials handling tasks. The ability to accurately predict lifting patterns through video coding can provide ergonomists with greater resolution in characterising or assessing the lifting tasks than evaluation based solely on sampling with a single lifting posture event.

  6. Joint angle variability in 3D bimanual pointing: uncontrolled manifold analysis.

    PubMed

    Domkin, Dmitry; Laczko, Jozsef; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Jaric, Slobodan; Latash, Mark L

    2005-05-01

    The structure of joint angle variability and its changes with practice were investigated using the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) computational approach. Subjects performed fast and accurate bimanual pointing movements in 3D space, trying to match the tip of a pointer, held in the right hand, with the tip of one of three different targets, held in the left hand during a pre-test, several practice sessions and a post-test. The prediction of the UCM approach about the structuring of joint angle variance for selective stabilization of important task variables was tested with respect to selective stabilization of time series of the vectorial distance between the pointer and aimed target tips (bimanual control hypothesis) and with respect to selective stabilization of the endpoint trajectory of each arm (unimanual control hypothesis). The components of the total joint angle variance not affecting (V(COMP)) and affecting (V(UN)) the value of a selected task variable were computed for each 10% of the normalized movement time. The ratio of these two components R(V)=V(COMP)/V(UN) served as a quantitative index of selective stabilization. Both the bimanual and unimanual control hypotheses were supported, however the R(V) values for the bimanual hypothesis were significantly higher than those for the unimanual hypothesis applied to the left and right arm both prior to and after practice. This suggests that the CNS stabilizes the relative trajectory of one endpoint with respect to the other more than it stabilizes the trajectories of each of the endpoints in the external space. Practice-associated improvement in both movement speed and accuracy was accompanied by counter-intuitive lack of changes in R(V). Both V(COMP) and V(UN) variance components decreased such that their ratio remained constant prior to and after practice. We conclude that the UCM approach offers a unique and under-explored opportunity to track changes in the organization of multi-effector systems with practice

  7. An evaluation of the spring finger solder joints on SA1358-10 and SA2052-4 connector assemblies (MC3617,W87).

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Hlava, Paul Frank; Zender, Gary L.

    2006-08-01

    The SA1358-10 and SA2052-4 circular JT Type plug connectors are used on a number of nuclear weapons and Joint Test Assembly (JTA) systems. Prototype units were evaluated for the following specific defects associated with the 95Sn-5Sb (Sn-Sb, wt.%) solder joint used to attach the beryllium-copper (BeCu) spring fingers to the aluminum (Al) connector shell: (1) extended cracking within the fillet; (2) remelting of the solder joint during the follow-on, soldering step that attached the EMR adapter ring to the connector shell (and/or soldering the EMR shell to the adapter ring) that used the lower melting temperature 63Sn-37Pb (Sn-Pb) alloy; and (3) spalling of the Cd (Cr) layer overplating layer from the fillet surface. Several pedigrees of connectors were evaluated, which represented older fielded units as well as those assemblies that were recently constructed at Kansas City Plant. The solder joints were evaluated that were in place on connectors made with the current soldering process as well as an alternative induction soldering process for attaching the EMR adapter ring to the shell. Very similar observations were made, which crossed the different pedigrees of parts and processes. The extent of cracking in the top side fillets varied between the different connector samples and likely the EMR adapter ring to the shell. Very similar observations were made, which crossed the different pedigrees of parts and processes. The extent of cracking in the top side fillets varied between the different connector samples and likely reflected the different extents to which the connector was mated to its counterpart assembly. In all cases, the spring finger solder joints on the SA1358-10 connectors were remelted as a result of the subsequent EMR adapter ring attachment process. Spalling of the Cd (Cr) overplating layer was also observed for these connectors, which was a consequence of the remelting activity. On the other hand, the SA2052-4 connector did not exhibit evidence of

  8. EVALUATION OF THE INTERMETATARSAL ANGLE AFTER THE ARTHRODESIS OF THE FIRST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT FOR TREATMENT OF THE HALLUX VALGUS

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marco Túlio; Neto, Douglas Lobato Lopes; Kojima, Fábio Henrique; Ferreira, Ricardo Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correction of the intermetatarsal angle after arthrodesis of the metatarsophalangeal joint of the hallux. We believe that varus deformity of the first metatarsal can be corrected after arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, without the need for proximal osteotomy. Methods: Forty-three feet of patients who had undergone arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint between May 1997 and October 2009 were retrospectively analyzed by means of radiographs. The mean length of follow-up was 58 months. Measurements on the metatarsophalangeal angle, intermetatarsal angle and sesamoid dislocation were made using radiographs made before, immediately after and later on after the operation. Results: The mean metatarsophalangeal angle was 37.6 degrees preoperatively, 12.8 degrees immediately after the operation and 16.4 degrees later on after the operation. The mean intermetatarsal angle was 16 degrees preoperatively, 10 degrees immediately after the operation and 10.2 degrees later on after the operation. Regarding sesamoid dislocation, preoperative radiographs showed most feet to be classified as G3; immediately after the operation, most were classified as G2; and later on after the operation, most were G1. Conclusion: The intermetatarsal angle and sesamoid dislocation improved with arthrodesis of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, without the need for osteotomy at the base of the first metatarsal. PMID:27042648

  9. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  10. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  11. Design and characterization of a wearable macrobending fiber optic sensor for human joint angle determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Ana S.; Catarino, André; Correia, Miguel V.; Frazão, Orlando

    2013-12-01

    The work presented here describes the development and characterization of intensity fiber optic sensor integrated in a specifically designed piece of garment to measure elbow flexion. The sensing head is based on macrobending incorporated in the garment, and the increase of curvature number was studied in order to investigate which scheme provided a good result in terms of sensitivity and repeatability. Results showed the configuration that assured a higher sensitivity (0.644 dBm/deg) and better repeatability was the one with four loops. Ultimately, this sensor can be used for rehabilitation purposes to monitor human joint angles, namely, elbow flexion on stroke survivors while performing the reach functional task, which is the most common upper-limb human gesture.

  12. Effect of elbow joint angle on force-EMG relationships in human elbow flexor and extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; Lowery, Madeleine M; Fitzpatrick, David P; O'Malley, Mark J

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of joint angle on the relationship between force and electromyogram (EMG) amplitude and median frequency, in the biceps, brachioradialis and triceps muscles. Surface EMG were measured at eight elbow angles, during isometric flexion and extension at force levels from 10% to 100% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Joint angle had a significant effect on MVC force, but not on MVC EMG amplitude in all of the muscles examined. The median frequency of the biceps and triceps EMG decreased with increasing muscle length, possibly due to relative changes in electrode position or a decrease in muscle fibre diameter. The relationship between EMG amplitude and force, normalised with respect to its maximum force at each angle, did not vary with joint angle in the biceps or brachioradialis muscles over all angles, or in the triceps between 45 degrees and 120 degrees of flexion. These results suggest that the neural excitation level to each muscle is determined by the required percentage of available force rather than the absolute force required. It is, therefore, recommended that when using surface EMG to estimate muscle excitation, force should be normalised with respect to its maximum value at each angle.

  13. Influence of Joint Angle on EMG-Torque Model During Constant-Posture, Torque-Varying Contractions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Liu, Lukai; Clancy, Edward A

    2015-11-01

    Relating the electromyogram (EMG) to joint torque is useful in various application areas, including prosthesis control, ergonomics and clinical biomechanics. Limited study has related EMG to torque across varied joint angles, particularly when subjects performed force-varying contractions or when optimized modeling methods were utilized. We related the biceps-triceps surface EMG of 22 subjects to elbow torque at six joint angles (spanning 60° to 135°) during constant-posture, torque-varying contractions. Three nonlinear EMG σ -torque models, advanced EMG amplitude (EMG σ ) estimation processors (i.e., whitened, multiple-channel) and the duration of data used to train models were investigated. When EMG-torque models were formed separately for each of the six distinct joint angles, a minimum "gold standard" error of 4.01±1.2% MVC(F90) resulted (i.e., error relative to maximum voluntary contraction at 90° flexion). This model structure, however, did not directly facilitate interpolation across angles. The best model which did so achieved a statistically equivalent error of 4.06±1.2% MVC(F90). Results demonstrated that advanced EMG σ processors lead to improved joint torque estimation as do longer model training durations.

  14. Limited-angle multi-energy CT using joint clustering prior and sparsity regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huayu; Xing, Yuxiang

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present an easy-to-implement Multi-energy CT scanning strategy and a corresponding reconstruction method, which facilitate spectral CT imaging by improving the data efficiency the number-of-energy- channel fold without introducing visible limited-angle artifacts caused by reducing projection views. Leveraging the structure coherence at different energies, we first pre-reconstruct a prior structure information image using projection data from all energy channels. Then, we perform a k-means clustering on the prior image to generate a sparse dictionary representation for the image, which severs as a structure information constraint. We com- bine this constraint with conventional compressed sensing method and proposed a new model which we referred as Joint Clustering Prior and Sparsity Regularization (CPSR). CPSR is a convex problem and we solve it by Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). We verify our CPSR reconstruction method with a numerical simulation experiment. A dental phantom with complicate structures of teeth and soft tissues is used. X-ray beams from three spectra of different peak energies (120kVp, 90kVp, 60kVp) irradiate the phantom to form tri-energy projections. Projection data covering only 75◦ from each energy spectrum are collected for reconstruction. Independent reconstruction for each energy will cause severe limited-angle artifacts even with the help of compressed sensing approaches. Our CPSR provides us with images free of the limited-angle artifact. All edge details are well preserved in our experimental study.

  15. Influence of joint angle on EMG-torque model during constant-posture, quasi-constant-torque contractions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Liu, Lukai; Martel, Francois; Rancourt, Denis; Clancy, Edward A

    2013-10-01

    Electromyogram (EMG)-torque modeling is of value to many different application areas, including ergonomics, clinical biomechanics and prosthesis control. One important aspect of EMG-torque modeling is the ability to account for the joint angle influence. This manuscript describes an experimental study which relates the biceps/triceps surface EMG of 12 subjects to elbow torque at seven joint angles (spanning 45-135°) during constant-posture, quasi-constant-torque contractions. Advanced EMG amplitude (EMGσ) estimation processors (i.e., whitened, multiple-channel) were investigated and three non-linear EMGσ-torque models were evaluated. When EMG-torque models were formed separately for each of the seven distinct joint angles, a minimum "gold standard" error of 4.23±2.2% MVCF90 resulted (i.e., error relative to maximum voluntary contraction at 90° flexion). This model structure, however, did not directly facilitate interpolation across angles. The best model which did so (i.e., parameterized the angle dependence), achieved an error of 4.17±1.7% MVCF90. Results demonstrated that advanced EMGσ processors lead to improved joint torque estimation. We also contrasted models that did vs. did not account for antagonist muscle co-contraction. Models that accounted for co-contraction estimated individual flexion muscle torques that were ∼29% higher and individual extension muscle torques that were ∼68% higher.

  16. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  17. Segment and joint angles of hind limb during bipedal and quadrupedal walking of the bonobo (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    D'Août, Kristiaan; Aerts, Peter; De Clercq, Dirk; De Meester, Koen; Van Elsacker, Linda

    2002-09-01

    We describe segment angles (trunk, thigh, shank, and foot) and joint angles (hip, knee, and ankle) for the hind limbs of bonobos walking bipedally ("bent-hip bent-knee walking," 17 sequences) and quadrupedally (33 sequences). Data were based on video recordings (50 Hz) of nine subjects in a lateral view, walking at voluntary speed. The major differences between bipedal and quadrupedal walking are found in the trunk, thigh, and hip angles. During bipedal walking, the trunk is approximately 33-41 degrees more erect than during quadrupedal locomotion, although it is considerably more bent forward than in normal human locomotion. Moreover, during bipedal walking, the hip has a smaller range of motion (by 12 degrees ) and is more extended (by 20-35 degrees ) than during quadrupedal walking. In general, angle profiles in bonobos are much more variable than in humans. Intralimb phase relationships of subsequent joint angles show that hip-knee coordination is similar for bipedal and quadrupedal walking, and resembles the human pattern. The coordination between knee and ankle differs much more from the human pattern. Based on joint angles observed throughout stance phase and on the estimation of functional leg length, an efficient inverted pendulum mechanism is not expected in bonobos.

  18. Wearable Goniometer and Accelerometer Sensory Fusion for Knee Joint Angle Measurement in Daily Life

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Alessandro; Lorussi, Federico; Carbonaro, Nicola; de Rossi, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Human motion analysis is crucial for a wide range of applications and disciplines. The development and validation of low cost and unobtrusive sensing systems for ambulatory motion detection is still an open issue. Inertial measurement systems and e-textile sensors are emerging as potential technologies for daily life situations. We developed and conducted a preliminary evaluation of an innovative sensing concept that combines e-textiles and tri-axial accelerometers for ambulatory human motion analysis. Our sensory fusion method is based on a Kalman filter technique and combines the outputs of textile electrogoniometers and accelerometers without making any assumptions regarding the initial accelerometer position and orientation. We used our technique to measure the flexion-extension angle of the knee in different motion tasks (monopodalic flexions and walking at different velocities). The estimation technique was benchmarked against a commercial measurement system based on inertial measurement units and performed reliably for all of the various tasks (mean and standard deviation of the root mean square error of 1.96 and 0.96∘, respectively). In addition, the method showed a notable improvement in angular estimation compared to the estimation derived by the textile goniometer and accelerometer considered separately. In future work, we will extend this method to more complex and multi-degree of freedom joints. PMID:26569249

  19. Wearable Goniometer and Accelerometer Sensory Fusion for Knee Joint Angle Measurement in Daily Life.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Alessandro; Lorussi, Federico; Carbonaro, Nicola; de Rossi, Danilo

    2015-11-11

    Human motion analysis is crucial for a wide range of applications and disciplines. The development and validation of low cost and unobtrusive sensing systems for ambulatory motion detection is still an open issue. Inertial measurement systems and e-textile sensors are emerging as potential technologies for daily life situations. We developed and conducted a preliminary evaluation of an innovative sensing concept that combines e-textiles and tri-axial accelerometers for ambulatory human motion analysis. Our sensory fusion method is based on a Kalman filter technique and combines the outputs of textile electrogoniometers and accelerometers without making any assumptions regarding the initial accelerometer position and orientation. We used our technique to measure the flexion-extension angle of the knee in different motion tasks (monopodalic flexions and walking at different velocities). The estimation technique was benchmarked against a commercial measurement system based on inertial measurement units and performed reliably for all of the various tasks (mean and standard deviation of the root mean square error of 1:96 and 0:96, respectively). In addition, the method showed a notable improvement in angular estimation compared to the estimation derived by the textile goniometer and accelerometer considered separately. In future work, we will extend this method to more complex and multi-degree of freedom joints.

  20. Joint small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data analysis of asymmetric lipid vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Barbara; Heberle, Frederick A.; Marquardt, Drew; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Katsaras, John

    2017-01-01

    Low- and high-resolution models describing the internal transbilayer structure of asymmetric lipid vesicles have been developed. These models can be used for the joint analysis of small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. The models describe the underlying scattering length density/electron density profiles either in terms of slabs or through the so-called scattering density profile, previously applied to symmetric lipid vesicles. Both models yield structural details of asymmetric membranes, such as the individual area per lipid, and the hydrocarbon thickness of the inner and outer bilayer leaflets. The scattering density profile model, however, comes at a cost of increased computational effort but results in greater structural resolution, showing a slightly lower packing of lipids in the outer bilayer leaflet of ∼120 nm diameter palmitoyl­oleoyl phosphatidyl­choline (POPC) vesicles, compared to the inner leaflet. Analysis of asymmetric dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine/POPC vesicles did not reveal evidence of transbilayer coupling between the inner and outer leaflets at 323 K, i.e. above the melting transition temperature of the two lipids. PMID:28381971

  1. A novel functional calibration method for real-time elbow joint angles estimation with magnetic-inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Ligorio, G; Zanotto, D; Sabatini, A M; Agrawal, S K

    2017-01-30

    Magnetic-inertial measurement units (MIMUs) are often used to measure the joint angles between two body segments. To obtain anatomically meaningful joint angles, each MIMU must be computationally aligned (i.e., calibrated) with the anatomical rotation axes. In this paper, a novel four-step functional calibration method is presented for the elbow joint, which relies on a two-degrees-of-freedom elbow model. In each step, subjects are asked to perform a simple task involving either one-dimensional motions around some anatomical axes or a static posture. The proposed method was implemented on a fully portable wearable system, which, after calibration, was capable of estimating the elbow joint angles in real time. Fifteen subjects participated in a multi-session experiment that was designed to assess accuracy, repeatability and robustness of the proposed method. When compared against an optical motion capture system (OMCS), the proposed wearable system showed an accuracy of about 4° along each degree of freedom. The proposed calibration method was tested against different MIMU mountings, multiple repetitions and non-strict observance of the calibration protocol and proved to be robust against these factors. Compared to previous works, the proposed method does not require the wearer to maintain specific arm postures while performing the calibration motions, and therefore it is more robust and better suited for real-world applications.

  2. Cardan angle rotation sequence effects on first-metatarsophalangeal joint kinematics: implications for measuring hallux valgus deformity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There currently are no recommended standards for reporting kinematics of the first-metatarsophalangeal joint. This study compared 2 different rotation sequences of Cardan angles, with implications for understanding the measurement of hallux valgus deformity. Methods Thirty-one women (19 hallux valgus; 12 controls) participated. All were scanned in an open-upright magnetic resonance scanner, their foot posed to simulate the gait conditions of midstance, heel-off, and terminal stance. Using computer processes, selected tarsals were reconstructed into virtual bone models and embedded with principal-axes coordinate systems, from which the rotation matrix between the hallux and first metatarsal was decomposed into Cardan angles. Joint angles were then compared using a within factors (rotation sequence and gait condition) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Only the transverse plane-first sequence consistently output incremental increases of dorsiflexion and abduction across gait events in both groups. There was an interaction (F ≥ 25.1; p < 0.001). Follow-up comparisons revealed angles were different (p < 0.05) at terminal stance. Conclusions Different rotation sequences yield different results. Extracting the first rotation in the transverse plane allows for the resting alignment of the hallux to deviate from the sagittal plane. Therefore, representing first-metatarsophalangeal joint kinematics with the transverse plane-first rotation sequence may be preferred, especially in cases of hallux valgus deformity. PMID:24839465

  3. Mallet finger - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Baseball finger - aftercare; Drop finger - aftercare; Avulsion fracture - mallet finger - aftercare ... away from the rest of the bone (avulsion fracture) Mallet finger most often occurs when something hits ...

  4. Coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscle activity as a function of wrist joint angle during two-digit grasping

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jamie A.; Bobich, Lisa R.; Santello, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Fingertip forces result from activation of muscles that cross the wrist and muscles whose origins and insertions reside within the hand (extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles, respectively). Thus, tasks that involve changes in wrist angle affect the moment arm and length, hence the force-producing capabilities, of extrinsic muscles only. If a grasping task requires the exertion of constant fingertip forces, the Central Nervous System (CNS) may respond to changes in wrist angle by modulating the neural drive to extrinsic or intrinsic muscles only or by co-activating both sets of muscles. To distinguish between these scenarios, we recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the thumb and index finger as a function of wrist angle during a two-digit object hold task. We hypothesized that changes in wrist angle would elicit EMG amplitude modulation of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles. In one experimental condition we asked subjects to exert the same digit forces at each wrist angle, whereas in a second condition subjects could choose digit forces for holding the object. EMG activity was significantly modulated in both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a function of wrist angle (both p < 0.05) but only for the constant force condition. Furthermore, EMG modulation resulted from uniform scaling of EMG amplitude across all muscles. We conclude that the CNS controlled both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a muscle synergy. These findings are discussed within the theoretical frameworks of synergies and common neural input across motor nuclei of hand muscles. PMID:20227463

  5. Coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscle activity as a function of wrist joint angle during two-digit grasping.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jamie A; Bobich, Lisa R; Santello, Marco

    2010-04-26

    Fingertip forces result from the activation of muscles that cross the wrist and muscles whose origins and insertions reside within the hand (extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles, respectively). Thus, tasks that involve changes in wrist angle affect the moment arm and length, hence the force-producing capabilities, of extrinsic muscles only. If a grasping task requires the exertion of constant fingertip forces, the Central Nervous System (CNS) may respond to changes in wrist angle by modulating the neural drive to extrinsic or intrinsic muscles only or by co-activating both sets of muscles. To distinguish between these scenarios, we recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the thumb and index finger as a function of wrist angle during a two-digit object hold task. We hypothesized that changes in wrist angle would elicit EMG amplitude modulation of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles. In one experimental condition we asked subjects to exert the same digit forces at each wrist angle, whereas in a second condition subjects could choose digit forces for holding the object. EMG activity was significantly modulated in both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a function of wrist angle (both p<0.05) but only for the constant force condition. Furthermore, EMG modulation resulted from uniform scaling of EMG amplitude across all muscles. We conclude that the CNS controlled both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a muscle synergy. These findings are discussed within the theoretical frameworks of synergies and common neural input across motor nuclei of hand muscles.

  6. A three-dimensional analysis of finger and bow string movements during the release in archery.

    PubMed

    Horsak, Brian; Heller, Mario

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine finger and bow string movements during archery by investigating a top Austrian athlete (FITA score = 1233) under laboratory conditions. Maximum lateral bow string deflection and angular displacements for index, third, and ring fingers between the full draw position and the end of the release were quantified using a motion tracking system. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether bow string deflection and finger movements are predictive for scoring. Joint ranges of motion during the shot itself were large in the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and much smaller in the metacarpophalangeal joints. Contrary to our expectations, greater deflection leads to higher scores (R2 = .18, p < .001) and the distal interphalangeal joint of the third finger weakly predicts the deflection (R2 = .11, p < .014). More variability in the joint angles of the third finger was found in bad shots than in good shots. Findings in this study let presume that maximum lateral bow string deflection does not adversely affect the archer's performance.

  7. Post-trial anatomical frame alignment procedure for comparison of 3D joint angle measurement from magnetic/inertial measurement units and camera-based systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingguo; Zhang, Jun-Tian

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units (MIMUs) have been widely used as an alternative to traditional camera-based motion capture systems for 3D joint kinematics measurement. Since these sensors do not directly measure position, a pre-trial anatomical calibration, either with the assistance of a special protocol/apparatus or with another motion capture system is required to establish the transformation matrices between the local sensor frame and the anatomical frame (AF) of each body segment on which the sensors are attached. Because the axes of AFs are often used as the rotational axes in the joint angle calculation, any difference in the AF determination will cause discrepancies in the calculated joint angles. Therefore, a direct comparison of joint angles between MIMU systems and camera-based systems is less meaningful because the calculated joint angles contain a systemic error due to the differences in the AF determination. To solve this problem a new post-trial AF alignment procedure is proposed. By correcting the AF misalignments, the joint angle differences caused by the difference in AF determination are eliminated and the remaining discrepancies are mainly from the measurement accuracy of the systems themselves. Lower limb joint angles from 30 walking trials were used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed AF alignment procedure. This technique could serve as a new means for calibrating magnetic/inertial sensor-based motion capture systems and correcting for AF misalignment in scenarios where joint angles are compared directly.

  8. Uncontrolled manifold analysis of arm joint angle variability during robotic teleoperation and freehand movement of surgeons and novices.

    PubMed

    Nisky, Ilana; Hsieh, Michael H; Okamura, Allison M

    2014-12-01

    Teleoperated robot-assisted surgery (RAS) is used to perform a wide variety of minimally invasive procedures. However, current understanding of the effect of robotic manipulation on the motor coordination of surgeons is limited. Recent studies in human motor control suggest that we optimize hand movement stability and task performance while minimizing control effort and improving robustness to unpredicted disturbances. To achieve this, the variability of joint angles and muscle activations is structured to reduce task-relevant variability and increase task-irrelevant variability. In this study, we determine whether teleoperation of a da Vinci Si surgical system in a nonclinical task of simple planar movements changes this structure of variability in experienced surgeons and novices. To answer this question, we employ the UnControlled manifold analysis that partitions users' joint angle variability into task-irrelevant and task-relevant manifolds. We show that experienced surgeons coordinate their joint angles to stabilize hand movements more than novices, and that the effect of teleoperation depends on experience--experts increase teleoperated stabilization relative to freehand whereas novices decrease it. We suggest that examining users' exploitation of the task-irrelevant manifold for stabilization of hand movements may be applied to: (1) evaluation and optimization of teleoperator design and control parameters, and (2) skill assessment and optimization of training in RAS.

  9. Development and Applications of a Self-Contained, Non-Invasive EVA Joint Angle and Muscle Fatigue Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranniger, C. U.; Sorenson, E. A.; Akin, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Maryland Space Systems Laboratory, as a participant in NASA's INSTEP program, is developing a non-invasive, self-contained sensor system which can provide quantitative measurements of joint angles and muscle fatigue in the hand and forearm. The goal of this project is to develop a system with which hand/forearm motion and fatigue metrics can be determined in various terrestrial and zero-G work environments. A preliminary study of the prototype sensor systems and data reduction techniques for the fatigue measurement system are presented. The sensor systems evaluated include fiberoptics, used to measure joint angle, surface electrodes, which measure the electrical signals created in muscle as it contracts; microphones, which measure the noise made by contracting muscle; and accelerometers, which measure the lateral muscle acceleration during contraction. The prototype sensor systems were used to monitor joint motion of the metacarpophalangeal joint and muscle fatigue in flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi ulnaris in subjects performing gripping tasks. Subjects were asked to sustain a 60-second constant-contraction (isometric) exercise and subsequently to perform a repetitive handgripping task to failure. Comparison of the electrical and mechanical signals of the muscles during the different tasks will be used to evaluate the applicability of muscle signal measurement techniques developed for isometric contraction tasks to fatigue prediction in quasi-dynamic exercises. Potential data reduction schemes are presented.

  10. An assembly method for micro parts jointing with given space angle based on projection matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Lie; Wu, Wenrong; Zhang, Juan; Yang, Honggang

    2017-02-01

    It is difficult to assemble micro parts jointing with given space angle as the parts assembled are not on the same flat and the visual depth of microscopic vision is small, which can cause the images gathered by the microscopic vision unintelligible and feature extraction difficult. For the problem, this paper presents an assembly method of micro parts based on projection matching. It can assemble micro parts jointing with given space angle accurately. Firstly, an ideal assembly model is established as the size of the micro parts through the drawing software. Secondly, a graphics algorithm based on the primitive information from CAD is designed. Thirdly, according to the pixel value calibration and the graphics algorithm, the projection pictures are shown on the control interface. Lastly, the control method of micro parts is proposed to assemble them with given space angle. And we accomplished an assembly experiment of micro-tube and micro-column in this way, whose assembly deviation is 0.12∘. Experiment results indicate that the angle between two micro parts assembled can be controlled within the given deviation.

  11. Absolute reliability of hamstring to quadriceps strength imbalance ratios calculated using peak torque, joint angle-specific torque and joint ROM-specific torque values.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; De Ste Croix, M; Sainz de Baranda, P; Santonja, F

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the absolute reliability of conventional (H/Q(CONV)) and functional (H/Q(FUNC)) hamstring to quadriceps strength imbalance ratios calculated using peak torque values, 3 different joint angle-specific torque values (10°, 20° and 30° of knee flexion) and 4 different joint ROM-specific average torque values (0-10°, 11-20°, 21-30° and 0-30° of knee flexion) adopting a prone position in recreational athletes. A total of 50 recreational athletes completed the study. H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) ratios were recorded at 3 different angular velocities (60, 180 and 240°/s) on 3 different occasions with a 72-96 h rest interval between consecutive testing sessions. Absolute reliability was examined through typical percentage error (CVTE), percentage change in the mean (CM) and intraclass correlations (ICC) as well as their respective confidence limits. H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) ratios calculated using peak torque values showed moderate reliability values, with CM scores lower than 2.5%, CV(TE) values ranging from 16 to 20% and ICC values ranging from 0.3 to 0.7. However, poor absolute reliability scores were shown for H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) ratios calculated using joint angle-specific torque values and joint ROM-specific average torque values, especially for H/Q(FUNC) ratios (CM: 1-23%; CV(TE): 22-94%; ICC: 0.1-0.7). Therefore, the present study suggests that the CV(TE) values reported for H/Q(CONV) and H/Q(FUNC) (≈18%) calculated using peak torque values may be sensitive enough to detect large changes usually observed after rehabilitation programmes but not acceptable to examine the effect of preventitive training programmes in healthy individuals. The clinical reliability of hamstring to quadriceps strength ratios calculated using joint angle-specific torque values and joint ROM-specific average torque values are questioned and should be re-evaluated in future research studies.

  12. Accuracy of visual estimates of joint angle and angular velocity using criterion movements.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Craig S; Knudson, Duane; Clayburn, Colby; Haywood, Philip

    2005-06-01

    A descriptive study to document undergraduate physical education majors' (22.8 +/- 2.4 yr. old) estimates of sagittal plane elbow angle and angular velocity of elbow flexion visually was performed. 42 subjects rated videotape replays of 30 movements organized into three speeds of movement and two criterion elbow angles. Video images of the movements were analyzed with Peak Motus to measure actual values of elbow angles and peak angular velocity. Of the subjects 85.7% had speed ratings significantly correlated with true peak elbow angular velocity in all three angular velocity conditions. Few (16.7%) subjects' ratings of elbow angle correlated significantly with actual angles. Analysis of the subjects with good ratings showed the accuracy of visual ratings was significantly related to speed, with decreasing accuracy for slower speeds of movement. The use of criterion movements did not improve the small percentage of novice observers who could accurately estimate body angles during movement.

  13. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  14. Olecranon orientation as an indicator of elbow joint angle in the stance phase, and estimation of forelimb posture in extinct quadruped animals.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shin-Ichi

    2009-09-01

    Reconstruction of limb posture is a challenging task in assessing functional morphology and biomechanics of extinct tetrapods, mainly because of the wide range of motions possible at each limb joint and because of our poor knowledge of the relationship between posture and musculoskeletal structure, even in the extant taxa. This is especially true for extinct mammals such as the desmostylian taxa Desmostylus and Paleoparadoxia. This study presents a procedure that how the elbow joint angles of extinct quadruped mammals can be inferred from osteological characteristics. A survey of 67 dried skeletons and 113 step cycles of 32 extant genera, representing 25 families and 13 orders, showed that the olecranon of the ulna and the shaft of the humerus were oriented approximately perpendicular to each other during the stance phase. At this angle, the major extensor muscles maximize their torque at the elbow joint. Based on this survey, I suggest that olecranon orientation can be used for inferring the elbow joint angles of quadruped mammals with prominent olecranons, regardless of taxon, body size, and locomotor guild. By estimating the elbow joint angle, it is inferred that Desmostylus would have had more upright forelimbs than Paleoparadoxia, because their elbow joint angles during the stance phase were approximately 165 degrees and 130 degrees , respectively. Difference in elbow joint angles between these two genera suggests possible differences in stance and gait of these two mammals.

  15. An instrumented tissue tester for measuring soft tissue property under the metatarsal heads in relation to metatarsophalangeal joint angle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Phyau-Wui Shim, Victor; Park, Seung-Bum; Lee, Taeyong

    2011-06-03

    Identification of the localized mechanical response of the plantar soft tissue pads underneath the metatarsal heads (i.e., sub-MTH pad) to external loading is key to understand and predict how it functions in a gait cycle. The mechanical response depends on various parameters, such as the external load (direction and rate), the sub-MTH tissue properties (anisotropy and viscoelasticity), and the configuration of the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint overlying the tissue. In this study, an instrument-driven tissue tester that incorporates a portable motorized indentor within a special foot positioning apparatus was developed for realistic in vivo mechanical characterization (i.e. tissue stiffness and force relaxation behavior) of the local sub-MTH pad with the MTP joint configured at various dorsiflexion angles associated with gait. The tester yields consistent results for tests on the 2nd sub-MTH pad. Measurement errors for the initial stiffness (for indentation depths ≤ 1 mm), end-point stiffness, and percentage force relaxation were less than 0.084 N/mm, 0.133 N/mm, and 0.127%, respectively, across all test configurations. The end-point tissue stiffness, which increased by 104.2% due to a 50° MTP joint dorsiflexion, also agreed with a previous investigation. In vivo tissue's force relaxation was shown to be pronounced (avg. = 8.1%), even for a short holding-time interval. The proposed technique to facilitate study of the dependence of the local sub-MTH pad and tissue response on the MTP joint angle might be preferable to methods that focus solely on measurement of tissue property because under physiologic conditions the sub-MTH pad elasticity may vary in gait, to adapt to drastically changing mechanical demands in the sub-MTH region of the terminal stance-phase, where MTP joint dorsiflexion occurs.

  16. Muscle Activation Differs between Three Different Knee Joint-Angle Positions during a Maximal Isometric Back Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jarbas da Silva, Josinaldo; Jon Schoenfeld, Brad; Nardi, Priscyla Silva Monteiro; Pecoraro, Silvio Luis; D'Andréa Greve, Julia Maria; Hartigan, Erin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation of the lower limb muscles when performing a maximal isometric back squat exercise over three different positions. Fifteen young, healthy, resistance-trained men performed an isometric back squat at three knee joint angles (20°, 90°, and 140°) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation of the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), semitendinosus (ST), and gluteus maximus (GM). In general, muscle activity was the highest at 90° for the three quadriceps muscles, yet differences in muscle activation between knee angles were muscle specific. Activity of the GM was significantly greater at 20° and 90° compared to 140°. The BF and ST displayed similar activation at all joint angles. In conclusion, knee position alters muscles activation of the quadriceps and gluteus maximus muscles. An isometric back squat at 90° generates the highest overall muscle activation, yet an isometric back squat at 140° generates the lowest overall muscle activation of the VL and GM only. PMID:27504484

  17. Provocative mechanical tests of the peripheral nervous system affect the joint torque-angle during passive knee motion.

    PubMed

    Andrade, R J; Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Pezarat-Correia, P

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of the head, upper trunk, and foot position on the passive knee extension (PKE) torque-angle response. PKE tests were performed in 10 healthy subjects using an isokinetic dynamometer at 2°/s. Subjects lay in the supine position with their hips flexed to 90°. The knee angle, passive torque, surface electromyography (EMG) of the semitendinosus and quadriceps vastus medialis, and stretch discomfort were recorded in six body positions during PKE. The different maximal active positions of the cervical spine (neutral; flexion; extension), thoracic spine (neutral; flexion), and ankle (neutral; dorsiflexion) were passively combined for the tests. Visual analog scale scores and EMG were unaffected by body segment positioning. An effect of the ankle joint was verified on the peak torque and knee maximum angle when the ankle was in the dorsiflexion position (P < 0.05). Upper trunk positioning had an effect on the knee submaximal torque (P < 0.05), observed as an increase in the knee passive submaximal torque when the cervical and thoracic spines were flexed (P < 0.05). In conclusion, other apparently mechanical unrelated body segments influence torque-angle response since different positions of head, upper trunk, and foot induce dissimilar knee mechanical responses during passive extension.

  18. Joint and angle-covariant spin measurements with a quadrupole magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Hans; Demuynck, Willem M.

    1994-01-01

    We study a Stern-Gerlach type setup, with a quadrupole magnetic field, for neutral particles of arbitrary spin. The Hamiltonian is of a form proposed for joint measurements of the incompatible observables. The measurement results are discussed, showing the limitation of such Hamiltonians. Some remarks are made on the relevance of covariance as a criterion for measurement schemes.

  19. Robust Pilot Decontamination Based on Joint Angle and Power Domain Discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Haifan; Cottatellucci, Laura; Gesbert, David; Muller, Ralf R.; He, Gaoning

    2016-06-01

    We address the problem of noise and interference corrupted channel estimation in massive MIMO systems. Interference, which originates from pilot reuse (or contamination), can in principle be discriminated on the basis of the distributions of path angles and amplitudes. In this paper we propose novel robust channel estimation algorithms exploiting path diversity in both angle and power domains, relying on a suitable combination of the spatial filtering and amplitude based projection. The proposed approaches are able to cope with a wide range of system and topology scenarios, including those where, unlike in previous works, interference channel may overlap with desired channels in terms of multipath angles of arrival or exceed them in terms of received power. In particular we establish analytically the conditions under which the proposed channel estimator is fully decontaminated. Simulation results confirm the overall system gains when using the new methods.

  20. Displaced unstable transverse fractures of the shaft of the proximal phalanx of the fingers in industrial workers: reduction and K-wire fixation leaving the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints free.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2011-09-01

    A series of 35 adult male industrial workers with displaced unstable transverse fractures of the shaft of the proximal phalanx of the fingers were treated with reduction and K-wire fixation leaving the metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints free to move immediately after surgery. At final follow-up, the total active motion score of the injured finger was graded as excellent, good, fair, or poor if it was greater than 240°, 220-240°, 180-219°, or less than 180°, respectively. Complications were also documented. The results were compared with our previously published series of these fractures treated with two other techniques: percutaneous K-wires immobilizing the metacarpophalangeal joint and open reduction and interosseous loop wire fixation. The final TAM scores in the current study were excellent in 43%, good in 29%, fair in 14% and poor in 14%. Four out of the 35 patients (11%) had minor pin tract infection. These results were significantly better than the results following percutaneous K-wire fixation immobilizing the metacarpophalangeal joint indicating that immediate mobilization of all joints has a significant effect on the outcome.

  1. Changes in the activity of trunk and hip extensor muscles during bridge exercises with variations in unilateral knee joint angle

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juseung; Park, Minchul

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared abdominal and hip extensor muscle activity during a bridge exercise with various knee joint angles. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy male subjects performed a bridge exercise in which the knee joint angle was altered. While subjects performed the bridge exercise, external oblique, internal oblique, gluteus maximus, and semitendinosus muscle activity was measured using electromyography. [Results] The bilateral external and internal oblique muscle activity was significantly higher at 0° knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The bilateral gluteus maximus muscle activity was significantly different at 0° of knee flexion compared to 120°, 90°, and 60°. The ipsilateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly increased at 90° and 60° of knee flexion compared to 120°, and significantly decreased at 0° knee flexion compared with 120°, 90°, and 60°. The contralateral semitendinosus muscle activity was significantly higher at 60° of knee flexion than at 120°, and significantly higher at 0° of knee flexion than at 120°, 90°, and 60°. [Conclusion] Bridge exercises performed with knee flexion less than 90° may be used to train the ipsilateral semitendinosus. Furthermore, bridge exercise performed with one leg may be used to train abdominal and hip extensor muscles. PMID:27799688

  2. Finger Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Bill

    2010-01-01

    The author has been prompted to write this article about finger multiplication for a number of reasons. Firstly there are a number of related articles in past issues of "Mathematics Teaching" ("MT") which have connections to this algorithm. Secondly, very few of his primary teaching students and professional colleagues appear to be aware of the…

  3. The relationship between unilateral mandibular angle fracture and temporomandibular joint function.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaityte, Ausra; Surna, Algimantas; Pileicikiene, Gaivile; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Zilinskas, Juozas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. Aim of this study was to analyze relation of occlusal correction and alterations of temporomandibular joint function during treatment of unilateral mandibular fractures. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We compared 49 patients treated for unilateral mandibular fracture without occlusal correction with 21 patient treated for unilateral mandibular fracture along with early and consequent occlusal analysis and correction and with 49 control subjects. Patients' complaints, mandibular movements and occlusal parameters were evaluated during the period of healing. ZEBRIS ultrasound system (Jaw Motion Analyzer, Zebris Medical GmbH, Isny, Germany) was used for analysis of mandibular movements and T-Scan analyzer (Tekscan, Inc., Boston, MA, USA) was used for occlusal analysis. RESULTS. Findings of our study showed statistically significant (p<0.05) diminution of patients complaints, mandibular movement alterations and occlusal disturbances in patients who received occlusal correction during MF treatment if compared to patients treated without occlusal correction, except noises from the joint in the injured side and mandibular lateral track to the injured side in the final stage of investigation. Despite applied treatment recovery of the TMJ function was not complete and the investigated parameters remained worse if compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS. Results of this study confirmed positive influence of early and subsequent occlusal analysis and correction during stages of MF treatment on diminution of functional alterations of the temporomandibular joint function. Timely occlusal correction improves and hastens process of rehabilitation therefore it is indispensable part of MF treatment.

  4. In vivo measurement of fascicle length and pennation of the human anconeus muscle at several elbow joint angles.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Daniel E; Smith, Cameron B; Harwood, Brad; Rice, Charles L

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound imaging has facilitated the reliable measure of the architectural variables fascicle length (LF ) and pennation angle (PA), at rest and during static and dynamic contractions in many human skeletal muscles in vivo. Despite its small size and very modest contribution to elbow extension torque, the anconeus muscle has proven a useful model for the study of neuromuscular function in health and disease. Recent single motor unit (MU) studies in the anconeus have reported discrete and identifiable individual trains of MU potentials from intramuscular electromyography (EMG) recordings during dynamic elbow extensions. It is unknown whether the anconeus has unique architectural features related to alterations in LF and PA throughout the elbow joint range of motion that may help explain these high-quality recordings. Previous anatomical studies have investigated this muscle in cadavers and at mainly one elbow joint angle. The purpose of this study was to measure in vivo PA and LF of the anconeus muscle in a relaxed state at different degrees of elbow flexion using ultrasonography. Ultrasound images were collected from 10 healthy males (25 ± 3 years) at 135°, 120°, 90°, 45°, and 0° of elbow flexion. Average values of LF decreased by 6 mm (10%), 6 mm (12%), and 4 mm (9%) from 135-120°, 120-90°, and 90-45° of elbow flexion, respectively, whereas average PA values increased by 1° (9%), 1° (8%), and 2° (14%) from 135-120°, 120-90°, and 45-0°, respectively. The results indicate that anconeus muscle architecture is dynamic, undergoing moderate changes with elbow joint excursion that are similar to other limb muscles reported elsewhere. The data obtained here are more comprehensive and representative of architectural changes at various elbow joint positions than those data reported in cadaveric studies. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that despite experiencing similar relative changes in muscle architecture to other skeletal muscles

  5. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Finger Foods for Babies KidsHealth > For Parents > Finger Foods for ... will accept a new food. previous continue Finger Foods to Avoid Finger feeding is fun and rewarding ...

  6. Measuring 3D Hand and Finger Kinematics—A Comparison between Inertial Sensing and an Opto-Electronic Marker System

    PubMed Central

    van den Noort, Josien C.; Kortier, Henk G.; van Beek, Nathalie; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective analysis of hand and finger kinematics is important to increase understanding of hand function and to quantify motor symptoms for clinical diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to compare a new 3D measurement system containing multiple miniature inertial sensors (PowerGlove) with an opto-electronic marker system during specific finger tasks in three healthy subjects. Various finger movements tasks were performed: flexion, fast flexion, tapping, hand open/closing, ab/adduction and circular pointing. 3D joint angles of the index finger joints and position of the thumb and index were compared between systems. Median root mean square differences of the main joint angles of interest ranged between 3.3 and 8.4deg. Largest differences were found in fast and circular pointing tasks, mainly in range of motion. Smallest differences for all 3D joint angles were observed in the flexion tasks. For fast finger tapping, the thumb/index amplitude showed a median difference of 15.8mm. Differences could be explained by skin movement artifacts caused by relative marker movements of the marker system, particularly during fast tasks; large movement accelerations and angular velocities which exceeded the range of the inertial sensors; and by differences in segment calibrations between systems. The PowerGlove is a system that can be of value to measure 3D hand and finger kinematics and positions in an ambulatory setting. The reported differences need to be taken into account when applying the system in studies understanding the hand function and quantifying hand motor symptoms in clinical practice. PMID:27812139

  7. A Soft Sensor-Based Three-Dimensional (3-D) Finger Motion Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wookeun; Ro, Kyongkwan; Kim, Suin; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a soft sensor-based three-dimensional (3-D) finger motion measurement system is proposed. The sensors, made of the soft material Ecoflex, comprise embedded microchannels filled with a conductive liquid metal (EGaln). The superior elasticity, light weight, and sensitivity of soft sensors allows them to be embedded in environments in which conventional sensors cannot. Complicated finger joints, such as the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint of the thumb are modeled to specify the location of the sensors. Algorithms to decouple the signals from soft sensors are proposed to extract the pure flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction joint angles. The performance of the proposed system and algorithms are verified by comparison with a camera-based motion capture system. PMID:28241414

  8. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ... Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin Carving Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring ...

  9. Behaviour of the electrical impedance myography in isometric contraction of biceps brachii at different elbow joint angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, A. B. B.; Jotta, B.; Pino, A. V.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) can be understood as an experimental technique applied to evaluate bioelectrical impedance associated to the muscular activity. With the development of technique, some studies are trying to associate the EIM parameters with the morphological and physiological changes that occur in the muscle during contraction. In this context this work sought to associate EIM parameters observed during isometric contractions of the biceps brachii muscle at different elbow joint angles with the correspondent muscular force. Differently from previous works that did not observe significant correlation between those data, our findings point to high correlations between the some EIM resistive parameters and the muscle force. Despite the need of further investigation, our results indicated that EIM technique can be used to estimate muscle force in a noninvasive way.

  10. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  11. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    PubMed Central

    van den Noort, Josien C.; van Beek, Nathalie; van der Kraan, Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instructed fingers) and range of independent finger movement through the whole finger flexion trajectory in single and multi-finger movement tasks. Thirteen young healthy subjects performed single- and multi-finger movement tasks under two conditions: active flexion through the full range of movement with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed finger(s) were restrained. Finger kinematics were measured using inertial sensors (PowerGlove), to assess enslaving and range of independent finger movement. Although all fingers showed enslaving movement to some extent, highest enslaving was found in adjacent fingers. Enslaving effects in ring and little finger were increased with movement of additional, non-adjacent fingers. The middle finger was the only finger affected by restriction in movement of non-instructed fingers. Each finger showed a range of independent movement before the non-instructed fingers started to move, which was largest for the index finger. The start of enslaving was asymmetrical for adjacent fingers. Little finger enslaving movement was affected by multi-finger movement. We conclude that no finger can move independently through the full range of finger flexion, although some degree of full independence is present for smaller movements. This range of independent movement is asymmetric and variable between fingers and between subjects. The presented results provide insight into the role of finger independency for different types of tasks and populations. PMID:27992598

  12. OpenSim Model Improvements to Support High Joint Angle Resistive Exercising

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, Christopher; Thompson, William; Lewandowski, Beth; Humphreys, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Long duration space travel to Mars or to an asteroid will expose astronauts to extended periods of reduced gravity. Since gravity is not present to aid loading, astronauts will use resistive and aerobic exercise regimes for the duration of the space flight to minimize the loss of bone density, muscle mass and aerobic capacity that occurs during exposure to a reduced gravity environment. Unlike the International Space Station (ISS), the area available for an exercise device in the next generation of spacecraft is limited. Therefore, compact resistance exercise device prototypes are being developed. The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) currently on the ISS is being used as a benchmark for the functional performance of these new devices. Rigorous testing of these proposed devices in space flight is difficult so computational modeling provides an estimation of the muscle forces and joint loads during exercise to gain insight on the efficacy to protect the musculoskeletal health of astronauts. The NASA Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is supporting the Advanced Exercise Concepts (AEC) Project, Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures (ExPC) project and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) funded researchers by developing computational models of exercising with these new advanced exercise device concepts

  13. A unitary ESPRIT scheme of joint angle estimation for MOTS MIMO radar.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chao; Shi, Guangming

    2014-08-07

    The transmit array of multi-overlapped-transmit-subarray configured bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MOTS MIMO) radar is partitioned into a number of overlapped subarrays, which is different from the traditional bistatic MIMO radar. In this paper, a new unitary ESPRIT scheme for joint estimation of the direction of departure (DOD) and the direction of arrival (DOA) for MOTS MIMO radar is proposed. In our method, each overlapped-transmit-subarray (OTS) with the identical effective aperture is regarded as a transmit element and the characteristics that the phase delays between the two OTSs is utilized. First, the measurements corresponding to all the OTSs are partitioned into two groups which have a rotational invariance relationship with each other. Then, the properties of centro-Hermitian matrices and real-valued rotational invariance factors are exploited to double the measurement samples and reduce computational complexity. Finally, the close-formed solution of automatically paired DOAs and DODs of targets is derived in a new manner. The proposed scheme provides increased estimation accuracy with the combination of inherent advantages of MOTS MIMO radar with unitary ESPRIT. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and advantage of the proposed scheme.

  14. Validation of the greater trochanter method with radiographic measurements of frontal plane hip joint centers and knee mechanical axis angles and two other hip joint center methods.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Hunter J; Shen, Guangping; Weinhandl, Joshua T; Zhang, Songning

    2016-09-06

    Several motion capture methods exist for predicting hip joint centers (HJC). These methods include regression models, functional joints, and projections from greater trochanters. While regression and functional methods have been compared to imaging techniques, the TROCH method has not been previously validated. The purpose of this study was to compare frontal-plane HJCs and knee mechanical axis angles estimated using the greater trochanter method with a regression (Bell) and a functional method against those obtained using radiographs. Thirty-five participants underwent a long-standing anteroposterior radiograph, and performed static and functional motion capture trials. The Bell, functional, and trochanter HJCs were constructed to predict mechanical axes and compare HJC locations. One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare mechanical axes and HJC locations estimated by motion capture methods and measured using radiographs (p<0.05). All methods overestimated mechanical axes compared to radiographs (<2°), but were not different. Mediolateral HJC locations and inter-HJC widths were similar between methods; however, inter-HJC widths were underestimated (average 3.7%) compared to radiographs. The Bell HJC was more superior and anterior to both functional and trochanter methods. The trochanter HJC was more posterior to both methods. The Bell method outperformed the other methods in leg length predictions compared to radiographs. Although differences existed between methods, all frontal-plane HJC location differences were <1.7cm. This study validated the trochanter HJC prediction method mediolaterally and vertically (with small respective correction factors). Therefore, all HJC methods seem to be viable in predicting mechanical axes and frontal-plane HJC locations compared with radiographs.

  15. Estimations of relative effort during sit-to-stand increase when accounting for variations in maximum voluntary torque with joint angle and angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Bieryla, Kathleen A; Anderson, Dennis E; Madigan, Michael L

    2009-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to compare three methods of determining relative effort during sit-to-stand (STS). Fourteen young (mean 19.6+/-SD 1.2 years old) and 17 older (61.7+/-5.5 years old) adults completed six STS trials at three speeds: slow, normal, and fast. Sagittal plane joint torques at the hip, knee, and ankle were calculated through inverse dynamics. Isometric and isokinetic maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) for the hip, knee, and ankle were collected and used for model parameters to predict the participant-specific maximum voluntary joint torque. Three different measures of relative effort were determined by normalizing STS joint torques to three different estimates of maximum voluntary torque. Relative effort at the hip, knee, and ankle were higher when accounting for variations in maximum voluntary torque with joint angle and angular velocity (hip=26.3+/-13.5%, knee=78.4+/-32.2%, ankle=27.9+/-14.1%) compared to methods which do not account for these variations (hip=23.5+/-11.7%, knee=51.7+/-15.0%, ankle=20.7+/-10.4%). At higher velocities, the difference in calculating relative effort with respect to isometric MVC or incorporating joint angle and angular velocity became more evident. Estimates of relative effort that account for the variations in maximum voluntary torque with joint angle and angular velocity may provide higher levels of accuracy compared to methods based on measurements of maximal isometric torques.

  16. Triceps surae muscle-tendon unit length changes as a function of ankle joint angles and contraction levels: the effect of foot arch deformation.

    PubMed

    Iwanuma, Soichiro; Akagi, Ryota; Hashizume, Satoru; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to clarify how foot deformation affects the relationship between triceps surae muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length and ankle joint angle. For six women and six men a series of sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images of the right foot were taken, and changes in MTU length (the displacement of the calcaneal tuberosity), foot arch angle, and ankle joint angle were measured. In the passive session, each subject's ankle joint was secured at 10° dorsiflexed position, neutral position (NP), and 10° and 20° plantar flexed positions while MR images were acquired. In the active session, each subject was requested to perform submaximal isometric plantar flexions (30%, 60%, and 80% of voluntary maximum) at NP. The changes in MTU length in each trial were estimated by two different formulae reported previously. The changes of the measured MTU length as a function of ankle joint angles observed in all trials of the active session were significantly (p<0.05) larger than corresponding values in the passive session and by the estimation formulae. In the passive session, MTU length changes were significantly smaller than the estimated values when the ankle was plantar flexed. The foot arch angle increased as the contraction level increased from rest (117 ± 4°) to 80% (125 ± 3°), and decreased as the ankle was positioned further into plantar flexion in the passive session (115 ± 3°). These results indicate that foot deformation profoundly affects the triceps surae MTU length-ankle joint angle relationship during plantar flexion.

  17. [Ligament injuries of fingers and thumbs].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic ligament lesions of the carpometacarpal joints frequently occur at the thumb ray, whereas the carpometacarpal amphiarthrosis of other finger rays are rarely affected. The metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the thumb and fingers are stabilized by bilaterally running collateral ligaments and palmar plates. At the base of the metacarpophalangeal joints, several ligaments of the extensor hoods guide the extensor tendons and coordinate the fine motoric skills of phalangeal flexing and extending. Several annular and cruciform ligaments hold the flexor tendons close to the finger skeleton. Other than at the wrist, differentiation between dynamic and static instability patterns is possible by physical examination. This review article presents the ligaments of the thumb and the fingers, the traumatic and degenerative lesions as well as the diagnostic capability of x‑rays, cinematography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography.

  18. Trajectory of the index finger during grasping.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jason; Flash, Tamar

    2009-07-01

    The trajectory of the index finger during grasping movements was compared to the trajectories predicted by three optimization-based models. The three models consisted of minimizing the integral of the weighted squared joint derivatives along the path (inertia-like cost), minimizing torque change, and minimizing angular jerk. Of the three models, it was observed that the path of the fingertip and the joint trajectories, were best described by the minimum angular jerk model. This model, which does not take into account the dynamics of the finger, performed equally well when the inertia of the finger was altered by adding a 20 g weight to the medial phalange. Thus, for the finger, it appears that trajectories are planned based primarily on kinematic considerations at a joint level.

  19. Integration of marker and force data to compute three-dimensional joint moments of the thumb and index finger digits during pinch

    PubMed Central

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Li, Zong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    This study presents methodology to determine joint moments of the digits of the hand during pinch function. This methodology incorporates steps to identify marker-based kinematic data defining aligned coordinate systems for individual digit segments and joint center locations. The kinematic data are then transformed to a common reference frame along with the force data collected at pinch contact of a customized apparatus in three-dimensions (3-D). These methods were demonstrated with a pilot investigation to examine the static joint moments occurring during two-digit oppositional precision pinch at a particular endpoint force level applied at the digit pads. Notable abduction joint moments at the proximal joints of both digits were observed, which implicate the role of respective intrinsic and extrinsic muscles in maintaining pinch grasp. Examining differences in joint moment results when substituting select steps of this methodological approach suggested greater relative importance for joint center identification and segment coordinate system alignment. PMID:23947659

  20. High cycles fatigue damage of CFRP plates clamped by bolts for axial coupling joint with off-set angle during rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooka, Kazuaki; Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru; Umeda, Shinichi; Fujii, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Tetsuya

    2014-03-01

    This study discussed the change of residual fracture torque and the fatigue damage process of thin CFRP plates clamped by bolts for axial coupling joint, in which flexible deformation was allowed in the direction of off-set angle by the deflection of the CFRP plates while effective stiffness was obtained in rotational direction. Mechanically laminated 4 layers of the CFRP plates were repeatedly deflected during the rotation of axial coupling, when two axes were jointed with 3 degree of off-set angle, in which number of revolution was 1,800 rpm (30Hz of loading frequency). At first, the fracture morphology of specimen and the residual fracture torque was investigated after 1.0×107 cycles of repeated revolutions. The reduction ratio of spring constant was also determined by simple bending test after the fatigue. The residual fracture torque of the joint was determined on the rotational test machine after 1.0×107 cycles of fatigue. After rotations of cyclic fatigue, fiber breaking and wear of matrix were observed around the fixed parts compressed by washers for setting bolts. The reduction of spring constant of the CFRP plates was caused by the initiation of cyclic fatigue damages around the fixed parts, when the axial coupling joint was rotated with off-set angle. It was found that residual fracture torque of the joint was related with the specific fatigue damage of the CFRP observed in this study.

  1. Experimental results of full scattering profile from finger tissue-like phantom

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Idit; Wróbel, Maciej; Duadi, Hamootal; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata; Fixler, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Human tissue is one of the most complex optical media since it is turbid and nonhomogeneous. We suggest a new optical method for sensing physiological tissue state, based on the collection of the ejected light at all exit angles, to receive the full scattering profile. We built a unique set-up for noninvasive encircled measurement. We use a laser, a photodetector and finger tissues-mimicking phantoms presenting different optical properties. Our method reveals an isobaric point, which is independent of the optical properties. We compared the new finger tissues-like phantoms to others samples and found the linear dependence between the isobaric point's angle and the exact tissue geometry. These findings can be useful for biomedical applications such as non-invasive and simple diagnostic of the fingertip joint, ear lobe and pinched tissues. PMID:27896008

  2. Design and preliminary evaluation of the FINGER rehabilitation robot: controlling challenge and quantifying finger individuation during musical computer game play

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), a device for assisting in finger rehabilitation after neurologic injury. We developed FINGER to assist stroke patients in moving their fingers individually in a naturalistic curling motion while playing a game similar to Guitar Hero®a. The goal was to make FINGER capable of assisting with motions where precise timing is important. Methods FINGER consists of a pair of stacked single degree-of-freedom 8-bar mechanisms, one for the index and one for the middle finger. Each 8-bar mechanism was designed to control the angle and position of the proximal phalanx and the position of the middle phalanx. Target positions for the mechanism optimization were determined from trajectory data collected from 7 healthy subjects using color-based motion capture. The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths. For initial evaluation, we asked individuals with a stroke (n = 16) and without impairment (n = 4) to play a game similar to Guitar Hero® while connected to FINGER. Results Precision design, low friction bearings, and separate high speed linear actuators allowed FINGER to individually actuate the fingers with a high bandwidth of control (−3 dB at approximately 8 Hz). During the tests, we were able to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game by automatically adjusting the controller gains of FINGER. We also used FINGER to measure subjects’ effort and finger individuation while playing the game. Conclusions Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:24495432

  3. The effect of changing plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments while walking in patients post stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Singer, Madeline L.; Orendurff, Michael S.; Gao, Fan; Daly, Wayne K.; Foreman, K. Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background The adjustment of plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis is considered important in patients post stroke, but the evidence is still limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of changing the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis on ankle and knee joint angles and moments in patients post stroke. Methods Gait analysis was performed on 10 subjects post stroke under four different plantarflexion resistive moment conditions using a newly designed articulated ankle-foot orthosis. Data were recorded using a Bertec split-belt instrumented treadmill in a 3-dimensional motion analysis laboratory. Findings The ankle and knee sagittal joint angles and moments were significantly affected by the amount of plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis. Increasing the plantarflexion resistive moment of the ankle-foot orthosis induced significant decreases both in the peak ankle plantarflexion angle (P<0.01) and the peak knee extension angle (P<0.05). Also, the increase induced significant increases in the internal dorsiflexion moment of the ankle joint (P<0.01) and significantly decreased the internal flexion moment of the knee joint (P<0.01). Interpretation These results suggest an important link between the kinematic/kinetic parameters of the lower-limb joints and the plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis. A future study should be performed to clarify their relationship further so that the practitioners may be able to use these parameters as objective data to determine an optimal plantarflexion resistive moment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis for improved orthotic care in individual patients. PMID:26149007

  4. Radiographic assessment of the relative lengths of the bones of the fingers of the human hand.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, R; Dunsmuir, R A

    2002-12-01

    The study assessed whether a relationship existed between the lengths of the phalanges of the fingers of the hand. The centres of rotation of the joints in each finger were determined by dissection of cadaveric hands. Using these data, the distances between the joint centres was determined on anteroposterior hand X-rays taken for clinical purposes. The study has shown that, for all the fingers, there is a ratio of 1 for the distance between the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint and the distance between the proximal interphalangeal joint and the finger tip. The ratio for the distances between the interphalangeal joints and the distal joint and the tip approximates to 1.3 for the index, middle and ring fingers and to 1.0 for the little finger. No evidence was found to support Littler's hypothesis that the interarticular distances of the finger follow the Fibonacci sequence.

  5. Joint aerosol and water-leaving radiance retrieval from Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) [1] has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. In step-and-stare operation mode, AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° off the nadir. Its spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. In order to retrieve information from the AirMSPI observations, we developed a efficient and flexible retrieval code that can jointly retrieve aerosol and water leaving radiance simultaneously. The forward model employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) [2] and adding/doubling [3] radiative transfer method which is fully linearized and integrated with a multi-patch retrieval algorithm to obtain aerosol and water leaving radiance/Chl-a information. Various constraints are imposed to improve convergence and retrieval stability. We tested the aerosol and water leaving radiance retrievals using the AirMSPI radiance and polarization measurements by comparing to the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration to the values reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California. In addition, the MC-based retrievals of aerosol properties were compared with GRASP ([4-5]) retrievals for selected cases. The MC-based retrieval approach was then used to systematically explore the benefits of AirMSPI's ultraviolet and polarimetric channels, the use of multiple view angles, and constraints provided by inclusion of bio-optical models of the water-leaving radiance. References [1]. D. J. Diner, et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 6, 1717 (2013). [2]. F. Xu et al. Opt. Lett. 36, 2083 (2011). [3]. J. E. Hansen and L.D. Travis. Space Sci. Rev. 16, 527 (1974). [4]. O. Dubovik et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975 (2011). [5]. O. Dubovik et al. SPIE: Newsroom, DOI:10.1117/2.1201408.005558 (2014).

  6. Optimal three finger grasps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, J.; Lafferriere, G.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of optimal force distribution among three point fingers holding a planar object. A scheme that reduces the nonlinear optimization problem to an easily solved generalized eigenvalue problem is proposed. This scheme generalizes and simplifies results of Ji and Roth (1988). The generalizations include all possible geometric arrangements and extensions to three dimensions and to the case of variable coefficients of friction. For the two-dimensional case with constant coefficients of friction, it is proved that, except for some special cases, the optimal grasping forces (in the sense of minimizing the dependence on friction) are those for which the angles with the corresponding normals are all equal (in absolute value).

  7. Swimming propulsion forces are enhanced by a small finger spread.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Reis, Victor M; Kjendlie, Per L; Alves, Francisco B; Vilas-Boas, João P; Machado, Leandro; Silva, António J; Rouboa, Abel I

    2010-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of finger spread on the propulsive force production in swimming using computational fluid dynamics. Computer tomography scans of an Olympic swimmer hand were conducted. This procedure involved three models of the hand with differing finger spreads: fingers closed together (no spread), fingers with a small (0.32 cm) spread, and fingers with large (0.64 cm) spread. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent code. The measured forces on the hand models were decomposed into drag and lift coefficients. For hand models, angles of attack of 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 75 degrees, and 90 degrees, with a sweep back angle of 0 degrees, were used for the calculations. The results showed that the model with a small spread between fingers presented higher values of drag coefficient than did the models with fingers closed and fingers with a large spread. One can note that the drag coefficient presented the highest values for an attack angle of 90 degrees in the three hand models. The lift coefficient resembled a sinusoidal curve across the attack angle. The values for the lift coefficient presented few differences among the three models, for a given attack angle. These results suggested that fingers slightly spread could allow the hand to create more propulsive force during swimming.

  8. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  9. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  10. Comparison of 3D Joint Angles Measured With the Kinect 2.0 Skeletal Tracker Versus a Marker-Based Motion Capture System.

    PubMed

    Guess, Trent M; Razu, Swithin; Jahandar, Amirhossein; Skubic, Marjorie; Huo, Zhiyu

    2017-04-01

    The Microsoft Kinect is becoming a widely used tool for inexpensive, portable measurement of human motion, with the potential to support clinical assessments of performance and function. In this study, the relative osteokinematic Cardan joint angles of the hip and knee were calculated using the Kinect 2.0 skeletal tracker. The pelvis segments of the default skeletal model were reoriented and 3-dimensional joint angles were compared with a marker-based system during a drop vertical jump and a hip abduction motion. Good agreement between the Kinect and marker-based system were found for knee (correlation coefficient = 0.96, cycle RMS error = 11°, peak flexion difference = 3°) and hip (correlation coefficient = 0.97, cycle RMS = 12°, peak flexion difference = 12°) flexion during the landing phase of the drop vertical jump and for hip abduction/adduction (correlation coefficient = 0.99, cycle RMS error = 7°, peak flexion difference = 8°) during isolated hip motion. Nonsagittal hip and knee angles did not correlate well for the drop vertical jump. When limited to activities in the optimal capture volume and with simple modifications to the skeletal model, the Kinect 2.0 skeletal tracker can provide limited 3-dimensional kinematic information of the lower limbs that may be useful for functional movement assessment.

  11. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    PubMed Central

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  12. The effects of shoulder joint abduction angles on the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle and the upper trapezius muscle while vibrations are applied.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da-Eun; Moon, Dong-Chul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the ratio between the upper trapezius and the serratus anterior muscles during diverse shoulder abduction exercises applied with vibrations in order to determine the appropriate exercise methods for recovery of scapular muscle balance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The subjects performed shoulder abduction at various shoulder joint abduction angles (90°, 120°, 150°, 180°) with oscillation movements. [Results] At 120°, all the subjects showed significant increases in the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle in comparison with the upper trapezius muscle. However, no significant difference was found at angles other than 120°. [Conclusion] To selectively strengthen the serratus anterior, applying vibration stimuli at the 120° shoulder abduction position is considered to be appropriate.

  13. Fusion angle affects intervertebral adjacent spinal segment joint forces-Model-based analysis of patient specific alignment.

    PubMed

    Senteler, Marco; Weisse, Bernhard; Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Farshad, Mazda T; Snedeker, Jess G

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses the hypothesis that adjacent segment intervertebral joint loads are sensitive to the degree of lordosis that is surgically imposed during vertebral fusion. Adjacent segment degeneration is often observed after lumbar fusion, but a causative mechanism is not yet clearly evident. Altered kinematics of the adjacent segments and potentially nonphysiological mechanical joint loads have been implicated in this process. However, little is known of how altered alignment and kinematics influence loading of the adjacent intervertebral joints under consideration of active muscle forces. This study investigated these effects by simulating L4/5 fusions using kinematics-driven musculoskeletal models of one generic and eight sagittal alignment-specific models. Models featured different spinopelvic configurations but were normalized by body height, masses, and muscle properties. Fusion of the L4/5 segment was implemented in an in situ (22°), hyperlordotic (32°), and hypolordotic (8°) fashion and kinematic input parameters were changed accordingly based on findings of an in vitro investigation. Bending motion from upright standing to 45° forward flexion and back was simulated for all models in intact and fused conditions. Joint loads at adjacent levels and moment arms of spinal muscles experienced changes after all types of fusion. Hypolordotic configuration led to an increase of adjacent segment (L3/4) shear forces of 29% on average, whereas hyperlordotic fusion reduced shear by 39%. Overall, L4/5 in situ fusion resulted in intervertebral joint forces closest to intact loading conditions. An artificial decrease in lumbar lordosis (minus 14° on average) caused by an L4/5 fusion lead to adverse loading conditions, particularly at the cranial adjacent levels, and altered muscle moment arms, in particular for muscles in the vicinity of the fusion. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:131-139, 2017.

  14. Effect of core muscle thickness and static or dynamic balance on prone bridge exercise with sling by shoulder joint angle in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi Hwa; Yu, Jae Ho; Hong, Ji Heon; Kim, Jin Seop; Jung, Sang Woo; Lee, Dong Yeop

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To date, core muscle activity detected using ultrasonography during prone bridge exercises has not been reported. Here we investigated the effects of core muscle thickness and balance on sling exercise efficacy by shoulder joint angle in healthy individuals. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-three healthy university students were enrolled in this study. Ultrasonography thickness of external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis during sling workouts was investigated. Muscle thickness was measured on ultrasonography imaging before and after the experiment. Dynamic balance was tested using a functional reaching test. Static balance was tested using a Tetrax Interactive Balance System. [Results] Different muscle thicknesses were observed during the prone bridge exercise with the shoulder flexed at 60°, 90° or 120°. Shoulder flexion at 60° and 90° in the prone bridge exercise with a sling generated the greatest thickness of most transversus abdominis muscles. Shoulder flexion at 120° in the prone bridge exercise with a sling generated the greatest thickness of most external oblique muscles. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the prone bridge exercise with shoulder joint angle is an effective method of increasing global and local muscle strength. PMID:27134390

  15. Effect of Resistance Training Maintaining the Joint Angle-torque Profile Using a Haptic-based Machine on Shoulder Internal and External Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeonghun; Lee, Kunwoo; Moon, Jeheon; Koo, Dohoon; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Kyengnam; Hong, Daehie; Shin, Inshik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to present an individualized resistance training method to enable exercise while maintaining an exercise load that is set according to an individual’s joint angle-torque using a haptic-based resistance training machine. [Methods] Five participants (machine group) performed individualized shoulder internal and external rotation training with a haptic resistance training machine, while another five participants performed general dumbbell-based shoulder internal and external rotation training for eight weeks. Internal and external rotation powers of subjects were measured using an isokinetic machine before and after training. [Results] The average powers of both shoulder internal and external rotation has been improved after training (25.72%, 13.62%). The improvement in power of external rotation in the machine group was significantly higher than that in the control group. [Conclusion] This study proposes a haptic-based individualized rotator cuff muscle training method. The training protocol maintaining the joint angle-torque profile showed better improvement of shoulder internal/external rotation than dumbbell training. PMID:24764626

  16. The effects of shoes with a rounded soft sole in the anterior-posterior direction on leg joint angle and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    This study examines the effect of these shoes on the leg joint angle and muscle activity during walking. Ten healthy young male adults (mean age: 24.1±4.3 years) walked on a walkway while wearing one of three kinds of shoes with a rounded soft sole in the anterior-posterior direction (Stretch Walker: SW, mass: 440 g), MBT (Masai Barefoot Technology; similar to the SW in form and material, mass: 600 g), and flat-bottomed shoes (FS, mass: 420 g)). After familiarizing themselves with the shoes, subjects walked twenty laps on the walkway, which was about 40 m long (mean speed: 4.1 km/h). After a sufficient rest, they repeated this with the other shoes. During walking, the volume of muscle discharge was measured once every 2 laps. The mean value of the 10 measurements was used as the evaluation variable for integral values and joint angle, while the right foot touched the ground twice. In conclusion, the range of leg movement during walking was smaller when wearing shoes with a rounded soft sole in the anterior-posterior direction (SW and MBT) than when wearing normal shoes (FS). However, the effects of the SW and MBT on leg muscle activity during walking differ little from wearing the normal shoes during a leisurely 10-min walk.

  17. A preliminary investigation of the neoprene tube finger extension splint.

    PubMed

    Clark, E N

    1997-01-01

    Neoprene tube finger extension splints were analyzed to determine the production, amounts, and directions of force magnitude on the proximal interphalangeal joint during the flexing of the tube up to angles of 80 degrees. The tubes were examined in their empty form, with a human digit inserted into the tube, and with portions of the tube on the volar and dorsal surfaces removed. Upward forces ranged from less than 100 g to 225 g in the empty tubes. Upon insertion of a human digit into the tubes, forces increased from 125 g at 10 degrees to 650 g at 80 degrees flexion. Removal of a 2-cm square portion on the dorsal surface over the PIP joint did not significantly affect the tube's ability to lift upward demonstrating little or no downward pressure in the device. The tube had little or no upward force following removal of a 2-cm square encompassing the angle of the device on the volar surface. Positive effectiveness of the tubes were examined in case reports.

  18. Anatomic variation of the extensor tendons to the ring and little fingers: a cadaver dissection study.

    PubMed

    Seradge, H; Tian, W; Baer, C

    1999-07-01

    We found an anatomic variation of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) in a cadaveric dissection. The EDM had three tendon slips; two slips to the little finger and one to the ring finger metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint. The ring finger slip inserted in the extensor hood with the EDC. The EDC had a separate tendon to the little finger extensor hood. The EDM had an additional pulley distal to the extensor retinaculum. The MP joints of the little and ring fingers extended simultaneously upon pulling the EDM or the EDC. The third slip of the EDM could provide an extra donor site and possibly poses a unique clinical presentation.

  19. Management of the Stiff Finger: Evidence and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; McGlinn, Evan P.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The term “stiff finger” refers to a reduction in the range of motion in the finger, and it is a condition that has many different causes and involves a number of different structures. Almost all injuries of the fingers and some diseases can cause finger stiffness. Hand surgeons often face difficulty treating stiff fingers that are affected by irreversible soft tissues fibrosis. Stiff fingers can be divided into flexion and extension deformities. They can also be sub-classified into four categories according to the involved tissues extending from the skin to the joint capsule. Prevention of stiff fingers by judicious mobilization of the joints is prudent to avoid more complicated treatment after established stiffness occurs. Static progressive and dynamic splints have been considered as effective non-operative interventions to treat stiff fingers. Most authors believe force of joint distraction and time duration of stretching are two important factors to consider while applying a splint or cast. We also introduce the concepts of capsulotomy and collateral ligament release and other soft tissue release of the MCP and PIP joint in this article. Future outcomes research is vital to assessing the effectiveness of these surgical procedures and guiding postoperative treatment recommendations. PMID:24996467

  20. Fracture tolerance of the small female elbow joint in compression: the effect of load angle relative to the long axis of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Boggess, Brian M; Crandall, Jeff R; Mac Mahon, Conor B

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a fracture tolerance for the elbow joint, or proximal ends of the ulna and radius, relative to the fracture risk under side-impact airbag loading. Forty experiments were performed on the elbow joints of small female cadavers. The energy source, a pneumatic impactor, was configured to apply compressive loads that match the onset rate, peak force, and momentum transfer of previously conducted side-impact airbag tests with small female subjects. Three initial orientations of the impact load angle relative to the longitudinal axis of the forearm were selected based on analysis of side-impact airbag tests with the instrumented dummy upper extremity. These included loading directions that are 0 degrees , 20 degrees , and 30 degrees superior of the longitudinal axis of the forearm. Post-test necropsy revealed that 11 of the 40 tests resulted in chondral, osteochondral, or comminuted fractures of the proximal radial head or the distal trochlear notch. Using the fracture outcome as the binary variable, a generalized estimating equations statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between elbow load angle (p < 0.01) and risk of fracture, as well as peak elbow force (p = 0.04) and risk of fracture. Using data that were mass scaled to the 5(th) percentile female, the analysis produced a multivariate fracture risk function that predicts a 50% risk of elbow fracture at a compressive elbow load of 1780 N and load angle of 30 degrees superior to the longitudinal axis of the forearm (p < 0.01). It is anticipated that this tolerance will be used to reduce the risk of elbow fractures from side airbag deployment.

  1. Bilateral Volleyball-Related Deformity of the Little Fingers: Mallet Finger and Clinodactyly Mimic

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Mustafa; Solak, Kazim; Ozsahin, Mustafa; Uzun, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old male high school volleyball player was seen to evaluate right- and left-hand little-finger distal interphalangeal joint deformity and pain. His symptoms began during his second season of competitive play. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the little fingers flexed 20-30°, and a 10-15° valgus deformity was seen at the same joints. Pain was relieved with rest but returned immediately after playing volleyball, so plain radiographs were obtained. The flexion and valgus deformity was obvious on plain radiographs and through a clinical examination. Thus, a bilateral little-finger distal phalanx base epiphysis injury was seen. This injury is characterized by a biplanar Salter Harris physeal injury; type 5 on anteroposterior radiographs and type 2 on lateral plain radiographs. The deformity occurred as a result of competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral biplanar physial injury of the base of distal phalanges of the little fingers. Flexion and valgus deformities of DIP joints are a result of repeated micro traumas around the physis. Key points As a result of repeated micro traumas to the physial region, flexion and valgus deformities of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints should be occurred. Sports injuries to the hand often require treatment in orthopedic departments to avoid permanent deformities. Short- or long-term functional results can be gained by simple splinting procedures and abstention from play. PMID:24149318

  2. Relation between index finger width and hand width anthropometric measures.

    PubMed

    Komandur, Sashidharan; Johnson, Peter W; Storch, Richard L; Yost, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    Measures of hand and finger anthropometry are very important for designing many hand held devices as well as understanding anthropometric effects on the operation of such devices. Many historical datasets have measured and recorded gross hand dimensions but do not often record the finer dimensions of the hand such as finger anthropometry. Knowing the size and mass of fingers across genders can be critical to the design and operation of hand held devices. In this paper we compare two empirical linear models that predicts index finger width at the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (a finger anthropometric measure) based on hand-width (hand anthropometric measure). This will be especially useful for deriving population measures of finger anthropometry from large historical data sets where only gross hand dimensions are available.

  3. Jointed magnetic skyrmion lattices at a small-angle grain boundary directly visualized by advanced electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ishikawa, Ryo; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between magnetic skyrmions and structural defects, such as edges, dislocations, and grain boundaries (GBs), which are all considered as topological defects, will be important issues when magnetic skyrmions are utilized for future memory device applications. To investigate such interactions, simultaneous visualization of magnetic skyrmions and structural defects at high spatial resolution, which is not feasible by conventional techniques, is essential. Here, taking advantages of aberration-corrected differential phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the interaction of magnetic skyrmions with a small-angle GB in a thin film of FeGe1−xSix. We found that the magnetic skyrmions and the small-angle GB can coexist each other, but a domain boundary (DB) was formed in the skyrmion lattice along the small-angle GB. At the core of the DB, unexpectedly deformed magnetic skrymions, which appear to be created by joining two portions of magnetic skyrmions in the adjacent lattices, were formed to effectively compensate misorientations between the two adjacent magnetic skyrmion lattices. These observations strongly suggest the flexible nature of individual magnetic skyrmions, and also the significance of defect engineering for future device applications. PMID:27775056

  4. Distinct Inter-Joint Coordination during Fast Alternate Keystrokes in Pianists with Superior Skill

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Goda, Tatsushi; Katayose, Haruhiro; Miwa, Hiroyoshi; Nagata, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Musical performance requires motor skills to coordinate the movements of multiple joints in the hand and arm over a wide range of tempi. However, it is unclear whether the coordination of movement across joints would differ for musicians with different skill levels and how inter-joint coordination would vary in relation to music tempo. The present study addresses these issues by examining the kinematics and muscular activity of the hand and arm movements of professional and amateur pianists who strike two keys alternately with the thumb and little finger at various tempi. The professionals produced a smaller flexion velocity at the thumb and little finger and greater elbow pronation and supination velocity than did the amateurs. The experts also showed smaller extension angles at the metacarpo-phalangeal joint of the index and middle fingers, which were not being used to strike the keys. Furthermore, muscular activity in the extrinsic finger muscles was smaller for the experts than for the amateurs. These findings indicate that pianists with superior skill reduce the finger muscle load during keystrokes by taking advantage of differences in proximal joint motion and hand postural configuration. With an increase in tempo, the experts showed larger and smaller increases in elbow velocity and finger muscle co-activation, respectively, compared to the amateurs, highlighting skill level-dependent differences in movement strategies for tempo adjustment. Finally, when striking as fast as possible, individual differences in the striking tempo among players were explained by their elbow velocities but not by their digit velocities. These findings suggest that pianists who are capable of faster keystrokes benefit more from proximal joint motion than do pianists who are not capable of faster keystrokes. The distinct movement strategy for tempo adjustment in pianists with superior skill would therefore ensure a wider range of musical expression. PMID:21660290

  5. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  6. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  7. Reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle joint angles from a single frame of video data using the GAITRite camera system.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sandy A; Rice, Clinton; Von Behren, Kristyn; Meyer, April; Alexander, Rachel; Murfin, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish intra-rater, intra-session, and inter-rater, reliability of sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle angles with and without reflective markers using the GAITRite walkway and single video camera between student physical therapists and an experienced physical therapist. This study included thirty-two healthy participants age 20-59, stratified by age and gender. Participants performed three successful walks with and without markers applied to anatomical landmarks. GAITRite software was used to digitize sagittal hip, knee, and ankle angles at two phases of gait: (1) initial contact; and (2) mid-stance. Intra-rater reliability was more consistent for the experienced physical therapist, regardless of joint or phase of gait. Intra-session reliability was variable, the experienced physical therapist showed moderate to high reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.50-0.89) and the student physical therapist showed very poor to high reliability (ICC = 0.07-0.85). Inter-rater reliability was highest during mid-stance at the knee with markers (ICC = 0.86) and lowest during mid-stance at the hip without markers (ICC = 0.25). Reliability of a single camera system, especially at the knee joint shows promise. Depending on the specific type of reliability, error can be attributed to the testers (e.g. lack of digitization practice and marker placement), participants (e.g. loose fitting clothing) and camera systems (e.g. frame rate and resolution). However, until the camera technology can be upgraded to a higher frame rate and resolution, and the software can be linked to the GAITRite walkway, the clinical utility for pre/post measures is limited.

  8. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  9. Laser transillumination imaging for determining wood defects and grain angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Sari; Heikkinen, Jorma; Räty, Jukka

    2013-12-01

    Wood defects and grain angle correlate strongly with timber strength and grading. In this study a laser transillumination imaging method was developed to determine wood defects and grain angle. The method uses a near infrared laser light source which illuminates a wood sample with a round beam and the image generated by the light transmitted through the sample is captured for further analysis. In basic and flawless wood, the transmitted light pattern is an ellipse and wood defects and grain angle deviation will change the shape, size and location of the ellipse. The method could be used for determining the strength of wood, grading sawn timber, studying finger and glue joints, estimating moisture and differentiating between heartwood and sapwood.

  10. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients.

  11. Joint design of kT-points trajectories and RF pulses under explicit SAR and power constraints in the large flip angle regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gras, Vincent; Luong, Michel; Amadon, Alexis; Boulant, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    In Magnetic Resonance Imaging at ultra-high field, kT-points radiofrequency pulses combined with parallel transmission are a promising technique to mitigate the B1 field inhomogeneity in 3D imaging applications. The optimization of the corresponding k-space trajectory for its slice-selective counterpart, i.e. the spokes method, has been shown in various studies to be very valuable but also dependent on the hardware and specific absorption rate constraints. Due to the larger number of degrees of freedom than for spokes excitations, joint design techniques based on the fine discretization (gridding) of the parameter space become hardly tractable for kT-points pulses. In this article, we thus investigate the simultaneous optimization of the 3D blipped k-space trajectory and of the kT-points RF pulses, using a magnitude least squares cost-function, with explicit constraints and in the large flip angle regime. A second-order active-set algorithm is employed due to its demonstrated success and robustness in similar problems. An analysis of global optimality and of the structure of the returned trajectories is proposed. The improvement provided by the k-space trajectory optimization is validated experimentally by measuring the flip angle on a spherical water phantom at 7T and via Quantum Process Tomography.

  12. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    PubMed

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  13. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... textures. No longer are baby purees and mushy cereals the only things on the menu. By the ... ll still be helping out by spoon-feeding cereal and other important dietary elements. Encouraging finger feeding ...

  14. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  15. Initial results of finger imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Peter; Biswas, Samir K.; Moens, Hein J. Bernelot; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2014-06-01

    We present a photoacoustic computed tomography investigation on a healthy human finger, to image blood vessels with a focus on vascularity across the interphalangeal joints. The cross-sectional images were acquired using an imager specifically developed for this purpose. The images show rich detail of the digital blood vessels with diameters between 100 μm and 1.5 mm in various orientations and at various depths. Different vascular layers in the skin including the subpapillary plexus could also be visualized. Acoustic reflections on the finger bone of photoacoustic signals from skin were visible in sequential slice images along the finger except at the location of the joint gaps. Not unexpectedly, the healthy synovial membrane at the joint gaps was not detected due to its small size and normal vascularization. Future research will concentrate on studying digits afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis to detect the inflamed synovium with its heightened vascularization, whose characteristics are potential markers for disease activity.

  16. The Influence of Oblique Angle Forced Exercise in Surgically Destabilized Stifle Joints Is Synergistic with Bone, but Antagonistic with Cartilage in an Ovine Model of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rachel J; Mason, Holly M; Yeip, Gavin; Merchant, Samer S; Olsen, Aaron L; Stott, Rusty D; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Bressel, Eadric; Mason, Jeffrey B

    2017-01-01

    Large animal models of osteoarthritis are a necessary testing ground for FDA approval of human medicine applications. Sheep models have advantages over other available large animals, but development and progression of osteoarthritis in sheep is exceedingly slow, which handicaps progress in development of potential treatments. We combined oblique angle forced exercise to increase stress on the stifle, with surgical destabilization to hasten the development of osteoarthritis in ewes. Methods for early detection of clinical signs included radiography, urine, and serum biomarker assays and gait analysis and ex vivo we used microcomputed tomography and macroscopic joint analysis. Our model was able to produce clinically detectable signs of osteoarthritis in a relatively short period (14 weeks). Changes in bone were highly correlated between microcomputed tomography and radiographic analysis and changes in cartilage correlated well between urinary glycosaminoglycan levels and serum aggrecanase analyses. Exercise improved the negative effects of destabilization in bone but exacerbated the negative effects of destabilization in cartilage. These observations suggest that we may need to consider treatments for bone and cartilage separately. These results represent an improved large animal model of osteoarthritis with rapid onset of disease and superior detection of bone and soft tissue changes.

  17. The Influence of Oblique Angle Forced Exercise in Surgically Destabilized Stifle Joints Is Synergistic with Bone, but Antagonistic with Cartilage in an Ovine Model of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Rachel J.; Mason, Holly M.; Yeip, Gavin; Merchant, Samer S.; Olsen, Aaron L.; Stott, Rusty D.; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Bressel, Eadric

    2017-01-01

    Large animal models of osteoarthritis are a necessary testing ground for FDA approval of human medicine applications. Sheep models have advantages over other available large animals, but development and progression of osteoarthritis in sheep is exceedingly slow, which handicaps progress in development of potential treatments. We combined oblique angle forced exercise to increase stress on the stifle, with surgical destabilization to hasten the development of osteoarthritis in ewes. Methods for early detection of clinical signs included radiography, urine, and serum biomarker assays and gait analysis and ex vivo we used microcomputed tomography and macroscopic joint analysis. Our model was able to produce clinically detectable signs of osteoarthritis in a relatively short period (14 weeks). Changes in bone were highly correlated between microcomputed tomography and radiographic analysis and changes in cartilage correlated well between urinary glycosaminoglycan levels and serum aggrecanase analyses. Exercise improved the negative effects of destabilization in bone but exacerbated the negative effects of destabilization in cartilage. These observations suggest that we may need to consider treatments for bone and cartilage separately. These results represent an improved large animal model of osteoarthritis with rapid onset of disease and superior detection of bone and soft tissue changes. PMID:28348888

  18. Outcomes of Opening Wedge Osteotomy to Correct Angular Deformity in Small Finger Clinodactyly

    PubMed Central

    Piper, Samantha L.; Goldfarb, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes and complications in a series of children with clinodactyly treated with opening wedge osteotomy of the abnormal phalanx. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all children with clinodactyly treated at our institution with opening wedge osteotomy of the abnormal middle phalanx between 2003 and 2013. Patients with concomitant pathology or prior surgery in the affected finger were excluded. Pre and postoperative clinical angle, radiographic angle, digital range of motion, and pain were compared, and complications were recorded. Results Thirteen digits in 9 patients were included. All had greater than 20° of preoperative clinical angulation (mean 36°). Mean age at the time of surgery was 11 years and mean duration of follow-up was 25 months (12–43 months). All digits had significant improvement (mean 32°) in clinical and radiographic angles after surgery. This improvement was maintained at final follow-up in 12 digits. Six patients had pain preoperatively and no patient had pain postoperatively. One digit had a recurrent deformity at final follow-up, and 3 digits developed stiffness at the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusions Opening wedge osteotomy is an effective treatment for angulation in children with clinodactyly. We counsel families regarding the risk of distal interphalangeal joint stiffness. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV PMID:25754787

  19. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: dedo What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  20. The Crustal Structure of Northern Continental Margin of South China Sea: Revealed by Joint Onshore-Offshore Wide-Angle Seismic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Sun, J.; Xia, S.; Xu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The northern margin of South China Sea (SCS) is a rifted margin which located in the jointing area between South China Block and SCS Basin, it not only preserved the information about intensive tectonic deformation and magmatism generated by the west Pacific subducted to Eurasian Plate in late Mesozoic, but also recorded the process from continental margin rifting to seafloor spreading of SCS in Cenozoic for the same mechanical property. To investigate crustal structure of northern margin of SCS, a wide-angle onshore-offshore seismic experiment and a coincident multi-channel seismic (MCS) profile were carried out in the northern margin of SCS, 2010. A total of 14 stations consisted of ocean bottom seismometers, portable and permanent land stations were deployed during the survey. The two-dimensional precise crustal structure model of Pearl River Estuary (PRE) region was constructed from onshore to offshore. The model reveals that South mainland of China is a typical continental crust with a 30-32 km Moho depth, and a localized high-velocity anomaly in middle-lower crust under land area near Hong Kong was imaged, which may reflect magma underplating caused by subduction of paleo-Pacific plate in late Mesozoic. The Littoral Fault Zone (LFZ) lies 12 km south of Dangan Island with a width of 18-20 km low-velocity fracture zone from surface to Moho discontinuity. The shelf zone south of LFZ was consisted of a differential thinning upper and lower continental crust, which indicate stretch thinning of passive continent margin during the Cenozoic spreading of the SCS. All these results appear to further confirm that the northern margin of SCS experienced a transition from active margin to passive one from late Mesozoic to Cenozoic.

  1. Determining finger segmental centers of rotation in flexion-extension based on surface marker measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Lee, Sang-Wook; Braido, Peter

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel algorithm for deriving finger segmental center of rotation (COR) locations during flexion-extension from measured surface marker motions in vivo. The algorithm employs an optimization routine minimizing the time-variance of the internal link lengths, and incorporates an empirically quantifiable relationship between the local movement of a surface marker around a joint (termed "surface marker excursion") and the joint flexion-extension. The latter relationship constrains and simplifies the optimization routine to make it computationally tractable. To empirically investigate this relationship and test the proposed algorithm, an experiment was conducted, in which hand cylinder-grasping movements were performed by 24 subjects (12 males and 12 females). Spherical retro-reflective markers were placed at various surface landmarks on the dorsal aspect of each subject's right (grasping) hand, and were measured during the movements by an opto-electronic system. Analysis of experimental data revealed a highly linear relationship between the "surface marker excursion" and the marker-defined flexion-extension angle: the average R(2) in linear regression ranged from 0.89 to 0.97. The algorithm successfully determined the CORs of the distal interphalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and metacarpophalangeal joints of digits 2-5 during measured motions. The derived CORs appeared plausible as examined in terms of the physical locations relative to surface marker trajectories and the congruency across different joints and individuals.

  2. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  3. Hemangioma of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Kodachi, K; Kojima, T; Shimbashi, T; Furusato, M

    1990-01-01

    Fingers often suffer trauma and the clinician is continuously faced with the difficult task of clarifying the distinction between a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion. This study was undertaken to examine ten cases in which a small skin mass located on a finger had been diagnosed preoperatively as hemangioma. Our results showed that seven masses were confirmed pathologically as hemangioma (five cavernous hemangiomas and two capillary hemangiomas), two as traumatic thrombosis and one varix. The clinical manifestations of the two cases of traumatic thrombosis were related to those of hemangioma. In the varix, endothelial proliferation was observed in the area of the thrombosis. This phenomenon is called "intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia", and can confuse the differential diagnosis between a vascular neoplasm and a traumatic thrombosis. Our findings demonstrate that since the traumatic lesions were firmer than the hemangiomas, hardness on physical examination may be a helpful indicator in the differential diagnosis of a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion.

  4. Virtual three-dimensional blackboard: three-dimensional finger tracking with a single camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Andrew; Hassan-Shafique, Khurram; Shah, Mubarak; da Vitoria Lobo, N.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for three-dimensional (3D) tracking of a human finger from a monocular sequence of images. To recover the third dimension from the two-dimensional images, we use the fact that the motion of the human arm is highly constrained owing to the dependencies between elbow and forearm and the physical constraints on joint angles. We use these anthropometric constraints to derive a 3D trajectory of a gesticulating arm. The system is fully automated and does not require human intervention. The system presented can be used as a visualization tool, as a user-input interface, or as part of some gesture-analysis system in which 3D information is important.

  5. Use of a robotic device to measure age-related decline in finger proprioception.

    PubMed

    Ingemanson, Morgan L; Rowe, Justin B; Chan, Vicky; Wolbrecht, Eric T; Cramer, Steven C; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in proprioception are known to affect postural stability, yet the extent to which such changes affect the finger joints is poorly understood despite the importance of finger proprioception in the control of skilled hand movement. We quantified age-related changes in finger proprioception in 37 healthy young, middle-aged, and older adults using two robot-based tasks wherein participants' index and middle fingers were moved by an exoskeletal robot. The first task assessed finger position sense by asking participants to indicate when their index and middle fingers were directly overlapped during a passive crisscross movement; the second task assessed finger movement detection by asking participants to indicate the onset of passive finger movement. When these tasks were completed without vision, finger position sense errors were 48 % larger in older adults compared to young participants (p < 0.05); proprioceptive reaction time was 78 % longer in older adults compared to young adults (p < 0.01). When visual feedback was provided in addition to proprioception, these age-related differences were no longer apparent. No difference between dominant and non-dominant hand performance was found for either proprioception task. These findings demonstrate that finger proprioception is impaired in older adults, and visual feedback can be used to compensate for this deficit. The findings also support the feasibility and utility of the FINGER robot as a sensitive tool for detecting age-related decline in proprioception.

  6. Finger-thumb coupling contributes to exaggerated thumb flexion in stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Kamper, Derek G; Fischer, Heidi C; Conrad, Megan O; Towles, Joseph D; Rymer, William Z; Triandafilou, Kristen M

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate altered finger-thumb coupling in individuals with chronic hemiparesis poststroke. First, an external device stretched finger flexor muscles by passively rotating the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. Subjects then performed isometric finger or thumb force generation. Forces/torques and electromyographic signals were recorded for both the thumb and finger muscles. Stroke survivors with moderate (n = 9) and severe (n = 9) chronic hand impairment participated, along with neurologically intact individuals (n = 9). Stroke survivors exhibited strong interactions between finger and thumb flexors. The stretch reflex evoked by stretch of the finger flexors of stroke survivors led to heteronymous reflex activity in the thumb, while attempts to produce isolated voluntary finger MCP flexion torque/thumb flexion force led to increased and undesired thumb force/finger MCP torque production poststroke with a striking asymmetry between voluntary flexion and extension. Coherence between the long finger and thumb flexors estimated using intermuscular electromyographic correlations, however, was small. Coactivation of thumb and finger flexor muscles was common in stroke survivors, whether activation was evoked by passive stretch or voluntary activation. The coupling appears to arise from subcortical or spinal sources. Flexor coupling between the thumb and fingers seems to contribute to undesired thumb flexor activity after stroke and may impact rehabilitation outcomes.

  7. Joint contribution to fingertip movement during a number entry task: an application of Jacobian matrix.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Trudeau, Matthieu; Buchholz, Bryan; Katz, Jeffrey N; Xu, Xu; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2014-04-01

    Upper extremity kinematics during keyboard use is associated with musculoskeletal health among computer users; however, specific kinematics patterns are unclear. This study aimed to determine the dynamic roles of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints during a number entry task. Six subjects typed in phone numbers using their right index finger on a stand-alone numeric keypad. The contribution of each joint of the upper extremity to the fingertip movement during the task was calculated from the joint angle trajectory and the Jacobian matrix of a nine-degree-of-freedom kinematic representation of the finger, hand, forearm and upper arm. The results indicated that in the vertical direction where the greatest fingertip movement occurred, the MCP, wrist, elbow (including forearm) and shoulder joint contributed 10.2%, 55.6%, 27.7% and 6.5%, respectively, to the downward motion of the index finger averaged across subjects. The results demonstrated that the wrist and elbow contribute the most to the fingertip vertical movement, indicating that they play a major role in the keying motion and have a dynamic load beyond maintaining posture.

  8. Response to reflected-force feedback to fingers in teleoperations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, P. H.; Iatridis, J. C.; Thakor, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    Reflected-force feedback is an important aspect of teleoperations. The objective is to determine the ability of the human operator to respond to that force. Telerobotics operation is simulated by computer control of a motor-driven device with capabilities for programmable force feedback and force measurement. A computer-controlled motor drive is developed that provides forces against the fingers as well as (angular) position control. A load cell moves in a circular arc as it is pushed by a finger and measures reaction forces on the finger. The force exerted by the finger on the load cell and the angular position are digitized and recorded as a function of time by the computer. Flexure forces of the index, long and ring fingers of the human hand in opposition to the motor driven load cell are investigated. Results of the following experiments are presented: (1) Exertion of maximum finger force as a function of angle; (2) Exertion of target finger force against a computer controlled force; and (3) Test of the ability to move to a target force against a force that is a function of position. Averaged over ten individuals, the maximum force that could be exerted by the index or long finger is about 50 Newtons, while that of the ring finger is about 40 Newtons. From the tests of the ability of a subject to exert a target force, it was concluded that reflected-force feedback can be achieved with the direct kinesthetic perception of force without the use of tactile or visual clues.

  9. Formation of tough composite joints

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-coated fibers had a 0/90{degree} architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses.

  10. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  11. Finger Injuries in Ball Sports.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Pham, Dang T; Staines, Kimberly Goldie

    2017-02-01

    Finger injuries are common in athletes playing in professional ball sports. Understanding the intricate anatomy of the digit is necessary to properly diagnose and manage finger injuries. Unrecognized or poorly managed finger injuries can lead to chronic deformities that can affect an athlete's performance. Multiple factors and treatment options should be considered to provide the best functional outcome and rapid return to play for an athlete. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play recommendations for common finger injuries in ball sports.

  12. A Two-Axis Goniometric Sensor for Tracking Finger Motion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lefan; Meydan, Turgut; Williams, Paul Ieuan

    2017-04-05

    The study of finger kinematics has developed into an important research area. Various hand tracking systems are currently available; however, they all have limited functionality. Generally, the most commonly adopted sensors are limited to measurements with one degree of freedom, i.e., flexion/extension of fingers. More advanced measurements including finger abduction, adduction, and circumduction are much more difficult to achieve. To overcome these limitations, we propose a two-axis 3D printed optical sensor with a compact configuration for tracking finger motion. Based on Malus' law, this sensor detects the angular changes by analyzing the attenuation of light transmitted through polarizing film. The sensor consists of two orthogonal axes each containing two pathways. The two readings from each axis are fused using a weighted average approach, enabling a measurement range up to 180 ∘ and an improvement in sensitivity. The sensor demonstrates high accuracy (±0.3 ∘ ), high repeatability, and low hysteresis error. Attaching the sensor to the index finger's metacarpophalangeal joint, real-time movements consisting of flexion/extension, abduction/adduction and circumduction have been successfully recorded. The proposed two-axis sensor has demonstrated its capability for measuring finger movements with two degrees of freedom and can be potentially used to monitor other types of body motion.

  13. Zone 2 lacerations of both flexor tendons of all fingers in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2011-03-01

    Over an eight-year period, the author has treated five males (mean age of 31 years) with clean-cut zone 2 lacerations of both flexor tendons of all fingers using the same surgical technique (profundus only repair using three 'figure of eight' core sutures and proximal venting of the pulley system) and the same postoperative mobilization programme (a dorsal blocking splint with immediate active motion that allowed full extension at the interphalangeal joints). There were no ruptures of the repaired 20 fingers. At final follow-up (mean of 22 months after surgery), the outcome was considered excellent in 12 fingers, good in four fingers and fair in the remaining four fingers by the Strickland-Glogovac criteria. The outcome was similar in all four fingers for every patient supporting the hypothesis of previous studies that the outcome of repair of clean-cut flexor tendon lacerations in zone 2 is related to the psychological and biologic characteristics of the patient.

  14. Differences in finger localisation performance of patients with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Kessels, Roy P C; de Haan, Edward H F; Kappelle, L Jaap; Leijten, Frans S; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2008-09-17

    Several neuropsychological studies have suggested parallel processing of somatosensory input when localising a tactile stimulus on one's own by pointing towards it (body schema) and when localising this touched location by pointing to it on a map of a hand (body image). Usually these reports describe patients with impaired detection, but intact sensorimotor localisation. This study examined three patients with a lesion of the angular gyrus with intact somatosensory processing, but with selectively disturbed finger identification (finger agnosia). These patients performed normally when pointing towards the touched finger on their own hand but failed to indicate this finger on a drawing of a hand or to name it. Similar defects in the perception of other body parts were not observed. The findings provide converging evidence for the dissociation between body image and body schema and, more importantly, reveal for the first time that this distinction is also present in higher-order cognitive processes selectively for the fingers.

  15. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  16. Sliding window-based region of interest extraction for finger vein images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-03-18

    Region of Interest (ROI) extraction is a crucial step in an automatic finger vein recognition system. The aim of ROI extraction is to decide which part of the image is suitable for finger vein feature extraction. This paper proposes a finger vein ROI extraction method which is robust to finger displacement and rotation. First, we determine the middle line of the finger, which will be used to correct the image skew. Then, a sliding window is used to detect the phalangeal joints and further to ascertain the height of ROI. Last, for the corrective image with certain height, we will obtain the ROI by using the internal tangents of finger edges as the left and right boundary. The experimental results show that the proposed method can extract ROI more accurately and effectively compared with other methods, and thus improve the performance of finger vein identification system. Besides, to acquire the high quality finger vein image during the capture process, we propose eight criteria for finger vein capture from different aspects and these criteria should be helpful to some extent for finger vein capture.

  17. Joint Sparse Representation for Robust Multimodal Biometrics Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    cancelable iris recognition in [17]. Nagesh and Li [18] presented an expression-invariant face recognition method using distributed CS and joint sparsity...80 85 90 95 100 Sparsity parameter (λ 1 ) R ec og nt io n R at e Rank one recognition across sparsity All modality Fingerprint Iris Fig. 5... irises and (c) all modalities. Results for composite kernels using different techniques is shown in figure (d). Finger 1 Finger 2 Finger 3 Finger 4 Iris 1

  18. A new approach to depict bone surfaces in finger imaging using photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; van Es, P.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging the vasculature close around the finger joints is of interest in the field of rheumatology. Locally increased vasculature in the synovial membrane of these joints can be a marker for rheumatoid arthritis. In previous work we showed that part of the photoacoustically induced ultrasound from the epidermis reflects on the bone surface within the finger. These reflected signals could be wrongly interpreted as new photoacoustic sources. In this work we show that a conventional ultrasound reconstruction algorithm, that considers the skin as a collection of ultrasound transmitters and the PA tomography probe as the detector array, can be used to delineate bone surfaces of a finger. This can in the future assist in the localization of the joint gaps. This can provide us with a landmark to localize the region of the inflamed synovial membrane. We test the approach on finger mimicking phantoms.

  19. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user. PMID:27524880

  20. Design of a Reconfigurable Robotic System for Flexoextension Fitted to Hand Fingers Size.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pereyra, J Felipe; Castillo-Castaneda, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the growing demand for assistance in rehabilitation therapies for hand movements, a robotic system is proposed to mobilize the hand fingers in flexion and extension exercises. The robotic system is composed by four, type slider-crank, mechanisms that have the ability to fit the user fingers length from the index to the little finger, through the adjustment of only one link for each mechanism. The trajectory developed by each mechanism corresponds to the natural flexoextension path of each finger. The amplitude of the rotations for metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) varies from 0 to 90° and the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) varies from 0 to 60°; the joint rotations are coordinated naturally. The four R-RRT mechanisms orientation allows a 15° abduction movement for index, ring, and little fingers. The kinematic analysis of this mechanism was developed in order to assure that the displacement speed and smooth acceleration into the desired range of motion and the simulation results are presented. The reconfiguration of mechanisms covers about 95% of hand sizes of a group of Mexican adult population. Maximum trajectory tracking error is less than 3% in full range of movement and it can be compensated by the additional rotation of finger joints without injury to the user.

  1. Skilled Finger Movements in Typing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Donald R.

    Six skilled typists were studied while they transcribed English text. The typists showed stable patterns of performance, but with significant individual differences among themselves. Inter-keypress latencies for two-finger digraphs (typed by two fingers on the same hand) were particularly variable among typists. Two typists showed large…

  2. Gert Finger Becomes Emeritus Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Lucuix, C.; Péron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Gert Finger has retired after almost 33 years service and he has been made the first Emeritus Physicist at ESO. An appreciation of some of his many achievements in the development of infrared instrumentation and detector controllers is given. A retirement party for Gert Finger was held in February 2016.

  3. Biomechanical analysis of the human finger extensor mechanism during isometric pressing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints.

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of the Human Finger Extensor Mechanism during Isometric Pressing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dan; Howard, David; Ren, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the finger extensor mechanism on the bone-to-bone contact forces at the interphalangeal and metacarpal joints and also on the forces in the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles during finger pressing. This was done with finger postures ranging from very flexed to fully extended. The role of the finger extensor mechanism was investigated by using two alternative finger models, one which omitted the extensor mechanism and another which included it. A six-camera three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to capture the finger posture during maximum voluntary isometric pressing. The fingertip loads were recorded simultaneously using a force plate system. Two three-dimensional biomechanical finger models, a minimal model without extensor mechanism and a full model with extensor mechanism (tendon network), were used to calculate the joint bone-to-bone contact forces and the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle forces. If the full model is assumed to be realistic, then the results suggest some useful biomechanical advantages provided by the tendon network of the extensor mechanism. It was found that the forces in the intrinsic muscles (interosseus group and lumbrical) are significantly reduced by 22% to 61% due to the action of the extensor mechanism, with the greatest reductions in more flexed postures. The bone-to-bone contact force at the MCP joint is reduced by 10% to 41%. This suggests that the extensor mechanism may help to reduce the risk of injury at the finger joints and also to moderate the forces in intrinsic muscles. These apparent biomechanical advantages may be a result of the extensor mechanism's distinctive interconnected fibrous structure, through which the contraction of the intrinsic muscles as flexors of the MCP joint can generate extensions at the DIP and PIP joints. PMID:24732789

  5. Fjords in viscous fingering: selection of width and opening scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Ristroph, Leif; Thrasher, Matthew; Swinney, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths {lambda}{sub c}/2, where {lambda}{sub c} is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0{sup o}{+-}1.0{sup o}. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  6. Hydrodynamic analysis of different finger positions in swimming: a computational fluid dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Ramos, Rui J; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Silva, António J; Rouboa, Abel I; Machado, Leandro; Barbosa, Tiago M; Marinho, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this research was to numerically clarify the effect of finger spreading and thumb abduction on the hydrodynamic force generated by the hand and forearm during swimming. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a realistic hand and forearm model obtained using a computer tomography scanner was conducted. A mean flow speed of 2 m · s(-1) was used to analyze the possible combinations of three finger positions (grouped, partially spread, totally spread), three thumb positions (adducted, partially abducted, totally abducted), three angles of attack (a = 0°, 45°, 90°), and four sweepback angles (y = 0°, 90°, 180°, 270°) to yield a total of 108 simulated situations. The values of the drag coefficient were observed to increase with the angle of attack for all sweepback angles and finger and thumb positions. For y = 0° and 180°, the model with the thumb adducted and with the little finger spread presented higher drag coefficient values for a = 45° and 90°. Lift coefficient values were observed to be very low at a = 0° and 90° for all of the sweepback angles and finger and thumb positions studied, although very similar values are obtained at a = 45°. For y = 0° and 180°, the effect of finger and thumb positions appears to be much most distinct, indicating that having the thumb slightly abducted and the fingers grouped is a preferable position at y = 180°, whereas at y = 0°, having the thumb adducted and fingers slightly spread yielded higher lift values. Results show that finger and thumb positioning in swimming is a determinant of the propulsive force produced during swimming; indeed, this force is dependent on the direction of the flow over the hand and forearm, which changes across the arm's stroke.

  7. Losing dexterity: patterns of impaired coordination of finger movements in musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Tominaga, Kenta; Miyazaki, Fumio; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training can bring about highly-skilled action, but may also impair motor dexterity by producing involuntary movements and muscular cramping, as seen in focal dystonia (FD) and tremor. To elucidate the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms of FD, the present study addressed the organization of finger movements during piano performance in pianists suffering from the condition. Principal component (PC) analysis identified three patterns of fundamental joint coordination constituting finger movements in both patients and controls. The first two coordination patterns described less individuated movements between the “dystonic” finger and key-striking fingers for patients compared to controls. The third coordination pattern, representing the individuation of movements between the middle and ring fingers, was evident during a sequence of strikes with these fingers in controls, which was absent in the patients. Consequently, rhythmic variability of keystrokes was more pronounced during this sequence of strikes for the patients. A stepwise multiple-regression analysis further identified greater variability of keystrokes for individuals displaying less individuated movements between the affected and striking fingers. The findings suggest that FD alters dexterous joint coordination so as to lower independent control of finger movements, and thereby degrades fine motor control. PMID:26289433

  8. Simulation of light transport in arthritic- and non-arthritic human fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanic, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that frequently leads to joint destruction. It has high incidence rates worldwide, and the disease significantly reduces patient's quality of life due to pain, swelling and stiffness of the affected joints. Early diagnosis is necessary to improve course of the disease, therefore sensitive and accurate diagnostic tools are required. Optical imaging techniques have capability for early diagnosis and monitoring of arthritis. As compared to conventional diagnostic techniques optical technique is a noninvasive, noncontact and fast way of collecting diagnostic information. However, a realistic model of light transport in human joints is needed for understanding and developing of such optical diagnostic tools. The aim of this study is to develop a 3D numerical model of light transport in a human finger. The model will guide development of a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) diagnostic modality for arthritis in human fingers. The implemented human finger geometry is based on anatomical data. Optical data of finger tissues are adjusted to represent either an arthritic or an unaffected finger. The geometry and optical data serve as input into a 3D Monte Carlo method, which calculate diffuse reflectance, transmittance and absorbed energy distributions. The parameters of the model are optimized based on HIS-measurements of human fingers. The presented model serves as an important tool for understanding and development of HSI as an arthritis diagnostic modality. Yet, it can be applied to other optical techniques and finger diseases.

  9. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  10. Cross Gradient Based Joint Inversion of 2D Wide Angle Seismic Reflection/Refraction and Gravity Data Along the Profile Through the 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu Earthquake, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, S.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    2D wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction survey has been widely used to investigate crustal structure and Moho topography. Similarly gravity survey is also very important in the study of local and regional earth features. Seismic survey is sensitive to the seismic velocity parameters and interface variations. For gravity survey, it is sensitive to density parameters of the medium but the resolution along the vertical direction is relatively poor. In this study, we have developed a strategy to jointly invert for seismic velocity model, density model and interface positions using the gravity observations and seismic arrival times from different phases. For the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data, it often relies on the empirical relationship between seismic velocity and density. In comparison, our joint inversion strategy also includes the cross-gradient based structure constraint for seismic velocity and density models in addition to the empirical relationship between them. The objective function for the joint inversion includes data misfit terms for seismic travel times and gravity observations, the cross-gradient constraint, the smoothness terms for two models, and the data misfit term between predicted gravity data based on density model converted from velocity model using the empirical relationship. Each term has its respective weight. We have applied the new joint inversion method to the Riwoqe-Yushu-Maduo profile in northwest China. The profile crosses through the Qiangtang block and Bayan Har block from southwest to northeast, respectively. The 2010 Ms 7.1 Yushu earthquake is located on the profile, around the Ganzi-Yushu fault zone. The joint inversion produces the velocity and density models that are similar in structure and at the same time fit their respective data sets well. Compared to separate seismic inversion using seismic travel times, the joint inversion with gravity data gives a velocity model that better delineates the fault zones. Low

  11. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  12. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Theodore L.; River, Bryan H.; Murmanis, Lidija L.; Christiansen, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross section finger joint was the subject of a multi-disciplinary investigation. The primary objectives were to identify the failure mechanisms which occurred during the finger joint test and to provide avenues for general improvements in the design and fabrication of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures.

  13. [Scintigraphic monitoring of chondro-protective therapy of finger polyarthritis].

    PubMed

    Ammer, K; Knechtsberger, P; Atefie, K

    1990-01-01

    A pilot study in patients with osteoarthritis of fingers was done to clarify the question, whether abnormal joints in bone scanning can predict degenerative changes in X-rays and if scintigraphy is of help in monitoring therapy with chondroprotective medications. 2 groups of 7 patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis of fingers were treated either with galvanic bath alone or in combination with Rumalon-injections for 6 weeks. After therapy the number of abnormal joints in bone scan and number of tender joints was found reduced in both groups, a decrease of the mean circumference of joints was only seen in the Rumalon-group. After 1 year an increase of degenerative signs in X-rays was demonstrated in both groups. But the number of tender joints was smaller in the Rumalon-group than in controls. For abnormal joints in bone scanning a high positive value was calculated regarding to signs of osteoarthritis in radiographs. But no major information in monitoring the chondroprotective efficacy of the medicament was given by bone scanning.

  14. Review of Acute Traumatic Closed Mallet Finger Injuries in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Botero, Santiago; Hidalgo Diaz, Juan Jose; Benaïda, Anissa; Collon, Sylvie; Facca, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    In adults, mallet finger is a traumatic zone I lesion of the extensor tendon with either tendon rupture or bony avulsion at the base of the distal phalanx. High-energy mechanisms of injury generally occur in young men, whereas lower energy mechanisms are observed in elderly women. The mechanism of injury is an axial load applied to a straight digit tip, which is then followed by passive extreme distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) hyperextension or hyperflexion. Mallet finger is diagnosed clinically, but an X-ray should always be performed. Tubiana's classification takes into account the size of the bony articular fragment and DIPJ subluxation. We propose to stage subluxated fractures as stage III if the subluxation is reducible with a splint and as stage IV if not. Left untreated, mallet finger becomes chronic and leads to a swan-neck deformity and DIPJ osteoarthritis. The goal of treatment is to restore active DIPJ extension. The results of a six- to eight-week conservative course of treatment with a DIPJ splint in slight hyperextension for tendon lesions or straight for bony avulsions depends on patient compliance. Surgical treatments vary in terms of the approach, the reduction technique, and the means of fixation. The risks involved are stiffness, septic arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Given the lack of consensus regarding indications for treatment, we propose to treat all cases of mallet finger with a dorsal glued splint except for stage IV mallet finger, which we treat with extra-articular pinning. PMID:27019806

  15. Replantation (Finger, Hand, or Arm)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety Pumpkin ... A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ...

  16. Neural correlates of finger gnosis.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Tamè, Luigi; Furlan, Michele; Haggard, Patrick; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Adriani, Michela; Ferrari, Paolo; Braun, Christoph; Schwarzbach, Jens

    2014-07-02

    Neuropsychological studies have described patients with a selective impairment of finger identification in association with posterior parietal lesions. However, evidence of the role of these areas in finger gnosis from studies of the healthy human brain is still scarce. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the brain network engaged in a novel finger gnosis task, the intermanual in-between task (IIBT), in healthy participants. Several brain regions exhibited a stronger blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in IIBT than in a control task that did not explicitly rely on finger gnosis but used identical stimuli and motor responses as the IIBT. The IIBT involved stronger signal in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), bilateral precuneus (PCN), bilateral premotor cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. In all regions, stimulation of nonhomologous fingers of the two hands elicited higher BOLD signal than stimulation of homologous fingers. Only in the left anteromedial IPL (a-mIPL) and left PCN did signal strength decrease parametrically from nonhomology, through partial homology, to total homology with stimulation delivered synchronously to the two hands. With asynchronous stimulation, the signal was stronger in the left a-mIPL than in any other region, possibly indicating retention of task-relevant information. We suggest that the left PCN may contribute a supporting visuospatial representation via its functional connection to the right PCN. The a-mIPL may instead provide the core substrate of an explicit bilateral body structure representation for the fingers that when disrupted can produce the typical symptoms of finger agnosia.

  17. Multimodal biometric authentication based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Jun; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new multimodal biometric recognition based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry. This research shows three novelties compared to previous works. First, this is the first approach to combine the finger vein and finger geometry information at the same time. Second, the proposed method includes a new finger geometry recognition based on the sequential deviation values of finger thickness extracted from a single finger. Third, we integrate finger vein and finger geometry by a score-level fusion method based on a support vector machine. Results show that recognition accuracy is significantly enhanced using the proposed method.

  18. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers.

    PubMed

    Stapanian, Martin A; Stapanian, Adrienne M P; Staley, Keith E

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  19. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  20. Finger movement improves ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, K; Kamata, N; Iwata, A; Minamida, F; Abe, K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of finger movement on ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD patients). The subjects were 13 PD patients and 6 age-matched healthy adults. The subjects moved fingers before or after gait initiation, or initiated gait without finger movement. Ankle joint movement in the stance leg was recorded to estimate the duration of ankle dorsiflexion (DIF duration), which reflects the degree of disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients. In the PD patients with prolonged D/F duration, finger movement that preceded gait initiation shortened the D/F duration, but in the PD patients without prolonged D/F duration and in healthy subjects, the effect was not found. Accordingly, finger movement that precedes gait initiation improves ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients who suffer disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation.

  1. Single Degree-of-Freedom Exoskeleton Mechanism Design for Finger Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Wolbrecht, Eric T.; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Perez-Gracia, Alba

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the kinematic design of a single degree-of-freedom exoskeleton mechanism: a planar eight-bar mechanism for finger curling. The mechanism is part of a finger-thumb robotic device for hand therapy that will allow users to practice key pinch grip and finger-thumb opposition, allowing discrete control inputs for playing notes on a musical gaming interface. This approach uses the mechanism to generate the desired grasping trajectory rather than actuating the joints of the fingers and thumb independently. In addition, the mechanism is confined to the back of the hand, so as to allow sensory input into the palm of the hand, minimal size and apparent inertia, and the possibility of placing multiple mechanisms side-by-side to allow control of individual fingers. PMID:22275628

  2. Analysis of suitable geometrical parameters for designing a tendon-driven under-actuated mechanical finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penta, Francesco; Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to optimize the geometrical parameters of an under-actuated mechanical finger by conducting a theoretical analysis of these parameters. The finger is actuated by a flexion tendon and an extension tendon. The considered parameters are the tendon guide positions with respect to the hinges. By applying such an optimization, the correct kinematical and dynamical behavior of the closing cycle of the finger can be obtained. The results of this study are useful for avoiding the snapthrough and the single joint hyperflexion, which are the two breakdowns most frequently observed during experimentation on prototypes. Diagrams are established to identify the optimum values for the tendon guides position of a finger with specified dimensions. The findings of this study can serve as guide for future finger design.

  3. Acute blue finger: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed; Elmasry, Mohamed; Mabote, Thato; Elsayed, Ayman; Sunthareswaran, Rame

    2014-01-01

    The management of the acute blue finger is controversial with many regarding it as a benign condition. However, we would argue that it should always be considered as an emergency. We present a challenging case of a 43-year-old woman who presented with a 1-week history of sudden onset blue discolouration of the left fifth digit, and a 6-week history of episodic joint problems. Examination showed bilateral normal radial and ulnar pulses. Following blood investigations, an initial working diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis with associated Raynaud's phenomenon was made. Also, infective endocarditis was considered due to temporary misleading physical signs. Later, CT angiography of the left upper limb arteries showed a significant proximal left subclavian stenosis. Subsequently, a diagnosis of the left subclavian arteritis associated with digit ischaemia from embolic debris was made and the patient underwent a left subclavian angioplasty. However, delayed management resulted in a necrotic digit, which was left to autoamputate. PMID:24429047

  4. Influence of the contact line velocity on the finger formation of the liquid film expanding on an inclined plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masatoshi; Nishikawa, Masato; Ito, Takahiro; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    When a liquid film flows down on an inclined solid surface, the contact line can be destabilized to finger shape. This phenomenon leads to the non-uniform height of the liquid surface or even to generation of dry patch, and then has a great effect on cooling of energy device and quality of coating. In previous studies, the final finger shapes have been discussed by relating the with capillary (Ca) number and the wetting properties of the liquid for the solid substrate, i.e. the contact angle. However, in the experimental studies, little attention has been paid on the difference between the static contact angle and the dynamic one, the latter which is actually observed when the finger is developing. In this study, we performed three-dimensional measurement of surface geometry of the liquid film to clarify how the dynamic contact angles and the Ca number influence the finger shape by optical method. We observed two different finger shapes depending on the volumes of the working fluid., and verified that the finger shapes depend on the contact angle scaled by Ca number. We found that the local dynamic contact angle and the contact line velocity on the trough part of the wavy contact line can be highly related with the final finger shape.

  5. Lengths, girths, and diameters of children's fingers from 3 to 10 years of age.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Burkhart, K J; Rommens, P M; Prommersberger, K J; Konerding, M A

    2010-05-20

    We obtained data on the lengths, girths, and diameters of the fingers of children from 3 to 10 years of age. A total of 160 children (78 girls, 82 boys) were examined in a cross-sectional investigation. The length of each finger of the right hand of every child was measured, as were the girths of the proximal, middle, and distal phalanges, and of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joint. The average length of the thumb was 49 (35-65) mm. The index and ring fingers both averaged 69 (index, 50-88; ring, 42-96) mm in length, while the middle and little fingers averaged 72 (57-100) and 56 (40-74) mm, respectively. Average diameter, calculated from the girth measurement, was 16 (11-22) mm for the thumb, 15 mm for both the index (9-22) and middle (10-21) fingers, 14 (10-20) and 13 (8-19) mm for the ring and little fingers, respectively. The average length of each finger increased by 37% from 3 to 10 years of age, average girth by 24%, and diameter increased by 20%. We observed no differences in length, girth, and diameter between the sexes. The dimensions of children's fingers are relevant to injuries from automatic, power-operated window lifters of motor vehicles because risk of injury to a finger jammed between an ascending window and the seal entry depends upon the diameter of the finger. Additionally, short fingers of young children can be jammed over almost their entire length in the oblique design of a car window seal entry.

  6. Multiple toe transplantations to reconstruct three amputated neighbouring distal fingers by heat press injury--a case report.

    PubMed

    Fumiaki, Shimizu; Wei, Fu-Chan; Sassu, Paolo; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lin, Yu-Te

    2009-09-01

    Heat press injury to the finger results in severe damage. When it is difficult to recover the function in the damaged finger, amputation may be unavoidable. We present a case of three heat press-injured neighbouring fingers reconstructed by multiple toe transplantations. All transplanted toes survived successfully. Two-point discrimination was 9, 10 and 7 mm in the index, middle and ring finger, respectively. The overall motion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint was as follows: 30/130 degrees, 30/75 degrees and 30/105 degrees at the index, middle and ring finger. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint presented a claw deformity of 110 degrees, 65 degrees and 65 degrees. The ability to perform different kinds of pinches was judged fully satisfactory. We have found that toe transplantation is a good option for reconstruction of multiple amputated fingers by heat press injury. In our case, it was difficult to decide on the degree of debridement. Indeed, the reconstructed middle finger unfortunately developed secondary osteoarthritis as a result of the original heat press injury to the bone. Some may have preferred to sacrifice the joint, however, since the patient is young and highly motivated towards rehabilitation, we opted to preserve the PIP joint in the hope of providing superior function. Our principle is that great efforts should be afforded to preserve viable tissues during initial debridement if we plan to perform toe transplantation.

  7. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  8. Advantages of using volar vein repair in finger replantations.

    PubMed

    Mersa, Berkan; Kabakas, Fatih; Pürisa, Hüsrev; Özçelik, Ismail Bülent; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Sezer, Ilker; Tunçer, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Providing adequate venous outflow is essential in finger replantation surgeries. For a successful result, the quality and quantity of venous repairs should be adequate to drain arterial inflow. The digital dorsal venous plexus is a reliable source of material for venous repairs. Classically, volar digital veins have been used only when no other alternative was available. However, repairing volar veins to augment venous outflow has a number of technical advantages and gives a greater chance of survival. Increasing the repaired vein:artery ratio also increases the success of replantation. The volar skin, covering the volar vein, is less likely to be avulsed during injury and is also less likely to turn necrotic, than dorsal skin, after the replantation surgery. Primary repair of dorsal veins can be difficult due to tightness ensuing from arthrodesis of the underlying joint in flexion. In multiple finger replantations, repairing the volar veins after arterial repair and continuing to do so for each finger in the same way without changing the position of the hand and surgeon save time. In amputations with tissue loss, the size discrepancy is less for volar veins than for dorsal veins. We present the results of 366 finger replantations after volar vein repairs.

  9. Collet lock joint for space station truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A lock joint for a Space Station has a series of struts joined together in a predetermined configuration by node point fittings. The fittings have removeable inserts. The lock joint has an elongated housing connected at one end to a strut. A split-fingered collet is mounted within the housing to insure reciprocal movement. A handle on the housing is connected to the collet for moving the collet into the insert where the fingers of the collet expand to lock the joint to the fitting.

  10. Finger posture modulates structural body representations

    PubMed Central

    Tamè, Luigi; Dransfield, Elanah; Quettier, Thomas; Longo, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lesions of the left posterior parietal cortex commonly fail in identifying their fingers, a condition known as finger agnosia, yet are relatively unimpaired in sensation and skilled action. Such dissociations have traditionally been interpreted as evidence that structural body representations (BSR), such as the body structural description, are distinct from sensorimotor representations, such as the body schema. We investigated whether performance on tasks commonly used to assess finger agnosia is modulated by changes in hand posture. We used the ‘in between’ test in which participants estimate the number of unstimulated fingers between two touched fingers or a localization task in which participants judge which two fingers were stimulated. Across blocks, the fingers were placed in three levels of splay. Judged finger numerosity was analysed, in Exp. 1 by direct report and in Exp. 2 as the actual number of fingers between the fingers named. In both experiments, judgments were greater when non-adjacent stimulated fingers were positioned far apart compared to when they were close together or touching, whereas judgements were unaltered when adjacent fingers were stimulated. This demonstrates that BSRs are not fixed, but are modulated by the real-time physical distances between body parts. PMID:28223685

  11. Surgical treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Rongières, M

    2013-09-01

    Degenerative osteoarthritis of the long fingers is rare and surgical management is often necessary if there is joint pain, however this indication should not only be based on radiographic imaging. The specific anatomical problems of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints are described. The surgical approach for each joint is described as well as functional management, in particular that of the extensor apparatus. Mobility should always be preserved for the MCP, arthroplasties are recommended for the PIP except for the index, and arthrodesis for the DIP. The different and most frequently used implants are described as well as the indications and expected results. The indications are discussed in relation to the limited results in the literature as well as the preferences of a panel of French hand surgeons.

  12. Silicone Arthroplasty After Ankylosis of Proximal Interphalangeal Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Awan, Hisham M; Imbriglia, Joseph E

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can cause severe disability of the hand and fingers. Ankylosis of the finger joints is a known yet underreported manifestation of RA of the hand. We report the case of a patient who had RA and developed autofusion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints. At presentation, the PIP joints were fused in 15° of flexion. Silicone PIP arthroplasty was performed. Function improved with 60° of PIP joint motion and no pain.

  13. Long Arm Casting for Treatment of Trigger Finger in Children: Report of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Saeed Banadaky, SH; Baghianimoghadam, B

    2012-01-01

    Trigger digit in children is rare. Triggering predominantly occurs in thumbs presenting a flexion deformity of interphalangeal joint of finger. In children, the disease usually presents with a remained finger in locked flexion, unlike the adults in whom triggering is more prevalent. The pathology of the disease includes locking of the tendon over A1 pulley. Some treatment modalities have been suggested to cure the trigger thumb, such as conservative therapy without any invasive approach, and surgery. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report about casting as a treatment method for trigger finger in children. Herein, we report three cases of patients with trigger finger, who were treated by using long arm casting. PMID:22574097

  14. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  15. Integration of tactile input across fingers in a patient with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Overvliet, Krista E; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Brenner, Eli; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2011-01-01

    Finger agnosia has been described as an inability to explicitly individuate between the fingers, which is possibly due to fused neural representations of these fingers. Hence, are patients with finger agnosia unable to keep tactile information perceived over several fingers separate? Here, we tested a finger agnosic patient (GO) on two tasks that measured the ability to keep tactile information simultaneously perceived by individual fingers separate. In experiment 1 GO performed a haptic search task, in which a target (the absence of a protruded line) needed to be identified among distracters (protruded lines). The lines were presented simultaneously to the fingertips of both hands. Similarly to the controls, her reaction time decreased when her fingers were aligned as compared to when her fingers were stretched and in an unaligned position. This suggests that she can keep tactile input from different fingers separate. In experiment two, GO was required to judge the position of a target tactile stimulus to the index finger, relatively to a reference tactile stimulus to the middle finger, both in fingers uncrossed and crossed position. GO was able to indicate the relative position of the target stimulus as well as healthy controls, which indicates that she was able to keep tactile information perceived by two neighbouring fingers separate. Interestingly, GO performed better as compared to the healthy controls in the finger crossed condition. Together, these results suggest the GO is able to implicitly distinguish between tactile information perceived by multiple fingers. We therefore conclude that finger agnosia is not caused by minor disruptions of low-level somatosensory processing. These findings further underpin the idea of a selective impaired higher order body representation restricted to the fingers as underlying cause of finger agnosia.

  16. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  17. Optimality versus variability: effect of fatigue in multi-finger redundant tasks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaebum; Singh, Tarkeshwar; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    We used two methods to address two aspects of multi-finger synergies and their changes after fatigue of the index finger. Analytical inverse optimization (ANIO) was used to identify cost functions and corresponding spaces of optimal solutions over a broad range of task parameters. Analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to quantify co-variation of finger forces across repetitive trials that helped reduce variability of (stabilized) performance variables produced by all the fingers together. Subjects produced steady-state levels of total force and moment of force simultaneously as accurately as possible by pressing with the four fingers of the right hand. Both before and during fatigue, the subjects performed single trials for many force-moment combinations covering a broad range; the data were used for the ANIO analysis. Multiple trials were performed at two force-moment combinations; these data were used for analysis within the UCM hypothesis. Fatigue was induced by 1-min maximal voluntary contraction exercise by the index finger. Principal component (PC) analysis showed that the first two PCs explained over 90% of the total variance both before and during fatigue. Hence, experimental observations formed a plane in the four-dimensional finger force space both before and during fatigue conditions. Based on this finding, quadratic cost functions with linear terms were estimated from the experimental data. The dihedral angle between the plane of optimal solutions and the plane of experimental observations (D (ANGLE)) was very small (a few degrees); it increased during fatigue. There was an increase in fatigue of the coefficient at the quadratic term for the index finger force balanced by a drop in the coefficients for the ring and middle fingers. Within each finger pair (index-middle and ring-little), the contribution of the "central" fingers to moment production increased during fatigue. An index of antagonist moment production dropped

  18. "Finger Kits:" An Interactive Demonstration of Biomaterials and Engineering for Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canavan, Heather E.; Stanton, Michael; Lopez, Kaori; Grubin, Catherine; Graham, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on activity and demonstration developed at the University of Washington and further reined at the University of New Mexico. In this activity, the authors present a real-world problem to the student: Someone has an injured finger joint, and the students in the class need to design an implant to replace it. After…

  19. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  20. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-01-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations. Images PMID:933109

  1. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-04-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations.

  2. Viscous fingering in an elastic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, Andrew L.; Ducloué, Lucie; Juel, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the fingering instability of a flat, steadily propagating interface in a Hele-Shaw channel, where the top boundary has been replaced by an elastic membrane. In order to create a steadily propagating flat front, we exploit the reopening modes of fluid-filled elasto-rigid channels. The collapsed upper boundary reopens through the steady propagation of a wide finger, when air is injected from one end at a constant flow rate. For high levels of collapse and high finger speed, the tip of the finger becomes flat, creating a leading edge normal to the direction of propagation, which in turn is subject to a smaller scale viscous fingering instability. By modifying the cross-sectional geometry of the channel, we can actuate the finger shape to observe a variety of small-scale fingering phenomena including growth in a direction normal to the propagation and dendrite formation. The instability of the flat front exhibits constant-length fingers, very similar to the stubby fingers observed in radial compliant Hele-Shaw cells, and reminiscent of the printer's instability travel with the front. We investigate the geometry of those fingers in terms of the speed of the front, and the geometry of the reopening region. The financial support of the Leverhulme Trust is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  4. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  5. Usefulness of Ultrasound Imaging in Detecting Psoriatic Arthritis of Fingers and Toes in Patients with Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    De simone, Clara; Caldarola, Giacomo; D'Agostino, Magda; Carbone, Angelo; Guerriero, Cristina; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Amerio, Pierluigi; Magarelli, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Background. Given that clinical evaluation may underestimate the joint damage and that early treatment can slow down psoriatic arthritis (PsA) progression, screening psoriasis patients with imaging tools that can depict early PsA changes would entail clear benefits. Objective. To compare the ability of X-ray and ultrasound (US) examination in detecting morphological abnormalities consistent with early PsA in patients with psoriasis, using rheumatological evaluation as the gold standard for diagnosis. Methods. Patients with chronic plaque psoriasis and no previous PsA diagnosis attending our outpatient dermatology clinic and reporting finger/toe joint and/or tendon pain underwent X-ray and US evaluation; they were subsequently referred to a rheumatologist for clinical examination and review of imaging findings. Results. Abnormal US and/or X-ray findings involving at least one finger and/or toe (joints and/or tendons) were seen in 36/52 patients: 11 had one or more X-ray abnormalities, including erosion, joint space narrowing, new bone formation, periarticular soft tissue swelling, and periarticular osteoporosis; 36 had suspicious changes on US. Conclusion. US proved valuable in detecting joint and/or tendon abnormalities in the fingers and toes of patients with suspicious changes. The dermatologist should consider US to obtain an accurate assessment of suspicious findings. PMID:21461353

  6. Rotational stability test for the diagnosis of radial collateral ligament rupture in the fingers: Anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, P; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Prunières, G; Pire, E; Taleb, C; Honecker, S; Bellemère, P; Fontaine, C; Liverneaux, P A

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosing rupture of the radial collateral ligament (RCL) of the finger metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints is difficult. The aim of this cadaver study was to validate a rotational test for the MCP after RCL transection. With the MCP and proximal interphalangeal joints in flexion, rotation along the axis of the proximal phalanx was applied through an extended distal interphalangeal joint to 36 cadaver fingers. Each finger's pulp described an arc of pronation and supination that was noted on the palm. The test was repeated three times: before transection, after transection of the proper collateral ligament (CL) and after transection of both the proper and accessory CLs. Rotational arcs were measured in pronation and supination. Mean length of the pronation arc after transection of the main RCL was 17.53mm, while it was only 12.41mm before transection for the supination arc. Mean length of the pronation arc after transection of both CLs was 22.83mm compared to only 11.93mm before transection. Our results show a significant difference in pronation stability of the MCP joint after transection of the RCL proper. We can conclude that this rotational stability test is a valid test for diagnosing RCL rupture in MCP joints.

  7. OPTIMALITY VS. VARIABILITY: EFFECT OF FATIGUE IN MULTI-FINGER REDUNDANT TASKS

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaebum; Singh, Tarkeshwar; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    We used two methods to address two aspects of multi-finger synergies and their changes after fatigue of the index finger. Analytical inverse optimization (ANIO) was used to identify cost functions and corresponding spaces of optimal solutions over a broad range of task parameters. Analysis within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis was used to quantify co-variation of finger forces across repetitive trials that helped reduce variability of (stabilized) performance variables produced by all the fingers together. Subjects produced steady-state levels of total force and moment of force simultaneously as accurately as possible by pressing with the four fingers of the right hand. Both before- and during-fatigue, the subjects performed single trials for many force-moment combinations covering a broad range; the data were used for the ANIO analysis. Multiple trials were performed at two force-moment combinations; these data were used for analysis within the UCM hypothesis. Fatigue was induced by 1-min maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) exercise by the index finger. Principal component (PC) analysis showed that the first two PCs explained over 90% of the total variance both before and during fatigue. Hence, it was concluded that experimental observations formed a plane in the four-dimensional finger force space both before and during fatigue conditions. Based on this conclusion, quadratic cost functions with linear terms were assumed. The dihedral angle between the plane of optimal solutions and the plane of experimental observations was very small (a few degrees); it increased during fatigue. There was an increase with fatigue of the coefficient at the quadratic term for the index finger force balanced by a drop in the coefficients for the ring and middle fingers. Within each finger pair (index-middle and ring-little), the contribution of the “central” fingers to moment production increased during fatigue. An index of antagonist moment production dropped with

  8. A physical picture of atomic motions within the Dickerson DNA dodecamer in solution derived from joint ensemble refinement against NMR and large-angle X-ray scattering data.

    PubMed

    Schwieters, Charles D; Clore, G Marius

    2007-02-06

    The structure and dynamics of the Dickerson DNA dodecamer [5'd(CGCGAATTCGCG)2] in solution have been investigated by joint simulated annealing refinement against NMR and large-angle X-ray scattering data (extending from 0.25 to 3 A-1). The NMR data comprise an extensive set of hetero- and homonuclear residual dipolar coupling and 31P chemical shift anisotropy restraints in two alignment media, supplemented by NOE and 3J coupling data. The NMR and X-ray scattering data cannot be fully ascribed to a single structure representation, indicating the presence of anisotropic motions that impact the experimental observables in different ways. Refinement with ensemble sizes (Ne) of >or=2 to represent the atomic motions reconciles all the experimental data within measurement error. Cross validation against both the dipolar coupling and X-ray scattering data suggests that the optimal ensemble size required to account for the current data is 4. The resulting ensembles permit one to obtain a detailed view of the conformational space sampled by the dodecamer in solution and permit one to analyze fluctuations in helicoidal parameters, sugar puckers, and BI-BII backbone transitions and to obtain quantitative metrics of atomic motion such as generalized order parameters and thermal B factors. The calculated order parameters are in good agreement with experimental order parameters obtained from 13C relaxation measurements. Although DNA behaves as a relatively rigid rod with a persistence length of approximately 150 bp, dynamic conformational heterogeneity at the base pair level is functionally important since it readily permits optimization of intermolecular protein-DNA interactions.

  9. Is there an association between the individual anatomy of the scapula and the development of rotator cuff tears or osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint?: A radiological study of the critical shoulder angle.

    PubMed

    Moor, B K; Bouaicha, S; Rothenfluh, D A; Sukthankar, A; Gerber, C

    2013-07-01

    We hypothesised that a large acromial cover with an upwardly tilted glenoid fossa would be associated with degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCTs), and conversely, that a short acromion with an inferiorly inclined glenoid would be associated with glenohumeral osteoarthritis (OA). This hypothesis was tested using a new radiological parameter, the critical shoulder angle (CSA), which combines the measurements of inclination of the glenoid and the lateral extension of the acromion (the acromion index). The CSA was measured on standardised radiographs of three groups: 1) a control group of 94 asymptomatic shoulders with normal rotator cuffs and no OA; 2) a group of 102 shoulders with MRI-documented full-thickness RCTs without OA; and 3) a group of 102 shoulders with primary OA and no RCTs noted during total shoulder replacement. The mean CSA was 33.1° (26.8° to 38.6°) in the control group, 38.0° (29.5° to 43.5°) in the RCT group and 28.1° (18.6° to 35.8°) in the OA group. Of patients with a CSA > 35°, 84% were in the RCT group and of those with a CSA < 30°, 93% were in the OA group. We therefore concluded that primary glenohumeral OA is associated with significantly smaller degenerative RCTs with significantly larger CSAs than asymptomatic shoulders without these pathologies. These findings suggest that individual quantitative anatomy may imply biomechanics that are likely to induce specific types of degenerative joint disorders.

  10. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  11. Buddy Taping: Is It a Safe Method for Treatment of Finger and Toe Injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Sanglim; Chung, Chin Youb; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Kim, Tae Gyun; Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Kwon, Dae Gyu; Ha, Jae Hong; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok

    2014-01-01

    Background Buddy taping is a well known and useful method for treating sprains, dislocations, and other injuries of the fingers or toes. However, the authors have often seen complications associated with buddy taping such as necrosis of the skin, infections, loss of fixation, and limited joint motion. To our knowledge, there are no studies regarding the complications of buddy taping. The purpose of this study was to report the current consensus on treating finger and toe injuries and complications of buddy taping by using a specifically designed questionnaire. Methods A questionnaire was designed for this study, which was regarding whether the subjects were prescribed buddy taping to treat finger and toe injuries, reasons for not using it, in what step of injury treatment it was use, indications, complications, kinds of tape for fixation, and special methods for preventing skin injury. Fifty-five surgeons agreed to participate in the study and the survey was performed in a direct interview manner at the annual meetings of the Korean Pediatric Orthopedic Association and Korean Society for Surgery of the Hand, in 2012. Results Forty-eight surgeons (87%) used buddy taping to treat finger and toe injuries, especially proximal interphalangeal (PIP) injuries of the hand, finger fractures, toe fractures, metacarpophalangeal injuries of the hand, and PIP injuries of the foot. Sixty-five percent of the surgeons experienced low compliance. Forty-five percent of the surgeons observed skin injuries on the adhesive area of the tape, and skin injuries between the injured finger and healthy finger were observed by 45% of the surgeons. Conclusions This study sheds light on the current consensus and complications of buddy taping among physicians. Low compliance and skin injury should be considered when the clinician treats finger and toe injuries by using buddy taping. PMID:24605186

  12. Finger Mathematics: A Method for All Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Chavez, Maria

    The instruction of finger counting and finger calculation, also known as Chisanbop, is promoted as a natural method of introducing and teaching the basic processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to children, particularly to those who are mentally and physically handicapped. The sequential process for teaching finger…

  13. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  14. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  15. Fingering in Stochastic Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Aristotelous, Andreas C.; Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread use of hybrid-discrete cellular automata in modeling cancer, two simple growth models are studied on the two dimensional lattice that incorporate a nutrient, assumed to be oxygen. In the first model the oxygen concentration u(x, t) is computed based on the geometry of the growing blob, while in the second one u(x, t) satisfies a reaction-diffusion equation. A threshold θ value exists such that cells give birth at rate β(u(x, t) − θ)+ and die at rate δ(θ − u(x, t)+. In the first model, a phase transition was found between growth as a solid blob and “fingering” at a threshold θc = 0.5, while in the second case fingering always occurs, i.e., θc = 0. PMID:26430353

  16. Finger tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lakie, M; Mutch, W J

    1989-03-01

    Finger tremor was investigated in 20 patients (age range 54-88 yr) diagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease and six controls of a similar age and no known neurological abnormality. In nine of the patients tremor was not clinically obvious. When the tremor of these patients was recorded immediately after voluntary movement and subjected to instrumental analysis there were consistently observable differences from the controls. Such analysis may have diagnostic potential when there is clinical uncertainty. Surface EMG recordings were obtained from four patients. One patient had a large resting tremor with obvious reciprocating activity in flexors and extensors; in the others who had no symptomatic tremor there was reciprocating activity only after movement, and this died away in a few seconds as the induced tremor disappeared.

  17. Elastic Suppression of Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gunnar; Lister, John

    2016-11-01

    Consider peeling an elastic tape or beam away from a rigid base to which it is stuck by a film of viscous liquid. The peeling motion requires air to invade the viscous liquid and is thus susceptible to the Saffman-Taylor fingering instability. We analyse the fundamental travelling-wave solution and show that the advancing air-liquid interface remains linearly stable at higher capillary numbers than in a standard Hele-Shaw cell. A short-wavelength expansion yields an analytical expression for the growth rate which is valid for all unstable modes throughout the parameter space, allowing us to identify and quantify four distinct physical mechanisms that each help suppress the instability. Applying our method to the experiments by Pihler-Puzovic et al. (2012) reveals that the radial geometry and time-variation stabilize the system further.

  18. An effective preprocessing method for finger vein recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, JiaLiang; Li, Qiong; Wang, Ning; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2013-07-01

    The image preprocessing plays an important role in finger vein recognition system. However, previous preprocessing schemes remind weakness to be resolved for the high finger vein recongtion performance. In this paper, we propose a new finger vein preprocessing that includes finger region localization, alignment, finger vein ROI segmentation and enhancement. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme is capable of enhancing the quality of finger vein image effectively and reliably.

  19. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  20. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  1. Free digital artery flap: an ideal flap for large finger defects in situations where local flaps are precluded.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chin-Ho; Teoh, Lam-Chuan; Lee, Jonathan Y-L; Yam, Andrew K-T; Khoo, David B-A; Yong, Fok-Chuan

    2008-03-01

    The heterodigital arterialized flap is increasingly accepted as a flap of choice for reconstruction of large finger wounds. However, in situations where the adjacent fingers sustained concomitant injuries, the use of this flap as a local flap is precluded. This paper describes our experience with the free digital artery flap as an evolution of the heterodigital arterialized flap. Four patients with large finger wounds were reconstructed with free digital artery flap. Our indications for digital artery free flap were concomitant injuries to adjacent fingers that precluded their use as donor sites. The arterial supply of the flap was from the digital artery and the venous drainage was from the dominant dorsal vein of the finger. The flap was harvested from the ulnar side of the finger. The digital nerve was left in situ to minimize donor morbidity. The donor site was covered with a full-thickness skin graft and secured with bolster dressings. Early intensive mobilization was implemented for all patients. All flaps survived. No venous congestion was noted and primary healing was achieved in all flaps. In addition to providing well-vascularized tissue for coverage of vital structures, the digital artery was also used as a flow-through flap for finger revascularization in one patient. Donor-site morbidity was minimal, with all fingers retaining protective pulp sensation and the distal and proximal interphalangeal joints retaining full ranges of motion. In conclusion, the free digital artery flap is a versatile flap that is ideal for coverage of large-sized finger defects in situations where local flaps are unavailable. Donor-site morbidity can be minimized by preservation of the digital nerve, firmly securing the skin graft with bolster dressings, and early mobilization of the donor finger.

  2. Clubbed fingers and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Shih-Chang; Liu, Ta-Chih; Chen, Chung-Jen; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Ou, Tsan-Teng; Liu, Hong-Wen; Tsai, Wen-Chan

    2003-04-01

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is characterized by clubbed fingers and periosteal new bone formation. Etiologically, it can be divided into primary and secondary HOA, but its pathogenesis is uncertain. We report a 42-year-old male patient who suffered from painful clubbing fingers and toes. Serial examinations revealed periosteal new bone formation in the four limb long bones and a solid mass lesion in the right upper lung field. Pathologic examination of the resected mass lesion showed squamous cell carcinoma. After surgery and chemotherapy, the severity of clubbed fingers decreased and joint pain improved. Follow-up bone scan also suggested regression of the uptake of radioactivity in the four limb bones. We concluded that the HOA in this case was probably caused by lung cancer.

  3. The effect of enslaving on perception of finger forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Leonard, Charles T

    2006-07-01

    The primary purpose was to examine the effect of enslaving on finger force perception during isometric finger force production using an ipsilateral force-matching paradigm. Fourteen subjects were instructed to produce varying levels of reference forces [10, 20, 30, and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] force using one finger (index, I or little, L) and to reproduce these forces using the same finger (homo-finger tasks, I/I and L/L) or a different finger (hetero-finger tasks, I/L and L/I). Forces of all fingers were recorded. During homo-finger tasks, no differences were found in force magnitude or relative level of force (expressed as a proportion of MVC). The index finger matching force magnitudes were greater than the little finger reference force magnitudes, with significantly lower levels of relative force during L/I tasks; while the little finger matching forces underestimated the index finger reference forces with significantly higher levels of relative force during I/L tasks. The difference in the matching and reference forces by the instructed finger(s), i.e., matching error, was larger in hetero-finger tasks than in homo-finger tasks, particularly at high reference force levels (30, 40% MVC). When forces of all fingers were considered, enslaving (uninstructed finger forces) significantly minimized matching errors of the total force during both I/L and L/I hetero-finger tasks, especially at high reference force levels. Our results show that there is a tendency to match the absolute magnitude of the total force during ipsilateral finger force-matching tasks. This tendency is likely related to enslaving effects. Our results provide evidence that all (instructed and uninstructed) finger forces are sensed, thus resulting in perception of the absolute magnitude of total finger force.

  4. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis.

  5. A study of the dimensions and taper angles of the medullary canals of the proximal and middle phalanges.

    PubMed

    McArthur, P A; Cutts, A; Milner, R H; Johnson, G R

    1998-02-01

    The morphology and dimensions of the medullary canals of the proximal and middle phalanges have been studied with particular interest shown to the angle of taper of these canals. Measurements of 50 cadaveric fingers were taken from computer aided tomographic images using AutoCAD software. Tangents were fitted to the inner cortices in two orthogonal planes and the angles between them were measured. The angles of canal taper in the proximal phalanx were remarkably similar for each digit. This was also true for the middle phalanx of the index, middle and ring fingers but the taper of the middle phalanx of the little finger was found to be different.

  6. Finger muscle attachments for an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S; Dennerlein, Jack T; Jindrich, Devin L

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements.

  7. Finger Muscle Attachments for an OpenSim Upper-Extremity Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hwa; Asakawa, Deanna S.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Jindrich, Devin L.

    2015-01-01

    We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms). Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS) differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF) between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5%) for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D) of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm). Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths). The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements. PMID:25853869

  8. More efficient swimming by spreading your fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis; Breugem, Wim Paul; Westerweel, Jerry; Delfos, Rene; Grift, Ernst Jan

    2016-11-01

    A tantalizing question in free-style swimming is whether the stroke efficiency during the pull phase depends on spreading the fingers. It is a subtle effect-not more than a few percent-but it could make a big difference in a race. We measure the drag of arm models with increasing finger spreading in a wind tunnel and compare forces and moments to the results of immersed boundary simulations. Virtual arms were used in the simulations and their 3D-printed real versions in the experiment. We find an optimal finger spreading, accompanied by a marked increase of coherent vortex shedding. A simple actuator disk model explains this optimum.

  9. Development of a finger-like mechanism of end-effector for micro surgery.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Park, C M; Yoo, J H; Kim, K

    2016-08-01

    Neurosurgery had been considered nearly impossible due to its technical difficulty and the danger to its special target organ, but with endoscopic methods, many such surgeries can be made safely through the nose. Endoscopic neurosurgery is limited by available instruments, however, and there remain some areas of the human body inaccessible to standard surgical tools. To overcome some of these limitations, in this study we developed a simple mechanism that could form a high curvature in a narrow space. The end product is a finger-like mechanism consisting of five body parts and four joints. All body parts are connected in series, having a total length of 20mm and a diameter of φ4mm. A four-bar linkage internally connects the body parts and joints, and a nitinol backbone was used to improve repeatability. The first joint is driven by a rod or wire, and the shape of the mechanism is determined by rotating the first joint, because the position of each joint depends on the position of the joint before it. The study verified that an image sensor in the end of the finger-like mechanism has a wider range of view, 210 degrees than a conventional endoscope of 100 degrees. Finally, skull model simulation suggests that this device could be used in real neurosurgical applications.

  10. [Treatment of fractures of proximal phalanx of fingers by Eiffel Tower percutaneous pinning method. A review of 45 cases].

    PubMed

    Chbani, B; Amar, M F; Loudyi, D; Boutayeb, F

    2010-04-01

    The authors report in the treatment of fractures of the proximal phalanx of the fingers, the use of Eiffel Tower pinning, a relatively simple method, fast and stable, associated to a protection and early rehabilitation. The objective of this method is to offer to the patient a pollici-digital grip. Our study is a retrospective study of 45 patients treated for fractures of the proximal phalanx of the fingers by percutaneous pinning according to Eiffel Tower method. We detail this simple and economic technique and examine the functional and radiological results of this series of patients. The amplitude of the active total motion of the proximal interphalangeal joint is on average 94.16 degrees (78.5 % of the normal active mobility of the proximal interphalangeal joint), and the amplitude of the active total motion of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint is on average 90.05 degrees (75 % of the normal active mobility of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint).

  11. Patient-Specific Prosthetic Fingers by Remote Collaboration–A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabibihan, John-John

    2011-01-01

    The concealment of amputation through prosthesis usage can shield an amputee from social stigma and help improve the emotional healing process especially at the early stages of hand or finger loss. However, the traditional techniques in prosthesis fabrication defy this as the patients need numerous visits to the clinics for measurements, fitting and follow-ups. This paper presents a method for constructing a prosthetic finger through online collaboration with the designer. The main input from the amputee comes from the Computer Tomography (CT) data in the region of the affected and the non-affected fingers. These data are sent over the internet and the prosthesis is constructed using visualization, computer-aided design and manufacturing tools. The finished product is then shipped to the patient. A case study with a single patient having an amputated ring finger at the proximal interphalangeal joint shows that the proposed method has a potential to address the patient's psychosocial concerns and minimize the exposure of the finger loss to the public. PMID:21573246

  12. Investigation of an alleged mechanism of finger injury in an automobile crash.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Stephen; Kent, Richard

    2006-07-01

    This investigation centers on the case of an adult male whose finger was allegedly amputated by the steering wheel of his car during a crash. The subject claimed to have been driving with his left index finger inserted through a hole in the spoke of his steering wheel and was subsequently involved in an offset frontal collision with a tree. The finger was found to be cleanly severed at the mid-shaft of the proximal phalanx after the crash. This injury was alleged to have been caused by inertial loading from the rotation of the steering wheel during the crash. To determine whether this injury mechanism was plausible, three laboratory tests representing distinct loading scenarios were carried out with postmortem human surrogates loaded dynamically by the subject's steering wheel. It was found that the inertial loads generated in this loading scenario are insufficient to amputate the finger. Additionally, artificially constraining the finger to force an amputation to occur revealed that a separation at the proximal interphalangeal joint occurs rather than a bony fracture of the proximal phalanx. Based on these biomechanical tests, it can be concluded that the subject's injury did not occur during the automobile crash in question. Furthermore, it can be shown that the injury was self-inflicted to fraudulently claim on an insurance policy.

  13. Finger injuries caused by power-operated windows of motor vehicles: an experimental cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Pollinger, P; Burkhart, K J; Konerding, M A; Prommersberger, K J; Rommens, P M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this experimental cadaver study was to investigate which kinds of lesions could occur in jam events between the glass and seal entry of power-operated motor vehicle side door windows at two different closing forces. Ten hands of fresh cadaver specimens were used. Three different hand positions chosen to simulate real events in which a finger is jammed between the glass and seal entry of the window of a current motor vehicle were examined. The index, middle, ring, and little finger of each hand were separately jammed both at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joint at closing forces of 300 and 500 N with a constant window glass closing speed of 10 cm/s. Macroscopically visible injuries were documented and radiographs of all fingers were obtained in two standard planes. At a closing force of 300 N, contusion marks of the skin, palmar joint instabilities and superficial skin lesions occurred, whilst at 500 N superficial skin lesions, superficial and deep open crush injuries, and fractures were observed. The results of this study experimentally demonstrate the kinds of finger injuries that could be expected in real jam events between the glass and seal entry in automatic power-operated windows.

  14. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  15. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-01-01

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis. PMID:23988821

  16. Salt-finger convection under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to differential diffusion rates. Because of the fact that the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number (the ratio of thermal diffusivity to solute diffusivity) salt-finger convection can be generated at very much reduced gravity levels. This effect may be of importance in the directional solidification of binary alloys carried out in space. The transport of solute and heat by salt-finger convection at microgravity conditions is considered; instability arising from surface tension gradients, the Marangoni instability, is discussed, and the possible consequences of combined salt-finger and Marangoni instability are considered.

  17. Clubbing of the fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clubbing Images Clubbing Clubbed fingers References Davis JL, Murray JF. History and physical examinations. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst MD, et al. Murray & Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  18. Repair of webbed fingers - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Syndactyly is the abnormal development of the hand, such that the fingers are fused. The number of ... second surgery, depending on the complexity of the syndactyly. Hospital stays of 1 or 2 days are ...

  19. Repair of webbed fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... When joined fingers share a single fingernail, the creation of two normal-looking nails is rarely possible. ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  20. Tendon transfer or tendon graft for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

    PubMed

    Chung, U S; Kim, J H; Seo, W S; Lee, K H

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical outcome of tendon reconstruction using tendon graft or tendon transfer and the parameters related to clinical outcome in 51 wrists of 46 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with finger extensor tendon ruptures. At a mean follow-up of 5.6 years, the mean metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint extension lag was 8 degrees (range, 0-45) and the mean visual analogue satisfaction scale was 74 (range, 10-100). Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between tendon grafting and tendon transfer. The MP joint extension lag correlated with the patient's satisfaction score, but the pulp-to-palm distance did not correlate with patient satisfaction. We conclude that both tendon grafting and tendon transfer are reliable reconstruction methods for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

  1. Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative warning of wind chill. Indeed, guidance on the risk of finger freezing is important not only to safeguard the finger, but also because it pertains more closely to susceptible facial features, such as the nose, than if only the risk of cheek freezing was provided. The importance of blood flow to the finger and the modeling of vaso-constriction are demonstrated through cooling predictions that agree reasonably well with several reported observations. Differences in the prediction between the present physiologic-based model and the engineering model used to develop the wind chill index are also discussed. New wind chill charts are presented that tabulate the mean cooling rates and corresponding onset times to freezing of the finger for various combinations of air temperature and wind speed. Results indicate that the surface of the finger cools to its freezing point in approximately one-eighth of the time predicted for the cheek. For combinations that result in the same wind chill temperature (WCT), the rate of finger cooling is faster at the higher wind speed. This asymmetry was previously disclosed through the application of the model to cheek cooling, and it reiterates the ambiguity associated with the reporting of WCT. It is further emphasized that the reporting of onset times to freezing, or safe exposure limits, is a more logical and meaningful alternative to the WCT.

  2. Contributions and co-ordination of individual fingers in multiple finger prehension.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, H; Kawai, S; Ikuta, K

    1995-06-01

    The contributions and co-ordination of external finger grip forces were examined during a lifting task with a precision grip using multiple fingers. The subjects (n = 10) lifted a force transducer-equipped grip apparatus. Grip force from each of the five fingers was continuously measured under different object weight (200 g, 400 g and 800 g) and surface structure (plastic and sandpaper) conditions. The effect of five-, four-, and three-finger grip modes was also examined. It was found that variation of object weight or surface friction resulted in change of the total grip force magnitude; the largest change in finger force, was that for the index finger, followed by the middle, ring, and little fingers. Percentage contribution of static grip force to the total grip force for the index, middle, ring, and little fingers was 42.0%, 27.4%, 17.6% and 12.9%, respectively. These values were fairly constant for all object weight conditions, as well as for all surface friction conditions, suggesting that all individual finger force adjustments for light loads less than 800 g are controlled comprehensively simply by using a single common scaling value. A higher surface friction provided faster lifting initiation and required lesser grip force exertion, indicating advantageous effect of a non-slippery surface over a slippery surface. The results indicate that nearly 40% force reduction can be obtained when a non-slippery surface is used. Variation in grip mode changed the total grip force, i.e., the fewer the number of fingers, the greater the total grip force. The percent value of static grip force for the index, middle, and ring fingers in the four-finger grip mode was 42.7%, 32.5%, and 24.7%, respectively, and that for the index and middle fingers in the three-finger grip mode was 43.0% and 56.9%, respectively. Therefore, the grip mode was found to influence the force contributions of the middle and ring fingers, but not of the index finger.

  3. Design of a surface replacement prosthesis for the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Ash, H E; Unsworth, A

    2000-01-01

    A surface replacement finger joint prosthesis was designed specifically for the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ). The two-piece design consisted of a bi-condylar proximal phalangeal head and a conforming bi-concave middle phalangeal base. The bearing surfaces were designed as close to the original anatomy of the PIPJs as possible, using detailed information obtained from a previous anatomical study of 83 PIPJs by the present authors. Four sizes of prosthesis were designed with maximum head diameters of 7, 8, 9 and 10 mm. Fixation of the joint prosthesis was achieved by an interference fit between the stems of semicircular cross-section and the phalangeal bone shafts. The main considerations for the stem designs were the offset from the centre of rotation, angle of inclination, length, and cross-sectional shape and size. It is proposed that the two components will be made from cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) because it can be injection moulded to produce the complex shapes of the joint prosthesis. In addition, XLPE against itself has shown comparable wear rates with stainless steel against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene from previous work by Joyce et al.

  4. New Finger Biometric Method Using Near Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eui Chul; Jung, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeoul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new finger biometric method. Infrared finger images are first captured, and then feature extraction is performed using a modified Gaussian high-pass filter through binarization, local binary pattern (LBP), and local derivative pattern (LDP) methods. Infrared finger images include the multimodal features of finger veins and finger geometries. Instead of extracting each feature using different methods, the modified Gaussian high-pass filter is fully convolved. Therefore, the extracted binary patterns of finger images include the multimodal features of veins and finger geometries. Experimental results show that the proposed method has an error rate of 0.13%. PMID:22163741

  5. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy.

  6. Algorithmic surgical enhancement of function after finger revascularisation

    PubMed Central

    Landin, Luis; Bolado, Pedro; Gajete, Maria-Angeles; Gonzalez-Miranda, Alvaro; Bonastre, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Secondary surgical procedures can improve the function of revascularised and replanted digits. We describe the case of a patient who underwent multidigit revascularisation and replantation following a saw injury at flexor tendon Zone II. To achieve maximal functional improvement after finger revascularisation, we performed secondary surgical procedures in an order that was determined by following a reconstructive decision procedure that covered late revascularisation, nerve reconstruction, pedicled vascularised joint transfer, staged flexor tendon reconstruction and skin revision. Performing the procedures in this manner ensured overall safety. The patient's disabilities of the arm, hand and shoulder questionnaire score improved by 45 points, and the patient was able to return to work with an almost complete range of motion. PMID:27833288

  7. Rehabilitation of single finger amputation with customized silicone prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Niharika; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Finger amputations are common in accidents at home, work, and play. Apart from trauma, congenital disease and deformity also leads to finger amputation. This results in loss of function, loss of sensation as well as loss of body image. Finger prosthesis offers psychological support and social acceptance in such cases. This clinical report describes a method to fabricate ring retained silicone finger prosthesis in a patient with partial finger loss. PMID:28163487

  8. Man-equivalent telepresence through four fingered human-like hand system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    1992-01-01

    The author describes a newly developed mechanical hand system. The robot hand is in human-like configuration with a thumb and three fingers, a palm, a wrist, and the forearm in which the hand and wrist actuators are located. Each finger and the wrist has its own active electromechanical compliance system, allowing the joint drive trains to be stiffened or loosened. This mechanism imitates the human muscle dual function of positioner and stiffness controller. This is essential for soft grappling operations. The hand-wrist assembly has 16 finger joints, three wrist joints, and five compliance mechanisms for a total of 24 degrees of freedom. The strength of the hand is roughly half that of the human hand and its size is comparable to a male hand. The hand is controlled through an exoskeleton glove controller that the operator wears. The glove provides the man-machine interface in telemanipulation control mode: it senses the operator's inputs to guide the mechanical hand in hybrid position and force control. The hand system is intended for dexterous manipulations in structured environments. Typical applications will include work in hostile environment such as space operations and nuclear power plants.

  9. Wrist rhythm during wrist joint motion evaluated by dynamic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hiroki; Tada, Kaoru; Suganuma, Seigo; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that wrist joint motion involves a "wrist rhythm" similar to the scapulohumeral rhythm. Therefore, we used a flat-panel detector to evaluate the ratio of radiolunate and capitolunate joint motions during wrist joint motion by dynamic radiography. The subjects were 20 healthy men. Dynamic imaging of the wrist joint was performed during active exercise for a total of ten seconds. In this study, we defined the radiocarpal (RL angle) and midcarpal joint angle (CL angle) as the wrist joint angle in the obtained images and measured the variation of these angles. The average curve was plotted and regression lines calculated from the average curve. The ratio was calculated from the slopes of the regression lines of the RL CL angles. These findings indicated that the ratio of the RL and CL angle motions was approximately 1:4 during palmar flexion and approximately 2:1 during dorsiflexion.

  10. [Joint surface resection with a minimally invasive dorsal approach for arthrodesis of the distal interphalangeal joint].

    PubMed

    Ayala-Gamboa, U; Domínguez-Chacón, N D

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease of the distal interphalangeal joint of the fingers precedes its occurrence in all the remaining regions of the body and produces major disability. We describe a distal interphalangeal arthrodesis technique performed with minimally invasive surgery. Case etiology was varied and mean follow-up was 10 months. All cases healed and functional recovery started at postoperative week two. This is a reproducible technique that produces satisfactory results in the short and medium term.

  11. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  12. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-08-20

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously.

  13. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  14. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record ‘three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals. PMID:25366032

  15. Individual variability in finger-to-finger transmission efficiency of Enterococcus faecium clones

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Sánchez-Díaz, Ana María; Zamora, Javier; Torres, Carmen; Cintas, Luis María; Franco, Elvira; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A fingertip-to-fingertip intraindividual transmission experiment was carried out in 30 healthy volunteers, using four MLST-typed Enterococcus faecium clones. Overall results showed an adequate fit goodness to a theoretical exponential model, whereas four volunteers (13%) exhibited a significantly higher finger-to-finger bacterial transmission efficiency. This observation might have deep consequences in nosocomial epidemiology. PMID:24382843

  16. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  17. FingerSight: Fingertip Haptic Sensing of the Visual Environment

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Samantha; Galeotti, John; Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta; Siegel, Mel

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel device mounted on the fingertip for acquiring and transmitting visual information through haptic channels. In contrast to previous systems in which the user interrogates an intermediate representation of visual information, such as a tactile display representing a camera generated image, our device uses a fingertip-mounted camera and haptic stimulator to allow the user to feel visual features directly from the environment. Visual features ranging from simple intensity or oriented edges to more complex information identified automatically about objects in the environment may be translated in this manner into haptic stimulation of the finger. Experiments using an initial prototype to trace a continuous straight edge have quantified the user's ability to discriminate the angle of the edge, a potentially useful feature for higher levels analysis of the visual scene. PMID:27170882

  18. Osteophyte excision without cyst excision for a mucous cyst of the finger.

    PubMed

    Lee, H-J; Kim, P-T; Jeon, I-H; Kyung, H-S; Ra, I-H; Kim, T-K

    2014-03-01

    Osteophyte excision is a mainstay of treatment for mucous cyst combined with Heberden's node in a distal interphalangeal joint or in an interphalangeal joint of the thumb. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of osteophyte excision without cyst excision for the treatment of a mucous cyst combined with Heberden's node. The medical records of 37 patients (42 cases) with a mucous cyst with Heberden's node were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-eight of 40 cases with available pre-operative simple radiographs showed evidence of joint arthrosis. A T-shaped skin incision of the joint capsule between the extensor tendon and lateral collateral ligament was used. Osteophyte excision without cyst excision was performed. All cysts, except one, regressed without recurrence or a skin complication after osteophyte excision, but eight cases showed post-operative pain and loss of range of motion. Osteophyte excision without cyst excision may be a good treatment choice for mucous cyst of the finger.

  19. The immediate effects of therapeutic keyboard music playing for finger training in adults undergoing hand rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Songhuai; Yang, Degang; Du, Liangjie; Wang, Ziyuan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of therapeutic keyboard music playing on the finger function of subjects’ hands through measurements of the joint position error test, surface electromyography, probe reaction time, and writing time. [Subjects and Methods] Ten subjects were divided randomly into experimental and control groups. The experimental group used therapeutic keyboard music playing and the control group used grip training. All subjects were assessed and evaluated by the joint position error test, surface electromyography, probe reaction time, and writing time. [Results] After accomplishing therapeutic keyboard music playing and grip training, surface electromyography of the two groups showed no significant change, but joint position error test, probe reaction time, and writing time obviously improved. [Conclusion] These results suggest that therapeutic keyboard music playing is an effective and novel treatment for improving joint position error test scores, probe reaction time, and writing time, and it should be promoted widely in clinics. PMID:27630419

  20. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  1. Conformational Changes in the Carpus During Finger Traps Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Evan L.; Moore, Douglas C.; Akelman, Edward; Wolfe, Scott W.; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Wrist distraction is a common treatment maneuver used clinically for the reduction of distal radial fractures and mid-carpal dislocations. Wrist distraction is also required during wrist arthroscopy to access the radiocarpal joint and has been used as a test for scapholunate ligament injury. However, the effect of a distraction load on the normal wrist has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to measure the 3-D conformational changes of the carpal bones in the normal wrist as a result of a static distractive load. Methods The dominant wrists of 14 healthy volunteers were scanned using computed tomography at rest and during application of 98N of distraction. Load was applied using finger traps and volunteers were encouraged to relax their forearm muscles and to allow distraction of the wrist. The motions of the bones in the wrist were tracked between the unloaded and loaded trial using markerless bone registration. The average displacement vector of each bone was calculated relative to the radius as well as the interbone distances for 20 bone-bone interactions. Joint separation was estimated at the radiocarpal, midcarpal and carpal-metacarpal joints in the direction of loading using the radius, lunate, capitate and 3rd metacarpal. Results With loading, the distance between the radius and 3rd metacarpal increased an average of 3.3±3.1mm in the direction of loading. This separation was primarily located in the axial direction at the radiocarpal (1.0±1.0mm) and midcarpal (2.0±1.7mm) joints. There were minimal changes in the transverse direction within the distal row, although the proximal row narrowed by 0.98±0.7mm. Distraction between the radius and scaphoid (2.5±2.2mm) was 2.4 times greater than between the radius and lunate (1.0±1.0mm). Conclusions Carpal distraction has a significant effect on the conformation of the carpus, especially at the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. In the normal wrist, external traction causes twice as

  2. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    PubMed Central

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense. PMID:25852582

  3. Blood pressure measurement using finger cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choi, E; Jeong, H; Kim, K; Park, J

    2005-01-01

    Many research groups have studied blood pressure measurement in finger artery because of its convenience. But, low accuracy prohibits many hypertension patients from using this device. So, we suggest measurement algorithm that measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure in finger artery. And we also develop calibration method that decreases the error from difference of finger circumference by subjects. We apply our methods for 90 subjects (age form 20 to 49, 55 male, 35 female) to test feasibility of our method by AAMI SP10 standard. The mean difference of our system is ±4.7mmHg for systolic pressure, ±4.2mmHg for systolic pressure. It proved that the feasibility of our method is clinically acceptable.(under ±5mmHg).

  4. Analysis of the effects of surface stiffness on the contact interaction between a finger and a cylindrical handle using a three-dimensional hybrid model.

    PubMed

    Wu, John Z; Dong, Ren G; Warren, Christopher M; Welcome, Daniel E; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-07-01

    Contact interactions between the hand and handle, such as the contact surface softness and contact surface curvature, will affect both physical effort and musculoskeletal fatigue, thereby the comfort and safety of power tool operations. Previous models of hand gripping can be categorized into two groups: multi-body dynamic models and finite element (FE) models. The goal of the current study is to develop a hybrid FE hand gripping model, which combines the features of conventional FE models and multi-body dynamic models. The proposed model is applied to simulate hand-gripping on a cylindrical handle with covering materials of different softness levels. The model included three finger segments (distal, middle, and proximal phalanxes), three finger joints (the distal interphalangeal (DIP), proximal interphalangeal (PIP), and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint), and major anatomical substructures. The model was driven by joint moments, which are the net effects of all passive and active muscular forces acting about the joints. The finger model was first calibrated by using experimental data of human subject tests, and then applied to investigate the effects of surface softness on contact interactions between a finger and a cylindrical handle. Our results show that the maximal compressive stress and strain in the soft tissues of the fingers can be effectively reduced by reducing the stiffness of the covering material.

  5. Finger recognition and gesture imitation in Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moro, V; Pernigo, S; Urgesi, C; Zapparoli, P; Aglioti, S M

    2008-01-01

    We report the association between finger agnosia and gesture imitation deficits in a right-handed, right-hemisphere damaged patient with Gerstmann's syndrome (GS), a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by finger and toe agnosia, left-right disorientation and dyscalculia. No language deficits were found. The patient showed a gestural imitation deficit that specifically involved finger movements and postures. The association between finger recognition and imitation deficits suggests that both static and dynamic aspects of finger representations are impaired in GS. We suggest that GS is a disorder of body representation that involves hands and fingers, that is, the non-facial body parts most involved in social interactions.

  6. Finger tapping in musicians and nonmusicians.

    PubMed

    Franĕk, M; Mates, J; Radil, T; Beck, K; Pöppel, E

    1991-12-01

    Timing plays an important role in perceiving and performing music. Finger tapping has been successfully used for analyzing timing processes (Fraisse, 1966, Franĕk et al., 1987, 1988). The aim of this study is to determine differences between musically trained and untrained subjects in their ability to follow repetitive rhythmic tonal patterns by finger tapping. It has been found previously (Povel, 1981; Smith, 1983) that time estimation differs among musicians and nonmusicians under certain conditions. The results presented here show that motor timing revealed by tapping is more accurate in musicians than in nonmusicians.

  7. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  8. Wear testing of a DJOA finger prosthesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Thomas J

    2010-08-01

    Although the market for replacement of diseased metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints is dominated by single-piece silicone prostheses, several two-piece designs have been implanted. One such is the Digital Joint Operative Arthroplasty (DJOA) which consists of a part-spherical stainless steel metacarpal component which articulates within a matching concave phalangeal component made of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). A DJOA MCP prosthesis was tested using a clinically-validated finger simulator while a second DJOA prosthesis acted as a statically-loaded soak-control. Testing ran to 7.1 million cycles of flexion-extension. It was found that the UHMWPE components, both test and control, gained in weight by a similar amount. Therefore apparently there was no wear of the test components. However, the initial and final surface finish values of the test stainless steel metacarpal head were relatively high. Calculations based on this roughness data, plus recent dynamically-loaded soak data, may explain the apparent lack of wear.

  9. The shoulder and elbow joints and right and left sides demonstrate similar joint position sense.

    PubMed

    King, Jacqlyn; Harding, Elizabeth; Karduna, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Proper orientation of the shoulder and elbow is necessary for accurate and precise positioning of the hand. The authors' goal was to compare these joints with an active joint position sense task, while also taking into account the effects of joint flexion angle and arm dominance. Fifteen healthy subjects were asked to replicate presented joint angles with a single degree of freedom active positioning protocol. There were no significant differences in angular joint position sense errors with respect to joint (shoulder vs. elbow) and side (left vs. right). However, when considering linear positioning, errors were lower for the elbow, due to a shorter lever arm. Also, as flexion angles increased toward 90°, there was a consistent pattern of lower errors for both joints.

  10. An EMG Interface for the Control of Motion and Compliance of a Supernumerary Robotic Finger

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Irfan; Spagnoletti, Giovanni; Salvietti, Gionata; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel electromyographic (EMG) control interface to control motion and joints compliance of a supernumerary robotic finger. The supernumerary robotic fingers are a recently introduced class of wearable robotics that provides users additional robotic limbs in order to compensate or augment the existing abilities of natural limbs without substituting them. Since supernumerary robotic fingers are supposed to closely interact and perform actions in synergy with the human limbs, the control principles of extra finger should have similar behavior as human’s ones including the ability of regulating the compliance. So that, it is important to propose a control interface and to consider the actuators and sensing capabilities of the robotic extra finger compatible to implement stiffness regulation control techniques. We propose EMG interface and a control approach to regulate the compliance of the device through servo actuators. In particular, we use a commercial EMG armband for gesture recognition to be associated with the motion control of the robotic device and surface one channel EMG electrodes interface to regulate the compliance of the robotic device. We also present an updated version of a robotic extra finger where the adduction/abduction motion is realized through ball bearing and spur gears mechanism. We have validated the proposed interface with two sets of experiments related to compensation and augmentation. In the first set of experiments, different bimanual tasks have been performed with the help of the robotic device and simulating a paretic hand since this novel wearable system can be used to compensate the missing grasping abilities in chronic stroke patients. In the second set, the robotic extra finger is used to enlarge the workspace and manipulation capability of healthy hands. In both sets, the same EMG control interface has been used. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed control interface is intuitive and can

  11. An EMG Interface for the Control of Motion and Compliance of a Supernumerary Robotic Finger.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Irfan; Spagnoletti, Giovanni; Salvietti, Gionata; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel electromyographic (EMG) control interface to control motion and joints compliance of a supernumerary robotic finger. The supernumerary robotic fingers are a recently introduced class of wearable robotics that provides users additional robotic limbs in order to compensate or augment the existing abilities of natural limbs without substituting them. Since supernumerary robotic fingers are supposed to closely interact and perform actions in synergy with the human limbs, the control principles of extra finger should have similar behavior as human's ones including the ability of regulating the compliance. So that, it is important to propose a control interface and to consider the actuators and sensing capabilities of the robotic extra finger compatible to implement stiffness regulation control techniques. We propose EMG interface and a control approach to regulate the compliance of the device through servo actuators. In particular, we use a commercial EMG armband for gesture recognition to be associated with the motion control of the robotic device and surface one channel EMG electrodes interface to regulate the compliance of the robotic device. We also present an updated version of a robotic extra finger where the adduction/abduction motion is realized through ball bearing and spur gears mechanism. We have validated the proposed interface with two sets of experiments related to compensation and augmentation. In the first set of experiments, different bimanual tasks have been performed with the help of the robotic device and simulating a paretic hand since this novel wearable system can be used to compensate the missing grasping abilities in chronic stroke patients. In the second set, the robotic extra finger is used to enlarge the workspace and manipulation capability of healthy hands. In both sets, the same EMG control interface has been used. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed control interface is intuitive and can

  12. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  13. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done include: CBC or blood differential C-reactive protein Joint x-ray Sedimentation rate ... chap 256. Schaible H-G. Joint pain: basic mechanisms. In: McMahon SB, Koltzenburg M, Tracey I, Turk ...

  14. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products.

  15. Transdermal anaesthesia for percutaneous trigger finger release.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transdermal anaesthesia using eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) in patients undergoing percutaneous trigger finger release and to compare it with lidocaine infiltration. In this prospective, randomised study percutaneous release of the A1 annular pulley was performed to treat stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger syndrome) in 50 patients (50 fingers). The procedure was performed either under transdermal anaesthesia using EMLA applied transcutaneously 120 minutes prior to the operation (Group A, n = 25) or using local infiltration anaesthesia using lidocaine (Group B, n = 25). Pain experienced during administration of anaesthesia and during the operation was assessed using a 10-point Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), while all patients rated the effectiveness of anaesthesia with a 5-point scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the VAPS during the operation (1.33 +/- 0.52 versus 1.59 +/- 0.87) and the satisfaction scores (4.6 +/- 0.2 versus 4.4 +/- 0.3). The VAPS score during the administration of anaesthesia was statistically significantly less in the EMLA group (0 versus 5.96 +/- 2.41). All patients were satisfied with the final result of the operation. Percutaneous trigger finger release can be performed as an office procedure with the use of EMLA avoiding the use of injectable local infiltration anaesthesia.

  16. Fingering and fracturing in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Holtzman, R.; Szulczewski, M.

    2012-12-01

    Here, we describe the phenomenon of capillary fracturing in granular media. We study the displacement of immiscible fluids in deformable, non-cohesive granular media. Experimentally, we inject air into a thin bed of water-saturated glass beads and observe the invasion morphology. The control parameters are the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. We identify three invasion regimes: capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and "capillary fracturing", where capillary forces overcome frictional resistance and induce the opening of conduits. We derive two dimensionless numbers that govern the transition among the different regimes: a modified capillary number and a fracturing number. The experiments and analysis predict the emergence of fracturing in fine-grained media under low confining stress, a phenomenon that likely plays a fundamental role in many natural processes such as primary oil migration, methane venting from lake sediments, and the formation of desiccation cracks.Examples of experimentally observed patterns. We classify these patterns into three regimes: viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and fracturing.

  17. Layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, J. F.; Garaud, P.; Alsinan, A.; Meiburg, E.

    2017-04-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at larger density ratios. It also gives rise to a new layering instability that exists in $\\gamma-$stable regimes. The former is likely quite ubiquitous in geophysical systems for sufficiently large settling velocities, while the latter probably grows too slowly to be relevant, at least in the context of sediments in water.

  18. Compact Tactile Sensors for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.; Lussy, David; Gaudiano, Frank; Hulse, Aaron; Diftler, Myron A.; Rodriguez, Dagoberto; Bielski, Paul; Butzer, Melisa

    2004-01-01

    Compact transducer arrays that measure spatial distributions of force or pressure have been demonstrated as prototypes of tactile sensors to be mounted on fingers and palms of dexterous robot hands. The pressure- or force-distribution feedback provided by these sensors is essential for the further development and implementation of robot-control capabilities for humanlike grasping and manipulation.

  19. Viscous fingering of HCI through gastric mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, K. Ramakrishnan; Garik, Peter; Turner, Bradley S.; Bradley, James Douglas; Bansil, Rama; Stanley, H. Eugene; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1992-12-01

    THE HCI in the mammalian stomach is concentrated enough to digest the stomach itself, yet the gastric epithelium remains undamaged. One protective factor is gastric mucus, which forms a protective layer over the surface epithelium1-4 and acts as a diffusion barrier5,6 Bicarbonate ions secreted by the gastric epithelium7 are trapped in the mucus gel, establishing a gradient from pH 1-2 at the lumen to pH 6-7 at the cell surface8-10. How does HCI, secreted at the base of gastric glands by parietal cells, traverse the mucus layer without acidifying it? Here we demonstrate that injection of HCI through solutions of pig gastric mucin produces viscous fingering patterns11-18 dependent on pH, mucin concentration and acid flow rate. Above pH 4, discrete fingers are observed, whereas below pH 4, HCI neither penetrates the mucin solution nor forms fingers. Our in vitro results suggest that HCI secreted by the gastric gland can penetrate the mucus gel layer (pH 5-7) through narrow fingers, whereas HC1 in the lumen (pH 2) is prevented from diffusing back to the epithelium by the high viscosity of gastric mucus gel on the luminal side.

  20. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  1. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  2. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  3. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  4. Prediction of zinc finger DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K

    1995-04-01

    Using the neural network algorithm with back-propagation training procedure, we analysed the zinc finger DNA binding protein sequences. We incorporated the characteristic patterns around the zinc finger motifs TFIIIA type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-13-His-X2-5-His) and the steroid hormone receptor type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-15-Cys-X2-5-Cys-X15-16-Cys-X4-5-Cys-X8-10- Cys-X2-3-Cys) in the neural network algorithm. The patterns used in the neural network were the amino acid pattern, the electric charge and polarity pattern, the side-chain chemical property and subproperty patterns, the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity patterns and the secondary structure propensity pattern. Two consecutive patterns were also considered. Each pattern was incorporated in the single layer perceptron algorithm and the combinations of patterns were considered in the two-layer perceptron algorithm. As for the TFIIIA type zinc finger DNA binding motifs, the prediction results of the two-layer perceptron algorithm reached up to 96.9% discrimination, and the prediction results of the discriminant analysis using the combination of several characters reached up to 97.0%. As for the steroid hormone receptor type zinc finger, the prediction results of neural network algorithm and the discriminant analyses reached up to 96.0%.

  5. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  6. Coriolis effects on fingering patterns under rotation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2008-08-01

    The development of immiscible viscous fingering patterns in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell is investigated. We focus on understanding how the time evolution and the resulting morphologies are affected by the action of the Coriolis force. The problem is approached analytically and numerically by employing a vortex sheet formalism. The vortex sheet strength and a linear dispersion relation are derived analytically, revealing that the most relevant Coriolis force contribution comes from the normal component of the averaged interfacial velocity. It is shown that this normal velocity, uniquely due to the presence of the Coriolis force, is responsible for the complex-valued nature of the linear dispersion relation making the linear phases vary with time. Fully nonlinear stages are studied through intensive numerical simulations. A suggestive interplay between inertial and viscous effects is found, which modifies the dynamics, leading to different pattern-forming structures. The inertial Coriolis contribution plays a characteristic role: it generates a phase drift by deviating the fingers in the sense opposite to the actual rotation of the cell. However, the direction and intensity of finger bending is predominantly determined by viscous effects, being sensitive to changes in the magnitude and sign of the viscosity contrast. The finger competition behavior at advanced time stages is also discussed.

  7. Joint Interdiction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-09

    Purpose This publication has been prepared under the direction of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the...governmental and nongovernmental organizations, multinational forces, and other interorganizational partners. It provides military guidance for the...exercise of authority by combatant commanders and other joint force commanders (JFCs), and prescribes joint doctrine for operations and training. It

  8. Testing of FTS fingers and interface using a passive compliant robot manipulator. [flight telerobot servicer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Antrazi, Sami S.

    1992-01-01

    This report deals with testing of a pair of robot fingers designed for the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) to grasp a cylinder type of Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) interface. The report first describes the objectives of the study and then the testbed consisting of a Stewart Platform-based manipulator equipped with a passive compliant platform which also serves as a force/torque sensor. Kinematic analysis is then performed to provide a closed-form solution for the force inverse kinematics and iterative solution for the force forward kinematics using the Newton's Raphson Method. Mathematical expressions are then derived to compute force/torques applied to the FTS fingers during the mating/demating with the interface. The report then presents the three parts of the experimental study on the feasibility and characteristics of the fingers. The first part obtains data of forces applied by the fingers to the interface under various misalignments, the second part determines the maximum allowable capture angles for mating, and the third part processes and interprets the obtained force/torque data.

  9. Method for user interface of large displays using arm pointing and finger counting gesture recognition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hansol; Kim, Yoonkyung; Lee, Eui Chul

    2014-01-01

    Although many three-dimensional pointing gesture recognition methods have been proposed, the problem of self-occlusion has not been considered. Furthermore, because almost all pointing gesture recognition methods use a wide-angle camera, additional sensors or cameras are required to concurrently perform finger gesture recognition. In this paper, we propose a method for performing both pointing gesture and finger gesture recognition for large display environments, using a single Kinect device and a skeleton tracking model. By considering self-occlusion, a compensation technique can be performed on the user's detected shoulder position when a hand occludes the shoulder. In addition, we propose a technique to facilitate finger counting gesture recognition, based on the depth image of the hand position. In this technique, the depth image is extracted from the end of the pointing vector. By using exception handling for self-occlusions, experimental results indicate that the pointing accuracy of a specific reference position was significantly improved. The average root mean square error was approximately 13 pixels for a 1920 × 1080 pixels screen resolution. Moreover, the finger counting gesture recognition accuracy was 98.3%.

  10. Scar sarcoidosis on a finger mimicking a rapidly growing soft tissue tumour: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scar sarcoidosis is a rare and uncommon but specific cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. In general it arises in pre-existing scars deriving from mechanical traumas. As most surgeons dealing with scars might not be aware of cutaneous sarcoidosis and its different types of appearance the appropriate staging and treatment might be missed or at least delayed. To our knowledge this is the first case in literature of scar sarcoidosis on a finger. Case presentation We present a case of a 33-year-old carpenter who developed scar sarcoidosis on his right index finger 4 years after the tendon of the long digital flexor got accidentally cut by an angle grinder. He was referred due to a swelling of the finger suspected to be a malignant soft tissue tumour. The circumference of the affected finger had almost doubled, adding up to 94 mm. Incision biopsy revealed typical noncaseating granulomas. Further investigation showed a systemic extent of the disease with involvement of the lung. A systemic treatment with oral steroids led to an almost full regression of the swelling with restoration of function and resolution of lung infiltrates. Conclusion In case of a suspicious and/or progressive swelling a definite diagnosis should be achieved by biopsy within a short time to enable a proper treatment. If scar sarcoidosis is proven further investigation is necessary to exclude a systemical involvement. A surgical treatment of the swelling is not indicated. PMID:23031186

  11. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  12. 19. VAL, DETAIL OF 'Y' JOINT CONNECTING THE COMPRESSION TANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VAL, DETAIL OF 'Y' JOINT CONNECTING THE COMPRESSION TANK TO THE LAUNCHING TUBES. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  14. Robot-Assisted Guitar Hero for Finger Rehabilitation after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B.; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Wolbrecht, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (−3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n = 8) and without impairment (n = 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject’s effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:23366783

  15. Robot-assisted Guitar Hero for finger rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (-3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n= 8) and without impairment (n= 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject's success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject's effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke.

  16. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  17. Flare angles measured with ball gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, D.; Wall, W. A.

    1968-01-01

    Precision tungsten carbide balls measure the internal angle of flared joints. Measurements from small and large balls in the flare throat to an external reference point are made. The difference in distances and diameters determine the average slope of the flare between the points of ball contact.

  18. Extra-articular subcutaneous "inverted king post-truss" ligament reconstruction for severe swan neck deformity (snapping finger).

    PubMed

    de Soras, X; de Mourgues, P; Pradel, P; Urien, J-P; Beaudoin, E

    2017-02-01

    A swan neck deformity (SND) can be well tolerated for a long time, until the appearance of a disabling "snapping finger". In its most advanced condition, the other hand is needed to initiate finger flexion. We propose a technique of extra-articular, subcutaneous ligament reconstruction with an "inverted king post-truss" configuration use in roofs and to reinforce railway bridges. An artificial ligament (MaxBraid™ polyethylene surgical suture, 5 metric, Biomet) makes a figure of eight between transosseous tunnels in the proximal and middle phalanges, crossing over top of the A3 pulley. We limited our series to severe SND cases with "snapping finger". We excluded isolated SNDs without functional disability. Eleven patients were followed for 3.4 years on average. The cause was an acute injury 8 times (7 balloon accidents), rheumatoid arthritis 2 times and overuse once (saxophone). Only one case was a poor outcome of mallet finger. The 11 patients were reassessed by a telephone survey. Two patients underwent reoperation: one for a ligament rupture, the other one for a knot that became untied. One patient had a suspected late rupture but without recurrence of the disabling snapping finger. The 11 patients considered themselves improved by the intervention. Nine patients did not notice any difference between their operated finger and the contralateral side. Return to manual activity was possible once the skin had healed. The technique is simpler than the spiral oblique retinacular ligament (SORL) reconstruction technique described by Thomson-Littler and also less demanding because it does not involve the distal interphalangeal joint. It requires only a short incision in the volar crease of the proximal interphalangeal joint. No tendon or ligament is sacrificed. Neither postoperative immobilization nor lengthy physical therapy is needed. Complications can be avoided by selecting the appropriate artificial ligament material and careful knot tying.

  19. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  20. Using EMG data to constrain optimization procedure improves finger tendon tension estimations during static fingertip force production.

    PubMed

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Quaine, Franck; Labarre-Vila, Annick; Amarantini, David; Moutet, François

    2007-01-01

    Determining tendon tensions of the finger muscles is crucial for the understanding and the rehabilitation of hand pathologies. Since no direct measurement is possible for a large number of finger muscle tendons, biomechanical modelling presents an alternative solution to indirectly evaluate these forces. However, the main problem is that the number of muscles spanning a joint exceeds the number of degrees of freedom of the joint resulting in mathematical under-determinate problems. In the current study, a method using both numerical optimization and the intra-muscular electromyography (EMG) data was developed to estimate the middle finger tendon tensions during static fingertip force production. The method used a numerical optimization procedure with the muscle stress squared criterion to determine a solution while the EMG data of three extrinsic hand muscles serve to enforce additional inequality constraints. The results were compared with those obtained with a classical numerical optimization and a method based on EMG only. The proposed method provides satisfactory results since the tendon tension estimations respected the mechanical equilibrium of the musculoskeletal system and were concordant with the EMG distribution pattern of the subjects. These results were not observed neither with the classical numerical optimization nor with the EMG-based method. This study demonstrates that including the EMG data of the three extrinsic muscles of the middle finger as inequality constraints in an optimization process can yield relevant tendon tensions with regard to individual muscle activation patterns, particularly concerning the antagonist muscles.

  1. Analysis of prosody in finger braille using electromyography.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Manabi; Nishida, Masafumi; Horiuchi, Yasuo; Ichikawa, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Finger braille is one of the communication methods for the deaf blind. The interpreter types braille codes on the fingers of deaf blind. Finger braille seems to be the most suitable medium for real-time communication by its speed and accuracy of transmitting characters. We hypothesize that the prosody information exists in the time structure and strength of finger braille typing. Prosody is the paralinguistic information that has functions to transmit the sentence structure, prominence, emotions and other form of information in real time communication. In this study, we measured the surface electromyography (sEMG) of finger movement to analyze the typing strength of finger braille. We found that the typing strength increases at the beginning of a phrase and a prominent phrase. The result shows the possibility that the prosody in the typing strength of finger braille can be applied to create an interpreter system for the deafblind.

  2. Nylon-muscle-actuated robotic finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianjun; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Rome, Richard S.; Haines, Carter; Lima, Marcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental analysis of novel artificial muscles, made of twisted and coiled nylon fibers, for powering a biomimetic robotic hand. The design is based on circulating hot and cold water to actuate the artificial muscles and obtain fast finger movements. The actuation system consists of a spring and a coiled muscle within a compliant silicone tube. The silicone tube provides a watertight, expansible compartment within which the coiled muscle contracts when heated and expands when cooled. The fabrication and characterization of the actuating system are discussed in detail. The performance of the coiled muscle fiber in embedded conditions and the related characteristics of the actuated robotic finger are described.

  3. Saffman-Taylor fingering: why it is not a proper upscaled model of viscous fingering in a (even two-dimensional) random porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Toussaint, R.; Lovoll, G.; Maloy, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    P.G. Saffman & G. Taylor (1958) studied the stability of the interface between two immiscible fluids of different densities and viscosities when one displaces the other inside a Hele-Shaw (HS) cell. They showed that with a horizontal cell and if the displaced fluid is the more viscous, the interface is unstable and leads to a viscous fingering which they nearly fully modeled [1]. The HS geometry was introduced as a geometry imposing the same flow behavior as the Darcy-scale flow in a two-dimensional (2D) porous medium, and therefore allowing an analogy between the two configurations. This is however not obvious, since capillary forces act at very different scales in the two. Later, researchers performing unstable displacement experiments in HS cells containing random 2D porous media also observed viscous fingering at large viscosity ratios, but with invasion patterns very different from those of Saffman and Taylor (ST) [2-3]. It was however considered that the two processes were both Laplacian growth processes, i.e., processes in which the invasion probability density is proportional to the pressure gradient. Ten years ago, we investigated viscously-unstable drainage in 2D porous media experimentally and measured the growth activity as well as occupation probability maps for the invasion process [4-5]. We concluded that in viscous fingering in 2D porous media, the activity was rather proportional to the square of the pressure gradient magnitude (a so-called DBM model of exponent 2), so that the universality class of the growth/invasion process was different from that of ST viscous fingering. We now strengthen our claim with new results based on the comparison of (i) pressure measurements with the pressure field around a finger such as described by the ST analytical model, and (ii) branching angles in the invasion patterns with those expected for DBMs of various exponents. [1] Saffman, P. G. and Taylor, G. Proc. Soc. London 1958(Ser A 245), 312-329. [2] Lenormand, R

  4. Multi-finger Prehension: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the available experimental evidence on what people do when they grasp an object with several digits and then manipulate it. In addition to the Introduction, the paper includes three parts each addressing a specific aspect of multi-finger prehension. Part II discusses manipulation forces, i.e. the resultant force and moment of force exerted on the object, and the digits contribution to such force production. Part III deals with internal forces defined as forces that cancel each other and do not disturb object equilibrium. The role of the internal forces in maintaining the object stability is discussed with respect to such issues as slip prevention, tilt prevention and resistance to perturbations. Part IV is devoted to the motor control of prehension. It covers such topics as prehension synergies, chain effects, the principle of superposition, inter-finger connection matrices and reconstruction of neural commands, mechanical advantage of the fingers, and the simultaneous digit adjustment to several mutually reinforcing or conflicting demands. PMID:18782719

  5. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ian M.; Smith, Irene J.; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-01-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints. PMID:27433323

  6. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze.

    PubMed

    Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Thornton, Ian M; Smith, Irene J; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-03-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  7. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  8. Flexion contractures of fingers: contracture elimination with trapeze-flap plasty.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, V M

    2011-02-01

    Scar flexion contracture of fingers is one of the most serious consequences of hand burns and patient disability after burn. Many kinds of reconstructive techniques are currently used and new procedures are being investigated. The author presents a new method of finger contracture reconstruction developed in the process of burn reconstructive operations on hands of over a thousand patients. Finger flexion contractures are caused by a semilunar fold, both sheets of which are scars. The sheets have a surface deficiency in length, which causes a contracture, and excess of skin in width, which allows contracture elimination with local flaps. The length deficiency extends from the crest of the fold to the joint rotation axis and has a trapezoid form. To compensate for skin deficiency and to address the contracture, it is necessary to convert both fold sheets into trapezoid flaps by radial incisions. Because the fold is of semilunar (crescent) shape, the flaps accept a trapezoid form. One or several pairs of the flaps are mobilized with the split fat layer from the fold's crest to the joint rotation axis level. The oppositely transposed flaps fully or partially cover the wound in the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) zone first. The remaining smaller wounds are covered with full-thickness skin grafts. The flaps have a reliable blood circulation; partial flap loss is an exception. The flap's surface does not decrease, the skin grafts shrink insufficiently, and the distant results, as a rule, are good. Two hundred and seventy-five patients were operated upon. Scar contractures were satisfactorily addressed in all patients. Incomplete extension was found in 46 patients; this was caused by interphalangeal joint injuries (ligaments, capsule, cartilage), ankylosis or boutonniere deformity.

  9. Toe-to-finger transfer for post-traumatic reconstruction of the fingerless hand

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J. Scott; Manktelow, Ralph T.; Kelly, Louise; Marcuzzi, A.; Mahabir, Raman C.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess the utility of toe-to-finger transfers (TFTs) for post-traumatic reconstruction of the fingerless hand. Design A case series. Setting A regional trauma centre. Patients Eight men, mean age was 36 years (range from 25–59 yr), who had lost all the fingers from a hand due to a crush–degloving injury (6 patients), frostbite (1 patient) or a burn injury (1 patient). Intervention TFT. Twelve TFTs were cone and the mean time from injury to reconstruction was 17.2 months. Main outcome measures Objective (range of motion, moving 2-point discrimination, grip strength, key pinch, Jebsen–Taylor hand assessment, return to work) and subjective (activities of daily living and a questionnaire) measures. Results Eleven of the 12 transfers survived. Six of the 7 in whom the transfer was successful were available for follow-up (mean 45 mo). Range of motion was 10° at the distal interphalangeal joint, 18° at the proximal interphalangeal joint and 59° at the metacarpophalangeal joint. Sensation was protective in all. Grip strength and key pinch were 26.1% and 70.2% of the contralateral hand respectively. Jebsen–Taylor assessment indicated that basic activities were possible but slowed. All 6 patients returned to work and could perform 92.6% of the activities of daily living unassisted. Hand and foot symptoms were mild. Two-thirds were appearance conscious, 5 of the 6 went on to altered vocations and all reported overall satisfaction as high. Conclusion This study supports TFT for reconstruction of the fingerless hand in that, although transferred toe function may be poorer than a normal finger, the hand is restored to a useful, sensate and versatile functional unit, such that global hand and patient function, as well as patient satisfaction, are very good. PMID:11504261

  10. Improved Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1995-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint improved version of one described in "Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint" (MFS-28633). Locks automatically upon initial application of radial force (wearer's weight) and unlocks automatically, but only when all loads (radial force and bending) relieved. Joints lock whenever wearer applies weight to knee at any joint angle between full extension and 45 degree bend. Both devices offer increased safety and convenience relative to conventional orthotic knee joints.

  11. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  12. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  13. The role of fingers in number processing in young children

    PubMed Central

    Lafay, Anne; Thevenot, Catherine; Castel, Caroline; Fayol, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4–7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children's performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task), even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations. PMID:23908643

  14. Influence of local vibration on finger functions of forest workers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Nakamura, K; Sato, K; Tanaka, K

    1997-07-01

    We physically examined of forest workers in the northern part of Fukushima District, Japan. The main purpose of this study was to survey the state of finger functions, especially the differences between the functions of right and left fingers of forest workers. This physical examination was conducted in winter. The items of the physical examination were hand grip strength, finger skin temperature, vibration sensation threshold, nail pressure test of the finger. Subjects were classified into A and B groups on the base of the results of the physical examination. A group is normal or slight disorder, and B group is disorder or illness. Hand grip strength was measured five times at five-second intervals. The decrease ratio of the left hand grip strength was greater than that of the right hand grip strength. Although there were significant differences among each finger of A and B groups, there were no big differences in the skin temperatures of the fingers in each group. Vibration sensation threshold was measured for II, III and IV fingers. The vibration sensation threshold of the index finger was the most sensitive and that of IV finger was the least sensitive. The vibration sensation threshold of the right fingers was more sensitive than that of the left fingers. The reaction times of the nail pressure test of the right fingers were generally faster than those of the left fingers. Forestry workers in Japan become elderly. There are big differences among the physical reactions or strengths of elderly people. Standard values for the measuring items for ageing are needed.

  15. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J.; Patten, Jr., Donald O.

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  16. Automatically Locking/Unlocking Orthotic Knee Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Proposed orthotic knee joint locks and unlocks automatically, at any position within range of bend angles, without manual intervention by wearer. Includes tang and clevis, locks whenever wearer transfers weight to knee and unlocks when weight removed. Locking occurs at any angle between 45 degrees knee bend and full extension.

  17. FINGER INTERACTION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRESSING TASK

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Shweta; Friedman, Jason; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate control of forces produced by the fingers is essential for performing object manipulation. This study examines the indices of finger interaction when accurate time profiles of force are produced in different directions, while using one of the fingers or all four fingers of the hand. We hypothesized that patterns of unintended force production among shear force components may involve features not observed in the earlier studies of vertical force production. In particular, we expected to see unintended forces generated by non-task fingers not in the direction on the instructed force but in the opposite direction as well as substantial force production in directions orthogonal to the instructed direction. We also tested a hypothesis that multi-finger synergies, quantified using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, will help reduce across-trials variance of both total force magnitude and direction. Young, healthy subjects were required to produce accurate ramps of force in five different directions by pressing on force sensors with the fingers of the right (dominant) hand. The index finger induced the smallest unintended forces in non-task fingers. The little finger showed the smallest unintended forces when it was a non-task finger. Task fingers showed substantial force production in directions orthogonal to the intended force direction. During four-finger tasks, individual force vectors typically pointed off the task direction, with these deviations nearly perfectly matched to produce a resultant force in the task direction. Multi-finger synergy indices reflected strong co-variation in the space of finger modes (commands to fingers) that reduced variability of the total force magnitude and direction across trials. The synergy indices increased in magnitude over the first 30% of the trial time and then stayed at a nearly constant level. The synergy index for stabilization of total force magnitude was higher for shear force components as

  18. A practical method for three-dimensional reconstruction of joints using a C-arm system and shift-and-add algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Li Senhu; Jiang Huabei

    2005-06-15

    Currently, radiography with C-arm systems is playing a major role in the assessment of arthritis. However, the radiographic two-dimensional projection images of joints often interfere with physicians' efforts to better understand and measure the structure changes of joints due to the overlap of bone structures at different depths. An accurate, low-cost, and practical three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction approach of joints will be beneficial in diagnosing arthritis. Toward this end, a novel method is developed in this paper based on a C-arm system. The idea is to apply the shift-and-add algorithm (commonly used in digital tomosynthesis) on the segmented projection images at multiple angles, which results in accurate reconstruction of the 3D structures of joints. The method provides a new solution to precisely distinguish objects from blurring background. The proposed method has been tested and evaluated on simulated cylinders, a chicken bone phantom with known structure, and an in vivo human index finger. The results are demonstrated and discussed.

  19. Virtual Hand Feedback Reduces Reaction Time in an Interactive Finger Reaching Task

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Johannes; Piccirelli, Marco; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Morari, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Computer interaction via visually guided hand or finger movements is a ubiquitous part of daily computer usage in work or gaming. Surprisingly, however, little is known about the performance effects of using virtual limb representations versus simpler cursors. In this study 26 healthy right-handed adults performed cued index finger flexion-extension movements towards an on-screen target while wearing a data glove. They received each of four different types of real-time visual feedback: a simple circular cursor, a point light pattern indicating finger joint positions, a cartoon hand and a fully shaded virtual hand. We found that participants initiated the movements faster when receiving feedback in the form of a hand than when receiving circular cursor or point light feedback. This overall difference was robust for three out of four hand versus circle pairwise comparisons. The faster movement initiation for hand feedback was accompanied by a larger movement amplitude and a larger movement error. We suggest that the observed effect may be related to priming of hand information during action perception and execution affecting motor planning and execution. The results may have applications in the use of body representations in virtual reality applications. PMID:27144927

  20. Finger agnosia and cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Trotter, Jeffrey S; Hertza, Jeremy; Bell, Christopher D; Dean, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of finger agnosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to determine if level of finger agnosia was related to cognitive impairment. Finger agnosia is a sensitive measure of cerebral impairment and is associated with neurofunctional areas implicated in AD. Using a standardized and norm-referenced approach, results indicated that patients with AD evidenced significantly decreased performance on tests of bilateral finger agnosia compared with healthy age-matched controls. Finger agnosia was predictive of cognitive dysfunction on four of seven domains, including: Crystallized Language, Fluid Processing, Associative Learning, and Processing Speed. Results suggest that measures of finger agnosia, a short and simple test, may be useful in the early detection of AD.

  1. Haptic discrimination of two-dimensional angles: influence of exploratory strategy.

    PubMed

    Levy, Myriam; Bourgeon, Stéphanie; Chapman, C Elaine

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to define the relative contribution of self-generated cutaneous and proprioceptive feedback to haptic shape discrimination by systematically constraining the exploratory strategy. Subjects (n = 23) explored pairs of two-dimensional (2-D) angles (standard angle, 90 degrees; comparison angles, 91 degrees -103 degrees) placed at arm's length from the subject, and identified the larger angle of each pair. The exploratory strategies included a reference condition, dynamic scan of the index finger over the entire object [combined cutaneous and proprioceptive (shoulder) feedback], and modified conditions, static touch of the intersection of the two bars that formed the angle using the index finger (cutaneous feedback) and dynamic scans of the object using a hand-held tool (proprioceptive feedback, shoulder). Discrimination thresholds (75% correct) were very similar for dynamic and static touch with the index finger. Thresholds varied as a function of the static contact duration (<1 s, 7.2 degrees +/- 0.6 degrees; approximately 3 s, 4.2 degrees +/- 0.5 degrees), but were not different from the reference condition (6.0 degrees +/- 0.9 degrees). The higher threshold with short static touch likely reflects movement-related gating of self-generated tactile inputs. Together, the results suggested that cutaneous feedback alone may be sufficient to explain 2-D angle discrimination, because the added proprioceptive feedback did not improve performance. Also, threshold did not vary with the number of dynamic scans (one or two), suggesting that the critical information was gathered on the first pass over the angle. In contrast, when the angles were explored with the tool, the threshold increased relative to the corresponding reference condition from the same session (tool, 9.6 degrees +/- 0.9 degrees; dynamic scan with the finger, 6.2 degrees +/- 1.0 degrees). Thus, performance was poorer with proprioceptive feedback alone, suggesting that cutaneous

  2. Entrapment of adult fingers between window glass and seal entry of a motor vehicle side door: an experimental study for investigation of the force at the subjective pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Hohendorff, B; Weidermann, C; Pollinger, P; Burkhart, K J; Konerding, M A; Prommersberger, K J; Rommens, P M

    2011-07-28

    In modern motor vehicles with automatic power windows, a potential hazard exists for jam events of fingers between the window glass and seal entry. This study determined entrapment forces acting on adult fingers at the subjective maximum pain threshold during entrapment in such windows. The length and the girth of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints of the triphalangeal fingers of the right hands of 109 participants (60 men, 49 women) were measured; the diameter was calculated from girth, which was assumed to be circular. The automatic power window system of a motor vehicle side door was changed to a mechanical system. During entrapment the force distributed across the four proximal interphalangeal joints (PIPs), and separately on the proximal interphalangeal (iPIP) and then the distal interphalangeal (iDIP) joints of the index finger was measured using a customized force sensor. The maximum bearable entrapment force was 97.2 ± 51.8 N for the PIPs, 43.4 ± 19.9 N for the iPIP, and 36.9 ± 17.8 N for the iDIP. The positive correlation between finger diameter and maximum entrapment force was significant. Particularly with regard to the risk to children's fingers, the 100 N statutory boundary value for closing force of electronic power windows should be reduced.

  3. Analysis of space crane articulated-truss joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. C.; Sutter, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines three articulated-truss joint concepts of the space crane in order to evaluate their static structural performance over a range of geometric design parameters. Emphasis is placed on maintaining the four-longeron reference truss performance across the joint while still allowing large-angle articulation. A maximum positive articulation angle is computed for each joint concept as the design parameters are varied, along with the actuator length ratio required to reach that angle. The tip rotation and lateral deflections of a truss beam with an articulated-truss joint at the midspan are employed to select a point design for each joint concept. The computed deflections for one point design are up to 30 percent higher than deflections for the other two designs. The two lowest natural frequencies of the three point designs are found to be relatively insensitive to large variations in the joint articulation angle.

  4. Fingerprint imaging of dry finger using photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Young; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2017-03-01

    Fingerprint imaging has been widely used in biometric identification systems. This work presents a photoacoustic (PA) fingerprint imaging system that provides acoustic resolution using a pulsed laser and focused ultrasound transducer operating as a receiver. This PA system can measure dry fingers with a wide-range laser field based on the differences in the ultrasound coupling between the fingertip areas contacting and not contacting a solid plate. To demonstrate and validate the image accuracy of the PA system, PA fingerprint images were compared to images captured using a pulse-echo ultrasound system and an ink-pressed fingerprint scan.

  5. Discrimination of Finger Area of Somatosensory Cortex by NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingdi; Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji

    We carried out a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to observe the hemodynamic responses associated with cortical activation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) by finger electrical stimulation. We examined whether NIRS can assist in investigating the somatotopic arrangement of fingers on the SI hand area. We found that although relatively low in spatial resolution, NIRS can to some extent help to discriminate the representations of thumb and ring finger on the SI hand area.

  6. A Finger Vein Identification Method Based on Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Tao, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    New methods for extracting vein features from finger vein image and generating templates for matching are proposed. In the algorithm for generating templates, we proposed a parameter-templates quality factor (TQF) - to measure the quality of generated templates. So that we can use fewer finger vein samples to generate templates that meet the quality requirement of identification. The recognition accuracy of using proposed methods of finger vein feature extraction and template generation strategy for identification is 97.14%.

  7. Vertical Finger Displacement is Reduced in Index Finger Tapping During Repeated Bout Rate Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mora-Jensen, Mark Holten; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-12-21

    The present study tested 1) whether a recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement in finger tapping (i.e. a cumulating increase in freely chosen finger tapping frequency following submaximal muscle activation in form of externally unloaded voluntary tapping) could be replicated, and 2) the hypotheses that the faster tapping was accompanied by changed vertical displacement of the fingertip and by changed peak force during tapping. Right-handed, healthy, and recreationally active individuals (n=24) performed two 3-min index finger tapping bouts at freely chosen tapping frequency, separated by 10 min rest. The recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement was replicated. The faster tapping (8.8±18.7 taps min-1, corresponding to 6.0±11.0%, p=.033) was accompanied by reduced vertical displacement (1.6±2.9 mm, corresponding to 6.3±14.9%, p=.012) of the fingertip. Concurrently, peak force was unchanged. The present study points at separate control mechanisms governing kinematics and kinetics during finger tapping.

  8. Friction between human finger flexor tendons and pulleys at high loads.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, A; Frank, O; Ochsner, P E; Jacob, H A C

    2003-01-01

    A method was developed to indirectly measure friction between the flexor tendons and pulleys of the middle and ring finger in vivo. An isokinetic movement device to determine maximum force of wrist flexion, interphalangeal joint flexion (rolling in and out) and isolated proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint flexion was built. Eccentric and concentric maximum force of these three different movements where gliding of the flexor tendon sheath was involved differently (least in wrist flexion) was measured and compared. Fifty-one hands in 26 male subjects were evaluated. The greatest difference between eccentric and concentric maximum force (29.9%) was found in flexion of the PIP joint. Differences in the rolling in and out movement (26.8%) and in wrist flexion (14.5%) were significantly smaller. The force of friction between flexor tendons and pulleys can be determined by the greater difference between eccentric and concentric maximum force provided by the same muscles in overcoming an external force during flexion of the interphalangeal joints and suggests the presence of a non-muscular force, such as friction. It constitutes of 9% of the eccentric flexion force in the PIP joint and therefore questions the low friction hypothesis at high loads.

  9. Stick-slip instability for viscous fingering in a gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puff, N.; Debrégeas, G.; di Meglio, J.-M.; Higgins, D.; Bonn, D.; Wagner, C.

    2002-05-01

    The growth dynamics of an air finger injected in a visco-elastic gel (a PVA/borax aqueous solution) is studied in a linear Hele-Shaw cell. Besides the standard Saffman-Taylor instability, we observe—with increasing finger velocities—the existence of two new regimes: (a) a stick-slip regime for which the finger tip velocity oscillates between 2 different values, producing local pinching of the finger at regular intervals; (b) a "tadpole" regime where a fracture-type propagation is observed. A scaling argument is proposed to interpret the dependence of the stick-slip frequency with the measured rheological properties of the gel.

  10. Multiple trigger fingers in a musician: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Masoud; Hassanpour, Seyed Esmail; Mosavizadeh, Seyed Mehdi

    2010-05-01

    Trigger finger is a common disease which particularly occurs in middle-aged women. We present a rare case of a male musician with six trigger fingers (five in the left hand and one in the right hand). Mostly these fingers had been used for playing the guitar. The patient had previously been treated with local steroid injections in his fingers, however no response was seen. Therefore, we performed a surgical procedure. Four weeks after surgery, the patient could play the guitar without discomfort in his hands.

  11. Natural Experiments in Outcrop- vs. Landscape-scale Controls on Longitudinal Profile Form, Finger Lakes, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, E. B.; Hauser, D.; Hoke, G. D.; Knuepfer, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Longitudinal stream profiles are commonly used to extract information about the geologic histories of transient landscapes. Correct interpretation of these histories requires understanding the impacts on profile morphology of outcrop-scale controls relative to those imposed by landscape-scale processes driving incision. Previous researchers have suggested that joint-perpendicular channel reaches form waterfalls while joint-oblique channel reaches form cascades. The Finger Lakes region of central New York offers a natural laboratory in which to test this hypothesis. The region is underpinned primarily by relatively flat-lying, well-jointed Devonian shales of the Hamilton Group. Ice retreated from the region and pro-glacial lake levels fell episodically some 14 ka ago, triggering post-glacial incision through plucking and abrasion that has sculpted gorges and waterfalls. All post-glacial streams draining to a given lake have essentially a common lithology and base level history. Using GIS, we analyzed the orientation of 50 m long channel segments relative to mapped patterns of joint orientation. All moderately sized (<20 km2) streams exhibit convex profiles which mimic the overall form of the valley slopes. For streams draining to southern Cayuga Lake, joint perpendicular reaches had an average slope of 4.2 degrees, while joint oblique reaches had an average slope of 3.6 degrees (p = 3e-19). However, the spatial location of major knickpoints do not appear to be controlled by joint orientation patterns, whose alignment with channel orientation varies over wavelengths shorter than knickpoint spacing (order 10-100 m vs. order 100-1000 m). On the other hand, knickpoint location and spacing along streams draining to southern Seneca Lake do not appear to differ systematically from those of the Cayuga profiles. Since Seneca's lake level was more stable than Cayuga's during glacial retreat, this suggests that base level history alone is also not controlling profile

  12. Autogenic heterotopic vascularized proximal interphalangeal joint transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Chiu, David T W; Lee, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    The proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) joint is the most crucial joint for the functionality of a finger. For a child with complex injury of the hand every effort should be exercised to maximize function restoration. If the PIP joint is irreparably damaged, its reconstruction is indicated. The technique of autogenic heterotopic vascularized toe joint transplantation provides unique advantage of a composite transfer of skin, tendons, bone and joint alone with growth plate and its efficacy has been affirmed in children. It has been suggested that such transfers require intact flexor tendon to achieve satisfactory results, our experience however indicates quite the contrary. As evidenced by this report of a 7-year-old boy with abrasion and avulsion injury to his dominant right hand resulting in a complex defect with skin lose, extensor, flexor avulsion along with cominution of the PIP joint of his long finger. A surgical formulation of staged reconstruction scheme including an autogenic heterotopic vascularized toe joint transplantation led to complete functional restoration to his right hand.

  13. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor); Kerley, James J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  14. Joint Commission

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content The Joint Commission Log In | Request Guest Access Forgot password? | Log In Help Contact Us | Careers | JCR Web Store | Press Room Search Home Accreditation Accreditation Ambulatory Health ...

  15. Robust identification of three-dimensional thumb and index finger kinematics with a minimal set of markers.

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-09-01

    This study presents a methodology to determine thumb and index finger kinematics while utilizing a minimal set of markers. The motion capture of skin-surface markers presents inherent challenges for the accurate and comprehensive measurement of digit kinematics. As such, it is desirable to utilize robust methods for assessing digit kinematics with fewer markers. The approach presented in this study involved coordinate system alignment, locating joint centers of rotation, and a solution model to estimate three-dimensional (3-D) digit kinematics. The solution model for each digit was based on assumptions of rigid-body interactions, specific degrees of freedom (DOFs) at each located joint, and the aligned coordinate system definitions. Techniques of inverse kinematics and optimization were applied to calculate the 3-D position and orientation of digit segments during pinching between the thumb and index finger. The 3-D joint center locations were reliably fitted with mean coefficients of variation below 5%. A parameterized form of the solution model yielded feasible solutions that met specified tolerance and convergence criteria for over 85% of the test points. The solution results were intuitive to the pinching function. The thumb was measured to be rotated about the CMC joint to bring it into opposition to the index finger and larger rotational excursions (>10 deg) were observed in flexion/extension compared to abduction/adduction and axial rotation for all joints. While the solution model produced results similar to those computed from a full marker set, the model facilitated the usage of fewer markers, which inherently lessened the effects of passive motion error and reduced the post-experimental effort required for marker processing.

  16. Teleoperation of Robonaut Using Finger Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champoux, Rachel G.; Luo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of new finger tracking systems, the idea of a more expressive and intuitive user interface is being explored and implemented. One practical application for this new kind of interface is that of teleoperating a robot. For humanoid robots, a finger tracking interface is required due to the level of complexity in a human-like hand, where a joystick isn't accurate. Moreover, for some tasks, using one's own hands allows the user to communicate their intentions more effectively than other input. The purpose of this project was to develop a natural user interface for someone to teleoperate a robot that is elsewhere. Specifically, this was designed to control Robonaut on the international space station to do tasks too dangerous and/or too trivial for human astronauts. This interface was developed by integrating and modifying 3Gear's software, which includes a library of gestures and the ability to track hands. The end result is an interface in which the user can manipulate objects in real time in the user interface. then, the information is relayed to a simulator, the stand in for Robonaut, at a slight delay.

  17. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  18. Finger-Powered Electro-Digital-Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Ju, Y Sungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Portable microfluidic devices are promising for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis and bio- and environmental surveillance in resource-constrained or non-laboratory environments. Lateral-flow devices, some built off paper or strings, have been widely developed but the fixed layouts of their underlying wicking/microchannel structures limit their flexibility and present challenges in implementing multistep reactions. Digital microfluidics can circumvent these difficulties by addressing discrete droplets individually. Existing approaches to digital microfluidics, however, often require bulky power supplies/batteries and high voltage circuits. We present a scheme to drive digital microfluidic devices by converting mechanical energy of human fingers to electrical energy using an array of piezoelectric elements. We describe the integration our scheme into two promising digital microfluidics platforms: one based on the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) phenomenon and the other on the electrophoretic control of droplet (EPD). Basic operations of droplet manipulations, such as droplet transport, merging and splitting, are demonstrated using the finger-powered digital-microfluidics.

  19. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  20. [Effects of zinc-finger proteins and artificial zinc-finger proteins on microbial metabolisms--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Zhang, Fei; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Zinc-finger proteins have been widely studied due to their highly conserved structures and DNA-binding specificity of zinc-finger domains. However, researches on the zinc-finger proteins from microorganisms, especially those from prokaryotes, are still very limited. This review focuses on the latest progress on microbial zinc-finger proteins, especially those from prokaryotes and the application of artificial zinc-finger proteins in the breeding of robust strains. Artificial zinc-finger proteins with transcriptional activation or repression domain can regulate the global gene transcription of microbial cells to acquire improved phenotypes, such as stress tolerance to heat, ethanol, butanol, and osmotic pressure. Using the zinc-finger domain as DNA scaffold in the construction of enzymatic system can enhance the catalytic efficiency and subsequently the production of specific metabolites. Currently, zinc-finger domains used in the construction of artificial transcription factor are usually isolated from mammalian cells. In the near future, novel transcription factors can be designed for strain development based on the natural zinc-finger domains from different microbes, which may be used to regulate the global gene expression of microbial cells more efficiently.

  1. Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

  2. Ulnopalmar dislocation of the fifth carpometacarpal joint. A rare injury.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J W; Waseem, M; Gambhir, A; Creedon, R J

    2002-04-01

    Volar dislocation of the carpometacarpal joint of the little finger is an uncommon injury. It is subdivided in ulnopalmar and radiopalmar dislocations. The injury can easily be missed on standard x-rays. Closed reduction and K-wire fixation has commonly been used in the treatment, although closed reduction and casting has been reported. Only 10 cases of an ulnopalmar dislocation were published previously. We report a case of a simultaneous dislocation of the 4th metacarpophalangeal joint and an ulnopalmar dislocation of the 5th carpometacarpal joint. The combination of these injuries has not been reported yet. We review the available literature and discuss the methods of treatment.

  3. Study on the constitutive model for jointed rock mass.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Chen, Jianyun; Li, Jing; Zhao, Chunfeng; Yuan, Chenyang

    2015-01-01

    A new elasto-plastic constitutive model for jointed rock mass, which can consider the persistence ratio in different visual angle and anisotropic increase of plastic strain, is proposed. The proposed the yield strength criterion, which is anisotropic, is not only related to friction angle and cohesion of jointed rock masses at the visual angle but also related to the intersection angle between the visual angle and the directions of the principal stresses. Some numerical examples are given to analyze and verify the proposed constitutive model. The results show the proposed constitutive model has high precision to calculate displacement, stress and plastic strain and can be applied in engineering analysis.

  4. The Effect of Distal Location of the Volar Short Arm Splint on the Metacarpophalangeal Joint Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Yub; Park, Ho Youn; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Joo Hak; Jung, Myung Gon; Cho, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The goals of this study were to compare maximal metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) flexion angles after application of a volar short arm splint at 3 different locations and verify the relations between the three different physical and radiological locations. Methods Forty dominant hands of healthy subjects were analyzed in the study. We defined a transverse skin folding line as a line drawn from the radial aspect of the thenar crease to the ulnar aspect of the distal transverse palmar crease. The distal end of the volar short arm splint was applied on 3 parallel locations to this line. Location A was on this transverse skin folding line; location B was 1 cm proximal to location A; and location C was 1 cm distal to location A. Two orthopedic surgeons measured the maximal MCPJ flexion angles of each finger except the thumb with the application of a volar short arm splint at 3 different locations as well as without a splint as a control. Radiological locations of the 3 different distal ends of the volar short arm splint were also assessed by anteroposterior radiographs of the wrist. Results When the splint was applied at location A and C, the maximal MCPJ flexion angle decreased to a mean of 83° (91% of control value) and 56° (62% of control value), respectively (compared to the control, p < 0.001). At location B, the maximal MCPJ flexion angle was a mean of 90° (99% of control value); no significant difference was observed compared to the control or without the splint (p = 0.103). On radiography, the average length from the metacarpal head to the distal end of the splint at all fingers decreased in the order of location B, A, and C (29 mm, 19 mm, and 10 mm, respectively; p < 0.001). Conclusions We recommend applying the distal end of a volar short arm splint at proximal 1 cm to the transverse skin folding line to preserve MCPJ motion perfectly, which is located at distal 44% of the whole metacarpal bone length radiologically. PMID:27247744

  5. Robust finger vein ROI localization based on flexible segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu; Xie, Shan Juan; Yoon, Sook; Yang, Jucheng; Park, Dong Sun

    2013-10-24

    Finger veins have been proved to be an effective biometric for personal identification in the recent years. However, finger vein images are easily affected by influences such as image translation, orientation, scale, scattering, finger structure, complicated background, uneven illumination, and collection posture. All these factors may contribute to inaccurate region of interest (ROI) definition, and so degrade the performance of finger vein identification system. To improve this problem, in this paper, we propose a finger vein ROI localization method that has high effectiveness and robustness against the above factors. The proposed method consists of a set of steps to localize ROIs accurately, namely segmentation, orientation correction, and ROI detection. Accurate finger region segmentation and correct calculated orientation can support each other to produce higher accuracy in localizing ROIs. Extensive experiments have been performed on the finger vein image database, MMCBNU_6000, to verify the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method shows the segmentation accuracy of 100%. Furthermore, the average processing time of the proposed method is 22 ms for an acquired image, which satisfies the criterion of a real-time finger vein identification system.

  6. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tomoko; Rivlis, Gil; Schieber, Marc H

    2016-02-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals.

  7. Detection of finger gesture using singular spectrum transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Umetani, T.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to detect finger movement using a singular spectrum transformation method. Human gesture recognition is essential for realizing natural user interfaces. However, constructing a robust, easily installable interface is extremely difficult. Our proposed method uses singular spectrum transformation to classify finger movements. This method robustly classifies gestures and behavior.

  8. Use of tactile afferent information in sequential finger movements.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A M; Soechting, J F

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated how tactile afferent information contributes to the generation of sequences of skilled finger movements by anesthetizing the right index fingers of experienced typists. Subjects were asked to type phrases in which the right index finger was used only once every seven to 12 keypresses. The time at which each key was depressed was recorded with a digital timer, and the translational and rotational motion of the fingers and wrist of the right hand were recorded optoelectronically from the location of reflective markers placed on the fingers. Midway through the experiment, a local anesthetic was injected at the base of the distal phalange of the right index finger. Following digital anesthesia, error rates increased considerably, mainly due to the diminished accuracy of movements of the anesthetized finger. The typing intervals following keypresses with the anesthetized fingertip were unaffected by the removal of tactile information. When errors occurred during control trials, the intervals immediately following the errors were greatly prolonged. However, errors produced with the anesthetized right index finger did not influence the timing of subsequent keypresses, implying that lack of tactile cues affected error recognition. The movement patterns during keypresses were similar before and after digital anesthesia for some subjects, while a less pronounced flexion-extension movement was seen in other subjects. The results suggest that tactile afferent information is not essential for initiating movement segments in a sequence. Rather, they emphasize the importance of this information for ensuring movement accuracy and for detecting errors.

  9. Coordination of bowing and fingering in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Baader, Andreas P; Kazennikov, Oleg; Wiesendanger, Mario

    2005-05-01

    Playing string instruments implies motor skills including asymmetrical interlimb coordination. How special is musical skill as compared to other bimanually coordinated, non-musical skillful performances? We succeeded for the first time to measure quantitatively bimanual coordination in violinists playing repeatedly a simple tone sequence. A motion analysis system was used to record finger and bow trajectories for assessing the temporal structure of finger-press, finger-lift (left hand), and bow stroke reversals (right arm). The main results were: (1) fingering consisted of serial and parallel (anticipatory) mechanisms; (2) synchronization between finger and bow actions varied from -12 ms to 60 ms, but these 'errors' were not perceived. The results suggest that (1) bow-finger synchronization varied by about 50 ms from perfect simultaneity, but without impairing auditory perception; (2) the temporal structure depends on a number of combinatorial mechanisms of bowing and fingering. These basic mechanisms were observed in all players, including all amateurs. The successful biomechanical measures of fingering and bowing open a vast practical field of assessing motor skills. Thus, objective assessment of larger groups of string players with varying musical proficiency, or of professional string players developing movement disorders, may be helpful in music education.

  10. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration.

    PubMed

    Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen

    PubMed Central

    Rivlis, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals. PMID:26683065

  12. Finger-vein image separation algorithms and realization with MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Ma, Junshan; Wu, Jiajie

    2010-10-01

    According to the characteristics of the finger-vein image, we adopted a series of methods to enhance the contrast of the image in order to separate the finger-vein areas from the background areas, and made prepare for the subsequent research such as feature extraction and recognition processing . The method consists of three steps: denoising, contrast enhancement and image binarization. In denoising, considering the relationship between gray levels in the adjacent areas of the finger-vein image, we adopted the Gradient Inverse Weighted Smoothing method. In contrast enhancement, we improved the conventional High Frequency Stress Filtering method and adopted a method which combined the traditional High Frequency Stress Filtering algorithm together with the Histogram Equalization. With this method, the contrast of the finger-vein area and the background area has been enhanced significantly. During the binarization process, after taking the differences of the gray levels between the different areas of the finger-vein image into consideration, we proposed a method which combined the binarization by dividing the image into several segments and the Morphological Image Processing means. Our experiment results show that after a series of processing mentioned above by using MATLAB, the finger-vein areas can be separated from the background areas obviously. We can get a vivid figure of the finger-vein which provided some references for the following research such as finger-vein image feature extraction, matching and identification.

  13. Finger vein extraction using gradient normalization and principal curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon Hwan; Song, Wonseok; Kim, Taejeong; Lee, Seung-Rae; Kim, Hee Chan

    2009-02-01

    Finger vein authentication is a personal identification technology using finger vein images acquired by infrared imaging. It is one of the newest technologies in biometrics. Its main advantage over other biometrics is the low risk of forgery or theft, due to the fact that finger veins are not normally visible to others. Extracting finger vein patterns from infrared images is the most difficult part in finger vein authentication. Uneven illumination, varying tissues and bones, and changes in the physical conditions and the blood flow make the thickness and brightness of the same vein different in each acquisition. Accordingly, extracting finger veins at their accurate positions regardless of their thickness and brightness is necessary for accurate personal identification. For this purpose, we propose a new finger vein extraction method which is composed of gradient normalization, principal curvature calculation, and binarization. As local brightness variation has little effect on the curvature and as gradient normalization makes the curvature fairly uniform at vein pixels, our method effectively extracts finger vein patterns regardless of the vein thickness or brightness. In our experiment, the proposed method showed notable improvement as compared with the existing methods.

  14. Bilateral Asymmetry in Upper Extremities Is More Pronounced in Distal Compared to Proximal Joints.

    PubMed

    Aune, T K; Ettema, G; Vereijken, B

    2016-01-01

    The authors' aim was to compare spatial and temporal accuracy in proximal versus distal joints in upper extremities. Given the morphological differences in corticospinal and corticomotoneuronal projections for proximal and distal muscles, they hypothesized that bilateral asymmetry would be larger for distal than for proximal joints. Twelve participants performed isolated flexion-extension movements with the shoulders and index fingers. Angular range of motion of finger and shoulder movements was kept constant. The results showed significant bilateral asymmetry for both proximal and distal joints for both spatial and temporal accuracy. More importantly, bilateral asymmetry was significantly larger for the index fingers than for the shoulders for both spatial and temporal variables, as hypothesized. These results at the behavioral level pave the way for further studies that combine direct measures of neural activation with behavioral measures to further illuminate the potential link between bilateral communication and laterality effects in motor performance.

  15. Actinomycosis of Finger: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Mansour; Zarch, Mojtaba Babaei

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous actinomycosis of finger is very unusual, chronic granulomatous disease caused by a group of anaerobic or microaerophilic Gram-positive filamentous bacteria that normally colonize the mouth, colon and urogenital tract. Actinomycosis of finger is rare but clinically important condition that requires suitable evaluation for guiding appropriate therapy. We hereby report a case of cutaneous actinomycosis of the right finger- a rare site, in a 34-year-old female patient which underwent usual treatment of surgical excision. This patient complained of existence of a mass and tenderness in the pulp of right index finger. The X-ray of hand revealed no significant abnormality. The patient was treated successfully with surgical excision. Surgery detected five small nodules measuring 0.5 to 1 cm in size. Histopathologic examination of the biopsy from the lesions confirmed diagnosis of cutaneous actinomycosis. Here, we report a cutaneous actinomycosis in a 34-year-old female located in the index finger. PMID:27656447

  16. A new algorithmic approach for fingers detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubashar Khan, Arslan; Umar, Waqas; Choudhary, Taimoor; Hussain, Fawad; Haroon Yousaf, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    Gesture recognition is concerned with the goal of interpreting human gestures through mathematical algorithms. Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Hand gesture detection in a real time environment, where the time and memory are important issues, is a critical operation. Hand gesture recognition largely depends on the accurate detection of the fingers. This paper presents a new algorithmic approach to detect and identify fingers of human hand. The proposed algorithm does not depend upon the prior knowledge of the scene. It detects the active fingers and Metacarpophalangeal (MCP) of the inactive fingers from an already detected hand. Dynamic thresholding technique and connected component labeling scheme are employed for background elimination and hand detection respectively. Algorithm proposed a new approach for finger identification in real time environment keeping the memory and time constraint as low as possible.

  17. Measurement and evaluation of finger tapping movements using magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Shima, Keisuke; Tsuji, Toshio; Kan, Eriko; Kandori, Akihiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a quantitative measurement and evaluation method of finger tapping movements for diagnosis support and assessment of motor function. In this method, a magnetic sensor consisting of two coils is used to measure movement. The coil voltage induced by the electromagnetic induction law changes depending on the distance between the two coils; this enables estimation of the distance between two coil-bearing fingertips from the voltage measured by the nonlinear modeling relationships between the voltages and distances. Further, the finger movements measured are evaluated by computing ten indices such as the finger tapping interval, and radar charts of the evaluation indices and phase-plane trajectories of the finger movements are then displayed in real time on a monitor. Evaluation experiments were performed on finger movement in 16 Parkinson's disease patients and 32 normal elderly subjects, with the results showing that all evaluation indices differ significantly for each subject (p < 0.05).

  18. Development of a CPM Machine for Injured Fingers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yili; Zhang, Fuxiang; Ma, Xin; Meng, Qinggang

    2005-01-01

    Human fingers are easy to be injured. A CPM machine is a mechanism based on the rehabilitation theory of continuous passive motion (CPM). To develop a CPM machine for the clinic application in the rehabilitation of injured fingers is a significant task. Therefore, based on the theories of evidence based medicine (EBM) and CPM, we've developed a set of biomimetic mechanism after modeling the motions of fingers and analyzing its kinematics and dynamics analysis. We also design an embedded operating system based on ARM (a kind of 32-bit RISC microprocessor). The equipment can achieve the precise control of moving scope of fingers, finger's force and speed. It can serves as a rational checking method and a way of assessment for functional rehabilitation of human hands. Now, the first prototype has been finished and will start the clinical testing in Harbin Medical University shortly.

  19. Isolated index finger palsy due to cortical infarction.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yuichi; Miyaji, Yosuke; Joki, Hideto; Seki, Syunsuke; Mori, Kentaro; Kamide, Tomoya; Tamase, Akira; Nomura, Motohiro; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    The case of an 86-year-old man presenting with isolated left index finger palsy caused by infarction on the lateral side of the right precentral knob is presented. Embolization from aortic atheroma was considered the cause of infarction. Cases with selective palsy of a particular group of fingers without sensory deficits due to cortical infarction of the precentral knob have been reported by several authors, and predominant weakness of radial-side fingers is known to be usually caused by laterally located infarction of the precentral knob. Among the previous reports, only 1 case involved isolated index finger palsy by an atypical, medially located infarction of the precentral knob in association with a concurrent nonrelated lesion. This is the first reported isolated index finger palsy caused by a single lateral precentral knob infarction.

  20. Finger gnosia: a predictor of numerical abilities in children?

    PubMed

    Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2005-10-01

    This paper aimed to test the specificity of predicting power of finger gnosia on later numerical abilities in school-age children and to contribute to the understanding of this effect. Forty-one children were tested in the beginning of Grade 1 on finger gnosia, left-right orientation (another sign of the Gerstmann "syndrome"), and global development. Fifteen months later, numerical and reading abilities were assessed. Analyses of the results indicated that, contrary to the general measures of cognitive development, performance in the finger gnosia test was a good predictor of numerical skills 1 year later but not of reading skills, which proves the specificity of that predictor. The same conclusion was also true for the left-right orientation. However, finger gnosia could equally predict performance in numerical tasks that do or do not rely heavily on finger representation or on magnitude representation. Results are discussed in terms of the localizationist and the functional hypotheses.

  1. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  2. Ferritin, finger clubbing, and lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shneerson, J M; Jones, B M

    1981-01-01

    The serum ferritin concentration has been determined by an immunoradiometric assay in 90 subjects with a variety of pulmonary diseases. No association between ferritin concentrations and finger clubbing has been found in any of the diseases studied. Ferritin levels were significantly raised in the subjects with bronchial carcinoma, but were not useful in monitoring recurrence of the tumour. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary vein ferritin concentrations were similar to systemic venous concentrations. It is therefore unlikely that the tumour releases ferritin into the pulmonary circulation. Ferritin levels were raised in patients with acute pneumonias but did not correlate with the total white cell count or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum ferritin concentrations were also increased in a variety of chronic lung diseases but were normal in subjects with asbestosis. PMID:7314044

  3. Can a soft robotic probe use stiffness control like a human finger to improve efficacy of haptic perception?

    PubMed

    Sornkarn, Nantachai; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha

    2016-10-19

    When humans are asked to palpate a soft tissue to locate a hard nodule, they regulate the stiffness, speed, and force of the finger during examination. If we understand the relationship between these behavioral variables and haptic information gain (transfer entropy) during manual probing, we can improve the efficacy of soft robotic probes for soft tissue palpation, such as in tumor localization in minimally invasive surgery. Here, we recorded the muscle co-contraction activity of the finger using EMG sensors to address the question as to whether joint stiffness control during manual palpation plays an important role in the haptic information gain. To address this question, we used a soft robotic probe with a controllable stiffness joint and a force sensor mounted at the base to represent the function of the tendon in a biological finger. Then, we trained a Markov chain using muscle co- contraction patterns of human subjects, and used it to control the stiffness of the soft robotic probe in the same soft tissue palpation task. The soft robotic experiments showed that haptic information gain about the depth of the hard nodule can be maximized by varying the internal stiffness of the soft probe.

  4. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  5. [Index finger pollicization for congenitally deficient first finger of the hand in children].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Rueda, F; Ayala Montoro, J; Blanco López, F; Ocaña Losa, J M

    2001-10-01

    Pollicization is a single-stage neurovascular pedicle transfer of the index digit to function as a thumb. The objective of this study is to investigate the results of index finger pollicization for correction of congenital deficiency of the first ray in pediatric hand. We have done 6 pollicizations of index fingers in 6 hands (there were 2 right hands, 2 left hands, and 1 bilaterally) in 5 patients (4 boys and 1 girl) who had absent or nonfunctioning thumbs (type III-V of Blauth's classification). Associated anomalies where numerous and included radial club hand, mirror hand and cardiovascular and urologic anomalies. The average time of Kirschner wire extraction was 32 days (30 to 36 days) and to beginning the hand rehabilitation at 5 degrees to 10 degrees day. The average age at pollicization was 5.5 years (range 2 to 8 years), and follow-up averaged 8 years (5 to 11 years). The cosmetic and functional results were excellent, with manual dexterity of prehension and opposition. Pollicization in children can be performed at least 2 years of age, to due of minor risk of neurovascular lesion but without delayed the cortical representation of the pollicized finger.

  6. Five- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia and calculation abilities.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children's representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation.

  7. Five- to 7-Year-Olds’ Finger Gnosia and Calculation Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds’ finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children’s representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation. PMID:22171220

  8. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Joint Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an ...

  9. Typing keystroke duration changed after submaximal isometric finger exercises.

    PubMed

    Joe Chang, Che-Hsu; Johnson, Peter W; Katz, Jeffrey N; Eisen, Ellen A; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2009-01-01

    A repeated-measures laboratory experiment tested whether keystroke duration during touch-typing changes after a finger performs submaximal isometric flexion exercises. Fourteen right-handed touch-typists used right ring finger to perform three 15-min exercise conditions, two isometric exercises and a no-force condition, each on a separate day. Before and after each exercise condition, typing keystroke duration and isometric force elicited by electrical stimulation were measured for right ring finger. Keystroke duration of right ring finger decreased by 5% (6 ms, P < 0.05) immediately after the exercises but not after the no-force condition. Peak isometric finger force elicited by electrical stimulation decreased by 17-26% (P < 0.05) for the flexor digitorum superficialis and decreased by 4-8% for the extensor digitorum communis after the isometric exercises. After the finger was exposed to isometric exercises, changes in typing keystroke duration coincided with changes in the physiological state of the finger flexor and extensor muscles.

  10. Finger vein verification system based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yang; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Haixia; Zhang, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Finger vein verification is a promising biometric pattern for personal identification in terms of security and convenience. The recognition performance of this technology heavily relies on the quality of finger vein images and on the recognition algorithm. To achieve efficient recognition performance, a special finger vein imaging device is developed, and a finger vein recognition method based on sparse representation is proposed. The motivation for the proposed method is that finger vein images exhibit a sparse property. In the proposed system, the regions of interest (ROIs) in the finger vein images are segmented and enhanced. Sparse representation and sparsity preserving projection on ROIs are performed to obtain the features. Finally, the features are measured for recognition. An equal error rate of 0.017% was achieved based on the finger vein image database, which contains images that were captured by using the near-IR imaging device that was developed in this study. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is faster and more robust than previous methods.

  11. Viewing angle changeable display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jinbi; Huang, Ziqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Chen, Xiaoxi

    2010-10-01

    Viewing angle changeable display can change the display viewing angle as needed: In the public place the display could have a narrow viewing angle for privacy, while in the private place the displays could have a wide viewing angle for the convenience of the operation and better viewing experience. This article propose a novel adjustable optical transmission device to realize the viewing angle changes for LCD by using the principle of guest- host effect of liquid crystal. The major technology is to insert a special equipment between the backlight and the LCD, through which the backlight will display either parallel or scattered features to get an either narrow or wide viewing angle. The equipment is an adjustable transmission cell (ATC) which is actually a black G-H LC cell. This ATC is the main focus of our invention. The ATC consists of a polarizer sheet and a special guest-host liquid crystal device filled with the two-phase dye (called as GH-LC in this report), to achieve the viewing angle change in the LCD. When an electrical field charges to the ATC, only the so-called near-axis lights can pass through the ATC within a relatively small angle, while the other scattered lights are absorbed sequentially by GH-LC and the polarizer sheet. On the other hand, when there is no electrical charge to the ATC, the cell behaves like a normal polarizer; and the scattered light can pass through the cell and polarizer in a normal way. This paper describes the principle and structure of the device, applies the electric field on the sample to observe the electro-optical properties, combine the theoretical and experimental research, getting the viewing angle effects of the display.

  12. Photoelectric angle converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  13. Meteorite incidence angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    1993-06-01

    Think about an asteroid smashing into the surface of the Moon and excavating a crater; or hitting Earth and scattering meteorite fragments over a strewn field. Imagine a fragment of cometary dust burning out in the Earth's atmosphere and producing a meteor. These bodies have paths that are inclined at some angle to the vertical. But what is the predominant value of this angle of incidence, i? How does the number of incident bodies vary as a function of angle i? And how do both these affect the prevalence of non- circular lunar craters and the ellipticity of meteorite strewn fields?

  14. Limited joint mobility syndrome in diabetes mellitus: A minireview

    PubMed Central

    Gerrits, Esther G; Landman, Gijs W; Nijenhuis-Rosien, Leonie; Bilo, Henk J

    2015-01-01

    Limited joint mobility syndrome (LJMS) or diabetic cheiroarthropathy is a long term complication of diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of LJMS is based on clinical features: progression of painless stiffness of hands and fingers, fixed flexion contractures of the small hand and foot joints, impairment of fine motion and impaired grip strength in the hands. As the syndrome progresses, it can also affect other joints. It is important to properly diagnose such a complication as LJMS. Moreover, it is important to diagnose LJMS because it is known that the presence of LJMS is associated with micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Due to the lack of curative treatment options, the suggested method to prevent or decelerate the development of LJMS is improving or maintaining good glycemic control. Daily stretching excercises of joints aim to prevent or delay progression of joint stiffness, may reduce the risk of inadvertent falls and will add to maintain quality of life. PMID:26265997

  15. Distal interphalangeal joint implant arthroplasty in a musician.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D A; Peimer, C A

    1998-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease commonly affects the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints, causing articular destruction and marginal bone formation. Treatment for pain relief and function is most often done through arthrodesis. The case of a 70-year-old concert violinist with left index finger DIP joint osteoarthritis is presented. Arthritis in the involved joint caused pain and deformity and interfered with the patient's ability to play music. Trial arthrodesis with K-wires proved impossible because of the patient's need for continued mobility. Swanson hinge implant arthroplasty was performed on the affected DIP joint. The patient eventually achieved an excellent result and was able to return to playing the violin professionally. Treatment and therapy guidelines are presented.

  16. [Idiopathic palmar vein thrombosis of the fingers - rare but relevant].

    PubMed

    Spies, C K; Schwarz-Furlan, S; Hahn, P; Oppermann, J; Unglaub, F

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic thrombosis of palmar finger veins is rare and women suffer from it almost exclusively. Synovial cysts, epidermoid inclusion cysts, giant cell tumours and haemangiomatous lesions should be considered in the process of diagnosis. We present a 56-year-old woman with idiopathic and symptomatic thrombosis of palmar finger veins. Using the palmar approach the painful veins were identified and excised completely. An uncomplicated wound healing has followed with completely unrestricted and painless range of motion. Surgical excision of the finger vein thrombosis should be considered if there is continuing pain.

  17. A hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Tao; Yang, Gongping; Yang, Lu

    2014-12-01

    Finger knuckle print has recently been seen as an effective biometric technique. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition, which is rooted in traditional score-level fusion methods. In the proposed method, we firstly take Gabor feature as the basic feature for finger knuckle print recognition and then a new decision rule is defined based on the predefined threshold. Finally, the minor feature speeded-up robust feature is conducted for these users, who cannot be recognized by the basic feature. Extensive experiments are performed to evaluate the proposed method, and experimental results show that it can achieve a promising performance.

  18. Narrow fingers in the Saffman-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couder, Y.; Gerard, N.; Rabaud, M.

    1986-12-01

    Saffman-Taylor fingers with a relative width much smaller than the classical limit lambda = 0.5 are found when a small isolated bubble is located at their tip. These solutions are members of a family found by Saffman and Taylor (1958) neglecting superficial tension. Recent theories have shown that when capillary forces are taken into account an unphysical cusplike singularity would appear at the tip of all the fingers with lambda less than 0.5. Conversely, here the replacement of the tip by a small bubble makes these solutions possible. At large velocity these fingers show dendritic instability.

  19. Finger rafting: a generic instability of floating elastic sheets.

    PubMed

    Vella, Dominic; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-02-23

    Colliding ice floes are often observed to form a series of interlocking fingers. We show that this striking phenomenon is not a result of some peculiar property of ice but rather a general and robust mechanical phenomenon reproducible in the laboratory with other floating materials. We determine the theoretical relationship between the width of the resulting fingers and the material's mechanical properties and present experimental results along with field observations to support the theory. The generality of this "finger rafting" suggests that analogous processes may be responsible for creating the large-scale structures observed at the boundaries between Earth's convergent tectonic plates.

  20. Real-time visualization of joint cavitation.

    PubMed

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Fryer, Jerome; Jaremko, Jacob L; Zeng, Hongbo; Rowe, Lindsay; Thompson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking.

  1. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  2. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  3. Objective measures of joint stiffness.

    PubMed

    Roberson, L; Giurintano, D J

    1995-01-01

    Objective measures of joint stiffness allow for the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment modalities. Without this, the effectiveness of therapy is not quantifiable. Presently, joint stiffness can be quantified by either passive range of motion (PROM) measurement or torque range of motion (TqROM) measurement. PROM measurement does not control the force applied, nor does it require that the other joints in the kinematic chain be held fixed. Also, it demonstrates poor interrater reliability. An idealized device melding existing technologies of constant passive motion devices and computerized workstations is proposed to allow for easier measurement of TqROM angles for analysis data for the determination of the effectiveness of treatment modalities.

  4. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  5. Joint Warrior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-04

    hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...reflect my own personal views and are not necessarily endorsed by the NWC or the Department of the Navy. 14. ABSTRACT The way we fight wars has been...evolving over thousands of years. Today, the U.S. Navy, finds itself in the post- modern area of war fighting . Joint warfare is the latest

  6. Finger Length Ratios in Serbian Transsexuals

    PubMed Central

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V.; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L.; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D : 4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D : 4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D : 4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D : 4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D : 4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D : 4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism. PMID:24982993

  7. Radial fingering at an active interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagilla, Amarender; Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Jadhav, Sameer

    2016-11-01

    It has been suggested that the shapes of single cells crawling on surfaces and those of the fronts of thin layers of cells collectively expanding to close a wound are the results of fingering instabilities. Motivated by these studies, we investigate the conditions under which an actively forced interface between a pair of immiscible viscous fluids will destabilize under Hele-Shaw confinement. The case of a circular active interface with surface tension and bending resistance is considered. Active forces exerted by the inner fluid at the interfacial region can be either completely internal or due to interactions with the confining substrate. In addition, the effects of cell growth or actin depolymerization or external injection of cell suspensions are modeled by including a distributed source and a point source of arbitrary strengths. Linear stability analysis reveals that at any given mean radius of the interface, its stability is dictated by two key dimensionless parameters. We discuss the different regions in a state space of these parameters.

  8. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  9. Finger length ratios in Serbian transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Vujović, Svetlana; Popović, Srdjan; Mrvošević Marojević, Ljiljana; Ivović, Miomira; Tančić-Gajić, Milina; Stojanović, Miloš; Marina, Ljiljana V; Barać, Marija; Barać, Branko; Kovačević, Milena; Duišin, Dragana; Barišić, Jasmina; Djordjević, Miroslav L; Micić, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Atypical prenatal hormone exposure could be a factor in the development of transsexualism. There is evidence that the 2nd and 4th digit ratio (2D:4D) associates negatively with prenatal testosterone and positively with estrogens. The aim was to assess the difference in 2D:4D between female to male transsexuals (FMT) and male to female transsexuals (MFT) and controls. We examined 42 MFT, 38 FMT, and 45 control males and 48 control females. Precise measurements were made by X-rays at the ventral surface of both hands from the basal crease of the digit to the tip using vernier calliper. Control male and female patients had larger 2D:4D of the right hand when compared to the left hand. Control male's left hand ratio was lower than in control female's left hand. There was no difference in 2D:4D between MFT and control males. MFT showed similar 2D:4D of the right hand with control women indicating possible influencing factor in embryogenesis and consequently finger length changes. FMT showed the lowest 2D:4D of the left hand when compared to the control males and females. Results of our study go in favour of the biological aetiology of transsexualism.

  10. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry.

    PubMed

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO₂) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO₂ was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO₂ was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO₂ was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO₂ without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO₂ in any condition of the fetus.

  11. The generation of zinc finger proteins by modular assembly

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta, Mital; Segal, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The modular assembly (MA) method of generating engineered zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) was the first practical method for creating custom DNA-binding proteins. As such, MA has enabled a vast exploration of sequence-specific methods and reagents, ushering in the modern era of zinc finger-based applications that are described in this volume. The first zinc finger nuclease to cleave an endogenous site was created using MA, as was the first artificial transcription factor to enter phase II clinical trials. In recent years, other excellent methods have been developed that improved the affinity and specificity of the engineered ZFPs. However, MA is still used widely for many applications. This chapter will describe methods and give guidance for the creation of ZFPs using MA. Such ZFPs might be useful as starting materials to perform other methods described in this volume. Here, we also describe a single-strand annealing recombination assay for the initial testing of zinc finger nucleases. PMID:20680825

  12. [Raynaud's phenomenon and other circulatory disorders of the fingers].

    PubMed

    Mahler, Felix

    2014-02-26

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is defined as attacks of blanking, subsequent cyanosis and rubeosis of fingers due to vasospasms in response to cold or emotional stimuli. Primary RP has no known underlying cause and occurs mainly in young and otherwise healthy women. Secondary RP goes along with various causes such as connective tissue diseases, toxic substances, drugs, physical trauma or organic finger artery occlusions, and occurs at any age and in both genders. Related affections are acrocyanosis and finger artery occlusions either due to arteriosclerosis or vasculitis. Also spontaneous finger hematoma may provoke an episode of RP. Therapeutically strict cold protection and avoidance of possible noxa is recommended besides the treatment of underlying diseases. No standard vasoactive drug has proven ideal for RP due to side effects. In cases with rest pain or ulcerations the same principles are applied as in ischemic diseases with no possibility for revascularization.

  13. Finger vein recognition based on local directional code.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianjing; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2012-11-05

    Finger vein patterns are considered as one of the most promising biometric authentication methods for its security and convenience. Most of the current available finger vein recognition methods utilize features from a segmented blood vessel network. As an improperly segmented network may degrade the recognition accuracy, binary pattern based methods are proposed, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP), Local Derivative Pattern (LDP) and Local Line Binary Pattern (LLBP). However, the rich directional information hidden in the finger vein pattern has not been fully exploited by the existing local patterns. Inspired by the Webber Local Descriptor (WLD), this paper represents a new direction based local descriptor called Local Directional Code (LDC) and applies it to finger vein recognition. In LDC, the local gradient orientation information is coded as an octonary decimal number. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LDC achieves better performance than methods using LLBP.

  14. Seal finger: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin P; Jewer, David D

    2009-01-01

    A recent case of seal finger which was misdiagnosed and hence mistreated at the patient’s first presentation is described. The patient was eventually referred to a hand specialist and after the correct treatment with tetracycline, responded well without any long-term sequelae. Seal finger is an occupational injury that occurs to those who work directly or indirectly with seals. The disease entity has been described in both Scandinavian and Canadian literature. The causative microorganism was unknown until 1991, when Mycoplasma phocacerebrale was isolated from both the finger of a patient with seal finger and from the mouth of a seal that bit the patient. Although rare, the disease is not uncommon in marine workers, biologists and veterinarians. Prompt identification based on patient history and treatment with oral tetracycline is pendant to a favourable patient outcome. PMID:21119845

  15. [Spontaneous Non Ischaemic Blue Finger: A Rare and Benign Phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Franco, Daniela; Alves, Daniela; Almeida, Ana Cristina; Almeida, Carlos Costa; Moreno, Cecília; Freixo, Joâo

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous non-ischaemic blue finger is a rare and benign disorder, characterized by purple discoloration of a finger, with complete resolution. This article reports the case of a woman of 88 years, which after a few hours of stay in the emergency department developed without associated trauma, a purplish color of the 3rd finger of the right hand, with a palpable pulse and without temperature changes or pain. The etiological investigation was negative. The patient was assessed one week after the event and showed completeresolution. There are several diseases that share the same signs and symptoms, as such the diagnosis is based on the spontaneous violaceous color sparing the finger tip, and fast resolution without treatment. Though being a harmless phenomenon, it requires early assessment for timely differential diagnosis with severe pathologies.

  16. Seal finger: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    White, Colin P; Jewer, David D

    2009-01-01

    A recent case of seal finger which was misdiagnosed and hence mistreated at the patient's first presentation is described. The patient was eventually referred to a hand specialist and after the correct treatment with tetracycline, responded well without any long-term sequelae. Seal finger is an occupational injury that occurs to those who work directly or indirectly with seals. The disease entity has been described in both Scandinavian and Canadian literature. The causative microorganism was unknown until 1991, when Mycoplasma phocacerebrale was isolated from both the finger of a patient with seal finger and from the mouth of a seal that bit the patient. Although rare, the disease is not uncommon in marine workers, biologists and veterinarians. Prompt identification based on patient history and treatment with oral tetracycline is pendant to a favourable patient outcome.

  17. Finger Vein Recognition Based on Local Directional Code

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xianjing; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2012-01-01

    Finger vein patterns are considered as one of the most promising biometric authentication methods for its security and convenience. Most of the current available finger vein recognition methods utilize features from a segmented blood vessel network. As an improperly segmented network may degrade the recognition accuracy, binary pattern based methods are proposed, such as Local Binary Pattern (LBP), Local Derivative Pattern (LDP) and Local Line Binary Pattern (LLBP). However, the rich directional information hidden in the finger vein pattern has not been fully exploited by the existing local patterns. Inspired by the Webber Local Descriptor (WLD), this paper represents a new direction based local descriptor called Local Directional Code (LDC) and applies it to finger vein recognition. In LDC, the local gradient orientation information is coded as an octonary decimal number. Experimental results show that the proposed method using LDC achieves better performance than methods using LLBP. PMID:23202194

  18. Suppression of viscous fingering in nonflat Hele-Shaw cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Rodolfo; Fontana, João V.; Miranda, José A.

    2014-11-01

    Viscous fingering formation in flat Hele-Shaw cells is a classical and widely studied fluid mechanical problem. Recently, instead of focusing on the development of the fingering instability, researchers have devised different strategies aiming to suppress its appearance. In this work, we study a protocol that intends to inhibit the occurrence of fingering instabilities in nonflat (spherical and conical) Hele-Shaw cell geometries. By using a mode-coupling theory to describe interfacial evolution, plus a variational controlling technique, we show that viscous fingering phenomena can be minimized in such a confined, curved environment by properly manipulating a time-dependent injection flow rate Q (t ) . Explicit expressions for Q (t ) are derived for the specific cases of spherical and conical cells. The suitability of the controlling method is verified for linear and weakly nonlinear stages of the flow.

  19. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.; Xu, Xueyan S.; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed. Relevance to industry Prolonged, intensive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration can cause hand-arm vibration syndrome. Vibration-reducing gloves have been used as an alternative approach to reduce the vibration exposure. However, their effectiveness for reducing finger-transmitted vibrations remains unclear. This study enhanced the understanding of the glove effects on finger vibration and provided useful information on the effectiveness of typical VR gloves at reducing the vibration transmitted to the fingers. The new

  20. Fingered bola body, bola with same, and methods of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzenitis, John M. (Inventor); Billica, Linda W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses bola bodies, bolas, and a snaring method which makes use such devices. A bola body, according to the present invention, is nonspherical or irregular in shape rather than a smooth sphere or ovoid body. One or more fingers extends from the bola body. These fingers may be relatively straight or they may have crooked or bent portions to enhance entanglement with a bola line or lines or with each other. Two or more of such fingers may be used and may be regularly or irregularly spaced apart on a bola body. A bola with such bodies includes lines which are connected to the other bodies. In one particular embodiment of a bola body, according to the present invention, the body has an irregular shape with a bottom rectangular portion and a top pyramid portion forming a nose. A plurality of fingers is extended from the pyramidal top portion with one finger extended up and away from each of four corners of the top portion. Such a bola body tends to be initially oriented with its nose and fingers against an object being snared since the body is pulled nose first when a bola line is secured at the tip of the pyramidal portion of the bola body. With such a bola, an unwrapping bola body can slip around a target member so that two of the rod-shaped fingers catch a bola line and guide it into an area or crook between the fingers and a side of the top pyramidal portion of the bola body. Tension on the bola line maintains the line in the crook and tends to press the fingers against the unwrapped target member to stabilize the wrapping of the line about the target member. With such a bola, it is difficult for two or more lines unwrapping in different directions to move past one another without being forced together by line tension. Also, the fingers of such bola bodies may hook and hold each other. The fingers may also hook or entangle some object on or portion of the target member. A probable known target member has known dimensions and shapes so that

  1. Targeted mutagenesis of zebrafish: use of zinc finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Leong, Ivone Un San; Lai, Daniel; Lan, Chuan-Ching; Johnson, Ross; Love, Donald R; Johnson, Ross; Love, Donald R

    2011-09-01

    The modeling of human disease in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) is moving away from chemical mutagensis and transient downregulation using morpholino oligomers to more targeted and stable transgenic methods. In this respect, zinc finger nucleases offer a means of introducing mutations at targeted sites at high efficiency. We describe here the development of zinc finger nucleases and their general use in model systems with a focus on the zebrafish.

  2. High-pressure injection injury of the finger

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The high-pressure injection injuries are unusual injuries and the extent of tissue damage is often under estimated. They represent potentially disabling forms of trauma and have disastrous effects on tissues if not treated promptly. We present a case of high pressure injection injury to the finger from lubricant oil. The patient presented late with necrosis of volar tissue of left index finger. The patient was aggressively managed in stages, with delayed flap cover, with satisfactory functional and aesthetic outcome. PMID:23325982

  3. Repeatability Evaluation of Finger Tapping Device with Magnetic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuko; Kandori, Akihiko; Shima, Keisuke; Tamura, Yasuhiro; Takagi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Toshio; Noda, Masafumi; Higashikawa, Fumiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    We tested the repeatability of a finger tapping device with magnetic sensors to determine its reliability. This device, which was developed to assist in the diagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and strokes, measures the distance between the first and index fingers during finger tapping movements (opening and closing the fingers repeatedly). We evaluated three types of repeatability based on ICC (interclass correlation coefficient) and Welch's test (test for equal means in a oneway layout): repeatability when measured at different times, when using different devices, and when using different measurers. We calculated these three types for three finger tapping tasks on both hands for 21 characteristics calculated from finger tapping waveforms. Results demonstrated that the repeatability when using different devices is high regardless of the task or hand. The repeatability when measuring at different times and when using different measurers is high at some tasks, but not all. One of the finger tapping tasks (finger tapping movement with the largest amplitude and highest velocity), which is used in a conventional PD diagnosis method (UPDRS), does not have enough repeatability, while other tasks show high repeatability. Results also showed that five characteristics have the highest repeatability (ICC ≥ 0.5 or significance probability of Welch's test ≥ 5% in all tasks): “total moving distance,” “average of local minimum acceleration in opening motion,” “average of local minimum acceleration in closing motion,” “average of local maximum distance” and “average of local minimum velocity”. These results clearly demonstrate the strong repeatability of this device and lead to more precise diagnosis of movement disorders.

  4. Extensor mechanism of the fingers. I. A quantitative geometric study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, M; An, K N; Berglund, L; Linscheid, R L; Cooney, W P; Chao, E Y

    1991-11-01

    A close-range stereophotogrammetric measurement system was used to determine the three-dimensional geometric characteristics of the extensor assembly in seven human finger specimens and five finger configurations. The numerical data obtained showed that, although changes in length of the different bundles are small, their spatial orientation varies considerably from one to another position. This information should help to improve the accuracy of models derived to understand the extensor assembly behavior in normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Finger blood content, light transmission, and pulse oximetry errors.

    PubMed

    Craft, T M; Lawson, R A; Young, J D

    1992-01-01

    The changes in light emitting diode current necessary to maintain a constant level of light incident upon a photodetector were measured in 20 volunteers at the two wavelengths employed by pulse oximeters. Three states of finger blood content were assessed; exsanguinated, hyperaemic, and normal. The changes in light emitting diode current with changes in finger blood content were small and are not thought to represent a significant source of error in saturation as measured by pulse oximetry.

  6. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  7. Automatic control of a drop-foot stimulator based on angle measurement using bioimpedance.

    PubMed

    Nahrstaedt, Holger; Schauer, Thomas; Shalaby, Raafat; Hesse, Stefan; Raisch, Jörg

    2008-08-01

    The topic of this contribution is iterative learning control of a drop-foot stimulator in which a predefined angle profile during the swing phase is realized. Ineffective dorsiflexion is compensated by feedback-controlled stimulation of the muscle tibialis anterior. The ankle joint measurement is based on changes in the bioimpedance (BI) caused by leg movements. A customized four-channel BI measurement system was developed. The suggested control approach and the new measurement method for the joint angle were successfully tested in preliminary experiments with a neurologically intact subject. Reference angle measurements were taken with a marker-based optical system. An almost linear relation between joint angle and BI was found for the angle range applicable during gait. The desired angle trajectory was closely tracked by the iterative learning controller after three gait cycles. The final root mean square tracking error was below 5 degrees.

  8. Biomechanical analysis of force distribution in human finger extensor mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Ren, Lei; Howard, David; Zong, Changfu

    2014-01-01

    The complexities of the function and structure of human fingers have long been recognised. The in vivo forces in the human finger tendon network during different activities are critical information for clinical diagnosis, surgical treatment, prosthetic finger design, and biomimetic hand development. In this study, we propose a novel method for in vivo force estimation for the finger tendon network by combining a three-dimensional motion analysis technique and a novel biomechanical tendon network model. The extensor mechanism of a human index finger is represented by an interconnected tendinous network moving around the phalanx's dorsum. A novel analytical approach based on the "Principle of Minimum Total Potential Energy" is used to calculate the forces and deformations throughout the tendon network of the extensor mechanism when subjected to an external load and with the finger posture defined by measurement data. The predicted deformations and forces in the tendon network are in broad agreement with the results obtained by previous experimental in vitro studies. The proposed methodology provides a promising tool for investigating the biomechanical function of complex interconnected tendon networks in vivo.

  9. Fluidic Channels Produced by Electro Hydrodynamic Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behler, Kristopher; Wetzel, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Viscous fingering is a term describing fingerlike extensions of liquid from a column of low viscosity liquid that has been injected into a more viscous liquid. The modification of viscous fingering, known as electro hydrodynamic viscous fingering (EHVF), utilizes large electrical potentials of 10-60 kV. The fingers see a reduction in size and increase in branching behavior due to the potential applied to the system. The resulting finely structured patterns are analogous to biological systems such as blood vessels and the lymphatic system. In this study silicone oils and water were studied in thin channel Hele-Shaw cells. The interfacial tension was optimized by altering the surfactant concentration in the silicone oils. EHVF of liquid filled packed beds consisting of beads and silicone oils showed retardation of the relaxation of the fingers after the voltage was turned off. Decreased relaxation provides a means to solidify patterns into a curable material, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). After the water is evacuated from the fingers, the cured materials then possess hollow channels that can be refilled and emptied, thus creating an artificial circulatory system.

  10. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events

    PubMed Central

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction. PMID:26082732

  11. Integrating optical finger motion tracking with surface touch events.

    PubMed

    MacRitchie, Jennifer; McPherson, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of integrating two contrasting sensor systems for studying human interaction with a mechanical system, using piano performance as the case study. Piano technique requires both precise small-scale motion of fingers on the key surfaces and planned large-scale movement of the hands and arms. Where studies of performance often focus on one of these scales in isolation, this paper investigates the relationship between them. Two sensor systems were installed on an acoustic grand piano: a monocular high-speed camera tracking the position of painted markers on the hands, and capacitive touch sensors attach to the key surfaces which measure the location of finger-key contacts. This paper highlights a method of fusing the data from these systems, including temporal and spatial alignment, segmentation into notes and automatic fingering annotation. Three case studies demonstrate the utility of the multi-sensor data: analysis of finger flexion or extension based on touch and camera marker location, timing analysis of finger-key contact preceding and following key presses, and characterization of individual finger movements in the transitions between successive key presses. Piano performance is the focus of this paper, but the sensor method could equally apply to other fine motor control scenarios, with applications to human-computer interaction.

  12. Fingering Convection and its Consequences for Accreting White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauclair, Sylvie; Vauclair, Gérard; Deal, Morgan; Wachlin, F. C.

    2015-06-01

    A number of white dwarf stars show absoption lines of heavy elements in their spectra. Many of them also exhibit infra-red excess in their spectral energy distribution. These observations prove that these white dwarfs are surrounded by an orbiting debris disk resulting from the disruption of rocky planetesimals, remnants of the primordial planetary system. Part of the material from the debris disk is accreted onto the white dwarfs, explaining the presence of heavy elements in their outer layers. Previous attempts to estimate the accretion rates have overlooked the importance of the fingering convection. The fingering convection is an instability triggered by the accumulation in the white dwarf outer layers of material heavier than the underlying H-rich (for the DA) or the He-rich (for the DB) composition. The fingering convection induces a deep mixing of the accreted material. Our preliminary simulations of the fingering convection show that the effect may be important in DA white dwarfs. The accretion rates needed in order to reproduce the observed heavy element abundances exceed by order of magnitudes the accretion rates estimated when this extra-mixing is ignored. By contrast, in the cases of the DB white dwarfs that we have considered in our simulations the fingering convection either does not occur or has very little effects on the derived accretion rates. We have undertaken a systematic exploration of the consequences of the fingering convection in accreting white dwarfs.

  13. Detecting overblown flute fingerings from the residual noise spectrum.

    PubMed

    Verfaille, Vincent; Depalle, Philippe; Wanderley, Marcelo M

    2010-01-01

    Producing a tone by increasing the blowing pressure to excite a higher frequency impedance minimum, or overblowing, is widely used in standard flute technique. In this paper, the effect of overblowing a fingering is explored with spectral analysis, and a fingering detector is designed based on acoustical knowledge and pattern classification techniques. The detector performs signal analysis of the strong broadband signal, that is, spectrally shaped by the pipe impedance, and measures the spectral energy during the attack around multiples of the fundamental frequency sub-multiples over the first octave and a half. It is trained and evaluated on sounds recorded with four expert performers. They played six series of tones from overblown and regular fingerings, with frequencies that are octave- and non-octave-related to the playing frequency. The best of the four proposed sound descriptors allows for a detection error below 1.3% for notes with two and three fingerings (C(5), D(5), C(6), and Cmusical sharp(6)) and below 14% for four (E(6)) or five fingerings (G(6)). The error is shown to dramatically increase when two fingerings' impedance become too similar (E(6) and A(4) and G(6) and C(5)).

  14. Viscous Fingering Induced Flow Instability in Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Kirsty; Shalliker, R. Andrew; Catchpoole, Heather J.; Sweeney, Alan P.; Wong, Victor; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    Viscous fingering is a flow instability phenomenon that results in the destabilisation of the interface between two fluids of differing viscosities. The destabilised interface results in a complex mixing of the two fluids in a pattern that resembles fingers. The conditions that enhance this type of flow instability can be found in coupled chromatographic separation systems, even when the solvents used in each of the separation stages have seemingly similar chemical and physical properties (other than viscosity). For example, the viscosities of acetonitrile and methanol are sufficiently different that instability at the interface between these two solvents can be established and viscous fingering results. In coupled chromatographic systems, the volume of solvent transported from one separation dimension to the second often exceeds the injection volume by two or more orders of magnitude. As a consequence, viscous fingering may occur, when otherwise following the injection of normal analytical size injection plugs viscous fingering would not occur. The findings in this study illustrate the onset of viscous fingering in emulated coupled chromatographic systems and show the importance of correct solvent selection for optimum separation performance.

  15. Disruption of the finger flexor pulley system in elite rock climbers.

    PubMed

    Gabl, M; Rangger, C; Lutz, M; Fink, C; Rudisch, A; Pechlaner, S

    1998-01-01

    We treated 13 elite rock climbers for isolated disruptions of the pulleys of the long fingers. Diagnosis and treatment were based on the clinical finding of bow-stringing, which was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients had bowstringing indicating incomplete disruption of the major pulley A2 and were treated nonoperatively (group A). Five patients showed bowstringing indicating complete disruption of the pulley A2. After failed nonoperative treatment, the pulleys were reconstructed (group B). The mechanism of injury and clinical and subjective results were evaluated. At a 31-month follow-up (range, 18 to 43 months), loss of extension in the proximal interphalangeal joint measured 5.6 degrees (range, 0 degree to 10 degrees) in group A and 4 degrees (range, 0 degree to 10 degrees) in group B. Circumference of the finger section was increased 4.2 mm in group A (range, 0 to 10 mm) and 4.8 mm in group B (range, 0 to 10 mm). Grip strength decreased 20 N in group A (range, 10 to 50 N) and 12 N in group B (range, 10 to 30 N). Four patients in group A and one in group B had bowstringing at clinical evaluation. On follow-up magnetic resonance images, bowstringing remained unchanged in group A but was reduced in all patients in group B. Good subjective results were seen in both groups.

  16. Electromyography of wrist and finger flexor muscles in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Patel, Biren A; Larson, Susan G; Stern, Jack T

    2012-01-01

    Some non-human primates use digitigrade hand postures when walking slowly on the ground. As a component of an extended limb, a digitigrade posture can help minimize wrist joint moments thereby requiring little force production directly from wrist flexors (and/or from the assistance of finger flexors) to maintain limb posture. As a consequence, less active muscle volume would be required from these anti-gravity muscles and overall metabolic costs associated with locomotion could be reduced. To investigate whether the use of digitigrade hand postures during walking in primates entails minimal use of anti-gravity muscles, this study examined electromyography (EMG) patterns in both the wrist and finger flexor muscles in facultatively digitigrade olive baboons (Papio anubis) across a range of speeds. The results demonstrate that baboons can adopt a digitigrade hand posture when standing and moving at slow speeds without requiring substantial EMG activity from distal anti-gravity muscles. Higher speed locomotion, however, entails increasing EMG activity and is accompanied by a dynamic shift to a more palmigrade-like limb posture. Thus, the ability to adopt a digitigrade hand posture by monkeys is an adaptation for ground living, but it was never co-opted for fast locomotion. Rather, digitigrady in primates appears to be related to energetic efficiency for walking long distances.

  17. Interdependency of the maximum range of flexion-extension of hand metacarpophalangeal joints.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ibáñez, V; Vergara, M; Sancho-Bru, J-L

    2016-12-01

    Mobility of the fingers metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints depends on the posture of the adjacent ones. Current Biomechanical hand models consider fixed ranges of movement at joints, regardless of the posture, thus allowing for non-realistic postures, generating wrong results in reach studies and forward dynamic analyses. This study provides data for more realistic hand models. The maximum voluntary extension (MVE) and flexion (MVF) of different combinations of MCP joints were measured covering their range of motion. Dependency of the MVF and MVE on the posture of the adjacent MCP joints was confirmed and mathematical models obtained through regression analyses (RMSE 7.7°).

  18. Child labour. Refuting the "nimble fingers" argument.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    According to an International Labor Organization (ILO) study, approximately 130,000 children work in India's hand-knotted carpet industry. In one-loom enterprises, children comprise 14% of all weavers; in businesses with five or more looms, this rate increases to 33%. India's Factories Act, which applies costly health, safety, and labor regulations to larger firms, has led to a proliferation of cottage industries. The finding that children are more likely to work on low-quality rather than highest-quality carpets refutes the "nimble fingers" argument used by apologists of child labor. Although child and adult weavers have similar productivity, children earn less while apprentices than trained weavers and serve to depress wages throughout the industry. According to ILO estimates, replacing the 22% of the work force currently occupied by children with adults would cause wages to rise by about 5%. The overall savings in production costs from the use of child labor are very small when compared to the foreign retail price of the carpets, which is often four times the Indian export price. The ILO has urged an international approach to the elimination of child labor, in which all carpet-producing countries simultaneously implement a no-child-labor strategy to avoid placing any one country at a competitive disadvantage. Given the thousands of cottages where one or two carpets are woven per year, strategies such as labelling and regulation are likely to be ineffective. Solutions that address the general problems of poverty, while developing alternative sources of education and employment, are most likely to be effective in reducing child labor in countries such as India.

  19. Finger blood pressure during leg resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Gomides, R S; Dias, R M R; Souza, D R; Costa, L A R; Ortega, K C; Mion, D; Tinucci, T; de Moraes Forjaz, C L

    2010-08-01

    Blood pressure (BP) assessment during resistance exercise can be useful to avoid high BP, reducing cardiovascular risk, especially in hypertensive individuals. However, non-invasive accurate technique for this purpose is not available. The aim of this study was to compare finger photoplethysmographic (FPP) and intra-arterial BP values and responses during resistance exercise. Eight non-medicated hypertensive subjects (5 males, 30-60 years) were evaluated during pre-exercise resting period and during three sets of the knee extension exercise performed at 80% of 1RM until fatigue. BP was measured simultaneously by FPP and intra-arterial methods. Data are mean+/-SD. Systolic BP was significantly higher with FPP than with intra-arterial: at pre-exercise (157+/-13 vs. 152+/-10 mmHg; p<0.01) and the mean (202+/-29 vs. 198+/-26 mmHg; p<0.01), and the maximal (240+/-26 vs. 234+/-16 mmHg; p<0.05) values achieved during exercise. The increase in systolic BP during resistance exercise was similar between FPP and intra-arterial (+73+/-29 vs. +71+/-18 mmHg; p=0.59). Diastolic BP values and increases were lower with FPP. In conclusion, FPP provides similar values of BP increment during resistance exercise than intra-arterial method. However, it overestimates by 2.6+/-6.1% the maximal systolic BP achieved during this mode of exercise and underestimates by 8.8+/-5.8% the maximal diastolic BP.

  20. Experiments and kinematics analysis of a hand rehabilitation exoskeleton with circuitous joints.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuhai; Fu, Yili; Zhang, Qinchao; Wang, Shuguo

    2015-01-01

    Aiming at the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients, a wearable hand exoskeleton with circuitous joint is proposed. The circuitous joint adopts the symmetric pinion and rack mechanism (SPRM) with the parallel mechanism. The exoskeleton finger is a serial mechanism composed of three closed-chain SPRM joints in series. The kinematic equations of the open chain of the finger and the closed chains of the SPRM joints were built to analyze the kinematics of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton. The experimental setup of the hand rehabilitation exoskeleton was built and the continuous passive motion (CPM) rehabilitation experiment and the test of human-robot interaction force measurement were conducted. Experiment results show that the mechanical design of the hand rehabilitation robot is reasonable and that the kinematic analysis is correct, thus the exoskeleton can be used for the hand rehabilitation of stroke patients.