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Sample records for finger reactive compounds

  1. Arenavirus Z protein as an antiviral target: virus inactivation and protein oligomerization by zinc finger-reactive compounds

    PubMed Central

    García, Cybele C.; Djavani, Mahmoud; Topisirovic, Ivan; Borden, Katherine L. B.; Salvato, María S.; Damonte, Elsa B.

    2008-01-01

    Several disulfide-based and azoic compounds have shown antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses in virus yield-inhibition and inactivation assays, respectively. The most effective virucidal agent, the aromatic disulfide NSC20625, was able to inactivate two strains of the prototype arenavirus species Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Inactivated viral particles retained the biological functions of the virion envelope glycoproteins in virus binding and uptake, but were unable to perform viral RNA replication. Furthermore, in inactivated virions, the electrophoretic profile of the Z protein was altered when analysed under non-reducing conditions, whereas the patterns of the proteins NP and GP1 remained unaffected. Treatment of a recombinant LCMV Z protein with the virucidal agents induced unfolding and oligomerization of Z to high-molecular-mass aggregates, probably due to metal-ion ejection and the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds through the cysteine residues of the Z RING finger. NSC20625 also exhibited antiviral properties in LCMV-infected cells without affecting other cellular RING-motif proteins, such as the promyelocytic leukaemia protein PML. Altogether, the investigations described here illustrate the potential of the Z protein as a promising target for therapy and the prospects of the Z-reactive compounds to prevent arenavirus dissemination. PMID:16603524

  2. Arenavirus Z protein as an antiviral target: virus inactivation and protein oligomerization by zinc finger-reactive compounds.

    PubMed

    García, Cybele C; Djavani, Mahmoud; Topisirovic, Ivan; Borden, Katherine L B; Salvato, María S; Damonte, Elsa B

    2006-05-01

    Several disulfide-based and azoic compounds have shown antiviral and virucidal properties against arenaviruses in virus yield-inhibition and inactivation assays, respectively. The most effective virucidal agent, the aromatic disulfide NSC20625, was able to inactivate two strains of the prototype arenavirus species Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Inactivated viral particles retained the biological functions of the virion envelope glycoproteins in virus binding and uptake, but were unable to perform viral RNA replication. Furthermore, in inactivated virions, the electrophoretic profile of the Z protein was altered when analysed under non-reducing conditions, whereas the patterns of the proteins NP and GP1 remained unaffected. Treatment of a recombinant LCMV Z protein with the virucidal agents induced unfolding and oligomerization of Z to high-molecular-mass aggregates, probably due to metal-ion ejection and the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds through the cysteine residues of the Z RING finger. NSC20625 also exhibited antiviral properties in LCMV-infected cells without affecting other cellular RING-motif proteins, such as the promyelocytic leukaemia protein PML. Altogether, the investigations described here illustrate the potential of the Z protein as a promising target for therapy and the prospects of the Z-reactive compounds to prevent arenavirus dissemination.

  3. Selective Sensitization of Zinc Finger Protein Oxidation by Reactive Oxygen Species through Arsenic Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xixi; Cooper, Karen L.; Sun, Xi; Liu, Ke J.; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) on redox-sensitive targets such as zinc finger proteins plays a critical role in redox signaling and subsequent biological outcomes. We found that arsenic exposure led to oxidation of certain zinc finger proteins based on arsenic interaction with zinc finger motifs. Analysis of zinc finger proteins isolated from arsenic-exposed cells and zinc finger peptides by mass spectrometry demonstrated preferential oxidation of C3H1 and C4 zinc finger configurations. C2H2 zinc finger proteins that do not bind arsenic were not oxidized by arsenic-generated ROS in the cellular environment. The findings suggest that selectivity in arsenic binding to zinc fingers with three or more cysteines defines the target proteins for oxidation by ROS. This represents a novel mechanism of selective protein oxidation and demonstrates how an environmental factor may sensitize certain target proteins for oxidation, thus altering the oxidation profile and redox regulation. PMID:26063799

  4. From needles to parabolas: the shapes of nonlinear fingers in reactive-infiltration instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Ladd, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    The reactive-infiltration instability, which develops when a porous matrix is dissolved by a flowing fluid is an important mechanism for pattern development in geology, with a range of morphologies and scales from cave systems running for hundreds of miles to laboratory acidization on the scale of centimeters. Theoretical investigations of this phenomenon have typically focused on initial instability of a planar, steadily propagating dissolution front that separates regions of high and low porosity. Much less is known, however, about the nonlinear regime, when the initial perturbations of the interface are transformed into finger-like structures that advance into the system. By conducting a series of numerical simulations of porous media dissolution for different flow rates and reaction rates we have analyzed the shapes and propagation velocities of these fingers. Interestingly, we find a transition in the finger shapes as the Peclet number is changed. At high Pe, the forms similar to Saffman-Taylor fingers are formed, occupying a fraction of the porous channel. Conversely, for small Pe, the fingers of parabolic shapes are formed, spanning the entire cell and advancing with a constant velocity into the system. We study numerically the details of this transitions and relate the results to the natural systems.

  5. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  6. Oxime-induced reactivation of carboxylesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.M.; Lieske, C.N.; Brecht, K.M.

    1994-06-01

    A structure-activity analysis of the ability of oximes to reactivate rat plasma carboxylesterase (CaE) that was inhibited by organophosphorus (OP) compounds revealed that uncharged oximes, such as 2,3-butanedione monoxime (diacetylmonoxime) or monoisonitrosoacetone, were better reactivators than cationic oximes. Cationic oximes that are excellent reactivators of OP-inhibited acetylcholinesterase, such as pyridine-2-aldoxime or the bis-pyridine aldoximes, HI-6 and TMB. 4, produced poor reactivation of OP-inhibited CaE. The best uncharged reactivator was 2,3. butanedione monoxime, which produced complete reactivation at 0.3 mM in 2 h of CaE that was inhibited by phosphinates, alkoxy-containing phosphates, and alkoxy-containing phosphonates. Complete reactivation of CaE could be achieved even after inhibition by phosphonates with highly branched alkoxy groups, such as sarin and soman, that undergo rapid aging with acetylcholinesterase. CaE that was inhibited by phosphonates or phosphates that contained aryloxy groups were reactivated to a lesser extent. The cause of this decreased reactivation appears to be an oxime-induced aging reaction that competes with the reactivation reaction. This oxime-induced aging reaction is accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents on the aryloxy groups of phosphonates and by the presence of multiple aryloxy groups on phosphates. Thus, reactivation and aging of OP-inhibited CaE differ from the same processes for OP- inhibited acetylcholinesterase in both their oxime specificity and inhibitor specificity and, presumably, in their underlying mechanisms.

  7. Effect of chemical degradation on fluxes of reactive compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, J.; Markkanen, T.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Petäjä, T.; Keronen, P.; Tang, M. J.; Crowley, J. N.; Rannik, Ü.; Vesala, T.

    2011-12-01

    In the analyses of VOC fluxes measured above plant canopies, one usually assumes the flux above canopy to equal the emission at the surface. Thus one assumes the chemical degradation to be much slower than the turbulent transport. We used a stochastic Lagrangian transport model in which the chemical degradation was described as first order decay in order to study the effect of the chemical degradation on above canopy fluxes of chemically reactive species. With the model we explored the sensitivity of the ratio of the above canopy flux to the surface emission on several parameters such as chemical lifetime of the compound, friction velocity, stability, and canopy density. Our results show that friction velocity and chemical lifetime affected the loss during transport the most. The canopy density had a significant effect if the chemically reactive compound was emitted from the forest floor. We used the results of the simulations together with oxidant data measured during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 campaign at a Scots pine site to estimate the effect of the chemistry on fluxes of three typical biogenic VOCs, isoprene, α-pinene, and β-caryophyllene. Of these, the chemical degradation had a~major effect on the fluxes of the most reactive species β-caryophyllene, while the fluxes of α-pinene were affected during nighttime. For these two compounds representing the mono- and sesquiterpenes groups, the effect of chemical degradation had also a significant diurnal cycle with the highest chemical loss at night. The different day and night time loss terms need to be accounted for, when measured fluxes of reactive compounds are used to reveal relations between primary emission and environmental parameters.

  8. Exposure profiling of reactive compounds in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shilpi; Evans-Johnson, Julie A; Georgieva, Nadia I; Boysen, Gunnar

    2013-11-16

    Humans are constantly exposed to mixtures, such as tobacco smoke, exhaust from diesel, gasoline or new bio-fuels, containing several 1000 compounds, including many known human carcinogens. Covalent binding of reactive compounds or their metabolites to DNA and formation of stable adducts is believed to be the causal link between exposure and carcinogenesis. DNA and protein adducts are well established biomarkers for the internal dose of reactive compounds or their metabolites and are an integral part of science-based risk assessment. However, technical limitations have prevented comprehensive detection of a broad spectrum of adducts simultaneously. Therefore, most studies have focused on measurement of abundant individual adducts. These studies have produced valuable insight into the metabolism of individual carcinogens, but they are insufficient for risk assessment of exposure to complex mixtures. To overcome this limitation, we present herein proof-of-principle for comprehensive exposure assessment, using N-terminal valine adduct profiles as a biomarker. The reported method is based on our previously established immunoaffinity liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method with modification to enrich all N-terminal valine alkylated peptides. The method was evaluated using alkylated peptide standards and globin reacted in vitro with alkylating agents (1,2-epoxy-3-butene, 1,2:3,4-diepoxybutane, propylene oxide, styrene oxide, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and methyl methanesulfonate), known to form N-terminal valine adducts. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, the method was successfully applied to globin from mice treated with four model compounds. The results suggest that this novel approach might be suitable for in vivo biomonitoring. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the European atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C. A.; Reis, S.; Bleeker, A.; Harrison, R. M.; Cape, J. N.; Fowler, D.; Skiba, U.; Simpson, D.; Jickells, T.; Kulmala, M.; Gyldenkærne, S.; Sørensen, L. L.; Erisman, J. W.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in the governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. Nr compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3) and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+)), oxidized nitrogen (NOy: nitrogen monoxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and their reaction products) as well as organic nitrogen compounds (organic N). Pollution abatement strategies need to take into account the differences in the governing processes of these compounds when assessing their impact on ecosystem services, biodiversity, human health and climate. NOx (NO + NO2) emitted from traffic affects human health in urban areas where the presence of buildings increases the residence time in streets. In urban areas this leads to enhanced exposure of the population to NOx concentrations. NOx emissions generally have little impact on nearby ecosystems because of the small dry deposition rates of NOx. These compounds need to be converted into nitric acid (HNO3) before removal through deposition is efficient. HNO3 sticks quickly to any surface and is thereby either dry deposited or incorporated into aerosols as nitrate (NO3-). In contrast to NOx compounds, NH3 has potentially high impacts on ecosystems near the main agricultural sources of NH3 because of its large ground-level concentrations along with large dry deposition rates. Aerosol phase NH4+ and NO3- contribute significantly to background PM2.5 and PM10 (mass of aerosols with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) with an impact on radiation balance as well as potentially on human health. Little is known quantitatively and qualitatively about organic N in the atmosphere, other than that it contributes a significant fraction of wet-deposited N, and is present in both gaseous and particulate forms. Further studies are needed to characterise the sources, air chemistry and

  10. The reactivity of myeloperoxidase compound I formed with hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Furtmüller, P G; Burner, U; Jantschko, W; Regelsberger, G; Obinger, C

    2000-01-01

    The reaction of human myeloperoxidase (MPO) with hypochlorous acid (HOCl) was investigated by conventional stopped-flow spectroscopy at pH 5, 7, and 9. In the reaction of MPO with HOCl, compound I is formed. Its formation is strongly dependent on pH. HOCl (rather than OCl-) reacts with the unprotonated enzyme in its ferric state. Apparent second-order rate constants were determined to be 8.1 x 10(7) M(-1)s(-1) (pH 5), 2.0 x 10(8) M(-1)s(-1) (pH 7) and 2.0 x 10(6) M(-1)s(-1) (pH 9) at 15 degrees C. Furthermore, the kinetics and spectra of the reactions of halides and thiocyanate and of physiologically relevant one-electron donors (ascorbate, nitrite, tyrosine and hydrogen peroxide) with this compound I were investigated using the sequential-mixing technique. The results show conclusively that the redox intermediates formed upon addition of either hydrogen peroxide or hypochlorous acid to native MPO exhibit the same spectral features and reactivities and thus are identical. In stopped-flow investigations, the MPO/HOCl system has some advantage since: (i) in contrast to H2O2, HOCl cannot function as a one-electron donor of compound I; and (ii) MPO can easily be prevented from cycling by addition of methionine as HOCl scavenger. As a consequence, the observed absorbance changes are bigger and errors in data analysis are smaller.

  11. Reactive Nitrogen Compounds in the Troposphere: Observations, Transport, and Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Winston Thomas

    Oxides of nitrogen critically control the photochemical production of ozone and account for approximately 1/3 of the total acid deposition in North America. This dissertation presents the results of three studies designed to enhance our knowledge of the distribution, transport, and photochemistry of reactive (or odd) nitrogen compounds in the troposphere. Concentrations of odd nitrogen were measured in both urban and rural air advected from the polluted east coast of North America to the western Atlantic ocean as part of the 1986 Western ATlantic Ocean eXperiment. On January 9, 1986, median (NOy) rose from 0.28 ppbv in the free troposphere (FT) to 1.38 ppbv in the marine boundary layer (MBL), and ratios of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) to NOy were similar to those observed at a non-urban site in Colorado during autumn. The maximum gross flux of nitrogen through the FT and MBL between 31.5-44.1^ circN was estimated to be 25.6 kg N s ^{-1}. Reactive nitrogen compounds, carbon monoxide, and ozone were measured over the central United States in 1985 and 1986 from a twin-jet aircraft. Vertical profiles of reactive nitrogen compounds show dramatic perturbations due to the effects of violent convective activity. Measurements made in stable air dominated by high pressure contrast with those made near organized, isolated convective cells, which efficiently transport odd nitrogen to the upper troposphere. The layered lifting associated with episodes of cold frontal passage efficiently mixes both the upper and middle troposphere, however. Rapid injection of boundary layer air into the upper troposphere, where colder temperatures and higher wind velocities combine to extend both the lifetimes and range of influence of a variety of primary and secondary pollutants, will increase the rate of photochemical ozone production aloft and may thus exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Finally, the photolysis rate coefficients (j) of several alkyl nitrates (RONO_2) to NO_2 and the alkoxy

  12. A Common Mechanism for Resistance to Oxime Reactivation of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibited by Organophosphorus Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    reactivators, we conducted a QSAR analysis for oxime reactivation of AChE inhibited by OP agents and their analogues. Our objective was to identify...reactivation as tabun-inhibited AChE. QSAR analysis of oxime reactivation of AChE inhibited by these OP compounds and others suggested that the presence of...organophosphorus; QSAR , quan- titative structure–activity relationship; VR, O-isobutyl methylphosphonofluoridate. ⇑ Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 410

  13. Fractographic finger printing of proton-irradiation-induced disordering and amorphization of intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.; Yuan, M.; Wagner, C. N. J.; Ardell, A. J.

    1989-05-01

    The intermetallic compounds NiTi, NiTi/sub 2/, CuZr, CuTi/sub 2/, and Zr/sub 3/Al were irradiated by 2 MeV protons at various temperatures between --175 /degree/C and --44 /degree/C to a fluence of 1.9/times/10/sup 22/ H/sup +//m/sup 2/. Transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction were used to evaluate the extents of disordering and amorphization induced by irradiation in the samples. Both phenomena progressed to varying extents in the five compounds, depending on the irradiation temperature and dose. It was observed that the C-A transition began before the degree of long-range order was reduced significantly, and that the amorphous phase nucleated homogeneously throughout the crystalline matrix. A major finding of the current investigation is that the technique of scanning electron fractography provides a useful correlation between the features of the fractured surfaces and the microstructural alterations induced by the proton irradiations. When amorphization is complete the fracture surfaces are either featureless (e.g., NiTi/sub 2/) or contain branching features resembling river patterns. In some cases (especially in CuZr) these are similar to the markings seen on the surface of fractured amorphous ribbons produced by melt-spinning. In general, however, there is not a particularly good correlation between the features on the fracture surfaces of the irradiated and melt-spun ribbons. When the microstructure consists of amorphous regions embedded in a partially disordered crystalline matrix, there is consierable evidence for irradiation-induced ductility. In such cases, exemplified by the results on NiTi and Zr/sub 3/Al, the fracture surfaces contain dimples, characteristic of ductile fracture, suggesting that disordering promotes ductility.

  14. Using the reactive dye method to covalently attach antibacterial compounds to cotton.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The antibacterial compounds used were sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. A version of the reactive dye method was used to react these two compounds chemically with the cotton fiber molecule. The two compounds were activated and then covalently bonded to cotton fabric, either separately or together...

  15. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  16. Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hanna, Mark Cooper [Boulder, CO; Reedy, Robert [Golden, CO

    2008-02-12

    A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

  17. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  18. ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

  19. ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

  20. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  1. Formation of dielectric silicon compounds by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselov, D. S.; Voronov, Yu A.

    2016-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of reactive magnetron sputtering of the silicon target in the ambient of inert argon gas with reactive gas, nitrogen or oxygen. The magnetron was powered by two mid-frequency generators of a rectangular pulse of opposite polarity. The negative polarity pulse provides the sputtering of the target. The positive polarity pulse provides removal of accumulated charge from the surface of the target. This method does not require any special devices of resistances matching and provides continuous sputtering of the target.

  2. Lanthanide alkyl and silyl compounds: Synthesis, reactivity and catalysts for green

    SciTech Connect

    Pindwal, Aradhana

    2016-01-01

    The last few decades have witnessed enormous research in the field of organometallic lanthanide chemistry. Our research group has developed a few rare earth alkyl compounds containing tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand and explored their reactivity. This thesis focusses on extending the study of lanthanide alkyl and silyl compounds to develop strategies for their synthesis and explore their reactivity and role as catalysts in processes such as hydrosilylation and cross-dehydrocoupling.

  3. Thorough study of reactivity of various compound classes toward the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent.

    PubMed

    Everette, Jace D; Bryant, Quinton M; Green, Ashlee M; Abbey, Yvonne A; Wangila, Grant W; Walker, Richard B

    2010-07-28

    A thorough study was done to test the reactivity of the Folin-Ciocalteu (F-C) reagent toward various compound classes. Over 80 compounds were tested. Compound classes included phenols, thiols, vitamins, amino acids, proteins, nucleotide bases, unsaturated fatty acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, inorganic ions, metal complexes, aldehydes, and ketones. All phenols, proteins, and thiols tested were reactive toward the reagent. Many vitamin derivatives were also reactive, as were the inorganic ions Fe(+2), Mn(2+), I(-), and SO(3)(2-). Other compounds showing reactivity included the nucleotide base guanine and the trioses glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone. Copper complexation enhanced the reactivity of salicylate derivatives toward the reagent, whereas zinc complexation did not. Several amino acids and sugars that were reported to be reactive toward the F-C reagent in earlier studies were found not to be reactive in this study, at least in the concentrations used. Reaction kinetics of each compound with the F-C reagent were also measured. Most compounds tested showed a biphasic kinetic pattern with half-lives under 1 min. Trolox and ascorbic acid displayed a rapid monophasic pattern in which the reaction reached end point within 1 min. In summary, this study has shown that the F-C reagent is significantly reactive toward other compounds besides phenols. As other investigators have suggested, the F-C assay should be seen as a measure of total antioxidant capacity rather than phenolic content. Because phenolics are the most abundant antioxidants in most plants, it gives a rough approximation of total phenolic content in most cases.

  4. A THOROUGH STUDY OF REACTIVITY OF VARIOUS COMPOUND CLASSES TOWARDS THE FOLIN-CIOCALTEU REAGENT

    PubMed Central

    Everette, Jace D.; Bryant, Quinton M.; Green, Ashlee M.; Abbey, Yvonne A.; Wangila, Grant W.

    2010-01-01

    A thorough study was done to test the reactivity of the Folin-Ciocalteu (F-C) reagent towards various compound classes. Over 80 compounds were tested. Compound classes included phenols, thiols, vitamins, amino acids, proteins, nucleotide bases, unsaturated fatty acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, inorganic ions, metal complexes, aldehydes and ketones. All phenols, proteins and thiols tested were reactive towards the reagent. Many vitamin derivatives were also reactive, as were the inorganic ions Fe+2, Mn+2, I− and SO3−2. Other compounds showing reactivity included the nucleotide base guanine and the trioses glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone. Copper complexation enhanced the reactivity of salicylate derivatives towards the reagent while zinc complexation did not. Several amino acids and sugars which were reported to be reactive towards the F-C reagent in earlier studies were found not to be reactive in our study, at least in the concentrations used. Reaction kinetics of each compound with the F-C reagent were also measured. Most compounds tested showed a biphasic kinetic pattern with half lives under one minute. Trolox and ascorbic acid displayed a rapid monophasic pattern in which the reaction reached endpoint within one minute. In summary, our study has shown that the F-C reagent is significantly reactive towards other compounds besides phenols. As other investigators have suggested, the F-C assay should be seen as a measure of total antioxidant capacity rather than phenolic content. Since phenolics are the most abundant antioxidants in most plants, it gives a rough approximation of total phenolic content in most cases. PMID:20583841

  5. Reactivity of Various Compound Classes Towards the Folin-Ciocalteu Reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Richard B.; Everette, Jace D.; Bryant, Quinton M.; Green, Ashlee M.; Abbey, Yvonne A.; Wangila, Grant W.

    2010-04-01

    The Folin-Ciocalteu assay has been used for over 80 years for the detection and quantitation of phenols. A modification of it, called the Lowry assay, is used for the quantitation of proteins. It has been commonly reported that the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, which is a complex mixture containing sodium molybdate and sodium tungstate, is reactive towards other antioxidants besides phenols. However, until now, no one has done experiments to test this hypothesis. In our study, we tested the reactivity of the reagent towards over 70 compounds. Compound classes included phenols, thiols, vitamins, amino acids, proteins, nucleotide bases, unsaturated fatty acids, carbohydrates, organic acids, inorganic ions, aldehydes and ketones. All phenols, proteins and thiols tested were reactive towards the reagent. Other compounds which showed reactivity included guanine, glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, tyrosine, tryptophan, cysteine, ascorbic acid, Trolox, retinoic acid, pyridoxine, Fe+2, Mn+2, I- and SO3-2. In summary, our study showed that the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent is significantly reactive towards other compounds besides phenols. Therefore, it should be seen as a measure of total antioxidant capacity rather than phenolic content. It would be useful as a general antioxidant assay for measuring antioxidant capacities of compounds of biomedical interest.

  6. Reactive uptake of organic compounds by liquid sulfuric acid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Michelsen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The uptake of several organic compounds by laboratory surrogates for tropospheric sulfuric acid particles were investigated by mass spectrometry and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. Among the compounds studied were acetone [(CH_3)_2CO], 2,4-hexanedione [CH_3CO(CH_2)_2COCH_3, MBO], and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol [CH_2CHC(CH_3)_2OH]. Experiments were carried out on ultrathin sulfuric acid films (ca. 10-100 monolayer equivalents thick) as functions of organic partial pressure, temperature, and acid composition. Acetone uptake is irreversible for acids that contain >70 weight percent (wt. %) H_2SO4, with kinetics that are second-order in concentration of dissolved acetone. Hexanedione and MBO are irreversibly taken for all acid compositions investigated (60-96 wt. %), with first-order uptake kinetics. In all cases, the irreversible uptake is a consequence of sulfuric acid catalyzed reactions that lead to the formation of new C-C bonds. Implications of these results for heterogeneous tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  7. Investigation of Organic Compound Reactivity in Liquid and Frozen Aqueous Systems Using Relative Rate Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurek, L.; Grannas, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that snow and ice are highly reactive media where photochemical reactions occur. These reactions can have important consequences for the environment, including the production of organic compounds, halogens and nitrogen oxides that impact surface boundary layer chemistry. Laboratory-based studies have shown that the nature of the sample and the physical location of solutes play a large role in determining the reactivity of a particular compound. During the freezing of aqueous solutions, most solute molecules become excluded from the ice crystal lattice, increasing their apparent concentrations as they accumulate in liquid-like layers, micropockets, and microveins within the ice (freeze-concentration effect). In an effort to better understand how the physicochemical properties of solutes may impact reactivity in frozen solutions, we have examined the relative reaction rates of various organic compounds with hydroxyl radical in both liquid and frozen conditions. Solutions containing two target organic compounds and hydrogen peroxide were made in liquid and frozen phases, and then irradiated using a Q-Panel 340 lamp to simulate natural sunlight. Relative rates of reaction were then obtained for the two compounds in both liquid and ice conditions. In most cases the reactions proceeded more quickly in liquid samples, and the relative rates of reaction were different in liquid and frozen conditions. We will discuss the potential role of a compound's physicochemical properties and the influence of the physical nature of the sample with respect to observed reactivity differences.

  8. Organic compounds in office environments - sensory irritation, odor, measurements and the role of reactive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, P; Wilkins, C K; Clausen, P A; Nielsen, G D

    2006-02-01

    Abstract Sensory irritation and odor effects of organic compounds in indoor environments are reviewed. It is proposed to subdivide volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into four categories: (i) chemically non-reactive, (ii) chemically 'reactive', (iii) biologically reactive (i.e. form chemical bonds to receptor sites in mucous membranes) and (iv) toxic compounds. Chemically non-reactive VOCs are considered non-irritants at typical indoor air levels. However, compounds with low odor thresholds contribute to the overall perception of the indoor air quality. Reported sensory irritation may be the result of odor annoyance. It appears that odor thresholds for many VOCs probably are considerably lower than previously reported. This explains why many building materials persistently are perceived as odorous, although the concentrations of the detected organic compounds are close to or below their reported odor thresholds. Ozone reacts with certain alkenes to form a gas and aerosol phase of oxidation products, some of which are sensory irritants. However, all of the sensory irritating species have not yet been identified and whether the secondary aerosols (ultrafine and fine particles) contribute to sensory irritation requires investigation. Low relative humidity may exacerbate the sensory irritation impact. Practical Implications Certain odors, in addition to odor annoyance, may result in psychological effects and distraction from work. Some building materials continually cause perceivable odors, because the odor thresholds of the emitted compounds are low. Some oxidation products of alkenes (e.g. terpenes) may contribute to eye and airway symptoms under certain conditions and low relative humidity.

  9. Incremental Reactivity Effects of Anthropogenic and Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacarab, M.; Li, L.; Carter, W. P. L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-12-01

    Two surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixtures were developed to create a controlled reactivity environment simulating different urban atmospheres with varying levels of anthropogenic (e.g. Los Angeles reactivity) and biogenic (e.g. Atlanta reactivity) influences. Traditional chamber experiments focus on the oxidation of one or two volatile organic compound (VOC) precursors, allowing the reactivity of the system to be dictated by those compounds. Surrogate ROG mixtures control the overall reactivity of the system, allowing for the incremental aerosol formation from an added VOC to be observed. The surrogate ROG mixtures were developed based on that used to determine maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for O3 formation from VOC precursors in a Los Angeles smog environment. Environmental chamber experiments were designed to highlight the incremental aerosol formation in the simulated environment due to the addition of an added anthropogenic (aromatic) or biogenic (terpene) VOC. All experiments were conducted in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT dual 90m3 environmental chambers. It was found that the aerosol precursors behaved differently under the two altered reactivity conditions, with more incremental aerosol being formed in the anthropogenic ROG system than in the biogenic ROG system. Further, the biogenic reactivity condition inhibited the oxidation of added anthropogenic aerosol precursors, such as m-xylene. Data will be presented on aerosol properties (density, volatility, hygroscopicity) and bulk chemical composition in the gas and particle phases (from a SYFT Technologies selected ion flow tube mass spectrometer, SIFT-MS, and Aerodyne high resolution time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS, respectively) comparing the two controlled reactivity systems and single precursor VOC/NOx studies. Incremental aerosol yield data at different controlled reactivities provide a novel and valuable insight in the attempt to extrapolate environmental chamber

  10. Discovery of New Classes of Compounds that Reactivate Acetylcholinesterase Inhibited by Organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Francine S.; Trakht, Ilya; Landry, Donald W.; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2015-09-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that has been covalently inhibited by organophosphate compounds (OPCs), such as nerve agents and pesticides, has traditionally been reactivated by using nucleophilic oximes. There is, however, a clearly recognized need for new classes of compounds with the ability to reactivate inhibited AChE with improved in vivo efficacy. Here we describe our discovery of new functional groups—Mannich phenols and general bases—that are capable of reactivating OPC-inhibited AChE more efficiently than standard oximes and we describe the cooperative mechanism by which these functionalities are delivered to the active site. These discoveries, supported by preliminary in vivo results and crystallographic data, significantly broaden the available approaches for reactivation of AChE.

  11. Nanoengineered Carbon-Based Materials For Reactive Adsorption of Toxic Industrial Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-13

    application of nanoporous carbon as toxic gas sensors was proposed and explored. The materials show very promising properties linking the detection and...2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Nanoengineered Carbon-Based Materials For Reactive Adsorption of Toxic...Nanoengineered Carbon-Based Materials For Reactive Adsorption of Toxic Industrial Compounds Report Title Composites of Cu-BTC and hydroxides of zinc, zirconium

  12. Varicella zoster virus reactivation during or immediately following treatment of tegumentary leishmaniasis with antimony compounds.

    PubMed

    Barros, Andrea Barbieri; Rodrigues, Alex Miranda; Batista, Mariane Pereira; Munhoz Junior, Sidney; Hueb, Marcia; Fontes, Cor Jesus

    2014-07-01

    Antimony compounds are the cornerstone treatments for tegumentary leishmaniasis. The reactivation of herpes virus is a side effect described in few reports. We conducted an observational study to describe the incidence of herpes zoster reactivation during treatment with antimony compounds. The global incidence of herpes zoster is approximately 2.5 cases per 1,000 persons per month (or 30 cases per 1,000 persons per year). The estimated incidence of herpes zoster in patients undergoing antimony therapy is higher than previously reported.

  13. Varicella zoster virus reactivation during or immediately following treatment of tegumentary leishmaniasis with antimony compounds

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Andrea Barbieri; Rodrigues, Alex Miranda; Batista, Mariane Pereira; Munhoz, Sidney; Hueb, Marcia; Fontes, Cor Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Antimony compounds are the cornerstone treatments for tegumentary leishmaniasis. The reactivation of herpes virus is a side effect described in few reports. We conducted an observational study to describe the incidence of herpes zoster reactivation during treatment with antimony compounds. The global incidence of herpes zoster is approximately 2.5 cases per 1,000 persons per month (or 30 cases per 1,000 persons per year). The estimated incidence of herpes zoster in patients undergoing antimony therapy is higher than previously reported. PMID:25004145

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of sulfided hexanuclear molybdenum cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, D.

    1990-09-21

    Hexanuclear molybdenum clusters with mixed chloride and sulfide bridging ligands were prepared by reacting {alpha}-MoCl{sub 2} with sodium hydrosulfide in the presence of sodium butoxide. The resulting species, Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub (8-x)}S{sub x}{center dot}npy(x {congruent} 3.6, n {congruent} 4, py = pyridine), was pyrophoric and insoluble. The mixed sulfide chloride cluster species Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}{center dot}6OPEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub {approximately}5}Cl{sub {approximately}3}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} were isolated and characterized. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV/visible spectra were obtained for each fraction. The completely sulfided cluster, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3}, was prepared similarly and used in various experiments as a possible precursor to Chevrel phase materials of the type Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}or M{sub n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}. With the goal of removing all of the triethylphosphine ligands, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} was reacted with the transition metal carbonyls molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dicobalt octacarbonyl. Reaction on the molecular sulfide cluster with copper(I) chloride in toluene gave a completely insoluble product. The reaction of Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} with propylene sulfide gave a product whose infrared spectra showed only very weak peaks associated with coordinated triethylphosphine. The elemental analysis of this product fit the formula Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}5SPEt{sub 3}. Reactivity of the outer ligands of the Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}npy and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}(6{minus}x)PrNH{sub x} clusters were investigated. Crystalline Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6THT was recovered from the reaction of the n-propylamine derivative with THT. A crystal structure determination was done. 87 refs., 12 fig., 15 tabs.

  15. Contact probe voltammetry for in situ monitoring of the reactivity of phenolic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) compounds with ROS.

    PubMed

    Doménech-Carbó, Antonio; Gavara, Rafael; Hernández-Muñoz, Pilar; Domínguez, Irene

    2015-11-01

    The application of an in situ electrochemical contact probe methodology for monitoring reactivity of antioxidant polyphenolic compounds in tomato fruits is described. Upon electrochemical generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), characteristic voltammetric responses were recorded for compounds resulting from the reaction of such species with tomato compounds. This suggests that new electrochemically oxidizable compounds are generated from the oxidation of highly reactive polyphenolic compounds with ROS. Therefore, an evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of such species could be made from voltammetric data for different tomato varieties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. CRISPR-Cas9-based target validation for p53-reactivating model compounds

    PubMed Central

    Wanzel, Michael; Vischedyk, Jonas B; Gittler, Miriam P; Gremke, Niklas; Seiz, Julia R; Hefter, Mirjam; Noack, Magdalena; Savai, Rajkumar; Mernberger, Marco; Charles, Joël P; Schneikert, Jean; Bretz, Anne Catherine; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor by Mdm2 is one of the most frequent events in cancer, so compounds targeting the p53-Mdm2 interaction are promising for cancer therapy. Mechanisms conferring resistance to p53-reactivating compounds are largely unknown. Here we show using CRISPR-Cas9–based target validation in lung and colorectal cancer that the activity of nutlin, which blocks the p53-binding pocket of Mdm2, strictly depends on functional p53. In contrast, sensitivity to the drug RITA, which binds the Mdm2-interacting N terminus of p53, correlates with induction of DNA damage. Cells with primary or acquired RITA resistance display cross-resistance to DNA crosslinking compounds such as cisplatin and show increased DNA cross-link repair. Inhibition of FancD2 by RNA interference or pharmacological mTOR inhibitors restores RITA sensitivity. The therapeutic response to p53-reactivating compounds is therefore limited by compound-specific resistance mechanisms that can be resolved by CRISPR-Cas9-based target validation and should be considered when allocating patients to p53-reactivating treatments. PMID:26595461

  17. Structurally defined allyl compounds of main group metals: coordination and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Crispin; Okuda, Jun

    2013-05-10

    Organometallic allyl compounds are important as allylation reagents in organic synthesis, as polymerization catalysts, and as volatile metal precursors in material science. Whereas the allyl chemistry of synthetically relevant transition metals such as palladium and of the lanthanoids is well-established, that of main group metals has been lagging behind. Recent progress on allyl complexes of Groups 1, 2, and 12-16 now provides a more complete picture. This is based on a fundamental understanding of metal-allyl bonding interactions in solution and in the solid state. Furthermore, reactivity trends have been rationalized and new types of allyl-specific reactivity patterns have been uncovered. Key features include 1) the exploitation of the different types of metal-allyl bonding (highly ionic to predominantly covalent), 2) the use of synergistic effects in heterobimetallic compounds, and 3) the adjustment of Lewis acidity by variation of the charge of allyl compounds.

  18. Emission of reactive compounds and secondary products from wood-based furniture coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salthammer, T.; Schwarz, A.; Fuhrmann, F.

    Emissions of organic fragmentation products, so-called "secondary emission products" and reactive species from wood-based furniture coatings have been studied in 1 m 3 test chambers. the climatic conditions were representative of indoor environments. Relevant compounds and compound groups were the wetting agent 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-dicyne-4,7-diol (T4MDD), the plasticiser di-2-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate (DEHP), aliphatic aldehydes, monoterpenes, photoinitiator fragments, acrylic monomers/reactive solvents and diisocyanate monomers. Such substances may affect human health in several ways. Aliphatic aldehydes and some photoinitiator fragments are of strong odour, while acrylates and diisocyanates cause irritation of skin, eyes and upper airways. Terpenes and reactive solvents like styrene undergo indoor chemistry in the presence of ozone, nitrogen oxides or hydroxy radicals. Secondary emission products and reactive species can achieve significant indoor concentrations. On the other hand, it has been reported that even small quantities can cause health effects. In the cases of indoor studies with special regard to emissions from furniture, chemical analysis should always include these compounds.

  19. Chemical reactivity and biological activity of chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Maydt, Daniela; De Spirt, Silke; Muschelknautz, Christian; Stahl, Wilhelm; Müller, Thomas J J

    2013-08-01

    Abstract 1. Chalcones are structural analogues of benzalacetophenone (BAP). Several derivatives have been identified in plants and anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties were attributed to the compounds, probably related to their direct antioxidant activity or stimulatory effects on the expression of endogenous defence enzymes like hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1 expression is triggered by the Nrf2-Keap1 signalling pathway, initiated by the addition of chalcones to thiol groups of Keap1 via Michael-type reaction. 2. The present study used a model system estimating the reactivity of different synthetic chalcones and other α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with thiols and compared the chemical reactivity with the biological activity, measured by HO-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts. 3. Chemical reactivity with the thiol group of N-acetylcysteine was determined with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and followed chemical principles of structure-reactivity relationship. Most reactive were sulforaphane, dimethylfumarate, chalcone 3 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-pyrimidin-2-ylprop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7 (1,3-diphenylprop-2-yn-1-one). This result demonstrates that α,β-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives react with thiols differently. All compounds were also biologically active; however, expression of HO-1 was not only related to the chemical reactivity but also to the lipophilicity of the molecules which likely affected transmembrane uptake. Most efficient inducers of HO-1 expression were BAP, 4-hydroxynonenal and chalcone 1 (4-[(1E)-3-oxo-3-phenylprop-1-en-1-yl]benzonitrile), chalcone 5 ((2E)-1-phenyl-3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]prop-2-en-1-one) and chalcone 7.

  20. Estimating sources, sinks and fluxes of reactive atmospheric compounds within a forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghannam, K.; Duman, T.; Walker, J. T.; Bash, J. O.; Huang, C. W.; Khlystov, A.; Katul, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    While few dispute the significance of within-canopy sources or sinks of reactive gaseous and particulate compounds, their estimation continues to be the subject of active research and debate. Reactive species undergo turbulent dispersion within an inhomogeneous flow field, and may be subjected to chemical, biological and/or physical deposition, emissions or transformations on leaves, woody elements, and the forest floor. This system involves chemical reactions and biological processes with multiple time scales and represents the terrestrial ecosystem's exposure to nutrient and acid deposition and atmospheric oxidants. The quantification of these processes is a first step in better understanding the ecological impact of air pollution and feedback to atmospheric composition. Hence, it follows that direct measurements of sources or sinks is difficult to conduct in the presence of all these processes. However, mean scalar concentration profiles measured within the canopy can be used to infer the profile distribution of effective sinks and sources if the flow field is known. This is commonly referred to as the 'inverse problem'. In-canopy and above-canopy multi-level concentration measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds (ammonia, nitric acid, nitrous acid), as well as other compounds that are highly reactive to ammonia and its secondary products (hydrochloric acid and sulfur dioxide), are presented within a deciduous second-growth 180 year old oak-hickory forest situated within the Southeastern U.S. Two different approaches are used to solve for the source-sink distribution from the measured mean scalar concentration profiles: (1) an Eulerian high-order closure model that solves the scalar flux budget equation and (2) a new Lagrangian stochastic model that estimates the dispersion matrix. As each of these methods is subject to different assumptions, the combination of the two can be used to constrain the solution to the inverse problem and permit inference on the

  1. An Arabidopsis Zinc Finger Protein Increases Abiotic Stress Tolerance by Regulating Sodium and Potassium Homeostasis, Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Osmotic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Dandan; Li, Hongyan; Xu, Hongyun; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhang, Yiming; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Plant zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise a large protein family and they are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance. Although Arabidopsis RING/FYVE/PHD ZFP At5g62460 (AtRZFP) is found to bind to zinc, whether it is involved in abiotic stress tolerance is still unknown. In the present study, we characterized the roles of AtRZFP in response to abiotic stresses. The expression of AtRZFP was induced significantly by salt and osmotic stress. AtRZFP positively mediates tolerance to salt and osmotic stress. Additionally, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis plants, plants overexpressing AtRZFP showed reduced reactive oxygen species (ROSs) accumulation, enhanced superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, increased soluble sugars and proline contents, reduced K+ loss, decreased Na+ accumulation, stomatal aperture and the water loss rate. Conversely, AtRZFP knockout plants displayed the opposite physiological changes when exposed to salt or osmotic stress conditions. These data suggested that AtRZFP enhances salt and osmotic tolerance through a series of physiological processes, including enhanced ROSs scavenging, maintaining Na+ and K+ homeostasis, controlling the stomatal aperture to reduce the water loss rate, and accumulating soluble sugars and proline to adjust the osmotic potential. PMID:27605931

  2. Enhancement of chemical rules for predicting compound reactivity towards protein thiol groups.

    PubMed

    Metz, James T; Huth, Jeffrey R; Hajduk, Philip J

    2007-01-01

    Non-specific chemical modification of protein thiol groups continues to be a significant source of false positive hits from high-throughput screening campaigns and can even plague certain protein targets and chemical series well into lead optimization. While experimental tools exist to assess the risk and promiscuity associated with the chemical reactivity of existing compounds, computational tools are desired that can reliably identify substructures that are associated with chemical reactivity to aid in triage of HTS hit lists, external compound purchases, and library design. Here we describe a Bayesian classification model derived from more than 8,800 compounds that have been experimentally assessed for their potential to covalently modify protein targets. The resulting model can be implemented in the large-scale assessment of compound libraries for purchase or design. In addition, the individual substructures identified as highly reactive in the model can be used as look-up tables to guide chemists during hit-to-lead and lead optimization campaigns.

  3. Porous desulfurization sorbent pellets containing a reactive metal oxide and an inert zirconium compound

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Todd H.; Gasper-Galvin, Lee D.

    1996-12-01

    Sorbent pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from coal gas are prepared by combining a reactive oxide, in particular zinc oxide, with a zirconium compound such as an oxide, silicate, or aluminate of zirconium, and an inorganic binder and pelletizing and calcining the mixture. Alternately, the zinc oxide may be replaced by copper oxide or a combination of copper, molybdenum, and manganese oxides. The pellet components may be mixed in dry form, moistened to produce a paste, and converted to pellets by forming an aqueous slurry of the components and spray drying the slurry, or the reactive oxide may be formed on existing zirconium-containing catalyst-carrier pellets by infusing a solution of a salt of the active metal onto the existing pellets and firing at a high temperature to produce the oxide. Pellets made according to this invention show a high reactivity with hydrogen sulfide and durability such as to be useful over repeated cycles of sorption and regeneration.

  4. Trigger finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Redness in your cut or hand Swelling or warmth in your cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  5. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Biomass Combustion - Emission Ratios, OH Reactivities and SOA Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, W. C.; Gilman, J. B.; Goldan, P. D.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J.; Veres, P. R.; Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Multiple instruments including a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), a proton ion trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS), a negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (NI-PT-CIMS) and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) acquired data from 77 burns of various biomass fuels conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Sciences Laboratory (FSL) in Missoula, MT in February 2009. We compare VOC measurements of oxygenates, aromatics and biogenics from the various instruments as well as from the various fuel types collected in southeastern and southwestern regions of the United States. The relative contribution of the combustion species to the total reactivity with the OH radical is calculated and compared to ambient air reactivity in various locations. Total reactivity for measured species in these fires occasionally exceeded 1000 sec-1 with the majority of this reactivity due to alkenes. In addition, we investigate the relative contribution of the combustion species to the potential for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Measurements of several compounds not previously reported in various urban ambient air measurement campaigns such as pyrazole (C3H4N2), pyrrole (C4H5N), benzofuran (C8H6O) and 2-furanaldehyde (C5H4O2), which are highly reactive with OH, will be presented.

  6. Reactivity of target compounds for chemical coal desulfurization. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, D.H.; Amin, M.; Cunningham, R.; Galyen, J.; Ho, K.K.

    1994-09-01

    This project seeks to identify representative organosulfur compounds which are removed by known coal desulfurization reactions. Demineralized coals are solvent extracted and the extracts fractionated to concentrate organosulfur compounds for analysis by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy. After sulfur compounds are characterized, the parent extracts are subjected to reactions previously shown to reduce the organic sulfur content of Illinois coals, fractionated and again analyzed for organosulfur content to determine if the identified compounds reacted during the chemical treatment. The original coal also will be subjected to chemical desulfurization, extraction, fractionation and analysis in order to correlate changes in organic sulfur content of the coal with reactions of specific sulfur compounds. These compounds can thus be reliably considered as target molecules for the next generation of desulfurization processes. Work during this quarter has shown that fractionation and chromatography of pyridine extracts to isolate suitable samples for GC/MS analysis, although time-consuming, appears to be better than direct toluene extraction in terms of providing a representative set of compounds for analysis. The toluene soluble fractions prepared by this route contain aromatic sulfur compounds and O, N, S-containing hetrocycles. A set of these compounds has been identified and their fate following desulfurization of the parent coal extracts is under investigation. Previously studied desulfurization reactions using the single electron transfer reagent, K/THF/naphthalene, and the reactive nickel boride reagent have been repeated and analyzed by GC/MS. SET and nickel boride reactions of the THF soluble portions of pyridine coal are currently in progress.

  7. Reactivation of mutant p53 by a dietary-related compound phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, M; Saxena, R; Sinclair, E; Fu, Y; Jacobs, A; Dyba, M; Wang, X; Cruz, I; Berry, D; Kallakury, B; Mueller, S C; Agostino, S D; Blandino, G; Avantaggiati, M L; Chung, F-L

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene are prevalent in human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense, which can be classified into contact mutations (that directly disrupts the DNA-binding activity of p53) and structural mutations (that disrupts the conformation of p53). Both of the mutations can disable the normal wild-type (WT) p53 activities. Nevertheless, it has been amply documented that small molecules can rescue activity from mutant p53 by restoring WT tumor-suppressive functions. These compounds hold promise for cancer therapy and have now entered clinical trials. In this study, we show that cruciferous-vegetable-derived phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) can reactivate p53 mutant under in vitro and in vivo conditions, revealing a new mechanism of action for a dietary-related compound. PEITC exhibits growth-inhibitory activity in cells expressing p53 mutants with preferential activity toward p53R175, one of the most frequent ‘hotspot' mutations within the p53 sequence. Mechanistic studies revealed that PEITC induces apoptosis in a p53R175 mutant-dependent manner by restoring p53 WT conformation and transactivation functions. Accordingly, in PEITC-treated cells the reactivated p53R175 mutant induces apoptosis by activating canonical WT p53 targets, inducing a delay in S and G2/M phase, and by phosphorylating ATM/CHK2. Interestingly, the growth-inhibitory effects of PEITC depend on the redox state of the cell. Further, PEITC treatments render the p53R175 mutant sensitive to degradation by the proteasome and autophagy in a concentration-dependent manner. PEITC-induced reactivation of p53R175 and its subsequent sensitivity to the degradation pathways likely contribute to its anticancer activities. We further show that dietary supplementation of PEITC is able to reactivate WT activity in vivo as well, inhibiting tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. These findings provide the first example of mutant p53 reactivation by a dietary compound and

  8. Low-energy nitrogen-ion implantation: relevance to reactive compound sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, R.W.; Hosford, C.D.; Rachocki, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    Reactive sputtering is a tool widely used to produce compound coatings. The details of the target physics and compound formation are not well understood. Among several factors, the low-energy ion-implant range in a target could well affect the stoichiometry of the resultant film. Thin films of aluminum, chromium, and tantalum were bombarded with low-energy nitrogen (approx. .5 - approx. .5 keV) and the subsequent implant profiles analyzed. Low-energy-argon depth profiling combined with Auger Electron Spectroscopy was employed to obtain the profiles. The profiles are compared with the computed range distribution obtained from low-energy LSS theory. The agreement between the computed and measured distributions is very good. Comparisons between sputtered-film stoichiometry and range profiles are made.

  9. Predicting reactivity of model DOM compounds towards chlorine with mediated electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Glen Andrew; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Radjenovic, Jelena

    2017-05-01

    Chlorine demand of a water sample depends on the characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM). It is an important parameter for water utilities used to assess oxidant and/or disinfectant consumption of source waters during treatment and distribution. In this study, model compounds namely resorcinol, tannic acid, vanillin, cysteine, tyrosine, and tryptophan were used to represent the reactive moieties of complex DOM mixtures. The reactivity of these compounds was evaluated in terms of Cl2 demand and electron donating capacity (EDC). The EDC was determined by mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO) which involves the use of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) as an electron shuttle. The Cl2 demand of readily oxidizable compounds (resorcinol, tannic acid, vanillin, and cysteine) was found to correlate well with EDC (R(2) = 0.98). The EDC values (mol e(-)/mol C) of the model compounds are as follows: 1.18 (cysteine) > 0.77 (resorcinol) > 0.59 (vanillin) > 0.52 (tannic acid) > 0.36 (tryptophan) > 0.19 (tyrosine). To determine the effect of pre-oxidation on EDC, ozone was added (0.1 mol O3/mol C) into each model compound solution. Ozonation caused a general decrease in EDC (10-40%), chlorine demand (10-30%), and UV absorbance (10-40%), except for tyrosine which showed both increased UV275 and EDC. Before and after ozonation, 24 h disinfection byproduct (DBP) formation potential tests (Cl2 residual = 1.5 mg/L) were conducted to evaluate the use of EDC for DBP formation prediction. The results indicate that there was no significant correlation between the EDC of the model compounds and the formation potentials of adsorbable organic chlorine, trichloromethane, and trichloroacetic acid. This suggests that while EDC correlates with Cl2 demand, chlorine consumption may not directly translate to DBP formation because oxidation reactions may dominate over substitution reactions. Overall, this study provides useful insights on the

  10. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Finger Foods for Babies KidsHealth > For Parents > Finger Foods for ... will accept a new food. previous continue Finger Foods to Avoid Finger feeding is fun and rewarding ...

  11. Homoclinic finger-rings in RN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changrong; Zhang, Weinian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we investigate bifurcations of a degenerate homoclinic loop in RN. We prove that a homoclinic finger-ring, an invariant manifold of a definite dimension textured with homoclinic orbits, arises from the degenerate homoclinic orbit. The size of the homoclinic finger-ring is decided by not only its dimension of manifold but also its width. For the rise of homoclinic finger-rings of different dimensions we give conditions, which are proved to form bifurcation manifolds in the parameter space. We further estimate the width for the homoclinic finger-ring and give a method to compute the bifurcation manifolds approximately.

  12. Environmental chamber study of maximum incremental reactivities of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, William P. L.; Pierce, John A.; Luo, Dongmin; Malkina, Irina L.

    The effects of 26 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on ozone formation, NO oxidation, and OH radical levels were measured by adding them to reactive organic gas (ROG)-NO x-air environmental chamber irradiations representing a simplified model photochemical smog system. These experiments had relatively low ROG/NOx ratios to represent conditions where ozone formation is most sensitive to VOC additions. The compounds studied included representative alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, and CO. The addition of formaldehyde, methylbenzenes, alkenes and methanol all caused increased integrated OH radical concentrations, and caused the most NO oxidation and ozone formation per molecule reacted. The C 6+n-alkanes had the most inhibiting effects on OH radicals, and caused reduced NO oxidation and ozone formation in these experiments. The other compounds had smaller negative effects on OH radicals, but moderate positive effects on ozone formed and NO oxidized. The implications of these results in terms of the atmospheric reaction mechanisms of these compounds are discussed.

  13. Reactivity of phenolic compounds towards free radicals under in vitro conditions.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sindhu; Abraham, T Emilia; Zakaria, Zainul Akmar

    2015-09-01

    The free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of 16 phenolic compounds including four hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives namely ferulic acid, caffeic acid, sinapic acid and p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid and its derivatives namely protocatechuic acid, gallic acid and vanillic acid, benzene derivatives namely vanillin, vanillyl alcohol, veratryl alcohol, veratraldehyde, pyrogallol, guaiacol and two synthetic antioxidants, butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA) and propyl gallate were evaluated using 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(•)), 2,2'-Azinobis-3- ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical (ABTS(+•)), Hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and Superoxide radical (O2 (•-)) scavenging assays and reduction potential assay. By virtue of their hydrogen donating ability, phenolic compounds with multiple hydroxyl groups such as protocatechuic acid, pyrogallol, caffeic acid, gallic acid and propyl gallate exhibited higher free radical scavenging activity especially against DPPH(•) and O2 (•-). The hydroxylated cinnamates such as ferulic acid and caffeic acid were in general better scavengers than their benzoic acid counter parts such as vanillic acid and protocatechuic acid. All the phenolic compounds tested exhibited more than 85 % scavenging due to the high reactivity of the hydroxyl radical. Phenolic compounds with multiple hydroxyl groups also exhibited high redox potential. Exploring the radical scavenging and reducing properties of antioxidants especially those which are found naturally in plant sources are of great interest due to their protective roles in biological systems.

  14. Evidence for Different Reactive Hg Sources and Chemical Compounds at Adjacent Valley and High Elevation Locations.

    PubMed

    Sexauer Gustin, Mae; Pierce, Ashley M; Huang, Jiaoyan; Miller, Matthieu B; Holmes, Heather A; Loria-Salazar, S Marcela

    2016-11-15

    The spatial distribution of chemical compounds and concentration of reactive mercury (RM), defined as the sum of gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and <3 μm particulate bound mercury (PBM), are poorly characterized. The objective of this study was to understand the chemistry, concentration, and spatial and temporal distribution of GOM at adjacent locations (12 km apart) with a difference in elevation of ∼1000 m. Atmospheric GOM measurements were made with passive and active samplers using membranes, and at one location, a Tekran mercury measurement system was used. The chemistry of GOM varied across time and location. On the basis of data collected, chemistry at the low elevation site adjacent to a highway was primarily influenced by pollutants generated by mobile sources (GOM = nitrogen and sulfur-based compounds), and the high elevation site (GOM = halogen-based compounds) was affected by long-range transport in the free troposphere over the marine boundary layer into Nevada. Data collected at these two locations demonstrate that different GOM compounds exist depending on the oxidants present in the air. Measurements of GOM made by the KCl denuder in the Tekran instrument located at the low elevation site were lower than that measured using membranes by 1.7-13 times. Accurate measurements of atmospheric concentrations and chemistry of RM are necessary for proper assessment of environmental impacts, and field measurements are essential for atmospheric models, which in turn influence policy decisions.

  15. Vanadium compounds discriminate hepatoma and normal hepatic cells by differential regulation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Liu, Tong-Tong; Fu, Ying; Wang, Kui; Yang, Xiao-Gai

    2010-09-01

    Our previous study indicated that vanadium compounds can block cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in human hepatoma HepG2 cells via a highly activated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal. To explore their differential action on normal cells, we investigated the response of an immortalized hepatic cell line, L02 cells. The results demonstrated that a higher concentration of vanadium compounds was needed to inhibit L02 proliferation, which was associated with S and G2/M cell cycle arrest. In addition, in contrast to insignificant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HepG2 cells, all of the vanadium compounds resulted significant increases in both O2.- and H2O2 levels in L02 cells. At the same time, ERK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) as well as cell division control protein 2 homolog (Cdc2) were found to be highly phosphorylated, which could be counteracted with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The current study also demonstrated that both the ERK and the JNK pathways contributed to the cell cycle arrest induced by vanadium compounds in L02 cells. More importantly, it was found that although NAC can ameliorate the cytotoxicity of vanadium compounds in L02 cells, it did not decrease their cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. It thus shed light on the potential therapeutic applications of vanadium compounds with antioxidants as synergistic agents to reduce their toxicities in human normal cells without affecting their antitumor activities in cancer cells.

  16. Nucleophilic reactivity and electrocatalytic reduction of halogenated organic compounds by nickel o-phenylenedioxamidate complexes.

    PubMed

    Das, Siva Prasad; Ganguly, Rakesh; Li, Yongxin; Soo, Han Sen

    2016-09-14

    A growing number of halogenated organic compounds have been identified as hazardous pollutants. Although numerous advanced oxidative processes have been developed to degrade organohalide compounds, reductive and nucleophilic molecular approaches to dehalogenate organic compounds have rarely been reported. In this manuscript, we employ nickel(ii)-ate complexes bearing the o-phenylenebis(N-methyloxamide) (Me2opba) tetraanionic ligand as nucleophilic reagents that can react with alkyl halides (methyl up to the bulky isobutyl) by O-alkylation to give their respective imidate products. Four new nickel(ii) complexes have been characterized by X-ray crystallography, and the salient structural parameters and FT-IR vibrational bands (∼1655 cm(-1)) concur with their assignment as the imidate tautomeric form. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the nucleophilic reactivity of Ni(II)(Me2opba) with halogenated organic compounds. The parent nickel(ii) Me2opba complex exhibits reversible electrochemical oxidation and reduction behavior. As a proof of concept, Ni(II)(Me2opba) and its alkylated congeners were utilized for the electrocatalytic reduction of chloroform, as a representative, simple polyhalogenated organic molecule that could arise from the oxidative treatment of organic compounds by chlorination. Modest turnover numbers of up to 6 were recorded, with dichloromethane identified as one of the possible products. Future efforts are directed towards bulkier -ate complexes that possess metal-centered instead of ligand-centered nucleophilic activity to create more effective electrocatalysts for the reduction of halogenated organic compounds.

  17. Characteristics and reactivity of volatile organic compounds from non-coal emission sources in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiusheng; Yan, Yulong; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Yiqiang; Chen, Laiguo; Wang, Yuhang

    2015-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled from non-coal emission sources including fuel refueling, solvent use, industrial and commercial activities in China, and 62 target species were determined by gas chromatography-mass selective detector (GC-MSD). Based on the results, source profiles were developed and discussed from the aspects of composition characteristics, potential tracers, BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) diagnostic ratios and chemical reactivity. Compared with vehicle exhausts and liquid fuels, the major components in refueling emissions of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), gasoline and diesel were alkenes and alkanes. Oppositely, aromatics were the most abundant group in emissions from auto-painting, book binding and plastic producing. Three groups contributed nearly equally in printing and commercial cooking emissions. Acetone in medical producing, chloroform and tetrachloroethylene in wet- and dry-cleaning, as well as TEX in plastic producing etc. were good tracers for the respective sources. BTEX ratios showed that some but not all VOCs sources could be distinguished by B/T, B/E and B/X ratios, while T/E, T/X and E/X ratios were not suitable as diagnostic indicators of different sources. The following reactivity analysis indicated that emissions from gasoline refueling, commercial cooking, auto painting and plastic producing had high atmospheric reactivity, and should be controlled emphatically to prevent ozone pollution, especially when there were large amounts of emissions for them.

  18. From inert to explosive, the hydrolytic reactivity of R-NSO compounds understood: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena V; Muchall, Heidi M

    2011-04-14

    We present a computational study on the concerted hydrolysis of several classes of N-sulfinylamines of generic formula R-N═S═O, such as the -amines themselves (R-NSO), -hydrazines (R-NH-NSO), -hydrazides (R-CO-NH-NSO) and -amides (R-CO-NSO), as these species are known to possess a wide range of hydrolytic reactivity. Two possible mechanisms of hydrolysis, with a water dimer across the S═O and N═S bonds, in the gas phase are investigated. The reactivity is discussed with respect to the electronic structures, established with the use of the quantum theory of Atoms in Molecules, Natural Bond Orbital and Natural Resonance Theory approaches. For the inert N-sulfinylhydrazines and the keto tautomers of N-sulfinylhydrazides, extended π-conjugation adds a sulfide-like resonance structure that is responsible for their insensitivity toward moisture. Activation barriers for hydrolysis, where water acts as a nucleophilic reagent, decrease with increasing positive charge on the NSO sulfur atom, a finding that might prove useful as a predictive tool in the determination of the general reactivity of an N-sulfinyl compound by experimentalists.

  19. Emission of reactive terpene compounds from orange orchards and their removal by within-canopy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccioli, Paolo; Brancaleoni, Enzo; Frattoni, Massimiliano; di Palo, Vincenzo; Valentini, Riccardo; Tirone, Giampiero; Seufert, Guenther; Bertin, Nadia; Hansen, Ute; Csiky, Olav; Lenz, Roman; Sharma, Meeta

    1999-04-01

    VOC emission from orange orchards was determined in the framework of two field campaigns aimed at assessing the contribution of vegetation emissions to tropospheric ozone formation in the Valencia Citrus belt. Branch emission from different varieties of Citrus sinensis and Citrus Clementi was dominated by β-caryophyllene during the summer period and by linalool during the blossoming season (April-May). Large emission of D-limonene from soil was also measured. Data collected with the enclosure technique were upscaled to determine canopy emission rates of terpene compounds. Values obtained were compared with fluxes measured by relaxed eddy accumulation. Substantial removal of β-caryophyllene and linalool was detected during transport from the canopy into the atmospheric boundary layer. While within-canopy removal of the sesquiterpene component was fully consistent with laboratory studies indicating the high reactivity of this compound with ozone, linalool losses were more difficult to explain. Although high canopy fluxes of acetone and acetaldehyde suggested linalool decomposition by gas-phase reactivity, removal by heterogeneous chemistry seems the more likely explanation for the observed losses.

  20. [Source profile and chemical reactivity of volatile organic compounds from vehicle exhaust].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yue-Zhen; Wang, Hong-Li; Huang, Cheng; Chen, Chang-Hong; Su, Lei-Yan; Zhou, Min; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Gang-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ran; Li, Li; Chen, Ming-Hua; Huang, Hai-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Light-duty gasoline taxis (LDGT) and passenger cars (LDGV), heavy-duty diesel buses (HDDB) and trucks (HDDT), gasoline motorcycles (MC) and LPG scooters (LPGS), were selected for tailpipe volatile organic compounds (VOCs) samplings by using transient dynamometer and on road test combined with SUMMA canisters technology. The samples were tested by GC-MS to analyze the concentration and species composition of VOCs. The results indicate that light-duty gasoline automobiles have higher fractions of aromatic hydrocarbons, which account for 43.38%-44.45% of the total VOCs, the main aromatic hydrocarbons are toluene and xylenes. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles have higher fractions of alkanes, which constitute 46.86%-48.57% of the total VOCs, the main alkanes are propane, n-dodecane and n-undecane. In addition, oxy-organics account for 13.28%-15.01% of the VOCs, the main oxy-organics is acetone. The major compound from MC and LPGS exhaust is acetylene, it accounts for 39.75% and 76.67% of the total VOCs, respectively. VOCs exhaust from gasoline motorcycles and light-duty gasoline automobiles has a significantly higher chemical reactivity than those from heavy-duty diesel vehicles, which contribute 55% and 44% to the atmospheric chemical reactivity in Shanghai. The gasoline motorcycles and light-duty gasoline automobiles are the key pollution sources affecting city and region ambient oxidation, and the key active species of toluene, xylenes, propylene, and styrene make the greatest contribution.

  1. OH reactivity and concentrations of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in a Mediterranean forest of downy oak trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, N.; Gros, V.; Lanza, M.; Sarda, R.; Bonsang, B.; Kalogridis, C.; Preunkert, S.; Legrand, M.; Jambert, C.; Boissard, C.; Lathiere, J.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the processes between the biosphere and the atmosphere is challenged by the difficulty to determine with enough accuracy the composition of the atmosphere. Total OH reactivity, which is defined as the total loss of the hydroxyl radical in the atmosphere, has proved to be an excellent tool to identify indirectly the important reactive species in ambient air. High levels of unknown reactivity were found in several forests worldwide and were often higher than at urban sites. Such results demonstrated the importance of OH reactivity for characterizing two of the major unknowns currently present associated to forests: the set of primary emissions from the canopy to the atmosphere and biogenic compounds oxidation pathways. Previous studies also highlighted the need to quantify OH reactivity and missing OH reactivity at more forested sites. Our study presents results of a field experiment conducted during late spring 2014 at the forest site at the Observatoire de Haute Provence, OHP, France. The forest is mainly composed of downy oak trees, a deciduous tree species characteristic of the Mediterranean region. We deployed the Comparative Reactivity Method and a set of state-of-the-art techniques such as Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography to measure the total OH reactivity, the concentration of volatile organic compounds and main atmospheric constituents at the site. We sampled the air masses at two heights: 2 m, i.e. inside the canopy, and 10 m, i.e. above the canopy, where the mean canopy height is 5 m. We found that the OH reactivity at the site mainly depended on the main primary biogenic species emitted by the forest, which was isoprene and to a lesser extent by its degradation products and long lived atmospheric compounds (up to 26 % during daytime). We determined that the daytime total measured reactivity equaled the calculated reactivity obtained from the concentrations of the compounds measured at the site. Hence, no

  2. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  3. Antagonism between lipid-derived reactive carbonyls and phenolic compounds in the Strecker degradation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Rosa M; Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    The Strecker-type degradation of phenylalanine in the presence of 2-pentanal and phenolic compounds was studied to investigate possible interactions that either promote or inhibit the formation of Strecker aldehydes in food products. Phenylacetaldehyde formation was promoted by 2-pentenal and also by o- and p-diphenols, but not by m-diphenols. This is consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to be converted into reactive carbonyls and produce the Strecker degradation of the amino acid. When 2-pentenal and phenolic compounds were simultaneously present, an antagonism among them was observed. This antagonism is suggested to be a consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to either react with both 2-pentenal and phenylacetaldehyde, or compete with other carbonyl compounds for the amino acids, a function that is determined by their structure. All these results suggest that carbonyl-phenol reactions may be used to modulate flavor formation produced in food products by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls.

  4. Rapid Reactivation of Deep Subsurface Microbes in the Presence of C-1 Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Pauliina; Bomberg, Malin; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Ahonen, Lasse; Nyyssönen, Mari; Itävaara, Merja

    2015-02-05

    Microorganisms in the deep biosphere are believed to conduct little metabolic activity due to low nutrient availability in these environments. However, destructive penetration to long-isolated bedrock environments during construction of underground waste repositories can lead to increased nutrient availability and potentially affect the long-term stability of the repository systems, Here, we studied how microorganisms present in fracture fluid from a depth of 500 m in Outokumpu, Finland, respond to simple carbon compounds (C-1 compounds) in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. C-1 compounds such as methane and methanol are important intermediates in the deep subsurface carbon cycle, and electron acceptors such as sulphate are critical components of oxidation processes. Fracture fluid samples were incubated in vitro with either methane or methanol in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Metabolic response was measured by staining the microbial cells with fluorescent dyes that indicate metabolic activity and transcriptional response with RT-qPCR. Our results show that deep subsurface microbes exist in dormant states but rapidly reactivate their transcription and respiration systems in the presence of C-1 substrates, particularly methane. Microbial activity was further enhanced by the addition of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Sulphate- and nitrate-reducing microbes were particularly responsive to the addition of C-1 compounds and sulphate. These taxa are common in deep biosphere environments and may be affected by conditions disturbed by bedrock intrusion, as from drilling and excavation for long-term storage of hazardous waste.

  5. Rapid Reactivation of Deep Subsurface Microbes in the Presence of C-1 Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Pauliina; Bomberg, Malin; Kietäväinen, Riikka; Kukkonen, Ilmo; Ahonen, Lasse; Nyyssönen, Mari; Itävaara, Merja

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms in the deep biosphere are believed to conduct little metabolic activity due to low nutrient availability in these environments. However, destructive penetration to long-isolated bedrock environments during construction of underground waste repositories can lead to increased nutrient availability and potentially affect the long-term stability of the repository systems, Here, we studied how microorganisms present in fracture fluid from a depth of 500 m in Outokumpu, Finland, respond to simple carbon compounds (C-1 compounds) in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. C-1 compounds such as methane and methanol are important intermediates in the deep subsurface carbon cycle, and electron acceptors such as sulphate are critical components of oxidation processes. Fracture fluid samples were incubated in vitro with either methane or methanol in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Metabolic response was measured by staining the microbial cells with fluorescent dyes that indicate metabolic activity and transcriptional response with RT-qPCR. Our results show that deep subsurface microbes exist in dormant states but rapidly reactivate their transcription and respiration systems in the presence of C-1 substrates, particularly methane. Microbial activity was further enhanced by the addition of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Sulphate- and nitrate-reducing microbes were particularly responsive to the addition of C-1 compounds and sulphate. These taxa are common in deep biosphere environments and may be affected by conditions disturbed by bedrock intrusion, as from drilling and excavation for long-term storage of hazardous waste. PMID:27682076

  6. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and dimethylated sulphur compounds in coral explants under acute thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Stephanie G; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Ralph, Peter J; Petrou, Katherina

    2017-03-08

    Coral bleaching is intensifying with global climate change. While the causes for these catastrophic events are well understood, the cellular mechanism that triggers bleaching is not well established. Our understanding of coral bleaching processes is hindered by the lack of robust methods for studying interactions between host and symbiont at the single-cell level. Here we exposed coral explants to acute thermal stress and measured oxidative stress, more specifically, reactive oxygen species (ROS), in individual symbiont cells. Furthermore, we measured concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) to elucidate the role of these compounds in coral antioxidant function. This work demonstrates the application of coral explants for investigating coral physiology and biochemistry under thermal stress and delivers a new approach to study host-symbiont interactions at the microscale, allowing us to directly link intracellular ROS with DMSP and DMSO dynamics.

  7. Analytical methods for trace levels of reactive carbonyl compounds formed in lipid peroxidation systems.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, T

    2006-04-11

    Analysis of trace levels of reactive carbonyl compounds (RCCs), including formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, malonaldehyde, glyoxal, and methyl glyoxal, is extremely difficult because they are highly reactive, water soluble, and volatile. Determination of these RCCs in trace levels is important because they are major products of lipid peroxidation, which is strongly associated with various diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's disease, aging, and atherosclerosis. This review covers the development and application of various derivatives for RCC analysis. Among the many derivatives which have been prepared, cysteamine derivatives for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde; N-hydrazine derivatives for acrolein, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and malonaldeyde; and o-phenylene diamine derivatives for glyoxal and methyl glyoxal were selected for extended discussion. The application of advanced instruments, including gas chromatograph with nitrogen-phosphorus detector (GC/NPD), mass spectrometer (MS), high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC), GC/MS, and LC/MS, to the determination of trace RCCs in various oxidized lipid samples, including fatty acids, skin lipids, beef fats, blood plasma, whole blood, and liver homogenates, is also discussed.

  8. OH reactivity and concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds in a Mediterranean forest of downy oak trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, N.; Gros, V.; Lanza, M.; Sarda, R.; Bonsang, B.; Kalogridis, C.; Preunkert, S.; Legrand, M.; Jambert, C.; Boissard, C.; Lathiere, J.

    2016-02-01

    Total OH reactivity, defined as the total loss frequency of the hydroxyl radical in the atmosphere, has proved to be an excellent tool to identify the total loading of reactive species in ambient air. High levels of unknown reactivity were found in several forests worldwide and were often higher than at urban sites.Our study presents atmospheric mixing ratios of biogenic compounds and total OH reactivity measured during late spring 2014 at the forest of downy oak trees of the Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP), France. Air masses were sampled at two heights: 2 m, i.e., inside the canopy, and 10 m, i.e., above the canopy, where the mean canopy height is 5 m.We found that the OH reactivity at the site mainly depended on the main primary biogenic species emitted by the forest, which was isoprene and to a lesser extent by its degradation products and long-lived atmospheric compounds (up to 26 % during daytime). During daytime, no significant missing OH reactivity was reported at the site, either inside or above the canopy. However, during two nights we determined a missing fraction of OH reactivity up to 50 %, possibly due to unmeasured oxidation products. We confirmed that no significant oxidation of the primary species occurred within the canopy; primary compounds emitted by the forest were fast transported to the atmosphere. Finally, the OH reactivity at this site was maximum 69 s-1, which is a high value for a forest characterized by a temperate climate. Observations in various and diverse forests in the Mediterranean region are therefore needed to better constrain the impact of reactive gases over this area.

  9. Trace gas concentrations and meteorology in rural Virginia. 2. Reactive nitrogen compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doddridge, Bruce G.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Wardell, R. Glenn; Civerolo, Kevin L.; Nunnermacker, Linda J.

    1992-12-01

    In this second of a two-part paper on the air chemistry of the Big Meadows site in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, we present measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds that play important roles in atmospheric photochemistry and acidity, and as nutrients in soil and water. These compounds are, however, poorly understood in terms of spatial and temporal variability. Measurements of nitric oxide, NO, and total reactive nitrogen, NOy, were made for over a year during 1988 and 1989 at a mountain site that we feel is representative of the regional tropospheric composition. We also measured total nitrate (HNO3 + NO3-) for three weeks during this period. For the whole year, the mean, standard deviation, (and median) NOy and daytime NO mixing ratios were 5.1±3.1 (4.3) ppbv and 0.59±0.94 (0.23) ppbv, respectively. A histogram for NOy appears to conform to a lognormal distribution, but fails a χ2 test of significance at the 0.05 level. The speciation of NOy indicates considerable photochemical aging, except in winter. Over the year during daylight, the median ratio NO/NOy was 0.06. Total nitrate (measured in August and September) accounted for 39% of the total NOy. Total reactive nitrogen shows no appreciable diurnal cycle, but NO, NOy, and the ratio NO/NOy show a summer minimum. For winter, spring, summer, and fall, the mean (and median) NOy mixing ratios were: 5.7±3.3 (5.0), 5.4±3.2 (4.4), 4.0±2.1 (3.5), and 5.2±3.2 (4.4) ppbv, respectively. Similarly, seasonally averaged daytime NO values were: 0.95±1.07 (0.61), 0.66±0.93 (0.28), 0.18±0.29 (0.13), and 0.70±1.10 (0.30) ppbv. Wet deposition of nitrate shows the opposite seasonality; we estimate the lifetime of NOy with respect to wet deposition to be 2.7 days in summer and 5.8 days in winter. Ozone and NOy were positively correlated in the summer and negatively correlated in the winter. Carbon monoxide and NOy were positively correlated in all seasons. The slope of a scatter plot of CO vs. NOy, 4

  10. Reactive and recoverable sorbents for halogenated organic compound remediation in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Taggalou, Villy; Kordulis, Christos; Dolfing, Jan; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2013-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) has been proposed as a sediment amendment for aquatic systems polluted with hydrophobic organic compounds. AC acts as a strong binding agent that lowers the pollutant concentration and thus, its toxicity. A draw back of this in-situ remediation method is that although the pollutant will remain non-bioavailable for many years being sorbed into AC, it actually stays in the system. A reactive sorbent, a sorbent that would, at the same time, facilitate the degradation of the pollutant, would be better accepted by the public or the regulators than AC amendment. So far, catalysts supported on AC with zero valent iron and a reactive metal have been proposed for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. These reactive metals are usually expensive or toxic and thus, their addition to the environment is not desirable. In the present study, activated carbon modified with reduced iron(AC/Fe) is tested in batch systems in the presence of sediment and DDT sorbed on polyethylene sheets. The batch systems are equilibrated for different contact times. Then, the DDT remaining in the polyethylene sheets is quantified along with DDD produced due to the dechlorination of DDT. A small percentage of DDT is degraded to DDD in the systems containing the AC/Fe material. No degradation of DDT is observed in the control systems containing the pollutant and the sediment or the pollutant, the sediment and AC. Thus, the addition of AC/Fe to the sediment with the DDT is enough to cause the dechlorination of DDT. At the end of the experiments, a magnet rod is used to recover the AC/Fe material from the batches with the sediment. An average recovery of 83% is achieved. This is a high percentage suggesting that the material can be easily recovered. Some drawbacks of the material preparation method are identified after the composite material characterization. For example, the AC/Fe surface area is decreased with the material preparation compared to the initial surface

  11. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of Anionic sp(2) -sp(3) Diboron Compounds: Readily Accessible Boryl Nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Sabrina; Neeve, Emily C; Apperley, David C; Bertermann, Rüdiger; Mo, Fanyang; Qiu, Di; Cheung, Man Sing; Dang, Li; Wang, Jianbo; Radius, Udo; Lin, Zhenyang; Kleeberg, Christian; Marder, Todd B

    2015-05-04

    Lewis base adducts of tetra-alkoxy diboron compounds, in particular bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2 pin2 ), have been proposed as the active source of nucleophilic boryl species in metal-free borylation reactions. We report the isolation and detailed structural characterization (by solid-state and solution NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography) of a series of anionic adducts of B2 pin2 with hard Lewis bases, such as alkoxides and fluoride. The study was extended to alternative Lewis bases, such as acetate, and other diboron reagents. The B(sp(2) )-B(sp(3) ) adducts exhibit two distinct boron environments in the solid-state and solution NMR spectra, except for [(4-tBuC6 H4 O)B2 pin2 ](-) , which shows rapid site exchange in solution. DFT calculations were performed to analyze the stability of the adducts with respect to dissociation. Stoichiometric reaction of the isolated adducts with two representative series of organic electrophiles-namely, aryl halides and diazonium salts-demonstrate the relative reactivities of the anionic diboron compounds as nucleophilic boryl anion sources.

  12. Lava flow superposition: the reactivation of flow units in compound flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, Jane; Pinkerton, Harry; James, Mike; Calvari, Sonia

    2010-05-01

    Long-lived basaltic eruptions often produce compound `a`ā lava flow fields that are constructed of many juxtaposed and superposed flow units. We have examined the processes that result from superposition when the underlying flows are sufficiently young to have immature crusts and deformable cores. It has previously been recognised that the time elapsed between the emplacement of two units determines the fate of the underlying flow[1], because it controls the rheological contrast between the units. If the time interval is long, the underlying flow is able to cool, degas and develop a rigid crust, so that it shows no significant response to loading, and the two units are easily discernable stratigraphically. If the interval is short, the underlying flow has little time to cool, so the two units may merge and cool as a single unit, forming a ‘multiple' flow[1]. In this case, the individual units are more difficult to distinguish post-eruption. The effects of superposition in intermediate cases, when underlying flows have immature roofs, are less well understood, and have received relatively little attention in the literature, possibly due to the scarcity of observations. However, the lateral and vertical coalescence of lava tubes has been described on Mt. Etna, Sicily[2], suggesting that earlier tubes can be reactivated and lengthened as a result of superposition. Through our recent analysis of images taken by INGV Catania during the 2001 eruption of Mt. Etna (Sicily), we have observed that the emplacement of new surface flows can reactivate underlying units by squeezing the still-hot flow core away from the site of loading. We have identified three different styles of reactivation that took place during that eruption, which depend on the time interval separating the emplacement of the two flows, and hence the rheological contrast between them. For relatively long time intervals (> 2 days), hence high rheological contrasts, superposition can cause an overpressure

  13. Robotic hand and fingers

    DOEpatents

    Salisbury, Curt Michael; Dullea, Kevin J.

    2017-06-06

    Technologies pertaining to a robotic hand are described herein. The robotic hand includes one or more fingers releasably attached to a robotic hand frame. The fingers can abduct and adduct as well as flex and tense. The fingers are releasably attached to the frame by magnets that allow for the fingers to detach from the frame when excess force is applied to the fingers.

  14. Assessing the Geochemical Reactivity of Fe-DOM Complexes in Lacustrine Sediments Using Nitroaromatic Probe Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, J.; Fimmen, R. L.; Chin, Y.; Agrawal, S. G.; Ward, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    The complexation environment of Fe in anoxic sediment porefluids is important for understanding its role in biogeochemical reactions in these systems. These include the microbial dissolution of iron-bearing sediments and the degradation of hydrophobic pesticides. We studied the effect of naturally occurring Fe-DOM complexes on the reduction of two nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) as a surrogate for probing electron-transfer kinetics, and monitored the geochemical parameters affecting reactivity. We found that Fe(II) was necessary for rapid NAC reduction (< 24 hr), and observed faster reduction with increased pH. NAC reduction in `pH-adjusted' porefluids (acidified to pH 2.5 after porefluid extraction and raised to the native pH (between 6.5 to 7.8) prior to reaction) was similar to that observed in model systems containing Fe(II) and aquatic fulvic acids. Conversely, NAC reduction in fresh, unaltered porefluids was slower than that observed in `pH-adjusted' porefluids, indicating that the natural metal redox speciation differs between fresh and `pH-adjusted' samples. Electrochemical scans demonstrate a vertical gradient in concentrations of Fe(III), Fe(II), and Mn(II) from 0 to 30 cm depth. Furthermore, the electrochemical data indicate that ferric iron in these systems is predominantly complexed with organic ligands, with a half-cell potential of -0.45 V. The magnitude of this ferric-organic peak decreases when porefluids are pH- adjusted for short durations (acidified to pH 2.5 and re-raised to circumneutral levels) and disappears completely when the acidified porefluid is allowed to equilibrate overnight. These data show that pH-adjustment of porefluids presumably alters both their complexation chemistry and reactivity towards NACs, and shows how small changes in Fe complexation chemistry potentially affects electron transfer reactions in anoxic environments.

  15. Alkyl Nitrates and Oxidized Volatile Organic Compounds during NACHTT: Influence on Reactive Chlorine Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarthout, R.; Sive, B. C.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that reactive chlorine species can contribute substantially to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and also influence tropospheric ozone chemistry in areas far from dominant marine sources. The photochemical processing of polluted air masses containing can potentially affect the formation of chlorine radical (Cl) through various processes involving hydrocarbons and NOx (NO + NO2). Organic peroxy radicals can react with nitric oxide (NO) to form alkyl nitrates or to produce nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), including alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Aldehydes can further react with NO2 to form peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN). Alkyl nitrates and PAN can serve as reservoirs for long range transport of NOx and can influence Cl production in remote areas. In order to further elucidate the influence of OVOCs and alkyl nitrates on chlorine activation processes, whole air samples were collected hourly during the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory in Erie, Colorado from February 18 through March 11, 2011. Profile samples up to 250 m were also collected throughout the campaign. Samples were analyzed for a comprehensive suite of volatile organic compounds, including OVOCs and C1 to C5 alkyl nitrates, using a five channel gas chromatographic analytical system. Alkyl nitrates and OVOCs were abundant throughout the campaign. Total alkyl nitrate mixing ratios ranged from 13 to 227 pptv with 2-butyl nitrate and 2-propyl nitrate accounting for over half of this total. Ethanol was the most abundant OVOC followed by methanol with median mixing ratios of 8.5 ppbv and 5.6 ppbv, respectively. This presentation will focus on the influence the observed alkyl nitrate and OVOC mixing ratios and air mass photochemical processing on Cl cycling.

  16. Flux measurements of reactive nitrogen compounds using a chemiluminescence analyser with different converter types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Wolff, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    The availability of reactive nitrogen (Nr) is a key limiting factors for the productivity and the competition success of individual species. On the other hand, certain nitrogenous compounds can also be emitted from natural or managed ecosystems. Thus the quantification of the Nr exchange can be essential for the interpretation of ecosystem behavior. For the observation of Nr dry deposition and emission the eddy covariance (EC) method is preferable since it does not modify the environmental conditions of the ecosystem, is less prone to wall effects than chamber methods, and is less affected by gas phase chemical reactions than gradient methods. Since the various Nr compounds can undergo fast chemical reactions and have differing chemical and physical characteristics, a variety of detection techniques is usually necessary that often cannot meet the fast response requirements of the EC technique. Here we show applications of a fast response 2-channel NO analyzer suitable for EC measurements. In combination with different inlet converters (photolytic converter, gold catalyst converter, and high-temperature steel converter), the system could alternatively be used for flux measurements of NO2, NOy, and total Nr. The quantification of By combining the 2-channel analyzer with the NOy and total Nr converter simultaneously, the NH3 flux could be determined from the difference between the two channels. Concentration and flux measurements of the system were verified by inter-comparison with other methods. Potential problems include the damping of high-frequency fluctuations in the inlet system. It is therefore important to place the converter close to the sampling inlet and to quantify and correct the damping effects. Moreover, like most other flux measurement techniques, the system is susceptible to non-stationary trace gas concentrations that often occur near pollution sources.

  17. Reactive carbonyl compounds impair wound healing by vimentin collapse and loss of the primary cilium.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ribera, Lara; Slattery, Craig; Mc Morrow, Tara; Marcos, Ricard; Pastor, Susana

    2017-10-01

    In renal pathologies tubulo-interstitial fibrosis results from an aberrant wound-healing ability where the normal epithelial tissue is substituted for scar tissue caused by accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). During the wound-healing process, epithelial cells may undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) acquiring a mesenchymal-like phenotype that allows cells to migrate and re-epithelialize the wound site. It has been reported that chronic inflammation and uremic milieu are involved in wound-healing and enhanced kidney damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In this study we evaluated reactive carbonyl compounds (RCC) effects on renal wound healing. The compounds resulting from carbonyl stress evaluated in this study were glyoxal (GO), methylglyoxal (MGO), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-hexenal (HHE). Wound repair ability was evaluated by the wound healing assay using HK-2 cells. EMT was evaluated by morphological, protein and transcriptional changes using microscopy, western blot, zymography and RT-qPCR. Changes in the vimentin network and primary cilia were assessed by immunofluorescence. Our data demonstrated that MDA and GO delay wound closure mediated by vimentin disruption, which caused collagen I mRNA decrease, and deciliation. In contrast, HHE treatment (and MGO to a minor degree) induced morphological changes and increased mesenchymal marker expression and gelatinase activity in HK-2 cells. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time that exposure to RCC differentially affects wound healing in proximal tubular epithelia. A better comprehension of effects of uremic toxins on wound healing and fibrosis and migration is necessary to seek mechanisms to slow down renal fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimation of Physical Properties and Chemical Reactivity Parameters of Organic Compounds for Environmental Modeling by SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the transport and fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values that is value of the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. Although empirical structure activity relationships have been developed th...

  19. Estimation of Physical Properties and Chemical Reactivity Parameters of Organic Compounds for Environmental Modeling by SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the transport and fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values that is value of the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. Although empirical structure activity relationships have been developed th...

  20. Effect of reactive core mat application on bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Meric, Dogus; Barbuto, Sara M.; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.; Shine, James P.; Sheahan, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Sediment remediation techniques to limit the bioavailability of contaminants are of special interest due to related acute or chronic toxicities associated with sediment contaminants. Bioavailability in aquatic sediments can be particularly problematic due to their accessibility to food chain biota, and interactions with surface and ground water. The effect of a reactive core mat (RCM) containing organoclay on the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) (i.e., PCBs and naphthalene) was studied using oligochaete worms (Lumbriculus variegatus). Sediment sampled from the Neponset River (Milton, MA) with 10 ppm background PCB contamination was used in the experimental study. The objective of this study is to investigate the difference in HOC concentration of worms exposed to: a) a grab sample of contaminated sediment (10.4% total organic carbon); and b) an initially clean mixture of sand and organic matter (the so-called biouptake layer), placed on top of the RCM-capped sediment during consolidation coupled solute transport experiments. In addition to the experimental data, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) database was validated and used to model biouptake of contaminants for certain cases. Results indicate that RCM capping reduced the average bioavailability of both PCBs and naphthalene by a factor of about 50. In fact, worms exposed to the RCM-protected biouptake layer show virtually the same HOC concentrations as those measured in the control worm samples. PMID:22386995

  1. Effect of reactive core mat application on bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Meric, Dogus; Barbuto, Sara M; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Shine, James P; Sheahan, Thomas C

    2012-04-15

    Sediment remediation techniques to limit the bioavailability of contaminants are of special interest due to related acute or chronic toxicities associated with sediment contaminants. Bioavailability in aquatic sediments can be particularly problematic due to their accessibility to food chain biota, and interactions with surface and ground water. The effect of a reactive core mat (RCM) containing organoclay on the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) (i.e., PCBs and naphthalene) was studied using oligochaete worms (Lumbriculus variegatus). Sediment sampled from the Neponset River (Milton, MA) with 10 ppm background PCB contamination was used in the experimental study. The objective of this study is to investigate the difference in HOC concentration of worms exposed to: a) a grab sample of contaminated sediment (10.4% total organic carbon); and b) an initially clean mixture of sand and organic matter (the so-called biouptake layer), placed on top of the RCM-capped sediment during consolidation coupled solute transport experiments. In addition to the experimental data, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) database was validated and used to model biouptake of contaminants for certain cases. Results indicate that RCM capping reduced the average bioavailability of both PCBs and naphthalene by a factor of about 50. In fact, worms exposed to the RCM-protected biouptake layer show virtually the same HOC concentrations as those measured in the control worm samples.

  2. Lung function and bronchial reactivity in asthmatics during exposure to volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Harving, H.; Dahl, R.; Molhave, L. )

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether vapors of organic solvents at low concentrations could exert an adverse effect in the lower airways. Under controlled conditions in a climate chamber, 11 persons with bronchial hyperreactivity to histamine and bronchial asthma were exposed for 90 min to a mixture of organic solvents at levels of zero, 2.5, and 25 mg/m3. During exposure to 25 mg/m3 a decrease in FEV1 to 90.7% of baseline value was measured. This was significantly different from the initial value (p less than 0.05), but not significantly different from the value found after sham exposure (FEV1, 97.4% of initial value). The decline in FEV1 during exposure to 25 mg/m3 was most pronounced in persons with high bronchial sensitivity. No changes were found in histamine reactivity after exposure, and no late reactions were registered. Ratings of discomfort showed different individual patterns ranging from no response to reactions towards both of the concentrations. The ratings indicated development of tolerance during exposure. Volatile organic compounds in concentrations found in both the work and the home environments may influence lung function and are probably of importance as bronchial irritants.

  3. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase and its substrates: formation of specific markers and reactive compounds during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an inflammatory enzyme that generates reactive hypochlorous acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. However, this enzyme also uses bromide ion or thiocyanate as a substrate to form hypobromous or hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These species play important roles in host defense against the invasion of microorganisms. In contrast, these enzyme products modify biomolecules in hosts during excess inflammation, indicating that the action of myeloperoxidase is both beneficial and harmful. Myeloperoxidase uses other endogenous compounds, such as serotonin, urate, and l-tyrosine, as substrates. This broad-range specificity may have some biological implications. Target molecules of this enzyme and its products vary, including low-molecular weight thiols, proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The modified products represent biomarkers of myeloperoxidase action. Moderate inhibition of this enzyme might be critical for the prevention/modulation of excess, uncontrolled inflammatory events. Some phytochemicals inhibit myeloperoxidase, which might explain the reductive effect caused by the intake of vegetables and fruits on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27013775

  4. Anthropogenic Emissions of Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOCs) Inferred from Oversampling of OMI HCHO Columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Lei; Jacob, Daniel; Mickley, Loretta; Marais, Eloise; Zhang, Aoxing; Cohan, Daniel; Yoshida, Yasuko; Duncan, Bryan; Abad, Gonzalo Gonzalez; Chance, Kelly; DeSmedt, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns provide top-down constraints on emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs). This approach has been used previously to constrain emissions of isoprene from vegetation, but application to US anthropogenic emissions has been stymied by lack of a discernable HCHO signal. Here we show that oversampling of HCHO data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for 2005 - 2008 enables quantitative detection of urban and industrial plumes in eastern Texas including Houston, Port Arthur, and Dallas-Fort Worth. By spatially integrating the individual urban-industrial HCHO plumes observed by OMI we can constrain the corresponding HCHO-weighted HRVOC emissions. Application to the Houston plume indicates a HCHO source of 260 plus or minus 110 kmol h-1 and implies a factor of 5.5 plus or minus 2.4 underestimate of anthropogenic HRVOC emissions in the US Environmental Protection Agency inventory. With this approach we are able to monitor the trend in HRVOC emissions over the US, in particular from the oil-gas industry, over the past decade.

  5. Anthropogenic emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds inferred from oversampling of OMI HCHO columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Mickley, L. J.; Marais, E. A.; Cohan, D. S.; Yoshida, Y.; Duncan, B. N.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Chance, K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns provide top-down constraints on emissions of highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs). This approach has been used previously to constrain emissions of isoprene from vegetation, but application to US anthropogenic emissions has been stymied by lack of a discernable HCHO signal. Here we show that oversampling of HCHO data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for 2005-2008 enables quantitative detection of urban and industrial plumes in eastern Texas including Houston, Port Arthur, and Dallas/Fort Worth. By spatially integrating the individual urban/industrial HCHO plumes observed by OMI we can constrain the corresponding HCHO-weighted HRVOC emissions. Application to the Houston plume indicates a HCHO source of 260±110 kmol h-1 and implies a factor of 5.5±2.4 underestimate of anthropogenic HRVOC emissions in the US Environmental Protection Agency inventory. This approach allows us to monitor trends in HRVOC emissions over the US, in particular from the urban areas and oil/gas industry.

  6. Copper compound induces autophagy and apoptosis of glioma cells by reactive oxygen species and jnk activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive of the primary brain tumors, with a grim prognosis despite intensive treatment. In the past decades, progress in research has not significantly increased overall survival rate. Methods The in vitro antineoplastic effect and mechanism of action of Casiopeina III-ia (Cas III-ia), a copper compound, on rat malignant glioma C6 cells was investigated. Results Cas III-ia significantly inhibited cell proliferation, inducing autophagy and apoptosis, which correlated with the formation of autophagic vacuoles, overexpression of LC3, Beclin 1, Atg 7, Bax and Bid proteins. A decrease was detected in the mitochondrial membrane potential and in the activity of caspase 3 and 8, together with the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased activity of c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). The presence of 3-methyladenine (as selective autophagy inhibitor) increased the antineoplastic effect of Cas III-ia, while Z-VAD-FMK only showed partial protection from the antineoplastic effect induced by Cas III-ia, and ROS antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine) decreased apoptosis, autophagy and JNK activity. Moreover, the JNK –specific inhibitor SP600125 prevented Cas III-ia-induced cell death. Conclusions Our data suggest that Cas III-ia induces cell death by autophagy and apoptosis, in part due to the activation of ROS –dependent JNK signaling. These findings support further studies of Cas III-ia as candidate for treatment of human malignant glioma. PMID:22540380

  7. Characterization of a selenocysteine-ligated P450 compound I reveals direct link between electron donation and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onderko, Elizabeth L.; Silakov, Alexey; Yosca, Timothy H.; Green, Michael T.

    2017-07-01

    Strong electron-donation from the axial thiolate ligand of cytochrome P450 has been proposed to increase the reactivity of compound I with respect to C-H bond activation. However, it has proven difficult to test this hypothesis, and a direct link between reactivity and electron donation has yet to be established. To make this connection, we have prepared a selenolate-ligated cytochrome P450 compound I intermediate. This isoelectronic perturbation allows for direct comparisons with the wild-type enzyme. Selenium incorporation was achieved using a cysteine auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain. The intermediate was prepared with meta-chloroperbenzoic acid and characterized by UV-visible, Mössbauer and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies. Measurements revealed increased asymmetry around the ferryl moiety, consistent with increased electron donation from the axial selenolate ligand. In line with this observation, we find that the selenolate-ligated compound I cleaves C-H bonds more rapidly than the wild-type intermediate.

  8. Reactivity of bis(organoamino)phosphanes with magnesium(II) compounds.

    PubMed

    Vrána, Jan; Jambor, Roman; Růžička, Aleš; Alonso, Mercedes; De Proft, Frank; Lyčka, Antonín; Dostál, Libor

    2015-03-14

    The reactivity of three phosphanes (PhP(NHR)2 [R = t-Bu (1), Ph (2)] and PhP(NEt2)(NHDip) (3) (where Dip = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3)) with n-Bu2Mg and MeMgBr is presented. In the case of 1, the reaction with n-Bu2Mg gave [PhP(NHt-Bu)(Nt-Bu)]Mg(n-Bu) (4) or [PhP(NHt-Bu)(Nt-Bu)]2Mg (5) depending on the stoichiometry. The treatment of 1 with MeMgBr led to the phosphinate [Ph(H)P(Nt-Bu)2]2Mg (7) as a result of both the NH→PH tautomeric transformation and elimination of MgBr2 from the non-isolable intermediate [PhP(NHt-Bu)(Nt-Bu)]MgBr(THF) (6). Phosphane 2 reacted with n-Bu2Mg in a 1:1 molar ratio resulting in the formation of {[PhP(NPh)2]2Mg(THF)2}2 (8), but the analogous reaction in a 2:1 molar ratio yielded phosphinate [Ph(H)P(NPh)2]2Mg(THF) (9). The heteroleptic compound [Ph(H)P(NPh)2]MgBr(THF)2 (10) was obtained by the reaction of 2 with MeMgBr. Finally, the reaction of 3 with n-Bu2Mg and MeMgBr produced compounds [PhP(NEt2)(NDip)]2Mg (11) and {[PhP(NEt2)(NDip)2]Mg(μ-Br)(THF)}2 (12), respectively. All products were characterized using (1)H, (13)C{(1)H} and (31)P NMR spectroscopy and, except for compounds 4 and 6, their molecular structures were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In addition, a theoretical study on plausible isomers of 10 was performed to provide additional evidence for the presence of a syn- and anti-isomer in dynamic equilibrium in a solution of 10.

  9. Phase I Metabolic Stability and Electrophilic Reactivity of 2-Phenylaminophenylacetic Acid Derived Compounds.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yi Yun; Tan, Yee Min; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Ho, Han Kiat

    2016-07-18

    Diclofenac and lumiracoxib are two highly analogous 2-phenylaminophenylacetic acid anti-inflammatory drugs exhibiting occasional dose-limiting hepatotoxicities. Prior data indicate that bioactivation and reactive metabolite formation play roles in the observed toxicity, but the exact chemical influence of the substituents remains elusive. In order to elucidate the role of chemical influence on metabolism related toxicity, metabolic stability and electrophilic reactivity were investigated for a series of structurally related analogues and their resulting metabolites. The resulting analogues embody progressive physiochemical changes through varying halogeno- and aliphatic substituents at two positions and were subjected to in vitro human liver microsomal metabolic stability and cell-based GSH depletion assays (to measure electrophilic reactivity). LC-MS/MS analysis of the GSH trapped reactive intermediates derived from the analogues was then used to identify the putative structures of reactive metabolites. We found that chemical modifications of the structural backbone led to noticeable perturbations of metabolic stability, electrophilic reactivity, and structures and composition of reactive metabolites. With the acquired data, the relationships between stability, reactivity, and toxicity were investigated in an attempt to correlate between Phase I metabolism and in vitro toxicity. A positive correlation was identified between reactivity and in vitro toxicity, indicating that electrophilic reactivity can be an indicator for in vitro toxicity. All in all, the effect of substituents on the structures and reactivity of the metabolites, however subtle the changes, should be taken into consideration during future drug design involving similar chemical features.

  10. Fingering dynamics driven by a precipitation reaction: Nonlinear simulations.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Priyanka; De Wit, A

    2016-02-01

    A fingering instability can develop at the interface between two fluids when the more mobile fluid is injected into the less-mobile one. For example, viscous fingering appears when a less viscous (i.e., more mobile) fluid displaces a more viscous (and hence less mobile) one in a porous medium. Fingering can also be due to a local change in mobility arising when a precipitation reaction locally decreases the permeability. We numerically analyze the properties of the related precipitation fingering patterns occurring when an A+B→C chemical reaction takes place, where A and B are reactants in solution and C is a solid product. We show that, similarly to reactive viscous fingering patterns, the precipitation fingering structures differ depending on whether A invades B or vice versa. This asymmetry can be related to underlying asymmetric concentration profiles developing when diffusion coefficients or initial concentrations of the reactants differ. In contrast to reactive viscous fingering, however, precipitation fingering patterns appear at shorter time scales than viscous fingers because the solid product C has a diffusivity tending to zero which destabilizes the displacement. Moreover, contrary to reactive viscous fingering, the system is more unstable with regard to precipitation fingering when the high-concentrated solution is injected into the low-concentrated one or when the faster diffusing reactant displaces the slower diffusing one.

  11. Reactivity-based industrial volatile organic compounds emission inventory and its implications for ozone control strategies in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoming; Chen, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jiani; Shi, Tianli; Sun, Xibo; Fan, Liya; Wang, Liming; Ye, Daiqi

    2017-08-01

    Increasingly serious ozone (O3) pollution, along with decreasing NOx emission, is creating a big challenge in the control of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in China. More efficient and effective measures are assuredly needed for controlling VOCs. In this study, a reactivity-based industrial VOCs emission inventory was established in China based on the concept of ozone formation potential (OFP). Key VOCs species, major VOCs sources, and dominant regions with high reactivity were identified. Our results show that the top 15 OFP-based species, including m/p-xylene, toluene, propene, o-xylene, and ethyl benzene, contribute 69% of the total OFP but only 30% of the total emission. The architectural decoration industry, oil refinery industry, storage and transport, and seven other sources constituted the top 10 OFP subsectors, together contributing a total of 85%. The provincial and spatial characteristics of OFP are generally consistent with those of mass-based inventory. The implications for O3 control strategies in China are discussed. We propose a reactivity-based national definition of VOCs and low-reactive substitution strategies, combined with evaluations of health risks. Priority should be given to the top 15 or more species with high reactivity through their major emission sources. Reactivity-based policies should be flexibly applied for O3 mitigation based on the sensitivity of O3 formation conditions.

  12. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bandosz, T.J.; Petit, C.

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH{sub 3} adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Bronsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air.

  13. On the reactive adsorption of ammonia on activated carbons modified by impregnation with inorganic compounds.

    PubMed

    Bandosz, Teresa J; Petit, Camille

    2009-10-15

    Ammonia adsorption was studied under dynamic conditions, at room temperature, on activated carbons of different origins (coal-based, wood-based and coconut-shell-based carbons) before and after their impregnation with various inorganic compounds including metal chlorides, metal oxides and polycations. The role of humidity was evaluated by running tests in both dry and moist conditions. Adsorbents were analyzed before and after exposure to ammonia by thermal analyses, sorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy. Results of breakthrough tests show significant differences in terms of adsorption capacity depending on the parent carbon, the impregnates and the experimental conditions. It is found that surface chemistry governs ammonia adsorption on the impregnated carbons. More precisely, it was demonstrated that a proper combination of the surface pH, the strength, type and amount of functional groups present on the adsorbents' surface is a key point in ammonia uptake. Water can have either positive or negative effects on the performance of adsorbents. It can enhance NH(3) adsorption capacity since it favors ammonia dissolution and thus enables reaction between ammonium ions and carboxylic groups from the carbons' surface. On the other hand, water can also reduce the performance from the strength of adsorption standpoint. It promotes dissolution of ammonia and that ammonia is first removed from the system when the adsorbent bed is purged with air. Ammonia, besides adsorption by van der Waals forces and dissolution in water, is also retained on the surface via reactive mechanisms such as acid-base reactions (Brønsted and Lewis) or complexation. Depending on the materials used and the experimental conditions, 6-47% ammonia adsorbed is strongly retained on the surface even when the bed is purged with air.

  14. Protective effect of phenolic compounds on carbonyl-amine reactions produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Delgado, Rosa M; Zamora, Rosario

    2017-08-15

    The degradation of phenylalanine initiated by 2-pentenal, 2,4-heptadienal, 4-oxo-2-pentenal, 4,5-epoxy-2-heptenal, or 4,5-epoxy-2-decenal in the presence of phenolic compounds was studied to determine the structure-activity relationship of phenolic compounds on the protection of amino compounds against modifications produced by lipid-derived carbonyls. The obtained results showed that flavan-3-ols were the most efficient phenolic compounds followed by single m-diphenols. The effectiveness of these compounds was found to be related to their ability to trap rapidly the carbonyl compound, avoiding in this way the reaction of the carbonyl compound with the amino acid. The ability of flavan-3-ols for this reaction is suggested to be related to the high electronic density existing in some of the aromatic carbons of their ring A. This is the first report showing that carbonyl-phenol reactions involving lipid-derived reactive carbonyls can be produced more rapidly than carbonyl-amine reactions, therefore providing a satisfactory protection of amino compounds.

  15. Aldo-keto reductase-1 (AKR1) protect cellular enzymes from salt stress by detoxifying reactive cytotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Vemanna, Ramu S; Babitha, K C; Solanki, Jayant K; Amarnatha Reddy, V; Sarangi, S K; Udayakumar, M

    2017-04-01

    Cytotoxic compounds like reactive carbonyl compounds such as methylglyoxal (MG), melandialdehyde (MDA), besides the ROS accumulate significantly at higher levels under salinity stress conditions and affect lipids and proteins that inhibit plant growth and productivity. The detoxification of these cytotoxic compounds by overexpression of NADPH-dependent Aldo-ketoreductase (AKR1) enzyme enhances the salinity stress tolerance in tobacco. The PsAKR1 overexpression plants showed higher survival and chlorophyll content and reduced MDA, H2O2, and MG levels under NaCl stress. The transgenic plants showed reduced levels of Na(+) levels in both root and shoot due to reduced reactive carbonyl compounds (RCCs) and showed enhanced membrane stability resulted in higher root growth and biomass. The increased levels of antioxidant glutathione and enhanced activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) suggest AKR1 could protect these enzymes from the RCC induced protein carbonylation by detoxification process. The transgenics also showed higher activity of delta 1-pyrroline-5- carboxylate synthase (P5CS) enzyme resulted in increasedproline levels to maintain osmotic homeostasis. The results demonstrates that the AKR1 protects proteins or enzymes that are involved in scavenging of cytotoxic compounds by detoxifying RCCs generated under salinity stress.

  16. The in situ generation and reactive quench of diazonium compounds in the synthesis of azo compounds in microreactors

    PubMed Central

    Akwi, Faith M

    2016-01-01

    Summary In this paper, a micro-fluidic optimized process for the continuous flow synthesis of azo compounds is presented. The continuous flow synthesis of Sudan II azo dye was used as a model reaction for the study. At found optimal azo coupling reaction temperature and pH an investigation of the optimum flow rates of the reactants for the diazotization and azo coupling reactions in Little Things Factory-MS microreactors was performed. A conversion of 98% was achieved in approximately 2.4 minutes and a small library of azo compounds was thus generated under these reaction conditions from couplers with aminated or hydroxylated aromatic systems. The scaled up synthesis of these compounds in PTFE tubing (i.d. 1.5 mm) was also investigated, where good reaction conversions ranging between 66–91% were attained. PMID:27829903

  17. Effect of chemical degradation on fluxes of reactive compounds - a study with a stochastic Lagrangian transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, J.; Markkanen, T.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Petäjä, T.; Keronen, P.; Tang, M. J.; Crowley, J. N.; Rannik, Ü.; Vesala, T.

    2012-06-01

    In the analyses of VOC fluxes measured above plant canopies, one usually assumes the flux above canopy to equal the exchange at the surface. Thus one assumes the chemical degradation to be much slower than the turbulent transport. We used a stochastic Lagrangian transport model in which the chemical degradation was described as first order decay in order to study the effect of the chemical degradation on above canopy fluxes of chemically reactive species. With the model we explored the sensitivity of the ratio of the above canopy flux to the surface emission on several parameters such as chemical lifetime of the compound, friction velocity, stability, and canopy density. Our results show that friction velocity and chemical lifetime affected the loss during transport the most. The canopy density had a significant effect if the chemically reactive compound was emitted from the forest floor. We used the results of the simulations together with oxidant data measured during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010 campaign at a Scots pine site to estimate the effect of the chemistry on fluxes of three typical biogenic VOCs, isoprene, α-pinene, and β-caryophyllene. Of these, the chemical degradation had a major effect on the fluxes of the most reactive species β-caryophyllene, while the fluxes of α-pinene were affected during nighttime. For these two compounds representing the mono- and sesquiterpenes groups, the effect of chemical degradation had also a significant diurnal cycle with the highest chemical loss at night. The different day and night time loss terms need to be accounted for, when measured fluxes of reactive compounds are used to reveal relations between primary emission and environmental parameters.

  18. Current concepts: mallet finger.

    PubMed

    Alla, Sreenivasa R; Deal, Nicole D; Dempsey, Ian J

    2014-06-01

    Loss of the extensor mechanism at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint leads to mallet finger also known as baseball finger or drop finger. This can be secondary to tendon substance disruption or to a bony avulsion. Soft tissue mallet finger is the result of a rupture of the extensor tendon in Zone 1, and a bony mallet finger is the result of an avulsion of the extensor tendon from the distal phalanx with a small fragment of bone attached to the avulsed tendon. Mallet finger leads to an imbalance in the distribution of the extensor force between the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) and DIP joints. If left untreated, mallet finger leads to a swan neck deformity from PIP joint hyper extension and DIP joint flexion. Most mallet finger injuries can be managed non-surgically, but occasionally surgery is recommended for either an acute or a chronic mallet finger or for salvage of failed prior treatment.

  19. Scale up tools in reactive extrusion and compounding processes. Could 1D-computer modeling be helpful?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradel, J.-L.; David, C.; Quinebèche, S.; Blondel, P.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial scale-up (or scale down) in Compounding and Reactive Extrusion processes is one of the most critical R&D challenges. Indeed, most of High Performances Polymers are obtained within a reactive compounding involving chemistry: free radical grafting, in situ compatibilization, rheology control... but also side reactions: oxidation, branching, chain scission... As described by basic Arrhenius and kinetics laws, the competition between all chemical reactions depends on residence time distribution and temperature. Then, to ensure the best possible scale up methodology, we need tools to match thermal history of the formulation along the screws from a lab scale twin screw extruder to an industrial one. This paper proposes a comparison between standard scale-up laws and the use of Computer modeling Software such as Ludovic® applied and compared to experimental data. Scaling data from a compounding line to another one, applying general rules (for example at constant specific mechanical energy), shows differences between experimental and computed data, and error depends on the screw speed range. For more accurate prediction, 1D-Computer Modeling could be used to optimize the process conditions to ensure the best scale-up product, especially in temperature sensitive reactive extrusion processes. When the product temperature along the screws is the key, Ludovic® software could help to compute the temperature profile along the screws and extrapolate conditions, even screw profile, on industrial extruders.

  20. Species profiles and normalized reactivity of volatile organic compounds from gasoline evaporation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Shao, Min; Lee, Frank S. C.; Yu, Jianzhen

    2013-11-01

    In China, fast increase in passenger cars and gasoline consumption with yet quite limited vapor recovery during gasoline distribution has procured growing concern about gasoline evaporation as an important emission source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particularly in megacities hard-hit by air quality problems. This study presents VOC species profiles related to major pathways of gasoline evaporative loss in China, including headspace displacement, refueling operations and spillage/leakage. Apart from liquid gasoline and headspace vapors, gasoline vapors emitted when refueling cars in service stations or tank trucks in oil marketing depots were also sampled in situ with vapor recovery units (VRUs) turning on/off. Alkanes, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons accounted for 55-66, 21-35 and 4-8% in refueling vapors, 59-72, 18-28 and 4-10% in headspace vapors and 33-51, 8-15 and 38-48% in liquid gasoline samples, respectively. During refueling with VRUs turning on, total VOCs in vapors were less than one fifth of that with VRUs turning off, and aromatic hydrocarbons had higher weight percentages of about 8% in contrast with that of about 4% during refueling with VRUs turning off. Refueling vapors, especially for that with VRUs turning off, showed a larger fraction of light hydrocarbons including C3-C5 light alkenes when compared to headspace vapors, probably due to splashing and disturbance during filling operation. In refueling or headspace vapors the ratios of i-pentane/benzene, i-pentane/toluene, and MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether)/benzene ranged 8.7-57, 2.7-4.8, and 1.9-6.6, respectively; and they are distinctively much higher than those previously reported in vehicle exhausts. Calculated normalized reactivity or ozone formation potential of the gasoline vapors in China ranged 3.3-4.4 g O3 g-1 VOC, about twice that of gasoline headspace vapors reported in USA as a result of larger fractions of alkenes in China's gasoline vapors. The results suggested that

  1. Compounds leached from quinoa seeds inhibit matrix metalloproteinase activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Graf, B L; Cheng, D M; Esposito, D; Shertel, T; Poulev, A; Plundrich, N; Itenberg, D; Dayan, N; Lila, M A; Raskin, I

    2015-04-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a seed crop rich in bioactive compounds including phytoecdysones (especially 20-hydroxyecdysone, 20HE), polyphenols, proteins and essential fatty acids. We previously reported a method to leach and concentrate quinoa bioactives into a complex phytochemical mixture termed quinoa leachate (QL). Here, we aimed to determine the effect of QL and its chemically distinct fractions on five biochemical endpoints relevant to skin care applications: (i) cell viability, (ii) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) mRNA expression, (iii) MMP enzymatic activity, (iv) tyrosinase enzymatic activity and (v) intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Quinoa leachate was fractionated and chemically characterized using column chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Cell viability was determined using a MTT assay in four mammalian cell lines. MMP-1 mRNA expression was assessed in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) via qRT-PCR. The enzymatic activity of MMP-9 and tyrosinase was measured using fluorometric and colorimetric in vitro assays, respectively. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ROS production was determined in human dermal fibroblasts by fluorescence intensity of an oxidant-sensitive probe. Quinoa leachate was separated into three fractions: (i) carbohydrate-rich fraction (QL-C; 71.3% w/w of QL); (ii) phytoecdysone, polyphenol and protein-rich fraction (QL-P, 13.3% w/w of QL); (iii) oil-rich fraction (QL-O, 10.8% w/w of QL). QL did not reduce cell viability in any of the four cell lines tested. QL, QL-P and QL-O each significantly inhibited MMP-1 mRNA expression in HDF at a concentration of 5 μg mL(-1) . QL and QL-P also significantly inhibited MMP-9 enzymatic activity, whereas QL-P demonstrated significant tyrosinase enzymatic inhibition. Furthermore, QL, QL-P, QL-O and 20HE significantly inhibited intracellular ROS production. This study is the first to demonstrate the MMP, tyrosinase and ROS inhibiting

  2. Bioactive compounds and scavenging capacity of extracts from different parts of Vismia cauliflora against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Berto, Alessandra; Chisté, Renan Campos; Freitas, Marisa; Visentainer, Jesuí V; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2015-01-01

    Vismia cauliflora A.C.Sm. [Hypericaceae (Clusiaceae)] is a plant from Amazonian forest. It is used by Amerindians to treat dermatosis and inflammatory processes in the skin and has been considered an interesting source of bioactive compounds. We evaluated the scavenging capacity of extracts from V. cauliflora (leaf, branch, stem bark, flower, and whole fruit) against reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), namely, superoxide radical ([Formula: see text]), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), nitric oxide ((•)NO), and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). In addition, for the first time, the profile of phenolic compounds and carotenoids was determined. The scavenging capacities of each extract were determined using specific probes (fluorescent, colorimetric, and chemiluminescent) to detect different reactive species ((1)O2, HOCl, H2O2, [Formula: see text], (•)NO, and ONOO(-)). The identification and the quantification of phenolic compounds and carotenoids were carried out by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and HPLC-DAD, respectively. (-)-Epicatechin and proanthocyanidin dimers and trimer were the major phenolic compounds tentatively identified in leaf, branch, stem bark, and flower extracts, while dihydroxybenzoic acids were the major compounds in whole fruit extracts. All-trans-zeinoxanthin and all-trans-β-carotene were the major carotenoids tentatively identified in leaf extracts. All extracts of V. cauliflora showed high efficiency against all tested ROS and RNS, although flower and stem bark extracts exhibited the most remarkable scavenging capacity, especially for (•)NO and ONOO(-). Vismia cauliflora has great potential to be used in the development of phytopharmaceutical products due to its characteristic of being a promising source of bioactive compounds with high antioxidant properties.

  3. OH Reactivity and Potential SOA Yields from Volatile Organic Compounds and Other Trace Gases Measured in Controlled Laboratory Biomass Burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Goldan, P. D.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; de Gouw, J. A.; Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive suite of instruments were used to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases (e.g., CO, CH4, NO2, etc.) emitted from controlled burns of various fuel types common to the Southeastern and Southwestern United States. These laboratory-based measurements were conducted in February 2009 at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. An on-line GC-MS provided highly speciated VOC measurements of alkenes, alkanes, oxygenates, aromatics, biogenics, and nitrogen-containing compounds during the flaming or smoldering phases of replicate burns. The speciated GC-MS “grab” samples were integrated with fast-response gas-phase measurements (e.g., PTR-MS, PTR-IT-MS, NI-PT-CIMS, and FTIR) in order to determine VOC emission ratios and the fraction of identified vs. unidentifiable mass detected by PTR-MS. Emission ratios were used to calculate OH reactivity, which is a measure of potential ozone formation, as well as potential secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from the various fuel types. Small oxygenated VOCs had the highest emission ratios of the compounds observed. Alkenes dominated the VOC OH reactivity, which occasionally exceeded 1000 s-1. Calculated SOA yields from known precursors were dominated by aromatic VOCs, such as toluene, naphthalene (C10H8), and 1,3-benzenediol (C6H6O2, resorcinol). The contribution of several compounds not typically reported in ambient air measurements, such as substituted furans (C4H4O), pyrroles (C4H5N), and unsaturated C9 aromatics (C9H10), on OH reactivity and SOA yields will be discussed.

  4. Photochemical modeling of emissions trading of highly reactive volatile organic compounds in Houston, Texas. 1. Reactivity based trading and potential for ozone hot spot formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linlin; Thompson, Tammy; McDonald-Buller, Elena C; Webb, Alba; Allen, David T

    2007-04-01

    As part of the State Implementation Plan for attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality has created a Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOC) Emissions Cap and Trade Program for industrial point sources in the Houston/Galveston/Brazoria area. This program has a number of unique features, including its focus on a limited group of ozone precursors and its provisions for trading emissions based on atmospheric reactivity. This series of papers examines the potential air quality impacts of this new emission trading program through photochemical modeling of potential trading scenarios; this first paper in the series describes the air quality modeling methods used to assess potential trades, the potential for localized increases in ozone concentrations (ozone "hot spots") due to HRVOC emission trading, and the use of reactivity scales in the trading. When HRVOC emissions are traded on a mass basis, the simulations indicate that trading of HRVOC allowances between facilities resulted in less than 0.15 ppb (<0.13%) and 0.06 ppb (<0.06%) increases in predicted maximum, area-wide 1-h averaged and 8-h averaged ozone concentrations, respectively. Maximum decreases in ozone concentrations associated with trading, as opposed to across-the-board reductions, were larger than the increases. All of these changes are small compared to the maximum changes in ozone concentrations due to the VOC emissions from these sources (up to 5-10 ppb for 8 h averages; up to 30 ppb for 1-h averages). When emissions of HRVOCs are traded for other, less reactive emissions, on a reactivity weighted basis, air quality simulations indicate that daily maximum ozone concentrations increased by less than 0.3%. Because these relatively small changes (< 1%) are for unlikely trading scenarios designed to produce a maximum change in ozone concentrations (all emissions traded into localized regions), the simulations indicate that the

  5. Abiotic sulfhydryl reactivity: a predictor of aquatic toxicity for carbonyl-containing alpha,beta-unsaturated compounds.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, Jason W; Schultz, T Wayne

    2007-03-01

    A diverse series of aliphatic alpha,beta-unsaturated esters, ketones, and aldehydes were evaluated for reactivity with the model nucleophile sulfhydryl group in the form of the cysteine residue of the tripeptide glutathione; the reactive end point (RC50) was then related to aquatic toxicity (IGC50) assessed in the Tetrahymena pyriformis population growth impairment assay. The substructure specific to all tested reactive substances, an olefin conjugated to a carbonyl group, is inherently electrophilic and conveys the potential to act by way of Michael-type nucleophilic addition. All such unsaturated compounds are inherently acutely toxic. However, their toxicity is difficult to model with conventional descriptors since toxicity is independent of both hydrophobicity and molecular orbital electrophilicity but dependent on the specific molecular structure. While methacrylates typically did not attain an RC50 value at saturation, a linear relationship [log (IGC50(-1)) = 0.936[log (RC50(-1))] + 0.508, where n = 41, r2 = 0.846, q2 = 0.832, s = 0.35, F = 214, and Pr > F = 0.0001] was observed between aquatic toxicity and reactivity for the other carbonyl-containing alpha,beta-unsaturated chemicals.

  6. Predicting the reactivity of phenolic compounds with formaldehyde. II, continuation of an ab initio study.

    Treesearch

    Tohru Mitsunaga; Anthony H. Conner; Charles G. Jr. Hill

    2002-01-01

    Phenol–formaldehyde resins are important adhesives used by the forest products industry. The phenolic compounds in these resins are derived primarily from petrochemical sources. Alternate sources of phenolic compounds include tannins, lignins, biomass pyrolysis products, and coal gasification products. Because of variations in their chemical structures, the...

  7. What happens after the activation of ascaridole? Reactive compounds and their implications for skin sensitization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To replace animal testing and to improve the prediction of skin sensitization, significant attention has been directed to the use of alternative methods. Along with induction of Nrf2 target gene and upregulation of CD86 and C54 markers, the direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA), the regulatory agen...

  8. What Happens after Activation of Ascaridole? Reactive Compounds and Their Implications for Skin Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Chittiboyina, Amar G; Avonto, Cristina; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-09-19

    To replace animal testing and improve the prediction of skin sensitization, significant attention has been directed to the use of alternative methods. The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA), the regulatory agencies' approved alternative in chemico method, has been applied for understanding the sensitization capacity of activated ascaridole. Ascaridole, the oxidative metabolite of α-terpinene, is considered to be one of the components responsible for the contact allergy associated with essential oils derived from Chenopodium and Melaleuca species. The recently developed high-throughput screening based on the dansyl cysteamine (HTS-DCYA) method was applied to understand the reported enhanced reactivity of activated ascaridole and possibly to identify the resulting elusive radical or other reactive species. For the first time, a substituted cyclohexenone was identified as a potential electrophilic intermediate resulting in higher depletion of nucleophilic DCYA, along with several nonreactive byproducts of ascaridole via a radical degradation mechanism. Formation of electrophilic species via radical degradation is one of the possible pathways should be considered for the peptide reactivity of in aged tea tree oil or oils rich in terpinenes along with commonly believed reactants, allylic-epoxides and allylic-peroxides.

  9. Structural characteristics of compounds that can be activated to chemically reactive metabolites: use for a prediction of a carcinogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Lutz, W K

    1984-01-01

    Many mutagens and carcinogens act via covalent interaction of metabolic intermediates with DNA in the target cell. This report groups those structural elements which are often found to form the basis for a metabolism to such chemically reactive metabolites. Compounds which are chemically reactive per se and which do not require metabolic activation form group 1. Group 2 comprises of olefins and aromatic hydrocarbons where the oxidation via an epoxide can be responsible for the generation of reactive species. Aromatic amines, hydrazines, and nitrosamines form group 3 requiring an oxidation of a nitrogen atom or of a carbon atom in alpha position to a nitrosated amine. Group 4 compounds are halogenated hydrocarbons which can either give rise to radicals or can form an olefin (group 2) upon dehydrohalogenation. Group 5 compounds depend upon some preceding enzymatic activity either not available in the target cell or acting on positions in the molecule which are not directly involved in the subsequent formation of electrophilic atoms. Examples for each group are taken from the "List of Chemicals and Industrial Processes Associated with Cancer in Humans" as compiled by the International Agency for the Research on Cancer, and it is shown that 91% of the organic carcinogens would have been detected on the basis of structural elements characteristic for group 1-5. As opposed to this very high sensitivity, the specificity (the true negative fraction) of using this approach as a short-term test for carcinogenicity is shown to be bad because detoxification pathways have so far not been taken into account. These competing processes are so complex, however, that either only very extensive knowledge about pharmacokinetics, stability, and reactivity will be required or that in vivo systems have to be used to predict, on a quantitative basis, the damage expected on the DNA. DNA-binding experiments in vivo are presented with benzene and toluene to demonstrate one possible way for

  10. The Study and Development of Metal Oxide Reactive Adsorbents for the Destruction of Toxic Organic Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-15

    exposure of personnel and systems to chemical warfare agents and other toxic organic compounds. The research program that was developed built upon earlier...TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911NF-04-1-0377 406038 Form Approved OMB NO. 0704...of the exposure of personnel and systems to chemical warfare agents and other toxic organic compounds. The research program that was developed

  11. Hazardous components and health effects of atmospheric aerosol particles: reactive oxygen species, soot, polycyclic aromatic compounds and allergenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Selzle, Kathrin; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    This review outlines recent advances in the investigation of the chemical properties, molecular interactions and health effects of hazardous compounds in atmospheric aerosols, in particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), soot, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and allergenic proteins. Epidemiological studies show correlations between air particulate matter and adverse health effects of air pollution including allergy, asthma, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, but the causative relations and mechanisms of interaction on the molecular level are still unclear. ROS generated by photochemical and heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere seem to play a key role in aerosol health effects and provide a direct link between atmospheric and physiological multiphase processes. Soot and PACs can trigger formation of ROS in vivo, leading to inflammation and cellular damage. PACs as well as allergenic proteins are efficiently oxygenated and nitrated upon exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide, which leads to an enhancement of their toxicity and allergenicity.

  12. Screening and characterization of reactive compounds with in vitro peptide-trapping and liquid chromatography/high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cong; Chupak, Louis S; Philip, Thomas; Johnson, Benjamin M; Gentles, Robert; Drexler, Dieter M

    2014-02-01

    The present study describes a novel methodology for the detection of reactive compounds using in vitro peptide-trapping and liquid chromatography-high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Compounds that contain electrophilic groups can covalently bind to nucleophilic moieties in proteins and form adducts. Such adducts are thought to be associated with drug-mediated toxicity and therefore represent potential liabilities in drug discovery programs. In addition, reactive compounds identified in biological screening can be associated with data that can be misinterpreted if the reactive nature of the compound is not appreciated. In this work, to facilitate the triage of hits from high-throughput screening (HTS), a novel assay was developed to monitor the formation of covalent peptide adducts by compounds suspected to be chemically reactive. The assay consists of in vitro incubations of test compounds (under conditions of physiological pH) with synthetically prepared peptides presenting a variety of nucleophilic moieties such as cysteine, lysine, histidine, arginine, serine, and tyrosine. Reaction mixtures were analyzed using full-scan LC-HRMS, the data were interrogated using postacquisition data mining, and modified amino acids were identified by subsequent LC-HRMS/mass spectrometry. The study demonstrated that in vitro nucleophilic peptide trapping followed by LC-HRMS analysis is a useful approach for screening of intrinsically reactive compounds identified from HTS exercises, which are then removed from follow-up processes, thus obviating the generation of data from biochemical activity assays.

  13. Exploring the mechanism of inhibition of human telomerase by cysteine-reactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Guillaume; Dingli, Florent; Masson, Vanessa; Dauzonne, Daniel; Ségal-Bendirdjian, Evelyne; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Loew, Damarys; Bombard, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    Telomerase is an almost universal cancer target that consists minimally of a core protein human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and a RNA component human telomerase RNA (hTR). Some inhibitors of this enzyme are thought to function by the covalent binding to one or several cysteine residues; however, this inhibition mechanism has never been investigated because of the difficulty in producing telomerase. In this study, we use a recent method to produce recombinant hTERT to analyze the effect of cysteine-reactive inhibitors on telomerase. Using mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analysis, we identify several targeted residues in separated domains of the hTERT protein and show that cysteine-reactive reagents abolish the interaction with the CR4/5 region of hTR. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Governing processes for reactive nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere in relation to ecosystem, climatic and human health impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, O.; Skjøth, C. A.; Reis, S.; Bleeker, A.; Harrison, R.; Cape, J. N.; Fowler, D.; Skiba, U.; Simpson, D.; Jickells, T.; Kulmala, M.; Gyldenkærne, S.; Sørensen, L. L.; Erisman, J. W.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-07-01

    Reactive nitrogen (Nr) compounds have different fates in the atmosphere due to differences in governing processes of physical transport, deposition and chemical transformation. Nr compounds addressed here include reduced nitrogen (NHx: ammonia (NH3) and its reaction product ammonium (NH4+)), oxidized nitrogen (NOy: nitrogen monoxide (NO) + nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and their reaction products) as well as organic nitrogen compounds (organic N). Pollution abatement strategies need to take into account these differences in the governing processes of these compounds when assessing their impact on ecosystem services, biodiversity, human health and climate. NOx (NO + NO2) emitted from traffic affects human health in urban areas where the presence of buildings increases the residence time in streets. In urban areas this leads to enhanced exposure of the population to NOx concentrations. NOx emissions have little impact on nearby ecosystems because of the small dry deposition rates of NOx. These compounds need to be converted into nitric acid (HNO3) before removal through deposition is efficient. HNO3 sticks quickly to any surface and is thereby either dry deposited or incorporated into aerosols as nitrate (NO3-). In contrast to NOx compounds, NH3 has potentially high impacts on ecosystems near the main agricultural sources of NH3 because of its large ground-level concentrations along with large dry deposition rates. Aerosol phase NH4+ and NO3- contribute significantly to background PM2.5 and PM10 (mass of aerosols with a diameter of less than 2.5 and 10 μm, respectively) with an impact on radiation balance as well as potentially on human health. Little is known quantitatively and qualitatively about organic N in the atmosphere, other than that it contributes a significant fraction of wet-deposited N, and is present in both gaseous and particulate forms in the atmosphere. Further studies are needed to characterize the sources, air chemistry and removal rates of organic N

  15. Evaluation of a horizontal permeable reactive barrier for preventing upward diffusion of volatile organic compounds through the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; Hartog, Niels; Raoof, Amir; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    2015-11-01

    Permeable reactive barriers are commonly used to treat contaminant plumes in the saturated zone. However, no known applications of horizontal permeable reactive barriers (HPRBs) exist for oxidizing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the unsaturated zone. In this study, laboratory column experiments were carried out to investigate the ability of a HPRB containing solid potassium permanganate, to oxidize the vapors of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene, and ethanol migrating upward from a contaminated saturated zone. Results revealed that an increase in initial water saturation and HPRB thickness strongly affected the removal efficiency of the HPRB. Installing the HPRB relatively close to the water table was more effective due to the high background water content and enhanced diffusion of protons and/or hydroxides away from the HPRB. Inserting the HPRB far above the water table caused rapid changes in pH within the HPRB, leading to lower oxidation rates. The pH effects were included in a reactive transport model, which successfully simulated the TCE and toluene experimental observations. Simulations for ethanol were not affected by pH due to condensation of water during ethanol oxidation, which caused some dilution in the HRPB.

  16. Flux estimates and OH reaction potential of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from a mixed northern hardwood forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, John; Helmig, Detlev; Guenther, Alex; Harley, Peter; Pressley, Shelley; Vogel, Christoph

    Diurnal branch-level emission rates of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) including isoprene, monoterpenes (MT), and sesquiterpenes (SQT) were determined at the University of Michigan Biological Station for the tree species red maple ( Acer rubrum), red oak ( Quercus rubra), paper birch ( Betula papyrifera), white pine ( Pinus strobus), and big tooth aspen ( Populus grandidentata). These emission rates were combined with detailed biomass distribution and meteorological data and incorporated into the canopy model, model of emissions of gasses and aerosols from nature (MEGAN), for estimating whole-canopy fluxes of isoprene. The modeled half-hour fluxes (mgCm-2h-1) and cumulative seasonal fluxes (mgCm-2) compared favorably with results from direct, canopy-level eddy covariance (EC) isoprene measurements; modeled cumulative seasonal flux deviated less than 30% from the EC results. Significant MT emissions were found from four of the five tree species. MT emissions from three of these were both light- and temperature-dependent and were approximately one order of magnitude greater than light-independent MT emissions. SQT emissions were identified from three of the five tree species. The model was modified to incorporate SQT and both light-dependent and light-independent MT emissions for determining fluxes. Isoprene comprised >95% of the total terpenoid flux with MT and SQT comprising 4% and 0.3%, respectively. The average cumulative fluxes (in mgCm-2) from June through September were 2490 for isoprene, 105 for MT, and 7 for SQT. A simple box model analysis was used to estimate the contribution of the isoprene, MT, and SQT emissions to the total OH reactivity. These results confirm that isoprene dominates OH reactions especially during daytime hours. Emissions of reactive MT and SQT increase the BVOC+OH reactivity, but are still lower than estimates of BVOC fluxes at this site necessary for affecting OH reactivity to the significant degree suggested by recent

  17. Correlations between chemical reactivity and mutagenic activity against S. typhimurium TA100 for alpha-dicarbonyl compounds as a proof of the mutagenic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Mellado, J M; Ruiz Montoya, M

    1994-01-16

    The mutagenic activities in the Ames test against S. typhimurium TA100 for a series of alpha-dicarbonyl compounds are examined together with the formation constants of the adducts formed between such compounds and guanine and guanosine. Correlations between the equilibrium constants, the apparent reaction enthalpies, and the mutagenic activity are presented. These correlations imply that the mutagenic activity is related to the chemical reactivity of the dicarbonyl compounds with the puric bases.

  18. Performing organic chemistry with inorganic compounds: electrophilic reactivity of selected nitrosyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Doctorovich, Fabio; Di Salvo, Florencia

    2007-10-01

    The inorganic nitrosyl (NO(+)) complexes [Fe(CN) 5NO](2-), [Ru(bpy)2(NO)Cl](2+), and [IrCl 5(NO)](-) are useful reagents for the nitrosation of a variety of organic compounds, ranging from amines to the relatively inert alkenes. Regarding [IrCl 5(NO)](-), its high electrophilicity and inertness define it as a unique reagent and provide a powerful synthetic route for the isolation and stabilization of coordinated nitroso compounds that are unstable in free form, such as S-nitrosothiols and primary nitrosamines. Related to the high electrophilicity of [IrCl 5(NO)](-), an unusual behavior is described for its PPh 4(+) salt in the solid state, showing an electronic distribution represented by Ir(IV)-NO(*) instead of Ir (III)-NO(+) (as for the K(+) and Na(+) salts).

  19. Atomization of cadmium compounds under reactive and inert high-temperature environment with stationary sample introduction.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Dávid; Nagy, Tibor; Balogh, Attila; Falussy, Csaba; Posta, József

    2014-01-01

    Atomization of cadmium compounds (acetate, chloride, nitrate, perchlorate, sulfate, formate, propionate) was studied using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Our goal was to study processes influencing atomization separately, the focus was on the contribution of thermal properties of substances to atomization. For this purpose new techniques and equipment have been developed, such as a special separated three-slot burner, quartz flame furnace, and an electrically heated thermospectrometer. According to quartz flame furnace and thermospectrometric measurements, cadmium salts do not atomize below 600 °C in an inert atmosphere. We found that in the thermospectrometer the atomization of cadmium compounds follows at least two different reaction courses. At lower temperatures (650-700 °C) a slower mechanism is dominant at higher regions of the furnace, while at 800 °C a faster mechanism demanding less residence time in the furnace becomes dominant. Under inert atmosphere the degree of atomization strongly depends on the thermal properties of substances.

  20. Development of a QSAR for worst case estimates of acute toxicity of chemically reactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Freidig, A P; Dekkers, S; Verwei, M; Zvinavashe, E; Bessems, J G M; van de Sandt, J J M

    2007-05-15

    Future EU legislations enforce a fast hazard and risk assessment of thousands of existing chemicals. If conducted by means of present data requirements, this assessment will use a huge number of test animals and will be neither cost nor time effective. The purpose of the current research was to develop methods to increase the acceptability of in vitro data for classification and labelling regarding acute toxicity. For this purpose, a large existing database containing in vitro and in vivo data was analysed. For more than 300 compounds in the database, relations between in vitro cytotoxicity and rat or mouse intravenous and oral in vivo LD50 values were re-evaluated and the possibilities for definition of mechanism based chemical subclasses were investigated. A high in vitro-in vivo correlation was found for chemicals classified as irritants. This can be explained by a shared unspecific cytotoxicity of these compounds which will act as the predominant mode of action for both endpoints, irritation and acute toxicity. For this subclass, which covered almost 40% of all compounds in the database, the LD50 values after intravenous dosing could be predicted with high accuracy. A somewhat lower accuracy was found for the prediction of oral LD50 values based on in vitro cytotoxicity data. Based on this successful correlation, a classification and labelling scheme was developed, that includes a hazard based definition of the applicability domain (irritants) and a prediction of the labelling of compounds for their acute iv and oral toxicity. The scheme was tested by an external validation.

  1. Microstructural behavior of nitriding compound layer for Nb-carbonitride coating grown by thermo-reactive diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Kang, Namhyun; Bae, Jong-Seong; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to understand the microstructural behavior of nitriding compound layer and its effect on Nb-carbonitride growth produced by the thermo-reactive diffusion (TRD) process. Gas nitriding was performed at 550 °C for 3 and 6 h, followed by TRD at 900 °C for 6 h. The nitriding compound layers had thicknesses of 10 and 16 μm for nitriding time of 3 and 6 h, respectively. The corresponding Nb-carbonitride layers produced by TRD were 7.2 and 11.2 μm thick, respectively. Reheating at 900 °C transformed the microstructure of the nitriding compounds to Fe3O4 and FeN0.0939. As reheating proceeded to 30 min, high concentration of nitrogen, initially existing in the nitride layer diffused to 80-90 μm into the substrate. Therefore, the TRD process produced NbN layer at the interfacial area due to intensively dissolved nitrogen from FeN0.0939. As the TRD proceeded, supply of C atoms from the base metal became competitive with the N diffusion. Thus, the TRD coating layer was grown to above the interface. Reheating at 900 °C for the 16-μm-thick nitride layer resulted in a nitrogen content ˜0.4 at% higher than that for the 10-μm-thick nitride layer, thereby producing a thicker Nb-carbonitride layer.

  2. Interactions between volatile organic compounds and reactive halogen in the tropical marine atmosphere using WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badia, Alba; Reeves, Claire E.; Baker, Alex; Volkamer, Rainer; von Glasow, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Halogen species (chlorine, bromine and iodine) are known to play an important role in the chemistry and oxidizing capacity of the troposphere, particularly in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Reactive halogens cause ozone (O3) destruction, change the HOx and NOX partitioning, affect the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mercury, reduce the lifetime of methane, and take part in new particle formation. Numerical models predicted that reactive halogen compounds account for 30% of O3 destruction in the MBL and 5-20% globally. There are indications that the chemistry of reactive halogens and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) in the tropics are inter-related. Moreover, the presence of aldehydes, such as glyoxal (CHOCHO), has a potential impact on radical cycling and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the MBL and free troposphere (FT). Model calculations suggest aldehydes to be an important sink for bromine atoms and hence competition for their reaction with O3 forming BrO and so illustrating a link between the cycles of halogens and OVOCs in the marine atmosphere. The main objective of this contribution is to investigate the atmospheric chemistry in the tropical East Pacific with a focus on reactive halogens and OVOCs and their links using the latest version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and field data from the TORERO campaign. WRF-Chem is a highly flexible community model for atmospheric research where aerosol-radiation-cloud feedback processes are taken into account. Our current reaction mechanism in WRF-Chem is based on the MOZART mechanism and has been extended to include bromine, chlorine and iodine chemistry. The MOZART mechanism includes detailed gas-phase chemistry of CHOCHO formation as well as state-of-the-science pathways to form SOA. Oceanic emissions of aldehydes, including CHOCHO, and of organic halogens based on measurements from the TORERO campaign have been added into the model. Sea

  3. Fluorescent-Antibody Study of Natural Finger-Like Zooloeae

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, Samuel R.; Unz, Richard F.

    1975-01-01

    Fluorescent-antibody techniques using Zoogloea ramigera 106 antiserum were used to study fresh activated sludge flocs and finger-like zoogloeae in the microbial film that developed over stored samples of activated sludge. Few cells in fresh activated sludge reacted positively with the fluorescein-labeled antiserum. Finger-like zoogloeae containing reactive cells were readily observed in the microbial film layer over stored activated sludge. Certain of the natural finger-like projections were entirely composed of cells that reacted positively to the labeled Z. ramigera 106 antiserum, whereas other projections were devoid of reactive cells. Images PMID:1096822

  4. A global plasma model for reactive deposition of compound films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, B. C.; Wu, Z. L.; Wu, B.; Li, Y. G.; Lei, M. K.

    2017-05-01

    A spatially averaged, time-dependent global plasma model has been developed to describe the reactive deposition of a TiAlSiN thin film by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharges in Ar/N2 mixture gas, based on the particle balance and the energy balance in the ionization region, and considering the formation and erosion of the compound at the target surface. The modeling results show that, with increasing the N2 partial pressure from 0% to 40% at a constant working pressure of 0.3 Pa, the electron temperature during the strongly ionized period increases from 4 to 7 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient, which represents the power fraction that effectively heats the electrons and maintains the discharge, increases from about 4% to 7%; with increasing the working pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa at a constant N2 partial pressure of 25%, the electron temperature decreases from 10 to 4 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient decreases from 8% to 5%. Using the modeled plasma parameters to evaluate the kinetic energy of arriving ions, the ion-to-neutral flux ratio of deposited species, and the substrate heating, the variations of process parameters that increase these values lead to an enhanced adatom mobility at the target surface and an increased input energy to the substrate, corresponding to the experimental observation of surface roughness reduction, the microstructure transition from the columnar structure to the dense featureless structure, and the enhancement of phase separation. At higher N2 partial pressure or lower working pressure, the modeling results demonstrate an increase in electron temperature, which shifts the discharge balance of Ti species from Ti+ to Ti2+ and results in a higher return fraction of Ti species, corresponding to the higher Al/Ti ratio of deposited films at these conditions. The modeling results are well correlated with the experimental observation of the composition variation and the microstructure

  5. Structural modeling of iron halogenases: synthesis and reactivity of halide-iron(IV)-oxo compounds.

    PubMed

    Planas, Oriol; Clémancey, Martin; Latour, Jean-Marc; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2014-09-25

    A structural synthetic model of the iron(IV)-oxo-halide active species of non-heme iron dependent halogenases is reported. Compounds with general formula [Fe(IV)(O)(X)(Pytacn)](+) (1-X, X = Cl, Br) have been prepared and characterized spectroscopically and chemically with regard to their oxidizing ability. 1-X performs hydrogen-atom abstraction of C-H bonds at reaction rates 2-3 times faster than the corresponding solvato dicationic species, thus modelling the first step in C-H functionalization taking place in natural halogenation.

  6. Copper(II) mixed chelate compounds induce apoptosis through reactive oxygen species in neuroblastoma cell line CHP-212.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Anllely Grizett; Vázquez-Aguirre, Adriana; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Mejía, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    In the present work we report the antiproliferative activity of Cu(II) coordination compounds, CasIIgly ([Cu(4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) (glycinato) (H2O)]NO3), CasIIIia ([Cu(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) (glycinato) (H2O)]NO3), and CasIIIEa ([Cu(4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) (acetylacetonato) (H2O)]NO3), against human tumoral cell line CHP-212 (estromal neuroblastoma). Additionally, the molecular structure of CasIIIEa was reported. The IC50 values obtained for the evaluated compounds are in the range 18 to 47 μM, representing an inhibition potency increase of 5 to 12 times compared with cisplatin (IC50=226.7 μM). After 2h of incubation with the evaluated compounds, cells showed high levels of reactive oxygen species and a considerable GSH depletion, besides an important disruption of the mitochondrial membrane with release of cytochrome C and besides the presence of caspase-3, an effector caspase that is activated in the last step of apoptosis cascade. The results confirm that cell death in neuroblastoma CHP-212 treated with Casiopeínas occurs via apoptosis. Due to the lack of expression of caspase-8, cell death is principally by the mitochondrial pathway. Thus, one of the most interesting findings of this work is the identification of a very important damage in neuroblastoma cells induced by Cu(II) coordination compounds in a very short exposition times. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Environmental chamber studies of maximum incremental reactivities of volatile organic compounds. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.L.; Pierce, J.A.; Malkina, I.L.; Luo, D.; Long, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    The effects of 36 representative volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and CO on ozone formation, NO oxidation, and OH radical levels were measured in a series of environmental chamber experiments representing conditions where VOCs have the greatest effect on photochemical ozone formation. The experiments consisted of repeated 6-hour indoor chamber irradiations of a simplified mixture of ozone precursors with NOx in excess, alternating with runs with varying amounts of a test VOC added. The VOCs studied included representative alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alcohols, ethers, alcohol ethers, and siloxanes. CO, Acetone and 2-chloromethyl-3-chloropropene were also studied. Reactions of formaldehyde, acetone, the methylbenzenes and the alkenes had the largest positive effects on OH radical levels, and because of this they caused the most NO oxidation and ozone formation per molecule reacted. Reactions of the siloxanes and the C(6+) n-alkanes had the most inhibiting effects on radicals, causing them to inhibit NO oxidation and ozone formation under the conditions of these experiments. The other compounds had smaller and usually negative effects on OH radicals, and had moderate but positive effects on ozone formed and NO oxidized. Information was also obtained on amounts of NO oxidation caused directly by the reactions of the added VOCs or their products.

  8. Rolling friction robot fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A low friction, object guidance, and gripping finger device for a robotic end effector on a robotic arm is disclosed, having a pair of robotic fingers each having a finger shaft slideably located on a gripper housing attached to the end effector. Each of the robotic fingers has a roller housing attached to the finger shaft. The roller housing has a ball bearing mounted centering roller located at the center, and a pair of ball bearing mounted clamping rollers located on either side of the centering roller. The object has a recess to engage the centering roller and a number of seating ramps for engaging the clamping rollers. The centering roller acts to position and hold the object symmetrically about the centering roller with respect to the X axis and the clamping rollers act to position and hold the object with respect to the Y and Z axis.

  9. Estimation of biotransformation and sorption of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) during artificial recharge through a reactive barrier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valhondo, C.; Martinez-Landa, L.; Carrera, J.; Hidalgo, J. J.; Ayora, C.

    2016-12-01

    The reuse of lesser quality water such as effluents from wastewater treatment plants or effluent-receiving water bodies has been promoted due to the water shortages affecting many regions of the world. Artificial recharge through infiltration basins is known to improve several water quality parameters including the attenuation of emerging organic compounds (EOCs). Many of these contaminants exhibit redox dependent biotransformation because the redox state is one of the factors controlling microbial community development. Together with biotransformation, sorption also affects the behavior of EOCs in their passage through the soil. We studied EOCs attenuation in an infiltration system is located in Sant Vicenç dells Horts on the Llobregat delta (Barcelona, Spain), where the local water agency has an artificial recharge pilot project . The Llobregat river water used for the artificial recharge is affected by treatment plant effluents which contain EOCs. A reactive barrier consisting of vegetable compost, clay, and iron oxide was installed in the bottom of the infiltration basin to enhance biotransformation and sorption of EOCs. The barrier releases dissolved organic carbon, which favors the development of a broad range of redox environments, and supplies neutral, cationic, and anionic surfaces to favor sorption of different types of contaminants. Results were excellent, but quantitative evaluation of the EOCs attenuation requires knowledge of the residence time distribution of infiltrated water. A tracer test was performed by adding tracers to the infiltration water and interpreting the breakthrough curves at diverse monitoring points with a 2D multilayer numerical model. The calibrated model quantify degradation, as a first order law, and sorption through a linear distribution coefficient for ten selected EOCs. Results indicate higher degradation rates and sorption coefficients in the reactive barrier than in the rest of the aquifer for nine and eight of the ten

  10. Cross-reactivity among p-amino group compounds in sulfonamide fixed drug eruption: diagnostic value of patch testing.

    PubMed

    Tornero, P; De Barrio, M; Baeza, M L; Herrero, T

    2004-08-01

    We studied 28 patients with fixed drug eruption (FDE) caused by sulfonamide antibiotics to investigate cross-reactivity between sulfonamide derivatives and p-amino compounds and to explore the usefulness of patch testing, as an alternative to controlled oral challenge testing (COCT), in diagnosis within this clinical area. COCT with sulfamethoxazole (SMX), sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfamethizole (SMZ), furosemide (FU), procaine (PRO) and glipizide (GPZ) was performed. Patch testing (PT) with SMX and SDZ was carried out. In all patients, the diagnosis of FDE was confirmed by positive COCT and allergy to trimethoprim ruled out by COCT. 42.8 and 31.8% of the SMX-induced FDE patients reacted to SMZ and SDZ, respectively. All patients (n = 28) tolerated FU, PRO and GPZ. COCT performed with the 3 sulfonamide antibiotics in 12 patients was positive in 2 subjects with the 3 drugs, in 2 patients only with SMX and SMZ and in the remaining 8, SMX was the only causative drug. PT was positive in 5 of 25 patients positive on COCT. The probability of obtaining a positive PT was higher among patients who had a residual lesion than that among those who lacked this. Cross-reactivity between different sulfonamide antibiotics is thus variable, being most likely between SMX and SMZ. We have found no cross-reactivity between sulfonamide antibiotics and other sulfonamide derivatives or p-amino drugs in FDE. PT is a useful tool in the diagnosis of FDE, especially if there are residual lesions, because it avoided the need for COCT in 20% of patients.

  11. Photochemical modeling of emissions trading of highly reactive volatile organic compounds in Houston, Texas. 2. Incorporation of chlorine emissions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linlin; Thompson, Tammy; McDonald-Buller, Elena C; Allen, David T

    2007-04-01

    As part of the State Implementation Plan for attaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone, the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality has created a Highly Reactive Volatile Organic Compounds (HRVOC) Emissions Cap and Trade Program for industrial point sources in the Houston/Galveston/Brazoria area. This series of papers examines the potential air quality impacts of this new emission trading program through photochemical modeling of potential trading scenarios; this paper examines the air quality impact of allowing facilities to trade chlorine emission reductions for HRVOC allocations on a reactivity weighted basis. The simulations indicate that trading of anthropogenic chlorine emission reductions for HRVOC allowances at a single facility or between facilities, in general, resulted in improvements in air quality. Decreases in peak 1-h averaged and 8-h averaged ozone concentrations associated with trading chlorine emissions for HRVOC allocations on a Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) basis were up to 0.74 ppb (0.63%) and 0.56 ppb (0.61%), respectively. Air quality metrics based on population exposure decreased by up to 3.3% and 4.1% for 1-h and 8-h averaged concentrations. These changes are small compared to the maximum changes in ozone concentrations due to the VOC emissions from these sources (5-10 ppb for 8-h averages; up to 30 ppb for 1-h averages) and the chlorine emissions from the sources (5-10 ppb for maximum concentrations over wide areas and up to 70 ppb in localized areas). The simulations indicate that the inclusion of chlorine emissions in the trading program is likely to be beneficial to air quality and is unlikely to cause localized increases in ozone concentrations ("hot spots").

  12. Effects of a combined Diesel particle filter-DeNOx system (DPN) on reactive nitrogen compounds emissions: a parameter study.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Norbert V; Haag, Regula; Seiler, Cornelia; Schmid, Peter; Zennegg, Markus; Wichser, Adrian; Ulrich, Andrea; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas

    2012-12-18

    The impact of a combined diesel particle filter-deNO(x) system (DPN) on emissions of reactive nitrogen compounds (RNCs) was studied varying the urea feed factor (α), temperature, and residence time, which are key parameters of the deNO(x) process. The DPN consisted of a platinum-coated cordierite filter and a vanadia-based deNO(x) catalyst supporting selective catalytic reduction (SCR) chemistry. Ammonia (NH₃) is produced in situ from thermolysis of urea and hydrolysis of isocyanic acid (HNCO). HNCO and NH₃ are both toxic and highly reactive intermediates. The deNO(x) system was only part-time active in the ISO8178/4 C1cycle. Urea injection was stopped and restarted twice. Mean NO and NO₂ conversion efficiencies were 80%, 95%, 97% and 43%, 87%, 99%, respectively, for α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2. HNCO emissions increased from 0.028 g/h engine-out to 0.18, 0.25, and 0.26 g/h at α = 0.8, 1.0, and 1.2, whereas NH₃ emissions increased from <0.045 to 0.12, 1.82, and 12.8 g/h with maxima at highest temperatures and shortest residence times. Most HNCO is released at intermediate residence times (0.2-0.3 s) and temperatures (300-400 °C). Total RNC efficiencies are highest at α = 1.0, when comparable amounts of reduced and oxidized compounds are released. The DPN represents the most advanced system studied so far under the VERT protocol achieving high conversion efficiencies for particles, NO, NO₂, CO, and hydrocarbons. However, we observed a trade-off between deNO(x) efficiency and secondary emissions. Therefore, it is important to adopt such DPN technology to specific application conditions to take advantage of reduced NO(x) and particle emissions while avoiding NH₃ and HNCO slip.

  13. Marine and terrestrial sources of reactive volatile organic compounds and their impact on the tropospheric ozone chemistry of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, Daniel David

    Two areas integral to the global cycle of tropospheric ozone were studied. The first segment of this investigation involved the study of marine ecosystems to define the sources of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) in the surface ocean. This included laboratory and field investigations conducted to determine the function and importance of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the abiotic photochemical production of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) in surface seawater. Concurrently, phytoplankton were investigated as a biogenic source of NMHCs in the surface ocean. Low molecular weight alkenes, compounds observed in the greatest quantities in the surface ocean, are formed almost exclusively as a result of DOM-mediated photochemistry. Isoprene was found to be produced by all phytoplankton species investigated. The primary sink for NMHCs found in surface seawater was gas exchange. The second segment of this study focused on the prevalence of NMHCs and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in the rural southeastern United States. To characterize the importance of NMHCs and OVOCs to the process of atmospheric reactivity and tropospheric ozone chemistry, mixing ratios for a number of NMHCs and OVOCs were determined. Isoprene and its primary oxidation products, methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone, were observed to be the dominant hydroxyl radical (OH) sink in the rural atmosphere. Certain OVOCs, namely methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde-although not as important on a reactivity basis-were the most prevalent in terms of mass. Methanol was the dominant OVOC measured in the rural atmosphere and serves as an important source of formaldehyde in the rural atmosphere. On the basis of the mixing ratio patterns exhibited by many of the OVOCs present in the rural atmosphere, considerable biogenic sources are likely.

  14. Oxidation of sulfur compounds in petroleum residues: reactivity-structural relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.C.; Dorrence, S.M.; Nazir, M.; Plancher, H.; Barbour, F.A.

    1981-09-01

    Studies have been made on the reactivity of sulfur entities in oxidized asphalts and oxidized petroleum distillation residues during air oxidation. Asphalts are referred to as residues. The oxidation of these materials includes the rapid formation of an unsymmetrical ir band at ca 1030/cm. Sulfoxides are not normally found in unoxidized petroleum residues, but develop rapidly during air aging. Their presence in these residues has been inferred from their specific bands in ir spectra. Confirmation of sulfoxides was obtained from deoxygenation with chlorocarbenes and decomposition with bromine and peracetic acid. Hydroperoxides in amounts that might interfere with sulfoxide determination were not found in oxidated residues. The concentration of sulfoxides formed during air oxidation was found to rapidly reach a maximum value and to remain constant on further oxidation of the residue. Model studies indicate that hydroperoxides play a role in sulfoxide formation. The data show that both alkyl and aryl sulfides were present in aliphatic residues, that predominantly alkyl types were oxidized during oxidative aging in air and that concentrations of the alkyl and aryl types vary with crude source. Peracetic acid oxidation of the residues indicated that most of the sulfur present was in the form of sulfides. 2 figures, 6 tables.

  15. Reactivity of Cork Extracts with (+)-Catechin and Malvidin-3-O-glucoside in Wine Model Solutions: Identification of a New Family of Ellagitannin-Derived Compounds (Corklins).

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Joana; Fernandes, Ana; Oliveira, Joana; Brás, Natércia F; Reis, Sofia; Lopes, Paulo; Roseira, Isabel; Cabral, Miguel; Mateus, Nuno; de Freitas, Victor

    2017-09-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reactivity of phenolic compounds extracted from cork stoppers to wine model solutions with two major wine components, namely, (+)-catechin and malvidin-3-O-glucoside. Besides the formation of some compounds already described in the literature, these reactions also yielded a new family of ellagitannin-derived compounds, named herein as corklins. This new family of compounds that were found to result from the interaction between ellagitannins in alcoholic solutions and (+)-catechin were structurally characterized by mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and computational methods.

  16. Basalt Reactivity in the Presence of H2O-Saturated Supercritical CO2 Containing Gaseous Sulfur Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaef, H. T.; McGrail, P.; Owen, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Future impacts of climate change may be minimized by capture of emissions, primarily CO2 from fossil-fueled electric generating stations and subsequent sequestration in deep geologic formations. Injection of dry liquid CO2 into porous geologic reservoirs for long term storage is expected to eventually form a buoyant water-saturated bubble of supercritical fluid. Depending on purification processes and underground injection control regulations, the injected CO2 also could contain trace compounds associated with flue gas streams (SO2, N2, and O2). Once injected, the scCO2 will absorb water (1500 to 3000 ppmw) until becoming immobilized by reservoir trapping mechanisms. Reactivity of the water-bearing scCO2 with silicate minerals is relatively unknown and could have impacts on long term reservoir seal integrity and trapping by mineralization. To examine the reactivity of H2O-saturated scCO2, basalt experiments were conducted at pressures and temperatures relevant to geologic sequestration. Reaction products differed considerably depending on the gas mixtures used and type of basalt. In the presence of H2O-saturated CO2, the Newark Basin basalt reacted to produce secondary mineralization with needle-like morphologies and chemistries similar to aragonite. Exposing the same basalt to a CO2-H2S mixture (H2O saturated) produced two types of reaction products: carbonates in the form of small discrete nodules or needles and metallic-like circular areas similar in chemistry to pyrite and marcarsite. Tests conducted in the presence of CO2-SO2 produced the most extensive surface reaction products observed during the experiments. Some basalts were completely coated in white precipitate identified as a mixture of gypsum, sulfate bearing minerals (rozenite and melanterite), and a magnesium sulfate compound (MgSO4 ●5H2O). Hawaiian flow top basalts contained extensive reaction products including magnesium sulfate (MgSO4●6H2O), which formed on the large olivine crystals present

  17. Histamine chloramine reactivity with thiol compounds, ascorbate, and methionine and with intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Peskin, Alexander V; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2003-11-15

    Histamine is stored in granules of mast cells and basophils and released by inflammatory mediators. It has the potential to intercept some of the HOCl generated by the neutrophil enzyme, myeloperoxidase, to produce histamine chloramine. We have measured rate constants for reactions of histamine chloramine with methionine, ascorbate, and GSH at pH 7.4, of 91 M(-1)s(-1), 195 M(-1)s(-1), and 721 M(-1)s(-1), respectively. With low molecular weight thiols, the reaction was with the thiolate and rates increased exponentially with decreasing thiol group pK(a). Comparing rate constants for different chloramines reacting with ascorbate or a particular thiol anion, these were higher when there was less negative charge in the vicinity of the chloramine group. Histamine chloramine was the most reactive among biologically relevant chloramines. Consumption of histamine chloramine and oxidation of intracellular GSH were examined for human fibroblasts. At nontoxic doses, GSH loss over 10 min was slightly greater than that with HOCl, but the cellular uptake of histamine chloramine was 5-10-fold less. With histamine chloramine, GSSG was a minor product and most of the GSH was converted to mixed disulfides with proteins. HOCl gave a different profile of GSH oxidation products, with significantly less GSSG and mixed disulfide formation. There was irreversible oxidation and losses to the medium, as observed with HOCl and other cell types. Thus, histamine chloramine shows high preference for thiols both in isolation and in cells, and in this respect is more selective than HOCl.

  18. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of high oxidation state silver fluorides and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lucier, George Michael

    1995-05-01

    This thesis has been largely concerned with defining the oxidizing power of Ag(III) and Ag(II) in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) solution. Emphasis was on cationic species, since in a cation the electronegativity of a given oxidation state is greatest. Cationic Ag(III) solv has a short half life at ordinary temperatures, oxidizing the solvent to elemental fluorine with formation of Ag(II). Salts of such a cation have not yet been preparable, but solutions which must contain such a species have proved to be effective and powerful oxidizers. In presence of PtF6-, RuF6-, or RhF6-, Ag(III) solv effectively oxidizes the anions to release the neutral hexafluorides. Such reactivity ranks cationic Ag(III) as the most powerfully oxidizing chemical agent known as far. Unlike its trivalent relative Ag (II) solv is thermodynamically stable in acid aHF. Nevertheless, it oxidizes IrF6- to IrF6 at room temperature, placing its oxidizing potential not more than 2 eV below that of cationic Ag(III). Range of Ag2+ (MF6-2 salts attainable in aHF has been explored. An anion must be stable with respect to electron loss to Ag2+. The anion must also be a poor F- donor; otherwise, either AgF+ salts or AgF2 are generated.

  19. Multiple Fingers - One Gestalt.

    PubMed

    Lezkan, Alexandra; Manuel, Steven G; Colgate, J Edward; Klatzky, Roberta L; Peshkin, Michael A; Drewing, Knut

    2016-01-01

    The Gestalt theory of perception offered principles by which distributed visual sensations are combined into a structured experience ("Gestalt"). We demonstrate conditions whereby haptic sensations at two fingertips are integrated in the perception of a single object. When virtual bumps were presented simultaneously to the right hand's thumb and index finger during lateral arm movements, participants reported perceiving a single bump. A discrimination task measured the bump's perceived location and perceptual reliability (assessed by differential thresholds) for four finger configurations, which varied in their adherence to the Gestalt principles of proximity (small versus large finger separation) and synchrony (virtual spring to link movements of the two fingers versus no spring). According to models of integration, reliability should increase with the degree to which multi-finger cues integrate into a unified percept. Differential thresholds were smaller in the virtual-spring condition (synchrony) than when fingers were unlinked. Additionally, in the condition with reduced synchrony, greater proximity led to lower differential thresholds. Thus, with greater adherence to Gestalt principles, thresholds approached values predicted for optimal integration. We conclude that the Gestalt principles of synchrony and proximity apply to haptic perception of surface properties and that these principles can interact to promote multi-finger integration.

  20. Electrochemical and theoretical analysis of the reactivity of shikonin derivatives: dissociative electron transfer in esterified compounds.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Vidales, Georgina; Frontana, Carlos

    2014-09-07

    An electrochemical and theoretical analysis of a series of shikonin derivatives in aprotic media is presented. Results showed that the first electrochemical reduction signal is a reversible monoelectronic transfer, generating a stable semiquinone intermediate; the corresponding E(I)⁰ values were correlated with calculated values of electroaccepting power (ω(+)) and adiabatic electron affinities (A(Ad)), obtained with BH and HLYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) and considering the solvent effect, revealing the influence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and the substituting group at position C-2 in the experimental reduction potential. For the second reduction step, esterified compounds isobutyryl and isovalerylshikonin presented a coupled chemical reaction following dianion formation. Analysis of the variation of the dimensionless cathodic peak potential values (ξ(p)) as a function of the scan rate (v) functions and complementary experiments in benzonitrile suggested that this process follows a dissociative electron transfer, in which the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer is slow (~0.2 cm s(-1)), and the rate constant of the chemical process is at least 10(5) larger.

  1. Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

    2012-07-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in Northern Michigan. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

  2. Neuropathic pain and reactive gliosis are reversed by dialdehydic compound in neuropathic pain rat models.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Maria Rosaria; Cirillo, Giovanni; Petrosino, Valentina; Marcello, Lorenza; Soleti, Antonio; Merizzi, Giulia; Cavaliere, Carlo; Papa, Michele

    2012-11-14

    The role of the purinergic system in the modulation of pain mechanisms suggests that it might be promising target for treating neuropathic pain. In this study we evaluated the effects of two different dialdehydic compounds: a modified stable adenosine (2-[1-(6-amminopurin-9-il)-2-osso-etossi]prop-2-enale, named MED1101), and oxidized ATP (Ox-ATP), in two different neuropathic pain rat models: the sciatic spared nerve injury (SNI) and paclitaxel evoked painful peripheral neuropathy (pPPN). Neuropathic animals were divided in groups as follows: (a) treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) MED1101 or Ox-ATP for 21 days; (b) receiving vehicle (VEH) and (c) control (CTR) rats. The allodynic and hyperalgesic behavior was investigated by Von Frey filament test and thermal Plantar test, respectively. We evaluated by immunocytochemistry the astrocytic (GFAP) and microglial (Iba1) response on lumbar spinal cord sections. In either experimental models and using either substances, treated animals showed reduced allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia paralleled by a significant reduction of glial reaction in the spinal cord. These data prompt to hypothesize a potential role of dialdehydes as analgesic agent in chronic neuropathic pain and a possible role as anti-gliotic molecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Near-Roadway Emission of Reactive Nitrogen Compounds and Other Non-Criteria Pollutants at a Southern California Freeway Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, J. A.; Baum, M.; Castonguay, A. E.; Aguirre, V., Jr.; Pesta, A.; Fanter, R. K.; Anderson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Emission control systems in light-duty motor vehicles (LDMVs) have played an important role in improving regional air quality by dramatically reducing the concentration of criteria pollutants (carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides) in exhaust emissions. Unintended side-reactions occurring on the surface of three-way catalysts may lead to emission of a number of non-criteria pollutants whose identity and emission rates are poorly understood. A series of near-roadway field studies conducted between 2009-2015 has investigated LDMV emissions of these pollutants with unprecedented depth of coverage, including reactive nitrogen compounds (NH3, amines, HCN, HONO, and HNO3), organic peroxides, and carbonyl compounds (aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids). Methods to collect these pollutants using mist chambers, annular denuders, impingers, and solid-phase cartridges and quantify their concentration using GC-MS, LC-MS/MS, IC, and colorimetry were developed and validated in the laboratory and field. These methods were subsequently used in near-roadway field studies where the concentrations of the target compounds integrated over 1-4 hour blocks were measured at the edge of a freeway and at a background site 140 m from the roadway. Concentrations followed a steep decreasing gradient from the freeway to the background site. Emission factors (pollutant mass emitted per mass fuel consumed) were calculated by carbon mass balance using the difference in concentration measured between the freeway and background sites for the emitted pollutant and CO2 as a measure of carbon mass in the vehicle exhaust. The significance of these results will be discussed in terms of emissions inventories in the South Coast Air Basin of California, emission trends at this site over the period of 2009-2015, and for NH3, emission measurements conducted by our group and others over the period 2000-2015.

  4. Formation of Highly Reactive Cyclopentenone Isoprostane Compounds (A3/J3-Isoprostanes) in Vivo from Eicosapentaenoic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Joshua D.; Milne, Ginger L.; Yin, Huiyong; Sanchez, Stephanie C.; Porter, Ned A.; Morrow, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    Omega-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) found in marine fish oils are known to suppress inflammation associated with a wide variety of diseases. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is one of the most abundant ω-3 fatty acids in fish oil, but the mechanism(s) by which EPA exerts its beneficial effects is unknown. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that oxidized EPA, rather than native EPA, possesses anti-atherosclerotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-proliferative effects. Very few studies to date have investigated which EPA oxidation products are responsible for this bioactivity. Our research group has previously reported that anti-inflammatory prostaglandin A2-like and prostaglandin J2-like compounds, termed A2/J2-isoprostanes (IsoPs), are produced in vivo by the free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid and represent one of the major products resulting from the oxidation of this PUFA. Based on these observations, we questioned whether cyclopentenone-IsoP compounds are formed from the oxidation of EPA in vivo. Herein, we report the formation of cyclopentenone-IsoP molecules, termed A3/J3-IsoPs, formed in abundance in vitro and in vivo from EPA peroxidation. Chemical approaches coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) were used to structurally characterize these compounds as A3/J3-IsoPs. We found that levels of these molecules increase ∼200-fold with oxidation of EPA in vitro from a basal level of 0.8 ± 0.4 ng/mg EPA to 196 ± 23 ng/mg EPA after 36 h. We also detected these compounds in significant amounts in fresh liver tissue from EPA-fed rats at basal levels of 19 ± 2 ng/g tissue. Amounts increased to 102 ± 15 ng/g tissue in vivo in settings of oxidative stress. These studies have, for the first time, definitively characterized novel, highly reactive A/J-ring IsoP compounds that form in abundance from the oxidation of EPA in vivo. PMID:18263929

  5. Osseointegrated finger prostheses.

    PubMed

    Doppen, P; Solomons, M; Kritzinger, S

    2009-02-01

    Amputation of a digit can lead to functional and psychological problems and patients can benefit from digital prostheses. Unfortunately, standard prostheses are often unstable, particularly when fitted over short amputation stumps. Prosthesis fixation by osseointegration is widely used in oral and extraoral applications and may help avoid the problem of instability. This paper reports the results of four patients with five finger amputations who were treated with osseointegrated implants to attach finger prostheses. One implant failed to osseointegrate and the procedure was abandoned. Three patients were successfully treated to completion of three finger prostheses and are extremely satisfied with their outcomes, both cosmetically and functionally, with osseoperception reported by all three patients.

  6. Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

    2012-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in northern Michigan. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Notably, reaction of isoprene with NO3 leading to isoprene nitrate formation was found to be significant (~8% of primary organic nitrate production) during the daytime, and monoterpene reactions with NO3 were simulated to comprise up to ~83% of primary organic nitrate production at night. Lastly, forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

  7. MicroRNA‑128a, BMI1 polycomb ring finger oncogene, and reactive oxygen species inhibit the growth of U‑87 MG glioblastoma cells following exposure to X‑ray radiation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lan; Yu, Guanying; Wang, Cuihong; Du, Bin; Sun, Dianshui; Liu, Junli; Qi, Tonggang; Yu, Xiaoming; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Yuhua

    2015-10-01

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of numerous types of malignant tumors, including glioma. However, radioresistance and anti‑apoptotic mechanisms decrease the efficacy of radiotherapy in many patients with glioma. BMI1 polycomb ring finger oncogene (Bmi‑1) is an oncogene associated with radioresistance in tumor cells. MicroRNA (miRNA)‑128a is a brain-specific miRNA, which suppresses Bmi‑1 expression. The present study investigated the effects of various radiation intensities on U‑87 MG glioma cells, as well as the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Bmi‑1, and miRNA‑128a in the cellular response to radiotherapy. The response of U‑87 MG cells following exposure to X‑ray radiation was assessed using a cell growth curve and inhibition ratio. Cell cycle distribution and the levels of intracellular ROS were evaluated by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression levels of Bmi‑1 and those of miRNA‑128a in U‑87 MG cells exposed to X‑ray radiation were evaluated by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. X‑ray radiation did not decrease the number of U‑87 MG cells; however, it did inhibit cellular growth in a dose‑dependent manner. Following exposure to X‑ray radiation for 24 h, cell cycle distribution was altered, with an increase in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase. The mRNA expression levels of Bmi‑1 were downregulated in the 1 and 2 Gy groups, and upregulated in the 6 and 8 Gy groups. The expression levels of miRNA‑128a were upregulated in the 1 and 2 Gy groups, and downregulated in the 8 Gy group. The levels of ROS were increased following exposure to ≥2 Gy, and treatment with N-acetyl cysteine was able to induce radioresistance. These results suggested that U‑87 MG cells exhibited radioresistance. High doses of X‑ray radiation increased the expression levels of Bmi‑1, which may be associated with the evasion of cellular senescence. miRNA‑128a and its downstream

  8. Finger Foods for Babies

    MedlinePlus

    ... textures. No longer are baby purees and mushy cereals the only things on the menu. By the ... ll still be helping out by spoon-feeding cereal and other important dietary elements. Encouraging finger feeding ...

  9. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    PubMed

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  10. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... each fingertip. Repeat ____ times for ____ seconds.  Bend the end joint of your finger, keeping the base and middle joints straight. Hold this position. Relax and then straighten the end joint. Hold this position. Repeat ____ times for ____ seconds.  ...

  11. Characterization of Phase I and Phase II Hepatic Metabolism and Reactive Intermediates of Larrea nitida Cav. and Its Lignan Compounds.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyesoo; Kim, Soolin; Lee, Jimin; Park, Jin Young; Zhou, Wenmei; Liu, Xiyuan; Kim, So Dam; Song, Yun Seon; Jang, Chang-Young; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Choi, Sangho; Chang, Minsun

    2017-01-01

    Larrea nitida Cav. (LNC), which belongs to the family Zygophyllaceae, is widely indigenous and used in South America to treat various pathological conditions. It contains the antioxidant and antiinflammatory but toxic nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) as well as O-methylated metabolite of NDGA (MNDGA) as bioactive compounds. The hepatic metabolism-based toxicological potential of extracts of LNC (LNE), NDGA, and MNDGA has not previously been reported. The present study aimed to characterize the phase I and phase II hepatic metabolism and reactive intermediates of LNE, NDGA, and MNDGA and their effects on the major drug-metabolizing enzymes in vitro and ex vivo. A methanol extract of LNC collected from Chile as well as NDGA and MNDGA isolated from LNE were subjected to metabolic stability assays in liver microsomes in the presence of the cofactors reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and/or uridine 5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid (UDPGA). Cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assays were performed using CYP isozyme-specific model substrates to examine the inhibitory activities of LNE, NDGA, and MNDGA, which were expressed as % inhibition and IC50 values. Ex vivo CYP induction potential was investigated in the liver microsomes prepared from the rats intraperitoneally administered with LNE. Glutathione (GSH) adduct formation was monitored by LC-MS(3) analysis of the microsomal incubation samples with either NDGA or MNDGA and an excess of GSH to determine the formation of electrophilic reactive intermediates. Both NDGA and MNDGA were stable to NADPH-dependent phase I metabolism, but labile to glucuronide conjugation. LNE, NDGA, and MNDGA showed significant inhibitory effects on CYP1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and/or 3A4, with IC50 values in the micromolar range. LNE was found to be a CYP1A2 inducer in ex vivo rat experiments, and mono- and di-GSH adducts of both NDGA and MNDGA were identified by LC-MS(3) analysis. Our study suggests that hepatic clearance is the major

  12. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  13. Newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole compound 8 induces apoptosis, autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Naying; Yao, Guodong; Liu, Yuan; Cheng, Maosheng; Ikejima, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Compound 8 (C8) is a newly synthesized bis-benzimidazole derivative and exerts significant anti-tumor activity in vitro. Previous studies demonstrated that C8 induced apoptosis and autophagy in human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells. However, cytotoxicity study on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) showed that C8 exhibited less toxicity in normal cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism of C8 on human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells was investigated. The results showed that C8 inhibited the growth of HeLa cells and triggered both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Subsequent experiment also indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was induced in C8-treated HeLa cells. Since ROS scavenger decreased the ratio of apoptotic and autophagic cells, ROS generation contributed to C8-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, inhibitors of apoptosis and autophagy also reduced ROS generation, respectively. Autophagy inhibition increased cell growth compared to C8-treated group and attenuated apoptotic cell death, indicating that C8-induced autophagy promoted apoptosis for cell death. However, the percentage of autophagic cells was enhanced when limiting apoptosis process. Taken together, C8 induced ROS-mediated apoptosis and autophagy in HeLa cells, autophagy promoted apoptosis but the former was antagonized by the latter. The data also gave us a new perspective on the anti-tumor effect of C8. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Misconceptions about high-fructose corn syrup: is it uniquely responsible for obesity, reactive dicarbonyl compounds, and advanced glycation endproducts?

    PubMed

    White, John S

    2009-06-01

    Misconceptions about high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) abound in the scientific literature, the advice of health professionals to their patients, media reporting, product advertising, and the irrational behavior of consumers. Foremost among these is the misconception that HFCS has a unique and substantive responsibility for the current obesity crisis. Inaccurate information from ostensibly reliable sources and selective presentation of research data gathered under extreme experimental conditions, representing neither the human diet nor HFCS, have misled the uninformed and created an atmosphere of distrust and avoidance for what, by all rights, should be considered a safe and innocuous sweetener. In the first part of this article, common misconceptions about the composition, functionality, metabolism, and use of HFCS and its purported link to obesity are identified and corrected. In the second part, an emerging misconception, that HFCS in carbonated soft drinks contributes materially to physiological levels of reactive dicarbonyl compounds and advanced glycation endproducts, is addressed in detail, and evidence is presented that HFCS does not pose a unique dietary risk in healthy individuals or diabetics.

  15. An automated analyzer to measure surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of water soluble inorganic aerosol compounds and reactive trace gases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rick M; Trebs, Ivonne; Otjes, René; Jongejan, Piet A C; Ten Brink, Harry; Phillips, Gavin; Kortner, Michael; Meixner, Franz X; Nemitz, Eiko

    2009-03-01

    Here, we present a new automated instrument for semicontinuous gradient measurements of water-soluble reactive trace gas species (NH3, HNO3, HONO, HCl, and SO2) and their related aerosol compounds (NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, SO4(2-)). Gas and aerosol samples are collected simultaneously at two heights using rotating wet-annular denuders and steam-jet aerosol collectors, respectively. Online (real-time) analysis using ion chromatography (IC) for anions and flow injection analysis (FIA) for NH4+ and NH3 provide a half-hourly averaged gas and aerosol gradients within each hour. Through the use of syringe pumps, IC preconcentration columns, and high-quality purified water, the system achieves detection limits (3sigma-definition) under field conditions of typically: 136/207,135/114, 29/ 22,119/92, and 189/159 ng m(-3) for NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-, HONO/ NO2-, HCl/Cl- and SO2/SO4(2-), respectively. The instrument demonstrates very good linearity and accuracy for liquid and selected gas phase calibrations over typical ambient concentration ranges. As shown by examples from field experiments, the instrument provides sufficient precision (3-9%), even at low ambient concentrations, to resolve vertical gradients and calculate surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes undertypical meteorological conditions of the atmospheric surface layer using the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  16. Finger and toenail onycholysis.

    PubMed

    Zaias, N; Escovar, S X; Zaiac, M N

    2015-05-01

    Onycholysis - the separation of the nail plate from the nail bed occurs in fingers and toenails. It is diagnosed by the whitish appearance of the separated nail plate from the nail bed. In fingers, the majority is caused by trauma, manicuring, occupational or self-induced behavior. The most common disease producing fingernail onycholysis is psoriasis and pustular psoriasis. Phototoxic dermatitis, due to drugs can also produce finger onycholysis. Once the separation occurs, the environmental flora sets up temporary colonization in the available space. Finger onycholysis is most common in women. Candida albicans is often recovered from the onycholytic space. Many reports, want to associate the yeast as cause and effect, but the data are lacking and the treatment of the candida does not improve finger onycholysis. A reasonable explanation for the frequent isolation of Candida and Pseudomonas in fingernail onycholysis in women, is the close proximity the fingers have to the vaginal and gastrointestinal tract. Fifty per cent of humans harbour C. albicans in the GI tract and it is frequently carried to the vagina during hygienic practices. Finger onycholysis is best treated by drying the nail 'lytic' area with a hair blower, since all colonizing biota are moisture loving and perish in a dry environment. Toenail onycholysis has a very different etiology. It is mechanical, the result of pressure on the toes from the closed shoes, while walking, because of the ubiquitous uneven flat feet producing an asymmetric gait with more pressure on the foot with the flatter sole. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Reactive nitrogen compounds (RNCs) in exhaust of advanced PM-NO x abatement technologies for future diesel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeb, Norbert V.; Zimmerli, Yan; Czerwinski, Jan; Schmid, Peter; Zennegg, Markus; Haag, Regula; Seiler, Cornelia; Wichser, Adrian; Ulrich, Andrea; Honegger, Peter; Zeyer, Kerstin; Emmenegger, Lukas; Mosimann, Thomas; Kasper, Markus; Mayer, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Long-term exposure to increased levels of reactive nitrogen compounds (RNCs) and particulate matter (PM) affect human health. Many cities are currently not able to fulfill European air quality standards for these critical pollutants. Meanwhile, promising new abatement technologies such as diesel particle filters (DPFs) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts are developed to reduce PM and RNC emissions. Herein, effects of a urea-based SCR system on RNC emissions are discussed and we quantified the highly reactive intermediates isocyanic acid (HNCO) and ammonia (NH 3), both potential secondary pollutants of the urea-based SCR chemistry. A diesel engine (3.0 L, 100 kW), operated in the ISO 8178/4 C1, cycle was used as test platform. A V 2O 5-based SCR catalyst was either applied as such or down-stream of a high oxidation potential-DPF (hox-DPF). With active SCR, nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) conversion efficiencies of 0.86-0.94 and 0.86-0.99 were obtained. On the other hand, mean HNCO and NH 3 emissions increased to 240-280 and 1800-1900 mg h -1. On a molar basis, HNCO accounted for 0.8-1.4% and NH 3 for 14-25% of the emitted RNCs. On roads, SCR systems will partly be inactive when exhaust temperatures drop below 220 °C. The system was active only during 75% of the test cycle, and urea dosing was stopped and restarted several times. Consequently, NO conversion stopped but interestingly, NO 2 was still converted. Such light-off and shutdown events are frequent in urban driving, compromising the overall deNO x efficiency. Another important effect of the SCR technology is illustrated by the NH 3/NO 2 ratio, which was >1 with active SCR, indicating that exhaust is basic rather than acidic after the SCR catalyst. Under these conditions, isocyanic acid is stable. The widespread use of various converter technologies already affected RNC release. Diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) and hox-DPFs increased NO 2 emissions, three-way catalysts (TWCs

  18. A comparison of the therapeutic and reactivating efficacy of newly developed bispyridinium compounds (K206, K269) with currently available oximes against tabun in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Jiri; Karasova, Jana; Bajgar, Jiri; Kuca, Kamil; Musilek, Kamil

    2008-12-01

    The potency of newly developed bispyridinium compounds (K206, K269) in reactivating tabun-inhibited acetylcholinesterase and eliminating tabun-induced lethal toxic effects was compared with commonly used oximes (obidoxime, trimedoxime, the oxime HI-6) using in vivo methods. Studies which determined percentage of reactivation of tabun-inhibited blood and tissue AChE in poisoned rats showed that the reactivating efficacy of both newly developed oximes is comparable with obidoxime and trimedoxime in blood but lower than the reactivating potency of trimedoxime and obidoxime in the diaphragm and brain. Nevertheless, the differences in reactivating efficacy of obidoxime, trimedoxime and K206 was not significant while the potency of K269 to reactivate tabun-inhibited acetylcholinesterase was significantly lower. Both newly developed oximes were also found to be relatively efficacious in elimination of the lethal toxic effects in tabun-poisoned mice. Their therapeutic efficacy corresponds to the therapeutic potency of obidoxime. The oxime HI-6, relatively efficacious against soman, did not seem to be an adequately effective oxime in reactivation of tabun-inhibited AChE and to counteract lethal effects of tabun. Both newly developed oximes (K206, K269) are significantly more efficacious in reactivating tabun-inhibited AChE in rats and to eliminate lethal toxic effects of tabun in mice than the oxime HI-6 but their reactivating and therapeutic potency does not prevail over the effectiveness of currently available obidoxime and trimedoxime and, therefore, they are not suitable for their replacement of commonly used oximes for the treatment of acute tabun poisoning.

  19. Reactivity of selenium-containing compounds with myeloperoxidase-derived chlorinating oxidants: Second-order rate constants and implications for biological damage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Luke; Pattison, David I; Fu, Shanlin; Schiesser, Carl H; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2015-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and N-chloramines are produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) as part of the immune response to destroy invading pathogens. However, MPO also plays a detrimental role in inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis, as inappropriate production of oxidants, including HOCl and N-chloramines, causes damage to host tissue. Low molecular mass thiol compounds, including glutathione (GSH) and methionine (Met), have demonstrated efficacy in scavenging MPO-derived oxidants, which prevents oxidative damage in vitro and ex vivo. Selenium species typically have greater reactivity toward oxidants compared to the analogous sulfur compounds, and are known to be efficient scavengers of HOCl and other hypohalous acids produced by MPO. In this study, we examined the efficacy of a number of sulfur and selenium compounds to scavenge a range of biologically relevant N-chloramines and oxidants produced by both isolated MPO and activated neutrophils and characterized the resulting selenium-derived oxidation products in each case. A dose-dependent decrease in the concentration of each N-chloramine was observed on addition of the sulfur compounds (cysteine, methionine) and selenium compounds (selenomethionine, methylselenocysteine, 1,4-anhydro-4-seleno-L-talitol, 1,5-anhydro-5-selenogulitol) studied. In general, selenomethionine was the most reactive with N-chloramines (k2 0.8-3.4×10(3)M(-1) s(-1)) with 1,5-anhydro-5-selenogulitol and 1,4-anhydro-4-seleno-L-talitol (k2 1.1-6.8×10(2)M(-1) s(-1)) showing lower reactivity. This resulted in the formation of the respective selenoxides as the primary oxidation products. The selenium compounds demonstrated greater ability to remove protein N-chloramines compared to the analogous sulfur compounds. These reactions may have implications for preventing cellular damage in vivo, particularly under chronic inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurements of volatile organic compounds during the 2006 TexAQS/GoMACCS campaign: Industrial influences, regional characteristics, and diurnal dependencies of the OH reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Jessica B.; Kuster, William C.; Goldan, Paul D.; Herndon, Scott C.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Tucker, Sara C.; Brewer, W. Alan; Lerner, Brian M.; Williams, Eric J.; Harley, Robert A.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Warneke, Carsten; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2009-04-01

    An extensive set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other gas phase species were measured in situ aboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown as the ship sailed in the Gulf of Mexico and the Houston and Galveston Bay (HGB) area as part of the Texas Air Quality (TexAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) conducted from July-September 2006. The magnitudes of the reactivities of CH4, CO, VOCs, and NO2 with the hydroxyl radical, OH, were determined in order to quantify the contributions of these compounds to potential ozone formation. The average total OH reactivity (ROH,TOTAL) increased from 1.01 s-1 in the central gulf to 10.1 s-1 in the HGB area as a result of the substantial increase in the contribution from VOCs and NO2. The increase in the measured concentrations of reactive VOCs in the HGB area compared to the central gulf was explained by the impact of industrial emissions, the regional distribution of VOCs, and the effects of local meteorology. By compensating for the effects of boundary layer mixing, the diurnal profiles of the OH reactivity were used to characterize the source signatures and relative magnitudes of biogenic, anthropogenic (urban + industrial), and oxygenated VOCs as a function of the time of day. The source of reactive oxygenated VOCs (e.g., formaldehyde) was determined to be almost entirely from secondary production. The secondary formation of oxygenated VOCs, in addition to the continued emissions of reactive anthropogenic VOCs, served to sustain elevated levels of OH reactivity throughout the time of peak ozone production.

  1. Multi-fingered robotic hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Carl F. (Inventor); Salisbury, Kenneth, Jr. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A robotic hand is presented having a plurality of fingers, each having a plurality of joints pivotally connected one to the other. Actuators are connected at one end to an actuating and control mechanism mounted remotely from the hand and at the other end to the joints of the fingers for manipulating the fingers and passing externally of the robot manipulating arm in between the hand and the actuating and control mechanism. The fingers include pulleys to route the actuators within the fingers. Cable tension sensing structure mounted on a portion of the hand are disclosed, as is covering of the tip of each finger with a resilient and pliable friction enhancing surface.

  2. Iridium compounds with kappa-P,P,Si (biPSi) pincer ligands: favoring reactive structures in unsaturated complexes.

    PubMed

    Sola, Eduardo; García-Camprubí, Alba; Andrés, José L; Martín, Marta; Plou, Pablo

    2010-07-07

    The structure, coordination properties, insertion processes, and dynamic behavior in solution of the five-coordinate complexes [IrXH(biPSi)] (biPSi = kappa-P,P,Si-Si(Me){(CH(2))(3)PPh(2)}(2); X = Cl (1), Br (2), or I (3)) have been investigated. The compounds are formed as mixtures of two isomers, anti and syn, in slow equilibrium in solution. The equilibrium position depends on the halogen and the solvent. Both isomers display distorted square-based pyramidal structures in which the vacant position sits trans to silicon. The equatorial plane of the syn isomer is closer to the T structure due to distortions of steric origin. The small structural differences between the isomers trigger remarkable differences in reactivity. The syn isomers form six-coordinate adducts with chlorinated solvents, CO, P(OMe)(3), or NCMe, always after ligand coordination trans to silicon. The anti isomers do not form detectable adducts with chlorinated solvents and coordinate CO or P(OMe)(3) either trans to silicon (kinetic) or trans to hydride (thermodynamic). NCMe coordinates the anti isomers exclusively at the position trans to hydride. Qualitative and quantitative details (equilibrium constants, enthalpies, entropies, etc.) on these coordination processes are given and discussed. As a result of the different coordination properties, insertion reagents such as acetylene, diphenylacetylene, or the alkylidene resulting from the decomposition of ethyl diazoacetate selectively insert into the Ir-H bond of 1-syn, not into that of 1-anti. These reactions give five-coordinate syn alkenyl or alkyl compounds in which the vacancy also sits trans to silicon. Acetylene is polymerized in the coordination sphere of 1. The nonreactive isomer 1-anti also evolves into the syn insertion products via anti<-->syn isomerizations, the rates of which are notably dependent on the nature of the insertion reactants. H(2) renders anti<-->syn isomerization rates of the same order as the NMR time scale. The

  3. Prototype Systems Containing Human Cytochrome P450 for High-Throughput Real-Time Detection of DNA Damage by Compounds That Form DNA-Reactive Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Brito Palma, Bernardo; Fisher, Charles W; Rueff, José; Kranendonk, Michel

    2016-05-16

    The formation of reactive metabolites through biotransformation is the suspected cause of many adverse drug reactions. Testing for the propensity of a drug to form reactive metabolites has increasingly become an integral part of lead-optimization strategy in drug discovery. DNA reactivity is one undesirable facet of a drug or its metabolites and can lead to increased risk of cancer and reproductive toxicity. Many drugs are metabolized by cytochromes P450 in the liver and other tissues, and these reactions can generate hard electrophiles. These hard electrophilic reactive metabolites may react with DNA and may be detected in standard in vitro genotoxicity assays; however, the majority of these assays fall short due to the use of animal-derived organ extracts that inadequately represent human metabolism. The current study describes the development of bacterial systems that efficiently detect DNA-damaging electrophilic reactive metabolites generated by human P450 biotransformation. These assays use a GFP reporter system that detects DNA damage through induction of the SOS response and a GFP reporter to control for cytotoxicity. Two human CYP1A2-competent prototypes presented here have appropriate characteristics for the detection of DNA-damaging reactive metabolites in a high-throughput manner. The advantages of this approach include a short assay time (120-180 min) with real-time measurement, sensitivity to small amounts of compound, and adaptability to a microplate format. These systems are suitable for high-throughput assays and can serve as prototypes for the development of future enhanced versions.

  4. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  5. Finger agnosia in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Shenal, Brian V; Jackson, Melissa D; Crucian, Gregory P; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn if a deficit of finger naming (finger agnosia or anomia) is a sensitive test for Alzheimer disease (AD) and the best means of testing for finger agnosia. The subjects were 38 patients with AD and 10 matched normal controls. All subjects were asked to name the thumb, index, and pinky fingers. No control subject had trouble naming any of these fingers, but 37% of the AD subjects did. When AD patients had difficulty with finger naming, they always had trouble naming the index finger. In the absence of stroke, the inability to name the index finger seems as an indicator of dementia. Although brief, this test is not extremely sensitive test for AD.

  6. Three-Fingered Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.; Salisbury, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical joints and tendons resemble human hand. Robot hand has three "human-like" fingers. "Thumb" at top. Rounded tips of fingers covered with resilient material provides high friction for griping. Hand potential as prosthesis for humans.

  7. Spiral viscous fingering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2006-11-01

    When a less-viscous fluid displaces a more-viscous fluid in a radial Hele-Shaw cell, viscous fingering pattern is believed to develop in a radial direction. We performed experiments on viscous fingering in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a polymer solution, a sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution is used as the more-viscous fluid and the trivalent iron (Fe^3+) solution is as the less-viscous fluid. The experiment was done by varying the concentration of Fe^3+, cFe3+. We have found that viscous fingering pattern develops spirally when cFe3+ is larger than a threshold value, while the pattern develops in a radial direction for small cFe3+. We confirmed from different experiments that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between SPA solution and Fe^3+ solution. The chemical reaction produces precipitation and significantly reduces the viscosity of the SPA solution. The quantity of the precipitation is increased with cFe3+. We will make a discussion on the relationship between the formation of spiral viscous fingering and the chemical reaction taking place between the two fluids.

  8. Finger Lakes LPG

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Finger Lakes LPG Storage, LLC; Two Brush Creek Blvd, Suite 200; Kansas City; Missouri 64112 (Applicant) has applied to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f et. seq (the Act), for

  9. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet X-Ray Exam: Finger KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Finger Print A A A What's in ... You Have Questions What It Is A finger X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses ...

  10. Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzumura, Akitoshi; Watanabe, Masaki; Nagasako, Naoyuki; Asahi, Ryoji

    2014-06-01

    Recently, Cu-based chalcogenides such as Cu3SbSe4, Cu2Se, and Cu2SnSe3 have attracted much attention because of their high thermoelectric performance and their common feature of very low thermal conductivity. However, for practical use, materials without toxic elements such as selenium are preferable. In this paper, we report Se-free Cu3SbS4 thermoelectric material and improvement of its figure of merit ( ZT) by chemical substitutions. Substitutions of 3 at.% Ag for Cu and 2 at.% Ge for Sb lead to significant reductions in the thermal conductivity by 37% and 22%, respectively. These substitutions do not sacrifice the power factor, thus resulting in enhancement of the ZT value. The sensitivity of the thermal conductivity to chemical substitutions in these compounds is discussed in terms of the calculated phonon dispersion and previously proposed models for Cu-based chalcogenides. To improve the power factor, we optimize the hole carrier concentration by substitution of Ge for Sb, achieving a power factor of 16 μW/cm K2 at 573 K, which is better than the best reported for Se-based Cu3SbSe4 compounds.

  11. Safe Finger Tourniquet--Ideas.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lin-Gwei; Chen, Chieh-Feng; Hwang, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Chiu, Wen-Kuan; Li, Chun-Chang; Wang, Hsian-Jenn

    2016-03-01

    Tourniquets are often needed for optimized phalangeal surgeries. However, few surgeons forget to remove them and caused ischemic injuries. We have a modified method to create a safe finger tourniquet for short duration finger surgeries, which can avoid such tragedy. It is done by donning a glove, cutting the tip of the glove over the finger of interest, and rolling the glove finger to the base. From 2010 to 2013, approximately 54 patients underwent digital surgical procedures with our safe finger tourniquet. Because the glove cannot be forgotten to be removed, the tourniquet must be released and removed. This is a simple and efficient way to apply a safe finger tourniquet by using hand rubber glove for a short-term bloodless finger surgery and can achieve an excellent surgical result.

  12. Hemangioma of the fingers.

    PubMed

    Kodachi, K; Kojima, T; Shimbashi, T; Furusato, M

    1990-01-01

    Fingers often suffer trauma and the clinician is continuously faced with the difficult task of clarifying the distinction between a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion. This study was undertaken to examine ten cases in which a small skin mass located on a finger had been diagnosed preoperatively as hemangioma. Our results showed that seven masses were confirmed pathologically as hemangioma (five cavernous hemangiomas and two capillary hemangiomas), two as traumatic thrombosis and one varix. The clinical manifestations of the two cases of traumatic thrombosis were related to those of hemangioma. In the varix, endothelial proliferation was observed in the area of the thrombosis. This phenomenon is called "intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia", and can confuse the differential diagnosis between a vascular neoplasm and a traumatic thrombosis. Our findings demonstrate that since the traumatic lesions were firmer than the hemangiomas, hardness on physical examination may be a helpful indicator in the differential diagnosis of a hemangioma and a traumatic lesion.

  13. Importance of Diffusion and Compound-Specific Mixing for Conservative and Reactive Transport in Groundwater: An Investigation from Pore to Field Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolle, M.; Chiogna, G.; Hochstetler, D. L.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    Mixing processes significantly affect and limit contaminant transport and transformation rates in the subsurface. The correct quantification of mixing in groundwater systems must account for diffusion, local-scale dispersion and the flow variability in heterogeneous flow fields. Recent results of multi-tracer laboratory experiments revealed the significant effect of compound-specific diffusive properties on the physical displacement of dissolved species across a representative range of groundwater flow velocities. The goal of this study is to investigate the role of diffusion and compound-specific mixing for solute transport across a range of scales including: (i) pore-scale (~10^-2 m), (ii) laboratory bench-scale (~10^0 m) and (iii) field-scale (~10^2 m). We investigate both conservative and mixing-controlled reactive transport using pore-scale modeling, flow-through laboratory experiments and simulations, and field-scale numerical modeling of complex heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with statistical properties similar to the ones reported for the extensively investigated Borden aquifer (Ontario, Canada) and Columbus aquifer (Mississippi, USA). We consider different steady-state and transient transport scenarios. For the conservative cases we use as a metric of mixing the exponential of the Shannon entropy to quantify solute dilution either in a given volume (dilution index) or in a given solute flux (flux-related dilution index). The decrease in the mass and the mass-flux of the contaminant plumes is evaluated to quantify reactive mixing. The results show that diffusive processes, occurring at the small-scale of a pore channel, strongly affect conservative and reactive solute transport at larger macroscopic scales. The outcomes of our study illustrate the need to consider and properly account for compound-specific diffusion and mixing limitations in order to accurately describe and predict conservative and reactive transport in porous media.

  14. Recent advances in structure and reactivity of dissolved organic matter: radiation chemistry of non-isolated natural organic matter and selected model compounds.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Shakiba; Kalnina, Daina; Song, Weihua; Cottrell, Barbara A; Gonsior, Michael; Cooper, William J

    2012-01-01

    The importance of natural organic matter (NOM) as a source of carbon in natural waters, as the source of reactive oxygen species, or for the complications its presence causes in treatment of natural waters, is undeniable. Recent studies have also pointed to the major photochemical role of triplet excited state of natural organic matter in the environmental fate of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in waters. However, the characterization of NOM is problematic due to its complex molecular structure. One approach to better understand NOM chemistry is the use of model compounds. As the condensation of a plant's phenolic compounds leads to humification and the formation of NOM, a structurally broad group of nine phenolic compounds were selected as model compounds for this study. With methods used in the discipline of radiation chemistry, the oxidative chemistry and transient spectra of these phenols were studied. In addition, the oxidative chemistry and transient spectra of a sample of NOM from the Black River, North Carolina, USA, was characterized. This natural water sample was used as received and represents the first studies of non-isolated NOM by pulsed radiolysis. The results of the transient spectra of the NOM revealed that the radical intermediates were very long lived. This phenomenon was not captured using the nine model compounds suggesting that more complex compounds are needed to further our understanding of the oxidation chemistry of NOM.

  15. Compound K, a metabolite of ginseng saponin, induces mitochondria-dependent and caspase-dependent apoptosis via the generation of reactive oxygen species in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Kyung; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lim, Chae Moon; Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Hee Sun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Bum Joon; Chang, Weon Young; Choi, Jae Hyuck; Hyun, Jin Won

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the cytotoxic mechanism of Compound K, with respect to the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mitochondrial involved apoptosis, in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Compound K exhibited a concentration of 50% growth inhibition (IC(50)) at 20 μg/mL and cytotoxicity in a time dependent manner. Compound K produced intracellular ROS in a time dependent fashion; however, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) pretreatment resulted in the inhibition of this effect and the recovery of cell viability. Compound K induced a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway via the modulation of Bax and Bcl-2 expressions, resulting in the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)). Loss of the Δψ(m) was followed by cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, resulting in the activation of caspase-9, -3, and concomitant poly ADP-ribosyl polymerase (PARP) cleavage, which are the indicators of caspase-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic effect of Compound K, exerted via the activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), was abrogated by specific MAPK inhibitors. This study demonstrated that Compound K-mediated generation of ROS led to apoptosis through the modulation of a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway and MAPK pathway.

  16. On the Ambiphilic Reactivity of Geometrically Constrained Phosphorus(III) and Arsenic(III) Compounds: Insights into Their Interaction with Ionic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Thomas P.; Lo, Siu‐Kwan; De Rosa, Daniel; Aldridge, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ambiphilic nature of geometrically constrained Group 15 complexes bearing the N,N‐bis(3,5‐di‐tert‐butyl‐2‐phenolate)amide pincer ligand (ONO3−) is explored. Despite their differing reactivity towards nucleophilic substrates with polarised element–hydrogen bonds (e.g., NH3), both the phosphorus(III), P(ONO) (1 a), and arsenic(III), As(ONO) (1 b), compounds exhibit similar reactivity towards charged nucleophiles and electrophiles. Reactions of 1 a and 1 b with KOtBu or KNPh2 afford anionic complexes in which the nucleophilic anion associates with the pnictogen centre ([(tBuO)Pn(ONO)]− (Pn=P (2 a), As (2 b)) and [(Ph2N)Pn(ONO)]− (Pn=P (3 a), As (3 b)). Compound 2 a can subsequently be reacted with a proton source or benzylbromide to afford the phosphorus(V) compounds (tBuO)HP(ONO) (4 a) and (tBuO)BzP(ONO) (5 a), respectively, whereas analogous arsenic(V) compounds are inaccessible. Electrophilic substrates, such as HOTf and MeOTf, preferentially associate with the nitrogen atom of the ligand backbone of both 1 a and 1 b, giving rise to cationic species that can be rationalised as either ammonium salts or as amine‐stabilised phosphenium or arsenium complexes ([Pn{ON(H)O}]+ (Pn=P (6 a), As (6 b)) and [Pn{ON(Me)O}]+ (Pn=P (7 a), As (7 b)). Reaction of 1 a with an acid bearing a nucleophilic counteranion (such as HCl) gives rise to a phosphorus(V) compound HPCl(ONO) (8 a), whereas the analogous reaction with 1 b results in the addition of HCl across one of the As−O bonds to afford ClAs{(H)ONO} (8 b). Functionalisation at both the pnictogen centre and the ligand backbone is also possible by reaction of 7 a/7 b with KOtBu, which affords the neutral species (tBuO)Pn{ON(Me)O} (Pn=P (9 a), As (9 b)). The ambiphilic reactivity of these geometrically constrained complexes allows some insight into the mechanism of reactivity of 1 a towards small molecules, such as ammonia and water. PMID

  17. Effects of crystal orientation and ferroelastic domain structure on the photochemical reactivity of BiVO4 and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munprom, Ratiporn

    Bismuth vanadate, BiVO4, has been recognized for its high efficiency as a photoanode for water splitting. However, its performance is limited by photogenerated electron--hole recombination. Thus, researchers have attempted to modify BiVO4 to improve its performance. One strategy to improve charge separation is to utilize an internal field arising from surface termination differences. Previous studies concentrated on polygonal single crystals of BiVO4, providing limited information about the orientation-reactivity relationship. The current research focuses on polycrystalline BiVO4, which makes it possible to study the photochemical reactivity of all possible orientations and determine the complete orientation dependence of the photochemical reactivity of BiVO4. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  18. Rapid Diminution in the Level and Activity of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase in Cancer Cells by a Reactive Nitro-Benzoxadiazole Compound

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Viviane A. O.; Lafont, Florian; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Breton, Magali Le; Hulin, Philippe; Chabot, Thomas; Paris, François; Sakanyan, Vehary; Fleury, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The expression and activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is related to DNA repair status in the response of cells to exogenous and endogenous factors. Recent studies indicate that Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is involved in modulating DNA-PK. It has been shown that a compound 4-nitro-7-[(1-oxidopyridin-2-yl)sulfanyl]-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NSC), bearing a nitro-benzoxadiazole (NBD) scaffold, enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR and triggers downstream signaling pathways. Here, we studied the behavior of DNA-PK and other DNA repair proteins in prostate cancer cells exposed to compound NSC. We showed that both the expression and activity of DNA-PKcs (catalytic subunit of DNA-PK) rapidly decreased upon exposure of cells to the compound. The decline in DNA-PKcs was associated with enhanced protein ubiquitination, indicating the activation of cellular proteasome. However, pretreatment of cells with thioglycerol abolished the action of compound NSC and restored the level of DNA-PKcs. Moreover, the decreased level of DNA-PKcs was associated with the production of intracellular hydrogen peroxide by stable dimeric forms of Cu/Zn SOD1 induced by NSC. Our findings indicate that reactive oxygen species and electrophilic intermediates, generated and accumulated during the redox transformation of NBD compounds, are primarily responsible for the rapid modulation of DNA-PKcs functions in cancer cells. PMID:27187356

  19. Rapid Diminution in the Level and Activity of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase in Cancer Cells by a Reactive Nitro-Benzoxadiazole Compound.

    PubMed

    Silva, Viviane A O; Lafont, Florian; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Breton, Magali Le; Hulin, Philippe; Chabot, Thomas; Paris, François; Sakanyan, Vehary; Fleury, Fabrice

    2016-05-11

    The expression and activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is related to DNA repair status in the response of cells to exogenous and endogenous factors. Recent studies indicate that Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is involved in modulating DNA-PK. It has been shown that a compound 4-nitro-7-[(1-oxidopyridin-2-yl)sulfanyl]-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NSC), bearing a nitro-benzoxadiazole (NBD) scaffold, enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR and triggers downstream signaling pathways. Here, we studied the behavior of DNA-PK and other DNA repair proteins in prostate cancer cells exposed to compound NSC. We showed that both the expression and activity of DNA-PKcs (catalytic subunit of DNA-PK) rapidly decreased upon exposure of cells to the compound. The decline in DNA-PKcs was associated with enhanced protein ubiquitination, indicating the activation of cellular proteasome. However, pretreatment of cells with thioglycerol abolished the action of compound NSC and restored the level of DNA-PKcs. Moreover, the decreased level of DNA-PKcs was associated with the production of intracellular hydrogen peroxide by stable dimeric forms of Cu/Zn SOD1 induced by NSC. Our findings indicate that reactive oxygen species and electrophilic intermediates, generated and accumulated during the redox transformation of NBD compounds, are primarily responsible for the rapid modulation of DNA-PKcs functions in cancer cells.

  20. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas M. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  1. Robotic Finger Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Platt, Robert J., Jr. (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic hand includes a finger with first, second, and third phalanges. A first joint rotatably connects the first phalange to a base structure. A second joint rotatably connects the first phalange to the second phalange. A third joint rotatably connects the third phalange to the second phalange. The second joint and the third joint are kinematically linked such that the position of the third phalange with respect to the second phalange is determined by the position of the second phalange with respect to the first phalange.

  2. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  3. Fibonacci-compliant finger design.

    PubMed

    El-Sheikh, Mogeeb A

    2016-11-11

    This work presents the mechanical design of 4 configurations of compliant fingers in order to address the need for commercially feasible prosthetic and robotic hands. The fingers consist of a single part and utilize a compliant mechanism to reduce the cost and control complexity. The geometric parameters of the compliant finger designs follow the Fibonacci series. The first and second compliant fingers have 2 joints and 2 degrees of freedom. The others have 3 joints and 3 degrees of freedom. The type of flexure hinges of the compliant finger are single and multiple nonsymmetrical circular hinges. The finite element method (FEM) was used to verify the range of motion of the joints in the compliant finger. In addition, the study defines the finger tip trajectory of these configurations. The multiple flexure hinges have minimum stress. This study presents affordable, single-element, compliant finger designs and their presumable hypothetical design variables are defined by the Fibonacci series. This method is faster and simpler than optimization. The study identifies the application of each finger design for either prosthetic or robotic purposes.

  4. Finger Injuries in Ball Sports.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Pham, Dang T; Staines, Kimberly Goldie

    2017-02-01

    Finger injuries are common in athletes playing in professional ball sports. Understanding the intricate anatomy of the digit is necessary to properly diagnose and manage finger injuries. Unrecognized or poorly managed finger injuries can lead to chronic deformities that can affect an athlete's performance. Multiple factors and treatment options should be considered to provide the best functional outcome and rapid return to play for an athlete. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, diagnosis, treatment, and return-to-play recommendations for common finger injuries in ball sports.

  5. Repair of webbed fingers or toes

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin grafts Stiffness of the fingers or toes Injuries to the blood vessels, tendons, or bones in the fingers Call your provider if you notice the following: Fever Fingers that tingle, are numb, or have a bluish ... fingers or toes to protect the repaired area from injury. Small children who had webbed finger repair may ...

  6. Finger vein recognition based on finger crease location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiying; Ding, Shumeng; Yin, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Finger vein recognition technology has significant advantages over other methods in terms of accuracy, uniqueness, and stability, and it has wide promising applications in the field of biometric recognition. We propose using finger creases to locate and extract an object region. Then we use linear fitting to overcome the problem of finger rotation in the plane. The method of modular adaptive histogram equalization (MAHE) is presented to enhance image contrast and reduce computational cost. To extract the finger vein features, we use a fusion method, which can obtain clear and distinguishable vein patterns under different conditions. We used the Hausdorff average distance algorithm to examine the recognition performance of the system. The experimental results demonstrate that MAHE can better balance the recognition accuracy and the expenditure of time compared with three other methods. Our resulting equal error rate throughout the total procedure was 3.268% in a database of 153 finger vein images.

  7. Differences in finger localisation performance of patients with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Kessels, Roy P C; de Haan, Edward H F; Kappelle, L Jaap; Leijten, Frans S; van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2008-09-17

    Several neuropsychological studies have suggested parallel processing of somatosensory input when localising a tactile stimulus on one's own by pointing towards it (body schema) and when localising this touched location by pointing to it on a map of a hand (body image). Usually these reports describe patients with impaired detection, but intact sensorimotor localisation. This study examined three patients with a lesion of the angular gyrus with intact somatosensory processing, but with selectively disturbed finger identification (finger agnosia). These patients performed normally when pointing towards the touched finger on their own hand but failed to indicate this finger on a drawing of a hand or to name it. Similar defects in the perception of other body parts were not observed. The findings provide converging evidence for the dissociation between body image and body schema and, more importantly, reveal for the first time that this distinction is also present in higher-order cognitive processes selectively for the fingers.

  8. LGIT In Vitro Latency Model in Primary and T Cell Lines to Test HIV-1 Reactivation Compounds.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ulrike; Takahashi, Mayumi; Rossi, John J; Burnett, John C

    2016-01-01

    Persistent latent HIV-1 reservoirs pose a major barrier for combinatorial antiretroviral therapy (cART) to achieve eradication of the virus. A variety of mechanisms likely contribute to HIV-1 persistence, including establishment of post-integration latency in resting CD4+ T-lymphocytes, the proliferation of these latently infected cells, and the induced or spontaneous reactivation of latent virus. To elucidate the mechanisms of latency and to investigate therapeutic strategies for reactivating and purging the latent reservoir, investigators have developed in vitro models of HIV-1 latency using primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Several types of in vitro latency models range from replication-competent to single-round, replication-deficient viruses exhibiting different degrees of viral genomic deletion. Working under the hypothesis that HIV-1 post-integration latency is directly linked to HIV-1 promoter activity, which can be obscured by additional proteins expressed during replication, we focus here on the creation of latently infected primary human T-cells and cell lines through the single-round, replication deficient HIV-1 LGIT model. In this model the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the HIV-1 virus drives a cassette of GFP-IRES-Tat that allows testing of reactivating components and initiates a positive feedback loop through Tat expression.

  9. Stability, Reactivity, and Constituent Interaction in TiSe2-Based Metastable Misfit Layer Compounds Synthesized from Designed Amorphous Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Devin R.

    A series of intergrowth compounds with the basic formula [(MSe) 1+delta]m(TiSe2)n are reported. The compounds are prepared from modulated elemental reactants and display interesting structural and electronic behavior. Section 1 of this dissertation outlines initial attempts to characterize constituent interaction. The first member of the SnSe based subclass is reported and displays the highest Seebeck coefficient of any m = n = 1 compound reported to date, and a surprising amount of order is observed, compared to previously reported compounds. With properly established deposition parameters, the synthesis was extended to included the m = 2-4 compounds. These compounds display interesting electronic behavior that suggests the band structure shifts considerably as the SnSe block is expanded, affecting the interaction between the constituent layers. The first compound based on BiSe is then reported, suggesting that the Bi structure donates more conduction electrons to the band structure. Targeted substitution through kinetic control is the focus of Section 2, and a family of (PbxSn1-xSe)1+deltaTiSe 2 is reported over the entire range of x, even though a miscibility gap exists in the bulk PbxSn1-xSe system. The resulting alloyed intergrowth compounds also display equal or higher mobility than the end members, suggesting modulation doping could be used to affect transport properties. As a proof of principle, the analogous system based on a Bi xSn1-xSe constituent was prepared to attempt to systematically affect carrier concentration. It was found that while carrier concentration can be controlled, the evolving structure affects the doping efficiency of the Bi atoms and mobility in the structure. Section 3 outlines attempts to form higher order TiSe2-based heterostructures and the important chemical considerations observed during the preparation of these materials. The 3 component systems in the Pb-Sn-Ti-Se system can be formed at low temperature, with SnSe2 rather than

  10. Study of the reactivity of sodium compounds and Ca(OH){sub 2} towards SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}

    SciTech Connect

    Mocke, K.; Stejskalova, K.; Bach, P.

    1995-06-01

    The J.Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry (IPC) has conducted a detailed basic research under contract to Solvay Company (Belgium) to examine the reactivity of solid substances towards acid gases (SO{sub 2},NO{sub x}) with the aim to find the best conditions for their efficient removal. The reactivity of different sodium compounds (sodium bicarbonate, active soda, sodium carbonate monohydrate, dense soda ash) and Ca(OH){sub 2} was examined in the reaction with sulphur dioxide in a broad range of experimental variables (temperature, gas composition). The reactivity of selected samples was investigated also in the reactions with gaseous mixtures containing SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in the dependence on temperature, SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x}, and NO/NO{sub 2} ratios and the hydrodynamic regime of the fixed bed flow reactor. Further, ESCA and SEM methods were used for the identification of solid reaction products and their evolution as a function of reaction parameters. It is shown that in the case of NaHCO{sub 3} precursor it is possible to achieve in average at least a 90 % SO{sub 2} and simultaneously an almost 50 % NO{sub x} removal. The results obtained are very promising with respect to the NaHCO{sub 3} utilization especially for the purification of waste gases from incinerators and power plants.

  11. Environmental photochemical fate of selected pharmaceutical compounds in natural and reconstituted Suwannee River water: Role of reactive species in indirect photolysis.

    PubMed

    Santoke, Hanoz; Cooper, William J

    2017-02-15

    This study reports the impact of two reactive species, hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen, on the photochemical degradation of three selected pharmaceutical compounds in natural and reconstituted solutions of Suwannee River water. Absolute bimolecular rate constants (M(-1)s(-1)) were determined for the reaction of hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen with danofloxacin ((6.15±0.11)×10(9); (7.50±0.13)×10(4)), fluvastatin ((6.96±0.16)×10(9); (1.64±0.18)×10(8)), and paroxetine ((8.65±0.12)×10(9), (1.18±0.13)×10(8)), respectively. For all three pharmaceutical compounds, the rate constants for reactions with the hydroxyl radical were similar; however, those for singlet oxygen varied by three orders of magnitude. In the waters studied, the steady-state concentration of the hydroxyl radical was on the order of 10(-17)-10(-18)M, and for singlet oxygen, 10(-12)-10(-14)M. The percent contribution of each species to the degradation of each pharmaceutical in each water matrix was calculated, and several trends were identified enabling a better understanding of the role of these reactive species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Finger Movements in Transcription Typing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-07

    learned motor movements.- DD , , 1473 00f n,.. ofo I. OV.o 95c ’ ~ 15 O,/BSOL."ETE, .[ -. 4 a/ 11L 1.5U NTARF~ SO. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ECRT AUSTRAC ...fingers. Sensory information and proprioceptive feedback from the mus- cles controlling the fingers could play a role . Neural impulses take about 70

  13. Skilled Finger Movements in Typing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentner, Donald R.

    Six skilled typists were studied while they transcribed English text. The typists showed stable patterns of performance, but with significant individual differences among themselves. Inter-keypress latencies for two-finger digraphs (typed by two fingers on the same hand) were particularly variable among typists. Two typists showed large…

  14. Gert Finger Becomes Emeritus Physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw, T.; Lucuix, C.; Péron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Gert Finger has retired after almost 33 years service and he has been made the first Emeritus Physicist at ESO. An appreciation of some of his many achievements in the development of infrared instrumentation and detector controllers is given. A retirement party for Gert Finger was held in February 2016.

  15. Competition between anisotropic viscous fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecelerowicz, M.; Budek, A.; Szymczak, P.

    2014-09-01

    We consider viscous fingers created by injection of low viscosity fluid into the network of capillaries initially filled with a more viscous fluid (motor oil). Due to the anisotropy of the system and its geometry, such a setup promotes the formation of long-and-thin fingers which then grow and compete for the available flow, interacting through the pressure field. The interaction between the fingers is analyzed using the branched growth formalism of Halsey and Leibig (Phys. Rev. A 46, 7723, 1992) using a number of simple, analytically tractable models. It is shown that as soon as the fingers are allowed to capture the flow from one another, the fixed point appears in the phase space, corresponding to the asymptotic state in which the growth of one of the fingers in hindered by the other. The properties of phase space flows in such systems are shown to be remarkably insensitive to the details of the dynamics.

  16. Optimal three finger grasps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, J.; Lafferriere, G.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the problem of optimal force distribution among three point fingers holding a planar object. A scheme that reduces the nonlinear optimization problem to an easily solved generalized eigenvalue problem is proposed. This scheme generalizes and simplifies results of Ji and Roth (1988). The generalizations include all possible geometric arrangements and extensions to three dimensions and to the case of variable coefficients of friction. For the two-dimensional case with constant coefficients of friction, it is proved that, except for some special cases, the optimal grasping forces (in the sense of minimizing the dependence on friction) are those for which the angles with the corresponding normals are all equal (in absolute value).

  17. Clear microstructure-performance relationships in Mn-containing perovskite and hexaaluminate compounds prepared by activated reactive synthesis.

    PubMed

    Laassiri, Said; Bion, Nicolas; Duprez, Daniel; Royer, Sébastien; Alamdari, Houshang

    2014-03-07

    Microstructural properties of mixed oxides play essential roles in their oxygen mobility and consequently in their catalytic performances. Two families of mixed oxides (perovskite and hexaaluminate) with different microstructural features, such as crystal size and specific surface area, were prepared using the activated reactive synthesis (ARS) method. It was shown that ARS is a flexible route to synthesize both mixed oxides with nano-scale crystal size and high specific surface area. Redox properties and oxygen mobility were found to be strongly affected by the material microstructure. Catalytic activities of hexaaluminate and perovskite materials for methane oxidation were discussed in the light of structural, redox and oxygen mobility properties.

  18. Compilation and evaluation of gas phase diffusion coefficients of reactive trace gases in the atmosphere: volume 1. Inorganic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-09-01

    Diffusion of gas molecules to the surface is the first step for all gas-surface reactions. Gas phase diffusion can influence and sometimes even limit the overall rates of these reactions; however, there is no database of the gas phase diffusion coefficients of atmospheric reactive trace gases. Here we compile and evaluate, for the first time, the diffusivities (pressure-independent diffusion coefficients) of atmospheric inorganic reactive trace gases reported in the literature. The measured diffusivities are then compared with estimated values using a semi-empirical method developed by Fuller et al. (1966). The diffusivities estimated using Fuller's method are typically found to be in good agreement with the measured values within ±30%, and therefore Fuller's method can be used to estimate the diffusivities of trace gases for which experimental data are not available. The two experimental methods used in the atmospheric chemistry community to measure the gas phase diffusion coefficients are also discussed. A different version of this compilation/evaluation, which will be updated when new data become available, is uploaded online (https://sites.google.com/site/mingjintang/home/diffusion).

  19. Hispidin and related herbal compounds from Alpinia zerumbet inhibit both PAK1-dependent melanogenesis in melanocytes and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Be Tu, Pham Thi; Chompoo, Jamnian; Tawata, Shinkichi

    2015-06-01

    Recently several compounds from Okinawa plants including Alpinia zerumbet (alpinia) were shown to inhibit directly the oncogenic/ageing kinase PAK1 (p21-activated kinase 1). Furthermore, it was recently revealed that both PAK1 and PAK4 (p21-activated kinase 4) are equally essential for the melanogenesis in melanoma cells. Thus, in this study, we tested if several alpinia compounds inhibit the melanogenesis in melanoma (B16F10) cells, as well as the PAK1-dependent up-regulation of both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in cultured adipocytes (3T3-L1) without any cytotoxicity. The effect of alpinia compounds on the melanogenesis was measured by both the melanin content and intracellular tyrosinase activity in melanoma cells treated with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a melanogenesis stimulating hormone. We found that (1E,3E,5E)-6-methoxyhexa-1,3,5-trien-1-yl)-2,5-dihydrofuran (MTD), 5,6-dehydrokawain (DK), labdadiene, hispidin and dihydro-5,6-dehydrokawain (DDK) at 50 μg/mL reduced the melanin content by 63-79%. The MTD, DK and hispidin, at 50 μg/mL, inhibited tyrosinase activity by 70-83% in melanoma cells. Among these compounds, labdadiene, MTD, (E)-2,2,3,3-Tetramethyl8-methylene-7-(oct-6-en-1-yl)octahydro-1H-quinolizine (TMOQ) and hispidin strongly inhibited the ROS production. Hispidin, labdadiene and MTD at 20 μg/mL inhibited NO production by over 70%. These findings altogether suggest that some of these alpinia compounds could be potentially useful for the prevention or treatment of hyperpigmentation and obesity.

  20. OH reactivity and potential SOA yields from volatile organic compounds and other trace gases measured in controlled laboratory biomass burns

    Treesearch

    J. B. Gilman; C. Warneke; W. C. Kuster; P. D. Goldan; P. R. Veres; J. M. Roberts; J. A. de Gouw; I. R. Burling; R. J. Yokelson

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of instruments were used to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases (e.g., CO, CH4, NO2, etc.) emitted from controlled burns of various fuel types common to the Southeastern and Southwestern United States. These laboratory-based measurements were conducted in February 2009 at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fire...

  1. Approaches for quantifying reactive and low-volatility biogenic organic compound emissions by vegetation enclosure techniques - part B: applications.

    PubMed

    Ortega, John; Helmig, Detlev; Daly, Ryan W; Tanner, David M; Guenther, Alex B; Herrick, Jeffrey D

    2008-06-01

    The focus of the studies presented in the preceding companion paper (Part A: Review) and here (Part B: Applications) is on defining representative emission rates from vegetation for determining the roles of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions in atmospheric chemistry and aerosol processes. The review of previously published procedures for identifying and quantifying BVOC emissions has revealed a wide variety of experimental methods used by various researchers. Experimental details become increasingly critical for quantitative emission measurements of low volatility monoterpenes (MT) and sesquiterpenes (SQT). These compounds are prone to be lost inadvertently by uptake to materials in contact with the sample air or by reactions with atmospheric oxidants. These losses become more prominent with higher molecular weight compounds, potentially leading to an underestimation of their emission rates. We present MT and SQT emission rate data from numerous experiments that include 23 deciduous tree species, 14 coniferous tree species, 8 crops, and 2 shrubs. These data indicate total, normalized (30 degrees C) basal emission rates from <10 to 5600ngCg(-1)h(-1) for MT, and from <10 to 1150ngCg(-1)h(-1) for SQT compounds. Both MT and SQT emissions have exponential dependencies on temperature (i.e. rates are proportional to e(betaT)). The inter-quartile range of beta-values for MT was between 0.12 and 0.17K(-1), which is higher than the value commonly used in models (0.09K(-1)). However many of the MT emissions also exhibited light dependencies, making it difficult to separate light and temperature influences. The primary light-dependent MT was ocimene, whose emissions were up to a factor of 10 higher than light-independent MT emissions. The inner-quartile range of beta-values for SQT was between 0.15 and 0.21K(-1).

  2. New grape stems' isolated phenolic compounds modulate reactive oxygen species, glutathione, and lipid peroxidation in vitro: Combined formulations with vitamins C and E.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Marcelo; Oppolzer, David; Gouvinhas, Irene; Silva, Amélia M; Barros, Ana I R N A; Domínguez-Perles, Raúl

    2017-07-01

    The antioxidant potential of grape (Vitis vinífera L.) stems has been reported in the last decade although no identification of the individual compounds responsible for such action has been done. In this work, polyphenolic extract of grape stems was processed resorting to semi-preparative HPLC, allowing to obtain 5 purified polyphenols (caftaric acid, malvidin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, mailvidin-3-O-(6-O-caffeoyl)-glucoside, and Σ-viniferin), which were fully characterized by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS(n). Isolated compounds were featured on their radical scavenging capacity (DPPH and ABTS), cell viability, anti-inflammatory activity, and capacity to modulate the level of reactive oxygen species, glutathione, lipid peroxidation, and overall oxidative stress in a biological model (human keratinocytes) in vitro, under basal and oxidative conditions. The results obtained noticed the combinations malvidin-3-O-glucoside+Vitamin E and quercetin-3-O-glucuronide+vitamin C as the most effective, allowing to improve the capacity of complete extracts or individual compounds, and being candidates to be used in the development of new functional products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  4. [Multiple finger geodes in children].

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, J C; Oprisescu, B; Bresson, A; Ploier, R; Vidailhet, M

    1993-06-01

    Three pediatric patients with multiple geodes in the fingers are reported. This condition occurs mainly between one and three years and at seven years of age and is more common in winter. Affected fingers are swollen. Roentgenograms disclose several small lucent defects which are usually located in the middle phalanx. Several fingers are usually involved. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate is increased in virtually every case. Resolution occurs spontaneously within a few weeks or months. There is no tendency towards recurrence. Although the condition is inflammatory, exposure to cold is probably a precipitating factor.

  5. Finger-Circumference-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Suy

    1995-01-01

    Easy-to-use device quickly measures circumference of finger (including thumb) on human hand. Includes polytetrafluoroethylene band 1/8 in. wide, bent into loop and attached to tab that slides on scale graduated in millimeters. Sliding tab preloaded with constant-force tension spring, which pulls tab toward closure of loop. Designed to facilitate measurements at various points along fingers to obtain data for studies of volumetric changes of fingers in microgravity. Also used in normal Earth gravity studies of growth and in assessment of diseases like arthritis.

  6. Triggering the generation of an iron(IV)-oxo compound and its reactivity toward sulfides by Ru(II) photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Company, Anna; Sabenya, Gerard; González-Béjar, María; Gómez, Laura; Clémancey, Martin; Blondin, Geneviève; Jasniewski, Andrew J; Puri, Mayank; Browne, Wesley R; Latour, Jean-Marc; Que, Lawrence; Costas, Miquel; Pérez-Prieto, Julia; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2014-03-26

    The preparation of [Fe(IV)(O)(MePy2tacn)](2+) (2, MePy2tacn = N-methyl-N,N-bis(2-picolyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) by reaction of [Fe(II)(MePy2tacn)(solvent)](2+) (1) and PhIO in CH3CN and its full characterization are described. This compound can also be prepared photochemically from its iron(II) precursor by irradiation at 447 nm in the presence of catalytic amounts of [Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+) as photosensitizer and a sacrificial electron acceptor (Na2S2O8). Remarkably, the rate of the reaction of the photochemically prepared compound 2 toward sulfides increases 150-fold under irradiation, and 2 is partially regenerated after the sulfide has been consumed; hence, the process can be repeated several times. The origin of this rate enhancement has been established by studying the reaction of chemically generated compound 2 with sulfides under different conditions, which demonstrated that both light and [Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+) are necessary for the observed increase in the reaction rate. A combination of nanosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy with laser pulse excitation and other mechanistic studies has led to the conclusion that an electron transfer mechanism is the most plausible explanation for the observed rate enhancement. According to this mechanism, the in-situ-generated [Ru(III)(bpy)3](3+) oxidizes the sulfide to form the corresponding radical cation, which is eventually oxidized by 2 to the corresponding sulfoxide.

  7. Triggering the Generation of an Iron(IV)-Oxo Compound and Its Reactivity toward Sulfides by RuII Photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of [FeIV(O)(MePy2tacn)]2+ (2, MePy2tacn = N-methyl-N,N-bis(2-picolyl)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) by reaction of [FeII(MePy2tacn)(solvent)]2+ (1) and PhIO in CH3CN and its full characterization are described. This compound can also be prepared photochemically from its iron(II) precursor by irradiation at 447 nm in the presence of catalytic amounts of [RuII(bpy)3]2+ as photosensitizer and a sacrificial electron acceptor (Na2S2O8). Remarkably, the rate of the reaction of the photochemically prepared compound 2 toward sulfides increases 150-fold under irradiation, and 2 is partially regenerated after the sulfide has been consumed; hence, the process can be repeated several times. The origin of this rate enhancement has been established by studying the reaction of chemically generated compound 2 with sulfides under different conditions, which demonstrated that both light and [RuII(bpy)3]2+ are necessary for the observed increase in the reaction rate. A combination of nanosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy with laser pulse excitation and other mechanistic studies has led to the conclusion that an electron transfer mechanism is the most plausible explanation for the observed rate enhancement. According to this mechanism, the in-situ-generated [RuIII(bpy)3]3+ oxidizes the sulfide to form the corresponding radical cation, which is eventually oxidized by 2 to the corresponding sulfoxide. PMID:24568126

  8. Compound 800, a natural product isolated from genetically engineered Pseudomonas: proposed structure, reactivity, and putative relation to heme d1.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyung-Sun; Liang, Qiaoli; Cha, Jin K; Cai, Mengli; Timkovich, Russell

    2004-08-24

    Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were prepared harboring the gene cluster nirFDLGH from Pseudomonas stutzeri substrain ZoBell on a high copy plasmid. These genes have been previously implicated as being essential for the biosynthesis of heme d(1), the prosthetic group of dissimilatory nitrite reductases in anaerobic, denitryfying bacteria. Tetrapyrroles detectable at steady-state levels were identified from both organisms, and cell-free extracts from each were also used to transform uroporphyrinogen in vitro. E. coli does not naturally produce d(1), and the engineered strain failed to produce d(1) or any tetrapyrrole foreign to E. coli. Therefore, while nirFDLGHmay be necessary for d(1) biosynthesis, it is not sufficient. In the denitrifier P. aeruginosa, the results were more positive. The presence of the plasmid led to increased levels of d(1). In addition, a previously unidentified tetrapyrrole was detected. This compound was characterized by visible absorption spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and NMR, and a tentative structure was proposed for this compound. The tetrapyrrole has structural features similar to sirohydrochlorin (as precorrin-2 or sirotetrahydrochlorin, a known intermediate of d(1)) and d(1) itself. The most unusual substituents are epoxide and sulfoxide moieties. When this tetrapyrrole was treated with strong mineral acid and heat, it was converted into natural d(1).

  9. Heterogeneous OH oxidation of biomass burning organic aerosol surrogate compounds: assessment of volatilisation products and the role of OH concentration on the reactive uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Slade, Jonathan H; Knopf, Daniel A

    2013-04-28

    The reactive uptake coefficients (γ) of OH by levoglucosan, abietic acid, and nitroguaiacol serving as surrogate compounds for biomass burning aerosol have been determined employing a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer coupled to a rotating-wall flow-tube reactor over a wide range of [OH] ∼10(7)-10(11) molecule cm(-3). Volatilisation products of these organic substrates due to heterogeneous oxidation by OH have been determined at 1 atm using a high resolution proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR-PTR-ToF-MS). γ range within 0.05-1 for [OH] = 2.6 × 10(7)-3 × 10(9) molecule cm(-3) for all investigated organic compounds, but decrease to 0.008-0.034 for [OH] = 4.1 × 10(10)-6.7 × 10(10) molecule cm(-3). γ as a function of [OH] can be described by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, neglecting bulk processes, suggesting that despite its strong reactivity, OH is mobile on surfaces prior to reaction. The best fit Langmuir-Hinshelwood parameters on average are K(OH) = 3.81 × 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) and k(s) = 9.71 × 10(-17) cm(2) molecule(-1) s(-1) for all of the investigated organic compounds. Volatilised products have been identified indicating enhancements over background of 50% up to a factor of 15. Amongst the common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) identified between levoglucosan, abietic acid, and nitroguaiacol were methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, and acetic acid. VOCs having the greatest enhancement over background were glucic acid from levoglucosan, glycolic acid from abietic acid, and methanol and nitric acid from nitroguaiacol. Reaction mechanisms leading to the formation of glucic acid, glycolic acid, methanol, and nitric acid are proposed. Estimated lower limits of atmospheric lifetimes of biomass burning aerosol particles, 200 nm in diameter, by heterogeneous OH oxidation under fresh biomass burning plume conditions are ∼2 days and up to ∼2 weeks for atmospheric background conditions. However, estimated lifetimes

  10. Aerobic biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes in a fractured bedrock aquifer: quantitative assessment by compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and reactive transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Pooley, Kathryn E; Blessing, Michaela; Schmidt, Torsten C; Haderlein, Stefan B; Macquarrie, Kerry T B; Prommer, Henning

    2009-10-01

    A model-based analysis of concentration and isotope data was carried out to assess natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes in an aerobic fractured bedrock aquifer. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) concentrations decreased downgradient of the source, but constant delta13C signatures indicated the absence of PCE degradation. In contrast, geochemical and isotopic data demonstrated degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE) under the prevailing oxic conditions. Numerical modeling was employed to simulate isotopic enrichment of chlorinated ethenes and to evaluate alternative degradation pathway scenarios. Existing field information on groundwater flow, solute transport, geochemistry, and delta13C signatures of the chlorinated ethenes was integrated via reactive transport simulations. The results provided strong evidence for the occurrence of aerobic TCE and DCE degradation. The chlorinated ethene concentrations together with stable carbon isotope data allowed us to reliably constrain the assessment of the extent of biodegradation at the site and plume simulations quantitatively linked aerobic biodegradation with isotope signatures in the field. Our investigation provides the first quantitative assessment of aerobic biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes in a fractured rock aquifer based on compound specific stable isotope measurements and reactive transport modeling.

  11. Recent advances in high performance poly(lactide): From ``green'' plasticization to super-tough materials via (reactive) compounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kfoury, Georgio; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Hassouna, Fatima; Odent, Jérémy; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David; Dubois, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Due to its origin from renewable resources, its biodegradability, and recently, its industrial implementation at low costs, poly(lactide) (PLA) is considered as one of the most promising ecological, bio-sourced and biodegradable plastic materials to potentially and increasingly replace traditional petroleum derived polymers in many commodity and engineering applications. Beside its relatively high rigidity (high tensile strength and modulus compared with many common thermoplastics such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), high impact poly(styrene) (HIPS) and poly(propylene) (PP)), PLA suffers from an inherent brittleness, which can limit its applications especially where mechanical toughness such as plastic deformation at high impact rates or elongation is required. Therefore, the curve plotting stiffness vs. impact resistance and ductility must be shifted to higher values for PLA-based materials, while being preferably fully bio-based and biodegradable upon the application. This review aims to establish a state of the art focused on the recent progresses and preferably economically viable strategies developed in the literature for significantly improve the mechanical performances of PLA. A particular attention is given to plasticization as well as to impact resistance modification of PLA in the case of (reactive) blending PLA-based systems.

  12. Neural correlates of finger gnosis.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Elena; Tamè, Luigi; Furlan, Michele; Haggard, Patrick; Demarchi, Gianpaolo; Adriani, Michela; Ferrari, Paolo; Braun, Christoph; Schwarzbach, Jens

    2014-07-02

    Neuropsychological studies have described patients with a selective impairment of finger identification in association with posterior parietal lesions. However, evidence of the role of these areas in finger gnosis from studies of the healthy human brain is still scarce. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the brain network engaged in a novel finger gnosis task, the intermanual in-between task (IIBT), in healthy participants. Several brain regions exhibited a stronger blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in IIBT than in a control task that did not explicitly rely on finger gnosis but used identical stimuli and motor responses as the IIBT. The IIBT involved stronger signal in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), bilateral precuneus (PCN), bilateral premotor cortex, and left inferior frontal gyrus. In all regions, stimulation of nonhomologous fingers of the two hands elicited higher BOLD signal than stimulation of homologous fingers. Only in the left anteromedial IPL (a-mIPL) and left PCN did signal strength decrease parametrically from nonhomology, through partial homology, to total homology with stimulation delivered synchronously to the two hands. With asynchronous stimulation, the signal was stronger in the left a-mIPL than in any other region, possibly indicating retention of task-relevant information. We suggest that the left PCN may contribute a supporting visuospatial representation via its functional connection to the right PCN. The a-mIPL may instead provide the core substrate of an explicit bilateral body structure representation for the fingers that when disrupted can produce the typical symptoms of finger agnosia.

  13. Reactivity of Deoxy- and Oxyferrous Dehaloperoxidase B from Amphitrite ornata: Identification of Compound II and its Ferrous-Hydroperoxide Precursor†

    PubMed Central

    D’Antonio, Jennifer; Ghiladi, Reza A.

    2011-01-01

    Dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from the terebellid polychaete Amphitrite ornata is a bifunctional enzyme that possesses both hemoglobin and peroxidase activities. The bifunctional nature of DHP as a globin-peroxidase appears to be at odds with the traditional starting oxidation state for each individual activity. Namely, reversible oxygen-binding is only mediated via a ferrous heme in globins, and peroxidase activity is initiated from ferric centers and to the exclusion of the oxyferrous oxidation state from the peroxidase cycle. Thus, to address what appears to be a paradox, herein we report the details of our investigations into the DHP catalytic cycle when initiated from the deoxy- and oxyferrous states using biochemical assays, stopped-flow UV-visible and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies, and anaerobic methods. We demonstrate the formation of Compound II directly from deoxyferrous DHP B upon its reaction with hydrogen peroxide, and show that this occurs both in the presence and absence of trihalophenol. Prior to Compound II formation, we have identified a new species which we have preliminarily attributed to a ferrous-hydroperoxide precursor that undergoes heterolysis to generate the aforementioned ferryl intermediate. Taken together, the results demonstrate that the oxyferrous state in DHP is a peroxidase competent starting species, and an updated catalytic cycle for DHP is proposed in which the ferric oxidation state is not an obligatory starting point for the peroxidase catalytic cycle of dehaloperoxidase. The data presented herein provide a link between the peroxidase and oxygen transport activities which furthers our understanding of how this bifunctional enzyme is able to unite its two inherent functions in one system. PMID:21619067

  14. Multimodal biometric authentication based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byung Jun; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2009-09-01

    We propose a new multimodal biometric recognition based on the fusion of finger vein and finger geometry. This research shows three novelties compared to previous works. First, this is the first approach to combine the finger vein and finger geometry information at the same time. Second, the proposed method includes a new finger geometry recognition based on the sequential deviation values of finger thickness extracted from a single finger. Third, we integrate finger vein and finger geometry by a score-level fusion method based on a support vector machine. Results show that recognition accuracy is significantly enhanced using the proposed method.

  15. Differential involvement of reactive oxygen species in apoptosis induced by two classes of selenium compounds in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Xun; Hu, Hongbo; Jiang, Cheng; Schuster, Todd; Lü, Junxuan

    2007-05-01

    Selenium is a promising chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer, possibly via an induction of apoptosis. Earlier studies have shown that selenite induces DNA single strand breaks (SSBs), reactive oxygen species (ROS), p53 Ser-15 phosphorylation and caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis, whereas a methylselenol precursor methylseleninic acid (MSeA) induces caspase-mediated apoptosis regardless of p53 status. Here we address three main questions: What types of ROS are induced by selenite vs. MSeA in LNCaP (p53 wild type, androgen-responsive) and DU145 (mutant p53, androgen-independent) prostate cancer cells? Does ROS generation depend on androgen signaling? What are the relationships among ROS, DNA SSBs, p53 and caspases? We show that selenite (5 microM) induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in LNCaP cells much more than in DU145 cells and the ROS generation was not affected by physiological androgen stimulation. MSeA (10 microM) induced apoptosis without either type of ROS in both cell lines. In LNCaP cells, we established superoxide as a primary mediator for selenite-induced DNA SSBs, p53 activation and caspase-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore a p53-dominant negative mutant attenuated selenite-induced ROS, leading to a proportionate protection against apoptosis. The results support the p53-mitochondria axis in a feedback loop for sustaining superoxide production to lead to efficient caspase-mediated apoptosis by selenite. In contrast, caspase-mediated apoptosis induced by MSeA does not involve ROS induction. Since p53 is frequently mutated or deleted in prostate cancer and many other cancers, our results suggest that genotoxic vs. nongenotoxic classes of selenium may exert differential apoptosis efficacy depending on the p53 status of the cancer cells. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Quantification of reactive carbonyl compounds in icodextrin-based peritoneal dialysis fluids by combined UHPLC-DAD and -MS/MS detection.

    PubMed

    Gensberger-Reigl, Sabrina; Huppert, Jochen; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2016-01-25

    During heat sterilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids, the glucose component is partially degraded. The formed glucose degradation products impair biocompatibility and limit the long-term application of PD fluids. As an alternative to glucose, icodextrin, a polyglucose, is used as osmotic agent in PD fluids. After targeted screening for reactive carbonyl compounds, NMR- and MS-analyses very recently revealed 4-deoxyglucosone (4-DG), 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG), 3-deoxygalactosone (3-DGal), 3,4-dideoxypentosone (3,4-DDPS), and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) as main polyglucose degradation products (pGDPs) in icodextrin-based PD fluids. Now, the present study established and validated a UHPLC method with DAD as well as a UHPLC-MS/MS method for the first-time quantification of those five major pGDPs in commercial icodextrin PD fluids after derivatization with o-phenylenediamine. Thus, 4-DG was identified to be the main degradation product (in concentrations up to 20 μM). In contrast to the values measured in glucose-based products, the concentration of 3-DGal (≤ 16 μM) was higher than the concentration of 3-DG (≤ 7 μM) indicating different reaction pathways starting from polyglucose compared to glucose. The compounds 3,4-DDPS and 5-HMF were present in minor quantities (≤ 0.3 μM each). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clay for Little Fingers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Joan Bouza

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the renewed interest in clay as a modeling compound in early childhood programs; describes the nature of clay and presents a working vocabulary. Suggests methods of working with clay, including introducing clay to children, discovering its uses, clean up, firing clay, and finishing baked clay. Includes activity suggestions and…

  18. In situ experiments for element species-specific environmental reactivity of tin and mercury compounds using isotopic tracers and multiple linear regression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Pablo; Bouchet, Sylvain; Monperrus, Mathilde; Tessier, Emmanuel; Amouroux, David

    2013-03-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) and tin (Sn) compounds in ecosystems is strongly determined by their alkylation/dealkylation pathways. However, the experimental determination of those transformations is still not straightforward and methodologies need to be refined. The purpose of this work is the development of a comprehensive and adaptable tool for an accurate experimental assessment of specific formation/degradation yields and half-lives of elemental species in different aquatic environments. The methodology combines field incubations of coastal waters and surface sediments with the addition of species-specific isotopically enriched tracers and a mathematical approach based on the deconvolution of isotopic patterns. The method has been applied to the study of the environmental reactivity of Hg and Sn compounds in coastal water and surface sediment samples collected in two different coastal ecosystems of the South French Atlantic Coast (Arcachon Bay and Adour Estuary). Both the level of isotopically enriched species and the spiking solution composition were found to alter dibutyltin and monomethylmercury degradation yields, while no significant changes were measurable for tributyltin and Hg(II). For butyltin species, the presence of light was found to be the main source of degradation and removal of these contaminants from surface coastal environments. In contrast, photomediated processes do not significantly influence either the methylation of mercury or the demethylation of methylmercury. The proposed method constitutes an advancement from the previous element-specific isotopic tracers' approaches, which allows for instance to discriminate the extent of net and oxidative Hg demethylation and to identify which debutylation step is controlling the environmental persistence of butyltin compounds.

  19. Environmental chamber studies of atmospheric reactivities of volatile organic compounds: Effects of varying chamber and light source

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.; Luo, D.; Malkina, I.; Pierce, J.

    1995-05-01

    Photochemical oxidant models are essential tools for assessing effects of emissions changes on ground-level ozone formation. Such models are needed for predicting the ozone impacts of increased alternative fuel use. The gas-phase photochemical mechanism is an important component of these models because ozone is not emitted directly, but is formed from the gas-phase photochemical reactions of the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in air. The chemistry of ground level ozone formation is complex; hundreds of types of VOCs being emitted into the atmosphere, and most of their atmospheric reactions are not completely understood. Because of this, no chemical model can be relied upon to give even approximately accurate predictions unless it has been evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data. Therefore an experimental and modeling study was conducted to assess how chemical mechanism evaluations using environmental chamber data are affected by the light source and other chamber characteristics. Xenon arc lights appear to give the best artificial representation of sunlight currently available, and experiments were conducted in a new Teflon chamber constructed using such a light source. Experiments were also conducted in an outdoor Teflon Chamber using new procedures to improve the light characterization, and in Teflon chambers using blacklights. These results, and results of previous runs other chambers, were compared with model predictions using an updated detailed chemical mechanism. The magnitude of the chamber radical source assumed when modeling the previous runs were found to be too high; this has implications in previous mechanism evaluations. Temperature dependencies of chamber effects can explain temperature dependencies in chamber experiments when Ta-300{degree}K, but not at temperatures below that.

  20. A range of newly developed mobile generators to dynamically produce SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for reactive compounds at atmospheric concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuenberger, Daiana; Pascale, Céline; Guillevic, Myriam; Ackermann, Andreas; Niederhauser, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Three new mobile facilities have been developed at METAS to dynamically generate SI-traceable reference gas mixtures for a variety of reactive compounds at atmospheric amount of substance fractions and at very low levels of uncertainty (Ux < 3%). We present three new portable "Reactive Gas Standard ReGaS" reference gas generators for the realisation of the following substances: ReGaS1: Ammonia and nitrogen dioxide in the nmol/mol (ppb) range ReGaS2: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), e.g. limonene, alpha-pinene, MVK, MEK in the nmol/mol (ppb) range ReGaS-3: Fluorinated gases (F-gases, i.e. containing fluorine atoms) in the pmol/mol (ppt) range These three mobile generators have been designed and manufactured at METAS in the framework of the three EMRP projects MetNH3, KEY-VOCs and HIGHGAS. The method is based on permeation and subsequent dynamic dilution: A permeation tube containing the pure substance (e.g. NH3) is stored in the permeation chamber at constant temperature, pressure and matrix gas flow (N2, purified air, synthetic air). Under such conditions the pure substance permeates at constant rate into the matrix gas and can be diluted thereafter to the desired amount fractions in one or two subsequent steps. The permeation rate (mass loss over time) of the permeation tube is precisely calibrated in a fully traceable magnetic suspension balance. The carrier gas is previously purified from the compounds of interest using commercially available purification cartridges. The permeation chambers of ReGaS2 and ReGaS3 have multiple individual cells allowing for the generation of mixtures containing up to 5 different components if required. ReGaS1 allows for the generation of one-component mixtures only. These primary mixtures are then diluted to the required amount of substance fractions using thermal mass flow controllers for full flexibility and adaptability of the generation process over the entire range of possible concentrations. In order to considerably reduce

  1. Prooxidant action of furanone compounds: implication of reactive oxygen species in the metal-dependent strand breaks and the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Haneda, M; Makino, T; Yoshino, M

    2007-07-01

    Prooxidant properties of furanone compounds including 2,5-furanone (furaneol, 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-furan-3-one), 4,5-furanone (4,5-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone) (sotolone) and cyclotene (2-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one) were analyzed in relation to the metal-reducing activity. Only 2.5-furanone known as a "strawberry or pineapple furanone" inactivated aconitase the most sensitive enzyme to active oxygen in the presence of ferrous sulfate, suggesting the furaneol/iron-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species. 2,5-Furanone caused strand scission of pBR322 DNA in the presence of copper. Treatment of calf thymus DNA with 2,5-furanone plus copper produced 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA. 2,5-Furanone showed a potent copper-reducing activity, and thus, DNA strand breaks and the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine by 2,5-furanone can be initiated by the production of superoxide radical through the reduction of cupric ion to cuprous ion, resulting in the conversion to hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. However, an isomer and analog of 2,5-furanone, 4,5-furanone and cyclotene, respectively, did not show an inactivation of aconitase, DNA injuries including strand breakage and the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, and copper-reducing activity. Cytotoxic effect of 2,5-furanone with hydroxyketone structure can be explained by its prooxidant properties: furaneol/transition metal complex generates reactive oxygen species causing the inactivation of aconitase and the formation of DNA base damage by hydroxyl radical.

  2. Characterizing the chemical evolution of air masses via multi-platform measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during CalNEX: Composition, OH reactivity, and potential SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Holloway, J. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are critical components in the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). During the CalNex 2010 field campaign, an extensive set of VOCs were measured at the Pasadena ground site, and aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and the WHOI Research Vessel Atlantis. The measurements from each platform provide a unique perspective into the emissions, transport, and atmospheric processing of VOCs within the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The observed enhancement ratios of the hydrocarbons measured on all three platforms are in good agreement and are generally well correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), indicating the prevalence of on-road VOC emission sources throughout the SoCAB. Offshore measurements aboard the ship and aircraft are used to characterize the air mass composition as a function of the land/sea-breeze effect. VOC ratios and other trace gases are used to identify air masses containing relatively fresh emissions that were often associated with offshore flow and re-circulated continental air associated with onshore flow conditions. With the prevailing southwesterly airflow pattern in the LAB throughout the daytime, the Pasadena ground site effectively functions as a receptor site and is used to characterize primary VOC emissions from downtown Los Angeles and to identify the corresponding secondary oxidation products. The chemical evolution of air masses as a function of the time of day is investigated in order to determine the relative impacts of primary emissions vs. secondary VOC products on OH reactivity and potential SOA formation. The reactivity of VOCs with the hydroxyl radical (OH) at the Pasadena site was dominated by the light hydrocarbons, isoprene, and oxygenated VOCs including aldehydes (secondary products) and alcohols (primary anthropogenic emissions). Toluene and benzaldehyde, both of which are associated with primary anthropogenic emissions, are the predominant VOC precursors to the

  3. Reactive sintering and reactive hot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. C.; German, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    NbAl3 has been synthesized from elemental powders by reactive sintering (RS) and reactive hot isostatic pressing (RHIP). Both processes involve a self-propagating exothermic reaction between the constituent powders to form an intermetallic compound. The RHIP approach uses simultaneous external pressurization to make a higher density product. This study focused on developing a method to use reactive synthesis to form high-density NbAl3 compacts. High RS and RHIP densities were possible with the appropriate raw materials and processing parameters. These include powder purity, particle sizes, degassing, heating rate, furnace temperature, and compaction pressures. Near full density was attained with RHIP, and up to 95 pct density was attained with RS.

  4. Regional biogenic emissions of reactive volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from forests: First results on process studies, modelling and validation experiments (BEWA2000)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, B.; Bewa2000 Team

    2003-04-01

    The overall objective of the research consortia is to develop for a forest canopy a prognostic, validated emission model for primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOC) to be used for estimating regional biogenic emissions with a higher spatial and temporal resolution than present. To achieve this objective requires a better description of biosynthetic processes as well as chemical degradation mechanisms for reactive biogenic VOC in combination with a process-based model and latest vegetation specific land use information. Up to now several highlights were achieved within the different key activities. In the section model development a process-based isoprenoid emission model was supplemented with new differential equations especially taking into account the influence of transport-resistances for leaf gas-exchange. In biochemical process-studies related to the formation of isoprene in leaves it turned out that during daytime about 20-70% of the total carbon delivered to poplar leaves (photosynthesis + other sources) was derived from xylem-transported sugars. This finding indicates that xylem-delivered carbon may indeed act as a significant alternative carbon source for isoprenoid biosynthesis. First chemical process studies on the reaction of limonene with NO3 radicals (observed in the night and under low light conditions) in the EUPHORE (European Photoreactor) demonstrated a secondary particle formation. At the field site Waldstein (Fichtelgebirge) this reaction may result in maximum pinonealdhyde concentrations in the air and on particles observed in night periods. A first analysis of particle size distributions over the Norway spruce canopy showed the appearance of small particles (< 10nm) during early daytime. The first results demonstrate that the proposed approach of combining interdisciplinary field, laboratory and modelling exercises to address the complexity of the biosphere/atmosphere exchange of reactive trace gases will contribute

  5. Review on mallet finger treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Fung, Boris; Ip, Wing Yuk

    2012-01-01

    Mallet finger is a common injury involving either an extensor tendon rupture at its insertion or an avulsion fracture involving the insertion of the terminal extensor tendon. It is usually caused by a forceful blow to the tip of the finger causing sudden flexion or a hyperextension injury. Fracture at the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanx is commonly associated with palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx. Most mallet finger injuries are recommended to be treated with immobilisation of the distal interphalangeal joint in extension by splints. There is no consensus on the type of splint and the duration of use. Most studies have shown comparable results with different splints. Surgical fixation is still indicated in certain conditions such as open injuries, avulsion fracture involving at least one third of the articular surface with or without palmar subluxation of the distal phalanx and also failed splinting treatment.

  6. Finger flexion does not contribute to ball speed in overarm throws.

    PubMed

    Hore, J; Watts, S; Martin, J

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether, in overarm throws made by recreational ball players, the fingers undergo flexion movement before ball release and thereby contribute to the generation of ball speed. To obtain the high resolution needed to answer this question, the magnetic-field search-coil technique was used and the data were sampled at 1000 Hz. The subjects, who were either seated or were standing, threw tennis balls at different speeds at a target 3 m away. Angular positions in three dimensions were simultaneously recorded of the distal phalanx of the middle finger and hand and, in additional experiments to determine the mechanism of ball release in more detail, three middle finger phalanges and the hand. Different phases of ball release were determined by pressure-sensitive microswitches on the proximal and distal phalanges of the middle finger. Irrespective of whether the subjects were seated or were standing, for all throws at all speeds, finger flexion did not occur before ball release. That is, up until final release of the ball, the fingers only underwent extension associated with hand opening. For fast throws, at the instant of final ball release the fingers began to flex, presumably as a result of reactive forces associated with release of the ball. Thus, in overarm throws made by recreational ball players, finger flexion movement does not appear to contribute to the generation of ball speed.

  7. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  8. Synthesis of monooxime-monocarbamoyl bispyridinium compounds bearing (E)-but-2-ene linker and evaluation of their reactivation activity against tabun- and paraoxon-inhibited acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Musilek, Kamil; Holas, Ondrej; Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Opletalova, Veronika; Dolezal, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Six AChE monooxime-monocarbamoyl reactivators with an (E)-but-2-ene linker were synthesized using modification of currently known synthetic pathways. Their potency to reactivate AChE inhibited by the nerve agent tabun and insecticide paraoxon was tested in vitro. The reactivation efficacies of pralidoxime, HI-6, obidoxime, K048, K075 and the newly prepared reactivators were compared. According to the results obtained, one reactivator seems to be promising against tabun-inhibited AChE and two reactivators against paraoxon-inhibited AChE. The best results were obtained for bisquaternary substances with at least one oxime group in position four.

  9. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  10. Antiviral, anti-parasitic, and cytotoxic effects of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI), a reactive compound generated by phenoloxidase during insect immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Picheng; Lu, Zhiqiang; Strand, Michael R; Jiang, Haobo

    2011-09-01

    Phenoloxidase (PO) and its activation system are implicated in several defense responses of insects. Upon wounding or infection, inactive prophenoloxidase (proPO) is converted to active PO through a cascade of serine proteases and their homologs. PO generates reactive compounds such as 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI), which have a broad-spectrum antibacterial and antifungal activity. Here we report that DHI and its spontaneous oxidation products are also active against viruses and parasitic wasps. Preincubation of a baculovirus stock with 1.25 mM DHI for 3 h near fully disabled recombinant protein production. The LC₅₀ for lambda bacteriophage and eggs of the wasp Microplitis demolitor were 5.6 ± 2.2 and 111.0 ± 1.6 μM, respectively. The toxicity of DHI and related compounds also extended to cells derived from insects that serve as hosts for several of the aforementioned pathogens. Pretreatment of Sf9 cells with 1.0 mM DHI for 4 h resulted in 97% mortality, and LC₅₀ values of 20.3 ± 1.2 μM in buffer and 131.8 ± 1.1 μM in a culture medium. Symptoms of DHI toxicity in Sf9 cells included DNA polymerization, protein crosslinking, and lysis. Taken together, these data showed that proPO activation and DHI production is strongly toxic against various pathogens but can also damage host tissues and cells if not properly controlled. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Removal of ammonium-nitrogen from groundwater using a fully passive permeable reactive barrier with oxygen-releasing compound and clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Yang, Yingzhao; Deng, Wei; Li, Shengpin; Huang, Yuanying; Kong, Xiangke

    2015-05-01

    A novel fully passive permeable reactive barrier (PRB) with oxygen-releasing compound (ORC) and clinoptilolite was proposed for the removal of ammonium-nitrogen from groundwater. The PRB involves a combination of oxygen release, biological nitrification, ion exchange, and bioregeneration. A pilot-scale performance comparison experiment was carried out employing three parallel columns to assess the proposed PRB. The results showed that the PRB achieved nearly complete [Formula: see text] depletion (>99%). [Formula: see text] of 5.23-10.88 mg/L was removed, and [Formula: see text] of <1.93 mg/L and [Formula: see text] of 2.03-19.67 mg/L were generated. Ion exchange and biological nitrification both contributed to [Formula: see text] removal, and the latter played a dominant role under the condition of sufficient oxygen. Biological nitrification favored a delay in sorption saturation and a release of exchange sites. The ORC could sufficiently, efficiently supply oxygen for approximately 120 pore volumes. The clinoptilolite ensured a robust [Formula: see text] removal in case of temporary insufficient biological activities. No external alkalinity sources had to be supplied and no inhibition of aerobic metabolism occurred. The ceramicite had a negligible effect on the biomass growth. Based on the research findings, a full-scale continuous wall PRB was installed in Shenyang, China in 2012. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 'Frozen finger' in anal fissures.

    PubMed

    Chintamani; Tandon, Megha; Khandelwal, Rohan

    2009-10-01

    Acute anal fissures are usually managed by various invasive and non-invasive modalities ranging from simple lifestyle changes to chemical and surgical sphincterotomies. Frozen finger, prepared using a water-filled ordinary rubber glove, was successfully used in one hundred patients, thus providing a cost-effective and simple solution to the problem.

  13. Interventions for control of Salmonella: clearance of microbial growth from rubber picker fingers.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J W; Yates, I E

    2009-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine if a surface material with antimicrobial properties combined with an effective disinfectant could achieve total clearance of bacterial contamination. Before beginning the project, new rubber picker fingers collected from 3 processing facilities were tested for endogenous microflora. Five species of bacteria common to soil and human handling were present: Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus cereus/thuringiensis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis ssp. novobiosepticus, and Staphylococcus intermedius. In separate experiments, new (unused) rubber picker fingers from 3 manufacturers were exposed to broiler carcass rinses, and the kinetics of bacterial attachment to finger material was determined. Turbidity of the bacterial suspensions at varying dilutions containing picker finger sections was compared hourly with controls to evaluate inhibition. New rubber finger material from the 3 manufacturers significantly inhibited bacterial growth (P < 0.05), without the aid of antibacterial additives. We improved an assay for screening disinfectants against growth of pathogens and determined the activity of 5 disinfectant compounds. Two of the compounds were most effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Escherichia coli, and one of the compounds was selected for further study with Salmonella Enteritidis. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the levels of Salmonella Enteritidis before and after treatment. The most effective compound was nontoxic and completely cleared Salmonella Enteritidis contamination from the rubber picker finger surface.

  14. Finger posture modulates structural body representations

    PubMed Central

    Tamè, Luigi; Dransfield, Elanah; Quettier, Thomas; Longo, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lesions of the left posterior parietal cortex commonly fail in identifying their fingers, a condition known as finger agnosia, yet are relatively unimpaired in sensation and skilled action. Such dissociations have traditionally been interpreted as evidence that structural body representations (BSR), such as the body structural description, are distinct from sensorimotor representations, such as the body schema. We investigated whether performance on tasks commonly used to assess finger agnosia is modulated by changes in hand posture. We used the ‘in between’ test in which participants estimate the number of unstimulated fingers between two touched fingers or a localization task in which participants judge which two fingers were stimulated. Across blocks, the fingers were placed in three levels of splay. Judged finger numerosity was analysed, in Exp. 1 by direct report and in Exp. 2 as the actual number of fingers between the fingers named. In both experiments, judgments were greater when non-adjacent stimulated fingers were positioned far apart compared to when they were close together or touching, whereas judgements were unaltered when adjacent fingers were stimulated. This demonstrates that BSRs are not fixed, but are modulated by the real-time physical distances between body parts. PMID:28223685

  15. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section... Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural area...

  16. Viscous fingering of a draining suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Malambri, Frank; Lee, Sungyon

    2016-11-01

    The Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering arises when a viscous oil is withdrawn from a Hele-Shaw cell that is filled with a less viscous fluid. When particles are introduced into the draining fluid, new behaviors emerge, which are unobserved in the well-established pure oil case. We experimentally investigate the particle-modified inward fingering for varying particle concentrations. In particular, the fingering growth rate and number of fingers are experimentally quantified and are shown to be directly affected by the presence of particles. The physical mechanism of the particle-modified fingering is also discussed.

  17. Mechanical model of a single tendon finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Cesare; Savino, Sergio

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical model of a single tendon three phalanxes finger is presented. By means of the model both kinematic and dynamical behavior of the finger itself can be studied. This finger is a part of a more complex mechanical system that consists in a four finger grasping device for robots or in a five finger human hand prosthesis. A first prototype has been realized in our department in order to verify the real behavior of the model. Some results of both kinematic and dynamical behavior are presented.

  18. Acrylic Finger Prosthesis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bandela, Vinod; M, Bharathi; S V, Giridhar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Hands basic function is to grasp, hold and manipulate items. Hand gesture is perhaps the most blatant example of non-verbal communication. Finger and partial finger amputations are most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. Common causes are traumatic injuries, congenital absence or malformations present great clinical challenges. In addition to immediate loss of grasp strength, finger absence may cause marked psychological trauma. Individuals who desire finger replacement usually have high expectation for the appearance of prosthesis. This clinical report portrays simple method to retain acrylic finger prosthesis. PMID:25302271

  19. Ammonium-nitrogen-contaminated groundwater remediation by a sequential three-zone permeable reactive barrier (multibarrier) with oxygen-releasing compound (ORC)/clinoptilolite/spongy iron: column studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Yang, Yingzhao; Kong, Xiangke; Li, Shengpin; Zhang, Ying; Cao, Dejun

    2015-03-01

    A novel sequential permeable reactive barrier (multibarrier), composed of oxygen-releasing compound (ORC)/clinoptilolite/spongy iron zones in series, was proposed for ammonium-nitrogen-contaminated groundwater remediation. Column experiments were performed to: (1) evaluate the overall NH4(+)-N removal performance of the proposed multibarrier, (2) investigate nitrogen transformation in the three zones, (3) determine the reaction front progress, and (4) explore cleanup mechanisms for inorganic nitrogens. The results showed that NH4 (+)-N percent removal by the multibarrier increased up to 90.43 % after 21 pore volumes (PVs) at the influent dissolved oxygen of 0.68∼2.45 mg/L and pH of 6.76∼7.42. NH4(+)-N of 4.06∼10.49 mg/L was depleted and NOx(-)-N (i.e., NO3 (-)-N + NO2(-)-N) of 4.26∼9.63 mg/L was formed before 98 PVs in the ORC zone. NH4(+)-N of ≤4.76 mg/L was eliminated in the clinoptilolite zone. NOx(-)-N of 10.44∼12.80 mg/L was lost before 21 PVs in the spongy iron zone. The clinoptilolite zone length should be reduced to 30 cm. Microbial nitrification played a dominant role in NH4(+)-N removal in the ORC zone. Ion exchange was majorly responsible for NH4(+)-N elimination in the clinoptilolite zone. Chemical reduction and hydrogenotrophic denitrification both contributed to NOx(-)-N transformation, but the chemical reduction capacity decreased after 21 PVs in the spongy iron.

  20. Distribution, Magnitudes, Reactivities, Ratios and Diurnal Patterns of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Valley of Mexico During the MCMA 2002 & 2003 Field Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, Brian K.; Westberg, Halvor; Allwine, Eugene J.; Sosa, G.; Arriaga-Colina, J. L.; Jobson, B. T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Prazeller, Peter; Knighton, Walter B.; Rogers, T.; Grutter, M.; Herndon, S.; Kolb, C. E.; Zavala, Mary A.; de Foy, B.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Molina, Luisa; Molina, Mario J.

    2007-01-23

    A wide array of volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements was conducted in the Valley of Mexico during the MCMA-2002 and 2003 field campaigns. Study sites included locations in the urban core, in a heavily industrial area and at boundary sites in rural landscapes. In addition, a novel mobile-laboratory-based conditional sampling method was used to collect samples dominated by fresh on-road vehicle exhaust to identify those VOCs whose ambient concentrations were primarily due to vehicle emissions. Four distinct analytical techniques were used: whole air canister samples with Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detection (GC-FID), on-line chemical ionization using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), continuous real-time detection of olefins using a Fast Olefin Sensor (FOS), and long path measurements using UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometers (DOAS). The simultaneous use of these techniques provided a wide range of individual VOC measurements with different spatial and temporal scales. The VOC data were analyzed to understand concentration and spatial distributions, diurnal patterns, origin and reactivity in the atmosphere of Mexico City. The VOC burden (in ppbC) was dominated by alkanes (60%), followed by aromatics (15%) and olefins (5%). The remaining 20% was a mix of alkynes, halogenated hydrocarbons, oxygenated species (esters, ethers, etc.) and other unidentified VOCs. However, in terms of ozone production, olefins were the most relevant hydrocarbons. Elevated levels of toxic hydrocarbons, such as 1, 3-butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylenes, were also observed. Results from these various analytical techniques showed that vehicle exhaust is the main source of VOCs in Mexico City and that diurnal patterns depend on vehicular traffic in addition to meteorological processes. Finally, examination of the VOC data in terms of lumped modeling VOC classes and its comparison to the VOC lumped emissions reported in other photochemical air

  1. Atmospheric reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a biomass burning emitted compound: Secondary organic aerosol formation and gas-phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Deboudt, Karine; Fourmentin, Marc; Choël, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Methoxyphenols are low molecular weight semi-volatile polar aromatic compounds produced from the pyrolysis of wood lignin. The reaction of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the LPCA simulation chamber at (294 ± 2) K, atmospheric pressure, low relative humidity (RH < 1%) and under high-NOx conditions using CH3ONO as OH source. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer); the SOA yields were in the range from 0.003 to 0.87 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM) Electron Microscopy observations were performed to characterize the physical state of SOA produced from the OH reaction with guaiacol; they display both liquid and solid particles (in an amorphous state). GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detection) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) analysis show the formation of nitroguaiacol isomers as main oxidation products in the gas- and aerosol-phases. In the gas-phase, the formation yields were (10 ± 2) % for 4-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-4-nitrobenzene; 4-NG) and (6 ± 2) % for 3- or 6-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene or 1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene; 3/6-NG; the standards are not commercially available so both isomers cannot be distinguished) whereas in SOA their yield were much lower (≤0.1%). To our knowledge, this work represents the first identification of nitroguaiacols as gaseous oxidation products of the OH reaction with guaiacol. As the reactivity of nitroguaiacols with atmospheric oxidants is probably low, we suggest using them as biomass burning emission gas tracers. The atmospheric implications of the guaiacol + OH reaction are also discussed.

  2. Distribution, magnitudes, reactivities, ratios and diurnal patterns of volatile organic compounds in the Valley of Mexico during the MCMA 2002 & 2003 field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, B.; Westberg, H.; Allwine, E.; Sosa, G.; Arriaga-Colina, J. L.; Jobson, B. T.; Alexander, M. L.; Prazeller, P.; Knighton, W. B.; Rogers, T. M.; Grutter, M.; Herndon, S. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Zavala, M.; de Foy, B.; Volkamer, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    A wide array of volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements was conducted in the Valley of Mexico during the MCMA-2002 and 2003 field campaigns. Study sites included locations in the urban core, in a heavily industrial area and at boundary sites in rural landscapes. In addition, a novel mobile-laboratory-based conditional sampling method was used to collect samples dominated by fresh on-road vehicle exhaust to identify those VOCs whose ambient concentrations were primarily due to vehicle emissions. Four distinct analytical techniques were used: whole air canister samples with Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detection (GC-FID), on-line chemical ionization using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), continuous real-time detection of olefins using a Fast Olefin Sensor (FOS), and long path measurements using UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometers (DOAS). The simultaneous use of these techniques provided a wide range of individual VOC measurements with different spatial and temporal scales. The VOC data were analyzed to understand concentration and spatial distributions, diurnal patterns, origin and reactivity in the atmosphere of Mexico City. The VOC burden (in ppbC) was dominated by alkanes (60%), followed by aromatics (15%) and olefins (5%). The remaining 20% was a mix of alkynes, halogenated hydrocarbons, oxygenated species (esters, ethers, etc.) and other unidentified VOCs. However, in terms of ozone production, olefins were the most relevant hydrocarbons. Elevated levels of toxic hydrocarbons, such as 1,3-butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylenes, were also observed. Results from these various analytical techniques showed that vehicle exhaust is the main source of VOCs in Mexico City and that diurnal patterns depend on vehicular traffic in addition to meteorological processes. Finally, examination of the VOC data in terms of lumped modeling VOC classes and its comparison to the VOC lumped emissions reported in other photochemical air

  3. Distribution, magnitudes, reactivities, ratios and diurnal patterns of volatile organic compounds in the Valley of Mexico during the MCMA 2002 and 2003 field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, E.; Lamb, B.; Westberg, H.; Allwine, E.; Sosa, G.; Arriaga-Colina, J. L.; Jobson, B. T.; Alexander, M.; Prazeller, P.; Knighton, W. B.; Rogers, T. M.; Grutter, M.; Herndon, S. C.; Kolb, C. E.; Zavala, M.; de Foy, B.; Volkamer, R.; Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    2006-08-01

    A wide array of volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements was conducted in the Valley of Mexico during the MCMA-2002 and 2003 field campaigns. Study sites included locations in the urban core, in a heavily industrial area and at boundary sites in rural landscapes. In addition, a novel mobile-laboratory-based conditional sampling method was used to collect samples dominated by fresh on-road vehicle exhaust to identify those VOCs whose ambient concentrations were primarily due to vehicle emissions. Five distinct analytical techniques were used: whole air canister samples with Gas Chromatography/Flame Ionization Detection (GC-FID), on-line chemical ionization using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), continuous real-time detection of olefins using a Fast Olefin Sensor (FOS), and long path measurements using UV Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometers (DOAS). The simultaneous use of these techniques provided a wide range of individual VOC measurements with different spatial and temporal scales. The VOC data were analyzed to understand concentration and spatial distributions, diurnal patterns, origin and reactivity in the atmosphere of Mexico City. The VOC burden (in ppbC) was dominated by alkanes (60%), followed by aromatics (15%) and olefins (5%). The remaining 20% was a mix of alkynes, halogenated hydrocarbons, oxygenated species (esters, ethers, etc.) and other unidentified VOCs. However, in terms of ozone production, olefins were the most relevant hydrocarbons. Elevated levels of toxic hydrocarbons, such as 1,3-butadiene, benzene, toluene and xylenes were also observed. Results from these various analytical techniques showed that vehicle exhaust is the main source of VOCs in Mexico City and that diurnal patterns depend on vehicular traffic. Finally, examination of the VOC data in terms of lumped modeling VOC classes and its comparison to the VOC lumped emissions reported in other photochemical air quality modeling studies suggests that

  4. Finger doses for staff handling radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Pant, Gauri S; Sharma, Sanjay K; Rath, Gaura K

    2006-09-01

    Radiation doses to the fingers of occupational workers handling 99mTc-labeled compounds and 131I for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The doses were measured at the base of the ring finger and the index finger of both hands in 2 groups of workers. Group 1 (7 workers) handled 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, and group 2 (6 workers) handled 131I for diagnosis and therapy. Radiation doses to the fingertips of 3 workers also were measured. Two were from group 1, and 1 was from group 2. The doses to the base of the fingers for the radiopharmacy staff and physicians from group 1 were observed to be 17+/-7.5 (mean+/-SD) and 13.4+/-6.5 microSv/GBq, respectively. Similarly, the dose to the base of the fingers for the 3 physicians in group 2 was estimated to be 82.0+/-13.8 microSv/GBq. Finger doses for the technologists in both groups could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 1 wk. The doses to the fingertips of the radiopharmacy worker and the physician in group 1 were 74.3+/-19.8 and 53.5+/-21.9 microSv/GBq, respectively. The dose to the fingertips of the physician in group 2 was 469.9+/-267 microSv/GBq. The radiation doses to the fingers of nuclear medicine staff at our center were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y), except for a physician who handled large quantities of 131I for treatment. Because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year, the doses to the base of the fingers or the fingertips should not exceed the prescribed annual limit of 500 mSv.

  5. Impact of Finger Type in Fingerprint Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Bours, Patrick; Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph

    Nowadays fingerprint verification system is the most widespread and accepted biometric technology that explores various features of the human fingers for this purpose. In general, every normal person has 10 fingers with different size. Although it is claimed that recognition performance with little fingers can be less accurate compared to other finger types, to our best knowledge, this has not been investigated yet. This paper presents our study on the topic of influence of the finger type into fingerprint recognition performance. For analysis we employ two fingerprint verification software packages (one public and one commercial). We conduct test on GUC100 multi sensor fingerprint database which contains fingerprint images of all 10 fingers from 100 subjects. Our analysis indeed confirms that performance with small fingers is less accurate than performance with the others fingers of the hand. It also appears that best performance is being obtained with thumb or index fingers. For example, performance deterioration from the best finger (i.e. index or thumb) to the worst fingers (i.e. small ones) can be in the range of 184%-1352%.

  6. Integration of tactile input across fingers in a patient with finger agnosia.

    PubMed

    Anema, Helen A; Overvliet, Krista E; Smeets, Jeroen B J; Brenner, Eli; Dijkerman, H Chris

    2011-01-01

    Finger agnosia has been described as an inability to explicitly individuate between the fingers, which is possibly due to fused neural representations of these fingers. Hence, are patients with finger agnosia unable to keep tactile information perceived over several fingers separate? Here, we tested a finger agnosic patient (GO) on two tasks that measured the ability to keep tactile information simultaneously perceived by individual fingers separate. In experiment 1 GO performed a haptic search task, in which a target (the absence of a protruded line) needed to be identified among distracters (protruded lines). The lines were presented simultaneously to the fingertips of both hands. Similarly to the controls, her reaction time decreased when her fingers were aligned as compared to when her fingers were stretched and in an unaligned position. This suggests that she can keep tactile input from different fingers separate. In experiment two, GO was required to judge the position of a target tactile stimulus to the index finger, relatively to a reference tactile stimulus to the middle finger, both in fingers uncrossed and crossed position. GO was able to indicate the relative position of the target stimulus as well as healthy controls, which indicates that she was able to keep tactile information perceived by two neighbouring fingers separate. Interestingly, GO performed better as compared to the healthy controls in the finger crossed condition. Together, these results suggest the GO is able to implicitly distinguish between tactile information perceived by multiple fingers. We therefore conclude that finger agnosia is not caused by minor disruptions of low-level somatosensory processing. These findings further underpin the idea of a selective impaired higher order body representation restricted to the fingers as underlying cause of finger agnosia.

  7. Screening and identification of phytotoxic volatile compounds in medicinal plants and characterizations of a selected compound, eucarvone.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Yukari; Baba, Yohei; Matsuyama, Shigeru; Fujimura, Kaori; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    Screening and identification of phytotoxic volatile compounds were performed using 71 medicinal plant species to find new natural compounds, and the characterization of the promising compound was investigated to understand the mode of action. The volatile compounds from Asarum sieboldii Miq. showed the strongest inhibitory effect on the hypocotyl growth of lettuce seedlings (Lactuca sativa L.cv. Great Lakes 366), followed by those from Schizonepeta tenuifolia Briquet and Zanthoxylum piperitum (L.) DC.. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) identified four volatile compounds, α-pinene (2,6,6-trimethylbicyclo[3.1.1]hept-2-ene), β-pinene (6,6-dimethyl-2-methylenebicyclo[3.1.1]heptane), 3-carene (3,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[4.1.0]hept-3-ene), and eucarvone (2,6,6-trimethy-2,4-cycloheptadien-1-one), from A. sieboldii, and three volatile compounds, limonene (1-methyl-4-(1-methylethenyl)-cyclohexene), menthone (5-methyl-2-(propan-2-yl)cyclohexan-1-one), and pulegone (5-methyl-2-propan-2-ylidenecyclohexan-1-one), from S. tenuifolia. Among these volatile compounds, eucarvone, menthone, and pulegone exhibited strong inhibitory effects on both the root and shoot growth of lettuce seedlings. Eucarvone-induced growth inhibition was species-selective. Cell death, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lipid peroxidation were induced in susceptible finger millet seedlings by eucarvone treatment, whereas this compound (≤158 μM) did not cause the increase of lipid peroxidation and ROS production in tolerant maize. The results of the present study show that eucarvone can have strong phytotoxic activity, which may be due to ROS overproduction and subsequent oxidative damage in finger millet seedlings.

  8. Viscous fingering in an elastic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazel, Andrew L.; Ducloué, Lucie; Juel, Anne

    2016-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the fingering instability of a flat, steadily propagating interface in a Hele-Shaw channel, where the top boundary has been replaced by an elastic membrane. In order to create a steadily propagating flat front, we exploit the reopening modes of fluid-filled elasto-rigid channels. The collapsed upper boundary reopens through the steady propagation of a wide finger, when air is injected from one end at a constant flow rate. For high levels of collapse and high finger speed, the tip of the finger becomes flat, creating a leading edge normal to the direction of propagation, which in turn is subject to a smaller scale viscous fingering instability. By modifying the cross-sectional geometry of the channel, we can actuate the finger shape to observe a variety of small-scale fingering phenomena including growth in a direction normal to the propagation and dendrite formation. The instability of the flat front exhibits constant-length fingers, very similar to the stubby fingers observed in radial compliant Hele-Shaw cells, and reminiscent of the printer's instability travel with the front. We investigate the geometry of those fingers in terms of the speed of the front, and the geometry of the reopening region. The financial support of the Leverhulme Trust is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Current status of ultrasonography of the finger

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of advanced high-resolution transducers has enabled the fast, easy, and dynamic ultrasonographic evaluation of small, superficial structures such as the finger. In order to best exploit these advances, it is important to understand the normal anatomy and the basic pathologies of the finger, as exemplified by the following conditions involving the dorsal, volar, and lateral sections of the finger: sagittal band injuries, mallet finger, and Boutonnière deformity (dorsal aspect); flexor tendon tears, trigger finger, and volar plate injuries (volar aspect); gamekeeper’s thumb (Stener lesions) and other collateral ligament tears (lateral aspect); and other lesions. This review provides a basis for understanding the ultrasonography of the finger and will therefore be useful for radiologists. PMID:26753604

  10. Finger-Jointed Wood Products.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    long enough to be useful (14, 36, 38, 59, 124). Nonstructural finger joints are primarily found in molding stock, trim, siding, fascia boards, door...all beams but two in series 7 and 8 to the grain. The average modulus of be slightly higher than that for apparently was related to the joints, rupture ...inch, and a tip thickness of combinations laminated by the plant . (a)A bolt hole on tensile strength 0.031 inch. The other was classified Straight-bevel

  11. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  12. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  13. Pediatric finger fractures: which ones turn ugly?

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Roger

    2012-06-01

    The majority of pediatric finger fractures can be treated by closed means with expected excellent outcomes. However, a subset of fractures can turn "ugly," with complications such as growth arrest, malunion, and joint dysfunction if not recognized and treated appropriately. The present paper discusses several fractures in a child's fingers that can cause substantial problems if not recognized promptly, highlighting important themes in the evaluation and treatment of a child's injured finger.

  14. Bonding of silicon scanning mirror having vertical comb fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Ko, Young-Chul; Choi, Byoung-So; Kim, Jong-Min; Jeon, Duk Young

    2002-09-01

    A 1500 μm × 1200 μm silicon scanning mirror has been fabricated by using anodic bonding and flip chip bonding. This scanning mirror is mainly composed of two structures having vertical comb fingers. By anodic bonding between the silicon wafer and the Pyrex glass substrate, and following deep inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching (ICPRIE), isolated comb electrodes were fabricated at the lower structure. However, gold signal lines for electrical connection to the electrodes, which were inserted between silicon and Pyrex glass, were damaged during anodic bonding. This problem was solved by using the proposed processes and signal lines were successfully fabricated with the contact resistance below several tens of ohms. By flip chip bonding, the upper and lower structures having vertical comb fingers were assembled. Vertical comb fingers of two structures were aligned with a microscope and the frames of two structures were bonded at 300 °C for 20 s using the eutectic bonding material - electroplated AuSn. Finally, the scanning mirror was successfully fabricated and could be used for laser display as a galvanometric vertical scanner.

  15. Combination of Biological Screening in a Cellular Model of Viral Latency and Virtual Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Reactivate HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Gallastegui, Edurne; Marshall, Brett; Vidal, David; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Collado, Juan A.; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Luque, Neus; Terme, Jean-Michel; Gatell, Josep M.; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Muñoz, Eduardo; Mestres, Jordi; Verdin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has converted HIV into a chronic disease, a reservoir of HIV latently infected resting T cells prevents the eradication of the virus from patients. To achieve eradication, HAART must be combined with drugs that reactivate the dormant viruses. We examined this problem in an established model of HIV postintegration latency by screening a library of small molecules. Initially, we identified eight molecules that reactivated latent HIV. Using them as templates, additional hits were identified by means of similarity-based virtual screening. One of those hits, 8-methoxy-6-methylquinolin-4-ol (MMQO), proved to be useful to reactivate HIV-1 in different cellular models, especially in combination with other known reactivating agents, without causing T-cell activation and with lower toxicity than that of the initial hits. Interestingly, we have established that MMQO produces Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation and enhances the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 stimulation of HIV-1 reactivation from latency but inhibits CD3-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene transcription. Moreover, MMQO prevents TCR-induced cell cycle progression and proliferation in primary T cells. The present study documents that the combination of biological screening in a cellular model of viral latency with virtual screening is useful for the identification of novel agents able to reactivate HIV-1. Moreover, we set the bases for a hypothetical therapy to reactivate latent HIV by combining MMQO with physiological or pharmacological TCR/CD3 stimulation. PMID:22258251

  16. Invariantly propagating dissolution fingers in finite-width systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, Filip; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution fingers are formed in porous medium due to positive feedback between transport of reactant and chemical reactions [1-4]. We investigate two-dimensional semi-infinite systems, with constant width W in one direction. In numerical simulations we solve the Darcy flow problem combined with advection-dispersion-reaction equation for the solute transport to track the evolving shapes of the fingers and concentration of reactant in the system. We find the stationary, invariantly propagating finger shapes for different widths of the system, flow and reaction rates. Shape of the reaction front, turns out to be controlled by two dimensionless numbers - the (width-based) Péclet number PeW = vW/Dφ0 and Damköhler number DaW = ksW/v, where k is the reaction rate, s - specific reactive surface area, v - characteristic flow rate, D - diffusion coefficient of the solute, and φ0 - initial porosity of the rock matrix. Depending on PeW and DaW stationary shapes can be divided into seperate classes, e.g. parabolic-like and needle-like structures, which can be inferred from theoretical predictions. In addition we determine velocity of propagating fingers in time and concentration of reagent in the system. Our simulations are compared with natural forms (solution pipes). P. Ortoleva, J. Chadam, E. Merino, and A. Sen, Geochemical self-organization II: the reactive-infiltration instability, Am. J. Sci, 287, 1008-1040 (1987). M. L. Hoefner, and H. S. Fogler. Pore evolution and channel formation during flow and reaction in porous media, AIChE Journal 34, 45-54 (1988). C. E. Cohen, D. Ding, M. Quintard, and B. Bazin, From pore scale to wellbore scale: impact of geometry on wormhole growth in carbonate acidization, Chemical Engineering Science 63, 3088-3099 (2008). P. Szymczak and A. J. C. Ladd, Reactive-infiltration nstabilities in rocks. Part II: Dissolution of a porous matrix, J. Fluid Mech. 738, 591-630 (2014).

  17. Error compensation during finger force production after oneand four-finger voluntarily fatiguing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Eric S.; Hoopes, Josh A.; Cordial, Rory J.; Li, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The effect of muscle fatigue on error compensation strategies during multi-finger ramp force production tasks was investigated. Thirteen young, healthy subjects were instructed to produce a total force with four fingers of the right hand to accurately match a visually displayed template. The template consisted of a 3-s waiting period, a 3-s ramp force production (from 0 to 30% maximal voluntary contraction, MVC), and a 3-s constant force production. A series of twelve ramp trials was performed before and after fatigue. Fatigue was induced by a 60-s maximal isometric force production with either the index finger only or with all four fingers during two separate testing sessions. The average percent of drop was 38.2% in the MVC of the index finger after index-finger fatiguing exercise and 38.3% in the MVC of all fingers after four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ability of individual fingers to compensate for each other's errors in order for the total force to match the preset template was quantified as the error compensation index (ECI), i.e. the ratio of the sum of variances of individual finger forces and the variance of the total force. By comparing pre- and post-fatigue performance during four-finger ramp force production, we observed that the variance of the total force was not significantly changed after one- or four-finger fatiguing exercise. The ECI significantly decreased after four-finger fatiguing exercise, especially during the last second of the ramp; while the ECI remained unchanged after index finger single-finger fatiguing exercise. These results suggest that the central nervous system is able to utilize the abundant degrees of freedom to compensate for partial impairment of the motor apparatus induced by muscle fatigue to maintain the desired performance. However, this ability is significantly decreased when all elements of the motor apparatus are impaired. PMID:17443316

  18. Human erythrocyte hemolysis induced by selenium and tellurium compounds increased by GSH or glucose: a possible involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Schiar, Viviane Patrícia P; Dos Santos, Danúbia B; Paixão, Márcio W; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Rocha, João Batista T; Zeni, Gilson

    2009-01-15

    Oxidative stress can induce complex alterations of membrane proteins in red blood cells (RBCs) eventually leading to hemolysis. RBCs represent a good model to investigate the damage induced by oxidizing agents. Literature data have reported that chalcogen compounds can present pro-oxidant properties with potent inhibitory effects on cell growth, causing tissue damage and inhibit a variety of enzymes. In this study, human erythrocytes were incubated in vitro with various chalcogen compounds at 37 degrees C: diphenyl ditelluride (1), dinaphthalen diteluride (2), diphenyl diselenide (3), (S)-tert-butyl 1-diselenide-3-methylbutan-2-ylcarbamate (4), (S)-tert-butyl 1-diselenide-3-phenylpropan-2-ylcarbamate (5), selenium dioxide (6) and sodium selenite (7) in order to investigate their potential in vitro toxicity. After 6h of incubation, all the tested compounds increased the hemolysis rate, when compared to control and compound (2) had the most potent hemolytic effect. The addition of reduced glutathione (GSH) or glucose to the incubation medium enhanced hemolysis caused by chalcogen compounds. The thiol oxidase activity of these compounds was evaluated by measuring the rate of cysteine (CYS) and dithiotreitol (DTT) oxidation. DTT and cysteine oxidation was increased by all the compounds tested. The results suggest a relationship between the oxidation of intracellular GSH and subsequent generation of free radicals with the hemolysis by chalcogen compounds.

  19. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  20. Correcting Finger Counting to Snellen Acuity.

    PubMed

    Karanjia, Rustum; Hwang, Tiffany Jean; Chen, Alexander Francis; Pouw, Andrew; Tian, Jack J; Chu, Edward R; Wang, Michelle Y; Tran, Jeffrey Show; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the authors describe an online tool with which to convert and thus quantify count finger measurements of visual acuity into Snellen equivalents. It is hoped that this tool allows for the re-interpretation of retrospectively collected data that provide visual acuity in terms of qualitative count finger measurements.

  1. Correcting Finger Counting to Snellen Acuity

    PubMed Central

    Karanjia, Rustum; Hwang, Tiffany Jean; Chen, Alexander Francis; Pouw, Andrew; Tian, Jack J.; Chu, Edward R.; Wang, Michelle Y.; Tran, Jeffrey Show; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this paper, the authors describe an online tool with which to convert and thus quantify count finger measurements of visual acuity into Snellen equivalents. It is hoped that this tool allows for the re-interpretation of retrospectively collected data that provide visual acuity in terms of qualitative count finger measurements. PMID:27928408

  2. Finger Mathematics: A Method for All Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Earl J.; Chavez, Maria

    The instruction of finger counting and finger calculation, also known as Chisanbop, is promoted as a natural method of introducing and teaching the basic processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division to children, particularly to those who are mentally and physically handicapped. The sequential process for teaching finger…

  3. Creating Number Semantics through Finger Movement Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Pesenti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Communication, language and conceptual knowledge related to concrete objects may rely on the sensory-motor systems from which they emerge. How abstract concepts can emerge from these systems is however still unknown. Here we report a functional interaction between a specific meaningful finger movement, such as a finger grip closing, and a concept…

  4. Replacement of a Thiourea-S with an Amidine-NH Donor Group in a Platinum–Acridine Antitumor Compound Reduces the Metal's Reactivity with Cysteine Sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhidong; Rao, Lu; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity of two DNA-targeted platinum–acridine conjugates with cysteine sulfur was studied. The conjugate containing an amidine-NH donor group cis to the chloride leaving group showed considerably reduced reactivity with N-acetylcysteine compared to the prototypical derivative containing a thiourea-S linkage. The opposite scenario has been observed previously in reactions with nucleobase nitrogen. Possible consequences of the unique target-selective tuning of the substitution chemistry for the pharmacodynamic properties and biological activity of these agents are discussed. PMID:19397321

  5. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  6. Laplacian trees - fingered growth in channel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.; Gubiec, T.

    2009-04-01

    A variety of natural growth processes, including viscous fingering, electrodeposition, or solidification can be modeled in terms of Laplacian growth. Laplacian growth patterns are formed when the boundary of a domain moves with a velocity proportional to the gradient of a field Ψ, which satisfies the Laplace equation, ‡2Ψ = 0, outside the domain. A simple model of Laplacian growth is considered, in which the growth takes place only at the tips of long, thin fingers [1]. The evolution of the fingers is studied by conformal mapping techniques. Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for different domains and boundary conditions. In particular, a screening process is analyzed, when longer fingers suppress growth of the shorter ones. Possible geophysical applications of the model are discussed, including formation and evolution of the channels in a dissolving rock fracture. [1] T. Gubiec, P. Szymczak, Fingered growth in channel geometry: A Loewner equation approach , Phys. Rev. E, 77 , 041602, 2008

  7. Elastic fingering patterns in confined lifting flows.

    PubMed

    Fontana, João V; Miranda, José A

    2016-09-01

    The elastic fingering phenomenon occurs when two confined fluids are brought into contact, and due to a chemical reaction, the interface separating them becomes elastic. We study elastic fingering pattern formation in Newtonian fluids flowing in a lifting (time-dependent gap) Hele-Shaw cell. Using a mode-coupling approach, nonlinear effects induced by the interplay between viscous and elastic forces are investigated and the weakly nonlinear behavior of the fluid-fluid interfacial patterns is analyzed. Our results indicate that the existence of the elastic interface allows the development of unexpected morphological behaviors in such Newtonian fluid flow systems. More specifically, we show that depending on the values of the governing physical parameters, the observed elastic fingering structures are characterized by the occurrence of either finger tip splitting or side branching. The impact of the elastic interface on finger-competition events is also discussed.

  8. Use of twin dorsal middle phalangeal finger flaps for thumb or index finger reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Qi, W; Chen, K J

    2013-05-01

    Amputation or degloving injuries of the thumb or index finger are highly disabling. We describe the use of twin dorsal middle finger flaps harvested from the dorsal aspects of the middle and ring fingers, and based on one palmar proper digital artery, its venae comitantes, and the dorsal branches of the palmar digital nerves of the middle and ring fingers, respectively. These flaps offer advantages when large soft tissue defects of the thumb or index finger are present. In this study, twin dorsal middle finger flaps were used in nine patients (six thumbs, three index fingers). All flaps completely survived. At the mean follow-up of 20 months, the appearance of the reconstructed thumbs or index fingers was acceptable, the length was maintained, and the mean static 2-point discrimination values were 10 mm in the palmar flap and 13 mm in the dorsal flap of the reconstructed digit. All patients were satisfied with the appearance and mobility of the donor fingers. All but one donor finger showed normal finger pulp sensibility, with a static 2-point discrimination between 3 and 6 mm.

  9. Fingering in Stochastic Growth Models

    PubMed Central

    Aristotelous, Andreas C.; Durrett, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the widespread use of hybrid-discrete cellular automata in modeling cancer, two simple growth models are studied on the two dimensional lattice that incorporate a nutrient, assumed to be oxygen. In the first model the oxygen concentration u(x, t) is computed based on the geometry of the growing blob, while in the second one u(x, t) satisfies a reaction-diffusion equation. A threshold θ value exists such that cells give birth at rate β(u(x, t) − θ)+ and die at rate δ(θ − u(x, t)+. In the first model, a phase transition was found between growth as a solid blob and “fingering” at a threshold θc = 0.5, while in the second case fingering always occurs, i.e., θc = 0. PMID:26430353

  10. Elastic Suppression of Viscous Fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gunnar; Lister, John

    2016-11-01

    Consider peeling an elastic tape or beam away from a rigid base to which it is stuck by a film of viscous liquid. The peeling motion requires air to invade the viscous liquid and is thus susceptible to the Saffman-Taylor fingering instability. We analyse the fundamental travelling-wave solution and show that the advancing air-liquid interface remains linearly stable at higher capillary numbers than in a standard Hele-Shaw cell. A short-wavelength expansion yields an analytical expression for the growth rate which is valid for all unstable modes throughout the parameter space, allowing us to identify and quantify four distinct physical mechanisms that each help suppress the instability. Applying our method to the experiments by Pihler-Puzovic et al. (2012) reveals that the radial geometry and time-variation stabilize the system further.

  11. Fingering instability of Bingham fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Shilpa; Myers, Tim

    2005-11-01

    Contact line instabilities have been extensively studied and many useful results obtained for industrial applications. Our research in this area is to explore these instabilities for non-Newtonian fluids which has wide scope in geological, biological as well as industrial areas. In this talk, we will present an analysis of fingering instability near a contact line of the thin sheet of fluid flowing down on a moderately inclined plane. This instability has been well studied for Newtonian fluids. We explore the effect of a yield strength of the fluid on this instability. We have conveniently assumed the presence of the precussor film of small thickness ahead of the fluid film to avoid some mathematical singularities. Using a lubrication-type approximation, we perform a linear stability analysis of a straight contact line. We will show comparison with some experimental results using suspensions of kaolin in silicone oil as a yield strength fluid.

  12. Finger tremor in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lakie, M; Mutch, W J

    1989-03-01

    Finger tremor was investigated in 20 patients (age range 54-88 yr) diagnosed as suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease and six controls of a similar age and no known neurological abnormality. In nine of the patients tremor was not clinically obvious. When the tremor of these patients was recorded immediately after voluntary movement and subjected to instrumental analysis there were consistently observable differences from the controls. Such analysis may have diagnostic potential when there is clinical uncertainty. Surface EMG recordings were obtained from four patients. One patient had a large resting tremor with obvious reciprocating activity in flexors and extensors; in the others who had no symptomatic tremor there was reciprocating activity only after movement, and this died away in a few seconds as the induced tremor disappeared.

  13. IN SITU DESTRUCTION OF CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON COMPOUNDS IN GROUNDWATER USING CATALYTIC REDUCTIVE REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION IN A REACTIVE WELL: TESTING AND OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCES. (R825421)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A groundwater treatment technology based on catalytic reductive
    dehalogenation has been developed to efficiently destroy chlorinated
    hydrocarbons in situ using a reactive well approach. The treatment process
    utilizes dissolved H2 as an electron donor, in...

  14. An effective preprocessing method for finger vein recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, JiaLiang; Li, Qiong; Wang, Ning; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2013-07-01

    The image preprocessing plays an important role in finger vein recognition system. However, previous preprocessing schemes remind weakness to be resolved for the high finger vein recongtion performance. In this paper, we propose a new finger vein preprocessing that includes finger region localization, alignment, finger vein ROI segmentation and enhancement. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme is capable of enhancing the quality of finger vein image effectively and reliably.

  15. Differing Dynamics of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Coordination: Two-finger and Four-Finger Tapping Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Kentaro; Furuyama, Nobuhiro; Inamura, Tetsunari

    2015-01-01

    Finger-tapping experiments were conducted to examine whether the dynamics of intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems can be described equally by the Haken—Kelso—Bunz model, which describes inter-limb coordination dynamics. This article reports the results of finger-tapping experiments conducted in both systems. Two within-subject factors were investigated: the phase mode and the number of fingers. In the intrapersonal experiment (Experiment 1), the participants were asked to tap, paced by a gradually hastening auditory metronome, looking at their fingers moving, using the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. In the interpersonal experiment (Experiment 2), pairs of participants performed the task while each participant used the outside hand, tapping with the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions. First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition. Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition. From these findings, different coordination dynamics were inferred between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems against prediction from the previous studies. Results were discussed according to differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems in the availability of perceptual information and the complexity in the interaction between limbs derived from a nested structure. PMID:26070119

  16. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  17. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOEpatents

    Depiante, Eduardo V.

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  18. Comparison on reactivity of Fe(III) and Al(III) compounds in the presence of hydrogen peroxide: its relevance to possible origin for central nervous system toxicity by aluminum ion.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Y; Ito, S

    1995-01-01

    The iron(III) compounds with several aminocarboxylate chelates containing an aryl or furan substituent exhibit high activity in enhancement of the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide, leading to facile hydroxylation at benzene ring, and to degradation of furan ring, but no such activity was observed for the corresponding Al(III) compounds. These results were interpreted in terms of the molecular orbital consideration, and lack of the activity of the Al(III) complexes was attributed to lack of electrophilic nature of the peroxide adduct due to the absence of a d-orbital; this may explain the fact that there were no tumors in Al-NTA(nitrilotriacetic acid)-treated rats. Based on the facts observed in this study, the decreased function of iron(III) ions for synthesizing neurotransmitters in the brain was assumed to be one of the possible origin for the neurotoxicity by injection of the Al(III) salts in vivo.

  19. The effect of enslaving on perception of finger forces.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Leonard, Charles T

    2006-07-01

    The primary purpose was to examine the effect of enslaving on finger force perception during isometric finger force production using an ipsilateral force-matching paradigm. Fourteen subjects were instructed to produce varying levels of reference forces [10, 20, 30, and 40% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)] force using one finger (index, I or little, L) and to reproduce these forces using the same finger (homo-finger tasks, I/I and L/L) or a different finger (hetero-finger tasks, I/L and L/I). Forces of all fingers were recorded. During homo-finger tasks, no differences were found in force magnitude or relative level of force (expressed as a proportion of MVC). The index finger matching force magnitudes were greater than the little finger reference force magnitudes, with significantly lower levels of relative force during L/I tasks; while the little finger matching forces underestimated the index finger reference forces with significantly higher levels of relative force during I/L tasks. The difference in the matching and reference forces by the instructed finger(s), i.e., matching error, was larger in hetero-finger tasks than in homo-finger tasks, particularly at high reference force levels (30, 40% MVC). When forces of all fingers were considered, enslaving (uninstructed finger forces) significantly minimized matching errors of the total force during both I/L and L/I hetero-finger tasks, especially at high reference force levels. Our results show that there is a tendency to match the absolute magnitude of the total force during ipsilateral finger force-matching tasks. This tendency is likely related to enslaving effects. Our results provide evidence that all (instructed and uninstructed) finger forces are sensed, thus resulting in perception of the absolute magnitude of total finger force.

  20. Finger somatotopy in human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Beisteiner, R; Windischberger, C; Lanzenberger, R; Edward, V; Cunnington, R; Erdler, M; Gartus, A; Streibl, B; Moser, E; Deecke, L

    2001-06-01

    Although qualitative reports about somatotopic representation of fingers in the human motor cortex exist, up to now no study could provide clear statistical evidence. The goal of the present study was to reinvestigate finger motor somatotopy by means of a thorough investigation of standardized movements of the index and little finger of the right hand. Using high resolution fMRI at 3 Tesla, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses in a group of 26 subjects were repeatedly measured to achieve reliable statistical results. The center of mass of all activated voxels within the primary motor cortex was calculated for each finger and each run. Results of all runs were averaged to yield an individual index and little finger representation for each subject. The mean center of mass localizations for all subjects were then submitted to a paired t test. Results show a highly significant though small scale somatotopy of fingerspecific activation patterns in the order indicated by Penfields motor homunculus. In addition, considerable overlap of finger specific BOLD responses was found. Comparing various methods of analysis, the mean center of mass distance for the two fingers was 2--3 mm with overlapping voxels included and 4--5 mm with overlapping voxels excluded. Our data may be best understood in the context of the work of Schieber (1999) who recently described overlapping somatotopic gradients in lesion studies with humans. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. More efficient swimming by spreading your fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Water, Willem; van Houwelingen, Josje; Willemsen, Dennis; Breugem, Wim Paul; Westerweel, Jerry; Delfos, Rene; Grift, Ernst Jan

    2016-11-01

    A tantalizing question in free-style swimming is whether the stroke efficiency during the pull phase depends on spreading the fingers. It is a subtle effect-not more than a few percent-but it could make a big difference in a race. We measure the drag of arm models with increasing finger spreading in a wind tunnel and compare forces and moments to the results of immersed boundary simulations. Virtual arms were used in the simulations and their 3D-printed real versions in the experiment. We find an optimal finger spreading, accompanied by a marked increase of coherent vortex shedding. A simple actuator disk model explains this optimum.

  3. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  4. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  5. Finger blood flow in Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Elkington, E. J.

    1968-01-01

    1. Finger blood flow was estimated, by strain-gauge plethysmography, before and during a 1 hr immersion in ice water, on twenty-five men throughout a year at Wilkes, Antarctica. A total of 121 satisfactory immersions were made. 2. Blood flow before and during immersion decreased significantly in the colder months of the year, and the increase caused by cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) became less as the year progressed. The time of onset, blood flow at onset, and frequency of the cycles of CIVD showed no significant relation to the coldness of the weather (as measured by mean monthly wind chill) or the time in months. Comparisons of blood flow before and after five field trips (average duration 42 days), on which cold exposure was more severe than at Wilkes station, gave similar results. 3. The results suggest that vasoconstrictor tone increased. This interpretation agrees with previous work on general acclimatization in Antarctica, but contrasts with work elsewhere on local acclimatization of the hands. PMID:5684034

  6. Sensitivity-Based VOC Reactivity Calculation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) reactivity scales are used to compare the ozone-forming potentials of various compounds. The comparison allows for substitution of compounds to lessen formation of ozone from paints, solvents, and other products. Current reactivity scales for VOC c...

  7. Sensitivity-Based VOC Reactivity Calculation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) reactivity scales are used to compare the ozone-forming potentials of various compounds. The comparison allows for substitution of compounds to lessen formation of ozone from paints, solvents, and other products. Current reactivity scales for VOC c...

  8. Trajectory of the index finger during grasping.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jason; Flash, Tamar

    2009-07-01

    The trajectory of the index finger during grasping movements was compared to the trajectories predicted by three optimization-based models. The three models consisted of minimizing the integral of the weighted squared joint derivatives along the path (inertia-like cost), minimizing torque change, and minimizing angular jerk. Of the three models, it was observed that the path of the fingertip and the joint trajectories, were best described by the minimum angular jerk model. This model, which does not take into account the dynamics of the finger, performed equally well when the inertia of the finger was altered by adding a 20 g weight to the medial phalange. Thus, for the finger, it appears that trajectories are planned based primarily on kinematic considerations at a joint level.

  9. [Ligament injuries of fingers and thumbs].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, R

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic ligament lesions of the carpometacarpal joints frequently occur at the thumb ray, whereas the carpometacarpal amphiarthrosis of other finger rays are rarely affected. The metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joints of the thumb and fingers are stabilized by bilaterally running collateral ligaments and palmar plates. At the base of the metacarpophalangeal joints, several ligaments of the extensor hoods guide the extensor tendons and coordinate the fine motoric skills of phalangeal flexing and extending. Several annular and cruciform ligaments hold the flexor tendons close to the finger skeleton. Other than at the wrist, differentiation between dynamic and static instability patterns is possible by physical examination. This review article presents the ligaments of the thumb and the fingers, the traumatic and degenerative lesions as well as the diagnostic capability of x‑rays, cinematography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography.

  10. Spreading and fingering in spin coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Kristi E.; Habdas, Piotr; Semsarillar, Naeim; Burfitt, Kim; de Bruyn, John R.

    2007-04-01

    We study the spreading and fingering of drops of silicone oil on a rotating substrate for a range of rotation speeds and drop volumes. The spreading of the drop prior to the onset of fingering is found to follow the theoretically predicted time dependence, but with a large shift in time scale. For the full range of experimental parameters studied, the contact line becomes unstable and fingers develop when the radius of the drop becomes sufficiently large. We study the growth of perturbations around the perimeter of the drop and find the growth rate of the most unstable mode to agree well with the predictions of lubrication theory. The number of fingers which form around the perimeter of the drop is found to be a function of both rotation speed and drop volume, and is also in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions.

  11. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  12. Repair of webbed fingers - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Syndactyly is the abnormal development of the hand, such that the fingers are fused. The number of ... second surgery, depending on the complexity of the syndactyly. Hospital stays of 1 or 2 days are ...

  13. Finger prosthesis: a boon to handicapped

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ridhima; Kumar, Lakshya; Rao, Jitendra; Singh, Kamleshwar

    2013-01-01

    This is a clinical case report of a 52-year-old male patient with four partially missing fingers of the left hand. The article describes the clinical and laboratory procedure of making prosthesis with modern silicone material. A wax pattern was fabricated using the right hand of the patient. A special type of wax was formulated to make the pattern so that it can be easily moulded and carved. Intrinsic and extrinsic staining was also performed to match the adjacent skin colour. The patient was given the finger prosthesis and was asked to use a half glove (sports) to mask the junction between the prosthesis and the normal tissue. It also provides additional retention to the artificial fingers. The patient felt his social acceptance improved after wearing the finger prosthesis. PMID:23988821

  14. Salt-finger convection under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to differential diffusion rates. Because of the fact that the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number (the ratio of thermal diffusivity to solute diffusivity) salt-finger convection can be generated at very much reduced gravity levels. This effect may be of importance in the directional solidification of binary alloys carried out in space. The transport of solute and heat by salt-finger convection at microgravity conditions is considered; instability arising from surface tension gradients, the Marangoni instability, is discussed, and the possible consequences of combined salt-finger and Marangoni instability are considered.

  15. AIRE-PHD fingers are structural hubs to maintain the integrity of chromatin-associated interactome

    PubMed Central

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Matafora, Vittoria; Saare, Mario; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Mollica, Luca; Quilici, Giacomo; Chignola, Francesca; Mannella, Valeria; Zucchelli, Chiara; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the expression of peripheral-tissue antigens to mediate deletional tolerance, thereby preventing self-reactivity. AIRE contains two plant homeodomains (PHDs) which are sites of pathological mutations. AIRE-PHD fingers are important for AIRE transcriptional activity and presumably play a crucial role in the formation of multimeric protein complexes at chromatin level which ultimately control immunological tolerance. As a step forward the understanding of AIRE-PHD fingers in normal and pathological conditions, we investigated their structure and used a proteomic SILAC approach to assess the impact of patient mutations targeting AIRE-PHD fingers. Importantly, both AIRE-PHD fingers are structurally independent and mutually non-interacting domains. In contrast to D297A and V301M on AIRE-PHD1, the C446G mutation on AIRE-PHD2 destroys the structural fold, thus causing aberrant AIRE localization and reduction of AIRE target genes activation. Moreover, mutations targeting AIRE-PHD1 affect the formation of a multimeric protein complex at chromatin level. Overall our results reveal the importance of AIRE-PHD domains in the interaction with chromatin-associated nuclear partners and gene regulation confirming the role of PHD fingers as versatile protein interaction hubs for multiple binding events. PMID:23074189

  16. AIRE-PHD fingers are structural hubs to maintain the integrity of chromatin-associated interactome.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, Massimiliano; Matafora, Vittoria; Saare, Mario; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitrios; Mollica, Luca; Quilici, Giacomo; Chignola, Francesca; Mannella, Valeria; Zucchelli, Chiara; Peterson, Pärt; Bachi, Angela; Musco, Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    Mutations in autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the expression of peripheral-tissue antigens to mediate deletional tolerance, thereby preventing self-reactivity. AIRE contains two plant homeodomains (PHDs) which are sites of pathological mutations. AIRE-PHD fingers are important for AIRE transcriptional activity and presumably play a crucial role in the formation of multimeric protein complexes at chromatin level which ultimately control immunological tolerance. As a step forward the understanding of AIRE-PHD fingers in normal and pathological conditions, we investigated their structure and used a proteomic SILAC approach to assess the impact of patient mutations targeting AIRE-PHD fingers. Importantly, both AIRE-PHD fingers are structurally independent and mutually non-interacting domains. In contrast to D297A and V301M on AIRE-PHD1, the C446G mutation on AIRE-PHD2 destroys the structural fold, thus causing aberrant AIRE localization and reduction of AIRE target genes activation. Moreover, mutations targeting AIRE-PHD1 affect the formation of a multimeric protein complex at chromatin level. Overall our results reveal the importance of AIRE-PHD domains in the interaction with chromatin-associated nuclear partners and gene regulation confirming the role of PHD fingers as versatile protein interaction hubs for multiple binding events.

  17. The C-terminus of H-Ras as a target for the covalent binding of reactive compounds modulating Ras-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Oeste, Clara L; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Bray, Francesca; García de Lacoba, Mario; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David; Ruiz-Sánchez, Antonio J; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Rojas, José M; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-01-06

    Ras proteins are crucial players in differentiation and oncogenesis and constitute important drug targets. The localization and activity of Ras proteins are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications at their C-termini. In addition to an isoprenylated cysteine, H-Ras, but not other Ras proteins, possesses two cysteine residues (C181 and C184) in the C-terminal hypervariable domain that act as palmitoylation sites in cells. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are reactive lipidic mediators that covalently bind to H-Ras and activate H-Ras dependent pathways. Dienone cyPG, such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and Δ(12)-PGJ(2) selectively bind to the H-Ras hypervariable domain. Here we show that these cyPG bind simultaneously C181 and C184 of H-Ras, thus potentially altering the conformational tendencies of the hypervariable domain. Based on these results, we have explored the capacity of several bifunctional cysteine reactive small molecules to bind to the hypervariable domain of H-Ras proteins. Interestingly, phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a widely used tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and dibromobimane, a cross-linking agent used for cysteine mapping, effectively bind H-Ras hypervariable domain. The interaction of PAO with H-Ras takes place in vitro and in cells and blocks modification of H-Ras by 15d-PGJ(2). Moreover, PAO treatment selectively alters H-Ras membrane partition and the pattern of H-Ras activation in cells, from the plasma membrane to endomembranes. These results identify H-Ras as a novel target for PAO. More importantly, these observations reveal that small molecules or reactive intermediates interacting with spatially vicinal cysteines induce intramolecular cross-linking of H-Ras C-terminus potentially contributing to the modulation of Ras-dependent pathways.

  18. Probing the Reactivity of Dimethylsulfoxonium Methylide with Conjugated and Nonconjugated Carbonyl Compounds: An Undergraduate Experiment Combining Synthesis, Spectral Analysis, and Mechanistic Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciaccio, James A.; Guevara, Elena L.; Alam, Rabeka; D'agrosa, Christina D.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce students to dimethylsulfoxonium methylide (DMSY) epoxidation of aryl and nonconjugated aliphatic aldehydes and ketones without revealing that DMSY cyclopropanates enones by Michael-initiated ring closure (MIRC). Each student performs the reaction of DMSY with one of nine carbonyl compounds, including four enones, and then analyzes the…

  19. Probing the Reactivity of Dimethylsulfoxonium Methylide with Conjugated and Nonconjugated Carbonyl Compounds: An Undergraduate Experiment Combining Synthesis, Spectral Analysis, and Mechanistic Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciaccio, James A.; Guevara, Elena L.; Alam, Rabeka; D'agrosa, Christina D.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce students to dimethylsulfoxonium methylide (DMSY) epoxidation of aryl and nonconjugated aliphatic aldehydes and ketones without revealing that DMSY cyclopropanates enones by Michael-initiated ring closure (MIRC). Each student performs the reaction of DMSY with one of nine carbonyl compounds, including four enones, and then analyzes the…

  20. First-order kinetics-controlled multiple species reactive transport of dissolved organic compounds in groundwater: Development and application of a numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W.W. Jr.

    1990-05-01

    Reactive chemical transport models developed over the past decade have generally relied on the assumption that local thermodynamic equilibrium is achieved at all times between aqueous species in a given system. Consequently, homogeneous aqueous systems characterized by a number of kinetically slow reactions, particularly problems involving organic species, cannot be satisfactorily modeled. In this study, we present a prototype computer model, KINETRAN, which is designed to handle kinetically-controlled homogeneous reactions in the aqueous phase, along with the transport of the various species involved, through geologic media. 31 refs., 53 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  2. Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative warning of wind chill. Indeed, guidance on the risk of finger freezing is important not only to safeguard the finger, but also because it pertains more closely to susceptible facial features, such as the nose, than if only the risk of cheek freezing was provided. The importance of blood flow to the finger and the modeling of vaso-constriction are demonstrated through cooling predictions that agree reasonably well with several reported observations. Differences in the prediction between the present physiologic-based model and the engineering model used to develop the wind chill index are also discussed. New wind chill charts are presented that tabulate the mean cooling rates and corresponding onset times to freezing of the finger for various combinations of air temperature and wind speed. Results indicate that the surface of the finger cools to its freezing point in approximately one-eighth of the time predicted for the cheek. For combinations that result in the same wind chill temperature (WCT), the rate of finger cooling is faster at the higher wind speed. This asymmetry was previously disclosed through the application of the model to cheek cooling, and it reiterates the ambiguity associated with the reporting of WCT. It is further emphasized that the reporting of onset times to freezing, or safe exposure limits, is a more logical and meaningful alternative to the WCT.

  3. Finger Lake Region, NY State, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-04-02

    This view of the central portion of upstate New York, centers on the Finger Lakes. The large city on the shore of Lake Ontario, is Rochester. Although the city, being a business, educational and technical center, has no heavy industry, the outline of the city shows fairly well in the snow, but not as well as the outlines of industrial cities elsewhere in the world. The Finger Lakes are large linear lakes carved out by glaciers during the last ice age.

  4. Reverse Pressure Capable Finger Seal (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the typical solution for locations requiring reverse capable sealing are labyrinth seals which can exhibit significantly higher leakage...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2012-0215 REVERSE PRESSURE CAPABLE FINGER SEAL (PREPRINT) Nathan Gibson and Joe Yanof Honeywell International, Inc...AND SUBTITLE REVERSE PRESSURE CAPABLE FINGER SEAL (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-09-D-2925-0003 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  5. Contributions and co-ordination of individual fingers in multiple finger prehension.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, H; Kawai, S; Ikuta, K

    1995-06-01

    The contributions and co-ordination of external finger grip forces were examined during a lifting task with a precision grip using multiple fingers. The subjects (n = 10) lifted a force transducer-equipped grip apparatus. Grip force from each of the five fingers was continuously measured under different object weight (200 g, 400 g and 800 g) and surface structure (plastic and sandpaper) conditions. The effect of five-, four-, and three-finger grip modes was also examined. It was found that variation of object weight or surface friction resulted in change of the total grip force magnitude; the largest change in finger force, was that for the index finger, followed by the middle, ring, and little fingers. Percentage contribution of static grip force to the total grip force for the index, middle, ring, and little fingers was 42.0%, 27.4%, 17.6% and 12.9%, respectively. These values were fairly constant for all object weight conditions, as well as for all surface friction conditions, suggesting that all individual finger force adjustments for light loads less than 800 g are controlled comprehensively simply by using a single common scaling value. A higher surface friction provided faster lifting initiation and required lesser grip force exertion, indicating advantageous effect of a non-slippery surface over a slippery surface. The results indicate that nearly 40% force reduction can be obtained when a non-slippery surface is used. Variation in grip mode changed the total grip force, i.e., the fewer the number of fingers, the greater the total grip force. The percent value of static grip force for the index, middle, and ring fingers in the four-finger grip mode was 42.7%, 32.5%, and 24.7%, respectively, and that for the index and middle fingers in the three-finger grip mode was 43.0% and 56.9%, respectively. Therefore, the grip mode was found to influence the force contributions of the middle and ring fingers, but not of the index finger.

  6. Improved DNA binding specificity from polyzinc finger peptides by using strings of two-finger units

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Klug, Aaron; Choo, Yen

    2001-01-01

    Multizinc finger peptides are likely to reach increased prominence in the search for the “ideal” designer transcription factor for in vivo applications such as gene therapy. However, for these treatments to be effective and safe, the peptides must bind with high affinity and, more importantly, with great specificity. Our previous research has shown that zinc finger arrays can be made to bind 18 bp of DNA with picomolar affinity, but also has suggested that arrays of fingers also may bind tightly to related sequences. This work addresses the question of zinc finger DNA binding specificity. We show that by changing the way in which zinc finger arrays are constructed—by linking three two-finger domains rather than two three-finger units—far greater target specificity can be achieved through increased discrimination against mutated or closely related sequences. These new peptides have the added capability of being able to span two short gaps of unbound DNA, although still binding with picomolar affinity to their target sites. We believe that this new method of constructing zinc finger arrays will offer greater efficacy in the fields of gene therapy and in the production of transgenic organisms than previously reported zinc finger arrays. PMID:11171969

  7. Viscous fingering in a microfluidic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budek, Agnieszka; Garstecki, Piotr; Samborski, Adam; Szymczak, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    We study experimentally and numerically two-phase flow in a rectangular network of microfluidic channels. If the pressure gradient is oriented along the lattice, growth of long and thin dendrites ('thin fingers') is promoted. The dynamics of thin finger growth is of interest due to their appearance in a variety of other pattern forming systems, such as the growth of dendrites in electrochemical deposition experiments, channeling in dissolving rocks or side-branches growth in crystallization. Due to their simplicity, thin finger models are also attractive for theoretical analysis. A characteristic feature of these systems is a strong competition between the fingers which is a reflection of Saffman-Taylor instability acting in a nonlinear regime. Surprisingly, the case of miscible fluids turns out to be different, with the competition between the fingers hindered due to the strong lateral currents of the displaced fluid, which eventually cut off the heads of the advancing fingers, thus preventing their further growth. The heads continue to move through the system, preserving their shapes, thus forming the 'miscible droplets'. In immiscible case this process is hindered by the presence of the surface tension. A detailed analysis of this phenomenon is given with a particular emphasis on the scaling properties of the system.

  8. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-30

    Methylphosphonyl-AChE by la, lb, 2, and 3 . .............................................. 83 Chapter III 1 Lineweaver - Burke Plot for Compound 3a...Not determined. I11 ................ ."--..-. . . .S . -. -.. .i.,...,. _. o, . ’._ -. .-. . , , I I 1 .. .! 8.08.O 1I i i 7.0 LINEWEAVER - BURKE ...10 15 20 25 30 35 40 [AcSCh] - 1 , M -1 x 10 -4 JA-1 043-23 FIGURE 1 LINEWEAVER - BURKE PLOT FOR COMPOUND 3a 112 nonquaternary reactivators with ethyl

  9. Effect of olive mill wastewater phenol compounds on reactive carbonyl species and Maillard reaction end-products in ultrahigh-temperature-treated milk.

    PubMed

    Troise, Antonio Dario; Fiore, Alberto; Colantuono, Antonio; Kokkinidou, Smaro; Peterson, Devin G; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2014-10-15

    Thermal processing and Maillard reaction (MR) affect the nutritional and sensorial qualities of milk. In this paper an olive mill wastewater phenolic powder (OMW) was tested as a functional ingredient for inhibiting MR development in ultrahigh-temperature (UHT)-treated milk. OMW was added to milk at 0.1 and 0.05% w/v before UHT treatment, and the concentration of MR products was monitored to verify the effect of OMW phenols in controlling the MR. Results revealed that OMW is able to trap the reactive carbonyl species such as hydroxycarbonyls and dicarbonyls, which in turn led to the increase of Maillard-derived off-flavor development. The effect of OMW on the formation of Amadori products and N-ε-(carboxymethyl)-lysine (CML) showed that oxidative cleavage, C2-C6 cyclization, and the consequent reactive carbonyl species formation were also inhibited by OMW. Data indicated that OMW is a functional ingredient able to control the MR and to improve the nutritional and sensorial attributes of milk.

  10. New Finger Biometric Method Using Near Infrared Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eui Chul; Jung, Hyunwoo; Kim, Daeyeoul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new finger biometric method. Infrared finger images are first captured, and then feature extraction is performed using a modified Gaussian high-pass filter through binarization, local binary pattern (LBP), and local derivative pattern (LDP) methods. Infrared finger images include the multimodal features of finger veins and finger geometries. Instead of extracting each feature using different methods, the modified Gaussian high-pass filter is fully convolved. Therefore, the extracted binary patterns of finger images include the multimodal features of veins and finger geometries. Experimental results show that the proposed method has an error rate of 0.13%. PMID:22163741

  11. Finger multibiometric cryptosystems: fusion strategy and template security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jialiang; Li, Qiong; Abd El-Latif, Ahmed A.; Niu, Xiamu

    2014-03-01

    We address two critical issues in the design of a finger multibiometric system, i.e., fusion strategy and template security. First, three fusion strategies (feature-level, score-level, and decision-level fusions) with the corresponding template protection technique are proposed as the finger multibiometric cryptosystems to protect multiple finger biometric templates of fingerprint, finger vein, finger knuckle print, and finger shape modalities. Second, we theoretically analyze different fusion strategies for finger multibiometric cryptosystems with respect to their impact on security and recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of finger multibiometric cryptosystems at different fusion levels is investigated on a merged finger multimodal biometric database. The comparative results suggest that the proposed finger multibiometric cryptosystem at feature-level fusion outperforms other approaches in terms of verification performance and template security.

  12. Scattering Removal for Finger-Vein Image Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy. PMID:22737028

  13. Scattering removal for finger-vein image restoration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Ben; Shi, Yihua

    2012-01-01

    Finger-vein recognition has received increased attention recently. However, the finger-vein images are always captured in poor quality. This certainly makes finger-vein feature representation unreliable, and further impairs the accuracy of finger-vein recognition. In this paper, we first give an analysis of the intrinsic factors causing finger-vein image degradation, and then propose a simple but effective image restoration method based on scattering removal. To give a proper description of finger-vein image degradation, a biological optical model (BOM) specific to finger-vein imaging is proposed according to the principle of light propagation in biological tissues. Based on BOM, the light scattering component is sensibly estimated and properly removed for finger-vein image restoration. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is powerful in enhancing the finger-vein image contrast and in improving the finger-vein image matching accuracy.

  14. Characterization of Antifungal Natural Products Isolated from Endophytic Fungi of Finger Millet (Eleusine coracana).

    PubMed

    Mousa, Walaa Kamel; Schwan, Adrian L; Raizada, Manish N

    2016-09-03

    Finger millet is an ancient African-Indian crop that is resistant to many pathogens including the fungus, Fusarium graminearum. We previously reported the first isolation of putative fungal endophytes from finger millet and showed that the crude extracts of four strains had anti-Fusarium activity. However, active compounds were isolated from only one strain. The objectives of this study were to confirm the endophytic lifestyle of the three remaining anti-Fusarium isolates, to identify the major underlying antifungal compounds, and to initially characterize the mode(s) of action of each compound. Results of confocal microscopy and a plant disease assay were consistent with the three fungal strains behaving as endophytes. Using bio-assay guided fractionation and spectroscopic structural elucidation, three anti-Fusarium secondary metabolites were purified and characterized. These molecules were not previously reported to derive from fungi nor have antifungal activity. The purified antifungal compounds were: 5-hydroxy 2(3H)-benzofuranone, dehydrocostus lactone (guaianolide sesquiterpene lactone), and harpagoside (an iridoide glycoside). Light microscopy and vitality staining were used to visualize the in vitro interactions between each compound and Fusarium; the results suggested a mixed fungicidal/fungistatic mode of action. We conclude that finger millet possesses fungal endophytes that can synthesize anti-fungal compounds not previously reported as bio-fungicides against F. graminearum.

  15. Identification of impact odorants contributing to fresh mushroom off-flavor in wines: incidence of their reactivity with nitrogen compounds on the decrease of the olfactory defect.

    PubMed

    Pons, Monique; Dauphin, Brunhilde; La Guerche, Stephane; Pons, Alexandre; Lavigne-Cruege, Valérie; Shinkaruk, Svitlana; Bunner, Denis; Richard, Tristan; Monti, Jean-Pierre; Darriet, Philippe

    2011-04-13

    Analysis of wines from different grape varieties marked by sometimes intense aromatic nuances of fresh mushroom was performed by gas chromatography coupled with olfactometry. This analysis has led to the identification of several odoriferous zones, which were recalling a fresh mushroom odor. Two trace compounds responsible for these odoriferous zones, 1-nonen-3-one and 1-octen-3-one, have been identified and their content has been determined by using either a multidimensional gas chromatography technique coupled to olfactometry and mass spectrometry detection (in the case of 1-nonen-3-one) or the preparation of the derivative with O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine hydrochloride in the presence of the deuterated form, as the internal standard (in the case of 1-octen-3-one), then gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detection. The assays allowed the quantification of these compounds at concentration levels sometimes well above their detection and recognition olfactory threshold. We show that adding nitrogen compounds to the altered wines, such as an amino acid (glycine) or a tripeptide (glutathione), led to lower concentrations of 1-octen-3-one in wines and diminished smell of fresh mushrooms. The study of the reaction in a model medium, whose composition is close to wine, by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry demonstrated the formation of adducts between 1-octen-3-one and glycine, and 1-octen-3-one and glutathione characterized by NMR.

  16. A framework for studying dynamics and stability of diffusive-reactive interfaces with application to Cu6Sn5 intermetallic compound growth.

    PubMed

    Udupa, Anirudh; Sadasiva, Subramanya; Subbarayan, Ganesh

    2016-06-01

    Often during phase growth, the rate of accretion, on the one hand, is determined by a competition between bulk diffusion and surface reaction rate. The morphology of the phase interface, on the other hand, is determined by an interplay between surface diffusivity and surface reaction rate. In this study, a framework to predict the growth and the morphology of an interface by modelling the interplay between bulk diffusion, surface reaction rate and surface diffusion is developed. The framework is demonstrated using the example of Cu-Sn intermetallic compound growth that is of significance to modern microelectronic assemblies. In particular, the dynamics and stability of the interface created when Cu and Sn react to form the compound Cu6Sn5 is explored. Prior experimental observations of the Cu6Sn5-Sn interface have shown it to possess either a scalloped, flat or needle-shaped morphology. Diffuse interface simulations are carried out to elucidate the mechanism behind the interface formation. The computational model accounts for the bulk diffusion of Cu through the intermetallic compound, reaction at the interface to form Cu6Sn5, surface diffusion of Cu6Sn5 along the interface and the influence of the electric current density in accelerating the bulk diffusion of Cu. A stability analysis is performed to identify the conditions under which the interface evolves into a flat, scalloped or needle-shaped structure.

  17. A framework for studying dynamics and stability of diffusive–reactive interfaces with application to Cu6Sn5 intermetallic compound growth

    PubMed Central

    Sadasiva, Subramanya; Subbarayan, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Often during phase growth, the rate of accretion, on the one hand, is determined by a competition between bulk diffusion and surface reaction rate. The morphology of the phase interface, on the other hand, is determined by an interplay between surface diffusivity and surface reaction rate. In this study, a framework to predict the growth and the morphology of an interface by modelling the interplay between bulk diffusion, surface reaction rate and surface diffusion is developed. The framework is demonstrated using the example of Cu–Sn intermetallic compound growth that is of significance to modern microelectronic assemblies. In particular, the dynamics and stability of the interface created when Cu and Sn react to form the compound Cu6Sn5 is explored. Prior experimental observations of the Cu6Sn5–Sn interface have shown it to possess either a scalloped, flat or needle-shaped morphology. Diffuse interface simulations are carried out to elucidate the mechanism behind the interface formation. The computational model accounts for the bulk diffusion of Cu through the intermetallic compound, reaction at the interface to form Cu6Sn5, surface diffusion of Cu6Sn5 along the interface and the influence of the electric current density in accelerating the bulk diffusion of Cu. A stability analysis is performed to identify the conditions under which the interface evolves into a flat, scalloped or needle-shaped structure. PMID:27436981

  18. Synthesis, Reactivity Investigation, and X-ray Diffraction Structures of New Platinum(II) Compounds Containing Redox-Active Diphosphine Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoping; Richmond, Michael G.; Hunt, Sean W

    2009-01-01

    Substitution of the 1,5-cyclooctadiene (cod) ligand in PtCl2(cod) (1) by the diphosphine ligand 4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (bpcd) yields PtCl2(bpcd) (2). Knoevenagel condensation of 2 with 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde leads to the functionalization of the bpcd ligand and formation of the corresponding 2-(9-anthracenylidene)-4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-4-cyclopenten-1,3-dione (abpcd) substituted compound PtCl2(abpcd) (3), which is also obtained from the direct reaction of 1 with the abpcd ligand in near quantitative yield. The reaction of 3 with disodium maleonitriledithiolate (Na2mnt) affords the chelating dithiolate compound Pt(mnt)(abpcd) (4). Compounds 2 C4 have been fully characterized in solution by IR and NMR spectroscopies (1H and 31P), and their molecular structures established by X-ray crystallography. The electrochemical properties of 2 C4 have examined by cyclic voltammetry, and the nature of the HOMO and LUMO levels in these systems has been established by MO calculations at the extended H ckel level, the results of which are discussed with respect to electrochemical data and related diphosphine derivatives.

  19. Rehabilitation of single finger amputation with customized silicone prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Niharika; Chand, Pooran; Jurel, Sunit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Finger amputations are common in accidents at home, work, and play. Apart from trauma, congenital disease and deformity also leads to finger amputation. This results in loss of function, loss of sensation as well as loss of body image. Finger prosthesis offers psychological support and social acceptance in such cases. This clinical report describes a method to fabricate ring retained silicone finger prosthesis in a patient with partial finger loss. PMID:28163487

  20. Chemical reactivity of polycyclic organic compounds adsorbed on coal fly ash and related solid surfaces. Progress report, May 1985-April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Mamantov, G.; Wehry, E.L.

    1986-04-01

    The fundamental objectives of this research are to characterize and understand the photochemical and nonphotochemical reactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives as adsorbates on the surface of coal fly ash and related particulate solids. Specific efforts undertaken and results obtained during this period are summarized with detailed discussions presented in the form of Appendices. Results are tabulated from a thorough examination of the photochemistry of pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), anthracene, phenanthrene, and benz(a)anthracene (BaA) as adsorbates on eight coal stack ashes. A procedure was developed to separate coal ashes into carbon and iron contents. Attempts to measure heats of absorption of PAHs on various coal ashes were made. Pyrene nitration occurred only when NO/sub 2/ was contaminated with nitric acid.

  1. Evidence for the involvement of 5f orbitals in the bonding and reactivity of organometallic actinide compounds: thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) bis(hydrazonato) complexes.

    PubMed

    Cantat, Thibault; Graves, Christopher R; Jantunen, Kimberly C; Burns, Carol J; Scott, Brian L; Schelter, Eric J; Morris, David E; Hay, P Jeffrey; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-12-24

    Migratory insertion of diphenyldiazomethane into both metal-carbon bonds of the bis(alkyl) and bis(aryl) complexes (C(5)Me(5))(2)AnR(2) yields the first f-element bis(hydrazonato) complexes (C(5)Me(5))(2)An[eta(2)-(N,N')-R-N-N=CPh(2)](2) [An = Th, R = CH(3) (18), PhCH(2) (15), Ph (16); An = U, R = CH(3) (17), PhCH(2) (14)], which have been characterized by a combination of spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography. The two hydrazonato ligands adopt an eta(2)-coordination mode leading to 20-electron (for Th) and 22-electron (for U) complexes that have no transition-metal analogues. In fact, reaction of (C(5)H(5))(2)Zr(CH(3))(2) or (C(5)Me(5))(2)Hf(CH(3))(2) with diphenyldiazomethane is limited to the formation of the corresponding mono(hydrazonato) complex (C(5)R(5))(2)M[eta(2)-(N,N')-CH(3)-N-N=CPh(2)](CH(3)) (M = Zr, R = H or M = Hf, R = CH(3)). The difference in the reactivities of the group 4 metal complexes and the actinides was used as a unique platform for investigating in depth the role of 5f orbitals on the reactivity and bonding in actinide organometallic complexes. The electronic structure of the (C(5)H(5))(2)M[eta(2)-(N,N')-CH(3)-N-N=CH(2)](2) (M = Zr, Th, U) model complexes was studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and compared to experimental structural, electrochemical, and spectroscopic results. Whereas transition-metal bis(cyclopentadienyl) complexes are known to stabilize three ligands in the metallocene girdle to form saturated (C(5)H(5))(2)ML(3) species, in a bis(hydrazonato) system, a fourth ligand is coordinated to the metal center to give (C(5)H(5))(2)ML(4). DFT calculations have shown that 5f orbitals in the actinide complexes play a crucial role in stabilizing this fourth ligand by stabilizing both the sigma and pi electrons of the two eta(2)-coordinated hydrazonato ligands. In contrast, the stabilization of the hydrazonato ligands was found to be significantly less effective for the putative bis

  2. Involvement of 5f-orbitals in the bonding and reactivity of organoactinide compounds: thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) bis (hydrazonato) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cantat, Thibault; Graves, Christopher R; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Migratory insertion of diphenyldiazomethane into both metal-carbon bonds of the bis(alkyl) and bis(aryl) complexes (C5Me5)2AnR2 yields the first f-element bis(hydrazonato) complexes (C5Me5)2An[2-(N,N')-R-N-NCPh2]2 [An = Th, R = CH3 (18), PhCH2 (15), Ph (16); An = U, R = CH3 (17), PhCH2 (14)], which have been characterized by a combination of spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and X-ray crystallography. The two hydrazonato ligands adopt an 2-coordination mode leading to 20-electron (for Th) and 22-electron (for U) complexes that have no transition-metal analogues. In fact, reaction of (C5H5)2Zr(CH3)2 or (C5Me5)2Hf(CH3)2 with diphenyldiazomethane is limited to the formation of the corresponding mono(hydrazonato) complex (C5R5)2M[2-(N,N')-CH3-N-NCPh2](CH3) (M = Zr, R = H or M = Hf, R = CH3). The difference in the reactivities of the group 4 metal complexes and the actinides was used as a unique platform for investigating in depth the role of 5f orbitals on the reactivity and bonding in actinide organometallic complexes. The electronic structure of the (C5H5)2M[2-(N,N')-CH3-N-NCH2]2 (M = Zr, Th, U) model complexes was studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and compared to experimental structural, electrochemical, and spectroscopic results. Whereas transition-metal bis(cyclopentadienyl) complexes are known to stabilize three ligands in the metallocene girdle to form saturated (C5H5)2ML3 species, in a bis(hydrazonato) system, a fourth ligand is coordinated to the metal center to give (C5H5)2ML4. DFT calculations have shown that 5f orbitals in the actinide complexes play a crucial role in stabilizing this fourth ligand by stabilizing both the s and p electrons of the two 2-coordinated hydrazonato ligands. In contrast, the stabilization of the hydrazonato ligands was found to be significantly less effective for the putative bis(hydrazonato) zirconium(IV) complex, yielding a higher energy structure. However, the difference in the reactivities of the group 4

  3. Selenium-platinum coordination compounds as novel anticancer drugs: selectively killing cancer cells via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis route.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingwu; Li, Yang; Li, Tianyu; Cao, Wei; Yi, Yu; Geng, Weijia; Sun, Zhiwei; Xu, Huaping

    2014-08-01

    We report the preparation of selenium-containing platinum-based anticancer drug EG-Se/Pt. EG-Se/Pt was obtained from the coordination of selenium-containing molecules (EG-Se) with cisplatin (CDDP). The structure of EG-Se/Pt was characterized by (1) H and (77) Se NMR spectroscopy, XPS, ESI-MS, and MALDI-TOF. In aqueous solution, EG-Se/Pt self-assembles to form spherical aggregates. EG-Se/Pt shows enhanced stability against dilution and high salt concentration compared with EG-Se. EG-Se/Pt induces cell apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS), which leads to high selectivity between cancer cells and normal cells in cytotoxicity assays. More importantly, EG-Se/Pt effectively inhibits tumor growth in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. It is anticipated that tuning the ROS level through the assembly of selenium-containing molecules can be a general method to realize anticancer selectivity.

  4. Chicken Fetal Liver DNA Damage and Adduct Formation by Activation-Dependent DNA-Reactive Carcinogens and Related Compounds of Several Structural Classes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gary M.; Duan, Jian-Dong; Brunnemann, Klaus D.; Iatropoulos, Michael J.; Vock, Esther; Deschl, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The chicken egg genotoxicity assay (CEGA), which utilizes the liver of an intact and aseptic embryo-fetal test organism, was evaluated using four activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and four structurally related less potent carcinogens or non-carcinogens. In the assay, three daily doses of test substances were administered to eggs containing 9–11-day-old fetuses and the fetal livers were assessed for two endpoints, DNA breaks using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay and DNA adducts using the 32P-nucleotide postlabeling (NPL) assay. The effects of four carcinogens of different structures requiring distinct pathways of bioactivation, i.e., 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), were compared with structurally related non-carcinogens fluorene (FLU) and benzo[e]pyrene (B[e]P) or weak carcinogens, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA). The four carcinogens all produced DNA breaks at microgram or low milligram total doses, whereas less potent carcinogens and non-carcinogens yielded borderline or negative results, respectively, at higher doses. AAF and B[a]P produced DNA adducts, whereas none was found with the related comparators FLU or B[e]P, consistent with comet results. DEN and NDELA were also negative for adducts, as expected in the case of DEN for an alkylating agent in the standard NPL assay. Also, AFB1 and AFB2 were negative in NPL, as expected, due to the nature of ring opened aflatoxin adducts, which are resistant to enzymatic digestion. Thus, the CEGA, using comet and NPL, is capable of detection of the genotoxicity of diverse DNA-reactive carcinogens, while not yielding false positives for non-carcinogens. PMID:24973097

  5. Chicken fetal liver DNA damage and adduct formation by activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and related compounds of several structural classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gary M; Duan, Jian-Dong; Brunnemann, Klaus D; Iatropoulos, Michael J; Vock, Esther; Deschl, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    The chicken egg genotoxicity assay (CEGA), which utilizes the liver of an intact and aseptic embryo-fetal test organism, was evaluated using four activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and four structurally related less potent carcinogens or non-carcinogens. In the assay, three daily doses of test substances were administered to eggs containing 9-11-day-old fetuses and the fetal livers were assessed for two endpoints, DNA breaks using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay and DNA adducts using the (32)P-nucleotide postlabeling (NPL) assay. The effects of four carcinogens of different structures requiring distinct pathways of bioactivation, i.e., 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), were compared with structurally related non-carcinogens fluorene (FLU) and benzo[e]pyrene (B[e]P) or weak carcinogens, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA). The four carcinogens all produced DNA breaks at microgram or low milligram total doses, whereas less potent carcinogens and non-carcinogens yielded borderline or negative results, respectively, at higher doses. AAF and B[a]P produced DNA adducts, whereas none was found with the related comparators FLU or B[e]P, consistent with comet results. DEN and NDELA were also negative for adducts, as expected in the case of DEN for an alkylating agent in the standard NPL assay. Also, AFB1 and AFB2 were negative in NPL, as expected, due to the nature of ring opened aflatoxin adducts, which are resistant to enzymatic digestion. Thus, the CEGA, using comet and NPL, is capable of detection of the genotoxicity of diverse DNA-reactive carcinogens, while not yielding false positives for non-carcinogens.

  6. Hydrodynamic fingering instability induced by a precipitation reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Y; Ishii, Y; Tada, Y; De Wit, A

    2014-07-11

    We experimentally demonstrate that a precipitation reaction at the miscible interface between two reactive solutions can trigger a hydrodynamic instability due to the buildup of a locally adverse mobility gradient related to a decrease in permeability. The precipitate results from an A+B→C type of reaction when a solution containing one of the reactants is injected into a solution of the other reactant in a porous medium or a Hele-Shaw cell. Fingerlike precipitation patterns are observed upon displacement, the properties of which depend on whether A displaces B or vice versa. A mathematical modeling of the underlying mobility profile confirms that the instability originates from a local decrease in mobility driven by the localized precipitation. Nonlinear simulations of the related reaction-diffusion-convection model reproduce the properties of the instability observed experimentally. In particular, the simulations suggest that differences in diffusivity between A and B may contribute to the asymmetric characteristics of the fingering precipitation patterns.

  7. Miscible viscous fingering involving production of gel by chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hoshino, Kenichi

    2015-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated miscible viscous fingering with chemical reactions producing gel. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and aluminum ion (Al3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, SPA solution and ferric ion (Fe3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In the case of Al3 +, displacement efficiency was smaller than that in the non-reactive case, whereas in the case of Fe3 +, the displacement efficiency was larger. We consider that the difference in change of the patterns in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. We discuss relationship between the VF patterns and the rheological measurement.

  8. Hot spots in density fingering of exothermic autocatalytic chemical fronts.

    PubMed

    Gérard, T; Tóth, T; Grosfils, P; Horváth, D; De Wit, A; Tóth, A

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of two-dimensional (2D) temperature fields are performed by an interferometric method during density fingering of the autocatalytic chlorite-tetrathionate reaction in a Hele-Shaw cell. These measures confirm that, because of heat losses through the glass walls of the reactor, the temperature profile across the front is a pulse rather than a front. Moreover, the full 2D temperature field shows the presence in the reactive zone of hot spots where the temperature exceeds the maximum temperature measured in a stable planar front. We investigate here experimentally the increase of temperature in the hot spots when the composition of the reactants is varied to increase the exothermicity of the reaction. We back up these experimental observations by nonlinear simulations of a reaction-diffusion-convection model which show that the maximum temperature reached in the system depends on the intensity of convection.

  9. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-08-20

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously.

  10. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-11-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record `three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals.

  11. Ultrafast High-Resolution Mass Spectrometric Finger Pore Imaging in Latent Finger Prints

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Christian; Abel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Latent finger prints (LFPs) are deposits of sweat components in ridge and groove patterns, left after human fingers contact with a surface. Being important targets in biometry and forensic investigations they contain more information than topological patterns. With laser desorption mass spectrometry imaging (LD-MSI) we record ‘three-dimensional' finger prints with additional chemical information as the third dimension. Here we show the potential of fast finger pore imaging (FPI) in latent finger prints employing LD-MSI without a classical matrix in a high- spatial resolution mode. Thin films of gold rapidly sputtered on top of the sample are used for desorption. FPI employing an optical image for rapid spatial orientation and guiding of the desorption laser enables the rapid analysis of individual finger pores, and the chemical composition of their excretions. With this approach we rapidly detect metabolites, drugs, and characteristic excretions from the inside of the human organism by a minimally-invasive strategy, and distinguish them from chemicals in contact with fingers without any labeling. The fast finger pore imaging, analysis, and screening approach opens the door for a vast number of novel applications in such different fields as forensics, doping and medication control, therapy, as well as rapid profiling of individuals. PMID:25366032

  12. Individual variability in finger-to-finger transmission efficiency of Enterococcus faecium clones

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Rosa; Sánchez-Díaz, Ana María; Zamora, Javier; Torres, Carmen; Cintas, Luis María; Franco, Elvira; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A fingertip-to-fingertip intraindividual transmission experiment was carried out in 30 healthy volunteers, using four MLST-typed Enterococcus faecium clones. Overall results showed an adequate fit goodness to a theoretical exponential model, whereas four volunteers (13%) exhibited a significantly higher finger-to-finger bacterial transmission efficiency. This observation might have deep consequences in nosocomial epidemiology. PMID:24382843

  13. Design and preliminary evaluation of the FINGER rehabilitation robot: controlling challenge and quantifying finger individuation during musical computer game play

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot), a device for assisting in finger rehabilitation after neurologic injury. We developed FINGER to assist stroke patients in moving their fingers individually in a naturalistic curling motion while playing a game similar to Guitar Hero®a. The goal was to make FINGER capable of assisting with motions where precise timing is important. Methods FINGER consists of a pair of stacked single degree-of-freedom 8-bar mechanisms, one for the index and one for the middle finger. Each 8-bar mechanism was designed to control the angle and position of the proximal phalanx and the position of the middle phalanx. Target positions for the mechanism optimization were determined from trajectory data collected from 7 healthy subjects using color-based motion capture. The resulting robotic device was built to accommodate multiple finger sizes and finger-to-finger widths. For initial evaluation, we asked individuals with a stroke (n = 16) and without impairment (n = 4) to play a game similar to Guitar Hero® while connected to FINGER. Results Precision design, low friction bearings, and separate high speed linear actuators allowed FINGER to individually actuate the fingers with a high bandwidth of control (−3 dB at approximately 8 Hz). During the tests, we were able to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game by automatically adjusting the controller gains of FINGER. We also used FINGER to measure subjects’ effort and finger individuation while playing the game. Conclusions Test results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to motivate subjects with an engaging game environment that challenges individuated control of the fingers, automatically control assistance levels, and quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:24495432

  14. Assessment of the roles of reactive oxygen species in the UV and visible light photocatalytic degradation of cyanotoxins and water taste and odor compounds using C-TiO2.

    PubMed

    Fotiou, Theodora; Triantis, Theodoros M; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin E; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Hiskia, Anastasia

    2016-03-01

    Visible light (VIS) photocatalysis has large potential as a sustainable water treatment process, however the reaction pathways and degradation processes of organic pollutants are not yet clearly defined. The presence of cyanobacteria cause water quality problems since several genera can produce potent cyanotoxins, harmful to human health. In addition, cyanobacteria produce taste and odor compounds, which pose serious aesthetic problems in drinking water. Although photocatalytic degradation of cyanotoxins and taste and odor compounds have been reported under UV-A light in the presence of TiO2, limited studies have been reported on their degradation pathways by VIS photocatalysis of these problematic compounds. The main objectives of this work were to study the VIS photocatalytic degradation process, define the reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved and elucidate the reaction mechanisms. We report carbon doped TiO2 (C-TiO2) under VIS leads to the slow degradation of cyanotoxins, microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN), while taste and odor compounds, geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol, were not appreciably degraded. Further studies were carried-out employing several specific radical scavengers (potassium bromide, isopropyl alcohol, sodium azide, superoxide dismutase and catalase) and probes (coumarin) to assess the role of different ROS (hydroxyl radical OH, singlet oxygen (1)O2, superoxide radical anion [Formula: see text] ) in the degradation processes. Reaction pathways of MC-LR and CYN were defined through identification and monitoring of intermediates using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for VIS in comparison with UV-A photocatalytic treatment. The effects of scavengers and probes on the degradation process under VIS, as well as the differences in product distributions under VIS and UV-A, suggested that the main species in VIS photocatalysis is [Formula: see text] , with OH and (1)O2 playing minor roles in the degradation.

  15. Toward an "omic" physiopathology of reactive chemicals: thirty years of mass spectrometric study of the protein adducts with endogenous and xenobiotic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Federico Maria; Pitton, Marco; Di Fabio, Daniela; Colombi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Cancer and degenerative diseases are major causes of morbidity and death, derived from the permanent modification of key biopolymers such as DNA and regulatory proteins by usually smaller, reactive molecules, present in the environment or generated from endogenous and xenobiotic components by the body's own biochemical mechanisms (molecular adducts). In particular, protein adducts with organic electrophiles have been studied for more than 30 [see, e.g., Calleman et al., 1978] years essentially for three purposes: (a) as passive monitors of the mean level of individual exposure to specific chemicals, either endogenously present in the human body or to which the subject is exposed through food or environmental contamination; (b) as quantitative indicators of the mean extent of the individual metabolic processing which converts a non-reactive chemical substance into its toxic products able to damage DNA (en route to cancer induction through genotoxic mechanisms) or key proteins (as in the case of several drugs, pesticides or otherwise biologically active substances); (c) to relate the extent of protein modification to that of biological function impairment (such as enzyme inhibition) finally causing the specific health damage. This review describes the role that contemporary mass spectrometry-based approaches employed in the qualitative and quantitative study of protein-electrophile adducts play in the discovery of the (bio)chemical mechanisms of toxic substances and highlights the future directions of research in this field. A particular emphasis is given to the measurement of often high levels of the protein adducts of several industrial and environmental pollutants in unexposed human populations, a phenomenon which highlights the possibility that a number of small organic molecules are generated in the human organism through minor metabolic processes, the imbalance of which may be the cause of "spontaneous" cases of cancer and of other degenerative diseases of

  16. Phenylethynyl End-Capping Reagents And Reactive Diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Jensen, Brian J.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    Compounds containing phenylethynyl group serve as thermally reactive polymer end caps and reactive diluents. Useful in preparation of adhesives, composite matrices, and molding compounds. These reagents transform arylene ether oligomers and polymers into readily processable reactive materials that convert thermally to thermosets. Compounds synthesized for subsequent use in making thermoset polymers. Phenylethynyl group found to offer several unexpected advantages over ethynyl-based analog.

  17. Solid-state Forensic Finger sensor for integrated sampling and detection of gunshot residue and explosives: towards 'Lab-on-a-finger'.

    PubMed

    Bandodkar, Amay J; O'Mahony, Aoife M; Ramírez, Julian; Samek, Izabela A; Anderson, Sean M; Windmiller, Joshua R; Wang, Joseph

    2013-09-21

    Increasing security needs require field-deployable, on-the-spot detection tools for the rapid and reliable identification of gunshot residue (GSR) and nitroaromatic explosive compounds. This manuscript presents a simple, all-solid-state, wearable fingertip sensor for the rapid on-site voltammetric screening of GSR and explosive surface residues. To fabricate the new Forensic Fingers, we screen-print a three-electrode setup onto a nitrile finger cot, and coat another finger cot with an ionogel electrolyte layer. The new integrated sampling/detection methodology relies on 'voltammetry of microparticles' (VMP) and involves an initial mechanical transfer of trace amounts of surface-confined analytes directly onto the fingertip-based electrode contingent. Voltammetric measurements of the sample residues are carried out upon bringing the working electrode (printed on the index finger cot) in direct contact with a second finger cot coated with an ionogel electrolyte (worn on the thumb), thus completing the solid-state electrochemical cell. Sampling and screening are performed in less than four minutes and generate distinct voltammetric fingerprints which are specific to both GSR and explosives. The use of the solid, flexible ionogel electrolyte eliminates any liquid handling which can resolve problems associated with leakage, portability and contamination. A detailed study reveals that the fingertip detection system can rapidly identify residues of GSR and nitroaromatic compounds with high specificity, without compromising its attractive behavior even after undergoing repeated mechanical stress. This new integrated sampling/detection fingertip strategy holds considerable promise as a rapid, effective and low-cost approach for on-site crime scene investigations in various forensic scenarios.

  18. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  19. Recent advances in high performance poly(lactide): from “green” plasticization to super-tough materials via (reactive) compounding

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Georgio; Raquez, Jean-Marie; Hassouna, Fatima; Odent, Jérémy; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David; Dubois, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Due to its origin from renewable resources, its biodegradability, and recently, its industrial implementation at low costs, poly(lactide) (PLA) is considered as one of the most promising ecological, bio-sourced and biodegradable plastic materials to potentially and increasingly replace traditional petroleum derived polymers in many commodity and engineering applications. Beside its relatively high rigidity [high tensile strength and modulus compared with many common thermoplastics such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), high impact poly(styrene) (HIPS) and poly(propylene) (PP)], PLA suffers from an inherent brittleness, which can limit its applications especially where mechanical toughness such as plastic deformation at high impact rates or elongation is required. Therefore, the curve plotting stiffness vs. impact resistance and ductility must be shifted to higher values for PLA-based materials, while being preferably fully bio-based and biodegradable upon the application. This review aims to establish a state of the art focused on the recent progresses and preferably economically viable strategies developed in the literature for significantly improve the mechanical performances of PLA. A particular attention is given to plasticization as well as to impact resistance modification of PLA in the case of (reactive) blending PLA-based systems. PMID:24790960

  20. Tide-induced fingering flow during submarine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greskowiak, Janek

    2013-04-01

    range of 2 m initiates fingering flow. Flatter beach slope, higher hydraulic conductivity and increasing tidal range support this behavior. In the cases of fingering flow, freshwater is squeezed upward and pinches out within the inter-tidal zone. Once pinched out, the discharge point slowly moves along at the beach surface towards the low-tide mark. Overall, the fingering process further complicates the flow pattern and the mixing of salt and freshwater in the inter-tidal zone compared to the cases where the saline recirculation cell remains stable. This may have an important implication for the hydrogeochemical processes in this zone and thus the mass flux of reactive chemicals from the land to the ocean. Boufadel, M. C. (2000). A mechanistic study of nonlinear solute transport in a groundwater-surface water system under steady state and transient hydraulic conditions, Water Resour. Res., 36(9), 2549 2565. Bratton, J.F. (2010). The Three Scales of Submarine Groundwater Flow and Discharge across Passive Continental Margins, The Journal of Geology, 2010, 118, 565-575. Kuan, W. K., G. Jin, P. Xin, C. Robinson, B. Gibbes, and L. Li (2012). Tidal influence on seawater intrusion in unconfined coastal aquifers, Water Resour. Res., 48, W02502, doi:10.1029/2011WR010678. Langevin, C.D., D.T. Thorne, Jr., A.M. Dausman, M.C. Sukop, and G. Weixing (2007). Seawat version 4: a computer program for simulation of multi-species solute and heat transport, Technical Report, U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods Book 6, Chapter A22, 39 pp. Robinson, C., L. Li, and H. Prommer (2007). Tide-induced recirculation across the aquifer-ocean interface, Water Resour. Res., 43, W07428, doi:10.1029/2006WR005679. Moore, W.S. (2010). The Effect of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on the Ocean, Annu. Rev. Mar. Sci., 2, 59-88.

  1. Perceiving fingers in single-digit arithmetic problems

    PubMed Central

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Booth, James R.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate in children the neural underpinnings of finger representation and finger movement involved in single-digit arithmetic problems. Evidence suggests that finger representation and finger-based strategies play an important role in learning and understanding arithmetic. Because different operations rely on different networks, we compared activation for subtraction and multiplication problems in independently localized finger somatosensory and motor areas and tested whether activation was related to skill. Brain activations from children between 8 and 13 years of age revealed that only subtraction problems significantly activated finger motor areas, suggesting reliance on finger-based strategies. In addition, larger subtraction problems yielded greater somatosensory activation than smaller problems, suggesting a greater reliance on finger representation for larger numerical values. Interestingly, better performance in subtraction problems was associated with lower activation in the finger somatosensory area. Our results support the importance of fine-grained finger representation in arithmetical skill and are the first neurological evidence for a functional role of the somatosensory finger area in proficient arithmetical problem solving, in particular for those problems requiring quantity manipulation. From an educational perspective, these results encourage investigating whether different finger-based strategies facilitate arithmetical understanding and encourage educational practices aiming at integrating finger representation and finger-based strategies as a tool for instilling stronger numerical sense. PMID:25852582

  2. Development of Prediction Models for the Reactivity of Organic Compounds with Ozone in Aqueous Solution by Quantum Chemical Calculations: The Role of Delocalized and Localized Molecular Orbitals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minju; Zimmermann-Steffens, Saskia G; Arey, J Samuel; Fenner, Kathrin; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-08-18

    Second-order rate constants (kO3) for the reaction of ozone with micropollutants are essential parameters for the assessment of micropollutant elimination efficiency during ozonation in water and wastewater treatment. Prediction models for kO3 were developed for aromatic compounds, olefins, and amines by quantum chemical molecular orbital calculations employing ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods. The kO3 values for aromatic compounds correlated well with the energy of a delocalized molecular orbital first appearing on an aromatic ring (i.e., the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) or HOMO-n (n ≥ 0) when the HOMO is not located on the aromatic ring); the number of compounds tested (N) was 112, and the correlation coefficient (R(2)) values were 0.82-1.00. The kO3 values for olefins and amines correlated well with the energy of a localized molecular orbital (i.e., the natural bond orbital (NBO)) energy of the carbon-carbon π bond of olefins (N = 45, R(2) values of 0.82-0.85) and the NBO energy of the nitrogen lone-pair electrons of amines (N = 59, R(2) values of 0.81-0.83), respectively. Considering the performance of the kO3 prediction model and the computational costs, the HF/6-31G method is recommended for all aromatic groups and olefins investigated herein, whereas the HF/MIDI!, HF/6-31G*, or HF/6-311++G** methods are recommended for amines. Based on their mean absolute errors, the above models could predict kO3 within a factor of 4, on average, relative to the experimentally determined values. Overall, good correlations were also observed (R(2) values of 0.77-0.96) between kO3 predictions by quantum molecular orbital descriptors in this study and by the Hammett (σ) and Taft (σ*) constants from previously developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Hence, the quantum molecular orbital descriptors are an alternative to σ and σ*-values in QSAR applications and can also be utilized to

  3. Blood pressure measurement using finger cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choi, E; Jeong, H; Kim, K; Park, J

    2005-01-01

    Many research groups have studied blood pressure measurement in finger artery because of its convenience. But, low accuracy prohibits many hypertension patients from using this device. So, we suggest measurement algorithm that measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure in finger artery. And we also develop calibration method that decreases the error from difference of finger circumference by subjects. We apply our methods for 90 subjects (age form 20 to 49, 55 male, 35 female) to test feasibility of our method by AAMI SP10 standard. The mean difference of our system is ±4.7mmHg for systolic pressure, ±4.2mmHg for systolic pressure. It proved that the feasibility of our method is clinically acceptable.(under ±5mmHg).

  4. Finger forces in fastball baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi; Nasu, Daiki; Kadota, Koji; Matsuo, Tomoyuki; Fleisig, Glenn S

    2017-08-01

    Forces imparted by the fingers onto a baseball are the final, critical aspects for pitching, however these forces have not been quantified previously as no biomechanical technology was available. In this study, an instrumented baseball was developed for direct measurement of ball reaction force by individual fingers and used to provide fundamental information on the forces during a fastball pitch. A tri-axial force transducer with a cable having an easily-detachable connector were installed in an official baseball. Data were collected from 11 pitchers who placed the fingertip of their index, middle, ring, or thumb on the transducer, and threw four-seam fastballs to a target cage from a flat mound. For the index and middle fingers, resultant ball reaction force exhibited a bimodal pattern with initial and second peaks at 38-39ms and 6-7ms before ball release, and their amplitudes were around 97N each. The ring finger and thumb produced single-peak forces of approximately 50 and 83N, respectively. Shear forces for the index and middle fingers formed distinct peak at 4-5ms before release, and the peaks summed to 102N; a kinetic source for backspin on the ball. An additional experiment with submaximal pitching effort showed a linear relationship of peak forces with ball velocity. The peak ball reaction force for fastballs exceeded 80% of maximum finger strength measured, suggesting that strengthening of the distal muscles is important both for enhancing performance and for avoiding injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Finger recognition and gesture imitation in Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moro, V; Pernigo, S; Urgesi, C; Zapparoli, P; Aglioti, S M

    2008-01-01

    We report the association between finger agnosia and gesture imitation deficits in a right-handed, right-hemisphere damaged patient with Gerstmann's syndrome (GS), a neuropsychological syndrome characterized by finger and toe agnosia, left-right disorientation and dyscalculia. No language deficits were found. The patient showed a gestural imitation deficit that specifically involved finger movements and postures. The association between finger recognition and imitation deficits suggests that both static and dynamic aspects of finger representations are impaired in GS. We suggest that GS is a disorder of body representation that involves hands and fingers, that is, the non-facial body parts most involved in social interactions.

  6. Differential Binding of Monomethylarsonous Acid Compared to Arsenite and Arsenic Trioxide with Zinc Finger Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV–vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis. PMID:24611629

  7. Differential binding of monomethylarsonous acid compared to arsenite and arsenic trioxide with zinc finger peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xixi; Sun, Xi; Mobarak, Charlotte; Gandolfi, A Jay; Burchiel, Scott W; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-04-21

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin that enhances the carcinogenic effect of DNA-damaging agents, such as ultraviolet radiation and benzo[a]pyrene. Interaction with zinc finger proteins has been shown to be an important molecular mechanism for arsenic toxicity and cocarcinogenesis. Arsenicals such as arsenite, arsenic trioxide (ATO), and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) have been reported to interact with cysteine residues of zinc finger domains, but little is known about potential differences in their selectivity of interaction. Herein we analyzed the interaction of arsenite, MMA(III), and ATO with C2H2, C3H1, and C4 configurations of zinc fingers using UV-vis, cobalt, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry. We observed that arsenite and ATO both selectively bound to C3H1 and C4 zinc fingers, while MMA(III) interacted with all three configurations of zinc finger peptides. Structurally and functionally, arsenite and ATO caused conformational changes and zinc loss on C3H1 and C4 zinc finger peptide and protein, respectively, whereas MMA(III) changed conformation and displaced zinc on all three types of zinc fingers. The differential selectivity was also demonstrated in zinc finger proteins isolated from cells treated with these arsenicals. Our results show that trivalent inorganic arsenic compounds, arsenite and ATO, have the same selectivity and behavior when interacting with zinc finger proteins, while methylation removes the selectivity. These findings provide insights on the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential effects of inorganic versus methylated arsenicals, as well as the role of in vivo arsenic methylation in arsenic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  8. Finger tapping in musicians and nonmusicians.

    PubMed

    Franĕk, M; Mates, J; Radil, T; Beck, K; Pöppel, E

    1991-12-01

    Timing plays an important role in perceiving and performing music. Finger tapping has been successfully used for analyzing timing processes (Fraisse, 1966, Franĕk et al., 1987, 1988). The aim of this study is to determine differences between musically trained and untrained subjects in their ability to follow repetitive rhythmic tonal patterns by finger tapping. It has been found previously (Povel, 1981; Smith, 1983) that time estimation differs among musicians and nonmusicians under certain conditions. The results presented here show that motor timing revealed by tapping is more accurate in musicians than in nonmusicians.

  9. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  10. Fluctuation of biological rhythm in finger tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, H.; Miyazima, S.; Mitake, S.

    2000-06-01

    By analyzing biological rhythms obtained from finger tapping, we have investigated the differences of two biological rhythms between healthy and handicapped persons caused by Parkinson, brain infraction, car accident and so on. In this study, we have observed the motion of handedness of all subjects and obtained a slope a which characterizes a power-law relation between frequency and amplitude of finger-tapping rhythm. From our results, we have estimated that the slope a=0.06 is a rough criterion in order to distinguish healthy and handicapped persons.

  11. Density fingering of an exothermic autocatalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Bánsági, T; Horváth, D; Tóth, A; Yang, J; Kalliadasis, S; De Wit, A

    2003-11-01

    Density fingering of exothermic autocatalytic fronts in vertically oriented porous media and Hele-Shaw cells is studied theoretically for chemical reactions where the solutal and thermal contribution to density changes have opposite signs. The competition between these two effects leads to thermal plumes for ascending fronts. The descending fronts behave strikingly differently as they can feature, for some values of the parameters, fingers of constant amplitude and wavelength. The differences between up and down going fronts are discussed in terms of dispersion curves and nonlinear dynamics. The theoretically predicted dispersion curves are experimentally evidenced with the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction.

  12. Solitary plasmacytoma of the index finger.

    PubMed

    Daneshbod, Yahya; Nowshadi, Pooria Ali; Negahban, Shahrzad; Aledavood, Azita; Ramzi, Mani; Fanaie, Sara; Bedayat, Gholamreza; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Solitary osseous plasmacytoma rarely involves the distal extremities. We report a case and provide a brief review of the relevant literature. We report a 64-year-old man who presented with swelling, mild pain and a deformed right index finger. The workup led to the diagnosis of solitary osseous plasmacytoma and the patient eventually required amputation of his finger. With clinical follow-up, the disease spread to regional lymph nodes and subsequently the patient developed systemic involvement and received chemotherapy. Solitary osseous plasmacytoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of distal extremity neoplasms.

  13. Thermoregulatory control of finger blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1975-01-01

    In the present experiment, exercise was used to vary internal temperature and ambient air heat control was used to vary skin temperature. Finger temperature was fixed at about 35.7 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at different skin sites. Finger blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. An equation in these quantities is given which accounts for the data garnered.

  14. Versatile Reactivity and Theoretical Evaluation of Mono- and Dinuclear Oxidovanadium(V) Compounds of Aroylazines: Electrogeneration of Mixed-Valence Divanadium(IV,V) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dash, Subhashree P; Roy, Satabdi; Mohanty, Monalisa; Carvalho, M Fernanda N N; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Pessoa, João Costa; Kumar, Amit; Patil, Yogesh P; Crochet, Aurélien; Dinda, Rupam

    2016-09-06

    The substituted hydrazones H2L(1-4) (L(1-4) = dibasic tridentate ONO(2-) donor ligands) obtained by the condensation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and 2-aminobenzoylhydrazine (H2hnal-abhz) (H2L(1)) , 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and 2-hydroxybenzoylhydrazine (H2hnal-hbhz) (H2L(2)), 2-hydroxy-1-acetonaphthone and benzoylhydrazine (H2han-bhz) (H2L(3)), or 2-hydroxy-1-acetonaphthone and 2-aminobenzoylhydrazine (H2han-abhz) (H2L(4)) are prepared and characterized. Reaction of ammonium vanadate with the appropriate H2L(1-4) results in the formation of oxidoethoxidovanadium(V) [V(V)O(OEt)(L(1-4))] (1-4) complexes. All compounds are characterized in the solid state and in solution by spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-vis, (1)H, (13)C, and (51)V NMR, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of 1, 3, and 4 confirms the coordination of the corresponding ligands in the dianionic (ONO(2-)) enolate tautomeric form. In solution, the structurally characterized [V(V)O(OEt)(L)] compounds transform into the monooxido-bridged divanadium(V,V) [(V(V)OL)2-μ-O] complexes, with the processes being studied by IR and (1)H, (13)C, and (51)V NMR. The density functional theory (DFT) calculated Gibbs free energy of reaction 2[V(V)O(OEt)(L(4))] + H2O ⇆ [(V(V)OL(4))2-μ-O] + 2EtOH is only 2-3 kcal mol(-1), indicating that the dinuclear complexes may form in a significant amount. The electrochemical behavior of the complexes is investigated by cyclic voltammetry, with the V(V)-V(IV) E1/2(red) values being in the range 0.27-0.44 V (vs SCE). Upon controlled potential electrolysis, the corresponding (L)(O)V(IV)-O-V(V)(O)(L) mixed-valence species are obtained upon partial reduction of the [(V(V)OL)2-μ-O] complexes formed in solution, and some spectroscopic characteristics of these dinuclear mixed-valence complexes are investigated using DFT calculations and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), with the formation of V(IV)-O-V(V) species being

  15. Synthesis of a highly reactive form of WO2Cl2, its conversion into nanocrystalline mono-hydrated WO3 and coordination compounds with tetramethylurea.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Marco; Evangelisti, Claudio; Marchetti, Fabio; Pampaloni, Guido; Piccinelli, Fabio; Zacchini, Stefano

    2016-10-21

    A new form of WO2Cl2 was obtained by modification of a literature procedure. Both the newly prepared WO2Cl2 and the commercial yellow WO2Cl2 exhibited an orthorhombic structure (powder X-ray diffraction, P-XRD), and their air exposure at room temperature afforded light green and lemon yellow WO3·H2O (orthorhombic phase), respectively. These materials were characterized by P-XRD, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (S-TEM). The analyses revealed the nanocrystalline nature of light green WO3·H2O, and the prevalent amorphism of lemon yellow WO3·H2O. The reactions of grey WO2Cl2 with one and two equivalents of tetramethylurea (tmu), in CH2Cl2 at room temperature, led to the isolation of the trinuclear complex [WO2Cl2(tmu)]3, 1 (45% yield), and the mononuclear one WO2Cl2(tmu)2, 2 (64%), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 were fully characterized by analytical and spectroscopic methods, single crystal X-ray diffraction (SC-XRD) and DFT calculations.

  16. Organic compounds in tire particle induce reactive oxygen species and heat-shock proteins in the human alveolar cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Maurizio; Mantecca, Paride; Cetta, Francesco; Camatini, Marina

    2008-05-01

    Debris produced from the attrition of tires of motor vehicles constitutes 5-7% of the atmospheric particulate matter (PM10). Debris particles are indeed small enough to enter human lung and thus morphological and chemical characterization has been performed. We demonstrated that the organic fraction of tire debris induces a dose-dependent increase in cell mortality, DNA damage, as well as a significant modification of cell morphology at the dose of 60 microg/ml, which may correspond to the quantity present in the air humans inhale daily. The present research aims at investigating if reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and Hsp70 expression are involved in the cascade of toxic effects produced on the A549 cell line, as it has been suggested for the ultrafine atmospheric particles and diesel exhaust. To this end, cells were exposed at the doses of 10, 50, 60, 75 microg/ml of TD organic extract (TDOE) and analyzed at different exposure time. ROS were detected by the oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate to dichlorofluorescein, and fluorescence was measured by flow cytometry. Hsp70 protein expression was determined by immunochemical analysis, and protein expression quantification performed by optical densitometry. ROS production was analysed after 2 h of treatment. A statistically significant increase in fluorescence was observed and the intensity of the stress response was parallel to the increasing concentrations used. An evident increase of Hsp70 expression at lower doses (10, 50 microg/ml) and at longer exposure times (72 h) was observed, during the time that our previous studies showed that cell viability, plasma membrane integrity, and DNA molecules were not affected. Thus it can be deduced that the increase in Hsp70 expression protected the cells from those damages, which became evident at the higher doses, and that this parameter might be used as a sensitive indicator of exposure. These data suggest that ROS production may be the first

  17. Double-V block fingers with cruciform recess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.

    1993-01-01

    In a robot having a gripper including a pair of fingers and a drive motor for driving the fingers toward and away from one another while the fingers remain parallel to each other, the fingers consist of finger pads, which interface with a handle on an object to be grasped, and a shank, which attaches the fingers to the robot gripper. The double-V finger has two orthogonal V-grooves forming in the center of the finger pads and recessed cruciform. The double-V finger is used with a handle on the object to be grasped which is the negative of the finger pads. The handle face consists of V-shaped pads capped with a rectangular cruciform. As the gripper is brought into place near the handle, the finger pads are lined up facing the handle pads. When the finger pad and the handle pad are in proper alignment, the rectangular ridges on the handle fall inside the rectangular grooves on the finger, and the grip is complete.

  18. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    7.9) near the optimal value of pKa - 8. This compound is the best nonqua- ternary AChE reactivator studied to date 5-Hydroxyiminomethyl-3-phenyl-l,2,4...activities under different reaction conditions and at different time points. The values determined were: Ao - uninhibited AChE activity At - AChE...uninhibited) values . The effect of AChE level on reactivation rates indicates that reinhi- bition of the enzyme by phosphonyl oxime [reaction (14)] was

  19. Reactivity of C,N-chelated organoboron compounds with lithium anilides--formation of unexpected 1,2,3-trisubstituted 1H-2,1-benzazaboroles.

    PubMed

    Hejda, Martin; Lyčka, Antonín; Jambor, Roman; Růžička, Aleš; Dostál, Libor

    2013-05-14

    A set of C,N-intramolecularly coordinated boranes containing various C,N-chelating ligands L(1-3) (where L(1) = [o-(CH=NtBu)C6H4], L(2) = [o-(CH=N-2,6-iPr2C6H3)C6H4], L(3) = [o-(CH2NMe2)C6H4]); L(1-3)BCl2 (for 1 L = L(1), for 2 L = L(2), for 5 L = L(3)), L(1)BPhCl (3) and L(1)BCy2 (4) (where Cy = cyclohexyl) were synthesized and fully characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and in cases of 1 and 3-5 by the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The reaction of with the anilides ArNHLi (Ar = 2,6-Me2C6H3 or 2,6-iPr2C6H3) proceeded via unexpected addition of anilide across the C=N bond yielding 1,2,3-trisubstituted 1H-2,1-benzazaboroles 6-11, whose structures were unambiguously established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis (except for 11) and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. In contrast, compounds 4 and 5 were inert towards ArNHLi. The investigation dealing with the reaction mechanism between the parent boranes 1-3 and ArNHLi revealed that amidolithiation of the C=N double bond involved in the ligand backbones is the crucial step of the whole reaction. The C=N double bond in 1-3 is activated by its coordination to the ortho bonded Lewis acidic boron center, which was also proven by the fact that the non-substituted ligand L(1)H did not react with ArNHLi under the same reaction conditions in an analogous reaction.

  20. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L. |; Lowe, K.S.; Murdoch, L.D. |; Slack, W.W.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies.

  1. Compact Tactile Sensors for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.; Lussy, David; Gaudiano, Frank; Hulse, Aaron; Diftler, Myron A.; Rodriguez, Dagoberto; Bielski, Paul; Butzer, Melisa

    2004-01-01

    Compact transducer arrays that measure spatial distributions of force or pressure have been demonstrated as prototypes of tactile sensors to be mounted on fingers and palms of dexterous robot hands. The pressure- or force-distribution feedback provided by these sensors is essential for the further development and implementation of robot-control capabilities for humanlike grasping and manipulation.

  2. PN 2017-24: Finger Lakes LPG

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Finger Lakes LPG Storage, LLC; Two Brush Creek Blvd, Suite 200; Kansas City; Missouri 64112 (Applicant) has applied to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f et. seq (the Act), for

  3. Viscous fingering of HCI through gastric mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, K. Ramakrishnan; Garik, Peter; Turner, Bradley S.; Bradley, James Douglas; Bansil, Rama; Stanley, H. Eugene; Lamont, J. Thomas

    1992-12-01

    THE HCI in the mammalian stomach is concentrated enough to digest the stomach itself, yet the gastric epithelium remains undamaged. One protective factor is gastric mucus, which forms a protective layer over the surface epithelium1-4 and acts as a diffusion barrier5,6 Bicarbonate ions secreted by the gastric epithelium7 are trapped in the mucus gel, establishing a gradient from pH 1-2 at the lumen to pH 6-7 at the cell surface8-10. How does HCI, secreted at the base of gastric glands by parietal cells, traverse the mucus layer without acidifying it? Here we demonstrate that injection of HCI through solutions of pig gastric mucin produces viscous fingering patterns11-18 dependent on pH, mucin concentration and acid flow rate. Above pH 4, discrete fingers are observed, whereas below pH 4, HCI neither penetrates the mucin solution nor forms fingers. Our in vitro results suggest that HCI secreted by the gastric gland can penetrate the mucus gel layer (pH 5-7) through narrow fingers, whereas HC1 in the lumen (pH 2) is prevented from diffusing back to the epithelium by the high viscosity of gastric mucus gel on the luminal side.

  4. Fingering and fracturing in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, R.; Holtzman, R.; Szulczewski, M.

    2012-12-01

    Here, we describe the phenomenon of capillary fracturing in granular media. We study the displacement of immiscible fluids in deformable, non-cohesive granular media. Experimentally, we inject air into a thin bed of water-saturated glass beads and observe the invasion morphology. The control parameters are the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. We identify three invasion regimes: capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and "capillary fracturing", where capillary forces overcome frictional resistance and induce the opening of conduits. We derive two dimensionless numbers that govern the transition among the different regimes: a modified capillary number and a fracturing number. The experiments and analysis predict the emergence of fracturing in fine-grained media under low confining stress, a phenomenon that likely plays a fundamental role in many natural processes such as primary oil migration, methane venting from lake sediments, and the formation of desiccation cracks.Examples of experimentally observed patterns. We classify these patterns into three regimes: viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and fracturing.

  5. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  6. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  7. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger Lakes. 9.34 Section 9.34 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34...

  8. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  9. Prediction of zinc finger DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K

    1995-04-01

    Using the neural network algorithm with back-propagation training procedure, we analysed the zinc finger DNA binding protein sequences. We incorporated the characteristic patterns around the zinc finger motifs TFIIIA type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-13-His-X2-5-His) and the steroid hormone receptor type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-15-Cys-X2-5-Cys-X15-16-Cys-X4-5-Cys-X8-10- Cys-X2-3-Cys) in the neural network algorithm. The patterns used in the neural network were the amino acid pattern, the electric charge and polarity pattern, the side-chain chemical property and subproperty patterns, the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity patterns and the secondary structure propensity pattern. Two consecutive patterns were also considered. Each pattern was incorporated in the single layer perceptron algorithm and the combinations of patterns were considered in the two-layer perceptron algorithm. As for the TFIIIA type zinc finger DNA binding motifs, the prediction results of the two-layer perceptron algorithm reached up to 96.9% discrimination, and the prediction results of the discriminant analysis using the combination of several characters reached up to 97.0%. As for the steroid hormone receptor type zinc finger, the prediction results of neural network algorithm and the discriminant analyses reached up to 96.0%.

  10. Sticky fingers: Adhesive properties of human fingertips.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Marlene; Wiechert, Anke B; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-02-29

    Fingertip friction is a rather well studied subject. Although the phenomenon of finger stickiness is known as well, the pull-off force and the adhesive strength of human finger tips have never been previously quantified. For the first time, we provided here characterization of adhesive properties of human fingers under natural conditions. Human fingers can generate a maximum adhesive force of 15mN on a smooth surface of epoxy resin. A weak correlation of the adhesive force and the normal force was found on all test surfaces. Up to 300mN load, an increase of the normal force leads to an increase of the adhesive force. On rough surfaces, the adhesive strength is significantly reduced. Our data collected from untreated hands give also an impression of an enormous scattering of digital adhesion depending on a large set of inter-subject variability and time-dependent individual factors (skin texture, moisture level, perspiration). The wide inter- and intra-individual range of digital adhesion should be considered in developing of technical and medical products.

  11. Transdermal anaesthesia for percutaneous trigger finger release.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficiency of transdermal anaesthesia using eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) in patients undergoing percutaneous trigger finger release and to compare it with lidocaine infiltration. In this prospective, randomised study percutaneous release of the A1 annular pulley was performed to treat stenosing tenosynovitis (trigger finger syndrome) in 50 patients (50 fingers). The procedure was performed either under transdermal anaesthesia using EMLA applied transcutaneously 120 minutes prior to the operation (Group A, n = 25) or using local infiltration anaesthesia using lidocaine (Group B, n = 25). Pain experienced during administration of anaesthesia and during the operation was assessed using a 10-point Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS), while all patients rated the effectiveness of anaesthesia with a 5-point scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the VAPS during the operation (1.33 +/- 0.52 versus 1.59 +/- 0.87) and the satisfaction scores (4.6 +/- 0.2 versus 4.4 +/- 0.3). The VAPS score during the administration of anaesthesia was statistically significantly less in the EMLA group (0 versus 5.96 +/- 2.41). All patients were satisfied with the final result of the operation. Percutaneous trigger finger release can be performed as an office procedure with the use of EMLA avoiding the use of injectable local infiltration anaesthesia.

  12. Layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reali, J. F.; Garaud, P.; Alsinan, A.; Meiburg, E.

    2017-04-01

    When particles settle through a stable temperature or salinity gradient they can drive an instability known as sedimentary fingering convection. This phenomenon is thought to occur beneath sediment-rich river plumes in lakes and oceans, in the context of marine snow where decaying organic materials serve as the suspended particles, or in the atmosphere in the presence of aerosols or volcanic ash. Laboratory experiments of Houk and Green (1973) and Green (1987) have shown sedimentary fingering convection to be similar to the more commonly known thermohaline fingering convection in many ways. Here, we study the phenomenon using 3D direct numerical simulations. We find evidence for layer formation in sedimentary fingering convection in regions of parameter space where it does not occur for non-sedimentary systems. This is due to two complementary effects. Sedimentation affects the turbulent fluxes and broadens the region of parameter space unstable to the $\\gamma$-instability (Radko 2003) to include systems at larger density ratios. It also gives rise to a new layering instability that exists in $\\gamma-$stable regimes. The former is likely quite ubiquitous in geophysical systems for sufficiently large settling velocities, while the latter probably grows too slowly to be relevant, at least in the context of sediments in water.

  13. Fingerspell: Let Your Fingers Do the Talking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarlatos, Tony; Nesterenko, Dmitri

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss an application that translates hand gestures of the American Sign Language (ASL) alphabet and converts them to text. The FingerSpell application addresses the communication barrier of the deaf and the hearing-impaired by eliminating the need for a third party with knowledge of the American Sign Language, allowing a user…

  14. Fingering phenomena during grain-grain displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, Nathália M. P.; Paiva, Humberto A.; Combe, G.; Atman, A. P. F.

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous formation of fingered patterns during the displacement of dense granular assemblies was experimentally reported few years ago, in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. Here, by means of discrete element simulations, we have recovered the experimental findings and extended the original study to explore the control parameters space. In particular, using assemblies of grains with different geometries (monodisperse, bidisperse, or polydisperse), we measured the macroscopic stress tensor in the samples in order to confirm some conjectures proposed in analogy with Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering phenomena for immiscible fluids. Considering an axial setup which allows to control the discharge of grains and to follow the trajectory and the pressure gradient along the displacing interface, we have applied the Darcy law for laminar flow in fluids in order to measure an "effective viscosity" for each assembly combination, in an attempt to mimic variation of the viscosity ratio between the injected/displaced fluids in the Saffman-Taylor experiment. The results corroborate the analogy with the viscous fluids displacement, with the bidisperse assembly corresponding to the less viscous geometry. But, differently to fluid case, granular fingers only develop for a specific combination of displaced/injected geometries, and we have demonstrated that it is always related with the formation of a force chain network along the finger direction.

  15. Coriolis effects on fingering patterns under rotation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Gadêlha, Hermes; Miranda, José A

    2008-08-01

    The development of immiscible viscous fingering patterns in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell is investigated. We focus on understanding how the time evolution and the resulting morphologies are affected by the action of the Coriolis force. The problem is approached analytically and numerically by employing a vortex sheet formalism. The vortex sheet strength and a linear dispersion relation are derived analytically, revealing that the most relevant Coriolis force contribution comes from the normal component of the averaged interfacial velocity. It is shown that this normal velocity, uniquely due to the presence of the Coriolis force, is responsible for the complex-valued nature of the linear dispersion relation making the linear phases vary with time. Fully nonlinear stages are studied through intensive numerical simulations. A suggestive interplay between inertial and viscous effects is found, which modifies the dynamics, leading to different pattern-forming structures. The inertial Coriolis contribution plays a characteristic role: it generates a phase drift by deviating the fingers in the sense opposite to the actual rotation of the cell. However, the direction and intensity of finger bending is predominantly determined by viscous effects, being sensitive to changes in the magnitude and sign of the viscosity contrast. The finger competition behavior at advanced time stages is also discussed.

  16. [Management of peripheral injuries of the finger].

    PubMed

    Wichelhaus, A

    2015-02-01

    The treatment of acute peripheral finger injuries is part of the daily routine of surgeons in emergency departments. This article presents the most common forms of peripheral finger injuries and the specific diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. The injuries include incision and tear injuries, injuries to the nailbed, distal extensor tendon injuries, severed flexor tendons of the distal joint, bite injuries, high-pressure injection injuries and amputation injuries of the distal phalanx of fingers. For the latter, the form, level and height of the amputation are decisive for therapy. Soft tissue defects on the extensor and flexor side of the finger are also common for emergency surgeons. The basic principles of the initial management of peripheral soft tissue injuries of the hand involve the reconstruction of tendons and nerves and soft tissue coverage. Pathogenic organisms are detectable in more than 80 % of bite wounds so that prophylaxis and therapy of infections are of special importance. An adjuvant antibiotic therapy is necessary for infections as well as for high-pressure injection injuries. It is also important for the treating physician to recognize when a hand surgeon must be involved.

  17. Generation of albino Xenopus tropicalis using zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Keisuke; Nakajima, Taeko; Takase, Minoru; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2012-12-01

    To generate albino lines of Xenopus tropicalis, we injected fertilized eggs with mRNAs encoding zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) targeting the tyrosinase coding region. Surprisingly, vitiligo was observed on the skin of F0 frogs that had been injected with ZFN mRNAs, indicating that both tyrosinase genes in the genome were disrupted in all melanocytes within the vitiligo patches. Mutation analysis using genomic DNA from the skin revealed that two mosaic F0 frogs underwent spatially complex tyrosinase gene mutations. The data implies that the ZFN-induced tyrosinase gene ablations occurred randomly over space and time throughout the entire body, possibly until the young tadpole stage, and that melanocyte precursors lacking functional tyrosinase proliferated and formed vitiligo patches. Several albino X. tropicalis, which are compound heterozygotes for biallelic tyrosinase mutations, were obtained by mating the mosaic F0 frogs. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the albino vertebrates generated by the targeted gene knockout.

  18. Robot-assisted Guitar Hero for finger rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Wolbrecht, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (-3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n= 8) and without impairment (n= 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject's success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject's effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke.

  19. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device...

  1. Robot-Assisted Guitar Hero for Finger Rehabilitation after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Hossein; Rowe, Justin B.; Gardner, David; Chan, Vicky; Reinkensmeyer, David J.; Wolbrecht, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a robotic device for finger therapy after stroke: FINGER (Finger Individuating Grasp Exercise Robot). FINGER makes use of stacked single degree-of-freedom mechanisms to assist subjects in moving individual fingers in a naturalistic grasping pattern through much of their full range of motion. The device has a high bandwidth of control (−3dB at approximately 8 Hz) and is backdriveable. These characteristics make it capable of assisting in grasping tasks that require precise timing. We therefore used FINGER to assist individuals with a stroke (n = 8) and without impairment (n = 4) in playing a game similar to Guitar Hero©. The subjects attempted to move their fingers to target positions at times specified by notes that were graphically streamed to popular music. We show here that by automatically adjusting the robot gains, it is possible to use FINGER to modulate the subject’s success rate at the game, across a range of impairment levels. Modulating success rates did not alter the stroke subject’s effort, although the unimpaired subjects exerted more force when they were made less successful. We also present a novel measure of finger individuation that can be assessed as individuals play Guitar Hero with FINGER. The results demonstrate the ability of FINGER to provide controlled levels of assistance during an engaging computer game, and to quantify finger individuation after stroke. PMID:23366783

  2. Pressure Balanced, Low Hysteresis Finger Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Gul K.; Proctor, Margaret; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate: low cost photoetching fabrication technique; pressure balanced finger seal design; and finger seal operation. The tests and analyses includes: finger seal air leakage analysis; rotor-run out and endurance tests; and extensive analytical work and rig testing.

  3. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3230 - Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. 888... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3230 Finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis. (a) Identification. A finger joint polymer constrained prosthesis is a device intended...

  6. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger.

  7. Rapid on-plate and one-pot derivatization of carbonyl compounds for enhanced detection by reactive matrix LDI-TOF MS using the tailor-made reactive matrix, 4-dimethylamino-6-(4-methoxy-1-naphthyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2-hydrazine (DMNTH).

    PubMed

    Mugo, Samuel M; Bottaro, Christina S

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a very sensitive and economical high-throughput methodology has been developed for the analysis of small carbonyl compounds using rapid derivatization with 4-dimethylamino-6-(4-methoxy-1-naphthyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2-hydrazine (DMNTH), a derivatizing agent developed by the Karst group at the University of Münster. DMNTH is highly ionizable by the UV laser and reacts selectively and rapidly with carbonyl moieties. The resulting hydrazone is easily detectable by laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS), eliminating the need for the matrix assisted variant (MALDI) and the associated issue of matrix optimization, which greatly simplifies the analysis. It has been demonstrated that a range of carbonyl compounds can be conveniently analyzed by this reactive matrix LDI-TOF MS (RM-LDI-TOF MS) procedure and that furfural DMNThydrazone (prior labeled and labeled in situ) can be used as an internal standard for semiquantitative analysis. Amounts as low as 0.5 ng ml(-1) of 4-methoxybenzaldehyde have been detected using a one-pot derivatization methodology. Rapid on-plate derivatization was also found to be a simple approach for fast and reliable screening of various analytes, although with slightly higher detection limits. To test its applicability in complex matrices, analysis of furfural spiked in beer has been demonstrated. This RM-LDI-TOF MS method shows considerable promise for the analysis of carbonyl compounds in water, particularly for disinfection by-products that result from reaction of natural organic matter with oxidative disinfectants.

  8. Skin microvascular reactivity in patients with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Mihor, Ana; Gergar, Maša; Gaberšček, Simona; Lenasi, Helena

    2016-11-04

    Hypothyroidism is associated with impaired vascular function; however, little is known about its impact on microcirculation. We aimed to determine skin microvascular reactivity in hypothyroidism focusing on endothelial function and the sympathetic response. We measured skin laser Doppler (LD) flux (LDF) on the volar forearm and the finger pulp using LD flowmetry in hypothyroid patients (N = 13) and healthy controls (N = 15). Skin microvascular reactivity was assessed by a three-minute occlusion of the brachial artery, inducing postocclusive reactive hyperaemia (PRH), and by a four-minute local cooling of the hand. An electrocardiogram (ECG), digital artery blood pressure and skin temperature at the measuring sites were recorded. Baseline LDF, the digital artery blood pressure and the heart rate were comparable between patients and controls. On the other hand, patients exhibited significantly longer PRH duration, significantly higher blood pressure during cooling (unpaired t-test, p <0.05) and lower, albeit not significant, LDF in the ipsilateral finger pulp during cooling compared to controls. Unexpectedly, the results of the present study point to an increased vasodilator capacity of skin microcirculation and an apparent increase in sympathetic reactivity after local cooling in hypothyroid patients. Hypothyroidism induces subtle changes of some haemodynamic parameters in skin microcirculation implying altered endothelial function and altered sympathetic reactivity.

  9. Acute effects of force and vibration on finger blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Bovenzi, M; Welsh, A J L; Vedova, A Della; Griffin, M J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of contact force at the finger on acute changes in finger circulation during exposure to vibration. Methods Each of 10 subjects attended 11 sessions in which they experienced five successive experimental 5‐minute periods: (i) no force and no vibration; (ii) force and no vibration; (iii) force and vibration; (iv) force and no vibration; (v) no force and no vibration. During periods (ii) to (iv), the intermediate phalanx of the right middle finger applied one of two forces (2 N or 5 N) on a platform that vibrated during period (iii) at one of two frequencies: 31.5 Hz (at 4 or 16 ms−2 r.m.s.) or 125 Hz (at 16 or 64 ms−2 r.m.s.). Finger blood flow was measured in the exposed right middle finger, the unexposed right little finger, and the unexposed left middle fingers throughout the 25 minutes of each session. Results The application of force alone caused a reduction in finger blood flow in the exposed finger, but not other fingers. There were additional reductions in finger blood flow caused by vibration, with greater reductions at the higher vibration magnitudes at both frequencies but no difference between the two frequencies when using unweighted acceleration. The vibration caused a similar vasoconstriction in vibrated and non‐vibrated fingers. Conclusions Modest levels of force applied by a finger can have a large effect on the finger blood flow, possibly due to the constriction of local blood vessels. The acute vascular effects of vibration cause additional reductions in finger blood flow that are not limited to the finger experiencing force and vibration. In all fingers (exposed and not exposed to vibration), the greater the magnitude of vibration, the greater the reduction in finger blood flow. In all fingers (exposed and not exposed to vibration), when the vibration was frequency weighted according to current standards, 125 Hz vibration caused greater reductions in finger blood flow than 31.5

  10. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    PubMed Central

    van den Noort, Josien C.; van Beek, Nathalie; van der Kraan, Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instructed fingers) and range of independent finger movement through the whole finger flexion trajectory in single and multi-finger movement tasks. Thirteen young healthy subjects performed single- and multi-finger movement tasks under two conditions: active flexion through the full range of movement with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed finger(s) were restrained. Finger kinematics were measured using inertial sensors (PowerGlove), to assess enslaving and range of independent finger movement. Although all fingers showed enslaving movement to some extent, highest enslaving was found in adjacent fingers. Enslaving effects in ring and little finger were increased with movement of additional, non-adjacent fingers. The middle finger was the only finger affected by restriction in movement of non-instructed fingers. Each finger showed a range of independent movement before the non-instructed fingers started to move, which was largest for the index finger. The start of enslaving was asymmetrical for adjacent fingers. Little finger enslaving movement was affected by multi-finger movement. We conclude that no finger can move independently through the full range of finger flexion, although some degree of full independence is present for smaller movements. This range of independent movement is asymmetric and variable between fingers and between subjects. The presented results provide insight into the role of finger independency for different types of tasks and populations. PMID:27992598

  11. Effect of room temperature on tests for diagnosing vibration-induced white finger: finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ying; Griffin, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of room temperature on two standard tests used to assist the diagnosis of vibration-induced white finger (VWF): finger rewarming times and finger systolic blood pressures. Twelve healthy males and twelve healthy females participated in four sessions to obtain either finger skin temperatures (FSTs) during cooling and rewarming of the hand or finger systolic blood pressures (FSBPs) after local cooling of the fingers to 15 and 10 °C. The measures were obtained with the room temperature at either 20 or 28 °C. There were lower baseline finger skin temperatures, longer finger rewarming times, and lower finger systolic blood pressures with the room temperature at 20 than 28 °C. However, percentage reductions in FSBP at 15 and 10 °C relative to 30 °C (i.e. %FSBP) did not differ between the two room temperatures. Females had lower baseline FSTs, longer rewarming times, and lower FSBPs than males, but %FSBPs were similar in males and females. Finger rewarming times after cold provocation are heavily influenced by room temperature and gender. For evaluating peripheral circulatory function using finger rewarming times, the room temperature must be strictly controlled, and a different diagnostic criterion is required for females. The calculation of percentage changes in finger systolic blood pressure at 15 and 10 °C relative to 30 °C reduces effects of both room temperature and gender, and the test may be used in conditions where the ±1 °C tolerance on room temperature required by the current standard cannot be achieved.

  12. Analysis of prosody in finger braille using electromyography.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Manabi; Nishida, Masafumi; Horiuchi, Yasuo; Ichikawa, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Finger braille is one of the communication methods for the deaf blind. The interpreter types braille codes on the fingers of deaf blind. Finger braille seems to be the most suitable medium for real-time communication by its speed and accuracy of transmitting characters. We hypothesize that the prosody information exists in the time structure and strength of finger braille typing. Prosody is the paralinguistic information that has functions to transmit the sentence structure, prominence, emotions and other form of information in real time communication. In this study, we measured the surface electromyography (sEMG) of finger movement to analyze the typing strength of finger braille. We found that the typing strength increases at the beginning of a phrase and a prominent phrase. The result shows the possibility that the prosody in the typing strength of finger braille can be applied to create an interpreter system for the deafblind.

  13. Reactivity of niobium(v) and tantalum(v) halides with carbonyl compounds: synthesis of simple coordination adducts, C-H bond activation, C=O protonation, and halide transfer.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Fabio; Pampaloni, Guido; Zacchini, Stefano

    2007-10-10

    The metal halides of Group 5 MX(5) (M = Nb, Ta; X = F, Cl, Br) react with ketones and acetylacetones affording the octahedral complexes [MX(5)(ketone)] () and [TaX(4){kappa(2)(O)-OC(Me)C(R)C(Me)O}] (R = H, Me, ), respectively. The adducts [MX(5)(acetone)] are still reactive towards acetone, acetophenone or benzophenone, giving the aldolate species [MX(4){kappa(2)(O)-OC(Me)CH(2)C(R)(R')O}] (). The syntheses of (M = Ta, X = F, R = R' = Ph) and (M = Ta, X = Cl, R = Me, R' = Ph) take place with concomitant formation of [(Ph(2)CO)(2)-H][TaF(6)], and [(MePhCO)(2)-H][TaCl(6)], respectively. The compounds [acacH(2)][TaF(6)], and [TaF{OC(Me)C(Me)C(Me)O}(3)][TaF(6)], have been isolated as by-products in the reactions of TaF(5) with acacH and 3-methyl-2,4-pentanedione, respectively. The molecular structures of, and have been ascertained by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  14. Nylon-muscle-actuated robotic finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianjun; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Rome, Richard S.; Haines, Carter; Lima, Marcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental analysis of novel artificial muscles, made of twisted and coiled nylon fibers, for powering a biomimetic robotic hand. The design is based on circulating hot and cold water to actuate the artificial muscles and obtain fast finger movements. The actuation system consists of a spring and a coiled muscle within a compliant silicone tube. The silicone tube provides a watertight, expansible compartment within which the coiled muscle contracts when heated and expands when cooled. The fabrication and characterization of the actuating system are discussed in detail. The performance of the coiled muscle fiber in embedded conditions and the related characteristics of the actuated robotic finger are described.

  15. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  16. [Periarthritis calcarea of the finger joints].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Goth, D

    1989-11-01

    Calcium deposits close to finger joints are seen very often and are common in systemic diseases. There are also calcium deposits with no relation to other symptoms and therefore diagnosis is difficult. Between 1984-1988 we have analysed twelve such cases and explained the differential diagnosis and therapy. It seems important that these cases with typical clinical and radiologic findings are self-limiting and restitutio ad integrum is common without any therapy.

  17. Low-Friction Joint for Robot Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical linkage allows adjacent parts to move relative to each other with low friction and with no chatter, slipping, or backlash. Low-friction joint of two surfaces in rolling contact, held in alinement by taut flexible bands. No sliding friction or "stick-slip" motion: Only rolling-contact and bending friction within bands. Proposed linkage intended for finger joints in mechanical hands for robots and manipulators.

  18. The influence of cholinergic agents on histamine release from HMC-1 human mast cell line stimulated with IgG, C-reactive protein and compound 48/80.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Peter G; Pronina, Anastasia P

    2012-11-27

    The aim of this work is to study the role of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (AChRs) in the regulation of FcγR activity in human mast cells (MC) activated by aggregated IgG (aIgG) and CRP. MC, the key regulators at the interface of innate and acquired immunity, have abundant Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRII) which indicate the role of their ligands, IgG and C-reactive protein (CRP), in regulating MC activity. Cholinergic control of FcγR-dependent MC functions is poorly defined. HMC-1 culture of human MC; cell incubations with cholinergic drugs and FcγR ligands such as heat aggregated human IgG or purified human CRP; compound 48/80, a known histamine liberator employing G protein-coupled receptors, was used as a positive control of MC degranulation; assessment of histamine release. Both nAChR and mAChR antagonists (hexamethonium and methacine, respectively), per se, elevated histamine-releasing activity of the HMC-1 and suppressed the MC responses to most of investigated activators (carbachol, compound 48/80, and to a lesser extent aIgG). Two blockers together should be applied to aIgG-stimulated cells in order to obtain appreciable suppression of histamine release. The FcγR-mediated HMC-1 cell response to CRP was the least sensitive to attenuation by ACh signaling. The data obtained suggest the involvement of ACh in the functioning of other receptor systems. Our results indicate that AChRs are closely associated with G protein-coupled receptor-induced reactions of MC and optionally with FcγR-dependent functions. The data presented demonstrate that AChRs and endogenous ACh are involved in regulating mast cell degranulation and histamine release by affecting the functions of receptors to compound 48/80 and, less, FcγRs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-finger Prehension: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the available experimental evidence on what people do when they grasp an object with several digits and then manipulate it. In addition to the Introduction, the paper includes three parts each addressing a specific aspect of multi-finger prehension. Part II discusses manipulation forces, i.e. the resultant force and moment of force exerted on the object, and the digits contribution to such force production. Part III deals with internal forces defined as forces that cancel each other and do not disturb object equilibrium. The role of the internal forces in maintaining the object stability is discussed with respect to such issues as slip prevention, tilt prevention and resistance to perturbations. Part IV is devoted to the motor control of prehension. It covers such topics as prehension synergies, chain effects, the principle of superposition, inter-finger connection matrices and reconstruction of neural commands, mechanical advantage of the fingers, and the simultaneous digit adjustment to several mutually reinforcing or conflicting demands. PMID:18782719

  20. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze.

    PubMed

    Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Thornton, Ian M; Smith, Irene J; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-03-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints.

  1. Visual Foraging With Fingers and Eye Gaze

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ian M.; Smith, Irene J.; Chetverikov, Andrey; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-01-01

    A popular model of the function of selective visual attention involves search where a single target is to be found among distractors. For many scenarios, a more realistic model involves search for multiple targets of various types, since natural tasks typically do not involve a single target. Here we present results from a novel multiple-target foraging paradigm. We compare finger foraging where observers cancel a set of predesignated targets by tapping them, to gaze foraging where observers cancel items by fixating them for 100 ms. During finger foraging, for most observers, there was a large difference between foraging based on a single feature, where observers switch easily between target types, and foraging based on a conjunction of features where observers tended to stick to one target type. The pattern was notably different during gaze foraging where these condition differences were smaller. Two conclusions follow: (a) The fact that a sizeable number of observers (in particular during gaze foraging) had little trouble switching between different target types raises challenges for many prominent theoretical accounts of visual attention and working memory. (b) While caveats must be noted for the comparison of gaze and finger foraging, the results suggest that selection mechanisms for gaze and pointing have different operational constraints. PMID:27433323

  2. Measurement of finger joint angles and maximum finger forces during cylinder grip activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Rim, K

    1991-03-01

    Finger joint angles and finger forces during maximal cylindrical grasping were measured using multi-camera photogrammetry and pressure-sensitive sheets, respectively. The experimental data were collected from four healthy subjects gripping cylinders of five different sizes. For joint angles, an image analysis system was used to digitize slides showing markers. During the calibration of the camera system, both the nonlinear least square and the direct linear transform methods were applied and compared, the former providing the fewer errors; it was used to determine joint angles. Data were collected from the pressure-sensitive grip films by using the same image analysis system as used in the collection of the joint angle data. The method of using pressure-sensitive sheets provided an estimation of the weighted centre of the phalangeal forces. Results indicate that finger flexion angles at the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints gradually increase as cylinder diameter decreases, but that at the distal interphalangeal joint the angle remains constant throughout all cylinder sizes. It was also found that most of the radio-ulnar deviation and the axial rotation angles at the finger joints deviate from zero, but the deviations are small. For the force measurement, it was found that total finger force increases as cylinder size decreases, and the phalangeal force centres are not located at the mid-points of the phalanges. The data obtained in this experiment would be useful for muscle force predictions and for the design of handles.

  3. Distractor objects affect fingers' angular distances but not fingers' shaping during grasping.

    PubMed

    Ansuini, Caterina; Tognin, Veronica; Turella, Luca; Castiello, Umberto

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether and how hand shaping was affected by the presence of a distractor object adjacent to the to-be-grasped object. Twenty subjects were requested to reach towards and grasp a 'convex' or a 'concave' object in the presence or absence of a distractor object either of the same or different shape than the target object. Flexion/extension at the metacarpal-phalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal joints of all digits, and abduction angle between digits were measured by resistive sensors embedded in a glove. The results indicate robust interference effects at the level of reach duration and the extent of fingers' abduction angles together with changes at the level of a single joint for the thumb. No distractor effects on individual fingers' joints except for the MCP of the middle and little fingers were found. These findings suggest that the presence of distractor object affects hand shaping in terms of fingers' abduction angles, but not at the level of 'shape dependent' fingers' angular excursions. Furthermore, they support the importance of the thumb for the guidance of selective reach-to-grasp movements. We discuss these results in the context of current theories proposed to explain the object selection processes underlying the control of hand action.

  4. The creation of the artificial RING finger from the cross-brace zinc finger by {alpha}-helical region substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Kazuhide; Togiya, Kayo

    2010-04-16

    The creation of the artificial RING finger as ubiquitin-ligating enzyme (E3) has been demonstrated. In this study, by the {alpha}-helical region substitution between the EL5 RING finger and the Williams-Beuren syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) PHD finger, the artificial E3 (WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger) was newly created. The experiments of the chemical modification of residues Cys and the circular dichroism spectra revealed that the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger binds two zinc atoms and adopts the zinc-dependent ordered-structure. In the substrate-independent ubiquitination assay, the WSTF PHD{sub R}ING finger functions as E3 and was poly- or mono-ubiquitinated. The present strategy is very simple and convenient, and consequently it might be widely applicable to the creation of various artificial E3 RING fingers with the specific ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2)-binding capability.

  5. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  6. Cloning and characterization of a novel human gene encoding a zinc finger protein with 25 fingers.

    PubMed

    Li, X A; Kokame, K; Okubo, K; Shimokado, K; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyata, T; Kato, H; Yutani, C

    1999-12-23

    This study reports cloning and characterization of a human cDNA encoding a novel human zinc finger protein, ZFD25. ZFD25 cDNA is 6118 bp long and has an open reading frame of 2352 bp that encodes a 783 amino acid protein with 25 C2H2-type zinc fingers. The ZFD25 cDNA also contains a region with high sequence similarity to the Krüppel-associated box A and B domain in the 5'-untranslated region, suggesting that ZFD25 belongs to the Krüppel-associated box zinc finger protein family. The ZFD25 gene was localized to chromosome 7q11.2. Northern blot analysis showed that ZFD25 was expressed in a wide range of human organs. In cultured endothelial cells, the mRNA level was decreased upon serum starvation.

  7. Speed invariance of independent control of finger movements in pianists

    PubMed Central

    Soechting, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Independent control of finger movements characterizes skilled motor behaviors such as tool use and musical performance. The purpose of the present study was to identify the effect of movement frequency (tempo) on individuated finger movements in piano playing. Joint motion at the digits was recorded while 5 expert pianists were playing 30 excerpts from musical pieces with different fingering and key locations either at a predetermined normal tempo or as fast as possible. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis using an expectation-maximization algorithm determined three distinct patterns of finger movement coordination for a keypress with each of the index, middle, ring, and little fingers at each of the two tempi. The finger kinematics of each coordination pattern was overall similar across the tempi. Tone sequences assigned into each cluster were also similar for both tempi. A linear regression analysis determined no apparent difference in the amount of movement covariation between the striking and nonstriking fingers at both metacarpo-phalangeal and proximal-interphalangeal joints across the two tempi, which indicated no effect of tempo on independent finger movements in piano playing. In addition, the standard deviation of interkeystroke interval across strokes did not differ between the two tempi, indicating maintenance of rhythmic accuracy of keystrokes. Strong temporal constraints on finger movements during piano playing may underlie the maintained independent control of fingers over a wider range of tempi, a feature being likely to be specific to skilled pianists. PMID:22815403

  8. The role of fingers in number processing in young children

    PubMed Central

    Lafay, Anne; Thevenot, Catherine; Castel, Caroline; Fayol, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between finger counting and numerical processing in 4–7-year-old children. Children were assessed on a variety of numerical tasks and we examined the correlations between their rates of success and their frequency of finger use in a counting task. We showed that children's performance on finger pattern comparison and identification tasks did not correlate with the frequency of finger use. However, this last variable correlated with the percentages of correct responses in an enumeration task (i.e., Give-N task), even when the age of children was entered as a covariate in the analysis. Despite this correlation, we showed that some children who never used their fingers in the counting task were able to perform optimally in the enumeration task. Overall, our results support the conclusion that finger counting is useful but not necessary to develop accurate symbolic numerical skills. Moreover, our results suggest that the use of fingers in a counting task is related to the ability of children in a dynamic enumeration task but not to static tasks involving recognition or comparison of finger patterns. Therefore, it could be that the link between fingers and numbers remain circumscribed to counting tasks and do not extent to static finger montring situations. PMID:23908643

  9. Investigation on a three-cold-finger pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingjun; Chen, Houlei; Cai, Jinghui

    2015-09-01

    This paper introduces a new type of pulse tube cryocooler, three-cold-finger pulse tube cryocooler (TCFPTC), which consists of one linear compressor and three cold fingers, i.e., CFA, CFB and CFC. Those three cold fingers are driven by the linear compressor simultaneously. This paper investigates two aspects. First, it studies the mass flow distribution among the three cold fingers by varying the input electrical power. The cooling powers of the three cold fingers at constant cooling temperatures and the cooling temperatures of the three cold fingers at constant cooling powers with various input electrical powers are investigated. Secondly, the interaction among the three cold fingers is investigated by varying the heating power of any one cold finger. Generally, if the heating power applied on one cold finger increases, with its cold head temperature rising up, the cold head temperatures of the others will decrease. But, when the cooling power of CFC has been 4 W, the cold head temperature of whichever cold finger increases, the cold head temperature of CFA or CFB will seldom change if its heating power keeps constant.

  10. Influence of local vibration on finger functions of forest workers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Nakamura, K; Sato, K; Tanaka, K

    1997-07-01

    We physically examined of forest workers in the northern part of Fukushima District, Japan. The main purpose of this study was to survey the state of finger functions, especially the differences between the functions of right and left fingers of forest workers. This physical examination was conducted in winter. The items of the physical examination were hand grip strength, finger skin temperature, vibration sensation threshold, nail pressure test of the finger. Subjects were classified into A and B groups on the base of the results of the physical examination. A group is normal or slight disorder, and B group is disorder or illness. Hand grip strength was measured five times at five-second intervals. The decrease ratio of the left hand grip strength was greater than that of the right hand grip strength. Although there were significant differences among each finger of A and B groups, there were no big differences in the skin temperatures of the fingers in each group. Vibration sensation threshold was measured for II, III and IV fingers. The vibration sensation threshold of the index finger was the most sensitive and that of IV finger was the least sensitive. The vibration sensation threshold of the right fingers was more sensitive than that of the left fingers. The reaction times of the nail pressure test of the right fingers were generally faster than those of the left fingers. Forestry workers in Japan become elderly. There are big differences among the physical reactions or strengths of elderly people. Standard values for the measuring items for ageing are needed.

  11. Predicting the reactivity of adhesive starting materials

    Treesearch

    Anthony H. Conner

    1999-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are important in the production of bonded-wood products. Phenolic compounds in addition to phenol and resorcinol are potential alternative feedstocks for producing adhesives. The reactivity of a wide variety of phenolic compounds with formaldehyde was investigated using semi-empirical and ab initio computational chemistry methods...

  12. The Role of Vision in the Development of Finger-Number Interactions: Finger-Counting and Finger-Montring in Blind Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crollen, Virginie; Mahe, Rachel; Collignon, Olivier; Seron, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of the fingers may play a functional role in the development of a mature counting system. However, the role of developmental vision in the elaboration of a finger numeral representation remains unexplored. In the current study, 14 congenitally blind children and 14 matched sighted controls undertook…

  13. FINGER INTERACTION IN A THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRESSING TASK

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Shweta; Friedman, Jason; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate control of forces produced by the fingers is essential for performing object manipulation. This study examines the indices of finger interaction when accurate time profiles of force are produced in different directions, while using one of the fingers or all four fingers of the hand. We hypothesized that patterns of unintended force production among shear force components may involve features not observed in the earlier studies of vertical force production. In particular, we expected to see unintended forces generated by non-task fingers not in the direction on the instructed force but in the opposite direction as well as substantial force production in directions orthogonal to the instructed direction. We also tested a hypothesis that multi-finger synergies, quantified using the framework of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, will help reduce across-trials variance of both total force magnitude and direction. Young, healthy subjects were required to produce accurate ramps of force in five different directions by pressing on force sensors with the fingers of the right (dominant) hand. The index finger induced the smallest unintended forces in non-task fingers. The little finger showed the smallest unintended forces when it was a non-task finger. Task fingers showed substantial force production in directions orthogonal to the intended force direction. During four-finger tasks, individual force vectors typically pointed off the task direction, with these deviations nearly perfectly matched to produce a resultant force in the task direction. Multi-finger synergy indices reflected strong co-variation in the space of finger modes (commands to fingers) that reduced variability of the total force magnitude and direction across trials. The synergy indices increased in magnitude over the first 30% of the trial time and then stayed at a nearly constant level. The synergy index for stabilization of total force magnitude was higher for shear force components as

  14. Chemistry of peroxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volnov, I. I.

    1981-01-01

    The history of Soviet research from 1866 to 1967 on peroxide compounds is reviewed. This research dealt mainly with peroxide kinetics, reactivity and characteristics, peroxide production processes, and more recently with superoxides and ozonides and emphasis on the higher oxides of group 1 and 2 elements. Solid state fluidized bed synthesis and production of high purity products based on the relative solubilities of the initial, intermediate, and final compounds and elements in liquid ammonia are discussed.

  15. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  16. Experiments of periodic forcing of Saffman-Taylor fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torralba, M.; Ortín, J.; Hernández-Machado, A.; Poiré, E. Corvera

    2008-03-01

    We report on an experimental study of long normal Saffman-Taylor fingers subject to periodic forcing. The sides of the finger develop a low amplitude, long wavelength instability. We discuss the finger response in stationary and nonstationary situations, as well as the dynamics towards the stationary states. The response frequency of the instability increases with forcing frequency at low forcing frequencies, while, remarkably, it becomes independent of forcing frequency at large forcing frequencies. This implies a process of wavelength selection. These observations are in good agreement with previous numerical results reported in [Ledesma-Aguilar , Phys. Rev. E 71, 016312 (2005)]. We also study the average value of the finger width, and its fluctuations, as a function of forcing frequency. The average finger width is always smaller than the width of the steady-state finger. Fluctuations have a nonmonotonic behavior with a maximum at a particular frequency.

  17. Relation between index finger width and hand width anthropometric measures.

    PubMed

    Komandur, Sashidharan; Johnson, Peter W; Storch, Richard L; Yost, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    Measures of hand and finger anthropometry are very important for designing many hand held devices as well as understanding anthropometric effects on the operation of such devices. Many historical datasets have measured and recorded gross hand dimensions but do not often record the finer dimensions of the hand such as finger anthropometry. Knowing the size and mass of fingers across genders can be critical to the design and operation of hand held devices. In this paper we compare two empirical linear models that predicts index finger width at the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (a finger anthropometric measure) based on hand-width (hand anthropometric measure). This will be especially useful for deriving population measures of finger anthropometry from large historical data sets where only gross hand dimensions are available.

  18. Finger agnosia and cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Trotter, Jeffrey S; Hertza, Jeremy; Bell, Christopher D; Dean, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of finger agnosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to determine if level of finger agnosia was related to cognitive impairment. Finger agnosia is a sensitive measure of cerebral impairment and is associated with neurofunctional areas implicated in AD. Using a standardized and norm-referenced approach, results indicated that patients with AD evidenced significantly decreased performance on tests of bilateral finger agnosia compared with healthy age-matched controls. Finger agnosia was predictive of cognitive dysfunction on four of seven domains, including: Crystallized Language, Fluid Processing, Associative Learning, and Processing Speed. Results suggest that measures of finger agnosia, a short and simple test, may be useful in the early detection of AD.

  19. Viscous fingering and liquid crystals in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharoudiou, Ioannis

    This thesis focuses on two problems lying within the field of soft condensed matter: the viscous fingering or Saffman-Taylor instability and nematic liquid crystals in confinement. Whenever a low viscosity fluid displaces a high viscosity fluid in a porous medium, for example water pushing oil out of oil reservoirs, the interface between the two fluids is rendered unstable. Viscous fingers develop, grow and compete until a single finger spans all the way from inlet to outlet. Here, using a free energy lattice Boltzmann algorithm, we examine the Saffman-Taylor instability for two different wetting situations: (a) when neither of the two fluids wet the walls of the channel and (b) when the displacing fluids completely wets the walls. We demonstrate that curvature effects in the third dimension, which arise because of the wetting boundary conditions, can lead to a novel suppression of the instability. Recent experiments in microchannels using colloid-polymer mixtures support our findings. In the second part of the thesis we examine nematic liquid crystals confined in wedge-structured geometries. In these systems the final stable configuration of the liquid crystal system is controlled by the complex interplay between confinement, elasticity and surface anchoring. Varying the wedge opening angle this competition leads to a splay to bend transition mediated by a defect in the bulk of the wedge. Using a hybrid lattice Boltzmann algorithm we study the splay-bend transition and compare to recent experiments on {em fd} virus particles in microchannels. Our numerical results, in quantitative agreement with the experiments, enable us to predict the position of the defect as a function of opening angle, and elucidate its role in the change of director structure. This has relevance to novel energy saving, liquid crystal devices which rely on defect motion and pinning to create bistable director configurations.

  20. OH reactivity for screening crop volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannoni, N.; Gros, V.; Truong, F.; Ciuraru, R.; Lafouge, F.; Gonzaga, L.; Boissard, C.; Laville, P.; Bonsang, B.; Baisnee, D.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Durand, B.; Geudet, J. C.; Zurfluh, O.; Fanucci, O.; Loubet, B.

    2016-12-01

    Total OH reactivity is the first-order total loss rate of the hydroxyl radical in the atmosphere due to reactive molecules. The tremendous potential of measuring OH reactivity is to directly know the complete budget of reactive trace molecules in ambient air. An original approach is combining the total OH reactivity with the summed OH reactivity of trace gases measured at a field site. This serves to determine whether the composition of reactive compounds is fully understood. So far, sites characterized by opposite types of emissions have been investigated, including, forests, megacities and remote sites. Here, we apply this method to investigate agricultural crops emissions. Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) is globally one of the most diffused crop cultivation and emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wheat croplands implemented in models are affected by high uncertainty. We measured OH reactivity and reactive gases over a winter wheat cropland located in North-West Europe during June 2016. Specifically, the total OH reactivity was measured through the Comparative Reactivity Method while reactive gases as VOCs, CH4, O3, NOx were measured through a number of additional techniques, including proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) and gas chromatography (GC-FID). We will present preliminary results of our measurements.

  1. Finger Injuries in Football and Rugby.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Kate E; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-02-01

    Football and rugby athletes are at increased risk of finger injuries given the full-contact nature of these sports. Some players may return to play early with protective taping, splinting, and casting. Others require a longer rehabilitation period and prolonged time away from the field. The treating hand surgeon must weigh the benefits of early return to play for the current season and future playing career against the risks of reinjury and long-term morbidity, including post-traumatic arthritis and decreased range of motion and strength. Each player must be comprehensively assessed and managed with an individualized treatment plan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fingerprint imaging of dry finger using photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Young; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2017-03-01

    Fingerprint imaging has been widely used in biometric identification systems. This work presents a photoacoustic (PA) fingerprint imaging system that provides acoustic resolution using a pulsed laser and focused ultrasound transducer operating as a receiver. This PA system can measure dry fingers with a wide-range laser field based on the differences in the ultrasound coupling between the fingertip areas contacting and not contacting a solid plate. To demonstrate and validate the image accuracy of the PA system, PA fingerprint images were compared to images captured using a pulse-echo ultrasound system and an ink-pressed fingerprint scan.

  3. Discrimination of Finger Area of Somatosensory Cortex by NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingdi; Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji

    We carried out a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to observe the hemodynamic responses associated with cortical activation in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) by finger electrical stimulation. We examined whether NIRS can assist in investigating the somatotopic arrangement of fingers on the SI hand area. We found that although relatively low in spatial resolution, NIRS can to some extent help to discriminate the representations of thumb and ring finger on the SI hand area.

  4. A Finger Vein Identification Method Based on Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hui; Zhang, Bing; Tao, Zhigang; Wang, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    New methods for extracting vein features from finger vein image and generating templates for matching are proposed. In the algorithm for generating templates, we proposed a parameter-templates quality factor (TQF) - to measure the quality of generated templates. So that we can use fewer finger vein samples to generate templates that meet the quality requirement of identification. The recognition accuracy of using proposed methods of finger vein feature extraction and template generation strategy for identification is 97.14%.

  5. Zinc finger proteins as templates for metal ion exchange: Substitution effects on the C-finger of HIV nucleocapsid NCp7 using M(chelate) species (M=Pt, Pd, Au).

    PubMed

    de Paula, Queite A; Mangrum, John B; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2009-10-01

    The interactions of monofunctional [MCl(chelate)] compounds (M=Pt(II), Pd(II) or Au(III) and chelate=diethylenetriamine, dien or 2,2',2''-terpyridine, terpy) with the C-terminal finger of the HIV nucleocapsid NCp7 zinc finger (ZF) were studied by mass spectrometry and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In the case of [M(dien)] species, Pt(II) and Pd(II) behaved in a similar fashion with evidence of adducts caused by displacement of Pt-Cl or Pd-Cl by zinc-bound thiolate. Labilization, presumably under the influence of the strong trans influence of thiolate, resulted in loss of ligand (dien) as well as zinc ejection and formation of species with only Pd(II) or Pt(II) bound to the finger. For both Au(III) compounds the reactions were very fast and only "gold fingers" with no ancillary ligands were observed. For all terpyridine compounds ligand scrambling and metal exchange occurred with formation of [Zn(terpy)](2+). The results conform well to those proposed from the study of model Zn compounds such as N,N'-bis(2-mercapto-ethyl)-1,4-diazacycloheptanezinc(II), [Zn(bme-dach)](2). The possible structures of the adducts formed are discussed and, for Pt(II) and Pd(II), the evidence for possible expansion of the zinc coordination sphere from four- to five-coordinate is discussed. This observation reinforces the possibility of change in geometry for zinc in biology, even in common "structural" sites in metalloenzymes. The results further show that the extent and rate of zinc displacement by inorganic compounds can be modulated by the nature (metal, ligands) of the reacting compound.

  6. Bilateral Volleyball-Related Deformity of the Little Fingers: Mallet Finger and Clinodactyly Mimic

    PubMed Central

    Uslu, Mustafa; Solak, Kazim; Ozsahin, Mustafa; Uzun, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old male high school volleyball player was seen to evaluate right- and left-hand little-finger distal interphalangeal joint deformity and pain. His symptoms began during his second season of competitive play. The distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of the little fingers flexed 20-30°, and a 10-15° valgus deformity was seen at the same joints. Pain was relieved with rest but returned immediately after playing volleyball, so plain radiographs were obtained. The flexion and valgus deformity was obvious on plain radiographs and through a clinical examination. Thus, a bilateral little-finger distal phalanx base epiphysis injury was seen. This injury is characterized by a biplanar Salter Harris physeal injury; type 5 on anteroposterior radiographs and type 2 on lateral plain radiographs. The deformity occurred as a result of competitive volleyball play. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a bilateral biplanar physial injury of the base of distal phalanges of the little fingers. Flexion and valgus deformities of DIP joints are a result of repeated micro traumas around the physis. Key points As a result of repeated micro traumas to the physial region, flexion and valgus deformities of the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints should be occurred. Sports injuries to the hand often require treatment in orthopedic departments to avoid permanent deformities. Short- or long-term functional results can be gained by simple splinting procedures and abstention from play. PMID:24149318

  7. Vertical Finger Displacement is Reduced in Index Finger Tapping During Repeated Bout Rate Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Mora-Jensen, Mark Holten; Madeleine, Pascal; Hansen, Ernst Albin

    2016-12-21

    The present study tested 1) whether a recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement in finger tapping (i.e. a cumulating increase in freely chosen finger tapping frequency following submaximal muscle activation in form of externally unloaded voluntary tapping) could be replicated, and 2) the hypotheses that the faster tapping was accompanied by changed vertical displacement of the fingertip and by changed peak force during tapping. Right-handed, healthy, and recreationally active individuals (n=24) performed two 3-min index finger tapping bouts at freely chosen tapping frequency, separated by 10 min rest. The recently reported phenomenon of repeated bout rate enhancement was replicated. The faster tapping (8.8±18.7 taps min-1, corresponding to 6.0±11.0%, p=.033) was accompanied by reduced vertical displacement (1.6±2.9 mm, corresponding to 6.3±14.9%, p=.012) of the fingertip. Concurrently, peak force was unchanged. The present study points at separate control mechanisms governing kinematics and kinetics during finger tapping.

  8. Finger-vein verification based on multi-features fusion.

    PubMed

    Qin, Huafeng; Qin, Lan; Xue, Lian; He, Xiping; Yu, Chengbo; Liang, Xinyuan

    2013-11-05

    This paper presents a new scheme to improve the performance of finger-vein identification systems. Firstly, a vein pattern extraction method to extract the finger-vein shape and orientation features is proposed. Secondly, to accommodate the potential local and global variations at the same time, a region-based matching scheme is investigated by employing the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) matching method. Finally, the finger-vein shape, orientation and SIFT features are combined to further enhance the performance. The experimental results on databases of 426 and 170 fingers demonstrate the consistent superiority of the proposed approach.

  9. Extrinsic versus intrinsic hand muscle dominance in finger flexion.

    PubMed

    Al-Sukaini, A; Singh, H P; Dias, J J

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to identify the patterns of dominance of extrinsic or intrinsic muscles in finger flexion during initiation of finger curl and mid-finger flexion. We recorded 82 hands of healthy individuals (18-74 years) while flexing their fingers and tracked the finger joint angles of the little finger using video motion tracking. A total of 57 hands (69.5%) were classified as extrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal joints. A total of 25 (30.5%) were classified as intrinsic dominant, where the finger flexion was initiated and maintained at the metacarpophalangeal joint. The distribution of age, sex, dominance, handedness and body mass index was similar in the two groups. This knowledge may allow clinicians to develop more efficient rehabilitation regimes, since intrinsic dominant individuals would not initiate extrinsic muscle contraction till later in finger flexion, and might therefore be allowed limited early active motion. For extrinsic dominant individuals, by contrast, initial contraction of extrinsic muscles would place increased stress on the tendon repair site if early motion were permitted. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Multiple trigger fingers in a musician: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Masoud; Hassanpour, Seyed Esmail; Mosavizadeh, Seyed Mehdi

    2010-05-01

    Trigger finger is a common disease which particularly occurs in middle-aged women. We present a rare case of a male musician with six trigger fingers (five in the left hand and one in the right hand). Mostly these fingers had been used for playing the guitar. The patient had previously been treated with local steroid injections in his fingers, however no response was seen. Therefore, we performed a surgical procedure. Four weeks after surgery, the patient could play the guitar without discomfort in his hands.

  11. Stick-slip instability for viscous fingering in a gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puff, N.; Debrégeas, G.; di Meglio, J.-M.; Higgins, D.; Bonn, D.; Wagner, C.

    2002-05-01

    The growth dynamics of an air finger injected in a visco-elastic gel (a PVA/borax aqueous solution) is studied in a linear Hele-Shaw cell. Besides the standard Saffman-Taylor instability, we observe—with increasing finger velocities—the existence of two new regimes: (a) a stick-slip regime for which the finger tip velocity oscillates between 2 different values, producing local pinching of the finger at regular intervals; (b) a "tadpole" regime where a fracture-type propagation is observed. A scaling argument is proposed to interpret the dependence of the stick-slip frequency with the measured rheological properties of the gel.

  12. Swimming propulsion forces are enhanced by a small finger spread.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Reis, Victor M; Kjendlie, Per L; Alves, Francisco B; Vilas-Boas, João P; Machado, Leandro; Silva, António J; Rouboa, Abel I

    2010-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of finger spread on the propulsive force production in swimming using computational fluid dynamics. Computer tomography scans of an Olympic swimmer hand were conducted. This procedure involved three models of the hand with differing finger spreads: fingers closed together (no spread), fingers with a small (0.32 cm) spread, and fingers with large (0.64 cm) spread. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent code. The measured forces on the hand models were decomposed into drag and lift coefficients. For hand models, angles of attack of 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 75 degrees, and 90 degrees, with a sweep back angle of 0 degrees, were used for the calculations. The results showed that the model with a small spread between fingers presented higher values of drag coefficient than did the models with fingers closed and fingers with a large spread. One can note that the drag coefficient presented the highest values for an attack angle of 90 degrees in the three hand models. The lift coefficient resembled a sinusoidal curve across the attack angle. The values for the lift coefficient presented few differences among the three models, for a given attack angle. These results suggested that fingers slightly spread could allow the hand to create more propulsive force during swimming.

  13. Near-infrared finger vein patterns for personal identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Miyuki; Ueki, Hironori; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2002-12-01

    We have demonstrated a personal identification system that is based on near-infrared finger vein patterns. Finger vein patterns of 678 volunteers are acquired by transmitting near-infrared light through a finger and capturing the image with a CCD camera. These vein patterns are enhanced by a background-reduction filter. The similarity between two patterns is then quantified by use of the normalized maximum of the cross correlation of the two images after correction of the tilt angle. The enhanced finger vein pattern enabled 678 persons to be successfully identified.

  14. Design of polyzinc finger peptides with structured linkers

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    2001-01-01

    Zinc finger domains are perhaps the most versatile of all known DNA binding domains. By fusing up to six zinc finger modules, which normally recognize up to 18 bp of DNA, designer transcription factors can be produced to target unique sequences within large genomes. However, not all continuous DNA sequences make good zinc finger binding sites. To avoid having to target unfavorable DNA sequences, we designed multizinc finger peptides with linkers capable of spanning long stretches of nonbound DNA. Two three-finger domains were fused by using either transcription factor IIIA for the Xenopus 5S RNA gene (TFIIIA) finger 4 or a non-sequence-specific zinc finger as a “structured” linker. Our gel-shift results demonstrate that these peptides are able to bind with picomolar affinities to target sequences containing 0–10 bp of nonbound DNA. Furthermore, these peptides display greater sequence selectivity and bind with higher affinity than similar six-finger peptides containing long, flexible linkers. These peptides are likely to be of use in understanding the behavior of polydactyl proteins in nature and in the targeting of human, animal, or plant genomes for numerous applications. We also suggest that in certain polydactyl peptides an individual finger can “flip” out of the major groove to allow its neighbors to bind shorter, nontarget DNA sequences. PMID:11171968

  15. Numerical Simulations and an Experimental Investigation of a Finger Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Minel; Pierson, Hazel; Li, H.; Dong, Dingeng

    2006-01-01

    Besides sealing, the other main goal of a successful finger seal design is to exhibit appropriate compliance to outside forces. The ability of the seal to ride or float along the rotor without rubbing or excessive heating is essential to the successful operation of the seal. The compliance of the finger must only occur in the radial plane; The seal needs to be as sturdy as possible in the axial direction. The compliant finger that moves radially outward with rotor growth and motion has to be able to ride the rotor back down as the rotor diameter recovers or the rotor moves "away". Thus there is an optimum stiffness for the finger.

  16. Toward a code for the interactions of zinc fingers with DNA: selection of randomized fingers displayed on phage.

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Y; Klug, A

    1994-01-01

    We have used two selection techniques to study sequence-specific DNA recognition by the zinc finger, a small, modular DNA-binding minidomain. We have chosen zinc fingers because they bind as independent modules and so can be linked together in a peptide designed to bind a predetermined DNA site. In this paper, we describe how a library of zinc fingers displayed on the surface of bacteriophage enables selection of fingers capable of binding to given DNA triplets. The amino acid sequences of selected fingers which bind the same triplet are compared to examine how sequence-specific DNA recognition occurs. Our results can be rationalized in terms of coded interactions between zinc fingers and DNA, involving base contacts from a few alpha-helical positions. In the paper following this one, we describe a complementary technique which confirms the identity of amino acids capable of DNA sequence discrimination from these positions. Images PMID:7972027

  17. Reactive Hydrocarbons in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Roger

    The emissions of reactive volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources and the subsequent interaction of these organic compounds with oxides of nitrogen in the presence of sunlight lead to the formation of photochemical air pollution, now recognized to affect much of Europe, the United States, and many regions and urban areas elsewhere around the world. The past decade has seen the realization that emissions of organic compounds from biogenic sources (principally from vegetation) may be comparable to, or even dominate over, emissions of organic compounds from anthropogenic sources. Biogenic organics therefore play an important role in the chemistry of the troposphere and influence control strategies aimed at reducing the exposure of human populations to ozone and other manifestations of photochemical air pollution. Organic compounds also are involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol, the formation of acids in the atmosphere, the potential for global warming, and, for chlorine- and bromine-containing compounds, stratospheric ozone depletion.

  18. Cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in human fingers

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, J.D.; Cohen, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of a cholinergic agonist and antagonist on finger blood flow (FBF) was studied in 10 normal subjects. Total finger blood flow was measured by venous occlusion, air plethysmography, and capillary blood flow (FCF) by the disappearance rate of a radio-isotope from a fingertip injection. Methacholine in doses of 10-80 ..mu..g/min was given by constant infusion via a brachial artery catheter. Average FBF and vascular resistance were not significantly affected. However, the half time (t/sub 1/2/) of the disappearance rate decreased from 50.8 +/- 13.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.5 min; a decrease occurred in all subjects. In seven subjects, atropine (0.2 mg) had no affect alone but inhibited the effect of methacholine on FCF and prevented the redness and sweating of the forearm and hand that occurs with this agent. This study demonstrates a muscarinic cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in the fingertip that uniquely increase capillary blood flow.

  19. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  20. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers.

    PubMed

    Stapanian, Martin A; Stapanian, Adrienne M P; Staley, Keith E

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  1. Lipid Gymnastics: Tethers and Fingers in membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayebi, Lobat; Miller, Gregory; Parikh, Atul

    2009-03-01

    A significant body of evidence now links local mesoscopic structure (e.g., shape and composition) of the cell membrane with its function; the mechanisms by which cellular membranes adopt the specific shapes remain poorly understood. Among all the different structures adopted by cellular membranes, the tubular shape is one of the most surprising one. While their formation is typically attributed to the reorganization of membrane cytoskeleton, many exceptions exist. We report the instantaneous formation of tubular membrane mesophases following the hydration under specific thermal conditions. The shapes emerge in a bimodal way where we have two distinct diameter ranges for tubes, ˜20μm and ˜1μm, namely fat fingers and narrow tethers. We study the roughening of hydrated drops of 3 lipids in 3 different spontaneous curvatures at various temp. and ionic strength to figure out the dominant effect in selection of tethers and fingers. Dynamics of the tubes are of particular interest where we observe four distinct steps of birth, coiling, uncoiling and retraction with different lifetime on different thermal condition. These dynamics appear to reflect interplay between membrane elasticity, surface adhesion, and thermal or hydrodynamic gradient.

  2. Teleoperation of Robonaut Using Finger Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champoux, Rachel G.; Luo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of new finger tracking systems, the idea of a more expressive and intuitive user interface is being explored and implemented. One practical application for this new kind of interface is that of teleoperating a robot. For humanoid robots, a finger tracking interface is required due to the level of complexity in a human-like hand, where a joystick isn't accurate. Moreover, for some tasks, using one's own hands allows the user to communicate their intentions more effectively than other input. The purpose of this project was to develop a natural user interface for someone to teleoperate a robot that is elsewhere. Specifically, this was designed to control Robonaut on the international space station to do tasks too dangerous and/or too trivial for human astronauts. This interface was developed by integrating and modifying 3Gear's software, which includes a library of gestures and the ability to track hands. The end result is an interface in which the user can manipulate objects in real time in the user interface. then, the information is relayed to a simulator, the stand in for Robonaut, at a slight delay.

  3. Teleoperation of Robonaut Using Finger Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Champoux, Rachel G.; Luo, Victor

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of new finger tracking systems, the idea of a more expressive and intuitive user interface is being explored and implemented. One practical application for this new kind of interface is that of teleoperating a robot. For humanoid robots, a finger tracking interface is required due to the level of complexity in a human-like hand, where a joystick isn't accurate. Moreover, for some tasks, using one's own hands allows the user to communicate their intentions more effectively than other input. The purpose of this project was to develop a natural user interface for someone to teleoperate a robot that is elsewhere. Specifically, this was designed to control Robonaut on the international space station to do tasks too dangerous and/or too trivial for human astronauts. This interface was developed by integrating and modifying 3Gear's software, which includes a library of gestures and the ability to track hands. The end result is an interface in which the user can manipulate objects in real time in the user interface. then, the information is relayed to a simulator, the stand in for Robonaut, at a slight delay.

  4. Finger-Powered Electro-Digital-Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Ju, Y Sungtaek

    2017-01-01

    Portable microfluidic devices are promising for point-of-care (POC) diagnosis and bio- and environmental surveillance in resource-constrained or non-laboratory environments. Lateral-flow devices, some built off paper or strings, have been widely developed but the fixed layouts of their underlying wicking/microchannel structures limit their flexibility and present challenges in implementing multistep reactions. Digital microfluidics can circumvent these difficulties by addressing discrete droplets individually. Existing approaches to digital microfluidics, however, often require bulky power supplies/batteries and high voltage circuits. We present a scheme to drive digital microfluidic devices by converting mechanical energy of human fingers to electrical energy using an array of piezoelectric elements. We describe the integration our scheme into two promising digital microfluidics platforms: one based on the electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) phenomenon and the other on the electrophoretic control of droplet (EPD). Basic operations of droplet manipulations, such as droplet transport, merging and splitting, are demonstrated using the finger-powered digital-microfluidics.

  5. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  6. [Effects of zinc-finger proteins and artificial zinc-finger proteins on microbial metabolisms--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Zhang, Fei; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Zinc-finger proteins have been widely studied due to their highly conserved structures and DNA-binding specificity of zinc-finger domains. However, researches on the zinc-finger proteins from microorganisms, especially those from prokaryotes, are still very limited. This review focuses on the latest progress on microbial zinc-finger proteins, especially those from prokaryotes and the application of artificial zinc-finger proteins in the breeding of robust strains. Artificial zinc-finger proteins with transcriptional activation or repression domain can regulate the global gene transcription of microbial cells to acquire improved phenotypes, such as stress tolerance to heat, ethanol, butanol, and osmotic pressure. Using the zinc-finger domain as DNA scaffold in the construction of enzymatic system can enhance the catalytic efficiency and subsequently the production of specific metabolites. Currently, zinc-finger domains used in the construction of artificial transcription factor are usually isolated from mammalian cells. In the near future, novel transcription factors can be designed for strain development based on the natural zinc-finger domains from different microbes, which may be used to regulate the global gene expression of microbial cells more efficiently.

  7. Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

  8. Suppression of viscous fingering instability by a chemical reaction producing gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Kanbara, Toshizo; Taniguchi, Masafumi

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering (VF) is a well-known hydrodynamic instability which is observed when a more viscous fluid is displaced by another less viscous one in porous media or Hele-Shaw cell. In such a situation, the interface between two fluids formed finger-like patterns. Recently, several techniques for suppress VF instability has been developed, which include time-dependent injection, addition of permeability gradient, and use of viscoelastic plates of Hele-Shaw cell. Here, we demonstrate our trial to suppress VF by chemical reaction producing gel. We have succeeded to find a system of solutions and reaction in which the reaction producing a gel is able to completely suppress VF. In addition, we have performed rheological measurement of the gel produced at the reactive interface. The VF experiment and the rheological measurement have been performed by varying concentrations of the reactants. We show the storage modulus (G') of the gel, which corresponds to elastic response to small amplitude oscillatory shear, is responsible for the ability of suppression of VF in the present reactive system.

  9. Use of tactile afferent information in sequential finger movements.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A M; Soechting, J F

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated how tactile afferent information contributes to the generation of sequences of skilled finger movements by anesthetizing the right index fingers of experienced typists. Subjects were asked to type phrases in which the right index finger was used only once every seven to 12 keypresses. The time at which each key was depressed was recorded with a digital timer, and the translational and rotational motion of the fingers and wrist of the right hand were recorded optoelectronically from the location of reflective markers placed on the fingers. Midway through the experiment, a local anesthetic was injected at the base of the distal phalange of the right index finger. Following digital anesthesia, error rates increased considerably, mainly due to the diminished accuracy of movements of the anesthetized finger. The typing intervals following keypresses with the anesthetized fingertip were unaffected by the removal of tactile information. When errors occurred during control trials, the intervals immediately following the errors were greatly prolonged. However, errors produced with the anesthetized right index finger did not influence the timing of subsequent keypresses, implying that lack of tactile cues affected error recognition. The movement patterns during keypresses were similar before and after digital anesthesia for some subjects, while a less pronounced flexion-extension movement was seen in other subjects. The results suggest that tactile afferent information is not essential for initiating movement segments in a sequence. Rather, they emphasize the importance of this information for ensuring movement accuracy and for detecting errors.

  10. Automated Finger Spelling by Highly Realistic 3D Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta; Beni, Gerardo

    2004-01-01

    We present the design of a new 3D animation tool for self-teaching (signing and reading) finger spelling the first basic component in learning any sign language. We have designed a highly realistic hand with natural animation of the finger motions. Smoothness of motion (in real time) is achieved via programmable blending of animation segments. The…

  11. Finger vein extraction using gradient normalization and principal curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joon Hwan; Song, Wonseok; Kim, Taejeong; Lee, Seung-Rae; Kim, Hee Chan

    2009-02-01

    Finger vein authentication is a personal identification technology using finger vein images acquired by infrared imaging. It is one of the newest technologies in biometrics. Its main advantage over other biometrics is the low risk of forgery or theft, due to the fact that finger veins are not normally visible to others. Extracting finger vein patterns from infrared images is the most difficult part in finger vein authentication. Uneven illumination, varying tissues and bones, and changes in the physical conditions and the blood flow make the thickness and brightness of the same vein different in each acquisition. Accordingly, extracting finger veins at their accurate positions regardless of their thickness and brightness is necessary for accurate personal identification. For this purpose, we propose a new finger vein extraction method which is composed of gradient normalization, principal curvature calculation, and binarization. As local brightness variation has little effect on the curvature and as gradient normalization makes the curvature fairly uniform at vein pixels, our method effectively extracts finger vein patterns regardless of the vein thickness or brightness. In our experiment, the proposed method showed notable improvement as compared with the existing methods.

  12. The effects of vibration-reducing gloves on finger vibration.

    PubMed

    Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G; Xu, Xueyan S; Warren, Christopher; McDowell, Thomas W

    2014-01-01

    Vibration-reducing (VR) gloves have been used to reduce the hand-transmitted vibration exposures from machines and powered hand tools but their effectiveness remains unclear, especially for finger protection. The objectives of this study are to determine whether VR gloves can attenuate the vibration transmitted to the fingers and to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of how these gloves work. Seven adult male subjects participated in the experiment. The fixed factors evaluated include hand force (four levels), glove condition (gel-filled, air bladder, no gloves), and location of the finger vibration measurement. A 3-D laser vibrometer was used to measure the vibrations on the fingers with and without wearing a glove on a 3-D hand-arm vibration test system. This study finds that the effect of VR gloves on the finger vibration depends on not only the gloves but also their influence on the distribution of the finger contact stiffness and the grip effort. As a result, the gloves increase the vibration in the fingertip area but marginally reduce the vibration in the proximal area at some frequencies below 100 Hz. On average, the gloves reduce the vibration of the entire fingers by less than 3% at frequencies below 80 Hz but increase at frequencies from 80 to 400 Hz. At higher frequencies, the gel-filled glove is more effective at reducing the finger vibration than the air bladder-filled glove. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Coordination of bowing and fingering in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Baader, Andreas P; Kazennikov, Oleg; Wiesendanger, Mario

    2005-05-01

    Playing string instruments implies motor skills including asymmetrical interlimb coordination. How special is musical skill as compared to other bimanually coordinated, non-musical skillful performances? We succeeded for the first time to measure quantitatively bimanual coordination in violinists playing repeatedly a simple tone sequence. A motion analysis system was used to record finger and bow trajectories for assessing the temporal structure of finger-press, finger-lift (left hand), and bow stroke reversals (right arm). The main results were: (1) fingering consisted of serial and parallel (anticipatory) mechanisms; (2) synchronization between finger and bow actions varied from -12 ms to 60 ms, but these 'errors' were not perceived. The results suggest that (1) bow-finger synchronization varied by about 50 ms from perfect simultaneity, but without impairing auditory perception; (2) the temporal structure depends on a number of combinatorial mechanisms of bowing and fingering. These basic mechanisms were observed in all players, including all amateurs. The successful biomechanical measures of fingering and bowing open a vast practical field of assessing motor skills. Thus, objective assessment of larger groups of string players with varying musical proficiency, or of professional string players developing movement disorders, may be helpful in music education.

  14. Rediscovering Ruth Faison Shaw and Her Finger-Painting Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    Ruth Faison Shaw was an art educator who developed a nontraditional educational perspective of teaching and a different vision about children's art. As such, she is considered by some to be the initiator of finger-painting in America (The History of Art Education Timeline 1930-1939, 2002.) Shaw developed the technique of finger-painting and a…

  15. Biomimetic finger extension mechanism for soft wearable hand rehabilitation devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Heo, Si-Hwan; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2017-07-01

    For the rehabilitation and assistance of the hand functions, wearable devices have been developed, and the interest in tendon driven mechanisms have especially increased since it allows light weight and compact design. The tendon driven hand rehabilitation devices provides grasping force via exo-tendons routed on the dorsal and palmar sides of the hand pulled by remotely located actuators. However, most of the devices were not able to provide natural joint extension sequence of the finger and showed hyperextension of finger joints because the tendons for extension were fixed at the fingertip, concentrating the torque at the distal interphalangeal joint. In this study, a ring-type biomimetic finger extension mechanism was developed, which mimics the origin, structure, and orientation of the extensor tendon. The biomimetic mechanism was evaluated by comparing the motion with voluntary finger extension and the motion made by other conventional tendon driven finger extension mechanisms. The biomimetic extension mechanism provided the same joint extension sequence with voluntary finger extension, and the fully extended posture was most close to the voluntary finger extension among the tendon-driven mechanisms used in the experiments. The joint angle differences between the proposed tendon mechanism and the voluntary finger extension was -1.2 °±3.4 °, -2.9°±2.0°, and -3.1°±8.0° for distal phalangeal, proximal phalangeal, and metacarpo-phalangeal joint, respectively.

  16. Robust finger vein ROI localization based on flexible segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu; Xie, Shan Juan; Yoon, Sook; Yang, Jucheng; Park, Dong Sun

    2013-10-24

    Finger veins have been proved to be an effective biometric for personal identification in the recent years. However, finger vein images are easily affected by influences such as image translation, orientation, scale, scattering, finger structure, complicated background, uneven illumination, and collection posture. All these factors may contribute to inaccurate region of interest (ROI) definition, and so degrade the performance of finger vein identification system. To improve this problem, in this paper, we propose a finger vein ROI localization method that has high effectiveness and robustness against the above factors. The proposed method consists of a set of steps to localize ROIs accurately, namely segmentation, orientation correction, and ROI detection. Accurate finger region segmentation and correct calculated orientation can support each other to produce higher accuracy in localizing ROIs. Extensive experiments have been performed on the finger vein image database, MMCBNU_6000, to verify the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method shows the segmentation accuracy of 100%. Furthermore, the average processing time of the proposed method is 22 ms for an acquired image, which satisfies the criterion of a real-time finger vein identification system.

  17. Detection of finger gesture using singular spectrum transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Umetani, T.; Nakamura, H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to detect finger movement using a singular spectrum transformation method. Human gesture recognition is essential for realizing natural user interfaces. However, constructing a robust, easily installable interface is extremely difficult. Our proposed method uses singular spectrum transformation to classify finger movements. This method robustly classifies gestures and behavior.

  18. Case report of a rare mallet finger injury.

    PubMed

    Cohn, B T; Froimson, A I

    1986-04-01

    Mallet finger injuries are commonly seen in the emergency room and the treatment is usually simple, consisting of extension splinting of the DIP joint. The hyperextension mallet finger is a rare variant. The diagnosis can be made if the fracture fragment involves more than 50% of the joint surface. For this injury splinting is inadequate and open reduction is the treatment of choice.

  19. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Tomoko; Rivlis, Gil; Schieber, Marc H

    2016-02-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Downward finger displacement distinguishes Parkinson disease dementia from Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Abraham; Deep, Aman; Shi, Jiong; Dhall, Rohit; Shafer, Saulena; Moguel-Cobos, Guillermo; Dhillon, Ravneet; Frames, Christopher W; McCauley, Margaret

    2017-09-15

    Purpose/Aim of the study: To study finger displacement in patients with Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). We examined 56 patients with PDD and 35 with AD. Patients were examined during their regular outpatient clinic visit. Finger displacement was measured by observers not actively involved in the study using a creative grid ruler for all PDD and AD patients. Finger displacement was examined by asking patients to point their index fingers toward the grid ruler with the nails facing upward. Patients were asked to maintain the pointing position for 15 s. After 15 s, patients were asked to close their eyes for another 15 s while maintaining the same position. A positive result was downward index finger displacement of ≥5 cm within the 15-second time window with eyes closed. Of the 56 PDD patients, 53 had bilateral finger displacement of > 5 cm. In comparison, of the 35 AD patients, only 1 patient had minimal displacement. Results of the non-invasive finger displacement test may provide insight, on an outpatient basis, of the integrity of subcortical-cortical circuits. Downward finger displacement, especially bilateral downward displacement, may signal the extensive disruption of subcortical-cortical circuits that occurs in PDD patients.

  1. A biomechanical study of the finger pulley system during repair.

    PubMed

    Amirouche, F; Gonzalez, M; Koldoff, J; Tioco, J; Ham, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the mechanics of the finger/pulley system when subjected to various excisions and repairs. Several cadaver hands were used to study the finger/pulley's function, finger joint dynamics, and the relationship between tendon excursion and finger joint angles of rotation. By using a method of continuous and simultaneous data acquisition of the entire finger joint's motion, a more detailed analysis was achieved. Our experimental investigation is based on the use of four micro-potentiometers inserted at the finger's joints and a pulley system to simulate tendon excursion. Using this procedure, a detailed kinematic analysis of the entire finger was performed. This included analysis of the intact hand, various pulley excisions, and reconstruction. In addition to introducing a new method of acquisition, a mathematical model was developed for the inverse dynamic analysis of the finger pulley system. From this model, the torques required at the joints for the motion were computed. The results provided new insight into possible ways of characterizing kinematic changes resulting from pulley damage and repair.

  2. Melorheostosis of the index finger: a case report.

    PubMed

    Quarles, Ellen K; Richardson, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    We describe a case of melorheostosis involving multiple bones of the left index finger. This patient presented with a many-year history of a finger mass, and demonstrated the typical radiographic findings of melorheostosis on radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the hand. Following excisional biopsy and bone grafting, this patient is doing well and undergoing physical therapy.

  3. Toward a Phonetic Representation of Hand Configuration: The Fingers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert E.; Liddell, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a componential, articulatory approach to the phonetic description of the configuration of the four fingers. Abandoning the traditional holistic, perceptual approach, we propose a system of notational devices and distinctive features for the description of the four fingers proper (index, middle, ring, and pinky).…

  4. Finger-vein image separation algorithms and realization with MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoyan; Ma, Junshan; Wu, Jiajie

    2010-10-01

    According to the characteristics of the finger-vein image, we adopted a series of methods to enhance the contrast of the image in order to separate the finger-vein areas from the background areas, and made prepare for the subsequent research such as feature extraction and recognition processing . The method consists of three steps: denoising, contrast enhancement and image binarization. In denoising, considering the relationship between gray levels in the adjacent areas of the finger-vein image, we adopted the Gradient Inverse Weighted Smoothing method. In contrast enhancement, we improved the conventional High Frequency Stress Filtering method and adopted a method which combined the traditional High Frequency Stress Filtering algorithm together with the Histogram Equalization. With this method, the contrast of the finger-vein area and the background area has been enhanced significantly. During the binarization process, after taking the differences of the gray levels between the different areas of the finger-vein image into consideration, we proposed a method which combined the binarization by dividing the image into several segments and the Morphological Image Processing means. Our experiment results show that after a series of processing mentioned above by using MATLAB, the finger-vein areas can be separated from the background areas obviously. We can get a vivid figure of the finger-vein which provided some references for the following research such as finger-vein image feature extraction, matching and identification.

  5. Handedness and index finger movements performed on a small touchscreen

    PubMed Central

    Rivlis, Gil

    2015-01-01

    Many studies of right/left differences in motor performance related to handedness have employed tasks that use arm movements or combined arm and hand movements rather than movements of the fingers per se, the well-known exception being rhythmic finger tapping. We therefore explored four simple tasks performed on a small touchscreen with relatively isolated movements of the index finger. Each task revealed a different right/left performance asymmetry. In a step-tracking Target Task, left-handed subjects showed greater accuracy with the index finger of the dominant left hand than with the nondominant right hand. In a Center-Out Task, right-handed subjects produced trajectories with the nondominant left hand that had greater curvature than those produced with the dominant right hand. In a continuous Circle Tracking Task, slips of the nondominant left index finger showed higher jerk than slips of the dominant right index finger. And in a continuous Complex Tracking Task, the nondominant left index finger showed shorter time lags in tracking the relatively unpredictable target than the dominant right index finger. Our findings are broadly consistent with previous studies indicating left hemisphere specialization for dynamic control and predictable situations vs. right hemisphere specialization for impedance control and unpredictable situations, the specialized contributions of the two hemispheres being combined to different degrees in the right vs. left hands of right-handed vs. left-handed individuals. PMID:26683065

  6. Measurement and evaluation of finger tapping movements using magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Shima, Keisuke; Tsuji, Toshio; Kan, Eriko; Kandori, Akihiko; Yokoe, Masaru; Sakoda, Saburo

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a quantitative measurement and evaluation method of finger tapping movements for diagnosis support and assessment of motor function. In this method, a magnetic sensor consisting of two coils is used to measure movement. The coil voltage induced by the electromagnetic induction law changes depending on the distance between the two coils; this enables estimation of the distance between two coil-bearing fingertips from the voltage measured by the nonlinear modeling relationships between the voltages and distances. Further, the finger movements measured are evaluated by computing ten indices such as the finger tapping interval, and radar charts of the evaluation indices and phase-plane trajectories of the finger movements are then displayed in real time on a monitor. Evaluation experiments were performed on finger movement in 16 Parkinson's disease patients and 32 normal elderly subjects, with the results showing that all evaluation indices differ significantly for each subject (p < 0.05).

  7. Development of a CPM Machine for Injured Fingers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yili; Zhang, Fuxiang; Ma, Xin; Meng, Qinggang

    2005-01-01

    Human fingers are easy to be injured. A CPM machine is a mechanism based on the rehabilitation theory of continuous passive motion (CPM). To develop a CPM machine for the clinic application in the rehabilitation of injured fingers is a significant task. Therefore, based on the theories of evidence based medicine (EBM) and CPM, we've developed a set of biomimetic mechanism after modeling the motions of fingers and analyzing its kinematics and dynamics analysis. We also design an embedded operating system based on ARM (a kind of 32-bit RISC microprocessor). The equipment can achieve the precise control of moving scope of fingers, finger's force and speed. It can serves as a rational checking method and a way of assessment for functional rehabilitation of human hands. Now, the first prototype has been finished and will start the clinical testing in Harbin Medical University shortly.

  8. Finger motion capture from wrist-electrode contact resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shunsuke; Kawaguchi, Junki; Imura, Masataka; Oshiro, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Hand motion capture is an important yet challenging topic for biomechanics and human computer interaction. We proposed a novel electrical sensing technology for capturing the finger angles from the variation of the wrist shape. The proposed device detects the signal related to the wrist-electrode contact resistances, which change according to the variation of the wrist shape accompanying finger movements. The developed sensing device consists of a wrist band, sixteen electrodes and a sensing circuit of contact resistances. We investigated the relationships between the finger angles and the system outputs by using a glove-type joint angle sensor. As a result, we confirmed high correlations of the system outputs with the finger angles for several electrodes. Therefore, we conclude that the proposed system can be used for the estimation of the finger joint angles.

  9. A new algorithmic approach for fingers detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubashar Khan, Arslan; Umar, Waqas; Choudhary, Taimoor; Hussain, Fawad; Haroon Yousaf, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    Gesture recognition is concerned with the goal of interpreting human gestures through mathematical algorithms. Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Hand gesture detection in a real time environment, where the time and memory are important issues, is a critical operation. Hand gesture recognition largely depends on the accurate detection of the fingers. This paper presents a new algorithmic approach to detect and identify fingers of human hand. The proposed algorithm does not depend upon the prior knowledge of the scene. It detects the active fingers and Metacarpophalangeal (MCP) of the inactive fingers from an already detected hand. Dynamic thresholding technique and connected component labeling scheme are employed for background elimination and hand detection respectively. Algorithm proposed a new approach for finger identification in real time environment keeping the memory and time constraint as low as possible.

  10. Actinomycosis of Finger: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Mansour; Zarch, Mojtaba Babaei

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous actinomycosis of finger is very unusual, chronic granulomatous disease caused by a group of anaerobic or microaerophilic Gram-positive filamentous bacteria that normally colonize the mouth, colon and urogenital tract. Actinomycosis of finger is rare but clinically important condition that requires suitable evaluation for guiding appropriate therapy. We hereby report a case of cutaneous actinomycosis of the right finger- a rare site, in a 34-year-old female patient which underwent usual treatment of surgical excision. This patient complained of existence of a mass and tenderness in the pulp of right index finger. The X-ray of hand revealed no significant abnormality. The patient was treated successfully with surgical excision. Surgery detected five small nodules measuring 0.5 to 1 cm in size. Histopathologic examination of the biopsy from the lesions confirmed diagnosis of cutaneous actinomycosis. Here, we report a cutaneous actinomycosis in a 34-year-old female located in the index finger. PMID:27656447

  11. Finger gnosia: a predictor of numerical abilities in children?

    PubMed

    Noël, Marie-Pascale

    2005-10-01

    This paper aimed to test the specificity of predicting power of finger gnosia on later numerical abilities in school-age children and to contribute to the understanding of this effect. Forty-one children were tested in the beginning of Grade 1 on finger gnosia, left-right orientation (another sign of the Gerstmann "syndrome"), and global development. Fifteen months later, numerical and reading abilities were assessed. Analyses of the results indicated that, contrary to the general measures of cognitive development, performance in the finger gnosia test was a good predictor of numerical skills 1 year later but not of reading skills, which proves the specificity of that predictor. The same conclusion was also true for the left-right orientation. However, finger gnosia could equally predict performance in numerical tasks that do or do not rely heavily on finger representation or on magnitude representation. Results are discussed in terms of the localizationist and the functional hypotheses.

  12. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  13. Isolated index finger palsy due to cortical infarction.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yuichi; Miyaji, Yosuke; Joki, Hideto; Seki, Syunsuke; Mori, Kentaro; Kamide, Tomoya; Tamase, Akira; Nomura, Motohiro; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    The case of an 86-year-old man presenting with isolated left index finger palsy caused by infarction on the lateral side of the right precentral knob is presented. Embolization from aortic atheroma was considered the cause of infarction. Cases with selective palsy of a particular group of fingers without sensory deficits due to cortical infarction of the precentral knob have been reported by several authors, and predominant weakness of radial-side fingers is known to be usually caused by laterally located infarction of the precentral knob. Among the previous reports, only 1 case involved isolated index finger palsy by an atypical, medially located infarction of the precentral knob in association with a concurrent nonrelated lesion. This is the first reported isolated index finger palsy caused by a single lateral precentral knob infarction. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. NUMERICALLY DETERMINED TRANSPORT LAWS FOR FINGERING ('THERMOHALINE') CONVECTION IN ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Traxler, A.; Garaud, P.; Stellmach, S.

    2011-02-20

    We present the first three-dimensional simulations of fingering convection performed at parameter values approaching those relevant for astrophysics. Our simulations reveal the existence of simple asymptotic scaling laws for turbulent heat and compositional transport, which can be straightforwardly extrapolated from our numerically tractable values to the true astrophysical regime. Our investigation also indicates that thermo-compositional 'staircases', a key consequence of fingering convection in the ocean, cannot form spontaneously in the fingering regime in stellar interiors. Our proposed empirically determined transport laws thus provide simple prescriptions for mixing by fingering convection in a variety of astrophysical situations, and should, from here on, be used preferentially over older and less accurate parameterizations. They also establish that fingering convection does not provide sufficient extra-mixing to explain observed chemical abundances in red giant branch stars.

  15. Intervarietal variations in various oxidative stress markers and antioxidant potential of finger millet (Eleusine coracana) subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Bartwal, Arti; Pande, Anjali; Sharma, Priyadarshini; Arora, Sandeep

    2016-07-01

    Drought is a major form of abiotic stress leading to lower crop productivity. Experiment was carried out for selecting the most tolerant genotype among six different genotypes of finger millet under drought stress. Seeds of six finger millet genotypes were sown in pots and grown for 35 days. After this period, drought was induced by withholding watering for stressed plants while control plants were watered regularly for comparison. Among all six different varieties of finger millet screened (PR202, PES400, PRM6107, VL283, VL328 and VL149) under varying intensities of drought stress,PRM6107 and PR202 showed highest stress tolerance by limiting excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through activation of ROS scavenging antioxidative enzymes. A 200% increase in ascorbate content was recorded in PRM6107 and PR202, while in other varieties limited increase in ascorbate content was observed. Maximum decrease in chlorophyll content was observed in VL328 (83%) while least drop was observed in VL149 (65%). Relative water content indicated that PR202 was able to retain maximum water content under stress, as it recorded least drop in relative water content (55%), contributing to its better survival under stress. In conclusion finger millet genotypes PRM6107 and PR202 possessed maximum drought tolerance potential and thus may be used for allele mining of drought tolerant genes, which can further be employed for the development of more drought stress tolerant staple crops using biotechnological approach.

  16. Acute blue finger: a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed; Elmasry, Mohamed; Mabote, Thato; Elsayed, Ayman; Sunthareswaran, Rame

    2014-01-01

    The management of the acute blue finger is controversial with many regarding it as a benign condition. However, we would argue that it should always be considered as an emergency. We present a challenging case of a 43-year-old woman who presented with a 1-week history of sudden onset blue discolouration of the left fifth digit, and a 6-week history of episodic joint problems. Examination showed bilateral normal radial and ulnar pulses. Following blood investigations, an initial working diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis with associated Raynaud's phenomenon was made. Also, infective endocarditis was considered due to temporary misleading physical signs. Later, CT angiography of the left upper limb arteries showed a significant proximal left subclavian stenosis. Subsequently, a diagnosis of the left subclavian arteritis associated with digit ischaemia from embolic debris was made and the patient underwent a left subclavian angioplasty. However, delayed management resulted in a necrotic digit, which was left to autoamputate. PMID:24429047

  17. Ferritin, finger clubbing, and lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shneerson, J M; Jones, B M

    1981-01-01

    The serum ferritin concentration has been determined by an immunoradiometric assay in 90 subjects with a variety of pulmonary diseases. No association between ferritin concentrations and finger clubbing has been found in any of the diseases studied. Ferritin levels were significantly raised in the subjects with bronchial carcinoma, but were not useful in monitoring recurrence of the tumour. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary vein ferritin concentrations were similar to systemic venous concentrations. It is therefore unlikely that the tumour releases ferritin into the pulmonary circulation. Ferritin levels were raised in patients with acute pneumonias but did not correlate with the total white cell count or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum ferritin concentrations were also increased in a variety of chronic lung diseases but were normal in subjects with asbestosis. PMID:7314044

  18. Surface Tension and Fingering of Miscible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abib, Mohammed; Liu, Jian-Bang; Ronney, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments on miscible, buoyantly unstable reaction-diffusion fronts and non-reacting displacement fronts in Hele-Shaw cells show a fingering-type instability whose wavelengths (lambda*) are consistent with an interfacial tension (sigma) at the front caused by the change in chemical composition, even though the solutions are miscible in all proportions. In conjunction with the Saffman-Taylor model, the relation sigma = K/tau, where tau is the interface thickness and K approximately equal 4 +/- 2 x 10(exp -6) dyne, enables prediction of our measured values of lambda* as well as results from prior experiments on miscible interfaces. These results indicate that even for miscible fluids, surface tension is generally a more significant factor than diffusion in interfacial stability and flow characteristics.

  19. Crossover from capillary fingering to viscous fingering for immiscible unstable flow:Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferer, M.; Ji, Chuang; Bromhal, Grant S.; Cook, Joshua; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.

    2004-07-01

    Invasion percolation with trapping (IPT) and diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) are simple fractal models, which are known to describe two-phase flow in porous media at well defined, but unphysical limits of the fluid properties and flow conditions. A decade ago, Fernandez, Rangel, and Rivero predicted a crossover from IPT (capillary fingering) to DLA (viscous fingering) for the injection of a zero-viscosity fluid as the injection velocity was increased from zero. [J. F. Fernandez, R. Rangel, and J. Rivero, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2958 (1991)]. We have performed experiments in which air is injected into a glass micromodel to displace water. These experiments clearly demonstrate this crossover as the injection velocity of the air is increased. Furthermore, simulations, using our standard pore-level model, also support the predicted IPT-to-DLA crossover, as well as the predicted power-law behavior of the characteristic crossover length.

  20. Metabolite Identification through Machine Learning — Tackling CASMI Challenge Using FingerID

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huibin; Zamboni, Nicola; Heinonen, Markus; Rousu, Juho

    2013-01-01

    Metabolite identification is a major bottleneck in metabolomics due to the number and diversity of the molecules. To alleviate this bottleneck, computational methods and tools that reliably filter the set of candidates are needed for further analysis by human experts. Recent efforts in assembling large public mass spectral databases such as MassBank have opened the door for developing a new genre of metabolite identification methods that rely on machine learning as the primary vehicle for identification. In this paper we describe the machine learning approach used in FingerID, its application to the CASMI challenges and some results that were not part of our challenge submission. In short, FingerID learns to predict molecular fingerprints from a large collection of MS/MS spectra, and uses the predicted fingerprints to retrieve and rank candidate molecules from a given large molecular database. Furthermore, we introduce a web server for FingerID, which was applied for the first time to the CASMI challenges. The challenge results show that the new machine learning framework produces competitive results on those challenge molecules that were found within the relatively restricted KEGG compound database. Additional experiments on the PubChem database confirm the feasibility of the approach even on a much larger database, although room for improvement still remains. PMID:24958002

  1. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  2. Reactive nitrogen species in cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Levi; Franco, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    The transduction of cellular signals occurs through the modification of target molecules. Most of these modifications are transitory, thus the signal transduction pathways can be tightly regulated. Reactive nitrogen species are a group of compounds with different properties and reactivity. Some reactive nitrogen species are highly reactive and their interaction with macromolecules can lead to permanent modifications, which suggested they were lacking the specificity needed to participate in cell signaling events. However, the perception of reactive nitrogen species as oxidizers of macromolecules leading to general oxidative damage has recently evolved. The concept of redox signaling is now well established for a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In this context, the post-translational modifications introduced by reactive nitrogen species can be very specific and are active participants in signal transduction pathways. This review addresses the role of these oxidative modifications in the regulation of cell signaling events. PMID:25888647

  3. [Index finger pollicization for congenitally deficient first finger of the hand in children].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Rueda, F; Ayala Montoro, J; Blanco López, F; Ocaña Losa, J M

    2001-10-01

    Pollicization is a single-stage neurovascular pedicle transfer of the index digit to function as a thumb. The objective of this study is to investigate the results of index finger pollicization for correction of congenital deficiency of the first ray in pediatric hand. We have done 6 pollicizations of index fingers in 6 hands (there were 2 right hands, 2 left hands, and 1 bilaterally) in 5 patients (4 boys and 1 girl) who had absent or nonfunctioning thumbs (type III-V of Blauth's classification). Associated anomalies where numerous and included radial club hand, mirror hand and cardiovascular and urologic anomalies. The average time of Kirschner wire extraction was 32 days (30 to 36 days) and to beginning the hand rehabilitation at 5 degrees to 10 degrees day. The average age at pollicization was 5.5 years (range 2 to 8 years), and follow-up averaged 8 years (5 to 11 years). The cosmetic and functional results were excellent, with manual dexterity of prehension and opposition. Pollicization in children can be performed at least 2 years of age, to due of minor risk of neurovascular lesion but without delayed the cortical representation of the pollicized finger.

  4. Five- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia and calculation abilities.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds' finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children's representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation.

  5. Five- to 7-Year-Olds’ Finger Gnosia and Calculation Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Robert; Humberstone, Judi

    2011-01-01

    The research examined the relationship between 65 5- to 7-year-olds’ finger gnosia, visuo-spatial working memory, and finger-use in solving single-digit addition problems. Their non-verbal IQ and basic reaction time were also assessed. Previous research has found significant changes in children’s representational abilities between 5 and 7 years. One aim of the research was to determine whether changes in finger representational abilities (finger gnosia) occur across these ages and whether they are associated with finger-use in computation. A second aim was to determine whether visuo-spatial working memory is associated with finger gnosia and computation abilities. We used latent class profile analysis to identify patterns of similarities and differences in finger gnosia and computation/finger-use abilities. The analysis yielded four finger gnosia subgroups that differed in finger representation ability. It also yielded four finger/computation subgroups that differed in the relationship between finger-use and computation success. Analysis revealed associations between computation finger-use/success subgroups, finger gnosia subgroups, and visuo-spatial working memory. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that finger gnosia subgroup membership and visuo-spatial working memory uniquely contribute to a model predicting finger-use in computation group membership. The results show that finger gnosia abilities change in the early school years, and that these changes are associated with the ability to use fingers to aid computation. PMID:22171220

  6. Typing keystroke duration changed after submaximal isometric finger exercises

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Hsu (Joe); Johnson, Peter W.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Eisen, Ellen A.

    2012-01-01

    A repeated-measures laboratory experiment tested whether keystroke duration during touch-typing changes after a finger performs submaximal isometric flexion exercises. Fourteen right-handed touch-typists used right ring finger to perform three 15-min exercise conditions, two isometric exercises and a no-force condition, each on a separate day. Before and after each exercise condition, typing keystroke duration and isometric force elicited by electrical stimulation were measured for right ring finger. Keystroke duration of right ring finger decreased by 5% (6 ms, P < 0.05) immediately after the exercises but not after the no-force condition. Peak isometric finger force elicited by electrical stimulation decreased by 17–26% (P < 0.05) for the flexor digitorum superficialis and decreased by 4–8% for the extensor digitorum communis after the isometric exercises. After the finger was exposed to isometric exercises, changes in typing keystroke duration coincided with changes in the physiological state of the finger flexor and extensor muscles. PMID:18853179

  7. Management of the Stiff Finger: Evidence and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; McGlinn, Evan P.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The term “stiff finger” refers to a reduction in the range of motion in the finger, and it is a condition that has many different causes and involves a number of different structures. Almost all injuries of the fingers and some diseases can cause finger stiffness. Hand surgeons often face difficulty treating stiff fingers that are affected by irreversible soft tissues fibrosis. Stiff fingers can be divided into flexion and extension deformities. They can also be sub-classified into four categories according to the involved tissues extending from the skin to the joint capsule. Prevention of stiff fingers by judicious mobilization of the joints is prudent to avoid more complicated treatment after established stiffness occurs. Static progressive and dynamic splints have been considered as effective non-operative interventions to treat stiff fingers. Most authors believe force of joint distraction and time duration of stretching are two important factors to consider while applying a splint or cast. We also introduce the concepts of capsulotomy and collateral ligament release and other soft tissue release of the MCP and PIP joint in this article. Future outcomes research is vital to assessing the effectiveness of these surgical procedures and guiding postoperative treatment recommendations. PMID:24996467

  8. Relative finger lengths, sex differences, and psychological traits.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, John C; Medland, Sarah E; Martin, Nicholas G

    2009-04-01

    Various finger length and personality and ability measures were obtained for a sample of Australian adolescent twins (306 boys and 397 girls). A new measure of relative finger length (the length of a given finger relative to the sum of all four fingers) was investigated, and shown to be superior to the traditional 2D:4D for discriminating between the sexes. It also had the advantage of permitting a more analytic approach: for example, the 2nd finger-length contributed much more than the 4th finger length to the sex difference in 2D:4D, and a smooth gradient of sex differences across the hand was evident. Sex differences on right hands were greater than those for left hands. Within-sex correlations were obtained between the various finger-length measures and a personality and an ability scale that showed relatively large sex differences (Eysenck's Psychoticism scale and the spatial subscale from Jackson's Multidimensional Aptitude Battery). The correlations were low, but on the whole consistent with the between-sex differences for the girls. For the boys, this was so for Psychoticism, but spatial ability was, if anything, correlated in the opposite direction.

  9. Comparison of Inter-Finger Connection Matrix Computation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joel R.; Terekhov, Alexander V.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2014-01-01

    A hypothesis was proposed that the central nervous system controls force production by the fingers through hypothetical neural commands (NCs). The NCs are scaled between values of 0 to 1, indicating no intentional force production or maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force production, respectively. A matrix of finger inter-connections, [IFC], transforms NCs into finger forces. Two methods have been proposed to compute the [IFC]. The first method uses only single finger MVC trials and multiplies the [IFC] by a gain factor. The second method uses a neural network (NN) model based on experimental data. The performance of the two methods was compared on the MVC data and on a data set of sub-maximal forces, collected over a range of total forces and moments of force. The methods were compared in terms of: 1) ability to predict finger forces; 2) accuracy of NC reconstruction; and 3) preserved planarity of force data for sub-maximal force production task. Both methods did a reasonable job of predicting the total force in multi-finger MVC trials; however, the NN model performed better in regards to all other criteria. Overall, the results indicate that for modeling multi-finger interaction the NN method is preferable. PMID:23183029

  10. Typing keystroke duration changed after submaximal isometric finger exercises.

    PubMed

    Joe Chang, Che-Hsu; Johnson, Peter W; Katz, Jeffrey N; Eisen, Ellen A; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2009-01-01

    A repeated-measures laboratory experiment tested whether keystroke duration during touch-typing changes after a finger performs submaximal isometric flexion exercises. Fourteen right-handed touch-typists used right ring finger to perform three 15-min exercise conditions, two isometric exercises and a no-force condition, each on a separate day. Before and after each exercise condition, typing keystroke duration and isometric force elicited by electrical stimulation were measured for right ring finger. Keystroke duration of right ring finger decreased by 5% (6 ms, P < 0.05) immediately after the exercises but not after the no-force condition. Peak isometric finger force elicited by electrical stimulation decreased by 17-26% (P < 0.05) for the flexor digitorum superficialis and decreased by 4-8% for the extensor digitorum communis after the isometric exercises. After the finger was exposed to isometric exercises, changes in typing keystroke duration coincided with changes in the physiological state of the finger flexor and extensor muscles.

  11. Finger vein verification system based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yang; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Haixia; Zhang, Hong

    2012-09-01

    Finger vein verification is a promising biometric pattern for personal identification in terms of security and convenience. The recognition performance of this technology heavily relies on the quality of finger vein images and on the recognition algorithm. To achieve efficient recognition performance, a special finger vein imaging device is developed, and a finger vein recognition method based on sparse representation is proposed. The motivation for the proposed method is that finger vein images exhibit a sparse property. In the proposed system, the regions of interest (ROIs) in the finger vein images are segmented and enhanced. Sparse representation and sparsity preserving projection on ROIs are performed to obtain the features. Finally, the features are measured for recognition. An equal error rate of 0.017% was achieved based on the finger vein image database, which contains images that were captured by using the near-IR imaging device that was developed in this study. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is faster and more robust than previous methods.

  12. Response to reflected-force feedback to fingers in teleoperations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, P. H.; Iatridis, J. C.; Thakor, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    Reflected-force feedback is an important aspect of teleoperations. The objective is to determine the ability of the human operator to respond to that force. Telerobotics operation is simulated by computer control of a motor-driven device with capabilities for programmable force feedback and force measurement. A computer-controlled motor drive is developed that provides forces against the fingers as well as (angular) position control. A load cell moves in a circular arc as it is pushed by a finger and measures reaction forces on the finger. The force exerted by the finger on the load cell and the angular position are digitized and recorded as a function of time by the computer. Flexure forces of the index, long and ring fingers of the human hand in opposition to the motor driven load cell are investigated. Results of the following experiments are presented: (1) Exertion of maximum finger force as a function of angle; (2) Exertion of target finger force against a computer controlled force; and (3) Test of the ability to move to a target force against a force that is a function of position. Averaged over ten individuals, the maximum force that could be exerted by the index or long finger is about 50 Newtons, while that of the ring finger is about 40 Newtons. From the tests of the ability of a subject to exert a target force, it was concluded that reflected-force feedback can be achieved with the direct kinesthetic perception of force without the use of tactile or visual clues.

  13. Dendrites, viscous fingers, and the theory of pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the theory of pattern formation in dendritic crystal growth and viscous fingering in fluids are reviewed. Consideration is given to the discovery that weak capillary forces act as singular perturbations which lead to selection mechanisms in dendritic crystal growth and fingering patterns. Other topics include the conventional thermodynamic model of the solidification of a pure substance from its melt, fingering instability, pattern selection, the solvability theory, dendritic growth rates, the bubble effect discovered by Couder et al. (1986), the dynamics of pattern-forming systems, and snowflake formation.

  14. Viscous Fingers Driven by Oscillatory Pressure Drop Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma, Rodrigo; Corvera Poiré, Eugenia; Hernández-Machado, Aurora

    2004-03-01

    We study the response of the Saffman Taylor finger to a periodic force by means of a phase field model that was recently introduced for viscous fingers (1). A lateral instability on the sides of the finger develops, grows and coarsens. Sidebranching with wavelenght selection is obtained for a wide range of incident frequencies. (1) Phase-field model of Hele-Shaw flows in the high-viscosity contrast regime. A. Hernández-Machado, A.M. Lacasta, E.Mayoral and E. Corvera Poiré. Phys. Rev. E 68, 046310 (2003).

  15. A hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Tao; Yang, Gongping; Yang, Lu

    2014-12-01

    Finger knuckle print has recently been seen as an effective biometric technique. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical classification method for finger knuckle print recognition, which is rooted in traditional score-level fusion methods. In the proposed method, we firstly take Gabor feature as the basic feature for finger knuckle print recognition and then a new decision rule is defined based on the predefined threshold. Finally, the minor feature speeded-up robust feature is conducted for these users, who cannot be recognized by the basic feature. Extensive experiments are performed to evaluate the proposed method, and experimental results show that it can achieve a promising performance.

  16. Fingers in a Hele-Shaw Cell with Surface Tension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    A138 548 FINGERS IN A HELE-SHAid CELL WITH SURFACE TENSION (U) i/i WISCONSIN UN! V-*MADISON MATHEMATICS RESEARCH CENTER J YANDEN-BROECI( MAY 83 MRC...NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A A-4" MRC Technical Simimary Report #2518 i. FINGERS IN A HELE-SHAW CELLQ WITH SURFACE TENSION V=4 Jean-Marc...H CENTER "’ FINGERS IN A HXLZ-SHAW CELL WITH SURFACE TENSION Jean-Marc Vanden-Broeck Technical Summary Report #2518 May 1983 ABSTRACT McLean and

  17. End effects in DNA recognition by zinc finger arrays.

    PubMed

    Choo, Y

    1998-01-15

    The paradigmatic DNA binding domain from the transcription factor Zif268 contains three zinc finger modules in tandem repeat. When bound to their cognate DNA site the fingers read out the sequence of one DNA strand by making a linear series of successive base contacts. It is shown that the base-specific protein-DNA contacts made from the ends of the Zif268 three-finger array contribute less to the stability of the intermolecular complex than do structurally equivalent contacts from more central regions of the DNA binding domain. The effect is akin to the end fraying observed in duplex nucleic acid molecules.

  18. Energy harvesting from mouse click of robot finger using piezoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Youngsu; Hong, Jin; Lee, Jaemin; Park, Jung-Min; Kim, Keehoon

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of energy harvesting from the mouse click motion using a piezoelectric energy transducer. Specifically, we use a robotic finger to realize repeatable mouse click motion. The robotic finger wears a glove with a pocket for including the piezoelectric material as an energy transducer. We propose a model for the energy harvesting system through the inverse kinematic framework of parallel joints in the finger and the electromechanical coupling equations of the piezoelectric material. Experiments are performed to elucidate the effect of the load resistance and the mouse click motion on energy harvesting.

  19. [Idiopathic palmar vein thrombosis of the fingers - rare but relevant].

    PubMed

    Spies, C K; Schwarz-Furlan, S; Hahn, P; Oppermann, J; Unglaub, F

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic thrombosis of palmar finger veins is rare and women suffer from it almost exclusively. Synovial cysts, epidermoid inclusion cysts, giant cell tumours and haemangiomatous lesions should be considered in the process of diagnosis. We present a 56-year-old woman with idiopathic and symptomatic thrombosis of palmar finger veins. Using the palmar approach the painful veins were identified and excised completely. An uncomplicated wound healing has followed with completely unrestricted and painless range of motion. Surgical excision of the finger vein thrombosis should be considered if there is continuing pain.

  20. Learning Support System Reproducing Finger Movements in Practicing Nursing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Majima, Yukie; Maekawa, Yasuko; SOGA, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Heretofore, “skill proficiency” in nursing techniques has only been developed through experience. To pass that technical proficiency down to later generations, this study is intended to build a learning support system using virtual reality by reproducing finger movements used in practicing nursing techniques. For practicing blood drawing techniques, we earlier developed a prototype system that uses a finger motion capture system to acquire finger position data when a syringe is grasped. It uses the acquired data to reproduce the process of the techniques three-dimensionally. This paper outlines the prototype system and reports its effectiveness for learning after examining results of a demonstration experiment for nursing students. PMID:24199102