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Sample records for finite difference lattice

  1. An implicit-explicit finite-difference lattice Boltzmann subgrid method on nonuniform meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ruofan; Chen, Rongqian; You, Yancheng

    In this paper, an implicit-explicit finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with subgrid model on nonuniform meshes is proposed. The implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme, which has good convergence rate, is used for the time discretization and a mixed difference scheme, which combines the upwind scheme with the central scheme, is adopted for the space discretization. Meanwhile, the standard Smagorinsky subgrid model is incorporated into the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann scheme. The effects of implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme and nonuniform meshes of present lattice Boltzmann method are discussed through simulations of a two-dimensional lid-driven cavity flow on nonuniform meshes. Moreover, the comparison simulations of the present method and multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann subgrid method are conducted qualitatively and quantitatively.

  2. Phase-field-based lattice Boltzmann finite-difference model for simulating thermocapillary flows.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J; Zhang, Yonghao; Kang, Qinjun

    2013-01-01

    A phase-field-based hybrid model that combines the lattice Boltzmann method with the finite difference method is proposed for simulating immiscible thermocapillary flows with variable fluid-property ratios. Using a phase field methodology, an interfacial force formula is analytically derived to model the interfacial tension force and the Marangoni stress. We present an improved lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method to capture the interface between different phases and solve the pressure and velocity fields, which can recover the correct Cahn-Hilliard equation (CHE) and Navier-Stokes equations. The LBE method allows not only use of variable mobility in the CHE, but also simulation of multiphase flows with high density ratio because a stable discretization scheme is used for calculating the derivative terms in forcing terms. An additional convection-diffusion equation is solved by the finite difference method for spatial discretization and the Runge-Kutta method for time marching to obtain the temperature field, which is coupled to the interfacial tension through an equation of state. The model is first validated against analytical solutions for the thermocapillary driven convection in two superimposed fluids at negligibly small Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. It is then used to simulate thermocapillary migration of a three-dimensional deformable droplet and bubble at various Marangoni numbers and density ratios, and satisfactory agreement is obtained between numerical results and theoretical predictions.

  3. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann simulation on acoustics-induced particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sau-Chung; Yuen, Wai-Tung; Wu, Chili; Chao, Christopher Yu-Hang

    2015-10-01

    Particle manipulation by acoustics has been investigated for many years. By a proper design, particle deposition can be induced by the same principle. The use of acoustics can potentially be developed into an energy-efficient technique for particle removal or filtration system as the pressure drop due to acoustic effects is low and the flow velocity is not necessary to be high. Two nonlinear acoustic effects, acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, are important. Acoustic streaming introduces vortices and stagnation points on the surface of an air duct and removes the particles by deposition. Acoustic radiation pressure causes particles to form agglomerates and enhances inertial impaction and/or gravitational sedimentation. The objective of this paper is to develop a numerical model to investigate the particle deposition induced by acoustic effects. A three-step approach is adopted and lattice Boltzamnn technique is employed as the numerical method. This is because the lattice Boltzmann equation is hyperbolic and can be solved locally, explicitly, and efficiently on parallel computers. In the first step, the acoustic field and its mean square fluctuation values are calculated. Due to the advantage of the lattice Boltzmann technique, a simple, stable and fast lattice Boltzmann method is proposed and verified. The result of the first step is input into the second step to solve for acoustic streaming. Another finite difference lattice Boltzmann method, which has been validated by a number of flows and benchmark cases in the literature, is used. The third step consists in tracking the particle's motion by a Lagrangian approach where the acoustic radiation pressure is considered. The influence of the acoustics effects on particle deposition is explained. The numerical result matches with an experiment. The model is a useful tool for optimizing the design and helps to further develop the technique.

  4. Finite-Difference Lattice Boltzmann Scheme for High-Speed Compressible Flow: Two-Dimensional Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yan-Biao; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Lei; Li, Ying-Jun

    2008-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann (LB) modeling of high-speed compressible flows has long been attempted by various authors. One common weakness of most of previous models is the instability problem when the Mach number of the flow is large. In this paper we present a finite-difference LB model, which works for flows with flexible ratios of specific heats and a wide range of Mach number, from 0 to 30 or higher. Besides the discrete-velocity-model by Watari [Physica A 382 (2007) 502], a modified Lax Wendroff finite difference scheme and an artificial viscosity are introduced. The combination of the finite-difference scheme and the adding of artificial viscosity must find a balance of numerical stability versus accuracy. The proposed model is validated by recovering results of some well-known benchmark tests: shock tubes and shock reflections. The new model may be used to track shock waves and/or to study the non-equilibrium procedure in the transition between the regular and Mach reflections of shock waves, etc.

  5. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    PETRECZKY, P.

    2005-03-12

    I review recent progress in lattice QCD at finite temperature. Results on the transition temperature will be summarized. Recent progress in understanding in-medium modifications of interquark forces and quarkonia spectral functions at finite temperatures is discussed.

  6. Virtual Investigation of Free Convection from Concentric Annulus Cylinder by the Finite Difference Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmir, O. Shahrul; Azwadi, C. S. Nor

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents numerical study of flow behavior from a heated concentric annulus cylinder at various Rayleigh number Ra, Prandtl number Pr while the aspect ratio is fixed to 5.0 of the outer and inner cylinders. The Finite Different Lattice Boltzmann Method (FDLBM) numerical scheme is proposed to improve the computational efficiency and numerical stability of the conventional method. The proposed FELBM applied UTOPIA approach (third order accuracy in space) to study the temperature distribution and the vortex formation in the annulus cylinder. The comparison of the flow pattern and temperature distribution for every case via streamline, vortices and temperature distribution contour with published paper in literature were carried out for the validation purposes. Current investigation concluded that the UTOPIA FDLBM is an efficient approach for the current problem in hand and good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  7. Stochastic finite difference lattice Boltzmann method for steady incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S. C.; So, R. M. C.; Leung, W. W. F.

    2010-08-01

    With the advent of state-of-the-art computers and their rapid availability, the time is ripe for the development of efficient uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods to reduce the complexity of numerical models used to simulate complicated systems with incomplete knowledge and data. The spectral stochastic finite element method (SSFEM) which is one of the widely used UQ methods, regards uncertainty as generating a new dimension and the solution as dependent on this dimension. A convergent expansion along the new dimension is then sought in terms of the polynomial chaos system, and the coefficients in this representation are determined through a Galerkin approach. This approach provides an accurate representation even when only a small number of terms are used in the spectral expansion; consequently, saving in computational resource can be realized compared to the Monte Carlo (MC) scheme. Recent development of a finite difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) that provides a convenient algorithm for setting the boundary condition allows the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, with and without external body forces to be simulated with ease. Also, the inherent compressibility effect in the conventional lattice Boltzmann method, which might produce significant errors in some incompressible flow simulations, is eliminated. As such, the FDLBM together with an efficient UQ method can be used to treat incompressible flows with built in uncertainty, such as blood flow in stenosed arteries. The objective of this paper is to develop a stochastic numerical solver for steady incompressible viscous flows by combining the FDLBM with a SSFEM. Validation against MC solutions of channel/Couette, driven cavity, and sudden expansion flows are carried out.

  8. Stochastic finite difference lattice Boltzmann method for steady incompressible viscous flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.C.; So, R.M.C.; Leung, W.W.F.

    2010-08-20

    With the advent of state-of-the-art computers and their rapid availability, the time is ripe for the development of efficient uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods to reduce the complexity of numerical models used to simulate complicated systems with incomplete knowledge and data. The spectral stochastic finite element method (SSFEM) which is one of the widely used UQ methods, regards uncertainty as generating a new dimension and the solution as dependent on this dimension. A convergent expansion along the new dimension is then sought in terms of the polynomial chaos system, and the coefficients in this representation are determined through a Galerkin approach. This approach provides an accurate representation even when only a small number of terms are used in the spectral expansion; consequently, saving in computational resource can be realized compared to the Monte Carlo (MC) scheme. Recent development of a finite difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) that provides a convenient algorithm for setting the boundary condition allows the flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, with and without external body forces to be simulated with ease. Also, the inherent compressibility effect in the conventional lattice Boltzmann method, which might produce significant errors in some incompressible flow simulations, is eliminated. As such, the FDLBM together with an efficient UQ method can be used to treat incompressible flows with built in uncertainty, such as blood flow in stenosed arteries. The objective of this paper is to develop a stochastic numerical solver for steady incompressible viscous flows by combining the FDLBM with a SSFEM. Validation against MC solutions of channel/Couette, driven cavity, and sudden expansion flows are carried out.

  9. High-Accuracy Approximation of High-Rank Derivatives: Isotropic Finite Differences Based on Lattice-Boltzmann Stencils

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Keijo Kalervo; Hegele Júnior, Luiz Adolfo; Philippi, Paulo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    We propose isotropic finite differences for high-accuracy approximation of high-rank derivatives. These finite differences are based on direct application of lattice-Boltzmann stencils. The presented finite-difference expressions are valid in any dimension, particularly in two and three dimensions, and any lattice-Boltzmann stencil isotropic enough can be utilized. A theoretical basis for the proposed utilization of lattice-Boltzmann stencils in the approximation of high-rank derivatives is established. In particular, the isotropy and accuracy properties of the proposed approximations are derived directly from this basis. Furthermore, in this formal development, we extend the theory of Hermite polynomial tensors in the case of discrete spaces and present expressions for the discrete inner products between monomials and Hermite polynomial tensors. In addition, we prove an equivalency between two approaches for constructing lattice-Boltzmann stencils. For the numerical verification of the presented finite differences, we introduce 5th-, 6th-, and 8th-order two-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann stencils. PMID:24688360

  10. High-accuracy approximation of high-rank derivatives: isotropic finite differences based on lattice-Boltzmann stencils.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Keijo Kalervo; Hegele Júnior, Luiz Adolfo; Philippi, Paulo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    We propose isotropic finite differences for high-accuracy approximation of high-rank derivatives. These finite differences are based on direct application of lattice-Boltzmann stencils. The presented finite-difference expressions are valid in any dimension, particularly in two and three dimensions, and any lattice-Boltzmann stencil isotropic enough can be utilized. A theoretical basis for the proposed utilization of lattice-Boltzmann stencils in the approximation of high-rank derivatives is established. In particular, the isotropy and accuracy properties of the proposed approximations are derived directly from this basis. Furthermore, in this formal development, we extend the theory of Hermite polynomial tensors in the case of discrete spaces and present expressions for the discrete inner products between monomials and Hermite polynomial tensors. In addition, we prove an equivalency between two approaches for constructing lattice-Boltzmann stencils. For the numerical verification of the presented finite differences, we introduce 5th-, 6th-, and 8th-order two-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann stencils.

  11. Finite temperature mechanical instability in disordered lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leyou; Mao, Xiaoming

    Mechanical instability takes different forms in various ordered and disordered systems, and little is known about how thermal fluctuations affect different classes of mechanical instabilities. We develop an analytic theory involving renormalization of rigidity and coherent potential approximation that can be used to understand finite-temperature mechanical stabilities in various disordered systems. We used this theory to study two disordered lattices: randomly diluted triangular lattice and randomly braced square lattice. These two lattices belong to two different universality classes as they approach mechanical instability at T = 0 . We show that thermal fluctuations stabilize both lattices. In particular, the triangular lattice displays a critical regime in which the shear modulus scales as G ~T 1 / 2 , whereas the square lattice shows G ~T 2 / 3 . We discuss generic scaling laws for finite T mechanical instabilities and relate to experimental systems including jamming and glass transitions.

  12. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with a block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement technique.

    PubMed

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2014-03-01

    An adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) algorithm for the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) is presented in this study. The idea behind the proposed AMR is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure. Instead, pointer attributes are used to determine the neighbors of a certain block via appropriate adjustment of its children identifications. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with an efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. To allow different mesh sizes at separate parts of the computational domain, the Eulerian formulation of the streaming process is invoked. As a result, there is no need for rescaling the distribution functions or using a temporal interpolation at the fine-coarse grid boundaries. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed FDLBM AMR are extensively assessed by investigating a variety of vorticity-dominated flow fields, including Taylor-Green vortex flow, lid-driven cavity flow, thin shear layer flow, and the flow past a square cylinder.

  13. Finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method with a block-structured adaptive-mesh-refinement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2014-03-01

    An adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) algorithm for the finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) is presented in this study. The idea behind the proposed AMR is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure. Instead, pointer attributes are used to determine the neighbors of a certain block via appropriate adjustment of its children identifications. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with an efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. To allow different mesh sizes at separate parts of the computational domain, the Eulerian formulation of the streaming process is invoked. As a result, there is no need for rescaling the distribution functions or using a temporal interpolation at the fine-coarse grid boundaries. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed FDLBM AMR are extensively assessed by investigating a variety of vorticity-dominated flow fields, including Taylor-Green vortex flow, lid-driven cavity flow, thin shear layer flow, and the flow past a square cylinder.

  14. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2006-07-23

    I discuss different approaches to finite density lattice QCD. In particular, I focus on the structure of the phase diagram and discuss attempts to determine the location of the critical end-point. Recent results on the transition line as function of the chemical potential (T{sub c}({mu}{sub q})) are reviewed. Along the transition line, hadronic fluctuations have been calculated; which can be used to characterize properties of the Quark Gluon plasma and eventually can also help to identify the location of the critical end-point in the QCD phase diagram on the lattice and in heavy ion experiments. Furthermore, I comment on the structure of the phase diagram at large {mu}{sub q}.

  15. PROGRESS IN LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    PETRECZKY,P.

    2007-02-11

    I review recent developments in lattice QCD at finite temperature, including the determination of the transition temperature T{sub c}, equation of state and different static screening lengths. The lattice data suggest that at temperatures above 1.5T{sub c} the quark gluon plasma can be considered as gas consisting of quarks and gluons.

  16. An Accurate Multi-level Finite Difference Scheme for 1D Diffusion Equations Derived from the Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Shinsuke

    2010-08-01

    An accurate and unconditionally stable explicit finite difference scheme for 1D diffusion equations is derived from the lattice Boltzmann method with rest particles. The system of the lattice Boltzmann equations for the distribution of the number of the fictitious particles is rewritten as a four-level explicit finite difference equation for the concentration of the diffused matter with two parameters. The consistency analysis of the four-level scheme shows that the two parameters which appear in the scheme, the relaxation parameter and the amount of rest particles, can be determined such that the scheme has the truncation error of fourth order. Numerical experiments demonstrate the fourth-order rate of convergence for various combinations of model parameters.

  17. High-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite-difference formulation of the lattice Boltzmann method in generalized curvilinear coordinates.

    PubMed

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Saadat, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Sina

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (WENOLBM) is developed and assessed for an accurate simulation of incompressible flows. To handle curved geometries with nonuniform grids, the incompressible form of the discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation is transformed into the generalized curvilinear coordinates and the spatial derivatives of the resulting lattice Boltzmann equation in the computational plane are solved using the fifth-order WENO scheme. The first-order implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme and also the fourth-order Runge-Kutta explicit time integrating scheme are adopted for the discretization of the temporal term. To examine the accuracy and performance of the present solution procedure based on the WENOLBM developed, different benchmark test cases are simulated as follows: unsteady Taylor-Green vortex, unsteady doubly periodic shear layer flow, steady flow in a two-dimensional (2D) cavity, steady cylindrical Couette flow, steady flow over a 2D circular cylinder, and steady and unsteady flows over a NACA0012 hydrofoil at different flow conditions. Results of the present solution are compared with the existing numerical and experimental results which show good agreement. To show the efficiency and accuracy of the solution methodology, the results are also compared with the developed second-order central-difference finite-volume lattice Boltzmann method and the compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. It is shown that the present numerical scheme is robust, efficient, and accurate for solving steady and unsteady incompressible flows even at high Reynolds number flows.

  18. High-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite-difference formulation of the lattice Boltzmann method in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Saadat, Mohammad Hossein; Taheri, Sina

    2017-02-01

    In this work, a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (WENOLBM) is developed and assessed for an accurate simulation of incompressible flows. To handle curved geometries with nonuniform grids, the incompressible form of the discrete Boltzmann equation with the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) approximation is transformed into the generalized curvilinear coordinates and the spatial derivatives of the resulting lattice Boltzmann equation in the computational plane are solved using the fifth-order WENO scheme. The first-order implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme and also the fourth-order Runge-Kutta explicit time integrating scheme are adopted for the discretization of the temporal term. To examine the accuracy and performance of the present solution procedure based on the WENOLBM developed, different benchmark test cases are simulated as follows: unsteady Taylor-Green vortex, unsteady doubly periodic shear layer flow, steady flow in a two-dimensional (2D) cavity, steady cylindrical Couette flow, steady flow over a 2D circular cylinder, and steady and unsteady flows over a NACA0012 hydrofoil at different flow conditions. Results of the present solution are compared with the existing numerical and experimental results which show good agreement. To show the efficiency and accuracy of the solution methodology, the results are also compared with the developed second-order central-difference finite-volume lattice Boltzmann method and the compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method. It is shown that the present numerical scheme is robust, efficient, and accurate for solving steady and unsteady incompressible flows even at high Reynolds number flows.

  19. Exact finite-size corrections of the free energy for the square lattice dimer model under different boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Izmailian, N Sh; Oganesyan, K B; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2003-06-01

    We express the partition functions of the dimer model on finite square lattices under five different boundary conditions (free, cylindrical, toroidal, Möbius strip, and Klein bottle) obtained by others (Kasteleyn, Temperley and Fisher, McCoy and Wu, Brankov and Priezzhev, and Lu and Wu) in terms of the partition functions with twisted boundary conditions Z(alpha, beta) with (alpha, beta)=(1/2,0), (0,1/2) and (1/2,1/2). Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich, Izmailian, and Hu [J. Phys. A 35, 5543 (2002)] to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. We find that the aspect-ratio dependence of finite-size corrections is sensitive to boundary conditions and the parity of the number of lattice sites along the lattice axis. We have also established several groups of identities relating dimer partition functions for the different boundary conditions.

  20. Exact finite-size corrections of the free energy for the square lattice dimer model under different boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2003-06-01

    We express the partition functions of the dimer model on finite square lattices under five different boundary conditions (free, cylindrical, toroidal, Möbius strip, and Klein bottle) obtained by others (Kasteleyn, Temperley and Fisher, McCoy and Wu, Brankov and Priezzhev, and Lu and Wu) in terms of the partition functions with twisted boundary conditions Zα,β with (α,β)=(1/2,0), (0,1/2) and (1/2,1/2). Based on such expressions, we then extend the algorithm of Ivashkevich, Izmailian, and Hu [J. Phys. A 35, 5543 (2002)] to derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function for all boundary conditions mentioned above. We find that the aspect-ratio dependence of finite-size corrections is sensitive to boundary conditions and the parity of the number of lattice sites along the lattice axis. We have also established several groups of identities relating dimer partition functions for the different boundary conditions.

  1. Velocity slip and temperature jump simulations by the three-dimensional thermal finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Watari, Minoru

    2009-06-01

    Two problems exist in the current studies on the application of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) to rarefied gas dynamics. First, most studies so far are applications of two-dimensional models. The numbers of velocity particles are small. Consequently, the boundary-condition methods of these studies are not directly applicable to a multispeed finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (FDLBM) that has many velocity particles. Second, the LBM and FDLBM share their origins with the Boltzmann equation. Therefore, the results of LBM and FDLBM studies should be verified by the results of the continuous Boltzmann equation. In my review to date on the LBM studies, it appears that such verifications were seldom done. In this study, velocity slip and temperature jump simulations in the slip-flow regime were conducted using a three-dimensional FDLBM model. The results were compared with preceding theoretical studies based on the continuous Boltzmann equation. The results agreed with the theory with errors of a few percent. To further improve the accuracy of the FDLBM, it seems necessary to increase the number of velocity particles.

  2. Coupled lattice-Boltzmann and finite-difference simulation of electroosmosis in microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Kandhai, Drona; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2004-10-01

    In this article we are concerned with an extension of the lattice-Boltzmann method for the numerical simulation of three-dimensional electroosmotic flow problems in porous media. Our description is evaluated using simple geometries as those encountered in open-channel microfluidic devices. In particular, we consider electroosmosis in straight cylindrical capillaries with a (non)uniform zeta-potential distribution for ratios of the capillary inner radius to the thickness of the electrical double layer from 10 to 100. The general case of heterogeneous zeta-potential distributions at the surface of a capillary requires solution of the following coupled equations in three dimensions: Navier-Stokes equation for liquid flow, Poisson equation for electrical potential distribution, and the Nernst-Planck equation for distribution of ionic species. The hydrodynamic problem has been treated with high efficiency by code parallelization through the lattice-Boltzmann method. For validation velocity fields were simulated in several microcapillary systems and good agreement with results predicted either theoretically or obtained by alternative numerical methods could be established. Results are also discussed with respect to the use of a slip boundary condition for the velocity field at the surface.

  3. Percolation in finite matching lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Stephan; Ziff, Robert M.

    2016-12-01

    We derive an exact, simple relation between the average number of clusters and the wrapping probabilities for two-dimensional percolation. The relation holds for periodic lattices of any size. It generalizes a classical result of Sykes and Essam, and it can be used to find exact or very accurate approximations of the critical density. The criterion that follows is related to the criterion used by Scullard and Jacobsen to find precise approximate thresholds, and our work provides a different perspective on their approach.

  4. Finite-temperature mechanical instability in disordered lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Leyou; Mao, Xiaoming

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical instability takes different forms in various ordered and disordered systems and little is known about how thermal fluctuations affect different classes of mechanical instabilities. We develop an analytic theory involving renormalization of rigidity and coherent potential approximation that can be used to understand finite-temperature mechanical stabilities in various disordered systems. We use this theory to study two disordered lattices: a randomly diluted triangular lattice and a randomly braced square lattice. These two lattices belong to two different universality classes as they approach mechanical instability at T =0 . We show that thermal fluctuations stabilize both lattices. In particular, the triangular lattice displays a critical regime in which the shear modulus scales as G ˜T1 /2 , whereas the square lattice shows G ˜T2 /3 . We discuss generic scaling laws for finite-T mechanical instabilities and relate them to experimental systems.

  5. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUM,T.; CREUTZ,M.; PETRECZKY,P.

    2004-02-24

    With the operation of the RHIC heavy ion program, the theoretical understanding of QCD at finite temperature and density has become increasingly important. Though QCD at finite temperature has been extensively studied using lattice Monte-Carlo simulations over the past twenty years, most physical questions relevant for RHIC (and future) heavy ion experiments remain open. In lattice QCD at finite temperature and density there have been at least two major advances in recent years. First, for the first time calculations of real time quantities, like meson spectral functions have become available. Second, the lattice study of the QCD phase diagram and equation of state have been extended to finite baryon density by several groups. Both issues were extensively discussed in the course of the workshop. A real highlight was the study of the QCD phase diagram in (T, {mu})-plane by Z. Fodor and S. Katz and the determination of the critical end-point for the physical value of the pion mass. This was the first time such lattice calculations at, the physical pion mass have been performed. Results by Z Fodor and S. Katz were obtained using a multi-parameter re-weighting method. Other determinations of the critical end point were also presented, in particular using a Taylor expansion around {mu} = 0 (Bielefeld group, Ejiri et al.) and using analytic continuation from imaginary chemical potential (Ph. de Forcrand and O. Philipsen). The result based on Taylor expansion agrees within errors with the new prediction of Z. Fodor and S. Katz, while methods based on analytic continuation still predict a higher value for the critical baryon density. Most of the thermodynamics studies in full QCD (including those presented at this workshop) have been performed using quite coarse lattices, a = 0.2-0.3 fm. Therefore one may worry about cutoff effects in different thermodynamic quantities, like the transition temperature T{sub tr}. At the workshop U. Heller presented a study of the transition

  6. Frontiers of finite temperature lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Szabolcs

    2017-03-01

    I review a selection of recent finite temperature lattice results of the past years. First I discuss the extension of the equation of state towards high temperatures and finite densities, then I show recent results on the QCD topological susceptibility at high temperatures and highlight its relevance for dark matter search.

  7. A Block-Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Technique with a Finite-Difference-Based Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhari, Abbas; Lee, Taehun

    2013-11-01

    A novel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for the numerical solution of fluid flow problems is presented in this study. The proposed AMR algorithm can be used to solve partial differential equations including, but not limited to, the Navier-Stokes equations using an AMR technique. Here, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed as a substitute of the nearly incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Besides its simplicity, the proposed AMR algorithm is straightforward and yet efficient. The idea is to remove the need for a tree-type data structure by using the pointer attributes in a unique way, along with an appropriate adjustment of the child block's IDs, to determine the neighbors of a certain block. Thanks to the unique way of invoking pointers, there is no need to construct a quad-tree (in 2D) or oct-tree (in 3D) data structure for maintaining the connectivity data between different blocks. As a result, the memory and time required for tree traversal are completely eliminated, leaving us with a clean and efficient algorithm that is easier to implement and use on parallel machines. Several benchmark studies are carried out to assess the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed AMR-LBM, including lid-driven cavity flow, vortex shedding past a square cylinder, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability for single-phase and multiphase fluids.

  8. Simulation of two-phase liquid-vapor flows using a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Ezzatneshan, Eslam

    2015-11-01

    A high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (CFDLBM) is extended and applied to accurately simulate two-phase liquid-vapor flows with high density ratios. Herein, the He-Shan-Doolen-type lattice Boltzmann multiphase model is used and the spatial derivatives in the resulting equations are discretized by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference scheme and the temporal term is discretized with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to provide an accurate and efficient two-phase flow solver. A high-order spectral-type low-pass compact nonlinear filter is used to regularize the numerical solution and remove spurious waves generated by flow nonlinearities in smooth regions and at the same time to remove the numerical oscillations in the interfacial region between the two phases. Three discontinuity-detecting sensors for properly switching between a second-order and a higher-order filter are applied and assessed. It is shown that the filtering technique used can be conveniently adopted to reduce the spurious numerical effects and improve the numerical stability of the CFDLBM implemented. A sensitivity study is also conducted to evaluate the effects of grid size and the filtering procedure implemented on the accuracy and performance of the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed solution procedure based on the compact finite-difference LBM are examined by solving different two-phase systems. Five test cases considered herein for validating the results of the two-phase flows are an equilibrium state of a planar interface in a liquid-vapor system, a droplet suspended in the gaseous phase, a liquid droplet located between two parallel wettable surfaces, the coalescence of two droplets, and a phase separation in a liquid-vapor system at different conditions. Numerical results are also presented for the coexistence curve and the verification of the Laplace law. Results obtained are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and also

  9. Simulation of two-phase liquid-vapor flows using a high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejranfar, Kazem; Ezzatneshan, Eslam

    2015-11-01

    A high-order compact finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method (CFDLBM) is extended and applied to accurately simulate two-phase liquid-vapor flows with high density ratios. Herein, the He-Shan-Doolen-type lattice Boltzmann multiphase model is used and the spatial derivatives in the resulting equations are discretized by using the fourth-order compact finite-difference scheme and the temporal term is discretized with the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme to provide an accurate and efficient two-phase flow solver. A high-order spectral-type low-pass compact nonlinear filter is used to regularize the numerical solution and remove spurious waves generated by flow nonlinearities in smooth regions and at the same time to remove the numerical oscillations in the interfacial region between the two phases. Three discontinuity-detecting sensors for properly switching between a second-order and a higher-order filter are applied and assessed. It is shown that the filtering technique used can be conveniently adopted to reduce the spurious numerical effects and improve the numerical stability of the CFDLBM implemented. A sensitivity study is also conducted to evaluate the effects of grid size and the filtering procedure implemented on the accuracy and performance of the solution. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed solution procedure based on the compact finite-difference LBM are examined by solving different two-phase systems. Five test cases considered herein for validating the results of the two-phase flows are an equilibrium state of a planar interface in a liquid-vapor system, a droplet suspended in the gaseous phase, a liquid droplet located between two parallel wettable surfaces, the coalescence of two droplets, and a phase separation in a liquid-vapor system at different conditions. Numerical results are also presented for the coexistence curve and the verification of the Laplace law. Results obtained are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and also

  10. A hybrid wavelet-based adaptive immersed boundary finite-difference lattice Boltzmann method for two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiongwei; Yao, Xiongliang; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Minghao

    2017-03-01

    A second generation wavelet-based adaptive finite-difference Lattice Boltzmann method (FD-LBM) is developed in this paper. In this approach, the adaptive wavelet collocation method (AWCM) is firstly, to the best of our knowledge, incorporated into the FD-LBM. According to the grid refinement criterion based on the wavelet amplitudes of density distribution functions, an adaptive sparse grid is generated by the omission and addition of collocation points. On the sparse grid, the finite differences are used to approximate the derivatives. To eliminate the special treatments in using the FD-based derivative approximation near boundaries, the immersed boundary method (IBM) is also introduced into FD-LBM. By using the adaptive technique, the adaptive code requires much less grid points as compared to the uniform-mesh code. As a consequence, the computational efficiency can be improved. To justify the proposed method, a series of test cases, including fixed boundary cases and moving boundary cases, are invested. A good agreement between the present results and the data in previous literatures is obtained, which demonstrates the accuracy and effectiveness of the present AWCM-IB-LBM.

  11. Finite-size effect in lattice QCD hadron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Mino, H.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A. Faculty of Engineering, Yamanashi University, Kofu 400 National Laboratory for High Energy Physics , Ibaraki 305 Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 )

    1992-02-10

    A hadron spectrum calculation with two light dynamical quark flavors was carried out with the Kogut-Susskind quark action at {beta}=5.7 on lattices of spatial size 8{sup 3}, 12{sup 3}, and 20{sup 3} for {ital m}{sub {ital q}}=0.01 and 0.02 in lattice units, with emphasis given to a systematic study of the finite-lattice-size effect. It is found that hadron masses on a 16{sup 3} spatial lattice at this {beta} still suffer from a significant finite-lattice effect at least for {ital m}{sub {ital q}}=0.01, showing the importance of a quantitative control over the finite-size effect in comparing simulation results with the experimental hadron masses even for a fairly large lattice. A comparison is also made to the analytic prediction for the finite-size effect from chiral perturbation theory.

  12. Exact solution of the dimer model on the generalized finite checkerboard lattice.

    PubMed

    Izmailian, N Sh; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kenna, R

    2015-06-01

    We present the exact closed-form expression for the partition function of a dimer model on a generalized finite checkerboard rectangular lattice under periodic boundary conditions. We investigate three different sets of dimer weights, each with different critical behaviors. We then consider different limits for the model on the three lattices. In one limit, the model for each of the three lattices is reduced to the dimer model on a rectangular lattice, which belongs to the c=-2 universality class. In another limit, two of the lattices reduce to the anisotropic Kasteleyn model on a honeycomb lattice, the universality class of which is given by c=1. The result that the dimer model on a generalized checkerboard rectangular lattice can manifest different critical behaviors is consistent with early studies in the thermodynamic limit and also provides insight into corrections to scaling arising from the finite-size versions of the model.

  13. Nucleon resonance structure in the finite volume of lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Kamano, H.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Leinweber, D. B.; Thomas, A. W.

    2017-06-01

    An approach for relating the nucleon resonances extracted from π N reaction data to lattice QCD calculations has been developed by using the finite-volume Hamiltonian method. Within models of π N reactions, bare states are introduced to parametrize the intrinsic excitations of the nucleon. We show that the resonance can be related to the probability PN*(E) of finding the bare state, N*, in the π N scattering states in infinite volume. We further demonstrate that the probability PN*V(E) of finding the same bare states in the eigenfunctions of the underlying Hamiltonian in finite volume approaches PN*(E) as the volume increases. Our findings suggest that the comparison of PN* (E) and PN*V(E) can be used to examine whether the nucleon resonances extracted from the π N reaction data within the dynamical models are consistent with lattice QCD calculation. We also discuss the measurement of PN*V(E) directly from lattice QCD. The practical differences between our approach and the approach using the Lüscher formalism to relate LQCD calculations to the nucleon resonance poles embedded in the data are also discussed.

  14. Nucleon resonance structure in the finite volume of lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Jia -Jun; Kamano, H.; Lee, T. -S. H.; ...

    2017-06-19

    An approach for relating the nucleon resonances extracted from πN reaction data to lattice QCD calculations has been developed by using the finite-volume Hamiltonian method. Within models of πN reactions, bare states are introduced to parametrize the intrinsic excitations of the nucleon. We show that the resonance can be related to the probability PN*(E) of finding the bare state, N*, in the πN scattering states in infinite volume. We further demonstrate that the probability PVN*(E) of finding the same bare states in the eigenfunctions of the underlying Hamiltonian in finite volume approaches PN*(E) as the volume increases. Our findings suggestmore » that the comparison of PN*(E) and PVN*(E) can be used to examine whether the nucleon resonances extracted from the πN reaction data within the dynamical models are consistent with lattice QCD calculation. We also discuss the measurement of PVN*(E) directly from lattice QCD. Furthermore, the practical differences between our approach and the approach using the Lüscher formalism to relate LQCD calculations to the nucleon resonance poles embedded in the data are also discussed.« less

  15. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  16. Finite-size test for the finite-temperature chiral phase transition in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Mino, H.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A. Faculty of Engineering, Yamanashi University, Kofu National Laboratory for High Energy Physics , Ibaraki Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki )

    1990-08-13

    A finite-size test was carried out for the finite-temperature chiral phase transition in QCD for flavor number {ital N}{sub {ital f}}=4 and 2 on a lattice with four time slices using the Kogut-Susskind quark action at quark mass of 0.025 in lattice units. All the evidence supports a first-order transition for {ital N}{sub {ital f}}=4. For {ital N}{sub {ital f}}=2, however, the data on spatial lattice up to 12{sup 3} fail to yield convincing finite-size signatures for a first-order transition at this quark mass.

  17. Synergistic development of differential approximants and the finite lattice method in lattice statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enting, I. G.

    2017-04-01

    Several decades of parallel developments in the calculation and analysis of series expansions for lattice statistics have led to many new insights into critical phenomena. These studies have centered on the use of the finite lattice method for series expansions in lattice statistics and the use of differential approximants in analysing such series. One of these strands of research ultimately led to the result that a number of unsolved lattice statistics problems cannot be expressed as D-finite functions. Somewhat ironically, given power and success of differential approximants in analysing series, neither the assumed functional form, nor any finite generalisation thereof can fit such cases exactly. In honour of the 70th birthday for Professor A J Guttmann

  18. Phase transition in finite density and temperature lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhao-Feng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the behavior of the chiral condensate in lattice QCD at finite temperature and finite chemical potential. The study was done using two flavors of light quarks and with a series of β and ma at the lattice size 24 × 122 × 6. The calculation was done in the Taylor expansion formalism. We are able to calculate the first and second order derivatives of ≤ft< {\\bar{\\psi} \\psi } \\right> in both isoscalar and isovector channels. With the first derivatives being small, we find that the second derivatives are sizable close to the phase transition and that the magnitude of \\bar{\\psi} \\psi decreases under the influence of finite chemical potential in both channels. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335001, 11105153, 11405178), Projects of International Cooperation and Exchanges NSFC (11261130311)

  19. Mimetic finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method mimics fundamental properties of mathematical and physical systems including conservation laws, symmetry and positivity of solutions, duality and self-adjointness of differential operators, and exact mathematical identities of the vector and tensor calculus. This article is the first comprehensive review of the 50-year long history of the mimetic methodology and describes in a systematic way the major mimetic ideas and their relevance to academic and real-life problems. The supporting applications include diffusion, electromagnetics, fluid flow, and Lagrangian hydrodynamics problems. The article provides enough details to build various discrete operators on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes and summarizes the major convergence results for the mimetic approximations. Most of these theoretical results, which are presented here as lemmas, propositions and theorems, are either original or an extension of existing results to a more general formulation using polyhedral meshes. Finally, flexibility and extensibility of the mimetic methodology are shown by deriving higher-order approximations, enforcing discrete maximum principles for diffusion problems, and ensuring the numerical stability for saddle-point systems.

  20. Study of coupled double diffusive convection-radiation in a tilted cavity via a hybrid multi-relaxation time-lattice Boltzmann-finite difference and discrete ordinate methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufekkir, Fayçal; Moussaoui, Mohammed Amine; Mezrhab, Ahmed; Naji, Hassan

    2014-09-01

    The coupled double diffusive natural convection and radiation in a tilted and differentially heated square cavity containing a non-gray air-CO2 (or air-H2O) mixtures was numerically investigated. The horizontal walls are insulated and impermeable and the vertical walls are maintained at different temperatures and concentrations. The hybrid lattice Boltzmann method with the multiple-relaxation time model is used to compute the hydrodynamics and the finite difference method to determine temperatures and concentrations. The discrete ordinates method combined to the spectral line-based weighted sum of gray gases model is used to compute the radiative term and its spectral aspect. The effects of the inclination angle on the flow, thermal and concentration fields are analyzed for both aiding and opposing cases. It was found that radiation gas modifies the structure of the velocity and thermal fields by generating inclined stratifications and promoting the instabilities in opposing flows.

  1. Study of coupled double diffusive convection-radiation in a tilted cavity via a hybrid multi-relaxation time-lattice Boltzmann-finite difference and discrete ordinate methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufekkir, Fayçal; Moussaoui, Mohammed Amine; Mezrhab, Ahmed; Naji, Hassan

    2015-04-01

    The coupled double diffusive natural convection and radiation in a tilted and differentially heated square cavity containing a non-gray air-CO2 (or air-H2O) mixtures was numerically investigated. The horizontal walls are insulated and impermeable and the vertical walls are maintained at different temperatures and concentrations. The hybrid lattice Boltzmann method with the multiple-relaxation time model is used to compute the hydrodynamics and the finite difference method to determine temperatures and concentrations. The discrete ordinates method combined to the spectral line-based weighted sum of gray gases model is used to compute the radiative term and its spectral aspect. The effects of the inclination angle on the flow, thermal and concentration fields are analyzed for both aiding and opposing cases. It was found that radiation gas modifies the structure of the velocity and thermal fields by generating inclined stratifications and promoting the instabilities in opposing flows.

  2. Lattice QCD at finite temperature and density from Taylor expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecher, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    In the first part, I present an overview of recent Lattice QCD simulations at finite temperature and density. In particular, we discuss fluctuations of conserved charges: baryon number, electric charge and strangeness. These can be obtained from Taylor expanding the QCD pressure as a function of corresponding chemical potentials. Our simulations were performed using quark masses corresponding to physical pion mass of about 140 MeV and allow a direct comparison to experimental data from ultra-relativistic heavy ion beams at hadron colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In the second part, we discuss computational challenges for current and future exascale Lattice simulations with a focus on new silicon developments from Intel and NVIDIA.

  3. Hofstadter butterfly in the Falicov-Kimball model on some finite 2D lattices.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Subhasree

    2016-12-21

    Spinless, interacting electrons on a finite size triangular lattice moving in an extremely strong perpendicular magnetic field are studied in comparison to a square lattice. Using a Falicov-Kimball model, the effects of Coulomb correlation, magnetic field and finite system size on their energy spectrum are observed. Exact diagonalization and Monte Carlo simulation methods (based on a modified Metropolis algorithm) have been employed to examine the recursive structure of the Hofstadter spectrum in the presence of several electronic correlation strengths for different system sizes. It is possible to introduce a gap in the density of states even in the absence of electron correlation, which is anticipated as a metal to insulator transition driven by an orbital magnetic field. With further inclusion of the interaction, the gap in the spectrum is modified and in some cases the correlation is found to suppress extra states manifested by the finite size effects. At a certain flux, the opened gap due to magnetic field is reduced by the Coulomb interaction. An orbital current is calculated for both the square and the triangular lattice with and without electron correlation. In the non-interacting limit, the bulk current shows several patterns, while the edge current shows oscillations with magnetic flux. The oscillations persist in the interacting limit for the square lattice, but not for the triangular lattice.

  4. Hofstadter butterfly in the Falicov-Kimball model on some finite 2D lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Subhasree

    2016-12-01

    Spinless, interacting electrons on a finite size triangular lattice moving in an extremely strong perpendicular magnetic field are studied in comparison to a square lattice. Using a Falicov-Kimball model, the effects of Coulomb correlation, magnetic field and finite system size on their energy spectrum are observed. Exact diagonalization and Monte Carlo simulation methods (based on a modified Metropolis algorithm) have been employed to examine the recursive structure of the Hofstadter spectrum in the presence of several electronic correlation strengths for different system sizes. It is possible to introduce a gap in the density of states even in the absence of electron correlation, which is anticipated as a metal to insulator transition driven by an orbital magnetic field. With further inclusion of the interaction, the gap in the spectrum is modified and in some cases the correlation is found to suppress extra states manifested by the finite size effects. At a certain flux, the opened gap due to magnetic field is reduced by the Coulomb interaction. An orbital current is calculated for both the square and the triangular lattice with and without electron correlation. In the non-interacting limit, the bulk current shows several patterns, while the edge current shows oscillations with magnetic flux. The oscillations persist in the interacting limit for the square lattice, but not for the triangular lattice.

  5. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  6. Interquark Potential with Finite Quark Mass from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanai, Taichi; Sasaki, Shoichi

    2011-08-26

    We present an investigation of the interquark potential determined from the qq Bethe-Salpeter (BS) amplitude for heavy quarkonia in lattice QCD. The qq potential at finite quark mass m{sub q} can be calculated from the equal-time and Coulomb gauge BS amplitude through the effective Schroedinger equation. The definition of the potential itself requires information about a kinetic mass of the quark. We then propose a self-consistent determination of the quark kinetic mass on the same footing. To verify the proposed method, we perform quenched lattice QCD simulations with a relativistic heavy-quark action at a lattice cutoff of 1/a{approx_equal}2.1 GeV in a range 1.0{<=}m{sub q}{<=}3.6 GeV. Our numerical results show that the qq potential in the m{sub q}{yields}{infinity} limit is fairly consistent with the conventional one obtained from Wilson loops. The quark-mass dependence of the qq potential and the spin-spin potential are also examined.

  7. Interquark potential with finite quark mass from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Kawanai, Taichi; Sasaki, Shoichi

    2011-08-26

    We present an investigation of the interquark potential determined from the q ̄q Bethe-Salpeter (BS) amplitude for heavy quarkonia in lattice QCD. The q ̄q potential at finite quark mass m(q) can be calculated from the equal-time and Coulomb gauge BS amplitude through the effective Schrödinger equation. The definition of the potential itself requires information about a kinetic mass of the quark. We then propose a self-consistent determination of the quark kinetic mass on the same footing. To verify the proposed method, we perform quenched lattice QCD simulations with a relativistic heavy-quark action at a lattice cutoff of 1/a≈2.1  GeV in a range 1.0≤m(q)≤3.6 GeV. Our numerical results show that the q ̄q potential in the m(q)→∞ limit is fairly consistent with the conventional one obtained from Wilson loops. The quark-mass dependence of the q ̄q potential and the spin-spin potential are also examined. © 2011 American Physical Society

  8. Random walks on finite lattices with multiple traps: Application to particle-cluster aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.; Nord, R. S.

    1985-11-01

    For random walks on finite lattices with multiple (completely adsorbing) traps, one is interested in the mean walk length until trapping and in the probability of capture for the various traps (either for a walk with a specific starting site, or for an average over all nontrap sites). We develop the formulation of Montroll to enable determination of the large-lattice-size asymptotic behavior of these quantities. (Only the case of a single trap has been analyzed in detail previously.) Explicit results are given for the case of symmetric nearest-neighbor random walks on two-dimensional (2D) square and triangular lattices. Procedures for exact calculation of walk lengths on a finite lattice with a single trap are extended to the multiple-trap case to determine all the above quantities. We examine convergence to asymptotic behavior as the lattice size increases. Connection with Witten-Sander irreversible particle-cluster aggregation is made by noting that this process corresponds to designating all sites adjacent to the cluster as traps. Thus capture probabilities for different traps determine the proportions of the various shaped clusters formed. (Reciprocals of) associated average walk lengths relate to rates for various irreversible aggregation processes involving a gas of walkers and clusters. Results are also presented for some of these quantities.

  9. Obtaining local reciprocal lattice vectors from finite-element analysis.

    PubMed

    Sutter, John P; Connolley, Thomas; Hill, Tim P; Huang, Houcheng; Sharp, Doug W; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Finite-element analysis is frequently used by engineers at synchrotron beamlines to calculate the elastic deformation of a single crystal undergoing mechanical bending or thermal load. ANSYS Workbench software is widely used for such simulations. However, although ANSYS Workbench software provides useful information on the displacements, strains and stresses within the crystal, it does not yield the local reciprocal lattice vectors that would be required for X-ray diffraction calculations. To bridge this gap, a method based on the shape functions and interpolation procedures of the software itself has been developed. An application to the double-crystal bent Laue monochromator being designed for the I12 (JEEP) wiggler beamline at the Diamond Light Source is presented.

  10. Direct Lattice Shaking of Bose Condensates: Finite Momentum Superfluids

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Clark, Logan W.; Crawford, Jennifer; ...

    2017-05-31

    Here, we address band engineering in the presence of periodic driving by numerically shaking a lattice containing a bosonic condensate. By not restricting to simplified band structure models we are able to address arbitrary values of the shaking frequency, amplitude, and interaction strengths g. For "near-resonant" shaking frequencies with moderate g, a quantum phase transition to a finite momentum superfluid is obtained with Kibble-Zurek scaling and quantitative agreement with experiment. We use this successful calibration as a platform to support a more general investigation of the interplay between (one particle) Floquet theory and the effects associated with arbitrary g. Bandmore » crossings lead to superfluid destabilization, but where this occurs depends on g in a complicated fashion.« less

  11. Direct Lattice Shaking of Bose Condensates: Finite Momentum Superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Clark, Logan W.; Crawford, Jennifer; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.; Scherpelz, Peter; Feng, Lei; Chin, Cheng; Levin, K.

    2017-06-01

    We address band engineering in the presence of periodic driving by numerically shaking a lattice containing a bosonic condensate. By not restricting to simplified band structure models we are able to address arbitrary values of the shaking frequency, amplitude, and interaction strengths g . For "near-resonant" shaking frequencies with moderate g , a quantum phase transition to a finite momentum superfluid is obtained with Kibble-Zurek scaling and quantitative agreement with experiment. We use this successful calibration as a platform to support a more general investigation of the interplay between (one particle) Floquet theory and the effects associated with arbitrary g . Band crossings lead to superfluid destabilization, but where this occurs depends on g in a complicated fashion.

  12. Upwind Compact Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I.

    1985-07-01

    It was shown by Ciment, Leventhal, and Weinberg ( J. Comput. Phys.28 (1978), 135) that the standard compact finite difference scheme may break down in convection dominated problems. An upwinding of the method, which maintains the fourth order accuracy, is suggested and favorable numerical results are found for a number of test problems.

  13. The finite temperature behaviour of lattice QCD with moderate to large quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    Simulations of lattice QCD with 4 flavours of staggered quarks were performed using the Hybrid algorithm on a 12/sup 3/ /times/ 4 lattice. For quark masses greater than or equal to.1 (lattice units) the finite temperature transition did not appear to be first order. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Finite size effects on the helical edge states on the Lieb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Chen; Bin, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    For a two-dimensional Lieb lattice, that is, a line-centered square lattice, the inclusion of the intrinsic spin-orbit (ISO) coupling opens a topologically nontrivial gap, and gives rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect characterized by two pairs of gapless helical edge states within the bulk gap. Generally, due to the finite size effect in QSH systems, the edge states on the two sides of a strip of finite width can couple together to open a gap in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate the finite size effect of helical edge states on the Lieb lattice with ISO coupling under three different kinds of boundary conditions, i.e., the straight, bearded and asymmetry edges. The spectrum and wave function of edge modes are derived analytically for a tight-binding model on the Lieb lattice. For a strip Lieb lattice with two straight edges, the ISO coupling induces the Dirac-like bulk states to localize at the edges to become the helical edge states with the same Dirac-like spectrum. Moreover, it is found that in the case with two straight edges the gapless Dirac-like spectrum remains unchanged with decreasing the width of the strip Lieb lattice, and no gap is opened in the edge band. It is concluded that the finite size effect of QSH states is absent in the case with the straight edges. However, in the other two cases with the bearded and asymmetry edges, the energy gap induced by the finite size effect is still opened with decreasing the width of the strip. It is also proposed that the edge band dispersion can be controlled by applying an on-site potential energy on the outermost atoms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11274102), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University of the Ministry of Education of China (Grant No. NCET-11-0960), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of the Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20134208110001).

  15. Lattice approach to finite volume form-factors of the Massive Thirring (Sine-Gordon) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedűs, Árpád

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we demonstrate, that the light-cone lattice approach for the Massive-Thirring (sine-Gordon) model, through the quantum inverse scattering method, admits an appropriate framework for computing the finite volume form-factors of local operators of the model. In this work we compute the finite volume diagonal matrix elements of the U(1) conserved current in the pure soliton sector of the theory. Based on the systematic large volume expansion of our results, we conjecture an exact expression for the finite volume expectation values of local operators in pure soliton states. At large volume in leading order these expectation values have the same form as in purely elastic scattering theories, but exponentially small corrections differ from previous Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz conjectures of purely elastic scattering theories.

  16. Finite-density corrections to the unitary Fermi gas: A lattice perspective from dynamical mean-field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Privitera, Antonio; Capone, Massimo; Castellani, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the approach to the universal regime of the dilute unitary Fermi gas as the density is reduced to zero in a lattice model. To this end we study the chemical potential, superfluid order parameter and internal energy of the attractive Hubbard model in three different lattices with densities of states (DOSs) which share the same low-energy behavior of fermions in three-dimensional free space: a cubic lattice, a 'Bethe lattice' with a semicircular DOS, and a 'lattice gas' with parabolic dispersion and a sharp energy cutoff that ensures the normalization of the DOS. The model is solved using dynamical mean-field theory, that treats directly the thermodynamic limit and arbitrarily low densities, eliminating finite-size effects. At densities on the order of one fermion per site the lattice and its specific form dominate the results. The evolution to the low-density limit is smooth and it does not allow to define an unambiguous low-density regime. Such finite-density effects are significantly reduced using the lattice gas, and they are maximal for the three-dimensional cubic lattice. Even though dynamical mean-field theory is bound to reduce to the more standard static mean field in the limit of zero density due to the local nature of the self-energy and of the vertex functions, it compares well with accurate Monte Carlo simulations down to the lowest densities accessible to the latter.

  17. Theoretical description of two ultracold atoms in finite three-dimensional optical lattices using realistic interatomic interaction potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Grishkevich, Sergey; Sala, Simon; Saenz, Alejandro

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical approach is described for an exact numerical treatment of a pair of ultracold atoms interacting via a central potential and that are trapped in a finite three-dimensional optical lattice. The coupling of center-of-mass and relative-motion coordinates is treated using an exact diagonalization (configuration-interaction) approach. The orthorhombic symmetry of an optical lattice with three different but orthogonal lattice vectors is explicitly considered as is the fermionic or bosonic symmetry in the case of indistinguishable particles.

  18. Finite difference neuroelectric modeling software.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hung V; Ng, Kwong T

    2011-06-15

    This paper describes a finite difference neuroelectric modeling software (FNS), written in C and MATLAB, which can be executed as a standalone program or integrated with other packages for electroencephalography (EEG) analysis. The package from the Oxford Center for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB), FMRIB Software Library (FSL), is used to segment the anatomical magnetic resonance (MR) image for realistic head modeling. The EEG electrode array is fitted to the realistic head model using the Bioelectromagnetism MATLAB toolbox. The finite difference formulation for a general inhomogeneous anisotropic body is used to obtain the system matrix equation, which is then solved using the conjugate gradient algorithm. The reciprocity theorem is utilized to limit the number of required forward solutions to N-1, where N is the number of electrodes. Results show that the forward solver only requires 500 MB of random-access memory (RAM) for a realistic 256×256×256 head model and that the software can be conveniently combined with inverse algorithms such as beamformers and MUSIC. The software is freely available under the GNU Public License.

  19. Finite-size effects of hadron masses in lattice QCD: A comparative study for quenched and full QCD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Umemura, T.; Fukugita, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Mino, H.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A. Yukawa Institute, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606 Faculty of Engineering, Yamanashi University, Kofu 404 National Laboratory for High Energy Physics , Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 )

    1994-07-01

    A study of finite-size effects is carried out for hadron masses in the quenched simulation of lattice QCD using the Kogut-Susskind quark action. It is found that finite-size effects for quenched QCD are much smaller than those for full QCD, when hadron masses for the two cases are compared at the same physical lattice size and lattice spacing. Based on an extensive study of the boundary condition dependence of hadron masses we ascribe the origin of the difference to a partial cancellation of the finite-size effects among the [ital Z](3)-related gauge configurations in quenched QCD; such a cancellation does not take place in full QCD due to [ital Z](3) breaking effects of dynamical quarks. However, this does not mean finite-size errors are negligible in quenched QCD for lattice sizes of 2 to 3 fm used in current simulations; a still significant finite-size shift of hadron masses, especially of the nucleon mass, would pose a serious hindrance to obtaining the hadron mass spectrum at the few percent level aimed at in current quenched QCD simulations.

  20. REMARKS ON THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD APPLIED TO FINITE TEMPERATURE LATTICE QCD.

    SciTech Connect

    UMEDA, T.; MATSUFURU, H.

    2005-07-25

    We make remarks on the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) for studies of the spectral function of hadronic correlators in finite temperature lattice QCD. We discuss the virtues and subtlety of MEM in the cases that one does not have enough number of data points such as at finite temperature. Taking these points into account, we suggest several tests which one should examine to keep the reliability for the results, and also apply them using mock and lattice QCD data.

  1. Finite lattice model for molecular aggregation equilibria. Boolean statistics, analytical approximations, and the macroscopic limit.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor; Widom, B

    2015-09-14

    Molecular processes, ranging from hydrophobic aggregation and protein binding to mesoscopic self-assembly, are typically driven by a delicate balance of energetic and entropic non-covalent interactions. Here, we focus on a broad class of such processes in which multiple ligands bind to a central solute molecule as a result of solute-ligand (direct) and/or ligand-ligand (cooperative) interaction energies. Previously, we described a weighted random mixing (WRM) mean-field model for such processes and compared the resulting adsorption isotherms and aggregate size distributions with exact finite lattice (FL) predictions, for lattices with up to n = 20 binding sites. Here, we compare FL predictions obtained using both Bethe-Guggenheim (BG) and WRM approximations, and find that the latter two approximations are complementary, as they are each most accurate in different aggregation regimes. Moreover, we describe a computationally efficient method for exhaustively counting nearest neighbors in FL configurations, thus making it feasible to obtain FL predictions for systems with up n = 48 binding sites, whose properties approach the thermodynamic (infinite lattice) limit. We further illustrate the applicability of our results by comparing lattice model and molecular dynamics simulation predictions pertaining to the aggregation of methane around neopentane.

  2. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  3. Discrete Dirac equation on a finite half-integer lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    The formulation of the Dirac equation on a discrete lattice with half-integer spacing and periodic boundary conditions is investigated analytically. The importance of lattice formulations for problems in field theory and quantum mechanics is explained; the concept of half-integer Fourier representation is introduced; the discrete Dirac equation for the two-dimensional case is derived; dispersion relations for the four-dimensional case are developed; and the spinor formulation for the Dirac fields on the half-integer lattice and the discrete time variable for the four-dimensional time-dependent Dirac equation are obtained. It is argued that the half-integer lattice, because it takes the Dirac Lagrangian into account, is more than a mere relabeling of the integer lattice and may have fundamental physical meaning (e.g., for the statistics of fermions). It is noted that the present formulation does not lead to species doubling, except in the continuum limit.

  4. Discrete Dirac equation on a finite half-integer lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1986-01-01

    The formulation of the Dirac equation on a discrete lattice with half-integer spacing and periodic boundary conditions is investigated analytically. The importance of lattice formulations for problems in field theory and quantum mechanics is explained; the concept of half-integer Fourier representation is introduced; the discrete Dirac equation for the two-dimensional case is derived; dispersion relations for the four-dimensional case are developed; and the spinor formulation for the Dirac fields on the half-integer lattice and the discrete time variable for the four-dimensional time-dependent Dirac equation are obtained. It is argued that the half-integer lattice, because it takes the Dirac Lagrangian into account, is more than a mere relabeling of the integer lattice and may have fundamental physical meaning (e.g., for the statistics of fermions). It is noted that the present formulation does not lead to species doubling, except in the continuum limit.

  5. A new approach for modelling lattice energy in finite crystal domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilotsky, Y.; Gasik, M.

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation of internal energy in a crystal lattice requires precise calculation of lattice sums. Such evaluation is a problem in the case of small (nano) particles because the traditional methods are usually effective only for infinite lattices and are adapted to certain specific potentials. In this work, a new method has been developed for calculation of lattice energy. The method is a generalisation of conventional geometric probability techniques for arbitrary fixed lattices in a finite crystal domain. In our model, the lattice energy for wide range of two- body central interaction potentials (including long-range Coulomb potential) has been constructed using absolutely convergent sums. No artificial cut-off potential or periodical extension of the domain (which usually involved for such calculations) have been made for calculation of the lattice energy under this approach. To exemplify the applications of these techniques, the energy of Coulomb potential has been plotted as the function of the domain size.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid crystal particulate flow in a channel with finite anchoring boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; de Pablo, Juan; dePablo Team

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystals (LC) posses anisotropic viscoelastic properties, and, as such, LC flow can be incredibly complicated. Here we employ a hybrid lattice Boltzmann method (pioneered by Deniston, Yeomans and Cates) to systematically study the hydrodynamics of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) with and without solid particles. This method evolves the velocity field through lattice Boltzmann and the LC-order parameter via a finite-difference solver of the Beris-Edwards equation. The evolution equation of the boundary points with finite anchoring is obtained through Poisson bracket formulation. Our method has been validated by matching the Ericksen-Leslie theory. We demonstrate two applications in the flow alignment regime. We first investigate a hybrid channel flow in which the top and bottom walls have different anchoring directions. By measuring the apparent shear viscosity in terms of Couette flow, we achieve a viscosity inhomogeneous system which may be applicable to nano particle processing. In the other example, we introduce a homeotropic spherical particle to the channel, and focus on the deformations of the defect ring due to anchorings and flow. The results are then compared to the molecular dynamics simulations of a colloid particle in an LC modeled by a Gay-Berne potential.

  7. Fluctuations of conserved charges at finite temperature from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Szabolcs; Fodor, Zoltán; Katz, Sándor D.; Krieg, Stefan; Ratti, Claudia; Szabó, Kálman

    2012-01-01

    We present the full results of the Wuppertal-Budapest lattice QCD collaboration on flavor diagonal and non-diagonal quark number susceptibilities with 2 + 1 staggered quark flavors, in a temperature range between 125 and 400 MeV. The light and strange quark masses are set to their physical values. Lattices with N t = 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 are used. We perform a continuum extrapolation of all observables under study. A Symanzik improved gauge and a stout-link improved staggered fermion action is utilized. All results are compared to the Hadron Resonance Gas model predictions: good agreement is found in the temperature region below the transition.

  8. Finite Volume Dependence of Hadron Properties and Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony W. Thomas; Jonathan D. Ashley; Derek B. Leinweber; Ross D. Young

    2005-02-01

    Because the time needed for a simulation in lattice QCD varies at a rate exceeding the fourth power of the lattice size, it is important to understand how small one can make a lattice without altering the physics beyond recognition. It is common to use a rule of thumb that the pion mass times the lattice size should be greater than (ideally much greater than) four (i.e., m{sub {pi}} L >> 4). By considering a relatively simple chiral quark model we are led to suggest that a more realistic constraint would be m{sub {pi}} (L - 2R) >> 4, where R is the radius of the confinement region, which for these purposes could be taken to be around 0.8-1.0 fm. Within the model we demonstrate that violating the second condition can lead to unphysical behavior of hadronic properties as a function of pion mass. In particular, the axial charge of the nucleon is found to decrease quite rapidly as the chiral limit is approached.

  9. Design and Finite Temperature Aspects of Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakie, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The control and manipulation of Bose-Einstein condensates with optical lattices is a major current interest in cold atom research, and is an important component in proposals for quantum computing with neutral atoms. A condensate loaded into an optical lattice can be described by a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and presents a unique opportunity for investigating aspects of many-body physics in a controlled manner, as typified by a recent experimental investigation where the quantum phase transition of atoms from a superfluid to Mott-insulating state was observed [1]. In this talk we consider the interference of three co-planar equal frequency light fields, which are far detuned from atomic resonance. Atoms within the region of the light field overlap will experience a periodic light shift potential that forms a two-dimensional optical lattice. We demonstrate the range of possible geometries for this type of lattice, obtainable by varying the propagation directions of the light fields. From band structure calculations we show how the tunneling rates can be manipulated to control the effective number of nearest neighbors. We discuss possible applications of this work to cold atom research. In the second part of this talk we consider recent experiments done in collaboration with Morsch et al. [2] investigating the non-adiabatic loading of a condensate into an optical lattice. We discuss the dephasing mechanisms and preliminary results in developing a model for the long time dynamically behavior. [1] M. Greiner, O. Mandel, T.Esslinger, T.W. Hansch and I. Bloch, Nature 415, 2002. [2] O. Morsch, J.H. Müller, D. Ciampini, M. Cristiani, P.B. Blakie, C.J. Williams, P.S. Julienne and E. Arimondo. Cond-mat/0208162 (to appear in Phys. Rev. A)

  10. Diquark mass differences from unquenched lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yujiang; Cai, Hao; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Liu, Zhaofeng; Qiao, Hao-Xue; Yang, Yi-Bo

    2016-07-01

    We calculate diquark correlation functions in the Landau gauge on the lattice using overlap valence quarks and 2+1-flavor domain wall fermion configurations. Quark masses are extracted from the scalar part of quark propagators in the Landau gauge. The scalar diquark quark mass difference and axial vector scalar diquark mass difference are obtained for diquarks composed of two light quarks and of a strange and a light quark. The light sea quark mass dependence of the results is examined. Two lattice spacings are used to check the discretization effects. The coarse and fine lattices are of sizes 243 × 64 and 323 × 64 with inverse spacings 1/a = 1.75(4) GeV and 2.33(5) GeV, respectively. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (11575197, 10835002, 11405178, 11335001), joint funds of NSFC (U1232109), MG and ZL are partially supported by the Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS (2015013, 2011013), YC and ZL acknowledge support of NSFC and DFG (CRC110)

  11. Finite-volume QED corrections to decay amplitudes in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Sanfilippo, F.; Simula, S.; Tantalo, N.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that the leading and next-to-leading finite-volume effects in the evaluation of leptonic decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons at O (α ) are universal; i.e. they are independent of the structure of the meson. This is analogous to a similar result for the spectrum but with some fundamental differences, most notably the presence of infrared divergences in decay amplitudes. The leading nonuniversal, structure-dependent terms are of O (1 /L2) [compared to the O (1 /L3) leading nonuniversal corrections in the spectrum]. We calculate the universal finite-volume effects, which requires an extension of previously developed techniques to include a dependence on an external three-momentum (in our case, the momentum of the final-state lepton). The result can be included in the strategy proposed in Ref. [N. Carrasco et al.,Phys. Rev. D 91, 074506 (2015)., 10.1103/PhysRevD.91.074506] for using lattice simulations to compute the decay widths at O (α ), with the remaining finite-volume effects starting at order O (1 /L2). The methods developed in this paper can be generalized to other decay processes, most notably to semileptonic decays, and hence open the possibility of a new era in precision flavor physics.

  12. Exact dynamics of finite Glauber-Fock photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Lara, B. M.

    2011-11-15

    The dynamics of Glauber-Fock lattice of size N is given through exact diagonalization of the corresponding Hamiltonian; the spectra {l_brace}{lambda}{sub k}{r_brace} is given as the roots of the Nth Hermite polynomial, H{sub N}({lambda}{sub k}/{radical}(2))=0, and the eigenstates are given in terms of Hermite polynomials evaluated at these roots. The exact dynamics is used to study coherent phenomena in discrete lattices. Due to the symmetry and spacing of the eigenvalues {l_brace}{lambda}{sub k}{r_brace}, oscillatory behavior is predicted with highly localized spectra, that is, near complete revivals of the photon number and partial recovery of the initial state at given waveguides.

  13. Finite Data Lattice Algorithms for Instrumental Variable Recursions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    least squares, ARMA model, Fast Algorithm, Toeplitz matrix Work Unit Number 4 - Statistics and Probability. This work was completed at the Mathematics ...the Mathematics Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The author is with the Department of Statistics , Harvard University, Cambridge, MA...AD-A1A 598 WISCONSIN UNIV-MADISON MATHEMATICS RESEARCH CENTER FIG 12/1 F INITE DATA LATTICE ALGORITHMS FOR INSTRUMENTAL VARIARLE RECURS--ETC(Ul M4AR

  14. Finite-momentum Bose-Einstein condensates in shaken two-dimensional square optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Di Liberto, M.; Tieleman, O.; Smith, C. Morais; Branchina, V.

    2011-07-15

    We consider ultracold bosons in a two-dimensional square optical lattice described by the Bose-Hubbard model. In addition, an external time-dependent sinusoidal force is applied to the system, which shakes the lattice along one of the diagonals. The effect of the shaking is to renormalize the nearest-neighbor-hopping coefficients, which can be arbitrarily reduced, can vanish, or can even change sign, depending on the shaking parameter. Therefore, it is necessary to account for higher-order-hopping terms, which are renormalized differently by the shaking, and to introduce anisotropy into the problem. We show that the competition between these different hopping terms leads to finite-momentum condensates with a momentum that may be tuned via the strength of the shaking. We calculate the boundaries between the Mott insulator and the different superfluid phases and present the time-of-flight images expected to be observed experimentally. Our results open up possibilities for the realization of bosonic analogs of the Fulde, Ferrel, Larkin, and Ovchinnikov phase describing inhomogeneous superconductivity.

  15. Infrared features of unquenched finite temperature lattice Landau gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Sadataka; Nakajima, Hideo

    2007-09-01

    The color diagonal and color antisymmetric ghost propagators slightly above T{sub c} of N{sub f}=2 MILC 24{sup 3}x12 lattices are measured and compared with zero-temperature unquenched N{sub f}=2+1 MILC{sub c} 20{sup 3}x64 and MILC{sub f} 28{sup 3}x96 lattices and zero-temperature quenched 56{sup 4} {beta}=6.4 and 6.45 lattices. The expectation value of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator {phi}{sup c}(q) is zero, but its Binder cumulant, which is consistent with that of N{sub c}{sup 2}-1 dimensional Gaussian distribution below T{sub c}, decreases above T{sub c}. Although the color diagonal ghost propagator is temperature independent, the l{sup 1} norm of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator is temperature dependent. The expectation value of the ghost condensate observed at zero-temperature unquenched configuration is consistent with 0 in T>T{sub c}. We also measure transverse, magnetic, and electric gluon propagator and extract gluon screening masses. The running coupling measured from the product of the gluon dressing function and the ghost dressing function are almost temperature independent, but the effect of A{sup 2} condensate observed at zero temperature is consistent with 0 in T>T{sub c}. The transverse gluon dressing function at low temperature has a peak in the infrared at low temperature, but it becomes flatter at high temperature. The magnetic gluon propagator at high momentum depends on the temperature. These data imply that the magnetic gluon propagator and the color antisymmetric ghost propagator are affected by the presence of dynamical quarks, and there are strong nonperturbative effects through the temperature-dependent color antisymmetric ghost propagator.

  16. Finite-temperature phase transitions in lattice QCD with Langevin simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Ukawa, A.

    1988-09-15

    This article presents the result of Langevin simulation studies of finite-temperature behavior of QCD for a various number of flavor species. Most of the simulations employ an 8/sup 3/ x 4 lattice. A full description is made of the data and the identification problem of a first-order phase transition. The systematic bias problem is also investigated.

  17. Finite-temperature phase structure of lattice QCD with Wilson quark action

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Ukawa, A.; Umemura, T.

    1996-02-01

    The long-standing issue of the nature of the critical line of lattice QCD with the Wilson quark action at finite temperatures, defined to be the line of vanishing pion screening mass, and its relation to the line of finite-temperature chiral transition is examined. Presented are both analytical and numerical evidence that the critical line forms a cusp at a finite gauge coupling, and that the line of chiral transition runs past the tip of the cusp without touching the critical line. Implications on the continuum limit and the flavor dependence of chiral transition are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Simulations of time harmonic blood flow in the Mesenteric artery: comparing finite element and lattice Boltzmann methods

    PubMed Central

    Axner, Lilit; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Jeays, Adam; Lawford, Pat; Hose, Rod; Sloot, Peter MA

    2009-01-01

    Background Systolic blood flow has been simulated in the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. The simulations were carried out using two different computational hemodynamic methods: the finite element method to solve the Navier Stokes equations and the lattice Boltzmann method. Results We have validated the lattice Boltzmann method for systolic flows by comparing the velocity and pressure profiles of simulated blood flow between methods. We have also analyzed flow-specific characteristics such as the formation of a vortex at curvatures and traces of flow. Conclusion The lattice Boltzmann Method is as accurate as a Navier Stokes solver for computing complex blood flows. As such it is a good alternative for computational hemodynamics, certainly in situation where coupling to other models is required. PMID:19799782

  19. Simulations of time harmonic blood flow in the Mesenteric artery: comparing finite element and lattice Boltzmann methods.

    PubMed

    Axner, Lilit; Hoekstra, Alfons G; Jeays, Adam; Lawford, Pat; Hose, Rod; Sloot, Peter M A

    2009-10-02

    Systolic blood flow has been simulated in the abdominal aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. The simulations were carried out using two different computational hemodynamic methods: the finite element method to solve the Navier Stokes equations and the lattice Boltzmann method. We have validated the lattice Boltzmann method for systolic flows by comparing the velocity and pressure profiles of simulated blood flow between methods. We have also analyzed flow-specific characteristics such as the formation of a vortex at curvatures and traces of flow. The lattice Boltzmann Method is as accurate as a Navier Stokes solver for computing complex blood flows. As such it is a good alternative for computational hemodynamics, certainly in situation where coupling to other models is required.

  20. Measuring finite-range phase coherence in an optical lattice using Talbot interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Bodhaditya; Baals, Christian; Labouvie, Ralf; Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Pelster, Axel; Ott, Herwig

    2017-06-01

    One of the important goals of present research is to control and manipulate coherence in a broad variety of systems, such as semiconductor spintronics, biological photosynthetic systems, superconducting qubits and complex atomic networks. Over the past decades, interferometry of atoms and molecules has proven to be a powerful tool to explore coherence. Here we demonstrate a near-field interferometer based on the Talbot effect, which allows us to measure finite-range phase coherence of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. We apply this interferometer to study the build-up of phase coherence after a quantum quench of a Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Our technique of measuring finite-range phase coherence is generic, easy to adopt and can be applied in practically all lattice experiments without further modifications.

  1. Finite-size corrections and scaling for the dimer model on the checkerboard lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, Nickolay Sh.; Wu, Ming-Chya; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-11-01

    Lattice models are useful for understanding behaviors of interacting complex many-body systems. The lattice dimer model has been proposed to study the adsorption of diatomic molecules on a substrate. Here we analyze the partition function of the dimer model on a 2 M ×2 N checkerboard lattice wrapped on a torus and derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function. We find that the internal energy at the critical point is equal to zero. We also derive the exact finite-size corrections for the free energy, the internal energy, and the specific heat. Using the exact partition function and finite-size corrections for the dimer model on a finite checkerboard lattice, we obtain finite-size scaling functions for the free energy, the internal energy, and the specific heat of the dimer model. We investigate the properties of the specific heat near the critical point and find that the specific-heat pseudocritical point coincides with the critical point of the thermodynamic limit, which means that the specific-heat shift exponent λ is equal to ∞ . We have also considered the limit N →∞ for which we obtain the expansion of the free energy for the dimer model on the infinitely long cylinder. From a finite-size analysis we have found that two conformal field theories with the central charges c =1 for the height function description and c =-2 for the construction using a mapping of spanning trees can be used to describe the dimer model on the checkerboard lattice.

  2. Chapman-Enskog analysis for finite-volume formulation of lattice Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, D. V.

    2013-06-01

    The classical Chapman-Enskog expansion is performed for the recently proposed finite-volume formulation of lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method [D.V. Patil, K.N. Lakshmisha, Finite volume TVD formulation of lattice Boltzmann simulation on unstructured mesh, J. Comput. Phys. 228 (2009) 5262-5279]. First, a modified partial differential equation is derived from a numerical approximation of the discrete Boltzmann equation. Then, the multi-scale, small parameter expansion is followed to recover the continuity and the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations with additional error terms. The expression for apparent value of the kinematic viscosity is derived for finite-volume formulation under certain assumptions. The attenuation of a shear wave, Taylor-Green vortex flow and driven channel flow are studied to analyze the apparent viscosity relation.

  3. Finite current stationary states of random walks on one-dimensional lattices with aperiodic disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Stationary states of random walks with finite induced drift velocity on one-dimensional lattices with aperiodic disorder are investigated by scaling analysis. Three aperiodic sequences, the Thue-Morse (TM), the paperfolding (PF), and the Rudin-Shapiro (RS) sequences, are used to construct the aperiodic disorder. These are binary sequences, composed of two symbols A and B, and the ratio of the number of As to that of Bs converges to unity in the infinite sequence length limit, but their effects on diffusional behavior are different. For the TM model, the stationary distribution is extended, as in the case without current, and the drift velocity is independent of the system size. For the PF model and the RS model, as the system size increases, the hierarchical and fractal structure and the localized structure, respectively, are broken by a finite current and changed to an extended distribution if the system size becomes larger than a certain threshold value. Correspondingly, the drift velocity is saturated in a large system while in a small system it decreases as the system size increases.

  4. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    The current and future potential of finite difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism are demonstrated. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advanced-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  5. Finite-difference computations of rotor loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Tung, C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the current and future potential of finite-difference methods for solving real rotor problems which now rely largely on empiricism. The demonstration consists of a simple means of combining existing finite-difference, integral, and comprehensive loads codes to predict real transonic rotor flows. These computations are performed for hover and high-advance-ratio flight. Comparisons are made with experimental pressure data.

  6. Study of lattice QCD at finite baryon density using the canonical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornyakov, V. G.; Boyda, D. L.; Goy, V. A.; Molochkov, A. V.; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nikolaev, A. A.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2017-03-01

    At finite baryon density lattice QCD first-principle calculations can not be performed due to the sign problem. In order to circumvent this problem, we use the canonical approach, which provides reliable analytical continuation from the imaginary chemical potential region to the real chemical potential region. We briefly present the canonical partition function method, describe our formulation, and show the results, obtained for two temperatures: T/Tc = 0:93 and T/Tc = 0:99 in lattice QCD with two flavors of improved Wilson fermions.

  7. Exact sum rules for vector channel at finite temperature and their application to lattice QCD analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satow, Daisuke; Gubler, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    We derive three exact sum rules for the spectral function of the electromagnetic current with zero spatial momentum at finite temperature. Possible applications of the three sum rules to lattice computations of the spectral function and transport coefficients are also discussed: We propose an ansatz for the spectral function that can be applied to all three sum rules and fit it to available lattice data of the Euclidean vector correlator above the critical temperature. As a result, we obtain estimates for both the electrical conductivity σ and the second order transport coefficient τJ.

  8. Height probabilities in the Abelian sandpile model on the generalized finite Bethe lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Fuji

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we study the sandpile model on the generalized finite Bethe lattice with a particular boundary condition. Using a combinatorial method, we give the exact expressions for all single-site probabilities and some two-site joint probabilities. As a by-product, we prove that the height probabilities of bulk vertices are all the same for the Bethe lattice with certain given boundary condition, which was found from numerical evidence by Grassberger and Manna ["Some more sandpiles," J. Phys. (France) 51, 1077-1098 (1990)], 10.1051/jphys:0199000510110107700 but without a proof.

  9. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  10. Equation of state for QCD at finite temperature and density. Resummation versus lattice data

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Haque, Najmul; Mustafa, Munshi G.; Su, Nan

    2016-01-22

    The perturbative series for finite-temperature field theories has very poor convergence properties and one needs a way to reorganize it. In this talk, I review two ways of reorganizing the perturbative series for field theories at finite temperature and chemical potential, namely hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt) and dimensional reduction (DR). I will present results for the pressure, trace anomaly, speed of sound, and the quark susceptibilities from a 3-loop HTLpt calculation and for the quark susceptibilities using DR at four loops. A careful comparison with available lattice data shows good agreement for a number of physical quantities.

  11. Isomorphism of dimer configurations and spanning trees on finite square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brankov, J. G.

    1995-09-01

    One-to-one mappings of the close-packed dimer configurations on a finite square lattice with free boundaries L onto the spanning trees of a related graph (or two-graph) G are found. The graph (two-graph) G can be constructed from L by: (1) deleting all the vertices of L with arbitrarily fixed parity of the row and column numbers; (2) suppressing all the vertices of degree 2 except those of degree 2 in L; (3) merging all the vertices of degree 1 into a single vertex g. The matrix Kirchhoff theorem reduces the enumeration problem for the spanning trees on G to the eigenvalue problem for the discrete Laplacian on the square lattice L'=G g with mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions in at least one direction. That fact explains some of the unusual finite-size properties of the dimer model.

  12. Formation of Vortex Lattices in Superfluid Bose Gases at Finite Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahata, E.; Nikuni, T.

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a rotating trapped Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) at finite temperatures. Using the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin formalism, based on a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate coupled to a semiclassical kinetic equation for a thermal cloud, we numerically simulate vortex lattice formation in the presence of a time-dependent rotating trap potential. At low rotation frequency, the thermal cloud undergoes rigid body rotation, while the condensate exhibits irrotational flow. Above a certain threshold rotation frequency, vortices penetrate into the condensate and form a vortex lattice. Our simulation result clearly indicates a crucial role for the thermal cloud, which triggers vortex lattice formation in the rotating BEC.

  13. Emergence of a Fermionic Finite-Temperature Critical Point in a Kondo Lattice.

    PubMed

    Chou, Po-Hao; Zhai, Liang-Jun; Chung, Chung-Hou; Mou, Chung-Yu; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2016-04-29

    The underlying Dirac point is central to the profound physics manifested in a wide class of materials. However, it is often difficult to drive a system with Dirac points across the massless fermionic critical point. Here by exploiting screening of local moments under spin-orbit interactions in a Kondo lattice, we show that below the Kondo temperature, the Kondo lattice undergoes a topological transition from a strong topological insulator to a weak topological insulator at a finite temperature T_{D}. At T_{D}, massless Dirac points emerge and the Kondo lattice becomes a Dirac semimetal. Our analysis indicates that the emergent relativistic symmetry dictates nontrivial thermal responses over large parameter and temperature regimes. In particular, it yields critical scaling behaviors both in magnetic and transport responses near T_{D}.

  14. Equivalent Continuum Finite Element Modelling of Plate-Like Space Lattice Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    regulation cost of the structure as a function of the structural design parameters. A micropolar plate continuum model of large plate-like repetitive space...lattice structures with rigid joints is derived. A plate finite element is derived based on this continuum model with micropolar rotations and transverse...by rigid joints which makes use of the higher order micropolar beam continuum formulation. 8 Detailed Models For this research the baseline against

  15. Applications of an exponential finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An exponential finite difference scheme first presented by Bhattacharya for one dimensional unsteady heat conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates was extended. The finite difference algorithm developed was used to solve the unsteady diffusion equation in one dimensional cylindrical coordinates and was applied to two and three dimensional conduction problems in Cartesian coordinates. Heat conduction involving variable thermal conductivity was also investigated. The method was used to solve nonlinear partial differential equations in one and two dimensional Cartesian coordinates. Predicted results are compared to exact solutions where available or to results obtained by other numerical methods.

  16. Exact finite-size corrections for the square-lattice Ising model with Brascamp-Kunz boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2002-05-01

    Finite-size scaling, finite-size corrections, and boundary effects for critical systems have attracted much attention in recent years. Here we derive exact finite-size corrections for the free energy F and the specific heat C of the critical ferromagnetic Ising model on the M×2N square lattice with Brascamp-Kunz (BK) boundary conditions [J. Math. Phys. 15, 66 (1974)] and compare such results with those under toroidal boundary conditions. When the ratio ξ/2=(M+1)/2N is smaller than 1 the behaviors of finite-size corrections for C are quite different for BK and toroidal boundary conditions; when ln(ξ/2) is larger than 3, finite-size corrections for C in two boundary conditions approach the same values. In the limit N-->∞ we obtain the expansion of the free energy for infinitely long strip with BK boundary conditions. Our results are consistent with the conformal field theory prediction for the mixed boundary conditions by Cardy [Nucl. Phys. B 275, 200 (1986)] although the definitions of boundary conditions in two cases are different in one side of the long strip.

  17. Wedge filling and interface delocalization in finite Ising lattices with antisymmetric surface fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchev, Andrey; Müller, M.; Binder, K.; Landau, D. P.

    2003-09-01

    Theoretical predictions by Parry et al. for wetting phenomena in a wedge geometry are tested by Monte Carlo simulations. Simple cubic L×L×Ly Ising lattices with nearest neighbor ferromagnetic exchange and four free L×Ly surfaces, at which antisymmetric surface fields ±Hs act, are studied for a wide range of linear dimensions (4⩽L⩽320, 30⩽Ly⩽1000), in an attempt to clarify finite size effects on the wedge filling transition in this “double-wedge” geometry. Interpreting the Ising model as a lattice gas, the problem is equivalent to a liquid-gas transition in a pore with quadratic cross section, where two walls favor the liquid and the other two walls favor the gas. For temperatures T below the bulk critical temperature Tc this boundary condition (where periodic boundary conditions are used in the y direction along the wedges) leads to the formation of two domains with oppositely oriented magnetization and separated by an interface. For L,Ly→∞ and T larger than the filling transition temperature Tf(Hs), this interface runs from the one wedge where the surface planes with a different sign of the surface field meet (on average) straight to the opposite wedge, so that the average magnetization of the system is zero. For TTf(Hs) as a function of a bulk field and find that the associated exponents agree with theoretical predictions. The correlation length ξy in the y direction along the wedges is also studied, and we find no transition for finite L and Ly→∞. For L→∞ the prediction l0∝(Hsc-Hs)-1/4 is verified, where Hsc(T) is the inverse function

  18. Wedge filling and interface delocalization in finite Ising lattices with antisymmetric surface fields.

    PubMed

    Milchev, Andrey; Müller, M; Binder, K; Landau, D P

    2003-09-01

    Theoretical predictions by Parry et al. for wetting phenomena in a wedge geometry are tested by Monte Carlo simulations. Simple cubic LxLxL(y) Ising lattices with nearest neighbor ferromagnetic exchange and four free LxL(y) surfaces, at which antisymmetric surface fields +/-H(s) act, are studied for a wide range of linear dimensions (4finite size effects on the wedge filling transition in this "double-wedge" geometry. Interpreting the Ising model as a lattice gas, the problem is equivalent to a liquid-gas transition in a pore with quadratic cross section, where two walls favor the liquid and the other two walls favor the gas. For temperatures T below the bulk critical temperature T(c) this boundary condition (where periodic boundary conditions are used in the y direction along the wedges) leads to the formation of two domains with oppositely oriented magnetization and separated by an interface. For L,L(y)--> infinity and T larger than the filling transition temperature T(f)(H(s)), this interface runs from the one wedge where the surface planes with a different sign of the surface field meet (on average) straight to the opposite wedge, so that the average magnetization of the system is zero. For TT(f)(H(s)) from below, as is the corresponding behavior of the magnetization and its moments. We consider the variation of l(0) for T>T(f)(H(s)) as a function of a bulk field and find that the associated exponents agree with theoretical predictions. The correlation length xi(y) in the y direction along the wedges is also studied, and we find no transition for finite L and L(y)--> infinity. For L--> infinity the prediction l(0) proportional

  19. Quantum Phase Transition in the Finite Jaynes-Cummings Lattice Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-09-01

    Phase transitions are commonly held to occur only in the thermodynamical limit of a large number of system components. Here, we exemplify at the hand of the exactly solvable Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model and its generalization to finite JC lattices that finite component systems of coupled spins and bosons may exhibit quantum phase transitions (QPTs). For the JC model we find a continuous symmetry-breaking QPT, a photonic condensate with a macroscopic occupation as the ground state, and a Goldstone mode as a low-energy excitation. For the two site JC lattice we show analytically that it undergoes a Mott-insulator to superfluid QPT. We identify as the underlying principle of the emergence of finite system QPTs the combination of increasing atomic energy and increasing interaction strength between the atom and the bosonic mode, which allows for the exploration of an increasingly large portion of the infinite dimensional Hilbert space of the bosonic mode. This suggests that finite system phase transitions will be present in a broad range of physical systems.

  20. 2D Unstructured Finite Volume Lattice Boltzmann Model for Flow with Complex Geometric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leitao; Schaefer, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Many of the numerical issues of LBM (lattice Boltzmann method) are not yet fully solved. One of the issues is its inability of handling complex geometric boundaries. Some published work, which is based on collision-streaming discretization of the LBE and corresponding lattice-like mesh, introduced successful treatments for curved boundaries. However, those schemes are not applicable to the boundaries with large curvature like porous media since the lattice-like mesh is not able to recognize it. In order to solve this issue, a 2D FVM (finite volume method)-based numerical framework is proposed, which completely uncouples the lattice structure and the spatial discretization and therefore brings the freedom of using any type of lattice structure while keeping the basic framework unchanged. The model is solved on an unstructured triangular mesh and triangular control volume. Boundary schemes of isothermal and thermal flow for the new numerical framework are also studied. Finally, a variety of isothermal and thermal flow problems are simulated and compared with other work. The proposed model can simulate the flow with a complex geometry to the desired accuracy in addition to complementing the simple geometry of the existing LB model.

  1. Efficiency of encounter-controlled reaction between diffusing reactants in a finite lattice: Non-nearest-neighbor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Jonathan L.; Kozak, John J.; Nicolis, Gregoire

    2005-08-01

    The influence of non-nearest-neighbor displacements on the efficiency of diffusion-reaction processes involving one and two mobile diffusing reactants is studied. An exact analytic result is given for dimension d=1 from which, for large lattices, one can recover the asymptotic estimate reported 30 years ago by Lakatos-Lindenberg and Shuler. For dimensions d=2,3 we present numerically exact values for the mean time to reaction, as gauged by the mean walklength before reactive encounter, obtained via the theory of finite Markov processes and supported by Monte Carlo simulations. Qualitatively different results are found between processes occurring on d=1 versus d>1 lattices, and between results obtained assuming nearest-neighbor (only) versus non-nearest-neighbor displacements.

  2. Finite-size scaling tests for spectra in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrand, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    I carry out a finite-size scaling study of the correlation length in SU(3) lattice gauge theory coupled to 12 fundamental flavor fermions, using recent data published by Fodor, Holland, Kuti, Nógradi and Schroeder [Z. Fodor, K. Holland, J. Kuti, D. Nogradi, and C. Schroeder, Phys. Lett. B 703, 348 (2011).PYLBAJ0370-269310.1016/j.physletb.2011.07.037]. I make the assumption that the system is conformal in the zero-mass, infinite volume limit, that scaling is violated by both nonzero fermion mass and by finite volume, and that the scaling function in each channel is determined self-consistently by the data. From several different observables I extract a common exponent for the scaling of the correlation length ξ with the fermion mass mq, ξ˜mq-1/ym with ym˜1.35. Shortcomings of the analysis are discussed.

  3. Finite-difference migration to zero offset

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao.

    1992-01-01

    Migration to zero offset (MZO), also called dip moveout (DMO) or prestack partial migration, transforms prestack offset seismic data into approximate zero-offset data so as to remove reflection point smear and obtain quality stacked results over a range of reflector dips. MZO has become an important step in standard seismic data processing, and a variety of frequency-wavenumber (f-k) and integral MZO algorithms have been used in practice to date. Here, I present a finite-difference MZO algorithm applied to normal-moveout (NMO)-corrected, common-offset sections. This algorithm employs a traditional poststack 15-degree finite-difference migration algorithm and a special velocity function rather than the true migration velocity. This paper shows results of implementation of this MZO algorithm when velocity varies with depth, and discusses the possibility of applying this algorithm to cases where velocity varies with both depth and horizontal distance.

  4. Finite-difference migration to zero offset

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianchao

    1992-07-01

    Migration to zero offset (MZO), also called dip moveout (DMO) or prestack partial migration, transforms prestack offset seismic data into approximate zero-offset data so as to remove reflection point smear and obtain quality stacked results over a range of reflector dips. MZO has become an important step in standard seismic data processing, and a variety of frequency-wavenumber (f-k) and integral MZO algorithms have been used in practice to date. Here, I present a finite-difference MZO algorithm applied to normal-moveout (NMO)-corrected, common-offset sections. This algorithm employs a traditional poststack 15-degree finite-difference migration algorithm and a special velocity function rather than the true migration velocity. This paper shows results of implementation of this MZO algorithm when velocity varies with depth, and discusses the possibility of applying this algorithm to cases where velocity varies with both depth and horizontal distance.

  5. Finite-temperature phase transitions in lattice QCD for general number of flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Ohta, S.; Ukawa, A.

    1988-01-18

    Finite-temperature transitions in lattice QCD are studied for various numbers of flavors in the range 1less than or equal toN/sub f/less than or equal to18 on an 8/sup 3/ x 4 lattice by the Langevin simulation technique. It is found that the weakening of the transition at intermediate quark mass is a general feature for N/sub f/greater than or equal to2, but that the smoothing out of the transition observed for N/sub f/ = 2--4 does not occur for large numbers of flavors (N/sub f/greater than or equal to20). For N/sub f/ = 1 the transition weakens toward small quark mass m/sub q/ but remains first order down to m/sub q/a = 0.05.

  6. Exact vector channel sum rules at finite temperature and their applications to lattice QCD data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubler, Philipp; Satow, Daisuke

    2016-11-01

    We derive three exact sum rules for the spectral function of the electromagnetic current with zero spatial momentum at finite temperature. Two of them are derived in this paper for the first time. We explicitly check that these sum rules are satisfied in the weak coupling regime and examine which sum rule is sensitive to the transport peak in the spectral function at low energy or the continuum at high energy. Possible applications of the three sum rules to lattice computations of the spectral function and transport coefficients are also discussed: we propose an Ansatz for the spectral function that can be applied to all three sum rules and fit it to available lattice data of the Euclidean vector correlator above the critical temperature. As a result, we obtain estimates for both the electrical conductivity σ and the second-order transport coefficient τJ .

  7. Second Order Accurate Finite Difference Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-20

    a study of the idealized material has direct applications to some polymer structures (4, 5). Wave propagation studies in hyperelastic materials have...34Acceleration Wave Propagation in Hyperelastic Rods of Variable Cross- section. Wave Motion, V4, pp. 173-180, 1982. 9. M. Hirao and N. Sugimoto...Waves in Hyperelastic Road," Quart. Appl. Math., V37, pp. 377-399, 1979. 11. G. A. Sod. "A Survey of Several Finite Difference Methods for Systems of

  8. MCFET - A MICROSTRUCTURAL LATTICE MODEL FOR STRAIN ORIENTED PROBLEMS: A COMBINED MONTE CARLO FINITE ELEMENT TECHNIQUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.

    1994-01-01

    A specialized, microstructural lattice model, termed MCFET for combined Monte Carlo Finite Element Technique, has been developed to simulate microstructural evolution in material systems where modulated phases occur and the directionality of the modulation is influenced by internal and external stresses. Since many of the physical properties of materials are determined by microstructure, it is important to be able to predict and control microstructural development. MCFET uses a microstructural lattice model that can incorporate all relevant driving forces and kinetic considerations. Unlike molecular dynamics, this approach was developed specifically to predict macroscopic behavior, not atomistic behavior. In this approach, the microstructure is discretized into a fine lattice. Each element in the lattice is labeled in accordance with its microstructural identity. Diffusion of material at elevated temperatures is simulated by allowing exchanges of neighboring elements if the exchange lowers the total energy of the system. A Monte Carlo approach is used to select the exchange site while the change in energy associated with stress fields is computed using a finite element technique. The MCFET analysis has been validated by comparing this approach with a closed-form, analytical method for stress-assisted, shape changes of a single particle in an infinite matrix. Sample MCFET analyses for multiparticle problems have also been run and, in general, the resulting microstructural changes associated with the application of an external stress are similar to that observed in Ni-Al-Cr alloys at elevated temperatures. This program is written in FORTRAN for use on a 370 series IBM mainframe. It has been implemented on an IBM 370 running VM/SP and an IBM 3084 running MVS. It requires the IMSL math library and 220K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in EBCDIC format.

  9. MCFET - A MICROSTRUCTURAL LATTICE MODEL FOR STRAIN ORIENTED PROBLEMS: A COMBINED MONTE CARLO FINITE ELEMENT TECHNIQUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.

    1994-01-01

    A specialized, microstructural lattice model, termed MCFET for combined Monte Carlo Finite Element Technique, has been developed to simulate microstructural evolution in material systems where modulated phases occur and the directionality of the modulation is influenced by internal and external stresses. Since many of the physical properties of materials are determined by microstructure, it is important to be able to predict and control microstructural development. MCFET uses a microstructural lattice model that can incorporate all relevant driving forces and kinetic considerations. Unlike molecular dynamics, this approach was developed specifically to predict macroscopic behavior, not atomistic behavior. In this approach, the microstructure is discretized into a fine lattice. Each element in the lattice is labeled in accordance with its microstructural identity. Diffusion of material at elevated temperatures is simulated by allowing exchanges of neighboring elements if the exchange lowers the total energy of the system. A Monte Carlo approach is used to select the exchange site while the change in energy associated with stress fields is computed using a finite element technique. The MCFET analysis has been validated by comparing this approach with a closed-form, analytical method for stress-assisted, shape changes of a single particle in an infinite matrix. Sample MCFET analyses for multiparticle problems have also been run and, in general, the resulting microstructural changes associated with the application of an external stress are similar to that observed in Ni-Al-Cr alloys at elevated temperatures. This program is written in FORTRAN for use on a 370 series IBM mainframe. It has been implemented on an IBM 370 running VM/SP and an IBM 3084 running MVS. It requires the IMSL math library and 220K of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in EBCDIC format.

  10. Finite-size scaling tests for SU(3) lattice gauge theory with color sextet fermions

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The observed slow running of the gauge coupling in SU(3) lattice gauge theory with two flavors of color sextet fermions naturally suggests it is a theory with one relevant coupling, the fermion mass, and that at zero mass correlation functions decay algebraically. I perform a finite-size scaling study on simulation data at two values of the bare gauge coupling with this assumption and observe a common exponent for the scaling of the correlation length with the fermion mass, y{sub m}{approx}1.5. An analysis of the scaling of valence Dirac eigenvalues at one of these bare couplings produces a similar number.

  11. A study of symmetry restoration at finite temperature in the O(4) model using anisotropic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavai, R. V.; Heller, U. M.; Karsch, F.; Plache, B.; Neuhaus, T.

    Results of investigations of the O(4) spin model at finite temperature using anisotropic lattices are presented. In both the large N approximation and the numerical simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm we find that the ratio of the symmetry restoration temperature TSR to the Higgs mass mH is independent of the anisotropy. We obtain a lower bound of 0.59 ± 0.04 for the ratio, T SR/m H, at m H ⋍ 0.5 , which is lowered furhter by about 10% at m Ha ⋍ 1 .

  12. Finite-temperature twisted-untwisted transition of the kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedi, Deshpreet; Rocklin, D. Zeb; Mao, Xiaoming

    Mechanical instability governs many fascinating phenomena in nature, including jamming, glass transitions, and structural phase transitions. Although mechanical instability in athermal systems is well understood, how thermal fluctuations modify such transitions remains largely unexplored. Recent studies reveal that, due to the large number of floppy modes that emerge at mechanical instability, intriguing new phenomena occur, such as fluctuation-driven first-order transitions and order-by-disorder. In this talk, we present an analytic study of the finite-temperature rigidity transition for the kagome lattice. Our model exhibits a zero-temperature continuous twisted-untwisted transition as the sign of the next-nearest-neighbor spring constant changes. At finite temperature, we show that the divergent contribution of floppy modes to the vibrational entropy renormalizes this spring constant, resulting in a first-order transition. We also propose an experimental manifestation of this transition in the system of self-assembling triblock Janus particles.

  13. Dynamics of quantum coherence in two-dimensional quantum walk on finite lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhimin; Huang, Zhiming; Situ, Haozhen

    2017-07-01

    We study the dynamics of the l1 norm coherence in a two-dimensional quantum walk on finite lattices with four-dimensional (4D) and two-dimensional (2D) coins. It is observed that the boundaries suppress the growth of coherence of both the whole system and the position subsystem. The coherence of the quantum walk with a 2D coin is larger than that of the quantum walk with a 4D coin when it stabilizes after a number of steps. We also analyze the influence of two kinds of noise, i.e., broken links and lattice congestion, on the coherence of a bounded quantum walk. Experimental results show that both the broken links and the lattice congestion with low probability slightly increase the coherence of the whole system and the position subsystem. However, a high noise level significantly suppresses the growth of coherence, especially for static noise. The coherence of the coin subsystem is also analyzed and we find that the boundaries result in a large fluctuation of coherence of the coin subsystem.

  14. A conservative Dirichlet boundary treatment for the finite volume lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leitao; Schaefer, Laura

    2014-11-01

    The finite volume lattice Boltzmann method (FVLBM) enables the model to use the exact body-fitting mesh in the flow problems that involve the complex boundaries. However, the development of proper boundary treatment for the FVLBM has been outpaced. The boundary treatments designed for the conventional lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) framework are still heavily applied to the FVLBM. The largest defect of using the old boundary treatment is that, on the Dirichlet boundaries, the macroscopic variables cannot be conserved. In another word, there exist nontrivial discrepancies between the macroscopic variables defined by the boundary conditions and those yield by the numerical solutions. The errors on the boundaries will contaminate the internal solutions and even cause instability, especially on the complex boundaries. To overcome such a shortcoming, a conservative boundary treatment for the Dirichlet hydrodynamic boundary conditions is developed for the FVLBM. Through the benchmark tests, it is shown that the macroscopic conservations on the Direchlet boundaries are up to machine accuracy and completely independent of the size of relaxation time, the type of lattice model, the level of mesh resolution, the shape of boundaries and the type of internal scheme.

  15. Analysis of a finite difference grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopfer, G. H.

    1982-01-01

    Some means of assessing the suitability of a mesh network for a finite difference calculation are investigated in this study. This has been done by a study of the nonlinear truncation errors of the scheme. It turns out that the mesh can not be properly assessed a priori. The effect of the mesh on the numerical solution depends on several factors including the mesh itself, the numerical algorithm, and the solution. Several recommendations are made with regard to generating the mesh and to assessing its suitability for a particular numerical calculation.

  16. Finite difference methods for approximating Heaviside functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towers, John D.

    2009-05-01

    We present a finite difference method for discretizing a Heaviside function H(u(x→)), where u is a level set function u:Rn ↦ R that is positive on a bounded region Ω⊂Rn. There are two variants of our algorithm, both of which are adapted from finite difference methods that we proposed for discretizing delta functions in [J.D. Towers, Two methods for discretizing a delta function supported on a level set, J. Comput. Phys. 220 (2007) 915-931; J.D. Towers, Discretizing delta functions via finite differences and gradient normalization, Preprint at http://www.miracosta.edu/home/jtowers/; J.D. Towers, A convergence rate theorem for finite difference approximations to delta functions, J. Comput. Phys. 227 (2008) 6591-6597]. We consider our approximate Heaviside functions as they are used to approximate integrals over Ω. We prove that our first approximate Heaviside function leads to second order accurate quadrature algorithms. Numerical experiments verify this second order accuracy. For our second algorithm, numerical experiments indicate at least third order accuracy if the integrand f and ∂Ω are sufficiently smooth. Numerical experiments also indicate that our approximations are effective when used to discretize certain singular source terms in partial differential equations. We mostly focus on smooth f and u. By this we mean that f is smooth in a neighborhood of Ω, u is smooth in a neighborhood of ∂Ω, and the level set u(x)=0 is a manifold of codimension one. However, our algorithms still give reasonable results if either f or u has jumps in its derivatives. Numerical experiments indicate approximately second order accuracy for both algorithms if the regularity of the data is reduced in this way, assuming that the level set u(x)=0 is a manifold. Numerical experiments indicate that dependence on the placement of Ω with respect to the grid is quite small for our algorithms. Specifically, a grid shift results in an O(hp) change in the computed solution

  17. Slave-particle approach to the finite-temperature properties of ultracold Bose gases in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xiancong; Yu Yue; Li Jinbin

    2006-04-15

    By using slave particle (slave boson and slave fermion) techniques on the Bose-Hubbard model, we study the finite temperature properties of ultracold Bose gases in optical lattices. The phase diagrams at finite temperature are depicted by including different types of slave particles and the effect of the finite types of slave particles is estimated. The superfluid density is evaluated using the Landau second order phase transition theory. The atom density, excitation spectrum, and dispersion curve are also computed at various temperatures, and how the Mott-insulator evolves as the temperature increases is demonstrated. For most quantities to be calculated, we find that there are no qualitative differences in using the slave boson or the slave fermion approaches. However, when studying the stability of the mean field state, we find that in contrast to the slave fermion approach, the slave boson mean field state is not stable. Although the slave boson mean field theory gives a qualitatively correct phase boundary, it corresponds to a local maximum of Landau free energy and cannot describe the second order phase transition because the coefficient a{sub 4} of the fourth order term is always negative in the free energy expansion.

  18. The Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Rafael; Stich, Daniel; Morales, Jose

    2015-07-01

    We introduce the Complex-Step-Finite-Difference method (CSFDM) as a generalization of the well-known Finite-Difference method (FDM) for solving the acoustic and elastic wave equations. We have found a direct relationship between modelling the second-order wave equation by the FDM and the first-order wave equation by the CSFDM in 1-D, 2-D and 3-D acoustic media. We present the numerical methodology in order to apply the introduced CSFDM and show an example for wave propagation in simple homogeneous and heterogeneous models. The CSFDM may be implemented as an extension into pre-existing numerical techniques in order to obtain fourth- or sixth-order accurate results with compact three time-level stencils. We compare advantages of imposing various types of initial motion conditions of the CSFDM and demonstrate its higher-order accuracy under the same computational cost and dispersion-dissipation properties. The introduced method can be naturally extended to solve different partial differential equations arising in other fields of science and engineering.

  19. Efficient discretization in finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Koussis, Antonis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    Finite difference method (FDM) is a plausible and simple method for solving partial differential equations. The standard practice is to use an orthogonal discretization to form algebraic approximate formulations of the derivatives of the unknown function and a grid, much like raster maps, to represent the properties of the function domain. For example, for the solution of the groundwater flow equation, a raster map is required for the characterization of the discretization cells (flow cell, no-flow cell, boundary cell, etc.), and two raster maps are required for the hydraulic conductivity and the storage coefficient. Unfortunately, this simple approach to describe the topology comes along with the known disadvantages of the FDM (rough representation of the geometry of the boundaries, wasted computational resources in the unavoidable expansion of the grid refinement in all cells of the same column and row, etc.). To overcome these disadvantages, Hunt has suggested an alternative approach to describe the topology, the use of an array of neighbours. This limits the need for discretization nodes only for the representation of the boundary conditions and the flow domain. Furthermore, the geometry of the boundaries is described more accurately using a vector representation. Most importantly, graded meshes can be employed, which are capable of restricting grid refinement only in the areas of interest (e.g. regions where hydraulic head varies rapidly, locations of pumping wells, etc.). In this study, we test the Hunt approach against MODFLOW, a well established finite difference model, and the Finite Volume Method with Simplified Integration (FVMSI). The results of this comparison are examined and critically discussed.

  20. Different models of gravitating Dirac fermions in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celi, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    In this paper I construct the naive lattice Dirac Hamiltonian describing the propagation of fermions in a generic 2D optical metric for different lattice and flux-lattice geometries. First, I apply a top-down constructive approach that we first proposed in [Boada et al., New J. Phys. 13, 035002 (2011)] to the honeycomb and to the brickwall lattices. I carefully discuss how gauge transformations that generalize momentum (and Dirac cone) shifts in the Brillouin zone in the Minkowski homogeneous case can be used in order to change the phases of the hopping. In particular, I show that lattice Dirac Hamiltonian for Rindler spacetime in the honeycomb and brickwall lattices can be realized by considering real and isotropic (but properly position dependent) tunneling terms. For completeness, I also discuss a suitable formulation of Rindler Dirac Hamiltonian in semi-synthetic brickwall and π-flux square lattices (where one of the dimension is implemented by using internal spin states of atoms as we originally proposed in [Boada et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 133001 (2012)] and [Celi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 043001 (2014)]).

  1. TUNED FINITE-DIFFERENCE DIFFUSION OPERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Maron, Jason; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org

    2009-05-15

    Finite-difference simulations of fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics generally require an explicit diffusion operator, either to maintain stability by attenuating grid-scale structure, or to implement physical diffusivities such as viscosity or resistivity. If the goal is stability only, the diffusion must act at the grid scale, but should affect structure at larger scales as little as possible. For physical diffusivities the diffusion scale depends on the problem, and diffusion may act at larger scales as well. Diffusivity can undesirably limit the computational time step in both cases. We construct tuned finite-difference diffusion operators that minimally limit the time step while acting as desired near the diffusion scale. Such operators reach peak values at the diffusion scale rather than at the grid scale, but behave as standard operators at larger scales. These operators will be useful for simulations with high magnetic diffusivity or kinematic viscosity such as in the simulation of astrophysical dynamos with magnetic Prandtl number far from unity, or for numerical stabilization using hyperdiffusivity.

  2. A Numerical Study of Spectral Flows of the Hermitian Wilson-Dirac Operator and the Index Theorem in Abelian Gauge Theories on Finite Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, T.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate numerically the spectrum of the hermitian Wilson-Dirac operator in abelian gauge theories on finite lattices. The spectral flows for a continuous family of abelian gauge fields connecting different topological sectors are shown to have a characteristic structure leading to the lattice index theorem. We find that the index of Neuberger's Dirac operator coincides with the topological charge for a wide class of gauge field configurations. In two dimensions the eigenvalue spectra for some special but nontrivial configurations can be described by a set of characteristic polynomials and the index can be found exactly.

  3. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  4. Lattice fractional diffusion equation in terms of a Riesz-Caputo difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guo-Cheng; Baleanu, Dumitru; Deng, Zhen-Guo; Zeng, Sheng-Da

    2015-11-01

    A fractional difference is defined by the use of the right and the left Caputo fractional differences. The definition is a two-sided operator of Riesz type and introduces back and forward memory effects in space difference. Then, a fractional difference equation method is suggested for anomalous diffusion in discrete finite domains. A lattice fractional diffusion equation is proposed and the numerical simulation of the diffusion process is discussed for various difference orders. The result shows that the Riesz difference model is particularly suitable for modeling complicated dynamical behaviors on discrete media.

  5. A study on the optimization of finite volume effects of B K in lattice QCD by using the CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jangho; Cho, Kihyeon

    2015-07-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the non-perturbative implementation of field theory to solve the QCD theory of quarks and gluons by using the Feynman path integral approach. We calculate the kaon CP (charge-parity) violation parameter B K generally arising in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. Because lattice simulations are performed on finite volume lattices, the finite volume effects must be considered to exactly estimate the systematic error. The computational cost of numerical simulations may increase dramatically as the lattice spacing is decreased. Therefore, lattice QCD calculations must be optimized to account for the finite volume effects. The methodology used in this study was to develop an algorithm to parallelize the code by using a graphic processing unit (GPU) and to optimize the code to achieve as close to the theoretical peak performance as possible. The results revealed that the calculation speed of the newly-developed algorithm is significantly improved compared with that of the current algorithm for the finite volume effects.

  6. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  7. A Refined Finite Element Formulation for the Microstructure-Dependent Analysis of Two-Dimensional (2D) Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mancusi, Geminiano; Feo, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    A finite element approximation is proposed for the dynamic analysis of two-dimensional (2D) lattice materials. The unit cell is modeled by means of a defined number of shear deformable micro-beams. The main innovative feature concerns the presence of a microstructure-dependent scale length, which allows the consideration of the so called size-effect that can be highly relevant, due to the characteristics of the lattice at the local scale. Some numerical results show the influence of the microstructure parameter on the dynamic behavior of two-dimensional lattice materials. PMID:28809291

  8. Expansion of one-dimensional lattice hard-core bosons at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Rigol, Marcos

    2017-03-01

    We develop an exact approach to study the quench dynamics of hard-core bosons initially in thermal equilibrium in one-dimensional lattices. This approach is used to study the sudden expansion of thermal states after confining potentials are switched off. We find that a dynamical fermionization of the momentum distribution occurs at all temperatures. This phenomenon is studied for low initial site occupations, for which the expansion of the cloud is self-similar. In this regime, the occupation of the natural orbitals allows one to distinguish hard-core bosons from noninteracting fermions. We also study the free expansion of initial Mott insulating domains at finite temperature and show that the emergence of off-diagonal one-body correlations is suppressed gradually with increasing temperature. Surprisingly, the melting of the Mott domain is accompanied by an effective cooling of the system. We explain this phenomenon analytically using an equilibrium description based on an emergent local Hamiltonian.

  9. Finite-representation approximation of lattice gauge theories at the continuum limit with tensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyens, Boye; Montangero, Simone; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank; Van Acoleyen, Karel

    2017-05-01

    It has been established that matrix product states can be used to compute the ground state and single-particle excitations and their properties of lattice gauge theories at the continuum limit. However, by construction, in this formalism the Hilbert space of the gauge fields is truncated to a finite number of irreducible representations of the gauge group. We investigate quantitatively the influence of the truncation of the infinite number of representations in the Schwinger model, one-flavor QED2 , with a uniform electric background field. We compute the two-site reduced density matrix of the ground state and the weight of each of the representations. We find that this weight decays exponentially with the quadratic Casimir invariant of the representation which justifies the approach of truncating the Hilbert space of the gauge fields. Finally, we compute the single-particle spectrum of the model as a function of the electric background field.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Method for Evaluating Hydraulic Conductivity of Finite Array of Spheres

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Mário A.; Facin, Paulo C.; Pires, Luiz F.

    2012-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) represents an important hydrophysical parameter in a porous media. K direct measurements, usually demand a lot of work, are expensive and time consuming. Factors such as the media spatial variability, sample size, measurement method, and changes in the sample throughout the experiment directly affect K evaluations. One alternative to K measurement is computer simulation using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which can help to minimize problems such as changes in the sample structure during experimental measurements. This work presents K experimental and theoretical results (simulated) for three regular finite arrangements of spheres. Experimental measurements were carried out aiming at corroborating the LBM potential to predict K once the smallest relative deviation between experimental and simulated results was 1.4%. PMID:22654624

  11. Lattice Boltzmann method for evaluating hydraulic conductivity of finite array of spheres.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Mário A; Facin, Paulo C; Pires, Luiz F

    2012-01-01

    The hydraulic conductivity (K) represents an important hydrophysical parameter in a porous media. K direct measurements, usually demand a lot of work, are expensive and time consuming. Factors such as the media spatial variability, sample size, measurement method, and changes in the sample throughout the experiment directly affect K evaluations. One alternative to K measurement is computer simulation using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which can help to minimize problems such as changes in the sample structure during experimental measurements. This work presents K experimental and theoretical results (simulated) for three regular finite arrangements of spheres. Experimental measurements were carried out aiming at corroborating the LBM potential to predict K once the smallest relative deviation between experimental and simulated results was 1.4%.

  12. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang’s optimised finite difference scheme. PMID:27491333

  13. Adaptive finite difference for seismic wavefield modelling in acoustic media.

    PubMed

    Yao, Gang; Wu, Di; Debens, Henry Alexander

    2016-08-05

    Efficient numerical seismic wavefield modelling is a key component of modern seismic imaging techniques, such as reverse-time migration and full-waveform inversion. Finite difference methods are perhaps the most widely used numerical approach for forward modelling, and here we introduce a novel scheme for implementing finite difference by introducing a time-to-space wavelet mapping. Finite difference coefficients are then computed by minimising the difference between the spatial derivatives of the mapped wavelet and the finite difference operator over all propagation angles. Since the coefficients vary adaptively with different velocities and source wavelet bandwidths, the method is capable to maximise the accuracy of the finite difference operator. Numerical examples demonstrate that this method is superior to standard finite difference methods, while comparable to Zhang's optimised finite difference scheme.

  14. Simulation of finite size particles in turbulent flows using entropic lattice boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Abhineet; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Toschi, Federico

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flows occur in variety of industrial applications. While the numerical simulation of such flows has seen significant advances in recent years, it still remains a challenging problem. Many studies investigated the rheology of dense suspensions in laminar flows as well as the dynamics of point-particles in turbulence. Here we will present results on the development of numerical methods, based on the Lattice Boltzmann method, suitable for the study of suspensions of finite-size particles under turbulent flow conditions and with varying geometrical complexity. The turbulent flow is modeled by an entropic lattice Boltzmann method, and the interaction between particles and carrier fluid is modeled using bounce back rule. Direct contact and lubrication force models for particle-particle interactions and particle-wall interaction are taken into account to allow for a full four-way coupled interaction. The accuracy and robustness of the method is discussed by validating velocity profile in turbulent pipe flow, sedimentation velocity of spheres in duct flow and resistance functions of approaching particles. Results show that the velocity profiles and turbulence statistics can be significantly altered by the presence of the dispersed solid phase. The author is supported by Shell-NWO computational sciences for energy research (CSER) Grant (12CSER034).

  15. Finite difference computation of Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    In this Invited paper, we begin by a historical introduction to provide a motivation for the classical problems of interatomic force computation and associated challenges. This analysis will lead us from early theoretical and experimental accomplishments to the integration of these fascinating interactions into the operation of realistic, next-generation micro- and nanodevices both for the advanced metrology of fundamental physical processes and in breakthrough industrial applications. Among several powerful strategies enabling vastly enhanced performance and entirely novel technological capabilities, we shall specifically consider Casimir force time-modulation and the adoption of non-trivial geometries. As to the former, the ability to alter the magnitude and sign of the Casimir force will be recognized as a crucial principle to implement thermodynamical nano-engines. As to the latter, we shall first briefly review various reported computational approaches. We shall then discuss the game-changing discovery, in the last decade, that standard methods of numerical classical electromagnetism can be retooled to formulate the problem of Casimir force computation in arbitrary geometries. This remarkable development will be practically illustrated by showing that such an apparently elementary method as standard finite-differencing can be successfully employed to numerically recover results known from the Lifshitz theory of dispersion forces in the case of interacting parallel-plane slabs. Other geometries will be also be explored and consideration given to the potential of non-standard finite-difference methods. Finally, we shall introduce problems at the computational frontier, such as those including membranes deformed by Casimir forces and the effects of anisotropic materials. Conclusions will highlight the dramatic transition from the enduring perception of this field as an exotic application of quantum electrodynamics to the recent demonstration of a human climbing

  16. A dispersion reducing convective finite difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, R. J.; Hindman, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    A one-parameter family of finite difference schemes for systems of convective equations has been developed and applied to the inviscid Burgers' equation and the one-dimensional, unsteady Euler equations. The parameter, alpha, may be chosen in a way to reduce the phase error of the numerical solution compared to other commonly used second order difference schemes, and computational results are included which show the ability of the scheme, called the alpha-scheme in this paper, to calculate solutions which contain discontinuities with very little oscillation. For linear one-dimensional problems, the scheme reduces to Fromm's zero average phase error method, but the present scheme differs from Fromm's in that it is easily applied to nonlinear systems of equations such as the Euler equations describing inviscid fluid flow. A modified MacCormack scheme and Warming and Beam's predictor-corrector upwind scheme are also members of the family of schemes which can be retrieved for particular choices of the parameter, alpha.

  17. The square lattice Ising model on the rectangle I: finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucht, Alfred

    2017-02-01

    The partition function of the square lattice Ising model on the rectangle with open boundary conditions in both directions is calculated exactly for arbitrary system size L× M and temperature. We start with the dimer method of Kasteleyn, McCoy and Wu, construct a highly symmetric block transfer matrix and derive a factorization of the involved determinant, effectively decomposing the free energy of the system into two parts, F(L,M)={{F}\\text{strip}}(L,M)+F\\text{strip}\\text{res}(L,M) , where the residual part F\\text{strip}\\text{res}(L,M) contains the nontrivial finite-L contributions for fixed M. It is given by the determinant of a M/2× M/2 matrix and can be mapped onto an effective spin model with M Ising spins and long-range interactions. While F\\text{strip}\\text{res}(L,M) becomes exponentially small for large L/M or off-critical temperatures, it leads to important finite-size effects such as the critical Casimir force near criticality. The relations to the Casimir potential and the Casimir force are discussed.

  18. Finite-volume method with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme for incompressible porous media flow at the representative-elementary-volume scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Based on the Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, a finite-volume computational model with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme is proposed for incompressible porous media flow in this paper. The fluxes across the cell interface are calculated by reconstructing the local solution of the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation for porous media flow. The time-scaled midpoint integration rule is adopted to discretize the governing equation, which makes the time step become limited by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewy condition. The force term which evaluates the effect of the porous medium is added to the discretized governing equation directly. The numerical simulations of the steady Poiseuille flow, the unsteady Womersley flow, the circular Couette flow, and the lid-driven flow are carried out to verify the present computational model. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical, finite-difference, and/or previously published solutions.

  19. Finite-element/progressive-lattice-sampling response surface methodology and application to benchmark probability quantification problems

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, V.J.; Bankston, S.D.

    1998-03-01

    Optimal response surface construction is being investigated as part of Sandia discretionary (LDRD) research into Analytic Nondeterministic Methods. The goal is to achieve an adequate representation of system behavior over the relevant parameter space of a problem with a minimum of computational and user effort. This is important in global optimization and in estimation of system probabilistic response, which are both made more viable by replacing large complex computer models with fast-running accurate and noiseless approximations. A Finite Element/Lattice Sampling (FE/LS) methodology for constructing progressively refined finite element response surfaces that reuse previous generations of samples is described here. Similar finite element implementations can be extended to N-dimensional problems and/or random fields and applied to other types of structured sampling paradigms, such as classical experimental design and Gauss, Lobatto, and Patterson sampling. Here the FE/LS model is applied in a ``decoupled`` Monte Carlo analysis of two sets of probability quantification test problems. The analytic test problems, spanning a large range of probabilities and very demanding failure region geometries, constitute a good testbed for comparing the performance of various nondeterministic analysis methods. In results here, FE/LS decoupled Monte Carlo analysis required orders of magnitude less computer time than direct Monte Carlo analysis, with no appreciable loss of accuracy. Thus, when arriving at probabilities or distributions by Monte Carlo, it appears to be more efficient to expend computer-model function evaluations on building a FE/LS response surface than to expend them in direct Monte Carlo sampling.

  20. Finite Mathematics and Discrete Mathematics: Is There a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marvin L.

    Discrete mathematics and finite mathematics differ in a number of ways. First, finite mathematics has a longer history and is therefore more stable in terms of course content. Finite mathematics courses emphasize certain particular mathematical tools which are useful in solving the problems of business and the social sciences. Discrete mathematics…

  1. Finite Mathematics and Discrete Mathematics: Is There a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marvin L.

    Discrete mathematics and finite mathematics differ in a number of ways. First, finite mathematics has a longer history and is therefore more stable in terms of course content. Finite mathematics courses emphasize certain particular mathematical tools which are useful in solving the problems of business and the social sciences. Discrete mathematics…

  2. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  3. Lasing in dark and bright modes of a finite-sized plasmonic lattice

    PubMed Central

    Hakala, T. K.; Rekola, H. T.; Väkeväinen, A. I.; Martikainen, J.-P.; Nečada, M.; Moilanen, A. J.; Törmä, P.

    2017-01-01

    Lasing at the nanometre scale promises strong light-matter interactions and ultrafast operation. Plasmonic resonances supported by metallic nanoparticles have extremely small mode volumes and high field enhancements, making them an ideal platform for studying nanoscale lasing. At visible frequencies, however, the applicability of plasmon resonances is limited due to strong ohmic and radiative losses. Intriguingly, plasmonic nanoparticle arrays support non-radiative dark modes that offer longer life-times but are inaccessible to far-field radiation. Here, we show lasing both in dark and bright modes of an array of silver nanoparticles combined with optically pumped dye molecules. Linewidths of 0.2 nm at visible wavelengths and room temperature are observed. Access to the dark modes is provided by a coherent out-coupling mechanism based on the finite size of the array. The results open a route to utilize all modes of plasmonic lattices, also the high-Q ones, for studies of strong light-matter interactions, condensation and photon fluids. PMID:28045047

  4. Micro Blowing Simulations Using a Coupled Finite-Volume Lattice-Boltzman n L ES Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, S.; Feiz, H.

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional large-eddy simulations (LES) of single and multiple jet-in-cross-flow (JICF) are conducted using the 19-bit Lattice Boltzmann Equation (LBE) method coupled with a conventional finite-volume (FV) scheme. In this coupled LBE-FV approach, the LBE-LES is employed to simulate the flow inside the jet nozzles while the FV-LES is used to simulate the crossflow. The key application area is the use of this technique is to study the micro blowing technique (MBT) for drag control similar to the recent experiments at NASA/GRC. It is necessary to resolve the flow inside the micro-blowing and suction holes with high resolution without being restricted by the FV time-step restriction. The coupled LBE-FV-LES approach achieves this objectives in a computationally efficient manner. A single jet in crossflow case is used for validation purpose and the results are compared with experimental data and full LBE-LES simulation. Good agreement with data is obtained. Subsequently, MBT over a flat plate with porosity of 25% is simulated using 9 jets in a compressible cross flow at a Mach number of 0.4. It is shown that MBT suppresses the near-wall vortices and reduces the skin friction by up to 50 percent. This is in good agreement with experimental data.

  5. High-order lattice Boltzmann models for wall-bounded flows at finite Knudsen numbers.

    PubMed

    Feuchter, C; Schleifenbaum, W

    2016-07-01

    We analyze a large number of high-order discrete velocity models for solving the Boltzmann-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equation for finite Knudsen number flows. Using the Chapman-Enskog formalism, we prove for isothermal flows a relation identifying the resolved flow regimes for low Mach numbers. Although high-order lattice Boltzmann models recover flow regimes beyond the Navier-Stokes level, we observe for several models significant deviations from reference results. We found this to be caused by their inability to recover the Maxwell boundary condition exactly. By using supplementary conditions for the gas-surface interaction it is shown how to systematically generate discrete velocity models of any order with the inherent ability to fulfill the diffuse Maxwell boundary condition accurately. Both high-order quadratures and an exact representation of the boundary condition turn out to be crucial for achieving reliable results. For Poiseuille flow, we can reproduce the mass flow and slip velocity up to the Knudsen number of 1. Moreover, for small Knudsen numbers, the Knudsen layer behavior is recovered.

  6. Lattice models for granular-like velocity fields: finite-size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, C. A.; Manacorda, A.; Lasanta, A.; Puglisi, A.; Prados, A.

    2016-09-01

    Long-range spatial correlations in the velocity and energy fields of a granular fluid are discussed in the framework of a 1d lattice model. The dynamics of the velocity field occurs through nearest-neighbour inelastic collisions that conserve momentum but dissipate energy. A set of equations for the fluctuating hydrodynamics of the velocity and energy mesoscopic fields give a first approximation for (i) the velocity structure factor and (ii) the finite-size correction to the Haff law, both in the homogeneous cooling regime. At a more refined level, we have derived the equations for the two-site velocity correlations and the total energy fluctuations. First, we seek a perturbative solution thereof, in powers of the inverse of system size. On the one hand, when scaled with the granular temperature, the velocity correlations tend to a stationary value in the long time limit. On the other hand, the scaled standard deviation of the total energy diverges, that is, the system shows multiscaling. Second, we find an exact solution for the velocity correlations in terms of the spectrum of eigenvalues of a certain matrix. The results of numerical simulations of the microscopic model confirm our theoretical results, including the above described multiscaling phenomenon.

  7. Lasing in dark and bright modes of a finite-sized plasmonic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, T. K.; Rekola, H. T.; Väkeväinen, A. I.; Martikainen, J.-P.; Nečada, M.; Moilanen, A. J.; Törmä, P.

    2017-01-01

    Lasing at the nanometre scale promises strong light-matter interactions and ultrafast operation. Plasmonic resonances supported by metallic nanoparticles have extremely small mode volumes and high field enhancements, making them an ideal platform for studying nanoscale lasing. At visible frequencies, however, the applicability of plasmon resonances is limited due to strong ohmic and radiative losses. Intriguingly, plasmonic nanoparticle arrays support non-radiative dark modes that offer longer life-times but are inaccessible to far-field radiation. Here, we show lasing both in dark and bright modes of an array of silver nanoparticles combined with optically pumped dye molecules. Linewidths of 0.2 nm at visible wavelengths and room temperature are observed. Access to the dark modes is provided by a coherent out-coupling mechanism based on the finite size of the array. The results open a route to utilize all modes of plasmonic lattices, also the high-Q ones, for studies of strong light-matter interactions, condensation and photon fluids.

  8. Simulation of flow in the microcirculation using a hybrid Lattice-Boltzman and Finite Element algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Mancera, Andres; Gonzalez Cardenas, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Flow in the microcirculation is highly dependent on the mechanical properties of the cells suspended in the plasma. Red blood cells have to deform in order to pass through the smaller sections in the microcirculation. Certain deceases change the mechanical properties of red blood cells affecting its ability to deform and the rheological behaviour of blood. We developed a hybrid algorithm based on the Lattice-Boltzmann and Finite Element methods to simulate blood flow in small capillaries. Plasma was modeled as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells' membrane as a hyperelastic solid. The fluid-structure interaction was handled using the immersed boundary method. We simulated the flow of plasma with suspended red blood cells through cylindrical capillaries and measured the pressure drop as a function of the membrane's rigidity. We also simulated the flow through capillaries with a restriction and identify critical properties for which the suspended particles are unable to flow. The algorithm output was verified by reproducing certain common features of flow int he microcirculation such as the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect.

  9. Computer simulation of trails on a square lattice. II. Finite temperatures and the collapse transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirovitch, H.; Lim, H. A.

    1989-04-01

    We study by the scanning simulation method trails on a square lattice at finite temperatures. This method constitutes a very efficient tool since it enables one to obtain results at many temperatures from a single sample generated at any given temperature. The tricritical temperature at which the collapse transition occurs is -ɛ/kBTt=1.086+/-0.002. The tricritical exponents of the trail shape and its free energy are, respectively, νt=0.569+/-0.008 and γt=1.133+/-0.024 (95% confidence limits). They are equal within the error bars to the exact values of self-attracting self-avoiding walks (SAW's). However, the crossover exponent φt=0.807+/-0.005 is significantly larger than the exact value 0.423 of SAW's. We also carry out a detailed scaling analysis near Tt and demonstrate that the various properties scale as predicted by theory. At sufficiently low temperatures (T<=Tt) the persistence length appears to be ~1.

  10. Symmetry reduction of ordinary finite difference equations using moving frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Joseph; Valiquette, Francis

    2017-05-01

    The technique of equivariant moving frames is incorporated into the classical symmetry reduction method of ordinary finite difference equations. Using the recurrence relations for the finite difference invariants, computations are performed symbolically without relying on the coordinate expressions of the canonical variables and the difference invariants.

  11. An implicit block LU-SGS finite-volume lattice-Boltzmann scheme for steady flows on arbitrary unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weidong; Luo, Li-Shi

    2016-12-01

    This work proposes a fully implicit lattice Boltzmann (LB) scheme based on finite-volume (FV) discretization on arbitrary unstructured meshes. The linear system derived from the finite-volume lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is solved by the block lower-upper (BLU) symmetric-Gauss-Seidel (SGS) algorithm. The proposed implicit FV-LB scheme is efficient and robust, and has a low-storage requirement. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed implicit FV-LB scheme are validated and verified by the simulations of three test cases in two dimensions: (a) the laminar Blasius flow over a flat plate with Re =105; (b) the steady viscous flow past a circular cylinder with Re = 10, 20, and 40; and (c) the inviscid flow past a circular cylinder. The proposed implicit FV-LB scheme is shown to be not only effective and efficient for simulations of steady viscous flows, but also robust and efficient for simulations of inviscid flows in particular.

  12. Stationary Measures for Two Dual Families of Finite and Zero Temperature Models of Directed Polymers on the Square Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiery, Thimothée

    2016-10-01

    We study the recently introduced Inverse-Beta (IB) polymer, an exactly solvable, anisotropic finite temperature model of directed polymer on the square lattice, and obtain its stationary measure. In parallel we introduce an anisotropic zero temperature model of directed polymer on the square lattice, the Bernoulli-Geometric polymer, and obtain its stationary measure. This new exactly solvable model is dual to the IB polymer and interpolates between models of first and last passage percolation on the square lattice. Both stationary measures are shown to satisfy detailed balance. We also obtain the asymptotic mean value of (i) the free-energy of the IB polymer; (ii) the optimal energy of the Bernoulli-Geometric polymer. We discuss the convergence of both models to their stationary state. We perform simulations of the Bernoulli-Geometric polymer that confirm our results.

  13. Photonic band gap in an imperfect atomic diamond lattice: Penetration depth and effects of finite size and vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    We study the effects of finite size and of vacancies on the photonic band gap recently predicted for an atomic diamond lattice. Close to a Jg=0→Je=1 atomic transition, and for atomic lattices containing up to N≈3×104 atoms, we show how the density of states can be affected by both the shape of the system and the possible presence of a fraction of unoccupied lattice sites. We numerically predict and theoretically explain the presence of shape-induced border states and of vacancy-induced localized states appearing in the gap. We also investigate the penetration depth of the electromagnetic field which we compare to the case of an infinite system.

  14. Finite-temperature behavior of lattice QCD with Wilson fermion action and its implication on spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M.; Ohta, S.; Ukawa, A.

    1986-10-20

    Finite-temperature behavior of lattice QCD is studied with the Wilson fermion action and use of the Langevin technique for treating quarks dynamically. It is found that the transition zone from low- to high-temperature behavior does not cross the line of critical hopping parameter, but rather continues down to the strong-coupling limit. Practical implications for spectroscopic simulations at small quark masses are discussed.

  15. Numerical investigation of non-Newtonian fluids in annular ducts with finite aspect ratio using lattice Boltzmann method.

    PubMed

    Khali, S; Nebbali, R; Ameziani, D E; Bouhadef, K

    2013-05-01

    In this work the instability of the Taylor-Couette flow for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids (dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids) is investigated for cases of finite aspect ratios. The study is conducted numerically using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). In many industrial applications, the apparatuses and installations drift away from the idealized case of an annulus of infinite length, and thus the end caps effect can no longer be ignored. The inner cylinder is rotating while the outer one and the end walls are maintained at rest. The lattice two-dimensional nine-velocity (D2Q9) Boltzmann model developed from the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation is used to obtain the flow field for fluids obeying the power-law model. The combined effects of the Reynolds number, the radius ratio, and the power-law index n on the flow characteristics are analyzed for an annular space of finite aspect ratio. Two flow modes are obtained: a primary Couette flow (CF) mode and a secondary Taylor vortex flow (TVF) mode. The flow structures so obtained are different from one mode to another. The critical Reynolds number Re(c) for the passage from the primary to the secondary mode exhibits the lowest value for the pseudoplastic fluids and the highest value for the dilatant fluids. The findings are useful for studies of the swirling flow of non-Newtonians fluids in axisymmetric geometries using LBM. The flow changes from the CF to TVF and its structure switches from the two-cells to four-cells regime for both Newtonian and dilatant fluids. Contrariwise for pseudoplastic fluids, the flow exhibits 2-4-2 structure passing from two-cells to four cells and switches again to the two-cells configuration. Furthermore, the critical Reynolds number presents a monotonic increase with the power-law index n of the non-Newtonian fluid, and as the radius ratio grows, the transition flow regimes tend to appear for higher critical Reynolds numbers.

  16. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  17. Finite difference solutions to shocked acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkington, N. J.; Eversman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MacCormack, Lambda and split flux finite differencing schemes are used to solve a one dimensional acoustics problem. Two duct configurations were considered, a uniform duct and a converging-diverging nozzle. Asymptotic solutions for these two ducts are compared with the numerical solutions. When the acoustic amplitude and frequency are sufficiently high the acoustic signal shocks. This condition leads to a deterioration of the numerical solutions since viscous terms may be required if the shock is to be resolved. A continuous uniform duct solution is considered to demonstrate how the viscous terms modify the solution. These results are then compared with a shocked solution with and without viscous terms. Generally it is found that the most accurate solutions are those obtained using the minimum possible viscosity coefficients. All of the schemes considered give results accurate enough for acoustic power calculations with no one scheme performing significantly better than the others.

  18. Coupled finite-difference/finite-element approach for wing-body aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1992-01-01

    Computational methods using finite-difference approaches for fluids and finite-element approaches for structures have individually advanced to solve almost full-aircraft configurations. However, coupled approaches to solve fluid/structural interaction problems are still in their early stages of development, particularly for complex geometries using complete equations such as the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. Earlier work demonstrated the success of coupling finite-difference and finite-element methods for simple wing configurations using the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. In this paper, the same approach is extended for general wing-body configurations. The structural properties are represented by beam-type finite elements. The flow is modeled using the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. A general procedure to fully couple structural finite-element boundary conditions with fluid finite-difference boundary conditions is developed for wing-body configurations. Computations are made using moving grids that adapt to wing-body structural deformations. Results are illustrated for a typical wing-body configuration.

  19. Simulation of dissolution in porous media in three dimensions with lattice Boltzmann, finite-volume, and surface-rescaling methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, F.; Cen, J.; Boek, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a pore-scale dissolution model for the simulation of reactive transport in complex porous media such as those encountered in carbon-storage injection processes. We couple a lattice Boltzmann model for flow calculation with a finite-volume method for solving chemical transport equations, and allow the computational grid to change as mineral surfaces are dissolved according to first-order reaction kinetics. We appraise this scheme for use with high Péclet number flows in three-dimensional geometries and show how the popular first-order convection scheme is affected by severe numerical diffusion when grid Péclet numbers exceed unity, and confirm that this can be overcome relatively easily by using a second-order method in conjunction with a flux-limiter function. We then propose a surface rescaling method which uses parabolic elements to counteract errors in surface area exposed by the Cartesian grid and avoid the use of more complex embedded surface methods when surface reaction kinetics are incorporated. Finally, we compute dissolution in an image of a real porous limestone rock sample injected with HCl for different Péclet numbers and obtain dissolution patterns in concordance with theory and experimental observation. A low injection flow rate was shown to lead to erosion of the pore space concentrated at the face of the rock, whereas a high flow rate leads to wormhole formation.

  20. Simulation of dissolution in porous media in three dimensions with lattice Boltzmann, finite-volume, and surface-rescaling methods.

    PubMed

    Gray, F; Cen, J; Boek, E S

    2016-10-01

    We present a pore-scale dissolution model for the simulation of reactive transport in complex porous media such as those encountered in carbon-storage injection processes. We couple a lattice Boltzmann model for flow calculation with a finite-volume method for solving chemical transport equations, and allow the computational grid to change as mineral surfaces are dissolved according to first-order reaction kinetics. We appraise this scheme for use with high Péclet number flows in three-dimensional geometries and show how the popular first-order convection scheme is affected by severe numerical diffusion when grid Péclet numbers exceed unity, and confirm that this can be overcome relatively easily by using a second-order method in conjunction with a flux-limiter function. We then propose a surface rescaling method which uses parabolic elements to counteract errors in surface area exposed by the Cartesian grid and avoid the use of more complex embedded surface methods when surface reaction kinetics are incorporated. Finally, we compute dissolution in an image of a real porous limestone rock sample injected with HCl for different Péclet numbers and obtain dissolution patterns in concordance with theory and experimental observation. A low injection flow rate was shown to lead to erosion of the pore space concentrated at the face of the rock, whereas a high flow rate leads to wormhole formation.

  1. Localization and delocalization of ultracold bosonic atoms in finite optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Luehmann, Dirk-Soeren; Pfannkuche, Daniela; Bongs, Kai; Sengstock, Klaus

    2008-02-15

    We study bosonic atoms in small optical lattices by exact diagonalization and observe a striking similarity to the superfluid to Mott insulator transition in macroscopic systems. The momentum distribution, the formation of an energy gap, and the pair correlation function show only a weak size dependence. For noncommensurate filling we reveal in deep lattices a mixture of localized and delocalized particles, which is sensitive to lattice imperfections. Breaking the lattice symmetry causes a Bose-glass-like behavior. We discuss the nature of excited states and orbital effects by using an exact diagonalization technique that includes higher bands.

  2. Effects of finite volume on the KL – KS mass difference

    DOE PAGES

    Christ, N.  H.; Feng, X.; Martinelli, G.; ...

    2015-06-24

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Lüscher and Lellouch and Lüscher, which determine the leading-order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second-order mixing of the K⁰ and K⁰⁻ states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda, and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KLmore » – KS mass difference ΔMK and the CP-violating parameter εK are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.« less

  3. Eigenvalues of singular differential operators by finite difference methods. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    Note is made of an earlier paper which defined finite difference operators for the Hilbert space L2(m), and gave the eigenvalues for these operators. The present work examines eigenvalues for higher order singular differential operators by using finite difference methods. The two self-adjoint operators investigated are defined by a particular value in the same Hilbert space, L2(m), and are strictly positive with compact inverses. A class of finite difference operators is considered, with the idea of application to the theory of Toeplitz matrices. The approximating operators consist of a good approximation plus a perturbing operator.

  4. A Finite Difference-Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    ARL-RP-0531 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Finite Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion by...AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory A Finite Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion by Raymond A Wildman and George...Difference- Augmented Peridynamics Method for Wave Dispersion 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  5. High order spectral difference lattice Boltzmann method for incompressible hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weidong

    2017-09-01

    This work presents a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) based high order spectral difference method for incompressible flows. In the present method, the spectral difference (SD) method is adopted to discretize the convection and collision term of the LBE to obtain high order (≥3) accuracy. Because the SD scheme represents the solution as cell local polynomials and the solution polynomials have good tensor-product property, the present spectral difference lattice Boltzmann method (SD-LBM) can be implemented on arbitrary unstructured quadrilateral meshes for effective and efficient treatment of complex geometries. Thanks to only first oder PDEs involved in the LBE, no special techniques, such as hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin method (HDG), local discontinuous Galerkin method (LDG) and so on, are needed to discrete diffusion term, and thus, it simplifies the algorithm and implementation of the high order spectral difference method for simulating viscous flows. The proposed SD-LBM is validated with four incompressible flow benchmarks in two-dimensions: (a) the Poiseuille flow driven by a constant body force; (b) the lid-driven cavity flow without singularity at the two top corners-Burggraf flow; and (c) the unsteady Taylor-Green vortex flow; (d) the Blasius boundary-layer flow past a flat plate. Computational results are compared with analytical solutions of these cases and convergence studies of these cases are also given. The designed accuracy of the proposed SD-LBM is clearly verified.

  6. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics. [finite difference and finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    Both finite difference and finite element analyses of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts with flow, as might be found in a typical turboject engine duct, muffler, or industrial ventilation system, are reviewed. Both steady state and transient theories are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advantages and limitations associated with the various numerical techniques. Examples of practical problems are given for which the numerical techniques have been applied.

  7. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  8. Prediction of hydraulic and electrical transport properties of sandstone with multiscale lattice Boltzmann/finite element simulation on microtomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, T.; Sun, W.

    2012-12-01

    Microcomputed tomography can be used to characterize the geometry of the pore space of a sedimentary rock, with resolution that is sufficiently refined for the realistic simulation of physical properties based on the 3D image. Significant advances have been made on the characterization of pore size distribution and connectivity, development of techniques such as lattice Boltzmann method to simulate permeability, and its upscaling. Sun, Andrade and Rudnicki (2011) recently introduced a multiscale method that dynamically links these three aspects, which were often treated separately in previous computational schemes. In this study, we improve the efficiency of this multiscale method by introducing a flood-fill algorithm to determine connectivity of the pores, followed by a multiscale lattice Boltzmann/finite element calculation to obtain homogenized effective anisotropic permeability. The improved multiscale method also includes new capacity to consistently determine electrical conductivity and formation factor from CT images. Furthermore, we also introduce a level set based method that transforms pore geometry to finite element mesh and thus enables direct simulation of pore-scale flow with finite element method. When applied to the microCT data acquired by Lindquist et al. (2000) for four Fontainebleau sandstone samples with porosities ranging from 7.5% to 22%, this multiscale method has proved to be computationally efficient and our simulations has provided new insights into the relation among permeability, pore geometry and connectivity.

  9. Heat-current correlation loss induced by finite-size effects in a one-dimensional nonlinear lattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Lubo; Zhao, Huizhu

    2015-01-01

    The Green-Kubo formula provides a mathematical expression for heat conductivity in terms of integrals of the heat-current correlation function, which should be calculated in the thermodynamic limit. In finite systems this function generally decreases, i.e., it decays faster than it does in infinite systems. We compared the values of the correlation function in a one-dimensional purely quartic lattice with various lengths, and found that this loss is much smaller than is conventionally estimated. By studying the heat diffusion process in this lattice, we found that, in contrast to the conventional belief, the collisions between sound modes do not noticeably affect the current correlation function. Therefore, its loss being surprisingly small can be well understood. This finding allows one to calculate the heat conductivity in a very large system with desirable accuracy by performing simulations in a system with much smaller size, and thus greatly broadens the application of the Green-Kubo method.

  10. Heat-current correlation loss induced by finite-size effects in a one-dimensional nonlinear lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Lubo; Zhao, Huizhu

    2015-01-01

    The Green-Kubo formula provides a mathematical expression for heat conductivity in terms of integrals of the heat-current correlation function, which should be calculated in the thermodynamic limit. In finite systems this function generally decreases, i.e., it decays faster than it does in infinite systems. We compared the values of the correlation function in a one-dimensional purely quartic lattice with various lengths, and found that this loss is much smaller than is conventionally estimated. By studying the heat diffusion process in this lattice, we found that, in contrast to the conventional belief, the collisions between sound modes do not noticeably affect the current correlation function. Therefore, its loss being surprisingly small can be well understood. This finding allows one to calculate the heat conductivity in a very large system with desirable accuracy by performing simulations in a system with much smaller size, and thus greatly broadens the application of the Green-Kubo method.

  11. Finite-temperature transition of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a distorted kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2012-08-03

    Motivated by the recent experiment on kagome-lattice antiferromagnets, we study the zero-field ordering behavior of the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on a uniaxially distorted kagome lattice by Monte Carlo simulations. A first-order transition, which has no counterpart in the corresponding undistorted model, takes place at a very low temperature. The origin of the transition is ascribed to a cooperative proliferation of topological excitations inherent to the model.

  12. A lattice Boltzmann-finite element model for two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction problems involving shallow waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a numerical method for the modeling of shallow waters interacting with slender elastic structures is presented. The fluid domain is modeled through the lattice Boltzmann method, while the solid domain is idealized by corotational beam finite elements undergoing large displacements. Structure dynamics is predicted by using the time discontinuous Galerkin method and the fluid-structure interface conditions are handled by the Immersed Boundary method. An explicit coupling strategy to combine the adopted numerical methods is proposed and its effectiveness is tested by computing the error in terms of the energy that is artificially introduced at the fluid-solid interface.

  13. Superfluid to Normal Fluid Phase Transition in the Bose Gas Trapped in Two-Dimensional Optical Lattices at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, M. O. C.; de Passos, E. J. V.

    2017-02-01

    We develop the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory at finite temperature for Bose gas trapped in the two-dimensional optical lattice with the on-site energy low enough that the gas presents superfluid properties. We obtain the condensate density as function of the temperature neglecting the anomalous density in the thermodynamics equation. The condensate fraction provides two critical temperature. Below the temperature T_{C1}, there is one condensate fraction. Above two condensate fractions merger up to the critical temperature T_{C2}. At temperatures larger than T_{C2}, the condensate fraction is null and, therefore, the gas is normal fluid. We resume by a finite-temperature phase diagram where three domains can be identified: the normal fluid, the superfluid with one stable condensate fraction and the superfluid with two condensate fractions being unstable one of them.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of asymmetric flow in nematic liquid crystals with finite anchoring

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; Aranson, Igor S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-02-28

    Liquid crystals (LCs) display many of the flow characteristics of liquids but exhibit long range orientational order. In the nematic phase, the coupling of structure and flow leads to complex hydrodynamic effects that remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics of a nematic LC in a hybrid cell, where opposite walls have conflicting anchoring boundary conditions, and we employ a 3D lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the time-dependent flow patterns that can arise. Due to the symmetry breaking of the director field within the hybrid cell, we observe that at low to moderate shear rates, the volumetric flow rate under Couette and Poiseuille flows is different for opposite flow directions. At high shear rates, the director field may undergo a topological transition which leads to symmetric flows. By applying an oscillatory pressure gradient to the channel, a net volumetric flow rate is found to depend on the magnitude and frequency of the oscillation, as well as the anchoring strength. Taken together, our findings suggest several intriguing new applications for LCs in microfluidic devices.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of asymmetric flow in nematic liquid crystals with finite anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; Aranson, Igor S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-02-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) display many of the flow characteristics of liquids but exhibit long range orientational order. In the nematic phase, the coupling of structure and flow leads to complex hydrodynamic effects that remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics of a nematic LC in a hybrid cell, where opposite walls have conflicting anchoring boundary conditions, and we employ a 3D lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the time-dependent flow patterns that can arise. Due to the symmetry breaking of the director field within the hybrid cell, we observe that at low to moderate shear rates, the volumetric flow rate under Couette and Poiseuille flows is different for opposite flow directions. At high shear rates, the director field may undergo a topological transition which leads to symmetric flows. By applying an oscillatory pressure gradient to the channel, a net volumetric flow rate is found to depend on the magnitude and frequency of the oscillation, as well as the anchoring strength. Taken together, our findings suggest several intriguing new applications for LCs in microfluidic devices.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of asymmetric flow in nematic liquid crystals with finite anchoring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; Aranson, Igor S; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-02-28

    Liquid crystals (LCs) display many of the flow characteristics of liquids but exhibit long range orientational order. In the nematic phase, the coupling of structure and flow leads to complex hydrodynamic effects that remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics of a nematic LC in a hybrid cell, where opposite walls have conflicting anchoring boundary conditions, and we employ a 3D lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the time-dependent flow patterns that can arise. Due to the symmetry breaking of the director field within the hybrid cell, we observe that at low to moderate shear rates, the volumetric flow rate under Couette and Poiseuille flows is different for opposite flow directions. At high shear rates, the director field may undergo a topological transition which leads to symmetric flows. By applying an oscillatory pressure gradient to the channel, a net volumetric flow rate is found to depend on the magnitude and frequency of the oscillation, as well as the anchoring strength. Taken together, our findings suggest several intriguing new applications for LCs in microfluidic devices.

  17. Are two nucleons bound in lattice QCD for heavy quark masses? Consistency check with Lüscher's finite volume formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iritani, Takumi; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Ikeda, Yoichi; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji; HAL QCD Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    On the basis of Lüscher's finite volume formula, a simple test (consistency check or sanity check) is introduced and applied to inspect the recent claims of the existence of the nucleon-nucleon (N N ) bound state(s) for heavy quark masses in lattice QCD. We show that the consistency between the scattering phase shifts at k2>0 and/or k2<0 obtained from the lattice data and the behavior of phase shifts from the effective range expansion (ERE) around k2=0 exposes the validity of the original lattice data; otherwise, such information is hidden in the energy shift Δ E of the two nucleons on the lattice. We carry out this consistency check for all the lattice results in the literature claiming the existence of the N N bound state(s) for heavy quark masses and find that (i) some of the N N data show a clear inconsistency between the behavior of ERE at k2>0 and that at k2<0 , (ii) some of the N N data exhibit a singular behavior of the low-energy parameter (such as the divergent effective range) at k2<0 , (iii) some of the N N data have the unphysical residue for the bound-state pole in the S matrix, and (iv) the rest of the N N data are inconsistent among themselves. Furthermore, we raise a caution of using the ERE in the case of the multiple bound states. Our finding, together with the fake plateau problem previously pointed out by the present authors, brings a serious doubt on the existence of the N N bound states for pion masses heavier than 300 MeV in the previous studies.

  18. Direct simulations of turbulent flow using finite-difference schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Moin, Parviz

    1989-01-01

    A high-order accurate finite-difference approach is presented for calculating incompressible turbulent flow. The methods used include a kinetic energy conserving central difference scheme and an upwind difference scheme. The methods are evaluated in test cases for the evolution of small-amplitude disturbances and fully developed turbulent channel flow. It is suggested that the finite-difference approach can be applied to complex geometries more easilty than highly accurate spectral methods. It is concluded that the upwind scheme is a good candidate for direct simulations of turbulent flows over complex geometries.

  19. Finite-difference schemes for anisotropic diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Es, Bram van; Koren, Barry; Blank, Hugo J. de

    2014-09-01

    In fusion plasmas diffusion tensors are extremely anisotropic due to the high temperature and large magnetic field strength. This causes diffusion, heat conduction, and viscous momentum loss, to effectively be aligned with the magnetic field lines. This alignment leads to different values for the respective diffusive coefficients in the magnetic field direction and in the perpendicular direction, to the extent that heat diffusion coefficients can be up to 10{sup 12} times larger in the parallel direction than in the perpendicular direction. This anisotropy puts stringent requirements on the numerical methods used to approximate the MHD-equations since any misalignment of the grid may cause the perpendicular diffusion to be polluted by the numerical error in approximating the parallel diffusion. Currently the common approach is to apply magnetic field-aligned coordinates, an approach that automatically takes care of the directionality of the diffusive coefficients. This approach runs into problems at x-points and at points where there is magnetic re-connection, since this causes local non-alignment. It is therefore useful to consider numerical schemes that are tolerant to the misalignment of the grid with the magnetic field lines, both to improve existing methods and to help open the possibility of applying regular non-aligned grids. To investigate this, in this paper several discretization schemes are developed and applied to the anisotropic heat diffusion equation on a non-aligned grid.

  20. KL-KS Mass Difference from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Z.; Christ, N. H.; Izubuchi, T.; Sachrajda, C. T.; Soni, A.; Yu, J.

    2014-09-01

    We report on the first complete calculation of the KL-KS mass difference, ΔMK, using lattice QCD. The calculation is performed on a 2+1 flavor, domain wall fermion ensemble with a 330 MeV pion mass and a 575 MeV kaon mass. We use a quenched charm quark with a 949 MeV mass to implement Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani cancellation. For these heavier-than-physical particle masses, we obtain ΔMK=3.19(41)(96)×10-12 MeV, quite similar to the experimental value. Here the first error is statistical, and the second is an estimate of the systematic discretization error. An interesting aspect of this calculation is the importance of the disconnected diagrams, a dramatic failure of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule.

  1. Asymptotic analysis of numerical wave propagation in finite difference equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, M.; Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An asymptotic technique is developed for analyzing the propagation and dissipation of wave-like solutions to finite difference equations. It is shown that for each fixed complex frequency there are usually several wave solutions with different wavenumbers and the slowly varying amplitude of each satisfies an asymptotic amplitude equation which includes the effects of smoothly varying coefficients in the finite difference equations. The local group velocity appears in this equation as the velocity of convection of the amplitude. Asymptotic boundary conditions coupling the amplitudes of the different wave solutions are also derived. A wavepacket theory is developed which predicts the motion, and interaction at boundaries, of wavepackets, wave-like disturbances of finite length. Comparison with numerical experiments demonstrates the success and limitations of the theory. Finally an asymptotic global stability analysis is developed.

  2. A comparison of the finite difference and finite element methods for heat transfer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Mortazavi, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The finite difference method and finite element method for heat transfer calculations are compared by describing their bases and their application to some common heat transfer problems. In general it is noted that neither method is clearly superior, and in many instances, the choice is quite arbitrary and depends more upon the codes available and upon the personal preference of the analyst than upon any well defined advantages of one method. Classes of problems for which one method or the other is better suited are defined.

  3. Compact finite difference method for American option pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jichao; Davison, Matt; Corless, Robert M.

    2007-09-01

    A compact finite difference method is designed to obtain quick and accurate solutions to partial differential equation problems. The problem of pricing an American option can be cast as a partial differential equation. Using the compact finite difference method this problem can be recast as an ordinary differential equation initial value problem. The complicating factor for American options is the existence of an optimal exercise boundary which is jointly determined with the value of the option. In this article we develop three ways of combining compact finite difference methods for American option price on a single asset with methods for dealing with this optimal exercise boundary. Compact finite difference method one uses the implicit condition that solutions of the transformed partial differential equation be nonnegative to detect the optimal exercise value. This method is very fast and accurate even when the spatial step size h is large (h[greater-or-equal, slanted]0.1). Compact difference method two must solve an algebraic nonlinear equation obtained by Pantazopoulos (1998) at every time step. This method can obtain second order accuracy for space x and requires a moderate amount of time comparable with that required by the Crank Nicolson projected successive over relaxation method. Compact finite difference method three refines the free boundary value by a method developed by Barone-Adesi and Lugano [The saga of the American put, 2003], and this method can obtain high accuracy for space x. The last two of these three methods are convergent, moreover all the three methods work for both short term and long term options. Through comparison with existing popular methods by numerical experiments, our work shows that compact finite difference methods provide an exciting new tool for American option pricing.

  4. Convergence of finite difference transient response computations for thin shells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, L. H.; Geers, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical studies pertaining to the limits of applicability of the finite difference method in the solution of linear transient shell response problems are performed, and a computational procedure for the use of the method is recommended. It is found that the only inherent limitation of the finite difference method is its inability to reproduce accurately response discontinuities. This is not a serious limitation in view of natural constraints imposed by the extension of Saint Venant's principle to transient response problems. It is also found that the short wavelength limitations of thin shell (Bernoulli-Euler) theory create significant convergence difficulties in computed response to certain types of transverse excitations. These difficulties may be overcome, however, through proper selection of finite difference mesh dimensions and temporal smoothing of the excitation.

  5. Finite-temperature fidelity and von Neumann entropy in the honeycomb spin lattice with quantum Ising interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Yan-Wei; Shi, Qian-Qian; Cho, Sam Young; Batchelor, Murray T.; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2017-06-01

    The finite-temperature phase diagram is obtained for an infinite honeycomb lattice with spin-1 /2 Ising interaction J by using thermal-state fidelity and the von Neumann entropy based on the infinite projected entangled pair state algorithm with ancillas. The tensor network representation of the fidelity, which is defined as an overlap measurement between two thermal states, is presented for thermal states on the honeycomb lattice. We show that the fidelity per lattice site and the von Neumann entropy can capture the phase transition temperatures for an applied magnetic field, consistent with the transition temperatures obtained via the transverse magnetizations, which indicates that a continuous phase transition occurs in the system. In the temperature-magnetic field plane, the phase boundary for finite temperature is found to be well approximated by the functional form (kBTc) 2+hc2/2 =a J2 with a single numerical fitting coefficient a =2.298 (7 ) , where Tc and hc are the critical temperature and field with Boltzmann constant kB. The critical temperature in the absence of magnetic field is estimated as kBTc/J =√{a }≃1.516 (2 ) , compared with the exact result kBTc/J =1.51865 ⋯ . For the quantum state at zero temperature, this phase boundary function gives the critical field estimate hc/J =√{2 a }≃2.144 (3 ) , compared to the known value hc/J =2.13250 (4 ) calculated from a cluster Monte Carlo approach.

  6. Finite-Difference Algorithms For Computing Sound Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1993-01-01

    Governing equations considered as matrix system. Method variant of method described in "Scheme for Finite-Difference Computations of Waves" (ARC-12970). Present method begins with matrix-vector formulation of fundamental equations, involving first-order partial derivatives of primitive variables with respect to space and time. Particular matrix formulation places time and spatial coordinates on equal footing, so governing equations considered as matrix system and treated as unit. Spatial and temporal discretizations not treated separately as in other finite-difference methods, instead treated together by linking spatial-grid interval and time step via common scale factor related to speed of sound.

  7. Selecting step sizes in sensitivity analysis by finite differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iott, J.; Haftka, R. T.; Adelman, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with methods for obtaining near-optimum step sizes for finite difference approximations to first derivatives with particular application to sensitivity analysis. A technique denoted the finite difference (FD) algorithm, previously described in the literature and applicable to one derivative at a time, is extended to the calculation of several simultaneously. Both the original and extended FD algorithms are applied to sensitivity analysis for a data-fitting problem in which derivatives of the coefficients of an interpolation polynomial are calculated with respect to uncertainties in the data. The methods are also applied to sensitivity analysis of the structural response of a finite-element-modeled swept wing. In a previous study, this sensitivity analysis of the swept wing required a time-consuming trial-and-error effort to obtain a suitable step size, but it proved to be a routine application for the extended FD algorithm herein.

  8. A comparative analysis of finite element and finite difference methods for free surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Vafai, K. . Dept of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    The present work consists of the comparative evaluation of the finite element method (FEM) and the finite difference method (FDM) for the analysis of free surface transport within a hollow ampule. The phenomenon of motion reversal of the free surfaces obtained earlier by the FDM is also analyzed by the FEM. It is found that the times at which the motion reversal occurs are independent of the applied pressure difference for any fixed dimension of the hollow ampule. Furthermore, it appears that the displacement of the inner and outer free surfaces varies linearly with the magnitude of the applied pressure difference. Finally, detailed comparative discussion is presented on the differences between the results obtained by FDM and FEM.

  9. Finite-difference and finite-volume methods for nonlinear standing ultrasonic waves in fluid media.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, C; Conde, C; Campos-Pozuelo, C

    2004-04-01

    In the framework of the application of high-power ultrasonics in industrial processing in fluid media, the mathematical prediction of the acoustical parameters inside resonators should improve the development of practical systems. This can be achieved by the use of numerical tools able to treat the nonlinear acoustics involved in these phenomena. In particular, effects like nonlinear distortion and nonlinear attenuation are fundamental in applications. In this paper, three one-dimensional numerical models in the time domain for calculating the nonlinear acoustic field inside a one-dimensional resonant cavity are presented and compared. They are based on the finite-difference and the finite-volume methods. These different algorithms solve the differential equations, from the linear up to the strongly nonlinear case (including weak shock). Some physical results obtained from the modelling of ultrasonic waves and a comparison of the efficiency of the different algorithms are presented.

  10. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. II. Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Nicolazzi, William; Terki, Férial; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    In the first part of this work, an experimental study of the lattice dynamics of spin crossover nanoparticles was performed using the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS). A size dependence of low energy phonon modes appears under 10 nm, but its origin is not well understood. In this paper, we investigate the phonon confinement effects in the framework of molecular dynamics simulations by modeling three-dimensional nanoparticles considering a cubic lattice with an octahedral pattern. The vibrational density of states is computed and compared to the experiment. The simulations allow one to highlight both the role of the phonon quantification and the role of the size and shape distributions of particles on the extracted parameters leading to a better understanding of the experimental results.

  11. Fixed-scale approach to finite-temperature lattice QCD with shifted boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We study the thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory using the fixed-scale approach with shifted boundary conditions. The fixed-scale approach can reduce the numerical cost of the zero-temperature part in the equation of state calculations, while the number of possible temperatures is limited by the integer Nt, which represents the temporal lattice extent. The shifted boundary conditions can overcome such a limitation while retaining the advantages of the fixed-scale approach. Therefore, our approach enables the investigation of not only the equation of state in detail but also the calculation of the critical temperature with increased precision even with the fixed-scale approach. We also observe numerically that the boundary conditions suppress the lattice artifact of the equation of state, which has been observed in the noninteracting limit.

  12. Visibility of cold atomic gases in optical lattices for finite temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Alexander; Pelster, Axel

    2009-05-15

    In nearly all experiments with ultracold atoms time-of-flight pictures are the only data available. In this paper we present an analytical strong-coupling calculation for those time-of-flight pictures of bosons in a three-dimensional optical lattice in the Mott phase. This allows us to determine the visibility, which quantifies the contrast of peaks in the time-of-flight pictures, and we suggest how to use it as a thermometer.

  13. RECENT LATTICE RESULTS ON FINITE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY QCD, PART 1.

    SciTech Connect

    KARSCH,F.

    2007-07-09

    We discuss recent progress made studies of bulk thermodynamics of strongly interacting matter through lattice simulations of QCD with an almost physical light and strange quark mass spectrum. We present results on the QCD equation of state at vanishing and non-vanishing quark chemical potential and show first results on baryon number and strangeness fluctuations, which might be measured in event-by-event fluctuations in low energy runs at RHIC as well as at FAIR.

  14. Ising antiferromagnet on a finite triangular lattice with free boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Yeon

    2015-11-01

    The exact integer values for the density of states of the Ising model on an equilateral triangular lattice with free boundary conditions are evaluated up to L = 24 spins on a side for the first time by using the microcanonical transfer matrix. The total number of states is 2 N s = 2300 ≈ 2.037 × 1090 for L = 24, where N s = L( L+1)/2 is the number of spins. Classifying all 2300 spin states according to their energy values is an enormous work. From the density of states, the exact partition function zeros in the complex temperature plane of the triangular-lattice Ising model are evaluated. Using the density of states and the partition function zeros, we investigate the properties of the triangularlattice Ising antiferromagnet. The scaling behavior of the ground-state entropy and the form of the correlation length at T = 0 are studied for the triangular-lattice Ising antiferromagnet with free boundary conditions. Also, the scaling behavior of the Fisher edge singularity is investigated.

  15. Finite difference time domain modelling of particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jurgens, T.G.; Harfoush, F.A.

    1989-03-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) modelling has been successfully applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic scattering and interaction problems for many years. Here the method is extended to incorporate the modelling of wake fields in particle accelerators. Algorithmic comparisons are made to existing wake field codes, such as MAFIA T3. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Finite Difference Solution for Biopotentials of Axially Symmetric Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Maurice; Plonsey, Robert

    1972-01-01

    The finite difference equations necessary for calculating the three-dimensional, time-varying biopotentials within and surrounding axially symmetric cells are presented. The method of sucessive overrelaxation is employed to solve these equations and is shown to be rapidly convergent and accurate for the exemplary problem of a spheroidal cell under uniform field stimulation. PMID:4655665

  17. Direct Finite-Difference Simulations Of Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Moin, Parviz

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses use of upwind-biased finite-difference numerical-integration scheme to simulate evolution of small disturbances and fully developed turbulence in three-dimensional flow of viscous, incompressible fluid in channel. Involves use of computational grid sufficiently fine to resolve motion of fluid at all relevant length scales.

  18. Finite Deformations and Internal Forces in Elastic-Plastic Crystals: Interpretations From Nonlinear Elasticity and Anharmonic Lattice Statics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    0 Downlond inelastic...zm= 0 . 2.1 Plastic Deformation. Intermediate configuration B̃ in Fig. 1 differs from B0 due to influences of cumulative motion of lattice defects...and perturbations of atomic positions resulting from these defects. Configuration B̃ is by definition free of external traction t̃= 0 and free

  19. Fractional-order difference equations for physical lattices and some applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2015-10-15

    Fractional-order operators for physical lattice models based on the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional differences are suggested. We use an approach based on the models of lattices with long-range particle interactions. The fractional-order operators of differentiation and integration on physical lattices are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions. In continuum limit, these discrete operators of non-integer orders give the fractional-order derivatives and integrals with respect to coordinates of the Grünwald-Letnikov types. As examples of the fractional-order difference equations for physical lattices, we give difference analogs of the fractional nonlocal Navier-Stokes equations and the fractional nonlocal Maxwell equations for lattices with long-range interactions. Continuum limits of these fractional-order difference equations are also suggested.

  20. Density of States FFA analysis of SU(3) lattice gauge theory at a finite density of color sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Mario; Gattringer, Christof

    2017-10-01

    We present a Density of States calculation with the Functional Fit Approach (DoS FFA) in SU(3) lattice gauge theory with a finite density of static color sources. The DoS FFA uses a parameterized density of states and determines the parameters of the density by fitting data from restricted Monte Carlo simulations with an analytically known function. We discuss the implementation of DoS FFA and the results for a qualitative picture of the phase diagram in a model which is a further step towards implementing DoS FFA in full QCD. We determine the curvature κ in the μ-T phase diagram and find a value close to the results published for full QCD.

  1. Quantum dynamical response of ultracold few-boson ensembles in finite optical lattices to multiple interaction quenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus-Steinmetz, J.; Mistakidis, S. I.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-05-01

    The correlated nonequilibrium quantum dynamics following a multiple interaction quench protocol for few-bosonic ensembles confined in finite optical lattices is investigated. The quenches give rise to an interwell tunneling and excite the cradle and a breathing mode. Several tunneling pathways open during the time interval of increased interactions, while only a few occur when the system is quenched back to its original interaction strength. The cradle mode, however, persists during and in between the quenches, while the breathing mode possesses distinct frequencies. The occupation of excited bands is explored in detail revealing a monotonic behavior with increasing quench amplitude and a nonlinear dependence on the duration of the application of the quenched interaction strength. Finally, a periodic population transfer between momenta for quenches of increasing interaction is observed, with a power-law frequency dependence on the quench amplitude. Our results open the possibility to dynamically manipulate various excited modes of the bosonic system.

  2. Ground state properties of spinless extended Falicov-Kimball model on a triangular lattice with finite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Umesh K.

    2017-07-01

    Combined effects of correlated electron hopping, electron correlations and orbital magnetic field are studied on ground state properties of spinless Falicov-Kimball model (FKM). Results are obtained for finite size triangular lattice with periodic boundary conditions using numerical diagonalization and Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. It is found that the ground state configurations of electrons strongly depend on correlated electron hopping, onsite Coulomb interaction and orbital magnetic field. Several interesting configurations e.g. regular, segregated, axial and diagonal striped and hexagonal phases are found with change in correlated hopping and magnetic field. Study of density of states reveals that magnetic field induces a metal to insulator transition accompanied by segregated phase to an ordered phase. These results are applicable to the systems of recent interest like GdI2, NaTiO2 and MgV2O4 and can also be seen experimentally in cold atomic set up.

  3. Electromagnetic Scattering of Finite and Infinite 3D Lattices in Polarizable Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinet, Benjamin; Martin, Olivier J. F.

    2009-10-07

    A novel method is elaborated for the electromagnetic scattering from periodical arrays of scatterers embedded in a polarizable background. A dyadic periodic Green's function is introduced to calculate the scattered electric field in a lattice of dielectric or metallic objects. The method exhibits strong advantages: discretization and computation of the field are restricted to the volume of the scatterers in the unit cell, open and periodic boundary conditions for the electric field are included in the Green's tensor, and finally both near and far-fields physics are directly revealed, without any additional computational effort. Promising applications include the design of periodic structures such as frequency-selective surfaces, photonic crystals and metamaterials.

  4. Correlation versus commensurability effects for finite bosonic systems in one-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Brouzos, Ioannis; Schmelcher, Peter; Zoellner, Sascha

    2010-05-15

    We investigate few-boson systems in finite one-dimensional multiwell traps covering the full interaction crossover from uncorrelated to fermionized particles. Our treatment of the ground-state properties is based on the numerically exact multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree method. For commensurate filling, we trace the fingerprints of localization as the interaction strength increases, in several observables like reduced-density matrices, fluctuations, and momentum distribution. For a filling factor larger than 1 we observe on-site repulsion effects in the densities and fragmentation of particles beyond the validity of the Bose-Hubbard model upon approaching the Tonks-Girardeau limit. The presence of an incommensurate fraction of particles induces incomplete localization and spatial modulations of the density profiles, taking into account the finite size of the system.

  5. Time dependent wave envelope finite difference analysis of sound propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    A transient finite difference wave envelope formulation is presented for sound propagation, without steady flow. Before the finite difference equations are formulated, the governing wave equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the propagation direction. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Physically, the transformed pressure represents the amplitude of the conventional sound wave. The derivation for the wave envelope transient wave equation and appropriate boundary conditions are presented as well as the difference equations and stability requirements. To illustrate the method, example solutions are presented for sound propagation in a straight hard wall duct and in a two dimensional straight soft wall duct. The numerical results are in good agreement with exact analytical results.

  6. Experimentally constructing finite difference algorithms in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Matzner, Richard

    2002-04-01

    Computational studies of gravitational waves require numerical algorithms with long-term stability (necessary for convergence). However, constructing stable finite difference algorithms (FDA) for the ADM formulation of the Einstein equations, especially in multiple dimensions, has proven difficult. Most FDA's are constructed using rules of thumb gained from experience with simple model equations. To search for FDA's with improved stability, we adopt a brute-force approach, where we systematically test thousands of numerical schemes. We sort the spatial derivatives of the Einstein equations into groups, and parameterize each group by finite difference type (centered or upwind) and order. Furthermore, terms proportional to the constraints are added to the evolution equations with additional parameters. A spherically symmetric, excised Schwarzschild black hole (one dimension) and linearized waves in multiple dimensions are used as model systems to evaluate the different numerical schemes.

  7. End point of a first-order phase transition in many-flavor lattice QCD at finite temperature and density.

    PubMed

    Ejiri, Shinji; Yamada, Norikazu

    2013-04-26

    Towards the feasibility study of the electroweak baryogenesis in realistic technicolor scenario, we investigate the phase structure of (2+N(f))-flavor QCD, where the mass of two flavors is fixed to a small value and the others are heavy. For the baryogenesis, an appearance of a first-order phase transition at finite temperature is a necessary condition. Using a set of configurations of two-flavor lattice QCD and applying the reweighting method, the effective potential defined by the probability distribution function of the plaquette is calculated in the presence of additional many heavy flavors. Through the shape of the effective potential, we determine the critical mass of heavy flavors separating the first-order and crossover regions and find it to become larger with N(f). We moreover study the critical line at finite density and the first-order region is found to become wider as increasing the chemical potential. Possible applications to real (2+1)-flavor QCD are discussed.

  8. The Laguerre finite difference one-way equation solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Andrew V.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a new finite difference algorithm for solving the 2D one-way wave equation with a preliminary approximation of a pseudo-differential operator by a system of partial differential equations. As opposed to the existing approaches, the integral Laguerre transform instead of Fourier transform is used. After carrying out the approximation of spatial variables it is possible to obtain systems of linear algebraic equations with better computing properties and to reduce computer costs for their solution. High accuracy of calculations is attained at the expense of employing finite difference approximations of higher accuracy order that are based on the dispersion-relationship-preserving method and the Richardson extrapolation in the downward continuation direction. The numerical experiments have verified that as compared to the spectral difference method based on Fourier transform, the new algorithm allows one to calculate wave fields with a higher degree of accuracy and a lower level of numerical noise and artifacts including those for non-smooth velocity models. In the context of solving the geophysical problem the post-stack migration for velocity models of the types Syncline and Sigsbee2A has been carried out. It is shown that the images obtained contain lesser noise and are considerably better focused as compared to those obtained by the known Fourier Finite Difference and Phase-Shift Plus Interpolation methods. There is an opinion that purely finite difference approaches do not allow carrying out the seismic migration procedure with sufficient accuracy, however the results obtained disprove this statement. For the supercomputer implementation it is proposed to use the parallel dichotomy algorithm when solving systems of linear algebraic equations with block-tridiagonal matrices.

  9. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  10. Solving wave equation using finite differences and Taylor series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečasová, Gabriela; Kocina, Filip; Veigend, Petr; Chaloupka, Jan; Šátek, Václav; Kunovský, Jiří

    2017-07-01

    The paper deals with the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), especially wave equation. Two methods are used to obtain numerical solution of the wave equation. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) is used for transformation of wave equation to the system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), different types of difference formulas are used. The influence of arithmetic to higher order difference formulas is also presented. The Modern Taylor Series Method (MTSM) allows to solve ODEs numerically with extremely high precision. An important feature of this method is an automatic integration order setting, i.e. using as many Taylor series terms as the defined accuracy requires.

  11. Finite difference seismic modeling of axial magma chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, S.A.; Dougherty, M.E.; Stephen, R.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors tested the feasibility of using finite difference methods to model seismic propagation at {approximately}10 Hx through a two-dimensional representation of an axial magma chamber with a thin, liquid lid. This technique produces time series of displacement or pressure at seafloor receivers to mimic a seismic refraction experiment and snapshots of P and S energy propagation. The results indicate that the implementation is stable for models with sharp velocity contrasts and complex geometries. The authors observe a high-energy, downward-traveling shear phase, observable only with borehole receivers, that would be useful in studying the nature and shape of magma chambers. The ability of finite difference methods to model high-order wave phenomena makes this method ideal for testing velocity models of spreading axes and for planning near-axis drilling of the East Pacific Rise in order to optimize the benefits from shear wave imaging of sub-axis structure.

  12. Optimized Finite-Difference Coefficients for Hydroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Responsible utilization of marine renewable energy sources through the use of current energy converter (CEC) and wave energy converter (WEC) devices requires an understanding of the noise generation and propagation from these systems in the marine environment. Acoustic noise produced by rotating turbines, for example, could adversely affect marine animals and human-related marine activities if not properly understood and mitigated. We are utilizing a 3-D finite-difference acoustic simulation code developed at Sandia that can accurately propagate noise in the complex bathymetry in the near-shore to open ocean environment. As part of our efforts to improve computation efficiency in the large, high-resolution domains required in this project, we investigate the effects of using optimized finite-difference coefficients on the accuracy of the simulations. We compare accuracy and runtime of various finite-difference coefficients optimized via criteria such as maximum numerical phase speed error, maximum numerical group speed error, and L-1 and L-2 norms of weighted numerical group and phase speed errors over a given spectral bandwidth. We find that those coefficients optimized for L-1 and L-2 norms are superior in accuracy to those based on maximal error and can produce runtimes of 10% of the baseline case, which uses Taylor Series finite-difference coefficients at the Courant time step limit. We will present comparisons of the results for the various cases evaluated as well as recommendations for utilization of the cases studied. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique was applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been exclusively applied to antennas. Here, calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained during the method of moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  14. Finite difference time domain calculations of antenna mutual coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique has been applied to a wide variety of electromagnetic analysis problems, including shielding and scattering. However, the method has not been extensively applied to antennas. In this short paper calculations of self and mutual admittances between wire antennas are made using FDTD and compared with results obtained using the Method of Moments. The agreement is quite good, indicating the possibilities for FDTD application to antenna impedance and coupling.

  15. Finite difference time domain grid generation from AMC helicopter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.

    1992-01-01

    A simple technique is presented which forms a cubic grid model of a helicopter from an Aircraft Modeling Code (AMC) input file. The AMC input file defines the helicopter fuselage as a series of polygonal cross sections. The cubic grid model is used as an input to a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) code to obtain predictions of antenna performance on a generic helicopter model. The predictions compare reasonably well with measured data.

  16. Finite difference schemes for long-time integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haras, Zigo; Taasan, Shlomo

    1993-01-01

    Finite difference schemes for the evaluation of first and second derivatives are presented. These second order compact schemes were designed for long-time integration of evolution equations by solving a quadratic constrained minimization problem. The quadratic cost function measures the global truncation error while taking into account the initial data. The resulting schemes are applicable for integration times fourfold, or more, longer than similar previously studied schemes. A similar approach was used to obtain improved integration schemes.

  17. An analysis of finite-difference and finite-volume formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1986-01-01

    Finite-difference and finite-volume formulations are analyzed in order to clear up the confusion concerning their application to the numerical solution of conservation laws. A new coordinate-free formulation of systems of conservation laws is developed, which clearly distinguishes the role of physical vectors from that of algebraic vectors which characterize the system. The analysis considers general types of equations--potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes. Three-dimensional unsteady flows with time-varying grids are described using a single, consistent nomeclature for both formulations. Grid motion due to a non-inertial reference frame as well as flow adaptation is covered. In comparing the two formulations, it is found useful to distinguish between differences in numerical methods and differences in grid definition. The former plays a role for non-Cartesian grids, and results in only cosmetic differences in the manner in which geometric terms are handled. The differences in grid definition for the two formulations is found to be more important, since it affects the manner in which boundary conditions, zonal procedures, and grid singularities are handled at computational boundaries. The proper interpretation of strong and weak conservation-law forms for quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric flows is brought out.

  18. An analysis of finite-difference and finite-volume formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1989-01-01

    Finite-difference and finite-volume formulations are analyzed in order to clear up the confusion concerning their application to the numerical solution of conservation laws. A new coordinate-free formulation of systems of conservation laws is developed, which clearly distinguishes the role of physical vectors from that of algebraic vectors which characterize the system. The analysis considers general types of equations: potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes. Three-dimensional unsteady flows with time-varying grids are described using a single, consistent nomenclature for both formulations. Grid motion due to a non-inertial reference frame as well as flow adaptation is covered. In comparing the two formulations, it is found useful to distinguish between differences in numerical methods and differences in grid definition. The former plays a role for non-Cartesian grids, and results in only cosmetic differences in the manner in which geometric terms are handled. The differences in grid definition for the two formulations is found to be more important, since it affects the manner in which boundary conditions, zonal procedures, and grid singularities are handled at computational boundaries. The proper interpretation of strong and weak conservation-law forms for quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric flows is brought out.

  19. Introduction to finite-difference methods for numerical fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, E.; Harlow, F.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work is intended to be a beginner`s exercise book for the study of basic finite-difference techniques in computational fluid dynamics. It is written for a student level ranging from high-school senior to university senior. Equations are derived from basic principles using algebra. Some discussion of partial-differential equations is included, but knowledge of calculus is not essential. The student is expected, however, to have some familiarity with the FORTRAN computer language, as the syntax of the computer codes themselves is not discussed. Topics examined in this work include: one-dimensional heat flow, one-dimensional compressible fluid flow, two-dimensional compressible fluid flow, and two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow with additions of the equations of heat flow and the {Kappa}-{epsilon} model for turbulence transport. Emphasis is placed on numerical instabilities and methods by which they can be avoided, techniques that can be used to evaluate the accuracy of finite-difference approximations, and the writing of the finite-difference codes themselves. Concepts introduced in this work include: flux and conservation, implicit and explicit methods, Lagrangian and Eulerian methods, shocks and rarefactions, donor-cell and cell-centered advective fluxes, compressible and incompressible fluids, the Boussinesq approximation for heat flow, Cartesian tensor notation, the Boussinesq approximation for the Reynolds stress tensor, and the modeling of transport equations. A glossary is provided which defines these and other terms.

  20. Simulating incompressible flow on moving meshfree grids using General Finite Differences (GFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Yaroslav; Alexeev, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    We simulate incompressible flow around an oscillating cylinder at different Reynolds numbers using General Finite Differences (GFD) on a meshfree grid. We evolve the meshfree grid by treating each grid node as a particle. To compute velocities and accelerations, we consider the particles at a particular instance as Eulerian observation points. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are directly discretized using GFD with boundary conditions enforced using a sharp interface treatment. Cloud sizes are set such that the local approximations use only 16 neighbors. To enforce incompressibility, we apply a semi-implicit approximate projection method. To prevent overlapping particles and formation of voids in the grid, we propose a particle regularization scheme based on a local minimization principle. We validate the GFD results for an oscillating cylinder against the lattice Boltzmann method and find good agreement. Financial support provided by National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship, Grant No. DGE-1148903.

  1. Exact finite-size corrections for the spanning-tree model under different boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh.; Kenna, R.

    2015-02-01

    We express the partition functions of the spanning tree on finite square lattices under five different sets of boundary conditions in terms of a principal partition function with twisted-boundary conditions. Based on these expressions, we derive the exact asymptotic expansions of the logarithm of the partition function for each case. We have also established several groups of identities relating spanning-tree partition functions for the different boundary conditions. We also explain an apparent discrepancy between logarithmic correction terms in the free energy for a two-dimensional spanning-tree model with periodic and free-boundary conditions and conformal field theory predictions. We have obtained corner free energy for the spanning tree under free-boundary conditions in full agreement with conformal field theory predictions.

  2. Macroscopic traffic modeling with the finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.; Azarm, A.; Stock, D.

    1996-03-15

    A traffic congestion forecasting model (ATOP), developed in the present investigation, is described briefly. Several macroscopic models, based on the solution of the partial differential equation of conservation of vehicles by the finite difference method, were tested using actual traffic data. The functional form, as well as the parameters, of the equation of state which describes the relation between traffic speed and traffic density, were determined for a section of the Long Island Expressway. The Lax method and the forward difference technique were applied. The results of extensive tests showed that the Lax method, in addition to giving very good agreement with the traffic data, produces stable solutions.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Z. L.; Ishak, M. H. H.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Khor, Soon Fuat

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the three dimensional (3D) simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA) to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM) code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced. PMID:27454872

  4. Lattice Boltzmann Method of Different BGA Orientations on I-Type Dispensing Method.

    PubMed

    Abas, Aizat; Gan, Z L; Ishak, M H H; Abdullah, M Z; Khor, Soon Fuat

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the three dimensional (3D) simulation of fluid flows through the ball grid array (BGA) to replicate the real underfill encapsulation process. The effect of different solder bump arrangements of BGA on the flow front, pressure and velocity of the fluid is investigated. The flow front, pressure and velocity for different time intervals are determined and analyzed for potential problems relating to solder bump damage. The simulation results from Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) code will be validated with experimental findings as well as the conventional Finite Volume Method (FVM) code to ensure highly accurate simulation setup. Based on the findings, good agreement can be seen between LBM and FVM simulations as well as the experimental observations. It was shown that only LBM is capable of capturing the micro-voids formation. This study also shows an increasing trend in fluid filling time for BGA with perimeter, middle empty and full orientations. The perimeter orientation has a higher pressure fluid at the middle region of BGA surface compared to middle empty and full orientation. This research would shed new light for a highly accurate simulation of encapsulation process using LBM and help to further increase the reliability of the package produced.

  5. Effects of finite volume on the KL – KS mass difference

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, N.  H.; Feng, X.; Martinelli, G.; Sachrajda, C.  T.

    2015-06-24

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Lüscher and Lellouch and Lüscher, which determine the leading-order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second-order mixing of the K⁰ and K⁰⁻ states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda, and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KL – KS mass difference ΔMK and the CP-violating parameter εK are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.

  6. Seismic imaging using finite-differences and parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    A key to reducing the risks and costs of associated with oil and gas exploration is the fast, accurate imaging of complex geologies, such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and overthrust regions in US onshore regions. Prestack depth migration generally yields the most accurate images, and one approach to this is to solve the scalar wave equation using finite differences. As part of an ongoing ACTI project funded by the US Department of Energy, a finite difference, 3-D prestack, depth migration code has been developed. The goal of this work is to demonstrate that massively parallel computers can be used efficiently for seismic imaging, and that sufficient computing power exists (or soon will exist) to make finite difference, prestack, depth migration practical for oil and gas exploration. Several problems had to be addressed to get an efficient code for the Intel Paragon. These include efficient I/O, efficient parallel tridiagonal solves, and high single-node performance. Furthermore, to provide portable code the author has been restricted to the use of high-level programming languages (C and Fortran) and interprocessor communications using MPI. He has been using the SUNMOS operating system, which has affected many of his programming decisions. He will present images created from two verification datasets (the Marmousi Model and the SEG/EAEG 3D Salt Model). Also, he will show recent images from real datasets, and point out locations of improved imaging. Finally, he will discuss areas of current research which will hopefully improve the image quality and reduce computational costs.

  7. Coupled Vortex-Lattice Flight Dynamic Model with Aeroelastic Finite-Element Model of Flexible Wing Transport Aircraft with Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Daniel; Dao, Tung; Trinh, Khanh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled vortex-lattice flight dynamic model with an aeroelastic finite-element model to predict dynamic characteristics of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The aircraft model is based on NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with representative mass and stiffness properties to achieve a wing tip deflection about twice that of a conventional transport aircraft (10% versus 5%). This flexible wing transport aircraft is referred to as an Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC) which is equipped with a Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system for active wing shaping control for drag reduction. A vortex-lattice aerodynamic model of the ESAC is developed and is coupled with an aeroelastic finite-element model via an automated geometry modeler. This coupled model is used to compute static and dynamic aeroelastic solutions. The deflection information from the finite-element model and the vortex-lattice model is used to compute unsteady contributions to the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients. A coupled aeroelastic-longitudinal flight dynamic model is developed by coupling the finite-element model with the rigid-body flight dynamic model of the GTM.

  8. An Exponential Finite Difference Technique for Solving Partial Differential Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    density , kg/N 3 (lbm/ft 3) 91.*,e separation variables (At dimensionless timelAX) 2 vi -W sNiv W- NiW.4%1 1. INTRODUCTION Partial differential equations...competing numerical analysis were run in double precision on either the IBM-3033 or the Cray X-MP mainframes. The computer codes developed for the...is increased. - R P~p~ 15 Effect of Initial and Boundary Conditions on the Exponential Finite Difference Method In this section the effect of

  9. Finite difference time domain modeling of spiral antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penney, Christopher W.; Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives outlined in the original proposal for this project were to create a well-documented computer analysis model based on the finite-difference, time-domain (FDTD) method that would be capable of computing antenna impedance, far-zone radiation patterns, and radar cross-section (RCS). The ability to model a variety of penetrable materials in addition to conductors is also desired. The spiral antennas under study by this project meet these requirements since they are constructed of slots cut into conducting surfaces which are backed by dielectric materials.

  10. Further study of the finite-temperature chiral phase transition of two-flavor lattice QCD at a small quark mass

    SciTech Connect

    Fukugita, M. ); Mino, H. ); Okawa, M. , Ibaraki 305 ); Ukawa, A. )

    1990-10-15

    A previous finite-size study for the chiral phase transition of two-flavor QCD is extended to a smaller quark mass of {ital m}{sub {ital q}}=0.0125 in lattice units. The characteristics of the system for lattice sizes (6{sup 3}--12{sup 3}){times}4 are found to be quite similar to those for {ital m}{sub {ital q}}=0.025. The increase of susceptibilities over this range of the spatial size is still too mild to discriminate among the order of the transition also at this small quark mass.

  11. OBTAINING POTENTIAL FIELD SOLUTIONS WITH SPHERICAL HARMONICS AND FINITE DIFFERENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Gabor; Van der Holst, Bart; Huang Zhenguang

    2011-05-10

    Potential magnetic field solutions can be obtained based on the synoptic magnetograms of the Sun. Traditionally, a spherical harmonics decomposition of the magnetogram is used to construct the current- and divergence-free magnetic field solution. This method works reasonably well when the order of spherical harmonics is limited to be small relative to the resolution of the magnetogram, although some artifacts, such as ringing, can arise around sharp features. When the number of spherical harmonics is increased, however, using the raw magnetogram data given on a grid that is uniform in the sine of the latitude coordinate can result in inaccurate and unreliable results, especially in the polar regions close to the Sun. We discuss here two approaches that can mitigate or completely avoid these problems: (1) remeshing the magnetogram onto a grid with uniform resolution in latitude and limiting the highest order of the spherical harmonics to the anti-alias limit; (2) using an iterative finite difference algorithm to solve for the potential field. The naive and the improved numerical solutions are compared for actual magnetograms and the differences are found to be rather dramatic. We made our new Finite Difference Iterative Potential-field Solver (FDIPS) a publicly available code so that other researchers can also use it as an alternative to the spherical harmonics approach.

  12. Pencil: Finite-difference Code for Compressible Hydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Axel; Dobler, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The Pencil code is a high-order finite-difference code for compressible hydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. It is highly modular and can easily be adapted to different types of problems. The code runs efficiently under MPI on massively parallel shared- or distributed-memory computers, like e.g. large Beowulf clusters. The Pencil code is primarily designed to deal with weakly compressible turbulent flows. To achieve good parallelization, explicit (as opposed to compact) finite differences are used. Typical scientific targets include driven MHD turbulence in a periodic box, convection in a slab with non-periodic upper and lower boundaries, a convective star embedded in a fully nonperiodic box, accretion disc turbulence in the shearing sheet approximation, self-gravity, non-local radiation transfer, dust particle evolution with feedback on the gas, etc. A range of artificial viscosity and diffusion schemes can be invoked to deal with supersonic flows. For direct simulations regular viscosity and diffusion is being used. The code is written in well-commented Fortran90.

  13. Static Aeroelastic and Longitudinal Trim Model of Flexible Wing Aircraft Using Finite-Element Vortex-Lattice Coupled Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, Eric; Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a static aeroelastic model and longitudinal trim model for the analysis of a flexible wing transport aircraft. The static aeroelastic model is built using a structural model based on finite-element modeling and coupled to an aerodynamic model that uses vortex-lattice solution. An automatic geometry generation tool is used to close the loop between the structural and aerodynamic models. The aeroelastic model is extended for the development of a three degree-of-freedom longitudinal trim model for an aircraft with flexible wings. The resulting flexible aircraft longitudinal trim model is used to simultaneously compute the static aeroelastic shape for the aircraft model and the longitudinal state inputs to maintain an aircraft trim state. The framework is applied to an aircraft model based on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) with wing structures allowed to flexibly deformed referred to as the Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept (ESAC). The ESAC wing mass and stiffness properties are based on a baseline "stiff" values representative of current generation transport aircraft.

  14. Thermodynamics and Phase Transitions of Electrolytes on Lattices with Different Discretization Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly; Artyomov, Maxim; Kobelev, Vladimir

    2004-03-01

    Lattice models are crucial for understanding the thermodynamics and phase transitions in many biological and chemical systems. We investigate Lattice Restricted Primitive Model (LRPM) of ionic systems with different discretization parameters in order to understand the deviations from continuum description of charged systems. Discretization parameter is defined as a number of lattice sites occupied by every ion. Explicit analytic and numerical calculations are performed using Debye-Hückel approach, which takes into account dipole formations, dipole-ion interactions and correct lattice Coulomb potentials. The gas-liquid phase separation is found at low densities. The increase in the discretization parameter lowers the critical temperature and increases the critical density, in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations results. In the limit of infinitely large discretization, our results approach the predictions from continuum RPM of electrolytes. However, when every particle can only occupy one lattice site, the gas-liquid phase transitions are suppressed by order-disorder phase transformations.

  15. Parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference seismic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlen, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    Computational power has advanced to a state where we can begin to perform wavefield simulations for realistic (complex) 3-D earth models at frequencies of interest to both seismologists and engineers. On serial platforms, however, 3-D calculations are still limited to small grid sizes and short seismic wave traveltimes. To make use of the efficiency of network computers a parallel 3-D viscoelastic finite difference (FD) code is implemented which allows to distribute the work on several PCs or workstations connected via standard ethernet in an in-house network. By using the portable message passing interface standard (MPI) for the communication between processors, running times can be reduced and grid sizes can be increased significantly. Furthermore, the code shows good performance on massive parallel supercomputers which makes the computation of very large grids feasible. This implementation greatly expands the applicability of the 3-D elastic/viscoelastic finite-difference modelling technique by providing an efficient, portable and practical C-program.

  16. Finite Difference Elastic Wave Field Simulation On GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation is considered as a basic and important aspect in investigation of the Earth's structure, and earthquake phenomenon. Among various numerical methods, the finite-difference method is considered one of the most efficient tools for the wave field simulation. However, with the increment of computing scale, the power of computing has becoming a bottleneck. With the development of hardware, in recent years, GPU shows powerful computational ability and bright application prospects in scientific computing. Many works using GPU demonstrate that GPU is powerful . Recently, GPU has not be used widely in the simulation of wave field. In this work, we present forward finite difference simulation of acoustic and elastic seismic wave propagation in heterogeneous media on NVIDIA graphics cards with the CUDA programming language. We also implement perfectly matched layers on the graphics cards to efficiently absorb outgoing waves on the fictitious edges of the grid Simulations compared with the results on CPU platform shows reliable accuracy and remarkable efficiency. This work proves that GPU can be an effective platform for wave field simulation, and it can also be used as a practical tool for real-time strong ground motion simulation.

  17. Exact solution of the thermodynamics and size parameters of a polymer confined to a lattice of finite size: Large chain limit

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Chad R. Guttman, Charles M.; Di Marzio, Edmund A.

    2014-01-21

    We extend the exact solutions of the Di Marzio-Rubin matrix method for the thermodynamic properties, including chain density, of a linear polymer molecule confined to walk on a lattice of finite size. Our extensions enable (a) the use of higher dimensions (explicit 2D and 3D lattices), (b) lattice boundaries of arbitrary shape, and (c) the flexibility to allow each monomer to have its own energy of attraction for each lattice site. In the case of the large chain limit, we demonstrate how periodic boundary conditions can also be employed to reduce computation time. Advantages to this method include easy definition of chemical and physical structure (or surface roughness) of the lattice and site-specific monomer-specific energetics, and straightforward relatively fast computations. We show the usefulness and ease of implementation of this extension by examining the effect of energy variation along the lattice walls of an infinite rectangular cylinder with the idea of studying the changes in properties caused by chemical inhomogeneities on the surface of the box. Herein, we look particularly at the polymer density profile as a function of temperature in the confined region for very long polymers. One particularly striking result is the shift in the critical condition for adsorption due to surface energy inhomogeneities and the length scale of the inhomogeneities; an observation that could have important implications for polymer chromatography. Our method should have applications to both copolymers and biopolymers of arbitrary molar mass.

  18. Viscoelastic Finite Difference Modeling Using Graphics Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabien-Ouellet, G.; Gloaguen, E.; Giroux, B.

    2014-12-01

    Full waveform seismic modeling requires a huge amount of computing power that still challenges today's technology. This limits the applicability of powerful processing approaches in seismic exploration like full-waveform inversion. This paper explores the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPU) to compute a time based finite-difference solution to the viscoelastic wave equation. The aim is to investigate whether the adoption of the GPU technology is susceptible to reduce significantly the computing time of simulations. The code presented herein is based on the freely accessible software of Bohlen (2002) in 2D provided under a General Public License (GNU) licence. This implementation is based on a second order centred differences scheme to approximate time differences and staggered grid schemes with centred difference of order 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 for spatial derivatives. The code is fully parallel and is written using the Message Passing Interface (MPI), and it thus supports simulations of vast seismic models on a cluster of CPUs. To port the code from Bohlen (2002) on GPUs, the OpenCl framework was chosen for its ability to work on both CPUs and GPUs and its adoption by most of GPU manufacturers. In our implementation, OpenCL works in conjunction with MPI, which allows computations on a cluster of GPU for large-scale model simulations. We tested our code for model sizes between 1002 and 60002 elements. Comparison shows a decrease in computation time of more than two orders of magnitude between the GPU implementation run on a AMD Radeon HD 7950 and the CPU implementation run on a 2.26 GHz Intel Xeon Quad-Core. The speed-up varies depending on the order of the finite difference approximation and generally increases for higher orders. Increasing speed-ups are also obtained for increasing model size, which can be explained by kernel overheads and delays introduced by memory transfers to and from the GPU through the PCI-E bus. Those tests indicate that the GPU memory size

  19. Orthocomplemented complete lattices and graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollech, Astrid

    1995-08-01

    The problem I consider originates from Dörfler, who found a construction to assign an Orthocomplemented lattice H(G) to a graph G. By Dörfler it is known that for every finite Orthocomplemented lattice L there exists a graph G such that H(G)=L. Unfortunately, we can find more than one graph G with this property, i.e., orthocomplemented lattices which belong to different graphs can be isomorphic. I show some conditions under which two graphs have the same orthocomplemented lattice.

  20. Elastic finite-difference method for irregular grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oprsal, I.; Zahradnik, J.

    1999-01-01

    Finite-difference (FD) modeling of complicated structures requires simple algorithms. This paper presents a new elastic FD method for spatially irregular grids that is simple and, at the same time, saves considerable memory and computing time. Features like faults, low-velocity layers, cavities, and/or nonplanar surfaces are treated on a fine grid, while the remaining parts of the model are, with equal accuracy, represented on a coarse grid. No interpolation is needed between the fine and coarse parts due to the rectangular grid cells. Relatively abrupt transitions between the small and large grid steps produce no numerical artifacts in the present method. Planar or nonplanar free surfaces, including underground cavities, are treated in a way similar to internal grid points but with consideration of the zero-valued elastic parameters and density outside the free surface (vacuum formalism). A theoretical proof that vacuum formalism fulfills the free-surface conditions is given. Numerical validation is performed through comparison with independent methods, comparing FD with explicitly prescribed boundary conditions and finite elements. Memory and computing time needed in the studied models was only about 10 to 40% of that employing regular square grids of equal accuracy. A practical example of a synthetic seismic section, showing clear signatures of a coal seam and cavity, is presented. The method can be extended to three dimensions.

  1. Finite-volume versus streaming-based lattice Boltzmann algorithm for fluid-dynamics simulations: A one-to-one accuracy and performance study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Kalyan; Mompean, Gilmar; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    A finite-volume (FV) discretization method for the lattice Boltzmann (LB) equation, which combines high accuracy with limited computational cost is presented. In order to assess the performance of the FV method we carry out a systematic comparison, focused on accuracy and computational performances, with the standard streaming lattice Boltzmann equation algorithm. In particular we aim at clarifying whether and in which conditions the proposed algorithm, and more generally any FV algorithm, can be taken as the method of choice in fluid-dynamics LB simulations. For this reason the comparative analysis is further extended to the case of realistic flows, in particular thermally driven flows in turbulent conditions. We report the successful simulation of high-Rayleigh number convective flow performed by a lattice Boltzmann FV-based algorithm with wall grid refinement.

  2. Application of a new finite difference algorithm for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic problems have become extremely important in recent years because of research efforts such as the High Speed Civil Transport program. Computational aeroacoustics (CAA) requires a faithful representation of wave propagation over long distances, and needs algorithms that are accurate and boundary conditions that are unobtrusive. This paper applies a new finite difference method and boundary algorithm to the Linearized Euler Equations (LEE). The results demonstrate the ability of a new fourth order propagation algorithm to accurately simulate the genuinely multidimensional wave dynamics of acoustic propagation in two space dimensions with the LEE. The results also show the ability of a new outflow boundary condition and fourth order algorithm to pass the evolving solution from the computational domain with no perceptible degradation of the solution remaining within the domain.

  3. Finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Yee, Kane S.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In the finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media throughout the solution volume. The standard approach is to approximate the surface impedance over a very small bandwidth by its value at the center frequency, and then use that result in the boundary condition. Here, two implementations of the surface impedance boundary condition are presented. One implementation is a constant surface impedance boundary condition and the other is a dispersive surface impedance boundary condition that is applicable over a very large frequency bandwidth and over a large range of conductivities. Frequency domain results are presented in one dimension for two conductivity values and are compared with exact results. Scattering width results from an infinite square cylinder are presented as a two dimensional demonstration. Extensions to three dimensions should be straightforward.

  4. Finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Yee, Kane S.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media throughout the solution volume. The standard approach is to approximate the surface impedance over a very small bandwidth by its value at the center frequency, and then use that result in the boundary condition. Two implementations of the surface impedance boundary condition are presented. One implementation is a constant surface impedance boundary condition and the other is a dispersive surface impedance boundary condition that is applicable over a very large frequency bandwidth and over a large range of conductivities. Frequency domain results are presented in one dimension for two conductivity values and are compared with exact results. Scattering width results from an infinite square cylinder are presented as a 2-D demonstration. Extensions to 3-D should be straightforward.

  5. 3D finite-difference seismic migration with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, C.C.; Gjertsen, R.; Minkoff, S.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The ability to image complex geologies such as salt domes in the Gulf of Mexico and thrusts in mountainous regions is essential for reducing the risk associated with oil exploration. Imaging these structures, however, is computationally expensive as datasets can be terabytes in size. Traditional ray-tracing migration methods cannot handle complex velocity variations commonly found near such salt structures. Instead the authors use the full 3D acoustic wave equation, discretized via a finite difference algorithm. They reduce the cost of solving the apraxial wave equation by a number of numerical techniques including the method of fractional steps and pipelining the tridiagonal solves. The imaging code, Salvo, uses both frequency parallelism (generally 90% efficient) and spatial parallelism (65% efficient). Salvo has been tested on synthetic and real data and produces clear images of the subsurface even beneath complicated salt structures.

  6. Accurate finite difference methods for time-harmonic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harari, Isaac; Turkel, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Finite difference methods for solving problems of time-harmonic acoustics are developed and analyzed. Multidimensional inhomogeneous problems with variable, possibly discontinuous, coefficients are considered, accounting for the effects of employing nonuniform grids. A weighted-average representation is less sensitive to transition in wave resolution (due to variable wave numbers or nonuniform grids) than the standard pointwise representation. Further enhancement in method performance is obtained by basing the stencils on generalizations of Pade approximation, or generalized definitions of the derivative, reducing spurious dispersion, anisotropy and reflection, and by improving the representation of source terms. The resulting schemes have fourth-order accurate local truncation error on uniform grids and third order in the nonuniform case. Guidelines for discretization pertaining to grid orientation and resolution are presented.

  7. Finite difference modeling of Biot's poroelastic equations atseismic frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, Y.J.; Pride, S.R.; Nihei, K.T.

    2006-02-24

    Across the seismic band of frequencies (loosely defined as<10 kHz), a seismic wave propagating through a porous material willcreate flow in the pore space that is laminar; that is, in thislow-frequency "seismic limit," the development of viscous boundary layersin the pores need not be modeled. An explicit time steppingstaggered-grid finite difference scheme is presented for solving Biot'sequations of poroelasticity in this low-frequency limit. A key part ofthis work is the establishment of rigorous stability conditions. It isdemonstrated that over a wide range of porous material properties typicalof sedimentary rock and despite the presenceof fluid pressure diffusion(Biot slow waves), the usual Courant condition governs the stability asif the problem involved purely elastic waves. The accuracy of the methodis demonstrated by comparing to exact analytical solutions for both fastcompressional waves and slow waves. Additional numerical modelingexamples are also presented.

  8. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisshelm, Julie M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed.

  9. Parallelization of implicit finite difference schemes in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Naomi H.; Naik, Vijay K.; Nicoules, Michel

    1990-01-01

    Implicit finite difference schemes are often the preferred numerical schemes in computational fluid dynamics, requiring less stringent stability bounds than the explicit schemes. Each iteration in an implicit scheme involves global data dependencies in the form of second and higher order recurrences. Efficient parallel implementations of such iterative methods are considerably more difficult and non-intuitive. The parallelization of the implicit schemes that are used for solving the Euler and the thin layer Navier-Stokes equations and that require inversions of large linear systems in the form of block tri-diagonal and/or block penta-diagonal matrices is discussed. Three-dimensional cases are emphasized and schemes that minimize the total execution time are presented. Partitioning and scheduling schemes for alleviating the effects of the global data dependencies are described. An analysis of the communication and the computation aspects of these methods is presented. The effect of the boundary conditions on the parallel schemes is also discussed.

  10. Flexible Automatic Discretization for Finite Differences: Eliminating the Human Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranger, Casper

    2017-04-01

    In the geophysical numerical modelling community, finite differences are (in part due to their small footprint) a popular spatial discretization method for PDEs in the regular-shaped continuum that is the earth. However, they rapidly become prone to programming mistakes when physics increase in complexity. To eliminate opportunities for human error, we have designed an automatic discretization algorithm using Wolfram Mathematica, in which the user supplies symbolic PDEs, the number of spatial dimensions, and a choice of symbolic boundary conditions, and the script transforms this information into matrix- and right-hand-side rules ready for use in a C++ code that will accept them. The symbolic PDEs are further used to automatically develop and perform manufactured solution benchmarks, ensuring at all stages physical fidelity while providing pragmatic targets for numerical accuracy. We find that this procedure greatly accelerates code development and provides a great deal of flexibility in ones choice of physics.

  11. Explicit and implicit finite difference schemes for fractional Cattaneo equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazizadeh, H. R.; Maerefat, M.; Azimi, A.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, the numerical solution of fractional (non-integer)-order Cattaneo equation for describing anomalous diffusion has been investigated. Two finite difference schemes namely an explicit predictor-corrector and totally implicit schemes have been developed. In developing each scheme, a separate formulation approach for the governing equations has been considered. The explicit predictor-corrector scheme is the fractional generalization of well-known MacCormack scheme and has been called Generalized MacCormack scheme. This scheme solves two coupled low-order equations and simultaneously computes the flux term with the main variable. Fully implicit scheme however solves a single high-order undecomposed equation. For Generalized MacCormack scheme, stability analysis has been studied through Fourier method. Through a numerical test, the experimental order of convergency of both schemes has been found. Then, the domain of applicability and some numerical properties of each scheme have been discussed.

  12. High order accurate finite difference schemes based on symmetry preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbenli, Ersin; Vedula, Prakash

    2016-11-01

    A new algorithm for development of high order accurate finite difference schemes for numerical solution of partial differential equations using Lie symmetries is presented. Considering applicable symmetry groups (such as those relevant to space/time translations, Galilean transformation, scaling, rotation and projection) of a partial differential equation, invariant numerical schemes are constructed based on the notions of moving frames and modified equations. Several strategies for construction of invariant numerical schemes with a desired order of accuracy are analyzed. Performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using analysis of one-dimensional partial differential equations, such as linear advection diffusion equations inviscid Burgers equation and viscous Burgers equation, as our test cases. Through numerical simulations based on these examples, the expected improvement in accuracy of invariant numerical schemes (up to fourth order) is demonstrated. Advantages due to implementation and enhanced computational efficiency inherent in our proposed algorithm are presented. Extension of the basic framework to multidimensional partial differential equations is also discussed.

  13. Finite-difference modeling of commercial aircraft using TSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, S.T.; Poggio, A.J.

    1994-11-15

    Future aircraft may have systems controlled by fiber optic cables, to reduce susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. However, the digital systems associated with the fiber optic network could still experience upset due to powerful radio stations, radars, and other electromagnetic sources, with potentially serious consequences. We are modeling the electromagnetic behavior of commercial transport aircraft in support of the NASA Fly-by-Light/Power-by-Wire program, using the TSAR finite-difference time-domain code initially developed for the military. By comparing results obtained from TSAR with data taken on a Boeing 757 at the Air Force Phillips Lab., we hope to show that FDTD codes can serve as an important tool in the design and certification of U.S. commercial aircraft, helping American companies to produce safe, reliable air transportation.

  14. Visualization of elastic wavefields computed with a finite difference code

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.

    1994-11-15

    The authors have developed a finite difference elastic propagation model to simulate seismic wave propagation through geophysically complex regions. To facilitate debugging and to assist seismologists in interpreting the seismograms generated by the code, they have developed an X Windows interface that permits viewing of successive temporal snapshots of the (2D) wavefield as they are calculated. The authors present a brief video displaying the generation of seismic waves by an explosive source on a continent, which propagate to the edge of the continent then convert to two types of acoustic waves. This sample calculation was part of an effort to study the potential of offshore hydroacoustic systems to monitor seismic events occurring onshore.

  15. Stability of finite difference models containing two boundaries or interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefethen, L. N.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of finite difference models of hyperbolic initial boundary value problems is connected with the propagation and reflection of parasitic waves. Wave propagation ideas are applied to models containing two boundaires or interfaces, where repeated reflection of trapped wave packets is a potential new source of instability. Various known instability phenomena are accounted for in a unified way. Results show: (1) dissipativity does not ensure stability when three or more formulas are concatenated at a boundary or internal interface; (2) algebraic GKS instabilities can be converted by a second boundary to exponential instabilities only when an infinite numerical reflection coefficient is present; and (3) GKS-stability and P-stability can be established in certain problems by showing that all numerical reflection coefficients have modulus less than 1.

  16. Crosstalk comparison of lattice-form optical interleaver with different coupler structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhujun; Luo, Fengguang; Luo, Zhixiang

    2009-05-01

    Lattice circuit made from a cascade of couplers and delay-lines is a popular approach for optical interleaver based on planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. Different coupler structures can be employed in the lattice circuit, including 1-stage directional couplers (DCs), 4-stage DCs, and 2-stage multimode interference (MMI) couplers. We fabricated optical interleavers with above three coupler structures, respectively. The experimental results prove that the latter two coupler structures can help to reduce crosstalk, which meets the simulation results well.

  17. Emission difference super-resolution microscopy with optical lattices scanning and wide field detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dazhao; Chen, Youhua; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    A parallel scanning method using optical lattices is proposed theoretically to improve the imaging speed of fluorescence emission difference microscopy (FED), which gives the wide field imaging capability to FED while maintaining all the basic advantages of single point FED. The basic principle of wide field FED (wfFED) is presented briefly and the method of generating optical lattices is discussed. The resolution via two types of optical lattices pattern scanning is also studied. With optical lattices scanning, which is generated by two orthogonally crossed standing waves, the wfFED can be implemented without wide field excitation. This strategy can further improve the wfFED imaging speed and simplify the set-up.

  18. Finite difference time domain analysis of chirped dielectric gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochmuth, Diane H.; Johnson, Eric G.

    1993-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for solving Maxwell's time-dependent curl equations is accurate, computationally efficient, and straight-forward to implement. Since both time and space derivatives are employed, the propagation of an electromagnetic wave can be treated as an initial-value problem. Second-order central-difference approximations are applied to the space and time derivatives of the electric and magnetic fields providing a discretization of the fields in a volume of space, for a period of time. The solution to this system of equations is stepped through time, thus, simulating the propagation of the incident wave. If the simulation is continued until a steady-state is reached, an appropriate far-field transformation can be applied to the time-domain scattered fields to obtain reflected and transmitted powers. From this information diffraction efficiencies can also be determined. In analyzing the chirped structure, a mesh is applied only to the area immediately around the grating. The size of the mesh is then proportional to the electric size of the grating. Doing this, however, imposes an artificial boundary around the area of interest. An absorbing boundary condition must be applied along the artificial boundary so that the outgoing waves are absorbed as if the boundary were absent. Many such boundary conditions have been developed that give near-perfect absorption. In this analysis, the Mur absorbing boundary conditions are employed. Several grating structures were analyzed using the FDTD method.

  19. The limitations of staggered grid finite differences in plasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranger, Casper; Herrendörfer, Robert; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia

    2017-04-01

    Most crustal-scale applications operate at grid sizes much larger than those at which plasticity occurs in nature. As a consequence, plastic shear bands often localize to the scale of one grid cell, and numerical ploys — like introducing an artificial length scale — are needed to counter this. If for whatever reasons (good or bad) this is not done, we find that problems may arise due to the fact that in the staggered grid finite difference discretization, unknowns like components of the stress tensor and velocity vector are located in physically different positions. This incurs frequent interpolation, reducing the accuracy of the discretization. For purely stress-dependent plasticity problems the adverse effects might be contained because the magnitude of the stress discontinuity across a plastic shear band is limited. However, we find that when rate-dependence of friction is added in the mix, things become ugly really fast and the already hard-to-solve and highly nonlinear problem of plasticity incurs an extra penalty.

  20. A finite difference model for free surface gravity drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Couri, F.R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    The unconfined gravity flow of liquid with a free surface into a well is a classical well test problem which has not been well understood by either hydrologists or petroleum engineers. Paradigms have led many authors to treat an incompressible flow as compressible flow to justify the delayed yield behavior of a time-drawdown test. A finite-difference model has been developed to simulate the free surface gravity flow of an unconfined single phase, infinitely large reservoir into a well. The model was verified with experimental results in sandbox models in the literature and with classical methods applied to observation wells in the Groundwater literature. The simulator response was also compared with analytical Theis (1935) and Ramey et al. (1989) approaches for wellbore pressure at late producing times. The seepage face in the sandface and the delayed yield behavior were reproduced by the model considering a small liquid compressibility and incompressible porous medium. The potential buildup (recovery) simulated by the model evidenced a different- phenomenon from the drawdown, contrary to statements found in the Groundwater literature. Graphs of buildup potential vs time, buildup seepage face length vs time, and free surface head and sand bottom head radial profiles evidenced that the liquid refills the desaturating cone as a flat moving surface. The late time pseudo radial behavior was only approached after exaggerated long times.

  1. Nonlinear wave propagation using three different finite difference schemes (category 2 application)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, D. Stuart; Hardin, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Three common finite difference schemes are used to examine the computation of one-dimensional nonlinear wave propagation. The schemes are studied for their responses to numerical parameters such as time step selection, boundary condition implementation, and discretization of governing equations. The performance of the schemes is compared and various numerical phenomena peculiar to each is discussed.

  2. Finite-difference numerical simulations of underground explosion cavity decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Preston, L. A.; Jensen, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    Earth models containing a significant portion of ideal fluid (e.g., air and/or water) are of increasing interest in seismic wave propagation simulations. Examples include a marine model with a thick water layer, and a land model with air overlying a rugged topographic surface. The atmospheric infrasound community is currently interested in coupled seismic-acoustic propagation of low-frequency signals over long ranges (~tens to ~hundreds of kilometers). Also, accurate and efficient numerical treatment of models containing underground air-filled voids (caves, caverns, tunnels, subterranean man-made facilities) is essential. In support of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), we are developing a numerical algorithm for simulating coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation in mixed solid/fluid media. Solution methodology involves explicit, time-domain, finite-differencing of the elastodynamic velocity-stress partial differential system on a three-dimensional staggered spatial grid. Conditional logic is used to avoid shear stress updating within the fluid zones; this approach leads to computational efficiency gains for models containing a significant proportion of ideal fluid. Numerical stability and accuracy are maintained at air/rock interfaces (where the contrast in mass density is on the order of 1 to 2000) via a finite-difference operator "order switching" formalism. The fourth-order spatial FD operator used throughout the bulk of the earth model is reduced to second-order in the immediate vicinity of a high-contrast interface. Current modeling efforts are oriented toward quantifying the amount of atmospheric infrasound energy generated by various underground seismic sources (explosions and earthquakes). Source depth and orientation, and surface topography play obvious roles. The cavity decoupling problem, where an explosion is detonated within an air-filled void, is of special interest. A point explosion

  3. A hybrid finite-difference and analytic element groundwater model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H M; Feinstein, D T; Hunt, R J; Gusyev, M A

    2010-01-01

    Regional finite-difference models tend to have large cell sizes, often on the order of 1-2 km on a side. Although the regional flow patterns in deeper formations may be adequately represented by such a model, the intricate surface water and groundwater interactions in the shallower layers are not. Several stream reaches and nearby wells may occur in a single cell, precluding any meaningful modeling of the surface water and groundwater interactions between the individual features. We propose to replace the upper MODFLOW layer or layers, in which the surface water and groundwater interactions occur, by an analytic element model (GFLOW) that does not employ a model grid; instead, it represents wells and surface waters directly by the use of point-sinks and line-sinks. For many practical cases it suffices to provide GFLOW with the vertical leakage rates calculated in the original coarse MODFLOW model in order to obtain a good representation of surface water and groundwater interactions. However, when the combined transmissivities in the deeper (MODFLOW) layers dominate, the accuracy of the GFLOW solution diminishes. For those cases, an iterative coupling procedure, whereby the leakages between the GFLOW and MODFLOW model are updated, appreciably improves the overall solution, albeit at considerable computational cost. The coupled GFLOW-MODFLOW model is applicable to relatively large areas, in many cases to the entire model domain, thus forming an attractive alternative to local grid refinement or inset models.

  4. QED multi-dimensional vacuum polarization finite-difference solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Grismayer, Thomas; Silva, Luís; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    The Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is expected to deliver peak intensities of 1023 - 1024 W/cm2 allowing to probe nonlinear Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) phenomena in an unprecedented regime. Within the framework of QED, the second order process of photon-photon scattering leads to a set of extended Maxwell's equations [W. Heisenberg and H. Euler, Z. Physik 98, 714] effectively creating nonlinear polarization and magnetization terms that account for the nonlinear response of the vacuum. To model this in a self-consistent way, we present a multi dimensional generalized Maxwell equation finite difference solver with significantly enhanced dispersive properties, which was implemented in the OSIRIS particle-in-cell code [R.A. Fonseca et al. LNCS 2331, pp. 342-351, 2002]. We present a detailed numerical analysis of this electromagnetic solver. As an illustration of the properties of the solver, we explore several examples in extreme conditions. We confirm the theoretical prediction of vacuum birefringence of a pulse propagating in the presence of an intense static background field [arXiv:1301.4918 [quant-ph

  5. Assessment of Linear Finite-Difference Poisson-Boltzmann Solvers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Luo, Ray

    2009-01-01

    CPU time and memory usage are two vital issues that any numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation have to face in biomolecular applications. In this study we systematically analyzed the CPU time and memory usage of five commonly used finite-difference solvers with a large and diversified set of biomolecular structures. Our comparative analysis shows that modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient and geometric multigrid are the most efficient in the diversified test set. For the two efficient solvers, our test shows that their CPU times increase approximately linearly with the numbers of grids. Their CPU times also increase almost linearly with the negative logarithm of the convergence criterion at very similar rate. Our comparison further shows that geometric multigrid performs better in the large set of tested biomolecules. However, modified incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient is superior to geometric multigrid in molecular dynamics simulations of tested molecules. We also investigated other significant components in numerical solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It turns out that the time-limiting step is the free boundary condition setup for the linear systems for the selected proteins if the electrostatic focusing is not used. Thus, development of future numerical solvers for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation should balance all aspects of the numerical procedures in realistic biomolecular applications. PMID:20063271

  6. The geometry of finite difference discretizations of semilinear elliptic operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, Eduardo; Tomei, Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Discretizations by finite differences of some semilinear elliptic equations lead to maps F(u) = Au - f(u), u \\in {{R}}^n , given by nonlinear convex diagonal perturbations of symmetric matrices A. For natural nonlinearity classes, we consider the equation F(u) = y - tp, where t is a large positive number and p is a vector with negative coordinates. As the range of the derivative f'i of the coordinates of f encloses more eigenvalues of A, the number of solutions increases geometrically, eventually reaching 2n. This phenomenon, somewhat in contrast with behaviour associated with the Lazer-McKenna conjecture, has a very simple geometric explanation: a perturbation of a multiple fold gives rise to a function which sends connected components of its critical set to hypersurfaces with large rotation numbers with respect to vectors with very negative coordinates. Strictly speaking, the results have nothing to do with elliptic equations: they are properties of the interaction of a (self-adjoint) linear map with increasingly stronger nonlinear convex diagonal interactions.

  7. Finite difference approximations for a fractional advection diffusion problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Ercília

    2009-06-01

    The use of the conventional advection diffusion equation in many physical situations has been questioned by many investigators in recent years and alternative diffusion models have been proposed. Fractional space derivatives are used to model anomalous diffusion or dispersion, where a particle plume spreads at a rate inconsistent with the classical Brownian motion model. When a fractional derivative replaces the second derivative in a diffusion or dispersion model, it leads to enhanced diffusion, also called superdiffusion. We consider a one-dimensional advection-diffusion model, where the usual second-order derivative gives place to a fractional derivative of order α, with 1<α⩽2. We derive explicit finite difference schemes which can be seen as generalizations of already existing schemes in the literature for the advection-diffusion equation. We present the order of accuracy of the schemes and in order to show its convergence we prove they are stable under certain conditions. In the end we present a test problem.

  8. Finite-difference time-domain simulations of metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhengwei

    Metamaterials are periodic structures created by many identical scattering objects which are stationary and small compared to the wavelength of electromagnetic wave applied to it so that when combined with different elements, these materials have the potential to be coupled to the applied electromagnetic wave without modifying the structure. Due to their unusual properties that are not readily available in nature, metamaterials have been drawing significant attentions in many research areas, including theoretical, experimental as well as numerical investigations. As one of the major computational electromagnetic modeling methods, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique tackles problems by providing a full wave solution. FDTD, which is able to show transient evolution of interactions between electromagnetic wave and physical objects, not only has the advantage in dispersive and nonlinear material simulations, but also has the ability to model circuit elements including semiconductor devices. All these features make FDTD a competitive candidate in numerical methods of metamaterial simulations. This dissertation presents the implementation of FDTD technique to deal with three dimensional (3D) problems characterized with metamaterial structures. We endeavor to make the FDTD engine multi-functional and fast, as depicted in the following three efforts: (1) We incorporated FDTD engine with the stable and highly efficient model for materials with dispersion, nonlinearity and gain properties. (2) We coupled FDTD engine with SPICE, the general-purpose and powerful analog electronic circuit simulator. This makes FDTD ready to simulate complex semiconductor devices and provides a variety of possibilities for novel metamaterials. (3) We investigated the cutting-edge area of Graphics Processing Units (GPU) computing module to speed up the FDTD engine, and implemented subgridding system to target more efficient modeling for metamaterial applications with embedded fine

  9. Validation of finite difference core diffusion calculation methods with FEM and NEM for VVER-1000 MWe reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jagannathan, V.; Singh, T.; Pal, U.; Karthikeyan, R.; Sundaram, G.

    2006-07-01

    India is developing several in-house fuel management codes for the design evaluation of WER-1000 M We reactors, being built at Kudankulam, Tamil Nadu in collaboration with Russian Federation. A lattice burnup code EXCEL provides the few group lattice parameters of various fuel assembly types constituting the core. The core diffusion analyses have been performed by two methods. In the first method the entire fuel assembly is treated as a single homogenized cell. Each fuel assembly cell is divided into 6n{sup 2} triangles, where 'n' is the number of uniform divisions on a side of the hexagon. Regular triangular meshes are used in the active core as well as in surrounding reflector regions. This method is incorporated in the code TRIHEXFA. In the second method a pin by pin description of the core is accomplished by considering the few group lattice parameters generated by EXCEL code for various fuel and non-fuel cells in each fuel assembly. Regular hexagonal cells of one pin pitch are considered in the core and reflector regions. This method is incorporated in HEXPIN code. Both these codes use centre mesh finite difference method (FDM) for regular triangular or hexagonal meshes. It is well known that the large size of the WER fuel assembly, the zigzag structure of the core-baffle zone, the distribution of water tubes of different diameter in this baffle zone and the surrounding steel and water layers of different thickness, all lead to a very complex description of the core-reflector interface. We are analyzing the WER core in fresh state by two other approaches to obtain independent benchmark reference solutions. They are finite element method (FEM) and nodal expansion method (NEM). The few group cross sections of EXCEL are used in the FEM and NEM analyses. The paper would present the comparison of the results of core followup simulations of FD codes with those of FEM and NEM analyses. (authors)

  10. A hybrid finite-volume and finite difference scheme for depth-integrated non-hydrostatic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Sun, Jia-wen; Wang, Xing-gang; Yu, Yong-hai; Sun, Zhao-chen

    2017-06-01

    A depth-integrated, non-hydrostatic model with hybrid finite difference and finite volume numerical algorithm is proposed in this paper. By utilizing a fraction step method, the governing equations are decomposed into hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic parts. The first part is solved by using the finite volume conservative discretization method, whilst the latter is considered by solving discretized Poisson-type equations with the finite difference method. The second-order accuracy, both in time and space, of the finite volume scheme is achieved by using an explicit predictor-correction step and linear construction of variable state in cells. The fluxes across the cell faces are computed in a Godunov-based manner by using MUSTA scheme. Slope and flux limiting technique is used to equip the algorithm with total variation dimensioning property for shock capturing purpose. Wave breaking is treated as a shock by switching off the non-hydrostatic pressure in the steep wave front locally. The model deals with moving wet/dry front in a simple way. Numerical experiments are conducted to verify the proposed model.

  11. Vibrons in finite size molecular lattices: a route for high-fidelity quantum state transfer at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouthier, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    A communication protocol is proposed in which vibron-mediated quantum state transfer takes place in a molecular lattice. We consider two distant molecular groups grafted on each side of the lattice. These groups form two quantum computers where vibrational qubits are implemented and received. The lattice defines the communication channel along which a vibron delocalizes and interacts with a phonon bath. Using quasi-degenerate perturbation theory, vibron-phonon entanglement is taken into account through the effective Hamiltonian concept. A vibron is thus dressed by a virtual phonon cloud whereas a phonon is clothed by virtual vibronic transitions. It is shown that three quasi-degenerate dressed states define the relevant paths followed by a vibron to tunnel between the computers. When the coupling between the computers and the lattice is judiciously chosen, constructive interference takes place between these paths. Phonon-induced decoherence is minimized and a high-fidelity quantum state transfer occurs over a broad temperature range.

  12. 3D Finite Difference Modelling of Basaltic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell-Sørensen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The main purpose of the work was to generate realistic data to be applied for testing of processing and migration tools for basaltic regions. The project is based on the three - dimensional finite difference code (FD), TIGER, made by Sintef. The FD code was optimized (parallelized) by the author, to run on parallel computers. The parallel code enables us to model large-scale realistic geological models and to apply traditional seismic and micro seismic sources. The parallel code uses multiple processors in order to manipulate subsets of large amounts of data simultaneously. The general anisotropic code uses 21 elastic coefficients. Eight independent coefficients are needed as input parameters for the general TI medium. In the FD code, the elastic wave field computation is implemented by a higher order FD solution to the elastic wave equation and the wave fields are computed on a staggered grid, shifted half a node in one or two directions. The geological model is a gridded basalt model, which covers from 24 km to 37 km of a real shot line in horizontal direction and from the water surface to the depth of 3.5 km. The 2frac {1}{2}D model has been constructed using the compound modeling software from Norsk Hydro. The vertical parameter distribution is obtained from observations in two wells. At The depth of between 1100 m to 1500 m, a basalt horizon covers the whole sub surface layers. We have shown that it is possible to simulate a line survey in realistic (3D) geological models in reasonable time by using high performance computers. The author would like to thank Norsk Hydro, Statoil, GEUS, and SINTEF for very helpful discussions and Parallab for being helpful with the new IBM, p690 Regatta system.

  13. Discretizing delta functions via finite differences and gradient normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towers, John D.

    2009-06-01

    In [J.D. Towers, Two methods for discretizing a delta function supported on a level set, J. Comput. Phys. 220 (2007) 915-931] the author presented two closely related finite difference methods (referred to here as FDM1 and FDM2) for discretizing a delta function supported on a manifold of codimension one defined by the zero level set of a smooth mapping u :Rn ↦ R . These methods were shown to be consistent (meaning that they converge to the true solution as the mesh size h → 0) in the codimension one setting. In this paper, we concentrate on n ⩽ 3 , but generalize our methods to codimensions other than one - now the level set function is generally a vector valued mapping u → :Rn ↦Rm, 1 ⩽ m ⩽ n ⩽ 3 . Seemingly reasonable algorithms based on simple products of approximate delta functions are not generally consistent when applied to these problems. Motivated by this, we instead use the wedge product formalism to generalize our FDM algorithms, and this approach results in accurate, often consistent approximations. With the goal of ensuring consistency in general, we propose a new gradient normalization process that is applied before our FDM algorithms. These combined algorithms seem to be consistent in all reasonable situations, with numerical experiments indicating O (h2) convergence for our new gradient-normalized FDM2 algorithm. In the full codimension setting (m = n) , our gradient normalization processing also improves accuracy when using more standard approximate delta functions. This combination also yields approximations that appear to be consistent.

  14. Parallel performance of a lattice-Boltzmann/finite element cellular blood flow solver on the IBM Blue Gene/P architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Reasor, Daniel A.; Aidun, Cyrus K.

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the parallel implementation and scaling results of a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann/finite element code for suspension flow simulations. This code allows the direct numerical simulation of cellular blood flow, fully resolving the two-phase nature of blood and the deformation of the suspended phase. A brief introduction to the numerical methods employed is given followed by an outline of the code structure. Scaling results obtained on Argonne National Laboratories IBM Blue Gene/P ( BG/P) are presented. Details include performance characteristics on 512 to 65,536 processor cores.

  15. A comparative assessment of crystallite size and lattice strain in differently cast A356 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Roy, H.; Lohar, A. K.; Samanta, S. K.; Tiwari, S.; Dutta, K.

    2015-02-01

    In this investigation, A356 aluminium alloy has been prepared by different routes viz. gravity casting, rheo pressure die casting (RPDC) and RPDC with T6 heat treatment. X-ray diffraction studies of these samples have been done in the scanning range of 20 - 90°. X-ray peak broadening analysis has been used to estimate the crystallite size and lattice stain, in all the samples. The sample prepared by RPDC with T6 treatment has comparatively smaller crystallite size and lesser lattice strain than gravity cast and RPDC samples.

  16. An energy stable, hexagonal finite difference scheme for the 2D phase field crystal amplitude equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhen; Heinonen, Vili; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Cheng; Wise, Steven M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we construct an energy stable finite difference scheme for the amplitude expansion equations for the two-dimensional phase field crystal (PFC) model. The equations are formulated in a periodic hexagonal domain with respect to the reciprocal lattice vectors to achieve a provably unconditionally energy stable and solvable scheme. To our knowledge, this is the first such energy stable scheme for the PFC amplitude equations. The convexity of each part in the amplitude equations is analyzed, in both the semi-discrete and fully-discrete cases. Energy stability is based on a careful convexity analysis for the energy (in both the spatially continuous and discrete cases). As a result, unique solvability and unconditional energy stability are available for the resulting scheme. Moreover, we show that the scheme is point-wise stable for any time and space step sizes. An efficient multigrid solver is devised to solve the scheme, and a few numerical experiments are presented, including grain rotation and shrinkage and grain growth studies, as examples of the strength and robustness of the proposed scheme and solver.

  17. A finite difference method with reciprocity used to incorporate anisotropy in electroencephalogram dipole source localization.

    PubMed

    Hallez, Hans; Vanrumste, Bart; Van Hese, Peter; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace; Van de Walle, Rik

    2005-08-21

    Many implementations of electroencephalogram (EEG) dipole source localization neglect the anisotropical conductivities inherent to brain tissues, such as the skull and white matter anisotropy. An examination of dipole localization errors is made in EEG source analysis, due to not incorporating the anisotropic properties of the conductivity of the skull and white matter. First, simulations were performed in a 5 shell spherical head model using the analytical formula. Test dipoles were placed in three orthogonal planes in the spherical head model. Neglecting the skull anisotropy results in a dipole localization error of, on average, 13.73 mm with a maximum of 24.51 mm. For white matter anisotropy these values are 11.21 mm and 26.3 mm, respectively. Next, a finite difference method (FDM), presented by Saleheen and Kwong (1997 IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 44 800-9), is used to incorporate the anisotropy of the skull and white matter. The FDM method has been validated for EEG dipole source localization in head models with all compartments isotropic as well as in a head model with white matter anisotropy. In a head model with skull anisotropy the numerical method could only be validated if the 3D lattice was chosen very fine (grid size < or = 2 mm).

  18. A Multifunctional Interface Method for Coupling Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods: Two-Dimensional Scalar-Field Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.

    2002-01-01

    A multifunctional interface method with capabilities for variable-fidelity modeling and multiple method analysis is presented. The methodology provides an effective capability by which domains with diverse idealizations can be modeled independently to exploit the advantages of one approach over another. The multifunctional method is used to couple independently discretized subdomains, and it is used to couple the finite element and the finite difference methods. The method is based on a weighted residual variational method and is presented for two-dimensional scalar-field problems. A verification test problem and a benchmark application are presented, and the computational implications are discussed.

  19. An Investigation of Finite Difference and Finite Element Vertical Schemes for the Baroclinic Prediction Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    passes through zero degrees. FDM-A, FDM-B, FDM-C and FEM-C represent the same physical solution, which is called the consensus solution. These sol - utions...Fig. 18). All the models except FDM-C depict the same shape as the phase consensus and FEM-C is again closest to the consensus sol - ution. Note that...models are closer than the finite element models to the consensus sol - ution for grids A and C. FDM-B and FEM-B are nearly identical. FDM-C is closest

  20. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, How-Wei; Huang, Tai-Min

    1998-10-01

    Simulation of digital ground penetrating radar (GPR) wave propagation in two-dimensional (2-D) media is developed, tested, implemented, and applied using a time-domain staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) numerical method. Three types of numerical algorithms for constructing synthetic common-shot, constant-offset radar profiles based on an actual transmitter-to-receiver configuration and based on the exploding reflector concept are demonstrated to mimic different types of radar survey geometries. Frequency-dependent attenuation is also incorporated to account for amplitude decay and time shift in the recorded responses. The algorithms are based on an explicit FD solution to Maxwell's curl equations. In addition, the first-order TE mode responses of wave propagation phenomena are considered due to the operating frequency of current GPR instruments. The staggered-grid technique is used to sample the fields and approximate the spatial derivatives with fourth-order FDs. The temporal derivatives are approximated by an explicit second-order difference time-marching scheme. By combining paraxial approximation of the one-way wave equation ( A2) and the damping mechanisms (sponge filter), we propose a new composite absorbing boundary conditions (ABC) algorithm that effectively absorb both incoming and outgoing waves. To overcome the angle- and frequency-dependent characteristic of the absorbing behaviors, each ABC has two types of absorption mechanism. The first ABC uses a modified Clayton and Enquist's A2 condition. Moreover, a fixed and a floating A2 ABC that operates at one grid point is proposed. The second ABC uses a damping mechanism. By superimposing artificial damping and by alternating the physical attenuation properties and impedance contrast of the media within the absorbing region, those waves impinging on the boundary can be effectively attenuated and can prevent waves from reflecting back into the grid. The frequency-dependent characteristic of the damping

  1. A finite different field solver for dipole modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.M.

    1992-08-01

    A finite element field solver for dipole modes in axisymmetric structures has been written. The second-order elements used in this formulation yield accurate mode frequencies with no spurious modes. Quasi-periodic boundaries are included to allow travelling waves in periodic structures. The solver is useful in applications requiring precise frequency calculations such as detuned accelerator structures for linear colliders. Comparisons are made with measurements and with the popular but less accurate field solver URMEL.

  2. Atomic and electronic structure of germanium clusters at finite temperature using finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chelikowsky, J.R.; Oeguet, S.; Jing, X.; Wu, K.; Stathopoulos, A.; Saad, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Determining the electronic and structural properties of semiconductor clusters is one of the outstanding problems in materials science. The existence of numerous structures with nearly identical energies makes it very difficult to determine a realistic ground state structure. Moreover, even if an effective procedure can be devised to predict the ground state structure, questions can arise about the relevancy of the structure at finite temperatures. Kinetic effects and non-equilibrium structures may dominate the structural configurations present in clusters created under laboratory conditions. The authors illustrate theoretical techniques for predicting the structure and electronic properties of small germanium clusters. Specifically, they illustrate that the detailed agreement between theoretical and experimental features can be exploited to identify the relevant isomers present under experimental conditions.

  3. Third-order perturbative lattice and complex Langevin analyses of the finite-temperature equation of state of nonrelativistic fermions in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loheac, Andrew C.; Drut, Joaquín E.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze the pressure and density equations of state of unpolarized nonrelativistic fermions at finite temperature in one spatial dimension with contact interactions. For attractively interacting regimes, we perform a third-order lattice perturbation theory calculation, assess its convergence properties by comparing with hybrid Monte Carlo results (there is no sign problem in this regime), and demonstrate agreement with real Langevin calculations. For repulsive interactions, we present lattice perturbation theory results as well as complex Langevin calculations, with a modified action to prevent uncontrolled excursions in the complex plane. Although perturbation theory is a common tool, our implementation of it is unconventional; we use a Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation to decouple the system and automate the application of Wick's theorem, thus generating the diagrammatic expansion, including symmetry factors, at any desired order. We also present an efficient technique to tackle nested Matsubara frequency sums without relying on contour integration, which is independent of dimension and applies to both relativistic and nonrelativistic systems, as well as all energy-independent interactions. We find exceptional agreement between perturbative and nonperturbative results at weak couplings, and furnish predictions based on complex Langevin at strong couplings. We additionally present perturbative calculations of up to the fifth-order virial coefficient for repulsive and attractive couplings. Both the lattice perturbation theory and complex Langevin formalisms can easily be extended to a variety of situations including polarized systems, bosons, and higher dimension.

  4. An investigation of the accuracy of finite difference methods in the solution of linear elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauld, N. R., Jr.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The accuracy of the finite difference method in the solution of linear elasticity problems that involve either a stress discontinuity or a stress singularity is considered. Solutions to three elasticity problems are discussed in detail: a semi-infinite plane subjected to a uniform load over a portion of its boundary; a bimetallic plate under uniform tensile stress; and a long, midplane symmetric, fiber reinforced laminate subjected to uniform axial strain. Finite difference solutions to the three problems are compared with finite element solutions to corresponding problems. For the first problem a comparison with the exact solution is also made. The finite difference formulations for the three problems are based on second order finite difference formulas that provide for variable spacings in two perpendicular directions. Forward and backward difference formulas are used near boundaries where their use eliminates the need for fictitious grid points.

  5. The Benard problem: A comparison of finite difference and spectral collocation eigen value solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee; Mccaughan, Frances E.; Fitzmaurice, Nessan

    1995-01-01

    The application of spectral methods, using a Chebyshev collocation scheme, to solve hydrodynamic stability problems is demonstrated on the Benard problem. Implementation of the Chebyshev collocation formulation is described. The performance of the spectral scheme is compared with that of a 2nd order finite difference scheme. An exact solution to the Marangoni-Benard problem is used to evaluate the performance of both schemes. The error of the spectral scheme is at least seven orders of magnitude smaller than finite difference error for a grid resolution of N = 15 (number of points used). The performance of the spectral formulation far exceeded the performance of the finite difference formulation for this problem. The spectral scheme required only slightly more effort to set up than the 2nd order finite difference scheme. This suggests that the spectral scheme may actually be faster to implement than higher order finite difference schemes.

  6. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  7. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  8. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  9. Convergence Rates of Finite Difference Stochastic Approximation Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    was due to Chung (1954) and was formulated in the present form by Fabian (1971). Lemma 1. Let s, t, B,An, bn be real numbers, 0 < s ≤ 1, t ≥ 0, B > 0...Define b+ = 0 if s < 1 and b+ = t if s = 1 and assume that c = limn→∞An − b+ exists and is finite. If for 5 n ≥ n0, bn +1 ≤ bn (1− An ns ) + B ns+t and...Denote An = 1 + σ n −K3an − σ n K3an +O( 1 n2 ), Bn = (1 + 1 n )σnσ(banδ β n(1 + E[εn])− anE[τnθn]). Then zn+1 = Anzn − Bn .(16) Note that an = an −α, 0

  10. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for computing the aeroelasticity of wing-body configurations on multiple-instruction, multiple-data (MIMD) parallel computers. In this procedure, fluids are modeled using Euler equations discretized by a finite difference method, and structures are modeled using finite element equations. The procedure is designed in such a way that each discipline can be developed and maintained independently by using a domain decomposition approach. A parallel integration scheme is used to compute aeroelastic responses by solving the coupled fluid and structural equations concurrently while keeping modularity of each discipline. The present procedure is validated by computing the aeroelastic response of a wing and comparing with experiment. Aeroelastic computations are illustrated for a High Speed Civil Transport type wing-body configuration.

  11. Time-domain finite-difference/finite-element hybrid simulations of radio frequency coils in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H

    2008-05-21

    A hybrid method that combines the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the finite-element time-domain (FETD) method is presented for simulating radio-frequency (RF) coils in magnetic resonance imaging. This method applies a high-fidelity FETD method to RF coils, while the human body is modeled with a low-cost FDTD method. Since the FDTD and the FETD methods are applied simultaneously, the dynamic interaction between RF coils and the human body is fully accounted for. In order to simplify the treatment of the highly irregular FDTD/FETD interface, composite elements are proposed. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the hybrid method in high-field receive-and-transmit coil design. This approach is also applicable to general bio-electromagnetic simulations.

  12. Various finite-difference schemes for transient three-dimensional heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Yalamanchili, R.; Yalamanchili, S.R.

    1992-03-01

    The motivation for this task comes from the needs of future hypervelocity projectile surrounded by asymmetric flow due to angle of attack and/or fins in case of kinetic energy projectile. In either case, unsteady and three-dimensional effects, large and nonuniform heat fluxes, tedious and repetitive number crunching capabilities of supercomputers dictate optimum numerical techniques and predictive critical time steps for successful and practical solutions. Finite element modeling is ideal whenever there is geometrical complexity, coatings, composite and multi materials. However, classical finite element technique yields a particular equation. There may be some finite difference schemes superior to classical finite element technique. Therefore, various finite difference schemes are derived and their characteristics are discussed applicable to transient three dimensional heat conduction problems.

  13. Simulation of transonic separated airfoil flow by finite difference viscous-inviscid interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, W. R.; Steger, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A finite difference viscous inviscid interaction program has been developed for simulating the separated transonic flow about lifting airfoils, including the wake. In contrast to most interaction programs, this code combines a finite difference boundary layer algorithm with the inviscid program. The recently developed finite difference boundary layer code efficiently simulates attached and reversed compressible boundary layer and wake flows. New viscous inviscid interaction algorithms were also developed to couple the boundary layer code with the inviscid transonic full potential program. Transonic cases with shock induced and trailing edge separation are computed and compared with experimental and Navier-Stokes results.

  14. Similarity and generalized finite-difference solutions of parabolic partial differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clausing, A. M.

    1971-01-01

    Techniques are presented for obtaining generalized finite-difference solutions to partial differential equations of the parabolic type. It is shown that the advantages of similarity in the solution of similar problems are generally not lost if the solution to the original partial differential equations is effected in the physical plane by finite-difference methods. The analysis results in a considerable saving in computational effort in the solution of both similar and nonsimilar problems. Several examples, including both the heat-conduction equation and the boundary-layer equations, are given. The analysis also provides a practical means of estimating the accuracy of finite-difference solutions to parabolic equations.

  15. High-order cyclo-difference techniques: An alternative to finite differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Otto, John C.

    1993-01-01

    The summation-by-parts energy norm is used to establish a new class of high-order finite-difference techniques referred to here as 'cyclo-difference' techniques. These techniques are constructed cyclically from stable subelements, and require no numerical boundary conditions; when coupled with the simultaneous approximation term (SAT) boundary treatment, they are time asymptotically stable for an arbitrary hyperbolic system. These techniques are similar to spectral element techniques and are ideally suited for parallel implementation, but do not require special collocation points or orthogonal basis functions. The principal focus is on methods of sixth-order formal accuracy or less; however, these methods could be extended in principle to any arbitrary order of accuracy.

  16. a Finite Difference Numerical Model for the Propagation of Finite Amplitude Acoustical Blast Waves Outdoors Over Hard and Porous Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Victor Ward

    1990-01-01

    This study has concerned the propagation of finite amplitude, i.e. weakly non-linear, acoustical blast waves from explosions over hard and porous media models of outdoor ground surfaces. The nonlinear acoustic propagation effects require a numerical solution in the time domain. To model a porous ground surface, which in the frequency domain exhibits a finite impedance, the linear phenomenological porous model of Morse and Ingard was used. The phenomenological equations are solved in the time domain for coupling with the time domain propagation solution in the air. The numerical solution is found through the method of finite differences. The second-order in time and fourth -order in space MacCormack method was used in the air, and the second-order in time and space MacCormack method was used in the porous medium modeling the ground. Two kinds of numerical absorbing boundary conditions were developed for the air propagation equations to truncate the physical domain for solution on a computer. Radiation conditions first were used on those sides of the domain where there were outgoing waves. Characteristic boundary conditions secondly are employed near the acoustic source. The numerical model agreed well with the Pestorius algorithm for the propagation of electric spark pulses in the free field, and with a result of Pfriem for normal plane reflection off a hard surface. In addition, curves of pressure amplification versus incident angle for waves obliquely incident on the hard and porous surfaces were produced which are similar to those in the literature. The model predicted that near grazing finite amplitude acoustic blast waves decay with distance over hard surfaces as r to the power -1.2. This result is consistent with the work of Reed. For propagation over the porous ground surface, the model predicted that this surface decreased the decay rate with distance for the larger blasts compared to the rate expected in the linear acoustics limit.

  17. Analysis and improvement of Brinkman lattice Boltzmann schemes: Bulk, boundary, interface. Similarity and distinctness with finite elements in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Irina; Silva, Goncalo; Talon, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    This work focuses on the numerical solution of the Stokes-Brinkman equation for a voxel-type porous-media grid, resolved by one to eight spacings per permeability contrast of 1 to 10 orders in magnitude. It is first analytically demonstrated that the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the linear-finite-element method (FEM) both suffer from the viscosity correction induced by the linear variation of the resistance with the velocity. This numerical artefact may lead to an apparent negative viscosity in low-permeable blocks, inducing spurious velocity oscillations. The two-relaxation-times (TRT) LBM may control this effect thanks to free-tunable two-rates combination Λ . Moreover, the Brinkman-force-based BF-TRT schemes may maintain the nondimensional Darcy group and produce viscosity-independent permeability provided that the spatial distribution of Λ is fixed independently of the kinematic viscosity. Such a property is lost not only in the BF-BGK scheme but also by "partial bounce-back" TRT gray models, as shown in this work. Further, we propose a consistent and improved IBF-TRT model which vanishes viscosity correction via simple specific adjusting of the viscous-mode relaxation rate to local permeability value. This prevents the model from velocity fluctuations and, in parallel, improves for effective permeability measurements, from porous channel to multidimensions. The framework of our exact analysis employs a symbolic approach developed for both LBM and FEM in single and stratified, unconfined, and bounded channels. It shows that even with similar bulk discretization, BF, IBF, and FEM may manifest quite different velocity profiles on the coarse grids due to their intrinsic contrasts in the setting of interface continuity and no-slip conditions. While FEM enforces them on the grid vertexes, the LBM prescribes them implicitly. We derive effective LBM continuity conditions and show that the heterogeneous viscosity correction impacts them, a property also shared

  18. Analysis and improvement of Brinkman lattice Boltzmann schemes: bulk, boundary, interface. Similarity and distinctness with finite elements in heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, Irina; Silva, Goncalo; Talon, Laurent

    2015-02-01

    This work focuses on the numerical solution of the Stokes-Brinkman equation for a voxel-type porous-media grid, resolved by one to eight spacings per permeability contrast of 1 to 10 orders in magnitude. It is first analytically demonstrated that the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the linear-finite-element method (FEM) both suffer from the viscosity correction induced by the linear variation of the resistance with the velocity. This numerical artefact may lead to an apparent negative viscosity in low-permeable blocks, inducing spurious velocity oscillations. The two-relaxation-times (TRT) LBM may control this effect thanks to free-tunable two-rates combination Λ. Moreover, the Brinkman-force-based BF-TRT schemes may maintain the nondimensional Darcy group and produce viscosity-independent permeability provided that the spatial distribution of Λ is fixed independently of the kinematic viscosity. Such a property is lost not only in the BF-BGK scheme but also by "partial bounce-back" TRT gray models, as shown in this work. Further, we propose a consistent and improved IBF-TRT model which vanishes viscosity correction via simple specific adjusting of the viscous-mode relaxation rate to local permeability value. This prevents the model from velocity fluctuations and, in parallel, improves for effective permeability measurements, from porous channel to multidimensions. The framework of our exact analysis employs a symbolic approach developed for both LBM and FEM in single and stratified, unconfined, and bounded channels. It shows that even with similar bulk discretization, BF, IBF, and FEM may manifest quite different velocity profiles on the coarse grids due to their intrinsic contrasts in the setting of interface continuity and no-slip conditions. While FEM enforces them on the grid vertexes, the LBM prescribes them implicitly. We derive effective LBM continuity conditions and show that the heterogeneous viscosity correction impacts them, a property also shared

  19. Bound states in two-dimensional spin systems near the Ising limit: A quantum finite-lattice study

    SciTech Connect

    Dusuel, Sebastien; Kamfor, Michael; Schmidt, Kai Phillip; Thomale, Ronny; Vidal, Julien

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the properties of low-energy bound states in the transverse-field Ising model and in the XXZ model on the square lattice. To this end, we develop an optimized implementation of perturbative continuous unitary transformations. The Ising model is studied in the small-field limit which is found to be a special case of the toric code model in a magnetic field. To analyze the XXZ model, we perform a perturbative expansion about the Ising limit in order to discuss the fate of the elementary magnon excitations when approaching the Heisenberg point.

  20. Vibration analysis of rotating turbomachinery blades by an improved finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of calculating the natural frequencies and mode shapes of rotating blades is solved by an improved finite difference procedure based on second-order central differences. Lead-lag, flapping and coupled bending-torsional vibration cases of untwisted blades are considered. Results obtained by using the present improved theory have been observed to be close lower bound solutions. The convergence has been found to be rapid in comparison with the classical first-order finite difference method. While the computational space and time required by the present approach is observed to be almost the same as that required by the first-order theory for a given mesh size, accuracies of practical interest can be obtained by using the improved finite difference procedure with a relatively smaller matrix size, in contrast to the classical finite difference procedure which requires either a larger matrix or an extrapolation procedure for improvement in accuracy.

  1. Finite-number-of-periods holographic gratings with finite-width incident beams: analysis using the finite-difference frequency-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun-Der; Glytsis, Elias N.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of finite number of periods (FNP) and finite incident beams on the diffraction efficiencies of holographic gratings are investigated by the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method. Gratings comprising 20, 15, 10, 5, and 3 periods illuminated by TE and TM incident light with various beam sizes are analyzed with the FDFD method and compared with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Both unslanted and slanted gratings are treated in transmission as well as in reflection configurations. In general, the effect of the FNP is a decrease in the diffraction efficiency with a decrease in the number of periods of the grating. Similarly, a decrease in incident-beam width causes a decrease in the diffraction efficiency. Exceptions appear in off-Bragg incidence in which a smaller beam width could result in higher diffraction efficiency. For beam widths greater than 10 grating periods and for gratings with more than 20 periods in width, the diffraction efficiencies slowly converge to the values predicted by the RCWA (infinite incident beam and infinite-number-of-periods grating) for both TE and TM polarizations. Furthermore, the effects of FNP holographic gratings on their diffraction performance are found to be comparable to their counterparts of FNP surface-relief gratings. 2002 Optical Society of America

  2. Overcoming the sign problem at finite temperature: Quantum tensor network for the orbital eg model on an infinite square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnik, Piotr; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2017-07-01

    The variational tensor network renormalization approach to two-dimensional (2D) quantum systems at finite temperature is applied to a model suffering the notorious quantum Monte Carlo sign problem—the orbital eg model with spatially highly anisotropic orbital interactions. Coarse graining of the tensor network along the inverse temperature β yields a numerically tractable 2D tensor network representing the Gibbs state. Its bond dimension D —limiting the amount of entanglement—is a natural refinement parameter. Increasing D we obtain a converged order parameter and its linear susceptibility close to the critical point. They confirm the existence of finite order parameter below the critical temperature Tc, provide a numerically exact estimate of Tc, and give the critical exponents within 1 % of the 2D Ising universality class.

  3. Extended multiscale finite element method for elasto-plastic analysis of 2D periodic lattice truss materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. W.; Wu, J. K.; Fu, Z. D.

    2010-05-01

    An extended multiscale finite element method is developed for small-deformation elasto-plastic analysis of periodic truss materials. The base functions constructed numerically are employed to establish the relationship between the macroscopic displacement and the microscopic stress and strain. The unbalanced nodal forces in the micro-scale of unit cells are treated as the combined effects of macroscopic equivalent forces and microscopic perturbed forces, in which macroscopic equivalent forces are used to solve the macroscopic displacement field and microscopic perturbed forces are used to obtain the stress and strain in the micro-scale to make sure the correctness of the results obtained by the downscale computation in the elastic-plastic problems. Numerical examples are carried out and the results verify the validity and efficiency of the developed method by comparing it with the conventional finite element method.

  4. Application of a novel finite difference method to dynamic crack problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. M.; Wilkins, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    A versatile finite difference method (HEMP and HEMP 3D computer programs) was developed originally for solving dynamic problems in continuum mechanics. It was extended to analyze the stress field around cracks in a solid with finite geometry subjected to dynamic loads and to simulate numerically the dynamic fracture phenomena with success. This method is an explicit finite difference method applied to the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of continuum mechanics in two and three space dimensions and time. The calculational grid moves with the material and in this way it gives a more detailed description of the physics of the problem than the Eulerian formulation.

  5. Root-cause analysis of the better performance of the coarse-mesh finite-difference method for CANDU-type reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent assessment results indicate that the coarse-mesh finite-difference method (FDM) gives consistently smaller percent differences in channel powers than the fine-mesh FDM when compared to the reference MCNP solution for CANDU-type reactors. However, there is an impression that the fine-mesh FDM should always give more accurate results than the coarse-mesh FDM in theory. To answer the question if the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors was just a coincidence (cancellation of errors) or caused by the use of heavy water or the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation, three benchmark problems were set up with three different fuel lattices: CANDU, HWR and PWR. These benchmark problems were then used to analyze the root cause of the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors. The analyses confirm that the better performance of the coarse-mesh FDM for CANDU-type reactors is mainly caused by the use of lattice-homogenized cross sections for the sub-meshes of the cluster fuel geometry in the diffusion calculation. Based on the analyses, it is recommended to use 2 x 2 coarse-mesh FDM to analyze CANDU-type reactors when lattice-homogenized cross sections are used in the core analysis. (authors)

  6. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-10-16

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation.

  7. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-10-01

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation.

  8. Finite-difference scheme for the numerical solution of the Schroedinger equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Ramadhani, Issa

    1992-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for numerical integration of the Schroedinger equation is constructed. Asymptotically (r goes to infinity), the method gives the exact solution correct to terms of order r exp -2.

  9. A non-linear constrained optimization technique for the mimetic finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco; Svyatskiy, Daniil; Bertolazzi, Enrico; Frego, Marco

    2014-09-30

    This is a strategy for the construction of monotone schemes in the framework of the mimetic finite difference method for the approximation of diffusion problems on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes.

  10. Combination of the discontinuous Galerkin method with finite differences for simulation of seismic wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsa, Vadim; Tcheverda, Vladimir; Botter, Charlotte

    2016-04-15

    We present an algorithm for the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation in models with a complex near surface part and free surface topography. The approach is based on the combination of finite differences with the discontinuous Galerkin method. The discontinuous Galerkin method can be used on polyhedral meshes; thus, it is easy to handle the complex surfaces in the models. However, this approach is computationally intense in comparison with finite differences. Finite differences are computationally efficient, but in general, they require rectangular grids, leading to the stair-step approximation of the interfaces, which causes strong diffraction of the wavefield. In this research we present a hybrid algorithm where the discontinuous Galerkin method is used in a relatively small upper part of the model and finite differences are applied to the main part of the model.

  11. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-01-01

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation. PMID:26471947

  12. A lattice hydrodynamic model based on delayed feedback control considering the effect of flow rate difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunong; Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a lattice hydrodynamic model is derived considering not only the effect of flow rate difference but also the delayed feedback control signal which including more comprehensive information. The control method is used to analyze the stability of the model. Furthermore, the critical condition for the linear steady traffic flow is deduced and the numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the advantage of the proposed model with and without the effect of flow rate difference and the control signal. The results are consistent with the theoretical analysis correspondingly.

  13. Exact finite difference schemes for the non-linear unidirectional wave equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the construction of exact finite difference schemes for the nonlinear unidirectional wave equation that describes the nonlinear propagation of a wave motion in the positive x-direction. The schemes constructed for these equations are compared with those obtained by using the usual procedures of numerical analysis. It is noted that the order of the exact finite difference models is equal to the order of the differential equation.

  14. Wideband finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions for good conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.; Yee, Kane S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media, throughout the solution volume. A 1-D implementation for a surface impedance boundary condition for good conductors in the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique.

  15. Finite-difference solution to the radiative-transfer equation for in-water radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliwell, W. S.

    1985-08-01

    The radiative-transfer equation is solved using a finite-difference method. For the first time to the author's knowledge, finite-difference solutions are obtained for in-water radiance. Comparison with data is good for radiance distributions that are due to the sun at depths down to 26 attenuation lengths in a lake. Comparisons are also made with off-axis radiance measurements from an ocean laser experiment together with the solution from a small-angle approximation model.

  16. TheS=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the triangular lattice: Exact results and spin-wave theory for finite cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutscher, R.; Everts, H. U.

    1993-03-01

    We study the ground state properties of the S=$\\frac{1}{2}$ Heisenberg antiferromagnet (HAF) on the triangular lattice with nearest-neighbour ($J$) and next-nearest neighbour ($\\alpha J$) couplings. Classically, this system is known to be ordered in a $120^\\circ$ N\\'eel type state for values $-\\infty<\\alpha\\le 1/8$ of the ratio $\\alpha$ of these couplings and in a collinear state for $1/8<\\alpha<1$. The order parameter ${\\cal M}$ and the helicity $\\chi$ of the $120^\\circ$ structure are obtained by numerical diagonalisation of finite periodic systems of up to $N=30$ sites and by applying the spin-wave (SW) approximation to the same finite systems. We find a surprisingly good agreement between the exact and the SW results in the entire region $-\\infty<\\alpha< 1/8$. It appears that the SW theory is still valid for the simple triangular HAF ($\\alpha=0$) although the sublattice magnetisation ${\\cal M}$ is substantially reduced from its classical value by quantum fluctuations. Our numerical results for the order parameter ${\\cal N}$ of the collinear order support the previous conjecture of a first order transition between the $120^\\circ$ and the collinear order at $\\alpha \\simeq 1/8$.

  17. Application of steady state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable area duct: A comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Sound propagation without flow in a rectangular duct with a converging-diverging area variation was studied experimentally and theoretically. The area variation was of sufficient magnitude to produce large reflections and induce modal scattering. The rms (root-mean-squared) pressure and phase angle on both the flat and curved surface were measured and tabulated. The steady state finite element theory and the transient finite difference theory are in good agreement with the data. It is concluded that numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large area variations.

  18. Finite-Temperature Crossover Phenomenon in the S = 1/2 Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Model on the Kagome Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, Tokuro; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-11-01

    Thermal properties of the S = 1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet at low temperatures are investigated by means of the Hams-de Raedt method for clusters of up to 36 sites possessing a full symmetry of the lattice. The specific heat exhibits, in addition to the double peaks, the third and the fourth peaks at lower temperatures. With decreasing the temperature, the type of the magnetic short-range order (SRO) changes around the third-peak temperature from the √{3} × √{3} to the q = 0 states, suggesting that the third peak of the specific heat is associated with a crossover phenomenon between the spin-liquid states with distinct magnetic SRO. Experimental implications are discussed.

  19. Minimum divergence viscous flow simulation through finite difference and regularization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Rodolfo A.; Mirabolghasemi, Maryam; Bryant, Steven L.; Prodanović, Maša

    2016-09-01

    We develop a new algorithm to simulate single- and two-phase viscous flow through a three-dimensional Cartesian representation of the porous space, such as those available through X-ray microtomography. We use the finite difference method to discretize the governing equations and also propose a new method to enforce the incompressible flow constraint under zero Neumann boundary conditions for the velocity components. Finite difference formulation leads to fast parallel implementation through linear solvers for sparse matrices, allowing relatively fast simulations, while regularization techniques used on solving inverse problems lead to the desired incompressible fluid flow. Tests performed using benchmark samples show good agreement with experimental/theoretical values. Additional tests are run on Bentheimer and Buff Berea sandstone samples with available laboratory measurements. We compare the results from our new method, based on finite differences, with an open source finite volume implementation as well as experimental results, specifically to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of each method. Finally, we calculate relative permeability by using this modified finite difference technique together with a level set based algorithm for multi-phase fluid distribution in the pore space. To our knowledge this is the first time regularization techniques are used in combination with finite difference fluid flow simulations.

  20. On the monotonicity of multidimensional finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovyrkina, O.; Ostapenko, V.

    2016-10-01

    The classical concept of monotonicity, introduced by Godunov for linear one-dimensional difference schemes, is extended to multidimensional case. Necessary and sufficient conditions of monotonicity are obtained for linear multidimensional difference schemes of first order. The constraints on the numerical viscosity are given that ensure the monotonicity of a difference scheme in the multidimensional case. It is proposed a modification of the second order multidimensional CABARET scheme that preserves the monotonicity of one-dimensional discrete solutions and, as a result, ensures higher smoothness in the computation of multidimensional discontinuous solutions. The results of two-dimensional test computations illustrating the advantages of the modified CABARET scheme are presented.

  1. Finite-time stochastic outer synchronization between two complex dynamical networks with different topologies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongzheng; Li, Wang; Zhao, Donghua

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the finite-time stochastic outer synchronization between two different complex dynamical networks with noise perturbation is investigated. By using suitable controllers, sufficient conditions for finite-time stochastic outer synchronization are derived based on the finite-time stability theory of stochastic differential equations. It is noticed that the coupling configuration matrix is not necessary to be symmetric or irreducible, and the inner coupling matrix need not be symmetric. Finally, numerical examples are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the analytical results. The effect of control parameters on the settling time is also numerically demonstrated.

  2. Effect of difference in interaction strength on two-dimensional lattice structure in a binary system with DNA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keita; Katsuno, Hiroyasu; Sato, Masahide

    2017-07-01

    Keeping two-dimensional lattice structures formed by nanoparticles covered with DNA in mind, we carry out Brownian dynamics simulations to study the effect of interaction strength on a two-dimensional lattice structure formed in a binary system. In our previous study [H. Katsuno, Y. Maegawa, and M. Sato, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 85, 074605 (2016)], we carried out simulations using the Lennard-Jones potential, in which the difference in interaction length was taken into account. When the interaction length between different species, σ‧, is smaller than that between the same species, σ, various lattice structures were formed with changing the ratio σ‧/σ. In this paper, taking the difference in the interaction strength into account, we study the effect of the difference in interaction strength on the two-dimensional lattice structure.

  3. Numerical solutions of two moving boundary problems by both finite difference and finite element methods with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The time dependent heat conduction equation that is solved in different coordinate systems is solved subject to various boundary conditions. Boundary conditions include surface heat flux, energy to vaporization of target materials, radiation from surface to surrounding, and possible phase change of material. This system of equations is subject to two moving boundaries. One moving boundary being the melt-solid interface because the surface heat flux may result in melting the surface of the exposed material. Another moving boundary is the receding surface as a result of evaporation of the wall material due to the continuous heating of the melted surface. Finite difference and the finite element methods are used and compared in such solution to these problems. Physical applications to these problems include high energy deposition from electron or ion beams interaction with materials for space and weapons applications, plasma disruption and energy dump on the walls or components of a fusion reactor, and high energy laser welding and annealing of materials. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Off lattice Monte Carlo simulation study for different metal adlayers onto (1 1 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, M. I.

    2004-10-01

    The structure, energetics, and elastic properties of metallic adlayers adsorbed onto monocrystalline substrate surfaces are analyzed for a set of systems of electrochemical interest. The systems considered involve Ag, Au, Pt, Pd, and Cu. The different adsorbate/substrate (1 1 1) systems were simulated employing off lattice Monte Carlo simulations with embedded atom method potentials in the canonical ensemble at 300 K. The underpotential and overpotential deposition trends observed for this set of transition metal systems are analyzed taking into account the structure of the monolayer, the energy of the systems, and the surface stress change.

  5. Comparison of Finite Differences and WKB approximation Methods for PT symmetric complex potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naceri, Leila; Chekkal, Meziane; Hammou, Amine B.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the one dimensional schrödinger eigenvalue problem on a finite domain (Strum-Liouville problem) for several PT-symmetric complex potentials, studied by Bender and Jones using the WKB approximation method. We make a comparison between the solutions of theses PT-symmetric complex potentials using both the finite difference method (FDM) and the WKB approximation method and show quantitative and qualitative agreement between the two methods.

  6. A generalized finite difference method for modeling cardiac electrical activation on arbitrary, irregular computational meshes.

    PubMed

    Trew, Mark L; Smaill, Bruce H; Bullivant, David P; Hunter, Peter J; Pullan, Andrew J

    2005-12-01

    A generalized finite difference (GFD) method is presented that can be used to solve the bi-domain equations modeling cardiac electrical activity. Classical finite difference methods have been applied by many researchers to the bi-domain equations. However, these methods suffer from the limitation of requiring computational meshes that are structured and orthogonal. Finite element or finite volume methods enable the bi-domain equations to be solved on unstructured meshes, although implementations of such methods do not always cater for meshes with varying element topology. The GFD method solves the bi-domain equations on arbitrary and irregular computational meshes without any need to specify element basis functions. The method is useful as it can be easily applied to activation problems using existing meshes that have originally been created for use by finite element or finite difference methods. In addition, the GFD method employs an innovative approach to enforcing nodal and non-nodal boundary conditions. The GFD method performs effectively for a range of two and three-dimensional test problems and when computing bi-domain electrical activation moving through a fully anisotropic three-dimensional model of canine ventricles.

  7. Analysis of average density difference effect in a new two-lane lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Geng; Sun, Di-Hua; Zhao, Min; Liu, Wei-Ning; Cheng, Sen-Lin

    2015-11-01

    A new lattice model is proposed by taking the average density difference effect into account for two-lane traffic system according to Transportation Cyber-physical Systems. The influence of average density difference effect on the stability of traffic flow is investigated through linear stability theory and nonlinear reductive perturbation method. The linear analysis results reveal that the unstable region would be reduced by considering the average density difference effect. The nonlinear kink-antikink soliton solution derived from the mKdV equation is analyzed to describe the properties of traffic jamming transition near the critical point. Numerical simulations confirm the analytical results showing that traffic jam can be suppressed efficiently by considering the average density difference effect for two-lane traffic system.

  8. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  9. Finite-size effects on the lattice dynamics in spin crossover nanomaterials. I. Nuclear inelastic scattering investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolasek, Mirko; Félix, Gautier; Peng, Haonan; Rat, Sylvain; Terki, Férial; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Salmon, Lionel; Molnár, Gábor; Nicolazzi, William; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2017-07-01

    We report the investigation of the size evolution of lattice dynamics in spin crossover coordination nanoparticles of [ Fe (pyrazine ) (Ni (CN) 4) ] through nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) measurements. Vibrational properties in these bistable molecular materials are of paramount importance and NIS permits access to the partial vibrational density of states in both spin states [high spin (HS) and low spin (LS)] from which thermodynamical and mechanical properties can be extracted. We show that the size reduction leads to the presence of inactive metal centers with the coexistence of HS and LS vibrational modes. The confinement effect has only weak impact on the vibrational properties of nanoparticles, especially on the optical modes which remain almost unchanged. On the other hand, the acoustic modes are much more affected which results in the increase of the vibrational entropy and also the Debye sound velocity in the smallest particles (<10 nm) in both spin states. This stiffening may be due to the elastic surface stress exerted by the external environment. An evidence of the influence of the host matrix on the vibrational properties of the nanoparticles is also highlighted through the matrix dependence of the sound velocity.

  10. Simulation of axi-symmetric flow towards wells: A finite-difference approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louwyck, Andy; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Bakker, Mark; Lebbe, Luc

    2012-07-01

    A detailed finite-difference approach is presented for the simulation of transient radial flow in multi-layer systems. The proposed discretization scheme simulates drawdown within the well more accurately than commonly applied schemes. The solution is compared to existing (semi) analytical models for the simulation of slug tests and pumping tests with constant discharge in single- and multi-layer systems. For all cases, it is concluded that the finite-difference model approximates drawdown to acceptable accuracy. The main advantage of finite-difference approaches is the ability to account for the varying saturated thickness in unconfined top layers. Additionally, it is straightforward to include radial variation of hydraulic parameters, which is useful to simulate the effect of a finite-thickness well skin. Aquifer tests with variable pumping rate and/or multiple wells may be simulated by superposition. The finite-difference solution is implemented in MAxSym, a MATLAB tool which is designed specifically to simulate axi-symmetric flow. Alternatively, the presented equations can be solved using a standard finite-difference model. A procedure is outlined to apply the same approach with MODFLOW. The required modifications to the input parameters are much larger for MODFLOW than for MAxSym, but the results are virtually identical. The presented finite-difference solution may be used, for example, as a forward model in parameter estimation algorithms. Since it is applicable to multi-layer systems, its use is not limited to the simulation of traditional pumping and slug tests, but also includes advanced aquifer tests, such as multiple pumping tests or multi-level slug tests.

  11. A toxin-mediated size-structured population model: Finite difference approximation and well-posedness.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qihua; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The question of the effects of environmental toxins on ecological communities is of great interest from both environmental and conservational points of view. Mathematical models have been applied increasingly to predict the effects of toxins on a variety of ecological processes. Motivated by the fact that individuals with different sizes may have different sensitivities to toxins, we develop a toxin-mediated size-structured model which is given by a system of first order fully nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). It is very possible that this work represents the first derivation of a PDE model in the area of ecotoxicology. To solve the model, an explicit finite difference approximation to this PDE system is developed. Existence-uniqueness of the weak solution to the model is established and convergence of the finite difference approximation to this unique solution is proved. Numerical examples are provided by numerically solving the PDE model using the finite difference scheme.

  12. Optimization of finite difference forward modeling for elastic waves based on optimum combined window functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Wang; Xiaohong, Meng; Hong, Liu; Wanqiu, Zheng; Yaning, Liu; Sheng, Gui; Zhiyang, Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full waveform inversion and reverse time migration are active research areas for seismic exploration. Forward modeling in the time domain determines the precision of the results, and numerical solutions of finite difference have been widely adopted as an important mathematical tool for forward modeling. In this article, the optimum combined of window functions was designed based on the finite difference operator using a truncated approximation of the spatial convolution series in pseudo-spectrum space, to normalize the outcomes of existing window functions for different orders. The proposed combined window functions not only inherit the characteristics of the various window functions, to provide better truncation results, but also control the truncation error of the finite difference operator manually and visually by adjusting the combinations and analyzing the characteristics of the main and side lobes of the amplitude response. Error level and elastic forward modeling under the proposed combined system were compared with outcomes from conventional window functions and modified binomial windows. Numerical dispersion is significantly suppressed, which is compared with modified binomial window function finite-difference and conventional finite-difference. Numerical simulation verifies the reliability of the proposed method.

  13. Improved lattice Boltzmann model for multi-component diffusion flow with large pressure difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Min; Wang, An-Lin; Qiu, Ruo-Fan; Jiang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model has been widely used to solve multi-phase and multi-component flow problems. However, original pseudopotential model cannot be used in simulating diffusion flow with large pressure difference because of its limitation. In this paper, we incorporate pseudopotential model with a new form of effective mass to solve this problem based on the relationship between pressure difference and effective mass. The improved model is verified through Laplace’s law and binary immiscible Poiseuille flow. By simulating pipeline binary diffusion flow and two-inlet binary cavity jet flow, we show that the improved model can achieve larger pressure difference than pseudopotential model with traditional effective mass forms.

  14. SOME NEW FINITE DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR HELMHOLTZ EQUATIONS ON IRREGULAR DOMAINS OR WITH INTERFACES.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaohai; Li, Zhilin

    2012-06-01

    Solving a Helmholtz equation Δu + λu = f efficiently is a challenge for many applications. For example, the core part of many efficient solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is to solve one or several Helmholtz equations. In this paper, two new finite difference methods are proposed for solving Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, or with interfaces. For Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, the accuracy of the numerical solution obtained using the existing augmented immersed interface method (AIIM) may deteriorate when the magnitude of λ is large. In our new method, we use a level set function to extend the source term and the PDE to a larger domain before we apply the AIIM. For Helmholtz equations with interfaces, a new maximum principle preserving finite difference method is developed. The new method still uses the standard five-point stencil with modifications of the finite difference scheme at irregular grid points. The resulting coefficient matrix of the linear system of finite difference equations satisfies the sign property of the discrete maximum principle and can be solved efficiently using a multigrid solver. The finite difference method is also extended to handle temporal discretized equations where the solution coefficient λ is inversely proportional to the mesh size.

  15. Improving sub-grid scale accuracy of boundary features in regional finite-difference models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    As an alternative to grid refinement, the concept of a ghost node, which was developed for nested grid applications, has been extended towards improving sub-grid scale accuracy of flow to conduits, wells, rivers or other boundary features that interact with a finite-difference groundwater flow model. The formulation is presented for correcting the regular finite-difference groundwater flow equations for confined and unconfined cases, with or without Newton Raphson linearization of the nonlinearities, to include the Ghost Node Correction (GNC) for location displacement. The correction may be applied on the right-hand side vector for a symmetric finite-difference Picard implementation, or on the left-hand side matrix for an implicit but asymmetric implementation. The finite-difference matrix connectivity structure may be maintained for an implicit implementation by only selecting contributing nodes that are a part of the finite-difference connectivity. Proof of concept example problems are provided to demonstrate the improved accuracy that may be achieved through sub-grid scale corrections using the GNC schemes.

  16. Improving sub-grid scale accuracy of boundary features in regional finite-difference models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Sorab; Langevin, Christian D.

    2012-06-01

    As an alternative to grid refinement, the concept of a ghost node, which was developed for nested grid applications, has been extended towards improving sub-grid scale accuracy of flow to conduits, wells, rivers or other boundary features that interact with a finite-difference groundwater flow model. The formulation is presented for correcting the regular finite-difference groundwater flow equations for confined and unconfined cases, with or without Newton Raphson linearization of the nonlinearities, to include the Ghost Node Correction (GNC) for location displacement. The correction may be applied on the right-hand side vector for a symmetric finite-difference Picard implementation, or on the left-hand side matrix for an implicit but asymmetric implementation. The finite-difference matrix connectivity structure may be maintained for an implicit implementation by only selecting contributing nodes that are a part of the finite-difference connectivity. Proof of concept example problems are provided to demonstrate the improved accuracy that may be achieved through sub-grid scale corrections using the GNC schemes.

  17. SOME NEW FINITE DIFFERENCE METHODS FOR HELMHOLTZ EQUATIONS ON IRREGULAR DOMAINS OR WITH INTERFACES

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaohai; Li, Zhilin

    2012-01-01

    Solving a Helmholtz equation Δu + λu = f efficiently is a challenge for many applications. For example, the core part of many efficient solvers for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is to solve one or several Helmholtz equations. In this paper, two new finite difference methods are proposed for solving Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, or with interfaces. For Helmholtz equations on irregular domains, the accuracy of the numerical solution obtained using the existing augmented immersed interface method (AIIM) may deteriorate when the magnitude of λ is large. In our new method, we use a level set function to extend the source term and the PDE to a larger domain before we apply the AIIM. For Helmholtz equations with interfaces, a new maximum principle preserving finite difference method is developed. The new method still uses the standard five-point stencil with modifications of the finite difference scheme at irregular grid points. The resulting coefficient matrix of the linear system of finite difference equations satisfies the sign property of the discrete maximum principle and can be solved efficiently using a multigrid solver. The finite difference method is also extended to handle temporal discretized equations where the solution coefficient λ is inversely proportional to the mesh size. PMID:22701346

  18. Performance prediction of finite-difference solvers for different computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louboutin, Mathias; Lange, Michael; Herrmann, Felix J.; Kukreja, Navjot; Gorman, Gerard

    2017-08-01

    The life-cycle of a partial differential equation (PDE) solver is often characterized by three development phases: the development of a stable numerical discretization; development of a correct (verified) implementation; and the optimization of the implementation for different computer architectures. Often it is only after significant time and effort has been invested that the performance bottlenecks of a PDE solver are fully understood, and the precise details varies between different computer architectures. One way to mitigate this issue is to establish a reliable performance model that allows a numerical analyst to make reliable predictions of how well a numerical method would perform on a given computer architecture, before embarking upon potentially long and expensive implementation and optimization phases. The availability of a reliable performance model also saves developer effort as it both informs the developer on what kind of optimisations are beneficial, and when the maximum expected performance has been reached and optimisation work should stop. We show how discretization of a wave-equation can be theoretically studied to understand the performance limitations of the method on modern computer architectures. We focus on the roofline model, now broadly used in the high-performance computing community, which considers the achievable performance in terms of the peak memory bandwidth and peak floating point performance of a computer with respect to algorithmic choices. A first principles analysis of operational intensity for key time-stepping finite-difference algorithms is presented. With this information available at the time of algorithm design, the expected performance on target computer systems can be used as a driver for algorithm design.

  19. Strong scintillations in astrophysics. 4. Cross-correlation between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The cross correlation of the intensity fluctuations between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects on the intensity correlations based on the Markov approximation were calculated. Results may be applied to quite general turbulence spectra for an extended turbulent medium. Calculations of the cross-correlation function and of finite bandwidth effects are explicitly carried out for both Gaussian and Kolmogorov turbulence spectra. The increases of the correlation scale of intensity fluctuations are different for these two spectra and the difference can be used to determine whether the interstellar turbulent medium has a Gaussian or a Kolmogorov spectrum.

  20. Radiation boundary condition and anisotropy correction for finite difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Webb, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper finite-difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation in an open domain are considered. By using a second-order central difference scheme and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition, reasonably accurate solutions can be obtained when the number of grid points per acoustic wavelength used is large. However, when a smaller number of grid points per wavelength is used excessive reflections occur which tend to overwhelm the computed solutions. Excessive reflections are due to the incompability between the governing finite difference equation and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition. The Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition was developed from the asymptotic solution of the partial differential equation. To obtain compatibility, the radiation boundary condition should be constructed from the asymptotic solution of the finite difference equation instead. Examples are provided using the improved radiation boundary condition based on the asymptotic solution of the governing finite difference equation. The computed results are free of reflections even when only five grid points per wavelength are used. The improved radiation boundary condition has also been tested for problems with complex acoustic sources and sources embedded in a uniform mean flow. The present method of developing a radiation boundary condition is also applicable to higher order finite difference schemes. In all these cases no reflected waves could be detected. The use of finite difference approximation inevita bly introduces anisotropy into the governing field equation. The effect of anisotropy is to distort the directional distribution of the amplitude and phase of the computed solution. It can be quite large when the number of grid points per wavelength used in the computation is small. A way to correct this effect is proposed. The correction factor developed from the asymptotic solutions is source independent and, hence, can be determined once and for all. The

  1. Radiation boundary condition and anisotropy correction for finite difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Webb, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper finite-difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation in an open domain are considered. By using a second-order central difference scheme and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition, reasonably accurate solutions can be obtained when the number of grid points per acoustic wavelength used is large. However, when a smaller number of grid points per wavelength is used excessive reflections occur which tend to overwhelm the computed solutions. Excessive reflections are due to the incompability between the governing finite difference equation and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition. The Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition was developed from the asymptotic solution of the partial differential equation. To obtain compatibility, the radiation boundary condition should be constructed from the asymptotic solution of the finite difference equation instead. Examples are provided using the improved radiation boundary condition based on the asymptotic solution of the governing finite difference equation. The computed results are free of reflections even when only five grid points per wavelength are used. The improved radiation boundary condition has also been tested for problems with complex acoustic sources and sources embedded in a uniform mean flow. The present method of developing a radiation boundary condition is also applicable to higher order finite difference schemes. In all these cases no reflected waves could be detected. The use of finite difference approximation inevita bly introduces anisotropy into the governing field equation. The effect of anisotropy is to distort the directional distribution of the amplitude and phase of the computed solution. It can be quite large when the number of grid points per wavelength used in the computation is small. A way to correct this effect is proposed. The correction factor developed from the asymptotic solutions is source independent and, hence, can be determined once and for all. The

  2. A composite Chebyshev finite difference method for nonlinear optimal control problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzban, H. R.; Hoseini, S. M.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a composite Chebyshev finite difference method is introduced and is successfully employed for solving nonlinear optimal control problems. The proposed method is an extension of the Chebyshev finite difference scheme. This method can be regarded as a non-uniform finite difference scheme and is based on a hybrid of block-pulse functions and Chebyshev polynomials using the well-known Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto points. The convergence of the method is established. The nice properties of hybrid functions are then used to convert the nonlinear optimal control problem into a nonlinear mathematical programming one that can be solved efficiently by a globally convergent algorithm. The validity and applicability of the proposed method are demonstrated through some numerical examples. The method is simple, easy to implement and yields very accurate results.

  3. Explicit finite-difference time domain for nonlinear analysis of waveguide modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, N. M.; Shabat, M. M.; El-Azab, S.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2003-07-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain Technique is at present the most widely used tool employed in the study of light propagation in various photonic waveguide structure. In this paper we derived an explicit finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for solving the wave equation in a four optical waveguiding rectangular structure. We derive the stability condition to achieve the stability in nonlinear media region, we also check that the wave equation used is consistence and convergent with the approximate finite difference equation. Our method is tested against some previous problems and we find a high degree of accuracy, moreover it is easy for programming. Numerical results are illustrated for a rectangular waveguide with four layers, where one of these layers is a nonlinear medium.

  4. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  5. Propagation of 3-D Beams Using a Finite-Difference Algorithm: Practical Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-22

    difference optical propagation, including non-paraxial methods, was reviewed and augmented by Bekker .2 2. FINITE DIFFERENCE APPROXIMATION TO THE...unstable resonator calculations with laser medium,” Applied Optics 13(11), 2546–2561 (1974). [2] Bekker , E. V., et al., “Wide-angle alternating-direction

  6. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  7. Fast solvers for finite difference approximations for the Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors consider several methods for solving the linear equations arising from finite difference discretizations of the Stokes equations. The pressure equation method presented here for the first time, apparently, and the method, presented by Bramble and Pasciak, are shown to have computational effort that grows slowly with the number of grid points. The methods work with second-order accurate discretizations. Computational results are shown for both the Stokes and incompressible Navier-Stokes at low Reynolds number. The inf-sup conditions resulting from three finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations are proven. These conditions are used to prove that the Schur complement Q[sub h] of the linear system generated by each of these approximations is bounded uniformly away from zero. For the pressure equation method, this guarantees that the conjugate gradient method applied to Q[sub h] converges in a finite number of iterations which is independent of mesh size. The fact that Q[sub h] is bounded below is used to prove convergence estimates for the solutions generated by these finite difference approximations. One of the estimates is for a staggered grid and the estimate of the scheme shows that both the pressure and the velocity parts of the solution are second-order accurate. Iterative methods are compared by the use of the regularized central differencing introduced by Strikwerda. Several finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations by the SOR method are compared and the excellence of the approximations by the regularized central differencing over the other finite difference approximation is mentioned. This difference gives rise to a linear equation with a matrix which is slightly non-symmetric. The convergence of the typical steepest descent method and conjugate gradient method, which is almost as same as the typical conjugate gradient method, applied to slightly non-symmetric positive definite matrices are proven.

  8. QUARKONIUM AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    UMEDA, T.

    2006-06-09

    Lattice QCD studies on charmonium at finite temperature are presented After a discussion about problems for the Maximum Entropy Method applied to finite temperature lattice QCD, I show several results on charmonium spectral functions. The 'wave function' of charmonium is also discussed to study the spatial correlation between quark and anti-quark in deconfinement phase.

  9. Bubble Dynamics Calculations Using the DYSMAS/E Finite Difference Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    NSWC TR 88-226 AD-A241 549 BUBBLE DYNAMICS CALCULATIONS USING THE DYSMAS/E FINITE DIFFERENCE CODE BY STEPHEN A. WILKERSON (NSWC) DR. HANS SCHITrKE...62314N RJ I4W27 1t. TITLE (include Securfry CJalssticdtti) Bubble Dynamics Calculations Using the l)YSMAS/E Finite D~ifference Code 12, PERSONAL AUTHOR...FIELD GROUP SUB. GR. bubble divnamics DN’SNAS/E, code 19 09 bubble collapse detonation 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on rovotse if noceisary and idenrty by block

  10. Locally conformal finite-difference time-domain techniques for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Miller, C. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Price, D. W.; Martin, P. N.; Short, D. J.; Jones, A. W. P.; Threadgold, J. R.

    2011-02-01

    The Dey-Mittra [S. Dey, R. Mitra, A locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for modeling three-dimensional perfectly conducting objects, IEEE Microwave Guided Wave Lett. 7 (273) 1997] finite-difference time-domain partial cell method enables the modeling of irregularly shaped conducting surfaces while retaining second-order accuracy. We present an algorithm to extend this method to include charged particle emission and absorption in particle-in-cell codes. Several examples are presented that illustrate the possible improvements that can be realized using the new algorithm for problems relevant to plasma simulation.

  11. Wideband finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions for good conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.; Yee, Kane S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are used to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be used to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media, throughout the solution volume. A one dimensional implementation is presented for a surface impedance boundary condition for good conductors in the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique. In order to illustrate the FDTD surface impedance boundary condition, a planar air-lossy dielectric interface is considered.

  12. The finite-difference matrix for beam propagation: eigenvalues and eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, Alan H.

    2016-03-01

    The partial differential equation for the three dimensional propagation of a light beam may be solved numerically by applying finite-difference techniques. We consider the matrix equation for the finite-difference, alternating direction implicit (ADI), numerical solution of the paraxial wave equation for the free-space propagation of light beams. The matrix is tridiagonal. It is also a Toeplitz matrix; Each diagonal descending from left to right is constant. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are known for such matrices. The equation can be solved by making use of the orthogonality property of the eigenvectors.

  13. Numerical solution of a diffusion problem by exponentially fitted finite difference methods.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele; Paternoster, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    This paper is focused on the accurate and efficient solution of partial differential differential equations modelling a diffusion problem by means of exponentially fitted finite difference numerical methods. After constructing and analysing special purpose finite differences for the approximation of second order partial derivatives, we employed them in the numerical solution of a diffusion equation with mixed boundary conditions. Numerical experiments reveal that a special purpose integration, both in space and in time, is more accurate and efficient than that gained by employing a general purpose solver.

  14. A transfer-matrix study of directed lattice animals and directed percolation on a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, Dragica; Knežević, Milan

    2016-03-01

    We studied the large-scale properties of directed lattice animals and directed percolation on a square lattice. Using a transfer-matrix approach on strips of finite widths, we generated relatively long sequences of estimates for effective values of critical fugacity, percolation threshold and correlation length critical exponents. We applied two different extrapolation methods to obtain estimates for infinite systems. The precision of our final estimates is comparable to (or better than) the precision of the best currently available results.

  15. Propagation Characteristics of Rectangular Waveguides at Terahertz Frequencies with Finite-Difference Frequency-Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Binke; Zhao, Chongfeng

    2014-01-01

    The 2-D finite-difference frequency-domain method (FDFD) combined with the surface impedance boundary condition (SIBC) was employed to analyze the propagation characteristics of hollow rectangular waveguides at Terahertz (THz) frequencies. The electromagnetic field components, in the interior of the waveguide, were discretized using central finite-difference schemes. Considering the hollow rectangular waveguide surrounded by a medium of finite conductivity, the electric and magnetic tangential field components on the metal surface were related by the SIBC. The surface impedance was calculated by the Drude dispersion model at THz frequencies, which was used to characterize the conductivity of the metal. By solving the Eigen equations, the propagation constants, including the attenuation constant and the phase constant, were obtained for a given frequency. The proposed method shows good applicability for full-wave analysis of THz waveguides with complex boundaries.

  16. K(L) - K(S) mass difference from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Bai, Z; Christ, N H; Izubuchi, T; Sachrajda, C T; Soni, A; Yu, J

    2014-09-12

    We report on the first complete calculation of the K_{L}-K_{S} mass difference, ΔM_{K}, using lattice QCD. The calculation is performed on a 2+1 flavor, domain wall fermion ensemble with a 330 MeV pion mass and a 575 MeV kaon mass. We use a quenched charm quark with a 949 MeV mass to implement Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani cancellation. For these heavier-than-physical particle masses, we obtain ΔM_{K}=3.19(41)(96)×10^{-12}  MeV, quite similar to the experimental value. Here the first error is statistical, and the second is an estimate of the systematic discretization error. An interesting aspect of this calculation is the importance of the disconnected diagrams, a dramatic failure of the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule.

  17. Effect of optimal estimation of flux difference information on the lattice traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-hong; Li, Chun-gui; Tang, Xin-lai; Tian, Chuan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a new lattice model is proposed by considering the optimal estimation of flux difference information. The effect of this new consideration upon the stability of traffic flow is examined through linear stability analysis. Furthermore, a modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation near the critical point is constructed and solved by means of nonlinear analysis method, and thus the propagation behavior of traffic jam can be described by the kink-antikink soliton solution of the mKdV equation. Numerical simulation is carried out under periodical condition with results in good agreement with theoretical analysis, therefore, it is verified that the new consideration can enhance the stability of traffic systems and suppress the emergence of traffic jams effectively.

  18. Solving parabolic and hyperbolic equations by the generalized finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, J. J.; Urena, F.; Gavete, L.

    2007-12-01

    Classical finite difference schemes are in wide use today for approximately solving partial differential equations of mathematical physics. An evolution of the method of finite differences has been the development of generalized finite difference (GFD) method, that can be applied to irregular grids of points. In this paper the extension of the GFD to the explicit solution of parabolic and hyperbolic equations has been developed for partial differential equations with constant coefficients in the cases of considering one, two or three space dimensions. The convergence of the method has been studied and the truncation errors over irregular grids are given. Different examples have been solved using the explicit finite difference formulae and the criterion of stability. This has been expressed in function of the coefficients of the star equation for irregular clouds of nodes in one, two or three space dimensions. The numerical results show the accuracy obtained over irregular grids. This paper also includes the study of the maximum local error and the global error for different examples of parabolic and hyperbolic time-dependent equations.

  19. An efficient finite differences method for the computation of compressible, subsonic, unsteady flows past airfoils and panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colera, Manuel; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2017-09-01

    A finite differences scheme is proposed in this work to compute in the time domain the compressible, subsonic, unsteady flow past an aerodynamic airfoil using the linearized potential theory. It improves and extends the original method proposed in this journal by Hariharan, Ping and Scott [1] by considering: (i) a non-uniform mesh, (ii) an implicit time integration algorithm, (iii) a vectorized implementation and (iv) the coupled airfoil dynamics and fluid dynamic loads. First, we have formulated the method for cases in which the airfoil motion is given. The scheme has been tested on well known problems in unsteady aerodynamics -such as the response to a sudden change of the angle of attack and to a harmonic motion of the airfoil- and has been proved to be more accurate and efficient than other finite differences and vortex-lattice methods found in the literature. Secondly, we have coupled our method to the equations governing the airfoil dynamics in order to numerically solve problems where the airfoil motion is unknown a priori as happens, for example, in the cases of the flutter and the divergence of a typical section of a wing or of a flexible panel. Apparently, this is the first self-consistent and easy-to-implement numerical analysis in the time domain of the compressible, linearized coupled dynamics of the (generally flexible) airfoil-fluid system carried out in the literature. The results for the particular case of a rigid airfoil show excellent agreement with those reported by other authors, whereas those obtained for the case of a cantilevered flexible airfoil in compressible flow seem to be original or, at least, not well-known.

  20. A guide to differences between stochastic point-source and stochastic finite-fault simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, G.M.; Assatourians, K.; Boore, D.M.; Campbell, K.; Motazedian, D.

    2009-01-01

    Why do stochastic point-source and finite-fault simulation models not agree on the predicted ground motions for moderate earthquakes at large distances? This question was posed by Ken Campbell, who attempted to reproduce the Atkinson and Boore (2006) ground-motion prediction equations for eastern North America using the stochastic point-source program SMSIM (Boore, 2005) in place of the finite-source stochastic program EXSIM (Motazedian and Atkinson, 2005) that was used by Atkinson and Boore (2006) in their model. His comparisons suggested that a higher stress drop is needed in the context of SMSIM to produce an average match, at larger distances, with the model predictions of Atkinson and Boore (2006) based on EXSIM; this is so even for moderate magnitudes, which should be well-represented by a point-source model. Why? The answer to this question is rooted in significant differences between point-source and finite-source stochastic simulation methodologies, specifically as implemented in SMSIM (Boore, 2005) and EXSIM (Motazedian and Atkinson, 2005) to date. Point-source and finite-fault methodologies differ in general in several important ways: (1) the geometry of the source; (2) the definition and application of duration; and (3) the normalization of finite-source subsource summations. Furthermore, the specific implementation of the methods may differ in their details. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of these differences, their origins, and implications. This sets the stage for a more detailed companion article, "Comparing Stochastic Point-Source and Finite-Source Ground-Motion Simulations: SMSIM and EXSIM," in which Boore (2009) provides modifications and improvements in the implementations of both programs that narrow the gap and result in closer agreement. These issues are important because both SMSIM and EXSIM have been widely used in the development of ground-motion prediction equations and in modeling the parameters that control

  1. Polarized IR spectra of the hydrogen bond in two different oxindole polymorphs with cyclic dimers in their lattices.

    PubMed

    Flakus, Henryk T; Hachuła, Barbara

    2011-11-10

    This article focuses on the problem of remarkably strong changes in the fine structure patterns of the ν(N-H) and ν(N-D) bands attributed to the hydrogen and deuterium bonds accompanying the phase transition, which occurs between two polymorphic forms of oxindole. The lattices of these two different crystals contain hydrogen-bonded cyclic dimers differ in their geometry parameters. The source of these differences in the polymorph spectral properties results from the geometry relations concerning the dimers constituting the lattice structural units. In the case of the "alpha" phase, the hydrogen bond lengths of the dimers differ by 0.18 Å. This leads to the "off-resonance exciton coupling" weakly involving the dimer hydrogen bonds. For the "beta" phase, with practically symmetric dimers in the lattice, the spectra become typical for centrosymmetric hydrogen bond systems due to the full resonance of the proton or deuteron vibrations.

  2. Finite difference methods for transient signal propagation in stratified dispersive media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Explicit difference equations are presented for the solution of a signal of arbitrary waveform propagating in an ohmic dielectric, a cold plasma, a Debye model dielectric, and a Lorentz model dielectric. These difference equations are derived from the governing time-dependent integro-differential equations for the electric fields by a finite difference method. A special difference equation is derived for the grid point at the boundary of two different media. Employing this difference equation, transient signal propagation in an inhomogeneous media can be solved provided that the medium is approximated in a step-wise fashion. The solutions are generated simply by marching on in time. It is concluded that while the classical transform methods will remain useful in certain cases, with the development of the finite difference methods described, an extensive class of problems of transient signal propagating in stratified dispersive media can be effectively solved by numerical methods.

  3. Determine the Dispersion Relation of an A6 Magnetron Using Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Nieter, C.; Stoltz, P. H.; Smithe, D. N.

    2009-05-01

    This work introduces a conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) method to accurately determine the dispersion relation of an A6 relativistic magnetron. The accuracy is measured by comparing with accurate SUPERFISH calculations based on finite element method. The results show that an accuracy of 99.4% can be achieved by using only 10,000 mesh points with Dey-Mittra algorithm. By comparison, a mesh number of 360,000 is needed to preserve 99% accuracy using conventional FDTD method. This suggests one can efficiently and accurately study the hot tests of microwave tubes using CFDTD particle-in-cell method instead of conventional FDTD one.

  4. Influence of exit impedance on finite difference solutions of transient acoustic mode propagation in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cutoff mode instability problem associated with a transient finite difference solution to the wave equation is explained. The steady-state impedance boundary condition is found to produce acoustic reflections during the initial transient, which cause finite instabilities in the cutoff modes. The stability problem is resolved by extending the duct length to prevent transient reflections. Numerical calculations are presented at forcing frequencies above, below, and nearly at the cutoff frequency, and exit impedance models are presented for use in the practical design of turbofan inlets.

  5. Rupture Dynamics Simulation for Non-Planar fault by a Curved Grid Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhu, G.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We first implement the non-staggered finite difference method to solve the dynamic rupture problem, with split-node, for non-planar fault. Split-node method for dynamic simulation has been used widely, because of that it's more precise to represent the fault plane than other methods, for example, thick fault, stress glut and so on. The finite difference method is also a popular numeric method to solve kinematic and dynamic problem in seismology. However, previous works focus most of theirs eyes on the staggered-grid method, because of its simplicity and computational efficiency. However this method has its own disadvantage comparing to non-staggered finite difference method at some fact for example describing the boundary condition, especially the irregular boundary, or non-planar fault. Zhang and Chen (2006) proposed the MacCormack high order non-staggered finite difference method based on curved grids to precisely solve irregular boundary problem. Based upon on this non-staggered grid method, we make success of simulating the spontaneous rupture problem. The fault plane is a kind of boundary condition, which could be irregular of course. So it's convinced that we could simulate rupture process in the case of any kind of bending fault plane. We will prove this method is valid in the case of Cartesian coordinate first. In the case of bending fault, the curvilinear grids will be used.

  6. Construction of finite difference schemes having special properties for ordinary and partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Work on the construction of finite difference models of differential equations having zero truncation errors is summarized. Both linear and nonlinear unidirectional wave equations are discussed. Results regarding the construction of zero truncation error schemes for the full wave equation and Burger's equation are also briefly reported.

  7. Implementing measured source signatures in a coarse-grid, finite-difference modeling scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Landroe, M.; Mittet, R.; Sollie, R. . Sintef Group)

    1993-12-01

    In a marine seismic air-gun array, each gun location does not necessarily coincide with a node in a finite-difference grid. Especially for coarse-grid, finite-difference modeling, this problem must be handled with care since there might be up to three or four air guns between adjacent grid points. The real sources are represented by fictitious monopole- and dipole source functions located at grid nodes. The effective sources are estimated from the extrapolated pressure field at a horizontal surface located below the sources. The authors find that an array consisting of eight guns separated by a distance of 3 m and located at 7.5 m depth can be approximated by six monopole- and dipole source functions distributed on a finite-difference grid with 10 m spatial sampling. The residual error energy norm between the actual wavefield and the corresponding finite-difference wavefield observed on a fictitious streamer placed at 95 m depth is less than 0.5 percent.

  8. High Order Finite Difference Methods, Multidimensional Linear Problems and Curvilinear Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordstrom, Jan; Carpenter, Mark H.

    1999-01-01

    Boundary and interface conditions are derived for high order finite difference methods applied to multidimensional linear problems in curvilinear coordinates. The boundary and interface conditions lead to conservative schemes and strict and strong stability provided that certain metric conditions are met.

  9. Positivity-preserving High Order Finite Difference WENO Schemes for Compressible Euler Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-15

    schemes are preferred, for example, cosmological simulation [5], finite difference WENO scheme [10] is more favored than DG schemes [2, 3] and the...densities, Journal of Computational Physics, 92 (1991), 273-295. [5] L.-L. Feng, C.-W. Shu and M. Zhang, A hybrid cosmological hydrodynamic/N-body code

  10. Parallel electromagnetic simulator based on the Finite-Difference Time Domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walendziuk, Wojciech

    2006-03-01

    In the following paper the parallel tool for electromagnetic field distribution analysis is presented. The main simulation programme is based on the parallel algorithm of the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method and use Message Passing Interface as a communication library. In the paper also ways of communications among computation nodes in a parallel environment and efficiency of the parallel algorithm are presented.

  11. Streamline-coordinate finite-difference method for hot metal deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.G. ); Kuwahara, K. ); Richmond, O. )

    1993-09-01

    The hot metal deformation in the rolling process is a typical example of near-steady, quasi two-dimensional non-Newtonian flows. An isotropic work-hardening model characterized by a dislocation energy-density is presented and analyzed the streamline-coordinate finite-difference method. 21 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Optimized compact-difference-based finite-volume schemes for linear wave phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitonde, D.; Shang, J.S.

    1997-12-01

    This paper discusses a numerical method to analyze linear wave propagation phenomena with emphasis on electromagnetic in the time-domain. The numerical methods is based on a compact-difference-based finite-volume method at higher-orders. This scheme is evaluated using a classical fourth-order Runge-Kutta technique.

  13. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromagnetic properties of the model are symmetric with respect ...

  14. The role of finite-difference methods in design and analysis for supersonic cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Finite-difference methods for analysis of steady, inviscid supersonic flows are described, and their present state of development is assessed with particular attention to their applicability to vehicles designed for efficient cruise flight. Current work is described which will allow greater geometric latitude, improve treatment of embedded shock waves, and relax the requirement that the axial velocity must be supersonic.

  15. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromagnetic properties of the model are symmetric with respect ...

  16. Finite difference micromagnetic simulation with self-consistent currents and smooth surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C; Gibbons, M R; Hewett, D W; Parker, G

    1999-05-27

    A micromagnetic algorithm has been developed using the finite difference method (FDM). Elliptic field equations are solved on the mesh using the efficient Dynamic Alternating Direction Implicit method. Smooth surfaces have been included in the FDM formulation so structures of irregular shape can be modeled. The current distribution and temperature of devices are also calculated. Keywords: Micromagnetic simulation, Magnetic dots, Read heads, Thermal Effects

  17. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromag-netic properties of the model are symmetric with respect...

  18. A FINITE-DIFFERENCE, DISCRETE-WAVENUMBER METHOD FOR CALCULATING RADAR TRACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid of the finite-difference method and the discrete-wavenumber method is developed to calculate radar traces. The method is based on a three-dimensional model defined in the Cartesian coordinate system; the electromag-netic properties of the model are symmetric with respect...

  19. Optimal convergence rate of the explicit finite difference scheme for American option valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bei; Liang, Jin; Jiang, Lishang

    2009-08-01

    An optimal convergence rate O([Delta]x) for an explicit finite difference scheme for a variational inequality problem is obtained under the stability condition using completely PDE methods. As a corollary, a binomial tree scheme of an American put option (where ) is convergent unconditionally with the rate O(([Delta]t)1/2).

  20. Finite-difference, spectral and Galerkin methods for time-dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadmor, E.

    1983-01-01

    Finite difference, spectral and Galerkin methods for the approximate solution of time dependent problems are surveyed. A unified discussion on their accuracy, stability and convergence is given. In particular, the dilemma of high accuracy versus stability is studied in some detail.

  1. An Eigenvalue Analysis of finite-difference approximations for hyperbolic IBVPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, Robert F.; Beam, Richard M.

    1989-01-01

    The eigenvalue spectrum associated with a linear finite-difference approximation plays a crucial role in the stability analysis and in the actual computational performance of the discrete approximation. The eigenvalue spectrum associated with the Lax-Wendroff scheme applied to a model hyperbolic equation was investigated. For an initial-boundary-value problem (IBVP) on a finite domain, the eigenvalue or normal mode analysis is analytically intractable. A study of auxiliary problems (Dirichlet and quarter-plane) leads to asymptotic estimates of the eigenvalue spectrum and to an identification of individual modes as either benign or unstable. The asymptotic analysis establishes an intuitive as well as quantitative connection between the algebraic tests in the theory of Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sundstrom and Lax-Richtmyer L(sub 2) stability on a finite domain.

  2. Spatial Parallelism of a 3D Finite Difference, Velocity-Stress Elastic Wave Propagation Code

    SciTech Connect

    MINKOFF,SUSAN E.

    1999-12-09

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately. finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. We model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MP1 library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speed up. Because i/o is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) we have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle i/o. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ''ghost cells''. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, we observe excellent scaled speed up. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, we achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  3. Dynamic Buckling of Elastic Bar under Axial Impact Based on Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Yang, Qiang; Han, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Guo-Yun

    2016-05-01

    Considering first order shear deformation theory, the dynamic buckling governing equations of elastic bar with initial imperfections, transverse inertia and axial inertia are derived by Hamilton principle. The equations are converted into the form of non-dimension. Based on the finite difference method, the equations are solved approximately. The buckling mode of elastic bar under different axial impact velocities has been obtained. The influence of different axial impact velocity on the dynamic buckling of elastic bar is discussed.

  4. A nine-point finite difference scheme for one-dimensional wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyszka, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    The paper is devoted to an implicit finite difference method (FDM) for solving initial-boundary value problems (IBVP) for one-dimensional wave equation. The second-order derivatives in the wave equation have been approximated at the four intermediate points, as a consequence, an implicit nine-point difference scheme has been obtained. Von Neumann stability analysis has been conducted and we have demonstrated, that the presented difference scheme is unconditionally stable.

  5. Estimation of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of soft tissue from indentation using two different-sized indentors: finite element analysis of the finite deformation effect.

    PubMed

    Choi, A P C; Zheng, Y P

    2005-03-01

    Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of a tissue can be simultaneously obtained using two indentation tests with two different sized indentors in two indentations. Owing to the assumption of infinitesimal deformation of the indentation, the finite deformation effect of indentation on the calculated material parameters was not fully understood in the double indentation approach. However, indentation tests with infinitesimal deformation are not practical for the measurement of real tissues. Accordingly, finite element models were developed to simulate the indentation with different indentor diameters and different deformation ratios to investigate the finite deformation effect of indentation. The results indicated that Young's modulus E increased with the increase in the indentation deformation w, if the finite deformation effect of indentation was not considered. This phenomenon became obvious when Poisson's ratio v approached 0.5 and/or the ratio of indentor radius and tissue thickness a/h increased. The calculated Young's modulus could be different by 23% at 10% deformation in comparison with its real value. The results also demonstrated that the finite deformation effect to indentation on the calculation of Poisson's ratio v was much smaller. After the finite deformation effect of indentation was considered, the error of the calculated Young's modulus could be controlled within 5% (a/h = 1) and 2% (a/h = 2) for deformation up to 10%.

  6. Application of 'steady' state finite element and transient finite difference theory to sound propagation in a variable duct - A comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.; White, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data are presented for sound propagation in a simulated infinite hard wall duct with a large change in duct cross sectional area. The data are conveniently tabulated for further use. The 'steady' state finite element theory of Astley and Eversman (1981) and the transient finite difference theory of White (1981) are in good agreement with the data for both the axial and transverse pressure profiles and the axial phase angle. Therefore, numerical finite difference and finite element theories appear to be ideally suited for handling duct propagation problems which encounter large axial gradients in acoustic parameters. The measured energy reflection coefficient agrees with the values from the Astley-Eversman modal coupling model.

  7. An improved finite-difference analysis of uncoupled vibrations of tapered cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure for determining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of tapered cantilever beams undergoing uncoupled vibrations is presented. Boundary conditions are derived in the form of simple recursive relations involving the second order central differences. Results obtained by using the conventional first order central differences and the present second order central differences are compared, and it is observed that the present second order scheme is more efficient than the conventional approach. An important advantage offered by the present approach is that the results converge to exact values rapidly, and thus the extrapolation of the results is not necessary. Consequently, the basic handicap with the classical finite difference method of solution that requires the Richardson's extrapolation procedure is eliminated. Furthermore, for the cases considered herein, the present approach produces consistent lower bound solutions.

  8. Modeling anisotropic flow and heat transport by using mimetic finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tao; Clauser, Christoph; Marquart, Gabriele; Willbrand, Karen; Büsing, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    Modeling anisotropic flow in porous or fractured rock often assumes that the permeability tensor is diagonal, which means that its principle directions are always aligned with the coordinate axes. However, the permeability of a heterogeneous anisotropic medium usually is a full tensor. For overcoming this shortcoming, we use the mimetic finite difference method (mFD) for discretizing the flow equation in a hydrothermal reservoir simulation code, SHEMAT-Suite, which couples this equation with the heat transport equation. We verify SHEMAT-Suite-mFD against analytical solutions of pumping tests, using both diagonal and full permeability tensors. We compare results from three benchmarks for testing the capability of SHEMAT-Suite-mFD to handle anisotropic flow in porous and fractured media. The benchmarks include coupled flow and heat transport problems, three-dimensional problems and flow through a fractured porous medium with full equivalent permeability tensor. It shows firstly that the mimetic finite difference method can model anisotropic flow both in porous and in fractured media accurately and its results are better than those obtained by the multi-point flux approximation method in highly anisotropic models, secondly that the asymmetric permeability tensor can be included and leads to improved results compared the symmetric permeability tensor in the equivalent fracture models, and thirdly that the method can be easily implemented in existing finite volume or finite difference codes, which has been demonstrated successfully for SHEMAT-Suite.

  9. Broadband ground motion simulation using a paralleled hybrid approach of Frequency Wavenumber and Finite Difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Wei, S.

    2016-12-01

    The serious damage of Mexico City caused by the 1985 Michoacan earthquake 400 km away indicates that urban areas may be affected by remote earthquakes. To asses earthquake risk of urban areas imposed by distant earthquakes, we developed a hybrid Frequency Wavenumber (FK) and Finite Difference (FD) code implemented with MPI, since the computation of seismic wave propagation from a distant earthquake using a single numerical method (e.g. Finite Difference, Finite Element or Spectral Element) is very expensive. In our approach, we compute the incident wave field (ud) at the boundaries of the excitation box, which surrounding the local structure, using a paralleled FK method (Zhu and Rivera, 2002), and compute the total wave field (u) within the excitation box using a parallelled 2D FD method. We apply perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing condition to the diffracted wave field (u-ud). Compared to previous Generalized Ray Theory and Finite Difference (Wen and Helmberger, 1998), Frequency Wavenumber and Spectral Element (Tong et al., 2014), and Direct Solution Method and Spectral Element hybrid method (Monteiller et al., 2013), our absorbing boundary condition dramatically suppress the numerical noise. The MPI implementation of our method can greatly speed up the calculation. Besides, our hybrid method also has a potential use in high resolution array imaging similar to Tong et al. (2014).

  10. A conservative implicit finite difference algorithm for the unsteady transonic full potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Caradonna, F. X.

    1980-01-01

    An implicit finite difference procedure is developed to solve the unsteady full potential equation in conservation law form. Computational efficiency is maintained by use of approximate factorization techniques. The numerical algorithm is first order in time and second order in space. A circulation model and difference equations are developed for lifting airfoils in unsteady flow; however, thin airfoil body boundary conditions have been used with stretching functions to simplify the development of the numerical algorithm.

  11. Finite difference numerical methods for boundary control problems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.; Zheng, Q.; Coleman, M.; Weerakoon, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews convergent finite difference schemes for hyperbolic initial boundary value problems and their applications to boundary control systems of hyperbolic type which arise in the modelling of vibrations. These difference schemes are combined with the primal and the dual approaches to compute the optimal control in the unconstrained case, as well as the case when the control is subject to inequality constraints. Some of the preliminary numerical results are also presented.

  12. An outgoing energy flux boundary condition for finite difference ICRP antenna models

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.

    1992-11-01

    For antennas at the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) modeling in vacuum can now be carried out to a high level of detail such that shaping of the current straps, isolating septa, and discrete Faraday shield structures can be included. An efficient approach would be to solve for the fields in the vacuum region near the antenna in three dimensions by finite methods and to match this solution at the plasma-vacuum interface to a solution obtained in the plasma region in one dimension by Fourier methods. This approach has been difficult to carry out because boundary conditions must be imposed at the edge of the finite difference grid on a point-by-point basis, whereas the condition for outgoing energy flux into the plasma is known only in terms of the Fourier transform of the plasma fields. A technique is presented by which a boundary condition can be imposed on the computational grid of a three-dimensional finite difference, or finite element, code by constraining the discrete Fourier transform of the fields at the boundary points to satisfy an outgoing energy flux condition appropriate for the plasma. The boundary condition at a specific grid point appears as a coupling to other grid points on the boundary, with weighting determined by a kemel calctdated from the plasma surface impedance matrix for the various plasma Fourier modes. This boundary condition has been implemented in a finite difference solution of a simple problem in two dimensions, which can also be solved directly by Fourier transformation. Results are presented, and it is shown that the proposed boundary condition does enforce outgoing energy flux and yields the same solution as is obtained by Fourier methods.

  13. Strong-Isospin Violation in the Neutron-Proton Mass Difference from Fully-Dynamical Lattice QCD and PQQCD

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Konstantinos Orginos; Martin Savage

    2007-04-01

    We determine the strong-isospin violating component of the neutron-proton mass difference from fully-dynamical lattice QCD and partially-quenched QCD calculations of the nucleon mass, constrained by partially-quenched chiral perturbation theory at one-loop level. The lattice calculations were performed with domain-wall valence quarks on MILC lattices with rooted staggered sea-quarks at a lattice spacing of b = 0.125 fm, lattice spatial size of L = 2.5 fm and pion masses ranging from m{sub {pi}} {approx} 290 MeV to {approx} 350 MeV. At the physical value of the pion mass, we predict M{sub n}-M{sub p}|{sup d-u} = 2.26 {+-} 0.57 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.10 MeV where the first error is statistical, the second error is due to the uncertainty in the ratio of light-quark masses, {eta} = m{sub u}/m{sub d}, determined by MILC, and the third error is an estimate of the systematic due to chiral extrapolation.

  14. A finite difference method for predicting supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows with tangential slot injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.; Lewis, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    An implicit finite difference method has been applied to tangential slot injection into supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows. In addition, the effects induced by the interaction between the boundary layer displacement thickness and the external pressure field are considered. In the present method, three different eddy viscosity models have been used to specify the turbulent momentum exchange. One model depends on the species concentration profile and the species conservation equation has been included in the system of governing partial differential equations. Results are compared with experimental data at stream Mach numbers of 2.4 and 6.0 and with results of another finite difference method. Good agreement was generally obtained for the reduction of wall skin friction with slot injection and with experimental Mach number and pitot pressure profiles. Calculations with the effects of pressure interaction included showed these effects to be smaller than effects of changing eddy viscosity models.

  15. The modified equation approach to the stability and accuracy analysis of finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warming, R. F.; Hyett, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The stability and accuracy of finite-difference approximations to simple linear partial differential equations are analyzed by studying the modified partial differential equation. Aside from round-off error, the modified equation represents the actual partial differential equation solved when a numerical solution is computed using a finite-difference equation. The modified equation is derived by first expanding each term of a difference scheme in a Taylor series and then eliminating time derivatives higher than first order by certain algebraic manipulations. The connection between 'heuristic' stability theory based on the modified equation approach and the von Neumann (Fourier) method is established. In addition to the determination of necessary and sufficient conditions for computational stability, a truncated version of the modified equation can be used to gain insight into the nature of both dissipative and dispersive errors.

  16. Finite difference analysis of torsional vibrations of pretwisted, rotating, cantilever beams with effects of warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-03-01

    Theoretical natural frequencies of the first three modes of torsional vibration of pre-twisted, rotating cantilever beams are determined for various thickness and aspect ratios. Conclusions concerning individual and collective effects of warping, pretwist, tension-torsion coupling and tennis racket effect (twist-rotational coupling) terms on the natural frequencies are drawn from numerical results obtained by using a finite difference procedure with first order central differences. The relative importance of structural warping, inertial warping, pretwist, tension-torsion and twist-rotational coupling terms is discussed for various rotational speeds. The accuracy of results obtained by using the finite difference approach is verified by a comparison with the exact solution for specialized simple cases of the equation of motion used in this paper.

  17. Energy stable and high-order-accurate finite difference methods on staggered grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Ossian; Lundquist, Tomas; Dunham, Eric M.; Nordström, Jan

    2017-10-01

    For wave propagation over distances of many wavelengths, high-order finite difference methods on staggered grids are widely used due to their excellent dispersion properties. However, the enforcement of boundary conditions in a stable manner and treatment of interface problems with discontinuous coefficients usually pose many challenges. In this work, we construct a provably stable and high-order-accurate finite difference method on staggered grids that can be applied to a broad class of boundary and interface problems. The staggered grid difference operators are in summation-by-parts form and when combined with a weak enforcement of the boundary conditions, lead to an energy stable method on multiblock grids. The general applicability of the method is demonstrated by simulating an explosive acoustic source, generating waves reflecting against a free surface and material discontinuity.

  18. Finite difference analysis of torsional vibrations of pretwisted, rotating, cantilever beams with effects of warping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical natural frequencies of the first three modes of torsional vibration of pretwisted, rotating cantilever beams are determined for various thickness and aspect ratios. Conclusions concerning individual and collective effects of warping, pretwist, tension-torsion coupling and tennis racket effect (twist-rotational coupling) terms on the natural frequencies are drawn from numerical results obtained by using a finite difference procedure with first order central differences. The relative importance of structural warping, inertial warping, pretwist, tension-torsion and twist-rotational coupling terms is discussed for various rotational speeds. The accuracy of results obtained by using the finite difference approach is verified by a comparison with the exact solution for specialized simple cases of the equation of motion used in this paper.

  19. Numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations of mixed type. [finite difference approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of some recently developed numerical methods for the solution of nonlinear equations of mixed type. The methods considered use finite difference approximations to the differential equation. Central difference formulas are employed in the subsonic zone and upwind difference formulas are used in the supersonic zone. The relaxation method for the small disturbance equation is discussed and a description is given of difference schemes for the potential flow equation in quasi-linear form. Attention is also given to difference schemes for the potential flow equation in conservation form, the analysis of relaxation schemes by the time dependent analogy, the accelerated iterative method, and three-dimensional calculations.

  20. Numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations of mixed type. [finite difference approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A.

    1976-01-01

    A review is presented of some recently developed numerical methods for the solution of nonlinear equations of mixed type. The methods considered use finite difference approximations to the differential equation. Central difference formulas are employed in the subsonic zone and upwind difference formulas are used in the supersonic zone. The relaxation method for the small disturbance equation is discussed and a description is given of difference schemes for the potential flow equation in quasi-linear form. Attention is also given to difference schemes for the potential flow equation in conservation form, the analysis of relaxation schemes by the time dependent analogy, the accelerated iterative method, and three-dimensional calculations.

  1. A finite difference solution for the propagation of sound in near sonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Lester, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    An explicit time/space finite difference procedure is used to model the propagation of sound in a quasi one-dimensional duct containing high Mach number subsonic flow. Nonlinear acoustic equations are derived by perturbing the time-dependent Euler equations about a steady, compressible mean flow. The governing difference relations are based on a fourth-order, two-step (predictor-corrector) MacCormack scheme. The solution algorithm functions by switching on a time harmonic source and allowing the difference equations to iterate to a steady state. The principal effect of the non-linearities was to shift aocustical energy to higher harmonics. With increased source strength, wave steepening was observed. This phenomenon suggests that the acoustical response may approach a shock behavior at higher sound pressure level as the throat Mach number approaches unity. On a peak level basis, good agreement between the nonlinear finite difference and linear finite element solutions was observed, even through a peak sound pressure level of about 150 dB occurred in the throat region. Nonlinear steady state waveform solutions are shown to be in excellent agreement with a nonlinear asymptotic theory. Previously announced in STAR as N83-30167

  2. A finite difference solution for the propagation of sound in near sonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Lester, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    An explicit time/space finite difference procedure is used to model the propagation of sound in a quasi one-dimensional duct containing high Mach number subsonic flow. Nonlinear acoustic equations are derived by perturbing the time-dependent Euler equations about a steady, compressible mean flow. The governing difference relations are based on a fourth-order, two-step (predictor-corrector) MacCormack scheme. The solution algorithm functions by switching on a time harmonic source and allowing the difference equations to iterate to a steady state. The principal effect of the non-linearities was to shift acoustical energy to higher harmonics. With increased source strengths, wave steepening was observed. This phenomenon suggests that the acoustical response may approach a shock behavior at at higher sound pressure level as the throat Mach number aproaches unity. On a peak level basis, good agreement between the nonlinear finite difference and linear finite element solutions was observed, even through a peak sound pressure level of about 150 dB occurred in the throat region. Nonlinear steady state waveform solutions are shown to be in excellent agreement with a nonlinear asymptotic theory.

  3. Higher-order finite-difference formulation of periodic Orbital-free Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Swarnava; Suryanarayana, Phanish

    2016-02-15

    We present a real-space formulation and higher-order finite-difference implementation of periodic Orbital-free Density Functional Theory (OF-DFT). Specifically, utilizing a local reformulation of the electrostatic and kernel terms, we develop a generalized framework for performing OF-DFT simulations with different variants of the electronic kinetic energy. In particular, we propose a self-consistent field (SCF) type fixed-point method for calculations involving linear-response kinetic energy functionals. In this framework, evaluation of both the electronic ground-state and forces on the nuclei are amenable to computations that scale linearly with the number of atoms. We develop a parallel implementation of this formulation using the finite-difference discretization. We demonstrate that higher-order finite-differences can achieve relatively large convergence rates with respect to mesh-size in both the energies and forces. Additionally, we establish that the fixed-point iteration converges rapidly, and that it can be further accelerated using extrapolation techniques like Anderson's mixing. We validate the accuracy of the results by comparing the energies and forces with plane-wave methods for selected examples, including the vacancy formation energy in Aluminum. Overall, the suitability of the proposed formulation for scalable high performance computing makes it an attractive choice for large-scale OF-DFT calculations consisting of thousands of atoms.

  4. A simple finite-difference scheme for handling topography with the first-order wave equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.; Huiskes, M. J.

    2017-07-01

    One approach to incorporate topography in seismic finite-difference codes is a local modification of the difference operators near the free surface. An earlier paper described an approach for modelling irregular boundaries in a constant-density acoustic finite-difference code, based on the second-order formulation of the wave equation that only involves the pressure. Here, a similar method is considered for the first-order formulation in terms of pressure and particle velocity, using a staggered finite-difference discretization both in space and in time. In one space dimension, the boundary conditions consist in imposing antisymmetry for the pressure and symmetry for particle velocity components. For the pressure, this means that the solution values as well as all even derivatives up to a certain order are zero on the boundary. For the particle velocity, all odd derivatives are zero. In 2D, the 1-D assumption is used along each coordinate direction, with antisymmetry for the pressure along the coordinate and symmetry for the particle velocity component parallel to that coordinate direction. Since the symmetry or antisymmetry should hold along the direction normal to the boundary rather than along the coordinate directions, this generates an additional numerical error on top of the time stepping errors and the errors due to the interior spatial discretization. Numerical experiments in 2D and 3D nevertheless produce acceptable results.

  5. On One-Dimensional Stretching Functions for Finite-Difference Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1980-01-01

    The class of one dimensional stretching function used in finite difference calculations is studied. For solutions containing a highly localized region of rapid variation, simple criteria for a stretching function are derived using a truncation error analysis. These criteria are used to investigate two types of stretching functions. One is an interior stretching function, for which the location and slope of an interior clustering region are specified. The simplest such function satisfying the criteria is found to be one based on the inverse hyperbolic sine. The other type of function is a two sided stretching function, for which the arbitrary slopes at the two ends of the one dimensional interval are specified. The simplest such general function is found to be one based on the inverse tangent. The general two sided function has many applications in the construction of finite difference grids.

  6. Convergence rates of finite difference stochastic approximation algorithms part II: implementation via common random numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liyi

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic optimization is a fundamental problem that finds applications in many areas including biological and cognitive sciences. The classical stochastic approximation algorithm for iterative stochastic optimization requires gradient information of the sample object function that is typically difficult to obtain in practice. Recently there has been renewed interests in derivative free approaches to stochastic optimization. In this paper, we examine the rates of convergence for the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm and the mirror descent algorithm, by approximating gradient using finite differences generated through common random numbers. It is shown that the convergence of these algorithms can be accelerated by controlling the implementation of the finite differences. Particularly, it is shown that the rate can be increased to n-2/5 in general and to n-1/2, the best possible rate of stochastic approximation, in Monte Carlo optimization for a broad class of problems, in the iteration number n.

  7. Convergence rates of finite difference stochastic approximation algorithms part I: general sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liyi

    2016-05-01

    Stochastic optimization is a fundamental problem that finds applications in many areas including biological and cognitive sciences. The classical stochastic approximation algorithm for iterative stochastic optimization requires gradient information of the sample object function that is typically difficult to obtain in practice. Recently there has been renewed interests in derivative free approaches to stochastic optimization. In this paper, we examine the rates of convergence for the Kiefer-Wolfowitz algorithm and the mirror descent algorithm, under various updating schemes using finite differences as gradient approximations. The analysis is carried out under a general framework covering a wide range of updating scenarios. It is shown that the convergence of these algorithms can be accelerated by controlling the implementation of the finite differences.

  8. A semi-implicit finite difference model for three-dimensional tidal circulation,

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casulli, V.; Cheng, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    A semi-implicit finite difference formulation for the numerical solution of three-dimensional tidal circulation is presented. The governing equations are the three-dimensional Reynolds equations in which the pressure is assumed to be hydrostatic. A minimal degree of implicitness has been introduced in the finite difference formula so that in the absence of horizontal viscosity the resulting algorithm is unconditionally stable at a minimal computational cost. When only one vertical layer is specified this method reduces, as a particular case, to a semi-implicit scheme for the solutions of the corresponding two-dimensional shallow water equations. The resulting two- and three-dimensional algorithm is fast, accurate and mass conservative. This formulation includes the simulation of flooding and drying of tidal flats, and is fully vectorizable for an efficient implementation on modern vector computers.

  9. A mapped finite difference study of noise propagation in nonuniform ducts with mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raad, Peter E.; White, James W.

    1987-10-01

    The primary objective of this work is to study noise propagation in acoustically lined variable area ducts with mean fluid flow. The method of study is numerical in nature and involves a body-fitted grid mapping procedure in conjunction with a factored-implicit finite difference technique. The mean fluid flow model used is two-dimensional, inviscid, irrotational, incompressible, and nonheat conducting. Fully-coupled solutions of the linearized gasdynamic equations are obtained for both positive and negative Mach numbers as well as for hard and soft wall conditions. The factored-implicit finite difference technique used did give rise to short wavelength perturbations, but these were dampened by the introduction of higher order artificial dissipation terms into the scheme. Results compared favorably with available numerical and experimental data.

  10. Thermal Analysis of AC Contactor Using Thermal Network Finite Difference Analysis Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Chen, Degui; Li, Xingwen; Geng, Yingsan

    To predict the thermal behavior of switchgear quickly, the Thermal Network Finite Difference Analysis method (TNFDA) is adopted in thermal analysis of AC contactor in the paper. The thermal network model is built with nodes, thermal resistors and heat generators, and it is solved using finite difference method (FDM). The main circuit and the control system are connected by thermal resistors network, which solves the problem of multi-sources interaction in the application of TNFDA. The temperature of conducting wires is calculated according to the heat transfer process and the fundamental equations of thermal conduction. It provides a method to solve the problem of boundary conditions in applying the TNFDA. The comparison between the results of TNFDA and measurements shows the feasibility and practicability of the method.

  11. Electromagnetic field distribution calculation in solenoidal inductively coupled plasma using finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W. P.; Liu, Y.; Long, Q.; Chen, D. H.; Chen, Y. M.

    2008-10-15

    The electromagnetic field (both E and B fields) is calculated for a solenoidal inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharge. The model is based on two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, and the finite difference method is used for solving Maxwell equations in both the radial and axial directions. Through one-turn coil measurements, assuming that the electrical conductivity has a constant value in each cross section of the discharge tube, the calculated E and B fields rise sharply near the tube wall. The nonuniform radial distributions imply that the skin effect plays a significant role in the energy balance of the stable ICP. Damped distributions in the axial direction show that the magnetic flux gradually dissipates into the surrounding space. A finite difference calculation allows prediction of the electrical conductivity and plasma permeability, and the induction coil voltage and plasma current can be calculated, which are verified for correctness.

  12. Linear finite-difference bond graph model of an ionic polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentefrit, M.; Grondel, S.; Soyer, C.; Fannir, A.; Cattan, E.; Madden, J. D.; Nguyen, T. M. G.; Plesse, C.; Vidal, F.

    2017-09-01

    With the recent growing interest for soft actuation, many new types of ionic polymers working in air have been developed. Due to the interrelated mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties which greatly influence the characteristics of such actuators, their behavior is complex and difficult to understand, predict and optimize. In light of this challenge, an original linear multiphysics finite difference bond graph model was derived to characterize this ionic actuation. This finite difference scheme was divided into two coupled subparts, each related to a specific physical, electrochemical or mechanical domain, and then converted into a bond graph model as this language is particularly suited for systems from multiple energy domains. Simulations were then conducted and a good agreement with the experimental results was obtained. Furthermore, an analysis of the power efficiency of such actuators as a function of space and time was proposed and allowed to evaluate their performance.

  13. The Incorporation of Truncated Fourier Series into Finite Difference Approximations of Structural Stability Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, S. R.; Palazotto, A. N.

    1978-01-01

    A new trigonometric approach to the finite difference calculus was applied to the problem of beam buckling as represented by virtual work and equilibrium equations. The trigonometric functions were varied by adjusting a wavelength parameter in the approximating Fourier series. Values of the critical force obtained from the modified approach for beams with a variety of boundary conditions were compared to results using the conventional finite difference method. The trigonometric approach produced significantly more accurate approximations for the critical force than the conventional approach for a relatively wide range in values of the wavelength parameter; and the optimizing value of the wavelength parameter corresponded to the half-wavelength of the buckled mode shape. It was found from a modal analysis that the most accurate solutions are obtained when the approximating function closely represents the actual displacement function and matches the actual boundary conditions.

  14. Solving moving interface problems using a higher order accurate finite difference scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, H. V. R.; Ray, Rajendra K.

    2017-07-01

    A new finite difference scheme is applied to solve partial differential equations in domains with discontinuities due to the presence of time dependent moving or deforming interfaces. This scheme is an extension of the finite difference idea developed for solving incompressible, steady stokes equations in discontinuous domains with fixed interfaces [1]. This new idea is applied at the irregular points at each time step in conjunction with the Crank-Nicolson (CN) implicit scheme and a recently developed Higher Order Compact (HOC) scheme at regular points. For validation, Stefan's problem is considered with a moving interface in one dimension. In two dimensions, heat equation is considered on a square domain with a circular interface whose radius is continuously changing with time. HOC scheme is found to produce better results and the order of accuracy is slightly better than that of the CN scheme. However, both the schemes show around second order accuracy and good agreement with the analytical solution.

  15. Accurate finite-difference time-domain simulation of anisotropic media by subpixel smoothing.

    PubMed

    Oskooi, Ardavan F; Kottke, Chris; Johnson, Steven G

    2009-09-15

    Finite-difference time-domain methods suffer from reduced accuracy when discretizing discontinuous materials. We previously showed that accuracy can be significantly improved by using subpixel smoothing of the isotropic dielectric function, but only if the smoothing scheme is properly designed. Using recent developments in perturbation theory that were applied to spectral methods, we extend this idea to anisotropic media and demonstrate that the generalized smoothing consistently reduces the errors and even attains second-order convergence with resolution.

  16. Finite-difference models of ordinary differential equations - Influence of denominator functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Smith, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence on the solutions of finite-difference schemes of using a variety of denominator functions in the discrete modeling of the derivative for any ordinary differential equation. The results obtained are a consequence of using a generalized definition of the first derivative. A particular example of the linear decay equation is used to illustrate in detail the various solution possibilities that can occur.

  17. Grid cell distortion and MODFLOW's integrated finite-difference numerical solution.

    PubMed

    Romero, Dave M; Silver, Steven E

    2006-01-01

    The ground water flow model MODFLOW inherently implements a nongeneralized integrated finite-difference (IFD) numerical scheme. The IFD numerical scheme allows for construction of finite-difference model grids with curvilinear (piecewise linear) rows. The resulting grid comprises model cells in the shape of trapezoids and is distorted in comparison to a traditional MODFLOW finite-difference grid. A version of MODFLOW-88 (herein referred to as MODFLOW IFD) with the code adapted to make the one-dimensional DELR and DELC arrays two dimensional, so that equivalent conductance between distorted grid cells can be calculated, is described. MODFLOW IFD is used to inspect the sensitivity of the numerical head and velocity solutions to the level of distortion in trapezoidal grid cells within a converging radial flow domain. A test problem designed for the analysis implements a grid oriented such that flow is parallel to columns with converging widths. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates MODFLOW IFD's capacity to numerically derive a head solution and resulting intercell volumetric flow when the internal calculation of equivalent conductance accounts for the distortion of the grid cells. The sensitivity of the velocity solution to grid cell distortion indicates criteria for distorted grid design. In the radial flow test problem described, the numerical head solution is not sensitive to grid cell distortion. The accuracy of the velocity solution is sensitive to cell distortion with error <1% if the angle between the nonparallel sides of trapezoidal cells is <12.5 degrees. The error of the velocity solution is related to the degree to which the spatial discretization of a curve is approximated with piecewise linear segments. Curvilinear finite-difference grid construction adds versatility to spatial discretization of the flow domain. MODFLOW-88's inherent IFD numerical scheme and the test problem results imply that more recent versions of MODFLOW 2000, with minor

  18. Three-dimensional elliptic grid generation about fighter aircraft for zonal finite-difference computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    An elliptic grid-generation method for finite-difference computations about complex aerodynamic configurations is developed. A zonal approach is used, which involves first making a coarse global grid filling the entire physical domain and then subdividing regions of that grid to make the individual zone grids. The details of the grid-generation method are presented along with results of the present application, a wing-body configuration based on the F-16 fighter aircraft.

  19. A nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpusik, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We present a nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection. The main advantage of this approach is that it preserves the essential qualitative features of the original continuous model (non-negativity and boundedness of the solution, equilibria and their stability conditions), while being easy to implement. All of the qualitative features are preserved independently of the chosen step-size. Numerical simulations of our approach and comparison with other conventional simulation methods are presented.

  20. ADI Finite Difference Discretization of the Heston-Hull-White PDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haentjens, Tinne; Hout, Karel in't.

    2010-09-01

    This paper concerns the efficient numerical solution of the time-dependent, three-dimensional Heston-Hull-White PDE for the fair prices of European call options. The numerical solution method described in this paper consists of a finite difference discretization on non-uniform spatial grids followed by an Alternating Direction Implicit scheme for the time discretization and extends the method recently proved effective by In't Hout & Foulon (2010) for the simpler, two-dimensional Heston PDE.

  1. Finite Difference Methods for Time-Dependent, Linear Differential Algebraic Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-27

    Time-Dependent, Linear Differential Algebraic Equations ’ BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT 2 T r e n - sa le; its tot puba"- c. 2 ed...1993 Finite Difference Methods for Time-Dependent, I Linear Differential Algebraic Equations ’ BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT2...LINEAR DIFFERENTIAL ALGEBRAIC EQUATIONS 1 BY PATRICK J. RABIER AND WERNER C. RHEINBOLDT 2 ABSTRACT. Recently the authors developed a global reduction

  2. Double absorbing boundaries for finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaGrone, John; Hagstrom, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We describe the implementation of optimal local radiation boundary condition sequences for second order finite difference approximations to Maxwell's equations and the scalar wave equation using the double absorbing boundary formulation. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate that the design accuracy of the boundary conditions is achieved and, for comparable effort, exceeds that of a convolution perfectly matched layer with reasonably chosen parameters. An advantage of the proposed approach is that parameters can be chosen using an accurate a priori error bound.

  3. Numerical solution of multiparameter spectral problems by high order finite different schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodio, Pierluigi; Settanni, Giuseppina

    2016-10-01

    We report on the progress achieved in the numerical simulation of self-adjoint multiparameter spectral problems for ordinary differential equations. We describe how to obtain a discrete problem by means of High Order Finite Difference Schemes and discuss its numerical solution. Based on this approach, we also define a recursive algorithm to compute approximations of the parameters by means of the solution of a set of problems converging to the original one.

  4. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite difference model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model by finite-difference (SIMFD) has been developed. SIMFD computes the flow rate, velocity field, and the concentration distribution of pollutants in surface impoundments with any number of islands located within the region of interest. Theoretical derivations and numerical algorithm are described in detail. Instructions for the application of SIMFD and listings of the FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given to illustrate the application and validity of the model.

  5. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of implanted deep brain stimulation electrodes and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gabran, S R I; Saad, J H; Salama, M M A; Mansour, R R

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the electromagnetic modeling and simulation of an implanted Medtronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode using finite difference time domain (FDTD). The model is developed using Empire XCcel and represents the electrode surrounded with brain tissue assuming homogenous and isotropic medium. The model is created to study the parameters influencing the electric field distribution within the tissue in order to provide reference and benchmarking data for DBS and intra-cortical electrode development.

  6. Finite-difference electromagnetic deposition/thermoregulatory model: comparison between theory and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, R.J.; Fatmi, M.B.; Ward, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The rate of the electromagnetic energy deposition and the resultant thermoregulatory response of a block model of a squirrel monkey exposed to plane-wave fields at 350 MHz were calculated using a finite-difference procedure. Noninvasive temperature measurements in live squirrel monkeys under similar exposure conditions were obtained using Vitek probes. Calculations exhibit reasonable correlation with the measured data, especially for the rise in colonic temperature.

  7. On discontinuous Galerkin for time integration in option pricing problems with adaptive finite differences in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Sydow, Lina

    2013-10-01

    The discontinuous Galerkin method for time integration of the Black-Scholes partial differential equation for option pricing problems is studied and compared with more standard time-integrators. In space an adaptive finite difference discretization is employed. The results show that the dG method are in most cases at least comparable to standard time-integrators and in some cases superior to them. Together with adaptive spatial grids the suggested pricing method shows great qualities.

  8. Explicit finite difference predictor and convex corrector with applications to hyperbolic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, C.; Dey, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    An explicit finite difference scheme consisting of a predictor and a corrector has been developed and applied to solve some hyperbolic partial differential equations (PDEs). The corrector is a convex-type function which is applied at each time level and at each mesh point. It consists of a parameter which may be estimated such that for larger time steps the algorithm should remain stable and generate a fast speed of convergence to the steady-state solution. Some examples have been given.

  9. Properties of finite difference models of non-linear conservative oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Finite-difference (FD) approaches to the numerical solution of the differential equations describing the motion of a nonlinear conservative oscillator are investigated analytically. A generalized formulation of the Duffing and modified Duffing equations is derived and analyzed using several FD techniques, and it is concluded that, although it is always possible to contstruct FD models of conservative oscillators which are themselves conservative, caution is required to avoid numerical solutions which do not accurately reflect the properties of the original equation.

  10. Finite-difference model for 3-D flow in bays and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Peter E.; Larock, Bruce E.; ,

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a semi-implicit finite-difference model for the numerical solution of three-dimensional flow in bays and estuaries. The model treats the gravity wave and vertical diffusion terms in the governing equations implicitly, and other terms explicitly. The model achieves essentially second-order accurate and stable solutions in strongly nonlinear problems by using a three-time-level leapfrog-trapezoidal scheme for the time integration.

  11. Generalized energy and potential enstrophy conserving finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramopoulos, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The conditions under which finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations can conserve both total energy and potential enstrophy are considered. A method of deriving such schemes using operator formalism is developed. Several such schemes are derived for the A-, B- and C-grids. The derived schemes include second-order schemes and pseudo-fourth-order schemes. The simplest B-grid pseudo-fourth-order schemes are presented.

  12. Simulation of realistic rotor blade-vortex interactions using a finite-difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Charles, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical finite-difference code has been used to predict helicopter blade loads during realistic self-generated three-dimensional blade-vortex interactions. The velocity field is determined via a nonlinear superposition of the rotor flowfield. Data obtained from a lifting-line helicopter/rotor trim code are used to determine the instantaneous position of the interaction vortex elements with respect to the blade. Data obtained for three rotor advance ratios show a reasonable correlation with wind tunnel data.

  13. Gradient Approximation on Uniform Meshes by Finite Differences and Cubic Spline Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablonnière, P.

    For the approximation of gradients from data values at vertices of a uniform grid, we compare two methods based on cubic spline interpolation with a classical method based on finite differences. For univariate cubic splines, we use the so-called de Boor’s Not a Knot property and a new method giving pretty good slopes. Then these methods are used on parallels to the axes for estimating gradients on bivariate grids. They are illustrated by several numerical examples.

  14. Double absorbing boundaries for finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrone, John Hagstrom, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    We describe the implementation of optimal local radiation boundary condition sequences for second order finite difference approximations to Maxwell's equations and the scalar wave equation using the double absorbing boundary formulation. Numerical experiments are presented which demonstrate that the design accuracy of the boundary conditions is achieved and, for comparable effort, exceeds that of a convolution perfectly matched layer with reasonably chosen parameters. An advantage of the proposed approach is that parameters can be chosen using an accurate a priori error bound.

  15. Generalized energy and potential enstrophy conserving finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramopoulos, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The conditions under which finite difference schemes for the shallow water equations can conserve both total energy and potential enstrophy are considered. A method of deriving such schemes using operator formalism is developed. Several such schemes are derived for the A-, B- and C-grids. The derived schemes include second-order schemes and pseudo-fourth-order schemes. The simplest B-grid pseudo-fourth-order schemes are presented.

  16. Full Wave Analysis of Passive Microwave Monolithic Integrated Circuit Devices Using a Generalized Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Faiza S.; Rascoe, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a modified Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) technique using a generalized conformed orthogonal grid. The use of the Conformed Orthogonal Grid, Finite Difference Time Domain (GFDTD) enables the designer to match all the circuit dimensions, hence eliminating a major source o error in the analysis.

  17. Coupled versus decoupled multigrid solvers for variable viscosity Stokes problems using a staggered finite difference scheme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, Boris; Popov, Anton; Püsök, Adina

    2014-05-01

    In order to solve high-resolution 3D problems in computational geodynamics it is crucial to use multigrid solvers in combination with parallel computers. A number of approaches are currently in use in the community, which can broadly be divided into coupled and decoupled approaches. In the decoupled approach, an algebraic or geometric multigrid method is used as a preconditioner for the velocity equations only while an iterative approach such as Schur complement reduction used to solve the outer velocity-pressure equations. In the coupled approach, on the other hand, a multigrid approach is applied to both the velocity and pressure equations. The coupled multigrid approaches are typically employed in combination with staggered finite difference discretizations, whereas the decoupled approach is the method of choice in many of the existing finite element codes. Yet, it is unclear whether there are differences in speed between the two approaches, and if so, how this depends on the initial guess. Here, we implemented both approaches in combination with a staggered finite difference discretization and test the robustness of the two approaches with respect to large jumps in viscosity contrast, as well as their computational efficiency as a function of the initial guess. Acknowledgements. Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC Grant agreement #258830. Numerical computations have been performed on JUQUEEN of the Jülich high-performance computing center.

  18. Pseudospectral versus finite-difference schemes in the numerical integration of stochastic models of surface growth.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Rafael; Castro, Mario; López, Juan M

    2007-11-01

    We present a comparison between finite differences schemes and a pseudospectral method applied to the numerical integration of stochastic partial differential equations that model surface growth. We have studied, in 1+1 dimensions, the Kardar, Parisi, and Zhang model (KPZ) and the Lai, Das Sarma, and Villain model (LDV). The pseudospectral method appears to be the most stable for a given time step for both models. This means that the time up to which we can follow the temporal evolution of a given system is larger for the pseudospectral method. Moreover, for the KPZ model, a pseudospectral scheme gives results closer to the predictions of the continuum model than those obtained through finite difference methods. On the other hand, some numerical instabilities appearing with finite difference methods for the LDV model are absent when a pseudospectral integration is performed. These numerical instabilities give rise to an approximate multiscaling observed in earlier numerical simulations. With the pseudospectral approach no multiscaling is seen in agreement with the continuum model.

  19. Digital lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohar, Erez; Farace, Alessandro; Reznik, Benni; Cirac, J. Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a general scheme for a digital construction of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions. In this method, the four-body interactions arising in models with 2 +1 dimensions and higher are obtained stroboscopically, through a sequence of two-body interactions with ancillary degrees of freedom. This yields stronger interactions than the ones obtained through perturbative methods, as typically done in previous proposals, and removes an important bottleneck in the road towards experimental realizations. The scheme applies to generic gauge theories with Lie or finite symmetry groups, both Abelian and non-Abelian. As a concrete example, we present the construction of a digital quantum simulator for a Z3 lattice gauge theory with dynamical fermionic matter in 2 +1 dimensions, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices, involving three atomic species, representing the matter, gauge, and auxiliary degrees of freedom, that are separated in three different layers. By moving the ancilla atoms with a proper sequence of steps, we show how we can obtain the desired evolution in a clean, controlled way.

  20. Topological lattice actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bietenholz, W.; Gerber, U.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2010-12-01

    We consider lattice field theories with topological actions, which are invariant against small deformations of the fields. Some of these actions have infinite barriers separating different topological sectors. Topological actions do not have the correct classical continuum limit and they cannot be treated using perturbation theory, but they still yield the correct quantum continuum limit. To show this, we present analytic studies of the 1-d O(2) and O(3) model, as well as Monte Carlo simulations of the 2-d O(3) model using topological lattice actions. Some topological actions obey and others violate a lattice Schwarz inequality between the action and the topological charge Q. Irrespective of this, in the 2-d O(3) model the topological susceptibility {χ_t} = {{{left< {{Q^2}} rightrangle }} left/ {V} right.} is logarithmically divergent in the continuum limit. Still, at non-zero distance the correlator of the topological charge density has a finite continuum limit which is consistent with analytic predictions. Our study shows explicitly that some classically important features of an action are irrelevant for reaching the correct quantum continuum limit.

  1. Finite difference time domain analysis of microwave ferrite devices and mobile antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Bahadir Suleyman

    This dissertation presents analysis and design of shielded mobile antenna systems and microwave ferrite devices using a finite-difference time-domain method. Novel shielded antenna structures suitable for cellular communications have been analyzed and designed with emphasize on reducing excessive radiated energy absorbed in user's head and hand, while keeping the antenna performance at its peak in the presence of user. These novel antennas include a magnetically shielded antenna, a dual-resonance shielded antenna and, a shorted and truncated microstrip antenna. The effect of magnetic coating on the performance of a shielded monopole antenna is studied extensively. A parametric study is performed to analyze the dual-resonance phenomenon observed in the dual-resonance shielded antenna, optimize the antenna design within the cellular communications band, and improve the antenna performance. Input impedance, near and far fields of the dual-resonance shielded antenna are calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method. Experimental validation is also presented. In addition, performance of a shorted and truncated microstrip antenna has been investigated over a wide range of substrate parameters and dimensions. Objectives of the research work also include development of a finite-difference time-domain technique to accurately model magnetically anisotropic media, including the effect of non-uniform magnetization within the finite-size ferrite material due to demagnetizing fields. A slow wave thin film isolator and a stripline disc junction circulator are analyzed. An extensive parametric study calculates wide-band frequency-dependent parameters of these devices for various device dimensions and material parameters. Finally, a ferrite-filled stripline configuration is analyzed to study the non- linear behaviour of ferrite by introducing a modified damping factor.

  2. Modelling migration in multilayer systems by a finite difference method: the spherical symmetry case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojbotǎ, C. I.; Toşa, V.; Mercea, P. V.

    2013-08-01

    We present a numerical model based on finite differences to solve the problem of chemical impurity migration within a multilayer spherical system. Migration here means diffusion of chemical species in conditions of concentration partitioning at layer interfaces due to different solubilities of the migrant in different layers. We detail here the numerical model and discuss the results of its implementation. To validate the method we compare it with cases where an analytic solution exists. We also present an application of our model to a practical problem in which we compute the migration of caprolactam from the packaging multilayer foil into the food.

  3. Characteristic nonreflecting boundary conditions for open boundaries in lattice Boltzmann methods.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Salvador; Fueyo, Norberto

    2008-10-01

    A boundary condition for lattice Boltzmann methods, based on the movement of information through Euler characteristic directions, is developed. With respect to the similar conditions used in finite-difference or finite-volume implementations, some corrections are needed to compensate the isothermal compressible nature of standard lattice Boltzmann methods for fluid flow. The results show that the proposed method for inlets and outlets is highly nonreflecting, and mass conserving.

  4. Mimetic finite difference method for the stokes problem on polygonal meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, K; Beirao Da Veiga, L; Gyrya, V; Manzini, G

    2009-01-01

    Various approaches to extend the finite element methods to non-traditional elements (pyramids, polyhedra, etc.) have been developed over the last decade. Building of basis functions for such elements is a challenging task and may require extensive geometry analysis. The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method has many similarities with low-order finite element methods. Both methods try to preserve fundamental properties of physical and mathematical models. The essential difference is that the MFD method uses only the surface representation of discrete unknowns to build stiffness and mass matrices. Since no extension inside the mesh element is required, practical implementation of the MFD method is simple for polygonal meshes that may include degenerate and non-convex elements. In this article, we develop a MFD method for the Stokes problem on arbitrary polygonal meshes. The method is constructed for tensor coefficients, which will allow to apply it to the linear elasticity problem. The numerical experiments show the second-order convergence for the velocity variable and the first-order for the pressure.

  5. A mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem with elected edge bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lipnikov, K; Berirao, L

    2009-01-01

    A new mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem is proposed and analyzed. The unstable P{sub 1}-P{sub 0} discretization is stabilized by adding a small number of bubble functions to selected mesh edges. A simple strategy for selecting such edges is proposed and verified with numerical experiments. The discretizations schemes for Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations must satisfy the celebrated inf-sup (or the LBB) stability condition. The stability condition implies a balance between discrete spaces for velocity and pressure. In finite elements, this balance is frequently achieved by adding bubble functions to the velocity space. The goal of this article is to show that the stabilizing edge bubble functions can be added only to a small set of mesh edges. This results in a smaller algebraic system and potentially in a faster calculations. We employ the mimetic finite difference (MFD) discretization technique that works for general polyhedral meshes and can accomodate non-uniform distribution of stabilizing bubbles.

  6. Mimetic finite difference method for the Stokes problem on polygonal meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beirão da Veiga, L.; Gyrya, V.; Lipnikov, K.; Manzini, G.

    2009-10-01

    Various approaches to extend finite element methods to non-traditional elements (general polygons, pyramids, polyhedra, etc.) have been developed over the last decade. The construction of basis functions for such elements is a challenging task and may require extensive geometrical analysis. The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method works on general polygonal meshes and has many similarities with low-order finite element methods. Both schemes try to preserve the fundamental properties of the underlying physical and mathematical models. The essential difference between the two schemes is that the MFD method uses only the surface representation of discrete unknowns to build the stiffness and mass matrices. Since no extension of basis functions inside the mesh elements is required, practical implementation of the MFD method is simple for polygonal meshes that may include degenerate and non-convex elements. In this article, we present a new MFD method for the Stokes problem on arbitrary polygonal meshes and analyze its stability. The method is developed for the general case of tensor coefficients, which allows us to apply it to a linear elasticity problem, as well. Numerical experiments show, for the velocity variable, second-order convergence in a discrete L2 norm and first-order convergence in a discrete H1 norm. For the pressure variable, first-order convergence is shown in the L2 norm.

  7. Experiments with explicit filtering for LES using a finite-difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, T. S.; Kaltenbach, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The equations for large-eddy simulation (LES) are derived formally by applying a spatial filter to the Navier-Stokes equations. The filter width as well as the details of the filter shape are free parameters in LES, and these can be used both to control the effective resolution of the simulation and to establish the relative importance of different portions of the resolved spectrum. An analogous, but less well justified, approach to filtering is more or less universally used in conjunction with LES using finite-difference methods. In this approach, the finite support provided by the computational mesh as well as the wavenumber-dependent truncation errors associated with the finite-difference operators are assumed to define the filter operation. This approach has the advantage that it is also 'automatic' in the sense that no explicit filtering: operations need to be performed. While it is certainly convenient to avoid the explicit filtering operation, there are some practical considerations associated with finite-difference methods that favor the use of an explicit filter. Foremost among these considerations is the issue of truncation error. All finite-difference approximations have an associated truncation error that increases with increasing wavenumber. These errors can be quite severe for the smallest resolved scales, and these errors will interfere with the dynamics of the small eddies if no corrective action is taken. Years of experience at CTR with a second-order finite-difference scheme for high Reynolds number LES has repeatedly indicated that truncation errors must be minimized in order to obtain acceptable simulation results. While the potential advantages of explicit filtering are rather clear, there is a significant cost associated with its implementation. In particular, explicit filtering reduces the effective resolution of the simulation compared with that afforded by the mesh. The resolution requirements for LES are usually set by the need to capture

  8. Optimizing for minimum weight when two different finite element models and analyses are required

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.

    1989-01-01

    The Finite Element Structural Optimization Program's (FESOP) ability to perform minimum weight optimization using two different finite element analyses and models is discussed. FESOP uses the ADS optimizer developed by Dr. Garret Vanderplaats to solve the nonlinear constrained optimization problem. The design optimization problem requires a response spectrum analysis and model to evaluate the stress and displacement constraints. However, the problem needs a frequency analysis and model to calculate the natural frequencies used to evaluate the frequency range constraints. The results of both the successful and unsuccessful approaches used to solve this difficult weight minimization problem are summarized. The results show that no one ADS optimization algorithm worked in all cases. However, the Sequential Convex Programming and Modified Method of Feasible Directions algorithms were the most successful.

  9. 3D finite-difference modeling algorithm and anomaly features of ZTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tan, Han-Dong; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Kun-Peng; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Zhang, Xing-Dong

    2016-09-01

    The Z-Axis tipper electromagnetic (ZTEM) technique is based on a frequency-domain airborne electromagnetic system that measures the natural magnetic field. A survey area was divided into several blocks by using the Maxwell's equations, and the magnetic components at the center of each edge of the grid cell are evaluated by applying the staggered-grid finite-difference method. The tipper and its divergence are derived to complete the 3D ZTEM forward modeling algorithm. A synthetic model is then used to compare the responses with those of 2D finite-element forward modeling to verify the accuracy of the algorithm. ZTEM offers high horizontal resolution to both simple and complex distributions of conductivity. This work is the theoretical foundation for the interpretation of ZTEM data and the study of 3D ZTEM inversion.

  10. Non-Reflecting Regions for Finite Difference Methods in Modeling of Elastic Wave Propagation in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishoni, Doron; Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    Solution of the wave equation using techniques such as finite difference or finite element methods can model elastic wave propagation in solids. This requires mapping the physical geometry into a computational domain whose size is governed by the size of the physical domain of interest and by the required resolution. This computational domain, in turn, dictates the computer memory requirements as well as the calculation time. Quite often, the physical region of interest is only a part of the whole physical body, and does not necessarily include all the physical boundaries. Reduction of the calculation domain requires positioning an artificial boundary or region where a physical boundary does not exist. It is important however that such a boundary, or region, will not affect the internal domain, i.e., it should not cause reflections that propagate back into the material. This paper concentrates on the issue of constructing such a boundary region.

  11. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges −5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ mol−1) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non-periodic PB

  12. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-11-01

    The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges -5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ mol-1) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non-periodic PB

  13. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: an accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects.

    PubMed

    Rocklin, Gabriel J; Mobley, David L; Dill, Ken A; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2013-11-14

    The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges -5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ mol(-1)) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non-periodic PB

  14. Calculating the binding free energies of charged species based on explicit-solvent simulations employing lattice-sum methods: An accurate correction scheme for electrostatic finite-size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Mobley, David L.; Dill, Ken A.; Hünenberger, Philippe H.

    2013-11-14

    The calculation of a protein-ligand binding free energy based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generally relies on a thermodynamic cycle in which the ligand is alchemically inserted into the system, both in the solvated protein and free in solution. The corresponding ligand-insertion free energies are typically calculated in nanoscale computational boxes simulated under periodic boundary conditions and considering electrostatic interactions defined by a periodic lattice-sum. This is distinct from the ideal bulk situation of a system of macroscopic size simulated under non-periodic boundary conditions with Coulombic electrostatic interactions. This discrepancy results in finite-size effects, which affect primarily the charging component of the insertion free energy, are dependent on the box size, and can be large when the ligand bears a net charge, especially if the protein is charged as well. This article investigates finite-size effects on calculated charging free energies using as a test case the binding of the ligand 2-amino-5-methylthiazole (net charge +1 e) to a mutant form of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in water. Considering different charge isoforms of the protein (net charges −5, 0, +3, or +9 e), either in the absence or the presence of neutralizing counter-ions, and sizes of the cubic computational box (edges ranging from 7.42 to 11.02 nm), the potentially large magnitude of finite-size effects on the raw charging free energies (up to 17.1 kJ mol{sup −1}) is demonstrated. Two correction schemes are then proposed to eliminate these effects, a numerical and an analytical one. Both schemes are based on a continuum-electrostatics analysis and require performing Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) calculations on the protein-ligand system. While the numerical scheme requires PB calculations under both non-periodic and periodic boundary conditions, the latter at the box size considered in the MD simulations, the analytical scheme only requires three non

  15. Comparison of finite-difference schemes for analysis of shells of revolution. [stress and free vibration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Stephens, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Several finite difference schemes are applied to the stress and free vibration analysis of homogeneous isotropic and layered orthotropic shells of revolution. The study is based on a form of the Sanders-Budiansky first-approximation linear shell theory modified such that the effects of shear deformation and rotary inertia are included. A Fourier approach is used in which all the shell stress resultants and displacements are expanded in a Fourier series in the circumferential direction, and the governing equations reduce to ordinary differential equations in the meridional direction. While primary attention is given to finite difference schemes used in conjunction with first order differential equation formulation, comparison is made with finite difference schemes used with other formulations. These finite difference discretization models are compared with respect to simplicity of application, convergence characteristics, and computational efficiency. Numerical studies are presented for the effects of variations in shell geometry and lamination parameters on the accuracy and convergence of the solutions obtained by the different finite difference schemes. On the basis of the present study it is shown that the mixed finite difference scheme based on the first order differential equation formulation and two interlacing grids for the different fundamental unknowns combines a number of advantages over other finite difference schemes previously reported in the literature.

  16. Dispersion and stability analysis for a finite difference beam propagation method.

    PubMed

    de-Oliva-Rubio, J; Molina-Fernández, I; Godoy-Rubio, R

    2008-06-09

    Applying continuous and discrete transformation techniques, new analytical expressions to calculate dispersion and stability of a Runge- Kutta Finite Difference Beam Propagation Method (RK-FDBPM) are obtained. These expressions give immediate insight about the discretization errors introduced by the numerical method in the plane-wave spectrum domain. From these expressions a novel strategy to adequately set the mesh steps sizes of the RK-FDBPM is presented. Assessment of the method is performed by studying the propagation in several linear and nonlinear photonic devices for different spatial discretizations.

  17. Evaluation of a thin-slot formalism for finite-difference time-domain electromagnetics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.D.; Bacon, L.D.

    1987-03-01

    A thin-slot formalism for use with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) electromagnetics codes has been evaluated in both two and three dimensions. This formalism allows narrow slots to be modeled in the wall of a scatterer without reducing the space grid size to the gap width. In two dimensions, the evaluation involves the calculation of the total fields near two infinitesimally thin coplanar strips separated by a gap. A method-of-moments (MoM) solution of the same problem is used as a benchmark for comparison. Results in two dimensions show that up to 10% error can be expected in total electric and magnetic fields both near (lambda/40) and far (1 lambda) from the slot. In three dimensions, the evaluation is similar. The finite-length slot is placed in a finite plate and an MoM surface patch solution is used for the benchmark. These results, although less extensive than those in two dimensions, show that slightly larger errors can be expected. Considering the approximations made near the slot in incorporating the formalism, the results are very promising. Possibilities also exist for applying this formalism to walls of arbitrary thickness and to other types of slots, such as overlapping joints. 11 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. An overlapped grid method for multigrid, finite volume/difference flow solvers: MaGGiE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Lessard, Victor R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to develop a domain decomposition method via overlapping/embedding the component grids, which is to be used by upwind, multi-grid, finite volume solution algorithms. A computer code, given the name MaGGiE (Multi-Geometry Grid Embedder) is developed to meet this objective. MaGGiE takes independently generated component grids as input, and automatically constructs the composite mesh and interpolation data, which can be used by the finite volume solution methods with or without multigrid convergence acceleration. Six demonstrative examples showing various aspects of the overlap technique are presented and discussed. These cases are used for developing the procedure for overlapping grids of different topologies, and to evaluate the grid connection and interpolation data for finite volume calculations on a composite mesh. Time fluxes are transferred between mesh interfaces using a trilinear interpolation procedure. Conservation losses are minimal at the interfaces using this method. The multi-grid solution algorithm, using the coaser grid connections, improves the convergence time history as compared to the solution on composite mesh without multi-gridding.

  19. High-order finite difference methods for earthquake rupture dynamics in complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, O.; Kozdon, J. E.; Dunham, E. M.; Nordström, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we continue our development of high-order summation-by-parts (SBP) finite difference methods for earthquake rupture dynamics. SBP methods use centered spatial differences in the interior and one-sided differences near the boundary. The transition to one-sided differences is done in a particular manner that permits one to provably maintain stability and accuracy. In many methods the boundary conditions are strongly enforced by modifying the difference operator at the boundary so that the solution there exactly satisfies the boundary condition. Though conceptually straightforward, this approach can introduce instabilities. In contrast, when boundary conditions are enforced weakly by adding a penalty term to the spatial discretization, it is possible to prove that the method is strictly stable, dissipating energy slightly faster than the continuous problem (with the additional dissipation vanishing under grid refinement). Another benefit of SBP operators is their built-in inner product which, if correctly constructed, can be interpreted as a quadrature operator. Thus, important integrated quantities such as the total mechanical energy in the system, the energy dissipation rate along faults, and the radiated energy flux through exterior boundaries can be rigorously calculated. These numerically integrated quantities converge to their true values with the same order of accuracy as the difference approximation. Though standard SBP methods are based on uniform Cartesian grids, it is possible to use the methods for problems with nonplanar faults, free surface topography, and branching faults through the use of coordinate transforms. Recently, it has also been shown how second-order SBP methods can be extended to unstructured grids. Due to the SBP character of both the finite difference and node-centered finite volume method they can be used together in a stable and accurate way. Inclusion of these techniques will be important for problems that have regions

  20. A time-space domain stereo finite difference method for 3D scalar wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yushu; Yang, Guangwen; Ma, Xiao; He, Conghui; Song, Guojie

    2016-11-01

    The time-space domain finite difference methods reduce numerical dispersion effectively by minimizing the error in the joint time-space domain. However, their interpolating coefficients are related with the Courant numbers, leading to significantly extra time costs for loading the coefficients consecutively according to velocity in heterogeneous models. In the present study, we develop a time-space domain stereo finite difference (TSSFD) method for 3D scalar wave equation. The method propagates both the displacements and their gradients simultaneously to keep more information of the wavefields, and minimizes the maximum phase velocity error directly using constant interpolation coefficients for different Courant numbers. We obtain the optimal constant coefficients by combining the truncated Taylor series approximation and the time-space domain optimization, and adjust the coefficients to improve the stability condition. Subsequent investigation shows that the TSSFD can suppress numerical dispersion effectively with high computational efficiency. The maximum phase velocity error of the TSSFD is just 3.09% even with only 2 sampling points per minimum wavelength when the Courant number is 0.4. Numerical experiments show that to generate wavefields with no visible numerical dispersion, the computational efficiency of the TSSFD is 576.9%, 193.5%, 699.0%, and 191.6% of those of the 4th-order and 8th-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method, the 4th-order staggered grid method (SG), and the 8th-order optimal finite difference method (OFD), respectively. Meanwhile, the TSSFD is compatible to the unsplit convolutional perfectly matched layer (CPML) boundary condition for absorbing artificial boundaries. The efficiency and capability to handle complex velocity models make it an attractive tool in imaging methods such as acoustic reverse time migration (RTM).

  1. a Mapped Finite Difference Study of Noise Transmission in Nonuniform Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raad, Peter Emile

    The primary objective of this work was to study a class of problems involving noise propagation in acoustically lined variable area ducts with or without mean fluid flow. The method of study was numerical in nature and included body -fitted grid mapping procedures in conjunction with implicit finite difference techniques. The work resulted in several general FORTRAN programs that were tested for cases with or without mean fluid flow, including soft wall or hard wall acoustic liner conditions, and plane wave or far field exit conditions. The results were compared to available theoretical and experimental data. The automated, body-fitted grid mapping procedure was found to be robust, simple to use, and capable of mapping very complicated geometries simply by defining the grid distribution on the boundaries. In general, the solution of the wave equation was found to be successful when using a plane wave exit condition, whereas a problem was encountered with reflections from the particular far field exit condition being applied. The problem was determined to be the result of the proximity of the far field boundary to the noise source as well as its applicability to exactly cylindrical wave expansions only. The fully-coupled solution of the linearized gas dynamic equations was successful for both positive and negative Mach numbers as well as for hard and soft wall conditions. The mean fluid flow considered was two-dimensional, inviscid, irrotational, incompressible, and nonheat conducting. The factored-implicit finite difference technique used did give rise to short wavelength perturbations, but these were dampened by the introduction of higher order artificial dissipation terms into the scheme. In the different problems that this study considered, the finite difference theory was found to be well-suited for the simulation of noise transmission in nonuniform ducts.

  2. Determination of critical linear lattice size for the four dimensional Ising model on the Creutz cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilirmak, Ganimet Mülazımoğlu

    2015-12-01

    The four-dimensional Ising model is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton (CCA) near the infinite-lattice critical temperature for the lattice with the linear dimension 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. The temperature dependence of Binder parameter ( g L) are analyzed for the lattice with the linear dimension 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. In this study conducted highly detailed, two different types of behavior were determined as a result of varying linear lattice dimension. The infinite lattice critical temperatures are obtained to be T c = 6.6845 ± 0.0005 in interval 4 ⩽ L ⩽ 12 and T c = 6.6807 ± 0.0024 in interval 14 ⩽ L ⩽ 22. The finite and infinite lattice critical exponents for the order parameter, the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat are computed from the results of simulations by using finite-size scaling relations. Critical linear lattice size have been identified as L = 14.

  3. Determination of cutoff frequencies of simple waveguides using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolagani, Sridhar

    Waveguides are used to transfer electromagnetic energy from one location to another. Within many electronic circles, waveguides are commonly used for microwave RF signals; the same principle can be used for many forms of waves from sound to light. They have been used in many technologies like acoustic waveguide speaker technology, high-performance passive waveguide technologies for remote sensing and communication, optical computing, robotic-vision, biochemical sensing and many more. Modern waveguide technology employs a variety of waveguides with different cross sections and perturbations, the cutoff frequencies and mode shapes of many of these waveguides are ill-suited for determination by an analytical method. In this thesis, we solve this type of waveguides by employing the numerical procedure of finite difference method. By adopting finite difference approach with an application of eigenvalue method, we discuss about few different types of these waveguides in determining the cutoff frequencies of supported modes, and extracting the possible degenerate modes and their field distributions. To validate the method and its accuracy, it is applied to the two well known rectangular waveguides, viz. PEC Rectangular Waveguide and Artificial Rectangular Waveguide (consists of PEC and PMC walls) and compared with the analytical solutions.

  4. A modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Michael G.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a finite-difference model and its associated modular computer program. The model simulates flow in three dimensions. The report includes detailed explanations of physical and mathematical concepts on which the model is based and an explanation of how those concepts are incorporated in the modular structure of the computer program. The modular structure consists of a Main Program and a series of highly independent subroutines called 'modules.' The modules are grouped into 'packages.' Each package deals with a specific feature of the hydrologic system which is to be simulated, such as flow from rivers or flow into drains, or with a specific method of solving linear equations which describe the flow system, such as the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The division of the program into modules permits the user to examine specific hydrologic features of the model independently. This also facilita development of additional capabilities because new packages can be added to the program without modifying the existing packages. The input and output systems of the computer program are also designed to permit maximum flexibility. Ground-water flow within the aquifer is simulated using a block-centered finite-difference approach. Layers can be simulated as confined, unconfined, or a combination of confined and unconfined. Flow associated with external stresses, such as wells, areal recharge, evapotranspiration, drains, and streams, can also be simulated. The finite-difference equations can be solved using either the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The program is written in FORTRAN 77 and will run without modification on most computers that have a FORTRAN 77 compiler. For each program ,module, this report includes a narrative description, a flow chart, a list of variables, and a module listing.

  5. A modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, M.G.; Harbaugh, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a finite-difference model and its associated modular computer program. The model simulates flow in three dimensions. The report includes detailed explanations of physical and mathematical concepts on which the model is based and an explanation of how those concepts were incorporated in the modular structure of the computer program. The modular structure consists of a Main Program and a series of highly independent subroutines called 'modules.' The modules are grouped into 'packages.' Each package deals with a specific feature of the hydrologic system which is to be simulated, such as flow from rivers or flow into drains, or with a specific method of solving linear equations which describe the flow system, such as the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The division of the program into modules permits the user to examine specific hydrologic features of the model independently. This also facilitates development of additional capabilities because new modules or packages can be added to the program without modifying the existing modules or packages. The input and output systems of the computer program are also designed to permit maximum flexibility. Ground-water flow within the aquifer is simulated using a block-centered finite-difference approach. Layers can be simulated as confined, unconfined, or a combination of confined and unconfined. Flow from external stresses, such as flow to wells, areal recharge, evapotranspiration, flow to drains, and flow through riverbeds, can also be simulated. The finite-difference equations can be solved using either the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The program is written in FORTRAN '66 and will run without modification on most computers which have a FORTRAN '66 compiler. It will also run, without modification, with most extended FORTRAN '77 compilers and with minor modifications on standard FORTRAN '77 compilers. Documentation presented in this report

  6. A Modular Three-Dimensional Finite-Difference Ground-Water Flow Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, Michael G.; Harbaugh, Arlen W.; Guo, Weixing; Lu, Guoping

    1988-01-01

    This report presents a finite-difference model and its associated modular computer program. The model simulates flow in three dimensions. The report includes detailed explanations of physical and mathematical concepts on which the model is based and an explanation of how those concepts are incorporated in the modular structure of the computer program. The modular structure consists of a Main Program and a series of highly independent subroutines called 'modules.' The modules are grouped into 'packages.' Each package deals with a specific feature of the hydrologic system which is to be simulated, such as flow from rivers or flow into drains, or with a specific method of solving linear equations which describe the flow system, such as the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The division of the program into modules permits the user to examine specific hydrologic features of the model independently. This also facilita development of additional capabilities because new packages can be added to the program without modifying the existing packages. The input and output systems of the computer program are also designed to permit maximum flexibility. Ground-water flow within the aquifer is simulated using a block-centered finite-difference approach. Layers can be simulated as confined, unconfined, or a combination of confined and unconfined. Flow associated with external stresses, such as wells, areal recharge, evapotranspiration, drains, and streams, can also be simulated. The finite-difference equations can be solved using either the Strongly Implicit Procedure or Slice-Successive Overrelaxation. The program is written in FORTRAN 77 and will run without modification on most computers that have a FORTRAN 77 compiler. For each program ,module, this report includes a narrative description, a flow chart, a list of variables, and a module listing.

  7. Subresolution Displacements in Finite Difference Simulations of Ultrasound Propagation and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Gianmarco F

    2017-03-01

    Time domain finite difference simulations are used extensively to simulate wave propagation. They approximate the wave field on a discrete domain with a grid spacing that is typically on the order of a tenth of a wavelength. The smallest displacements that can be modeled by this type of simulation are thus limited to discrete values that are integer multiples of the grid spacing. This paper presents a method to represent continuous and subresolution displacements by varying the impedance of individual elements in a multielement scatterer. It is demonstrated that this method removes the limitations imposed by the discrete grid spacing by generating a continuum of displacements as measured by the backscattered signal. The method is first validated on an ideal perfect correlation case with a single scatterer. It is subsequently applied to a more complex case with a field of scatterers that model an acoustic radiation force-induced displacement used in ultrasound elasticity imaging. A custom finite difference simulation tool is used to simulate propagation from ultrasound imaging pulses in the scatterer field. These simulated transmit-receive events are then beamformed into images, which are tracked with a correlation-based algorithm to determine the displacement. A linear predictive model is developed to analytically describe the relationship between element impedance and backscattered phase shift. The error between model and simulation is λ/ 1364 , where λ is the acoustical wavelength. An iterative method is also presented that reduces the simulation error to λ/ 5556 over one iteration. The proposed technique therefore offers a computationally efficient method to model continuous subresolution displacements of a scattering medium in ultrasound imaging. This method has applications that include ultrasound elastography, blood flow, and motion tracking. This method also extends generally to finite difference simulations of wave propagation, such as electromagnetic or

  8. Modeling unsteady state leachate flow in a landfill using finite difference and boundary element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, S.

    1992-01-01

    The physical processes involving leachate flow in a solid waste landfill are described by the unsaturated flow through the refuse to the saturated leachate mound at the bottom of a landfill. The moisture-flow in the unsaturated zone helps build up the saturated leachate mound at the bottom of a landfill. The moisture content in the unsaturated zone is obtained by solving the two-dimensional unsaturated moisture-flow equation using numerical techniques. A two-dimensional unsteady sate Flow Investigation for Landfill Leachate (FILL) model, based on the implicit finite-difference technique, has been developed to describe the leachate flow process in a landfill. To obtain accuracy and efficiency in numerical molding, it is important to investigate the numerical solution techniques suitable to solve the governing equations. Accuracy and efficiency of the boundary integral method over the finite-difference methods has been investigated. Two approaches, direct Green's function and perturbation Green's function formulations have been developed to solve the unsaturated flow problem. Direct Green's function and perturbation Green's function boundary integral solutions are found to be more accurate than both the Gauss-Seidel iteration and Gauss-Jordon elimination method of finite-difference solution. The efficiency of the boundary integral formulation for the computation of the moisture-flux is an advantage that is useful to estimate leachate of the moisture-flux is an advantage that is useful to estimate leachate accretion in a landfill. A close agreement of the internal fluxes with the exact solution shows the ability of the boundary integral methods to compute accurate recharge from the unsaturated zone to the saturated leachate mound.

  9. A study of unstable rock failures using finite difference and discrete element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, Ryan J.

    Case histories in mining have long described pillars or faces of rock failing violently with an accompanying rapid ejection of debris and broken material into the working areas of the mine. These unstable failures have resulted in large losses of life and collapses of entire mine panels. Modern mining operations take significant steps to reduce the likelihood of unstable failure, however eliminating their occurrence is difficult in practice. Researchers over several decades have supplemented studies of unstable failures through the application of various numerical methods. The direction of the current research is to extend these methods and to develop improved numerical tools with which to study unstable failures in underground mining layouts. An extensive study is first conducted on the expression of unstable failure in discrete element and finite difference methods. Simulated uniaxial compressive strength tests are run on brittle rock specimens. Stable or unstable loading conditions are applied onto the brittle specimens by a pair of elastic platens with ranging stiffnesses. Determinations of instability are established through stress and strain histories taken for the specimen and the system. Additional numerical tools are then developed for the finite difference method to analyze unstable failure in larger mine models. Instability identifiers are established for assessing the locations and relative magnitudes of unstable failure through measures of rapid dynamic motion. An energy balance is developed which calculates the excess energy released as a result of unstable equilibria in rock systems. These tools are validated through uniaxial and triaxial compressive strength tests and are extended to models of coal pillars and a simplified mining layout. The results of the finite difference simulations reveal that the instability identifiers and excess energy calculations provide a generalized methodology for assessing unstable failures within potentially complex

  10. A finite-difference program for stresses in anisotropic, layered plates in bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamon, N. J.

    1975-01-01

    The interlaminar stresses induced in a layered laminate that is bent into a cylindrical surface are studied. The laminate is modeled as a continuum, and the resulting elasticity equations are solved using the finite difference method. The report sets forth the mathematical framework, presents some preliminary results, and provides a listing and explanation of the computer program. Significant among the results are apparent symmetry relationships that will reduce the numerical size of certain problems and an interlaminar stress behavior having a sharp rise at the free edges.

  11. The electromagnetic modeling of thin apertures using the finite-difference time-domain technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarest, Kenneth R.

    1987-01-01

    A technique which computes transient electromagnetic responses of narrow apertures in complex conducting scatterers was implemented as an extension of previously developed Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) computer codes. Although these apertures are narrow with respect to the wavelengths contained within the power spectrum of excitation, this technique does not require significantly more computer resources to attain the increased resolution at the apertures. In the report, an analytical technique which utilizes Babinet's principle to model the apertures is developed, and an FDTD computer code which utilizes this technique is described.

  12. Slat Noise Predictions Using Higher-Order Finite-Difference Methods on Overset Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housman, Jeffrey A.; Kiris, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Computational aeroacoustic simulations using the structured overset grid approach and higher-order finite difference methods within the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) solver framework are presented for slat noise predictions. The simulations are part of a collaborative study comparing noise generation mechanisms between a conventional slat and a Krueger leading edge flap. Simulation results are compared with experimental data acquired during an aeroacoustic test in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility. Details of the structured overset grid, numerical discretization, and turbulence model are provided.

  13. A multigrid algorithm for the cell-centered finite difference scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Richard E.; Shen, Jian

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a non-variational V-cycle multigrid algorithm based on the cell-centered finite difference scheme for solving a second-order elliptic problem with discontinuous coefficients. Due to the poor approximation property of piecewise constant spaces and the non-variational nature of our scheme, one step of symmetric linear smoothing in our V-cycle multigrid scheme may fail to be a contraction. Again, because of the simple structure of the piecewise constant spaces, prolongation and restriction are trivial; we save significant computation time with very promising computational results.

  14. Varieties of operator manipulation. [for solving differential equations and calculating finite differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doohovskoy, A.

    1977-01-01

    A change in MACSYMA syntax is proposed to accommodate the operator manipulators necessary to implement direct and indirect methods for the solution of differential equations, calculus of finite differences, and the fractional calculus, as well as their modern counterparts. To illustrate the benefits and convenience of this syntax extension, an example is given to show how MACSYMA's pattern-matching capability can be used to implement a particular set of operator identities which can then be used to obtain exact solutions to nonlinear differential equations.

  15. A noniterative finite difference method for the compressible unsteady laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. S.; Kim, J. S.

    1985-11-01

    An investigation involving the determination of the friction drag and the rate of heat transfer at the surface of a body in dynamic motion must take into account details regarding the unsteady viscous flow. Difficulties concerning such an investigation are related to interaction effects due to aspects of increased dimensionality, nonlinearity, and compressibility. In the present study, the nonlinearity is eliminated by making use of approaches considered by Beam and Warming (1978) and Orlandi and Ferziger (1981). These approaches involve the employment of a technique of linearizing the general nonlinear implicit finite difference equations without sacrificing accuracy. A noniterative numerical formulation is developed to solve the unsteady compressible laminar boundary layer equations efficiently.

  16. 2D numerical simulation of the MEP energy-transport model with a finite difference scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, V. . E-mail: romano@dmi.unict.it

    2007-02-10

    A finite difference scheme of Scharfetter-Gummel type is used to simulate a consistent energy-transport model for electron transport in semiconductors devices, free of any fitting parameters, formulated on the basis of the maximum entropy principle. Simulations of silicon n{sup +}-n-n{sup +} diodes, 2D-MESFET and 2D-MOSFET and comparisons with the results obtained by a direct simulation of the Boltzmann transport equation and with other energy-transport models, known in the literature, show the validity of the model and the robustness of the numerical scheme.

  17. Subwavelength metrological chracterization by Mueller matrix polarimeter and finite difference time domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Dev, Kapil; Asundi, Anand

    2016-11-01

    Wire grid polarizers (WGP), are sub-wavelength gratings with applications in display projection system due to their compact size, wide field of view and long-term stability. Measurement and testing of these structures are important to optimize their use. This is done by first measuring the Mueller matrix of the WGP using a Mueller matrix polarimeter. Next the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to simulate a similar Mueller matrix thus providing the period and step height of the WGP. This approach may lead to more generic determination of sub-wavelength structures including diffractive optical structures.

  18. Shock capturing finite difference algorithms for supersonic flow past fighter and missile type configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, S.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of a reliable, shock capturing finite difference method to solve the Euler equations for inviscid, supersonic flow past fighter and missile type configurations is highly desirable. The numerical method must have a firm theoretical foundation and must be robust and efficient. It should be able to treat subsonic pockets in a predominantly supersonic flow. The method must also be easily applicable to the complex topologies of the aerodynamic configuration under consideration. The ongoing approach to this task is described and for steady supersonic flows is presented. This scheme is the basic numerical method. Results of work obtained during previous years are presented.

  19. A staggered mesh finite difference scheme for the computation of hypersonic Euler flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A shock capturing finite difference method for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws is presented which avoids the need to solve Riemann problems while being competitive in performance with other current methods. A staggered spatial mesh is employed, so that complicated nonlinear waves generated at cell interfaces are averaged over cell interiors at the next time level. The full method combines to form a conservative version of the modified method of characteristics. The advantages of the method are discussed, and numerical results are presented for the two-dimensional double ellipse problem.

  20. HEMP 3D -- a finite difference program for calculating elastic-plastic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.

    1993-05-26

    The HEMP 3D program can be used to solve problems in solid mechanics involving dynamic plasticity and time dependent material behavior and problems in gas dynamics. The equations of motion, the conservation equations, and the constitutive relations are solved by finite difference methods following the format of the HEMP computer simulation program formulated in two space dimensions and time. Presented here is an update of the 1975 report on the HEMP 3D numerical technique. The present report includes the sliding surface routines programmed by Robert Gulliford.

  1. Polarization-current-based, finite-difference time-domain, near-to-far-field transformation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yong; Moloney, Jerome V

    2009-05-15

    A near-to-far-field transformation algorithm for three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain is presented in this Letter. This approach is based directly on the polarization current of the scatterer, not the scattered near fields. It therefore eliminates the numerical errors originating from the spatial offset of the E and H fields, inherent in the standard near-to-far-field transformation. The proposed method is validated via direct comparisons with the analytical Lorentz-Mie solutions of plane waves scattered by large dielectric and metallic spheres with strong forward-scattering lobes.

  2. Finite-difference solution for turbulent swirling compressible flow in axisymmetric ducts with struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1974-01-01

    A finite-difference procedure for computing the turbulent, swirling, compressible flow in axisymmetric ducts is described. Arbitrary distributions of heat and mass transfer at the boundaries can be treated, and the effects of struts, inlet guide vanes, and flow straightening vanes can be calculated. The calculation procedure is programmed in FORTRAN 4 and has operated successfully on the UNIVAC 1108, IBM 360, and CDC 6600 computers. The analysis which forms the basis of the procedure, a detailed description of the computer program, and the input/output formats are presented. The results of sample calculations performed with the computer program are compared with experimental data.

  3. An efficient finite-difference strategy for sensitivity analysis of stochastic models of biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Monjur; Ingalls, Brian; Ilie, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis characterizes the dependence of a model's behaviour on system parameters. It is a critical tool in the formulation, characterization, and verification of models of biochemical reaction networks, for which confident estimates of parameter values are often lacking. In this paper, we propose a novel method for sensitivity analysis of discrete stochastic models of biochemical reaction systems whose dynamics occur over a range of timescales. This method combines finite-difference approximations and adaptive tau-leaping strategies to efficiently estimate parametric sensitivities for stiff stochastic biochemical kinetics models, with negligible loss in accuracy compared with previously published approaches. We analyze several models of interest to illustrate the advantages of our method.

  4. Computation of wing-vortex interaction in transonic flow using implicit finite difference algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Steger, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    An implicit delta form finite difference algorithm for Euler equations in conservation law form was used in preliminary calculations of three dimensional wing vortex interaction. Both steady and unsteady transonic flow wing vortex interactions are computed. The computations themselves are meant to guide upcoming wind tunnel experiments of the same flow field. Various modifications to the numerical method that are intended to improve computational efficiency are also described and tested in both two and three dimensions. Combination of these methods can reduce the overall computational time by a factor of 4.

  5. Rotordynamic coefficients for labyrinth seals calculated by means of a finite difference technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordmann, R.; Weiser, P.

    1989-01-01

    The compressible, turbulent, time dependent and three dimensional flow in a labyrinth seal can be described by the Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. Additionally, equations for mass and energy conservation and an equation of state are required. To solve these equations, a perturbation analysis is performed yielding zeroth order equations for centric shaft position and first order equations describing the flow field for small motions around the seal center. For numerical solution a finite difference method is applied to the zeroth and first order equations resulting in leakage and dynamic seal coefficients respectively.

  6. Finite Differences and Collocation Methods for the Solution of the Two Dimensional Heat Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouatchou, Jules

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we combine finite difference approximations (for spatial derivatives) and collocation techniques (for the time component) to numerically solve the two dimensional heat equation. We employ respectively a second-order and a fourth-order schemes for the spatial derivatives and the discretization method gives rise to a linear system of equations. We show that the matrix of the system is non-singular. Numerical experiments carried out on serial computers, show the unconditional stability of the proposed method and the high accuracy achieved by the fourth-order scheme.

  7. DNS of premixed turbulent V-flame: coupling spectral and finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauguel, Raphael; Vervisch, Luc; Domingo, Pascale

    2005-01-01

    To allow for a reliable examination of the interaction between velocity fluctuations, acoustics and combustion, a novel numerical procedure is discussed in which a spectral solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is directly associated to a high-order finite difference fully compressible DNS solver (sixth order PADE). Using this combination of high-order solvers with accurate boundary conditions, simulations have been performed where a turbulent premixed V-shape flame develops in grid turbulence. In the light of the DNS results, a sub-model for premixed turbulent combustion is analyzed. To cite this article: R. Hauguel et al., C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  8. A 3-dimensional finite-difference method for calculating the dynamic coefficients of seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the dynamic coefficients of seals with arbitrary geometry is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations are used in conjunction with the k-e turbulence model to describe the turbulent flow. These equations are solved by a full 3-dimensional finite-difference procedure instead of the normally used perturbation analysis. The time dependence of the equations is introduced by working with a coordinate system rotating with the precession frequency of the shaft. The results of this theory are compared with coefficients calculated by a perturbation analysis and with experimental results.

  9. Arbitrary Order Mixed Mimetic Finite Differences Method with Nodal Degrees of Freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Iaroshenko, Oleksandr; Gyrya, Vitaliy; Manzini, Gianmarco

    2016-09-01

    In this work we consider a modification to an arbitrary order mixed mimetic finite difference method (MFD) for a diffusion equation on general polygonal meshes [1]. The modification is based on moving some degrees of freedom (DoF) for a flux variable from edges to vertices. We showed that for a non-degenerate element this transformation is locally equivalent, i.e. there is a one-to-one map between the new and the old DoF. Globally, on the other hand, this transformation leads to a reduction of the total number of degrees of freedom (by up to 40%) and additional continuity of the discrete flux.

  10. Finite-difference time-domain analysis of light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline droplet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaho; Iwai, Yosuke; Uchida, Yoshiaki; Nishiyama, Norikazu

    2016-08-01

    We numerically analyzed the light propagation in cholesteric liquid crystalline (CLC) droplet array by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The FDTD method successfully reproduced the experimental light path observed in the complicated photonic structure of the CLC droplet array more accurately than the analysis of CLC droplets by geometric optics with Bragg condition, and this method help us understand the polarization of the propagating light waves. The FDTD method holds great promise for the design of various photonic devices composed of curved photonic materials like CLC droplets and microcapsules.

  11. WONDY V: A one-dimensional finite-difference wave-propagation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, M. E.; Lawrence, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    WONDY V solves the finite difference analogs to the Lagrangian equations of motion in one spatial dimension (planar, cylindrical, or spherical). Simulations of explosive detonation, energy deposition, plate impact, and dynamic fracture are possible, using a variety of existing material models. In addition, WONDY proves to be a powerful tool in the evaluation of new constitutive models. A preprocessor is available to allocate storage arrays commensurate with problem size, and automatic rezoning may be employed to improve resolution. A description of the equations solved, available material models, operating instructions, and sample problems are given.

  12. WONDY V: a one-dimensional finite-difference wave-propagation code

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, M.E.; Lawrence, R.J.

    1982-06-01

    WONDY V solves the finite difference analogs to the Lagrangian equations of motion in one spatial dimension (planar, cylindrical, or spherical). Simulations of explosive detonation, energy deposition, plate impact, and dynamic fracture are possible, using a variety of existing material models. In addition, WONDY has proven to be a powerful tool in the evaluation of new constitutive models. A preprocessor is available to allocate storage arrays commensurate with problem size, and automatic rezoning may be employed to improve resolution. This document provides a description of the equations solved, available material models, operating instructions, and sample problems.

  13. One-dimensional transient finite difference model of an operational salinity gradient solar pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Golding, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling approach used to simulate the transient behavior of a salinity gradient solar pond. A system of finite difference equations are used to generate the time dependent temperature and salinity profiles within the pond. The stability of the pond, as determined by the capacity of the resulting salinity profile to suppress thermal convection within the primary gradient region of the pond, is continually monitored and when necessary adjustments are made to the thickness of the gradient zone. Results of the model are then compared to measurements taken during two representative seasonal periods at the University of Texas at El Paso's (UTEP's) research solar pond.

  14. High order finite difference and multigrid methods for spatially evolving instability in a planar channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.

    1993-05-01

    The fourth-order finite-difference scheme with fully implicit time-marching presently used to computationally study the spatial instability of planar Poiseuille flow incorporates a novel treatment for outflow boundary conditions that renders the buffer area as short as one wavelength. A semicoarsening multigrid method accelerates convergence for the implicit scheme at each time step; a line-distributive relaxation is developed as a robust fast solver that is efficient for anisotropic grids. Computational cost is no greater than that of explicit schemes, and excellent agreement with linear theory is obtained.

  15. A comparison of finite difference methods for solving Laplace's equation on curvilinear coordinate systems. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Various finite difference techniques used to solve Laplace's equation are compared. Curvilinear coordinate systems are used on two dimensional regions with irregular boundaries, specifically, regions around circles and airfoils. Truncation errors are analyzed for three different finite difference methods. The false boundary method and two point and three point extrapolation schemes, used when having the Neumann boundary condition are considered and the effects of spacing and nonorthogonality in the coordinate systems are studied.

  16. Computing interaural differences through finite element modeling of idealized human heads.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tingli; Rakerd, Brad; Hartmann, William M

    2015-09-01

    Acoustical interaural differences were computed for a succession of idealized shapes approximating the human head-related anatomy: sphere, ellipsoid, and ellipsoid with neck and torso. Calculations were done as a function of frequency (100-2500 Hz) and for source azimuths from 10 to 90 degrees using finite element models. The computations were compared to free-field measurements made with a manikin. Compared to a spherical head, the ellipsoid produced greater large-scale variation with frequency in both interaural time differences and interaural level differences, resulting in better agreement with the measurements. Adding a torso, represented either as a large plate or as a rectangular box below the neck, further improved the agreement by adding smaller-scale frequency variation. The comparisons permitted conjectures about the relationship between details of interaural differences and gross features of the human anatomy, such as the height of the head, and length of the neck.

  17. Computing interaural differences through finite element modeling of idealized human heads

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tingli; Rakerd, Brad; Hartmann, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical interaural differences were computed for a succession of idealized shapes approximating the human head-related anatomy: sphere, ellipsoid, and ellipsoid with neck and torso. Calculations were done as a function of frequency (100–2500 Hz) and for source azimuths from 10 to 90 degrees using finite element models. The computations were compared to free-field measurements made with a manikin. Compared to a spherical head, the ellipsoid produced greater large-scale variation with frequency in both interaural time differences and interaural level differences, resulting in better agreement with the measurements. Adding a torso, represented either as a large plate or as a rectangular box below the neck, further improved the agreement by adding smaller-scale frequency variation. The comparisons permitted conjectures about the relationship between details of interaural differences and gross features of the human anatomy, such as the height of the head, and length of the neck. PMID:26428792

  18. Transient analysis of printed lines using finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid

    2012-03-29

    Comprehensive studies of ultra-wideband pulses and electromagnetic coupling on printed coupled lines have been performed using full-wave 3D finite-difference time-domain analysis. Effects of unequal phase velocities of coupled modes, coupling between line traces, and the frequency dispersion on the waveform fidelity and crosstalk have been investigated in detail. To discriminate the contributions of different mechanisms into pulse evolution, single and coupled microstrip lines without (ϵr = 1) and with (ϵr > 1) dielectric substrates have been examined. To consistently compare the performance of the coupled lines with substrates of different permittivities and transients of different characteristic times, a generic metric similar to the electrical wavelength has been introduced. The features of pulse propagation on coupled lines with layered and pedestal substrates and on the irregular traces have been explored. Finally, physical interpretations of the simulation results are discussed in the paper.

  19. Enhancing finite differences with radial basis functions: Experiments on the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyer, Natasha; Barnett, Gregory A.; Wicker, Louis J.

    2016-07-01

    Polynomials are used together with polyharmonic spline (PHS) radial basis functions (RBFs) to create local RBF-finite-difference (RBF-FD) weights on different node layouts for spatial discretizations that can be viewed as enhancements of the classical finite differences (FD). The presented method replicates the convergence properties of FD but for arbitrary node layouts. It is tested on the 2D compressible Navier-Stokes equations at low Mach number, relevant to atmospheric flows. Test cases are taken from the numerical weather prediction community and solved on bounded domains. Thus, attention is given on how to handle boundaries with the RBF-FD method, as well as a novel implementation for hyperviscosity. Comparisons are done on Cartesian, hexagonal, and quasi-uniform node layouts. Consideration and guidelines are given on PHS order, polynomial degree and stencil size. The main advantages of the present method are: 1) capturing the basic physics of the problem surprisingly well, even at very coarse resolutions, 2) high-order accuracy without the need of tuning a shape parameter, and 3) the inclusion of polynomials eliminates stagnation (saturation) errors. A MATLAB code is given to calculate the differentiation weights for this novel approach.

  20. On the Definition of Surface Potentials for Finite-Difference Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For a class of linear constant-coefficient finite-difference operators of the second order, we introduce the concepts similar to those of conventional single- and double-layer potentials for differential operators. The discrete potentials are defined completely independently of any notion related to the approximation of the continuous potentials on the grid. We rather use all approach based on differentiating, and then inverting the differentiation of a function with surface discontinuity of a particular kind, which is the most general way of introducing surface potentials in the theory of distributions. The resulting finite-difference "surface" potentials appear to be solutions of the corresponding continuous potentials. Primarily, this pertains to the possibility of representing a given solution to the homogeneous equation on the domain as a variety of surface potentials, with the density defined on the domain's boundary. At the same time the discrete surface potentials can be interpreted as one specific realization of the generalized potentials of Calderon's type, and consequently, their approximation properties can be studied independently in the framework of the difference potentials method by Ryaben'kii. The motivation for introducing and analyzing the discrete surface potentials was provided by the problems of active shielding and control of sound, in which the aforementioned source terms that drive the potentials are interpreted as the acoustic control sources that cancel out the unwanted noise on a predetermined region of interest.