Science.gov

Sample records for finite disk manifests

  1. The Gravitational Force and Potential of the Finite Mestel Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Earl

    2012-03-01

    Mestel determined the surface mass distribution of the finite disk for which the circular velocity is constant in the disk and found the gravitational field for points in the z = 0 plane. Here we find the exact closed form solutions for the potential and the gravitational field of this disk in cylindrical coordinates over all the space. The finite Mestel disk (FMD) is characterized by a cuspy mass distribution in the inner disk region and by an exponential distribution in the outer region of the disk. The FMD is quite different from the better known exponential disk or the untruncated Mestel disk which, being infinite in extent, are not realistic models of real spiral galaxies. In particular, the FMD requires significantly less mass to explain a measured velocity curve.

  2. THE GRAVITATIONAL FORCE AND POTENTIAL OF THE FINITE MESTEL DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Earl

    2012-03-10

    Mestel determined the surface mass distribution of the finite disk for which the circular velocity is constant in the disk and found the gravitational field for points in the z = 0 plane. Here we find the exact closed form solutions for the potential and the gravitational field of this disk in cylindrical coordinates over all the space. The finite Mestel disk (FMD) is characterized by a cuspy mass distribution in the inner disk region and by an exponential distribution in the outer region of the disk. The FMD is quite different from the better known exponential disk or the untruncated Mestel disk which, being infinite in extent, are not realistic models of real spiral galaxies. In particular, the FMD requires significantly less mass to explain a measured velocity curve.

  3. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-06

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  4. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  5. Manifestations of dynamo driven large-scale magnetic field in accretion disks of compact objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chagelishvili, G. D.; Chanishvili, R. G.; Lominadze, J. G.; Sokhadze, Z. A.

    1991-01-01

    A turbulent dynamo nonlinear theory of turbulence was developed that shows that in the compact objects of accretion disks, the generated large-scale magnetic field (when the generation takes place) has a practically toroidal configuration. Its energy density can be much higher than turbulent pulsations energy density, and it becomes comparable with the thermal energy density of the medium. On this basis, the manifestations to which the large-scale magnetic field can lead at the accretion onto black holes and gravimagnetic rotators, respectively, are presented.

  6. Finite element design study of a bladed, flat rotating disk to simulate cracking in a typical turbine disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2005-05-01

    Developing health management and ultrasafe engine technologies are the primary goals of NASA's Aviation Safety Program. Besides improving safety, health monitoring can also reduce maintenance costs. A unique disk spin simulation system was assembled by the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group at NASA Glenn Research Center to verify and study a crack detection technique based upon observing center of mass changes of the rotor system using various sensing technologies. This paper describes the finite element analysis results of low cost, a 25.4 cm (10 in.) diameter, flat turbine disk used to evaluate the detection techniques by simulating typical cracks observed in turbine engine disks. Changes in radial tip displacement and center of mass are presented as a function of speed, crack size and location.

  7. Finite element design study of a bladed, flat rotating disk to simulate cracking in a typical turbine disk; part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Baakilini, George Y.

    2006-03-01

    Health management development for advanced propulsion systems and ultrasafe engine technologies continues to be among the NASA's aviation safety program goals. Health management attempts to predict, detect, and prevent safety-significant propulsion malfunctions. The primary goal is to minimize the number of propulsion system faults that leads or contribute to civil aircraft accidents. Health monitoring of essential and key components in aircraft engines such as rotors continues to interest engine makers and aviation safety government institutions to improve safety and to lower maintenance costs. Having reliable diagnostic tools for damage detection and health monitoring of rotating components is important to maintain engine safety and reliability. This paper presents finite element analyses as a means to study the durability issues of a propulsion component such as a rotor disk. The analyses are carried out under representative engine loading conditions to further investigate the application, the performance, and the functionality of a crack detection system. Rotational speeds in the range of 2000 to 10000 rpm are used. Several key design parameters such as center of mass shift, induced cracks that ranged in length from a minimum of 0.508 cm (0.2 inches) to a maximum of 5.08 cm (2.0 inches), attachment blades and typical holes within the disk are all being explored to study their influence on the crack detection system performance. Results showing relevant influence of these parameters on the performance of the disk and the crack detection systems are presented.

  8. Purely hydrodynamic ordering of rotating disks at a finite Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yusuke; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Self-organization of moving objects in hydrodynamic environments has recently attracted considerable attention in connection to natural phenomena and living systems. However, the underlying physical mechanism is much less clear due to the intrinsically nonequilibrium nature, compared with self-organization of thermal systems. Hydrodynamic interactions are believed to play a crucial role in such phenomena. To elucidate the fundamental physical nature of many-body hydrodynamic interactions at a finite Reynolds number, here we study a system of co-rotating hard disks in a two-dimensional viscous fluid at zero temperature. Despite the absence of thermal noise, this system exhibits rich phase behaviours, including a fluid state with diffusive dynamics, a cluster state, a hexatic state, a glassy state, a plastic crystal state and phase demixing. We reveal that these behaviours are induced by the off-axis and many-body nature of nonlinear hydrodynamic interactions and the finite time required for propagating the interactions by momentum diffusion.

  9. Observational Manifestation of Chaos in the Gaseous Disk of the Grand Design Spiral Galaxy NGC 3631

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.; Polyachenko, E. V.

    2002-10-01

    The main goal of the paper is to demonstrate the presence of chaotic trajectories in the gaseous disk of a real spiral galaxy. As an example we have chosen NGC 3631. First, we show the stationarity of the 3-D velocity field restored from the observed line-of-sight velocity field of the gaseous disk. That allows to analyse behaviour of the trajectories of the fluid particles (gas clouds) in the disk, calculating the corresponding observed streamlines. We estimate the Lyapunov characteristic numbers using their independence of the metrics and show the existence of chaotic trajectories outside the vortices which are present in the velocity field, and in the vicinity of the saddle point. Related spectra of the stretching numbers for some trajectories are also calculated.

  10. Extinction efficiencies from DDA calculations solved for finite circular cylinders and disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withrow, J. R.; Cox, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most commonly noted uncertainties with respect to the modeling of cirrus clouds and their effect upon the planetary radiation balance is the disputed validity of the use of Mie scattering results as an approximation to the scattering results of the hexagonal plates and columns found in cirrus clouds. This approximation has historically been a kind of default, a result of the lack of an appropriate analytical solution of Maxwell's equations to particles other than infinite cylinders and spheroids. Recently, however, the use of such approximate techniques as the Discrete Dipole Approximation has made scattering solutions on such particles a computationally intensive but feasible possibility. In this study, the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) developed by Flatau (1992) is used to find such solutions for homogeneous, circular cylinders and disks. This can serve to not only assess the validity of the current radiative transfer schemes which are available for the study of cirrus but also to extend the current approximation of equivalent spheres to an approximation of second order, homogeneous finite circular cylinders and disks. The results will be presented in the form of a single variable, the extinction efficiency.

  11. Utilizing a general purpose finite element approach for assessing the rotordynamic response of a flexible disk/shaft system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, Adam C.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.

    2014-04-01

    With continual improvement in computing power and software codes that simulate multiple physical effects, complex analyses can be performed that allow for more accurate modeling of real world systems. Here, a general purpose finite element (FE) code was utilized to conduct a rotordynamic assessment of a rotor system containing a flexible disk. Typically, specialized rotordynamic software packages make numerous assumptions to simplify the various types of rotor response calculations. Disks, for example, are commonly assumed rigid and are represented by lumped masses or discrete beam elements. Such idealizations may cause inaccuracies when calculating critical speeds for rotor systems that involve a relatively flexible disk. By utilizing a general purpose FE approach, where multiple rotational effects are considered, a more accurate model can be developed that includes the dynamic contributions of a flexible disk. This paper illustrates the rotordynamic analysis of a generic, yet realistic, compressor with a shrouded impeller model, without extensive geometric simplification. Furthermore, through the utilization of the fully featured geometry, several dynamic effects are demonstrated to have a significant influence on the rotor system's Campbell diagram. The dynamic effects investigated include disk flexibility, stress stiffening, and spin softening. It is shown that neglecting any of these may cause significant errors regarding the rotordynamic analysis predictions.

  12. Effect of Degeneration on Fluid–Solid Interaction within Intervertebral Disk Under Cyclic Loading – A Meta-Model Analysis of Finite Element Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Mohammad; Khalaf, Kinda; Kuo, Ya-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Haghpanahi, Mohammad; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The risk of low back pain resulted from cyclic loadings is greater than that resulted from prolonged static postures. Disk degeneration results in degradation of disk solid structures and decrease of water contents, which is caused by activation of matrix digestive enzymes. The mechanical responses resulted from internal solid–fluid interactions of degenerative disks to cyclic loadings are not well studied yet. The fluid–solid interactions in disks can be evaluated by mathematical models, especially the poroelastic finite element (FE) models. We developed a robust disk poroelastic FE model to analyze the effect of degeneration on solid–fluid interactions within disk subjected to cyclic loadings at different loading frequencies. A backward analysis combined with in vitro experiments was used to find the elastic modulus and hydraulic permeability of intact and enzyme-induced degenerated porcine disks. The results showed that the averaged peak-to-peak disk deformations during the in vitro cyclic tests were well fitted with limited FE simulations and a quadratic response surface regression for both disk groups. The results showed that higher loading frequency increased the intradiscal pressure, decreased the total fluid loss, and slightly increased the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. Enzyme-induced degeneration decreased the intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss, and barely changed the maximum axial stress within solid matrix. The increase of intradiscal pressure and total fluid loss with loading frequency was less sensitive after the frequency elevated to 0.1 Hz for the enzyme-induced degenerated disk. Based on this study, it is found that enzyme-induced degeneration decreases energy attenuation capability of disk, but less change the strength of disk. PMID:25674562

  13. Trigonal warping, pseudodiffusive transport, and finite-system version of the Lifshitz transition in magnetoconductance of bilayer graphene Corbino disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rut, Grzegorz; Rycerz, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Using the transfer matrix in the angular-momentum space we investigate the impact of trigonal warping on magnetotransport and scaling properties of a ballistic bilayer graphene in the Corbino geometry. Although the conductivity at the charge-neutrality point and zero magnetic field exhibits a one-parameter scaling, the shot-noise characteristics, quantified by the Fano factor F and the third charge-transfer cumulant R , remain pseudodiffusive. This shows that the pseudodiffusive transport regime in bilayer graphene is not related to the universal value of the conductivity but can be identified by higher charge-transfer cumulants. For Corbino disks with larger radii ratios, the conductivity is suppressed by the trigonal warping, mainly because the symmetry reduction amplifies backscattering for normal modes corresponding to angular-momentum eigenvalues ± 2 ℏ . Weak magnetic fields enhance the conductivity, reaching the maximal value near the crossover field BL=4/3 √{3 }(ℏ /e ) t't⊥[t02a (Ro-Ri) ]-1 , where t0 (t⊥) is the nearest-neighbor intralayer (interlayer) hopping integral, t' is the skew-interlayer hopping integral, and Ro (Ri) is the outer (inner) disk radius. For magnetic fields B ≳ BL we observe quasiperiodic conductance oscillations characterized by the decreasing mean value <σ > -σ0∝ BL/B , where σ0=(8 /π ) e2/h . The conductivity, as well as higher charge-transfer cumulants, show beating patterns with an envelope period proportional to √{B /BL }. This constitutes a qualitative difference between the high-field (B ≫ BL ) magnetotransport in the t'=0 case [earlier discussed in Rut and Rycerz, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 26, 485301 (2014), 10.1088/0953-8984/26/48/485301] and in the t'≠ 0 case, providing a finite-system analog of the Lifshitz transition.

  14. Reduction in disk and fiber stresses by axial distraction is higher in cervical disk with fibers oriented toward the vertical rather than horizontal plane: a finite element model analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mozammil; Gay, Ralph E; An, Kai-Nan

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the biomechanical changes that occur in a compressed cervical disk with the application of axial distraction when the annular fiber orientation angles are varied between the horizontal and vertical planes. A 3-dimensional finite element (FE) model of a cervical motion segment was developed. From this model, 3 FE models were developed and validated corresponding to 3 different fiber angles relative to the end plate-disk interface: +/-25 degrees (oriented toward the horizontal plane), +/-45 degrees (midway between the horizontal and vertical planes), and +/-65 degrees (oriented toward the vertical plane). Compression (50N), followed by an axial distraction (17N), was simulated. Annulus and nucleus stresses, von-Mises fiber stresses, annulus radial bulging, and nucleus radial displacement were computed. Hard tissue (cortical and cancellous bones and end plate) stresses were also quantified. With increasing fiber angle (toward vertical), axial segmental stiffness increased, whereas annulus and nucleus stresses, fiber stresses, annulus radial bulging, and nucleus radial displacement decreased. Similar outcomes were observed when axial distraction was applied to the compressed segment. Hard tissues were not affected with varying fiber angles; however, their mechanics changed when axial distraction was applied on the compressed segment. We noted lower disk stress in axial distraction than in compression. The results confirmed the hypothesis that fibers oriented toward the vertical plane reduce disk and fiber stresses and disk bulging. By aligning annular fibers toward the vertical plane axial distraction may help reduce disk and fiber stresses. Axial disk stresses decrease radially from outside to inside under compressive loading and that the anterior annulus is more stressed than the posterior-lateral annulus during both compression and distraction. Stresses decreased in both the annulus tissue matrix and fibers with increasing

  15. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disk. This may place pressure on nearby nerves or the spinal cord. ... Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated ... LBP - herniated disk; Sciatica - herniated disk; Herniated disk

  16. TM01-mode microwave propagation property analysis for plasmas with disk-plate windows by a finite-difference time-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Fujita, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Taiki; Teramoto, Koji; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Kagami, Shin; Furukawa, Masakazu

    2007-07-15

    Numerical studies of microwave propagation properties in a conical horn and an adjustable waveguides, and for plasmas generated under disk-plate windows of a 220 mm diameter and in a vacuum chamber are studied by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method including plasma equations. In the numerical studies, a TM01-mode microwave of 2.45 GHz at a power of 1 kW is supplied from the top of the conical horn waveguide. In addition, numerical results by the FDTD method are compared with experimental results, and a validity of the numerical results is investigated. From the numerical results, it is found that the TM01-mode microwave changes its field shape and propagates along inner surfaces of the conical horn and the adjustable waveguides. Then electromagnetic fields of the TM01-mode microwave concentrate at the center surfaces of the disk-plate windows [quartz ({epsilon}{sub r}=3.8), alumina ({epsilon}{sub r}=9.7), and WG20 ({epsilon}{sub r}=20.0)]. A diameter of higher concentration is within 80 mm, and the orientation of electric field is almost vertical to the disk-plate window. The diameters within 80 mm are equivalent to a diameter at a higher electron density in an oxygen plasma experiment in the volume mode at 1 kW and 133 Pa with a quartz window. When heights of the adjustable waveguide are changed from 64 to 244 mm, peaks of electric fields in the heights, where microwave power is estimated to be strongly absorbed into the plasmas, appear and peak positions of the electric fields are observed periodically in surface-wave mode plasmas as well as the volume mode plasmas. Heights of the peaks increase with increasing dielectric constant and peak-to-peak distances of the peak positions decrease with increasing dielectric constant. The peak positions agree to the minimum microwave power reflections tuned by a combination of an autotuning unit and adjustable waveguide heights in experiments. Furthermore, peak positions of relatively absorbed microwave powers in

  17. Unified Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations in axisymmetric finite-gap stagnation and rotating-disk flows

    DOE PAGES

    Coltrin, Michael E.; Kee, Robert J.

    2016-06-18

    This paper develops a unified analysis of stagnation flow heat and mass transport, considering both semi-infinite domains and finite gaps, with and without rotation of the stagnation surface. An important objective is to derive Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations that represent heat and mass transport at the stagnation surface. The approach is based on computationally solving the governing conservation equations in similarity form as a boundary-value problem. The formulation considers ideal gases and incompressible fluids. The correlated results depend on fluid properties in terms of Prandtl, Schmidt, and Damkohler numbers. Heterogeneous chemistry at the stagnation surface is represented as a singlemore » first-order reaction. A composite Reynolds number represents the combination of stagnation flows with and without stagnation-surface rotation.« less

  18. Unified Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations in axisymmetric finite-gap stagnation and rotating-disk flows

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, Michael E.; Kee, Robert J.

    2016-06-18

    This paper develops a unified analysis of stagnation flow heat and mass transport, considering both semi-infinite domains and finite gaps, with and without rotation of the stagnation surface. An important objective is to derive Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations that represent heat and mass transport at the stagnation surface. The approach is based on computationally solving the governing conservation equations in similarity form as a boundary-value problem. The formulation considers ideal gases and incompressible fluids. The correlated results depend on fluid properties in terms of Prandtl, Schmidt, and Damkohler numbers. Heterogeneous chemistry at the stagnation surface is represented as a single first-order reaction. A composite Reynolds number represents the combination of stagnation flows with and without stagnation-surface rotation.

  19. Unified Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations in axisymmetric finite-gap stagnation and rotating-disk flows

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, Michael E.; Kee, Robert J.

    2016-06-18

    This paper develops a unified analysis of stagnation flow heat and mass transport, considering both semi-infinite domains and finite gaps, with and without rotation of the stagnation surface. An important objective is to derive Nusselt- and Sherwood-number correlations that represent heat and mass transport at the stagnation surface. The approach is based on computationally solving the governing conservation equations in similarity form as a boundary-value problem. The formulation considers ideal gases and incompressible fluids. The correlated results depend on fluid properties in terms of Prandtl, Schmidt, and Damkohler numbers. Heterogeneous chemistry at the stagnation surface is represented as a single first-order reaction. A composite Reynolds number represents the combination of stagnation flows with and without stagnation-surface rotation.

  20. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pain if the back is stressed. A herniated disk is a disk that ruptures. This allows the ... or back pain. Your doctor will diagnose a herniated disk with a physical exam and, sometimes, imaging tests. ...

  1. The Milky Way disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.

    2015-08-01

    This review summarises the invited presentation I gave on the Milky Way disc. The idea underneath was to touch those topics that can be considered hot nowadays in the Galactic disk research: the reality of the thick disk, the spiral structure of the Milky Way, and the properties of the outer Galactic disk. A lot of work has been done in recent years on these topics, but a coherent and clear picture is still missing. Detailed studies with high quality spectroscopic data seem to support a dual Galactic disk, with a clear separation into a thin and a thick component. Much confusion and very discrepant ideas still exist concerning the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Our location in the disk makes it impossible to observe it, and we can only infer it. This process of inference is still far from being mature, and depends a lot on the selected tracers, the adopted models and their limitations, which in many cases are neither properly accounted for, nor pondered enough. Finally, there are very different opinions on the size (scale length, truncation radius) of the Galactic disk, and on the interpretation of the observed outer disk stellar populations in terms either of external entities (Monoceros, Triangulus-Andromeda, Canis Major), or as manifestations of genuine disk properties (e.g., warp and flare).

  2. Shock Response of the Clamped Disk in Small Form Factor Hard Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bin; Shu, Dongwei; Shi, Baojun; Lu, Guoxing

    As small form factor (one-inch and smaller) hard disk drives are widely used in portable consumer appliances and gadgets, their mechanical robustness is of greater concern. In the previous work, it is found that when the disk is more tightly clamped, it helps to decrease the shock response of the disk and then avoid the head slap. In this paper, the real boundary condition of the disk for a small form factor hard disk drive from Seagate is investigated numerically. The disk is clamped between the clamp and the hub. The shock response of the disk under a half-sine acceleration pulse is simulated by using the finite element method. In the finite element model, both contact between disk and clamp and contact between disk and hub are considered. According to the simulation results, how to decrease the shock response of the disk is suggested.

  3. Flow between rotating disks. Part 1: Basic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S. J.; Labbe, F.; Kaufman, H. N.; Szeri, A. Z.

    Multiplicity of basic flows, when the fluid is bounded by two infinite disks, reported by several investigators is examined with emphasis on whether, and under what conditions infinite disk flows approximate to laboratory flows between two finite disks. Laser Doppler velocity measurements were obtained in water between finite rotating disks, with and without through flow. Angular velocity ratios were studied for: (1) one disk rotating and the other stationary; (2) co-rotating disks of equal angular velocity; and (3) counter rotating disks of equal but opposite angular velocity. It is concluded that limiting flows are unique and are independent of flow history. With one disk rotating and the other stationary, the mid-radius limiting flow is recognized as the Batchelor profile of infinite disk theory. Other profiles, predicted by this theory to coexist with the Batchelor profile were neither observed experimentally nor were they calculated numerically by the finite disk solution obtained with a Galerkin, b-spline formulation.

  4. Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    PubMed

    Salzman, M B; Sood, S K; Slavin, M L; Rubin, L G

    1992-05-01

    Ocular manifestations of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection, other than conjunctivitis, are uncommon. Optic disk swelling, optic nerve atrophy, retinal exudates and hemorrhages, and cranial nerve palsies have been infrequently reported. We describe a 15-year-old patient who developed bilateral optic disk edema and iritis during an acute infection with M. pneumoniae and review the world literature on findings associated with ocular manifestations of infection with this pathogen. Although our patient experienced complete resolution of iritis and optic disk edema after 6 weeks, several patients described in the literature have experienced permanent sequelae as a result of optic neuropathy.

  5. Persistent Patterns in Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Frolov, Andrei V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-03

    We present a set of new characteristic frequencies associated with accretion disks around compact objects. These frequencies arise from persistent rotating patterns in the disk that are finite in radial extent and driven purely by the gravity of the central body. Their existence depends on general relativistic corrections to orbital motion and, if observed, could be used to probe the strong gravity region around a black hole. We also discuss a possible connection to the puzzle of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  6. Optical Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

  7. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... forearm, or fingers.A slipped disk in the lumbar part of your spine can cause pain in the back and legs. It is often referred to as sciatica. This is because the disk pushes on the sciatic nerve, which runs down your leg. Symptoms include:Pain ...

  8. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  9. Nebra Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásztor, Emília

    An important archaeological find from the Bronze Age has come to light in Germany. It is a round bronze disk adorned with gold figures that might be interpreted as symbols for stars, the sun, and the moon, making the disk the oldest known surviving depiction of celestial objects in Europe. By comparing the iconography and ideography of the disk with archaeological finds, ethnographic material, and historical notes of different cultures and periods, the conclusion has been reached that the compositional elements might be understood as the depiction of a traditional folk worldview.

  10. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density have halved and doubled respectively every 2-2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. In this talk, the recent achievements in magnetic disk recording are first surveyed briefly. Then, the principal areas of current technical development are outlined. Finally, some comments are made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  11. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  12. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized.

  13. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  14. Optical disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Swafford, B.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the different types of optical storage technology is presented. Research efforts to integrate this technology into the VAX/VMS environment are discussed. In addition, plans for future applications of optical disk technology are described. The applications should prove to be beneficial to the NSSDC user community as a whole. Of particular interest is the concentration on the collaboration with the Dynamics Explorer project.

  15. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  16. Thin disk lasers: history and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiser, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    During the early 1990s, collaboration between the German Aerospace Center and the University of Stuttgart started to work on the Thin Disk concept. The core idea behind the thin disk design is the use of a thin, disk-shaped active medium that is cooled through one of the flat faces of the disk. This ensures a large surface-to-volume ratio and therefore provides very efficient thermal management. Today, the thin disk concept is used in various commercial lasers - ranging from compact, efficient low power systems to multi-kW lasers, including cw lasers and also pulsed (femtosecond to nanosecond) oscillators and amplifiers. The whole development of the Thin Disk laser was and will be accompanied by numerical modeling and optimization of the thermal and thermo-mechanic behavior of the disk and also the heat sink structure, mostly based on finite element models. For further increasing the energy and efficiency of pulsed Thin Disk lasers, the effects of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) are a core issue. Actual efforts are oriented towards short pulse and ultra-short pulse amplifiers with (multi-)kW average power or Joule-class Thin Disk amplifiers, but also on new designs for cw thin disk MOPA designs.

  17. Axisymmetric Bending Oscillations of Stellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    1996-12-01

    Self-gravitating stellar disks with random motion support both exponentially growing and, in some cases, purely oscillatory axisymmetric bending modes, unlike their cold disk counterparts. A razor-thin disk with even a very small degree of random motion in the plane is both unstable and possesses a discrete spectrum of neutral modes, irrespective of the sharpness of the edge. Random motion normal to the disk plane is stabilizing but at the same time allows bending waves to couple to the internal vibrations of the particles, which causes the formerly neutral modes to decay through Landau damping. Focusing first on instabilities, I here determine the degree of random motion normal to the plane needed to suppress global, axisymmetric, bending instabilities in a family of self-gravitating disks. As found previously, bending instabilities are suppressed only when the thickness exceeds that expected from a local criterion when the degree of pressure support within the disk plane is comparable to, or exceeds, the support from rotation. Nevertheless, a modest disk thickness would seem to be adequate for the bending stability of most disk galaxies, except perhaps near their centers. The discretization of the neutral spectrum in a zero-thickness disk is due to the existence of a turning point for bending waves in a warm disk, which is absent when the disk is cold. When the disk is given a finite thickness, the discrete neutral modes generally become strongly damped through wave-particle interactions. It is surprising therefore that I find some simulations of warm, stable disks can support (quasi-)neutral, large-scale, bending modes that decay very slowly, if at all.

  18. Gas dynamics for accretion disk simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, R.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of accretion disks can largely be understood in terms of the basic physical processes of mass, energy, and momentum conservation. Despite this, detailed modeling of these systems using modern computational techniques is challenging and controversial. Disturbing differences exist between methods used widely in astrophysics, namely Eulerian finite-difference techniques and particle codes such as SPH. Therefore neither technique is fully satisfactory for accretion disk simulations. This paper describes a new fully Lagrangian method designed to resolve these difficulties.

  19. Gaps in Protoplanetary Disks as Signatures of Planets. III. Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang-Condell, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Polarimetric observations of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars are a powerful way to image protoplanetary disks. However, interpretation of these images is difficult because the degree of polarization is highly sensitive to the angle of scattering of stellar light off the disk surface. We examine how disks with and without gaps created by planets appear in scattered polarized light as a function of inclination angle. Isophotes of inclined disks without gaps are distorted in polarized light, giving the appearance that the disks are more eccentric or more highly inclined than they truly are. Apparent gap locations are unaffected by polarization, but the gap contrast changes. In face-on disks with gaps, we find that the brightened far edge of the gap scatters less polarized light than the rest of the disk, resulting in slightly decreased contrast between the gap trough and the brightened far edge. In inclined disks, gaps can take on the appearance of being localized “holes” in brightness rather than full axisymmetric structures. Photocenter offsets along the minor axis of the disk in both total intensity and polarized intensity images can be readily explained by the finite thickness of the disk. Alone, polarized scattered light images of disks do not necessarily reveal intrinsic disk structure. However, when combined with total intensity images, the orientation of the disk can be deduced and much can be learned about disk structure and dust properties.

  20. Generation of Vortices in Superconducting Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    We study the nucleation of vortices in a thin mesoscopic superconducting disk and stable configurations of vortices as a function of the disk size, the applied magnetic field H and finite temperature T. We also investigate the stability of different vortex states inside the disk. Further, we compare the predictions from Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory and London theory - the GL equations take the superconducting density into account, but the London equations do not. Our simulations from both theories show similar vortex states. As more vortices are generated, more superconducting regions will be destoryed. The GL Equations consider this effect and provide a more accurate estimate.

  1. Generation of Vortices in Superconducting Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-12-01

    We study the nucleation of vortices in a thin mesoscopic superconducting disk and stable configurations of vortices as a function of the disk size, the applied magnetic field H and finite temperature T. We also investigate the stability of different vortex states inside the disk. Further, we compare the predictions from Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory and London theory - the GL equations take the superconducting density into account, but the London equations do not. Our simulations from both theories show similar vortex states. As more vortices are generated, more superconducting regions will be destoryed. The GL Equations consider this effect and provide a more accurate estimate.

  2. Stratified Simulations of Collisionless Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Kota; Hoshino, Masahiro

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a series of stratified-shearing-box simulations of collisionless accretion disks in the recently developed framework of kinetic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), which can handle finite non-gyrotropy of a pressure tensor. Although a fully kinetic simulation predicted a more efficient angular-momentum transport in collisionless disks than in the standard MHD regime, the enhanced transport has not been observed in past kinetic-MHD approaches to gyrotropic pressure anisotropy. For the purpose of investigating this missing link between the fully kinetic and MHD treatments, this paper explores the role of non-gyrotropic pressure and makes the first attempt to incorporate certain collisionless effects into disk-scale, stratified disk simulations. When the timescale of gyrotropization was longer than, or comparable to, the disk-rotation frequency of the orbit, we found that the finite non-gyrotropy selectively remaining in the vicinity of current sheets contributes to suppressing magnetic reconnection in the shearing-box system. This leads to increases both in the saturated amplitude of the MHD turbulence driven by magnetorotational instabilities and in the resultant efficiency of angular-momentum transport. Our results seem to favor the fast advection of magnetic fields toward the rotation axis of a central object, which is required to launch an ultra-relativistic jet from a black hole accretion system in, for example, a magnetically arrested disk state.

  3. Disk Alloy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tim; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack

    2001-01-01

    The advanced powder metallurgy disk alloy ME3 was designed using statistical screening and optimization of composition and processing variables in the NASA HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 "Fin large disks. Scaled-up disks of this alloy were produced at the conclusion of this program to demonstrate these properties in realistic disk shapes. The objective of the UEET disk program was to assess the mechanical properties of these ME3 disks as functions of temperature, in order to estimate the maximum temperature capabilities of this advanced alloy. Scaled-up disks processed in the HSR/EPM Compressor / Turbine Disk program were sectioned, machined into specimens, and tested in tensile, creep, fatigue, and fatigue crack growth tests by NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with General Electric Engine Company and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines. Additional sub-scale disks and blanks were processed and tested to explore the effects of several processing variations on mechanical properties. Scaled-up disks of an advanced regional disk alloy, Alloy 10, were used to evaluate dual microstructure heat treatments. This allowed demonstration of an improved balance of properties in disks with higher strength and fatigue resistance in the bores and higher creep and dwell fatigue crack growth resistance in the rims. Results indicate the baseline ME3 alloy and process has 1300 to 1350 O F temperature capabilities, dependent on detailed disk and engine design property requirements. Chemistry and process enhancements show promise for further increasing temperature capabilities.

  4. The Warped Nuclear Disk of Radio Galaxy 3C 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, G. R.; Quillen, A. C.; Floyd, D. J. E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Baum, S. A.; Axon, D. J.; O'Dea, C. P.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. B.; Miley, G. K.; Capetti, A.; Madrid, J. P.; Perlman, E.

    2005-12-01

    Among radio galaxies containing nuclear dust disks, the bipolar jet axis is generally expected to be perpendicular to the disk major axis. However, the FR I radio source 3C 449, possessing a nearly parallel jet/disk orientation on the sky, is an extreme example of a system that does not conform to this expectation. We examine the 600 pc dusty disk in this galaxy with images from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find that a colormap of the disk exhibits a twist in its isocolor contours (isochromes). We model the colormap by integrating galactic starlight through an absorptive disk, and find that the anomalous twist in the isochromes can be reproduced in the model with a vertically thin, warped disk. The model predicts that the disk is nearly perpendicular to the jet axis within 100 pc of the nucleus. We discuss physical mechanisms capable of causing such a warp. We show that a torque on the disk arising from a possible binary black hole in the AGN or radiation pressure from the AGN causes precession on a timescale that is too long to generate such a warp. However, we estimate that the pressure in the X-ray emitting interstellar medium is large enough to perturb the disk. The warped disk in 3C 449 may be a new manifestation of feedback from an active galactic nucleus.

  5. Equilibrium configuration of a stratus floating above accretion disks: Full-disk calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itanishi, Yusuke; Fukue, Jun

    2017-06-01

    We examine floating strati above a luminous accretion disk, supported by the radiative force from the entire disk, and calculate the equilibrium locus, which depends on the disk luminosity and the optical depth of the stratus. Due to the radiative transfer effect (albedo effect), the floating height of the stratus with a finite optical depth generally becomes high, compared with the particle case. In contrast to the case of the near-disk approximation, moreover, the floating height becomes yet higher in the present full-disk calculation, since the intense radiation from the inner disk is taken into account. As a result, when the disk luminosity normalized by the Eddington luminosity is ∼0.3 and the stratus optical depth is around unity, the stable configuration disappears at around r ∼ 50 rg, rg being the Schwarzschild radius, and the stratus would be blown off as a cloudy wind consisting of many strati with appropriate conditions. This luminosity is sufficiently smaller than the Eddington one, and the present results suggest that the radiation-driven cloudy wind can be easily blown off from the sub-Eddington disk, and this can explain various outflows observed in ultra-fast outflow objects as well as in broad-absorption-line quasars.

  6. UNVEILING THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Espaillat, C.; D'Alessio, P.; Hernandez, J.; Nagel, E.; Luhman, K. L.; Watson, D. M.; Calvet, N.; McClure, M.; Muzerolle, J. E-mail: p.dalessio@crya.unam.m E-mail: erick@astro.ugto.m E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.ed E-mail: melisma@umich.ed

    2010-07-01

    In the past few years, several disks with inner holes that are relatively empty of small dust grains have been detected and are known as transitional disks. Recently, Spitzer has identified a new class of 'pre-transitional disks' with gaps based on near-infrared photometry and mid-infrared spectra; these objects have an optically thick inner disk separated from an optically thick outer disk by an optically thin disk gap. A near-infrared spectrum provided the first confirmation of a gap in the pre-transitional disk of LkCa 15 by verifying that the near-infrared excess emission in this object was due to an optically thick inner disk. Here, we investigate the difference between the nature of the inner regions of transitional and pre-transitional disks using the same veiling-based technique to extract the near-infrared excess emission above the stellar photosphere. However, in this work we use detailed disk models to fit the excess continua as opposed to the simple blackbody fits previously used. We show that the near-infrared excess emission of the previously identified pre-transitional disks of LkCa 15 and UX Tau A in the Taurus cloud as well as the newly identified pre-transitional disk of ROX 44 in Ophiuchus can be fit with an inner disk wall located at the dust destruction radius. We also present detailed modeling of the broadband spectral energy distributions of these objects, taking into account the effect of shadowing by the inner disk on the outer disk, but considering the finite size of the star, unlike other recent treatments. The near-infrared excess continua of these three pre-transitional disks, which can be explained by optically thick inner disks, are significantly different from that of the transitional disks of GM Aur, whose near-infrared excess continuum can be reproduced by emission from sub-micron-sized optically thin dust, and DM Tau, whose near-infrared spectrum is consistent with a disk hole that is relatively free of small dust. The structure

  7. Supersized Disk Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-08

    This illustration compares the size of a gargantuan star and its surrounding dusty disk top to that of our solar system. Monstrous disks like this one were discovered around two hypergiant stars by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  8. Burst Testing of a Superalloy Disk with a Dual Grain Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete

    2002-01-01

    Room temperature burst testing of an advanced nickel-base superalloy disk with a dual grain structure was conducted. The disk had a fine grain bore and a coarse grain rim. The results of this test showed that the disk burst at 39,100 rpm in line with predictions based on a 2-D finite element analysis. Further, significant growth of the disk was observed before failure which was also in line with predictions.

  9. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  10. DISK PUMP FEASIBILITY INVESTIGATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The disk pump was investigated at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) to determine the feasibility of using a novel viscous pumping... pump primarily for application as an inducer. The disk pump differs drastically from conventional pumps because of the following major factors: (1) The...The pump inlet relative velocity is equal only to the through flow velocity between the disks. Therefore, there is good indication that the disk pump will

  11. Nonlinear calculations of the time evolution of black hole accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, C.

    1994-01-01

    Based on previous works on black hole accretion disks, I continue to explore the disk dynamics using the finite difference method to solve the highly nonlinear problem of time-dependent alpha disk equations. Here a radially zoned model is used to develop a computational scheme in order to accommodate functional dependence of the viscosity parameter alpha on the disk scale height and/or surface density. This work is based on the author's previous work on the steady disk structure and the linear analysis of disk dynamics to try to apply to x-ray emissions from black candidates (i.e., multiple-state spectra, instabilities, QPO's, etc.).

  12. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  13. Herniated lumbar disk (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herniated lumbar disk is a condition in which part or all of the soft, gelatinous central portion of an intervertebral disk (the nucleus pulposus) is forced through a weakened part of the disk, resulting in back pain and nerve root irritation.

  14. Optical Disk Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, George L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This special feature focuses on recent developments in optical disk technology. Nine articles discuss current trends, large scale image processing, data structures for optical disks, the use of computer simulators to create optical disks, videodisk use in training, interactive audio video systems, impacts on federal information policy, and…

  15. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  16. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A floppy disk utility program is described which transfers programs between files on a hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System. Sample operations are given.

  17. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Floppy Disk Utility Program transfers programs between files on the hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System (RDOS).

  18. Manifestly Local Theory of Vacuum Energy Sequestering.

    PubMed

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Padilla, Antonio; Stefanyszyn, David; Zahariade, George

    2016-02-05

    We present a manifestly local, diffeomorphism invariant, and locally Poincaré invariant formulation of vacuum energy sequestering. In this theory, quantum vacuum energy generated by matter loops is canceled by auxiliary fields. The auxiliary fields decouple from gravity almost completely. Their only residual effect is an a priori arbitrary, finite contribution to the curvature of the background geometry, which is radiatively stable. Its value is to be determined by a measurement, like the finite part of any radiatively stable UV-sensitive quantity in quantum field theory.

  19. A Ship's Manifest, 1847

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Presents a copy of a ship's manifest from 1847 and describes five learning activities to help students identify and organize information found in the document. Students answer questions about the ship's passengers based on information given in the manifest, draw conclusions about immigration in mid-nineteenth century, and write a family history…

  20. Rheumatic manifestations of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Claudia; Possemato, Niccolò; Pipitone, Nicolò; Manger, Bernhard; Salvarani, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    This paper reviews the rheumatological manifestations of scurvy, based on articles published in English from 1965 until October 2014, with a particular focus on rheumatological manifestations. Scurvy is a rare, uncommon disease in developed countries. Due to its clinical heterogeneity, the disease can easily mimic rheumatologic conditions leading to a delay in diagnosis and treatment.

  1. [Cutaneous manifestations of sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Amschler, K; Seitz, C S

    2017-03-17

    Skin manifestations of sarcoidosis occur in up to 30% of cases. This review summarizes and illustrates in detail the differences between specific and unspecific skin manifestations of sarcoidosis. Important differential diagnoses, such as tuberculosis, cutaneous lymphoma and syphilis have to be excluded. The indications for systemic treatment are primarily determined by the extent of organ involvement and also by the cosmetic impairment.

  2. Debris Disks: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backman, D.

    2004-12-01

    An overview regarding planetary debris disks: First, more history to complement Low and Aumann's summary appearing elsewhere in this volume. Then, commentary on the nature of debris disks and what we've learned from them: properties of the original ``Fabulous Four" archetypes, results from surveys showing that a large fraction of ordinary stars may be hosts for debris disks, and relatively detailed discussion of β Pictoris, the most prominent disk. Finally, discussion of the connection between debris disks, our solar system's Kuiper Belt, and the zodiacal dust cloud. Open questions about these objects will be highlighted which can lead on to the remainder of the proceedings.

  3. HNC IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Graninger, Dawn; Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-07-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3–2 toward the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3–2 and IRAM 30 m observations of HCN and HNC 1–0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1–0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. However, to realize the full potential of HNC as a disk tracer requires a combination of high SNR spatially resolved observations of HNC and HCN and disk-specific HNC chemical modeling.

  4. High Temperature Spin Testing of a Superalloy Disk With a Dual Grain Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete

    2002-01-01

    Comparative spin tests were run on superalloy disks at an elevated temperature to determine the benefits of a DMHT disk, with a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim, versus a traditional subsolvus disk with a fine grain structure in the bore and rim. The results of these tests showed that the DMHT disk exhibited significantly lower growth at 1500 F. Further, the results of these tests could be accurately predicted using a 2D viscoelastic finite element analysis. These results indicate DMHT technology can be used to extend disk operating temperatures when compared to traditional subsolvus heat treatment options for superalloy disks. However, additional research is required to ensure the safe operation of a DMHT disk under more realistic engine operating conditions. This includes testing to determine the burst margin and cyclic capability of DMHT disks in a spin pit, at a minimum, and ultimately running an engine test with a DMHT disk.

  5. Burst Testing and Analysis of Superalloy Disks With a Dual Grain Microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete

    2006-01-01

    Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of room temperature burst tests on four superalloy disks were conducted and reported in this paper. Two alloys, Rene 104 (General Electric Aircraft Engines) and Alloy 10 (Honeywell Engines & Systems), were studied. For both alloys an advanced dual microstructure disk, fine grain bore and coarse grain rim, were analyzed and compared with conventional disks with uniform microstructures, coarse grain for Rene 104 and fine grain for Alloy 10. The analysis and experimental data were in good agreement up to burst. At burst, the analysis underestimated the speed and growth of the Rene 104 disks, but overestimated the speed and growth of the Alloy 10 disks. Fractography revealed that the Alloy 10 disks displayed significant surface microcracking and coalescence in comparison to Rene 104 disks. This phenomenon may help explain the differences between the Alloy 10 disks and the Rene 104 disks, as well as the observed deviations between analytical and experimental data at burst.

  6. TF41 Engine Fan Disk Seeded Fault Crack Propagation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Uncontained engine failures, although rare in occurrence, can have a catastrophic effect on aircraft performance and safety. Engine disk cracks can eventually lead to these type of failures. A number of techniques to detect engine disk cracks have been developed in recent years. However, these technologies have only been validated by disk spin pit tests, not actual engine tests. Due to this, a project was established to perform seeded fault engine tests on a TF41 engine disk fan. A defect was machined in the first stage fan disk of a TF41 engine. The disk was run in a spin pit to initiate a crack. Once initiated, the disk was run in an actual engine test facility. The engine was cycled by a number of start and stops with the goal of propagating the crack to disk burst through low cycle fatigue. Various crack detection techniques were installed on the engine and run real-time during the test to validate their abilities to detect disk cracks. These techniques were based on methods such as change in mass imbalance using vibration or shaft displacement, change in blade position, acoustic emission, and torsional resonance. At the completion of 4474 test cycles, the crack in the TF41 disk was determined to have grown approximately 0.025 inches. This was far less the predicted crack growth based on a fracture mechanics analysis and finite element stress analysis.

  7. [Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: physiopathology, clinical manifestations and genetics].

    PubMed

    Preiss, Yudith; Santos, José L; Smalley, Susan V; Maiz, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by genetic deficiency of the 27-hydroxylase enzyme (encoded by CYP27A1). It plays a key role in cholesterol metabolism, especially in bile acid synthesis and in the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3 in the liver. Its deficiency causes reduced bile acid synthesis and tissue accumulation of cholestanol. Clinical manifestations are related to the presence of cholestanol deposits and include tendon xanthomas, premature cataracts, chronic diarrhea, progressive neurologic impairment and less frequently coronary heart disease, early onset osteoporosis and abnormalities in the optic disk and retina. An early diagnosis and treatment with quenodeoxycholic acid may prevent further complications, mainly neurological manifestations. This review summarizes cholesterol metabolism related to bile acid synthesis, physiopathology, biochemistry and treatment of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

  8. Ophthalmic manifestations of neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Huson, S; Jones, D; Beck, L

    1987-01-01

    The eyes of 64 patients known to have neurofibromatosis were examined. Lisch nodules were the commonest manifestation of the disease and were present in 95% of all patients (100% of those aged 16 years or older). Images PMID:3103673

  9. Superalloy Disk With Dual-Grain Structure Spin Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John; Kantzos, Pete T.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced nickel-base disk alloys for future gas turbine engines will require greater temperature capability than current alloys, but they must also continue to deliver safe, reliable operation. An advanced, nickel-base disk alloy, designated Alloy 10, was selected for evaluation in NASA s Ultra Safe Propulsion Project. Early studies on small test specimens showed that heat treatments that produced a fine grain microstructure promoted high strength and long fatigue life in the bore of a disk, whereas heat treatments that produced a coarse grain microstructure promoted optimal creep and crack growth resistance in the rim of a disk. On the basis of these results, the optimal combination of performance and safety might be achieved by utilizing a heat-treatment technology that could produce a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim in a nickel-base disk. Alloy 10 disks that were given a dual microstructure heat treatment (DMHT) were obtained from NASA s Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program for preliminary evaluation. Data on small test specimens machined from a DMHT disk were encouraging. However, the benefit of the dual grain structure on the performance and reliability of the entire disk still needed to be demonstrated. For this reason, a high temperature spin test of a DMHT disk was run at 20 000 rpm and 1500 F at the Balancing Company of Dayton, Ohio, under the direction of NASA Glenn Research Center personnel. The results of that test showed that the DMHT disk exhibited significantly lower crack growth than a disk with a fine grain microstructure. In addition, the results of these tests could be accurately predicted using a two-dimensional, axisymmetric finite element analysis of the DMHT disk. Although the first spin test demonstrated a significant performance advantage associated with the DMHT technology, a second spin test on the DMHT disk was run to determine burst margin. The disk burst in the web at a very high speed, over 39 000 rpm, in line with

  10. Cracking-Induced Mistuning in Bladed Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    caused by blade vibrations 1. Adding to this concern is the increased use in modern engines of integrated bladed disks, or blisks , which have dynamic...cracking induced mistuning for a weakly coupled research blisk using 3D finite methods. It was found that the natural frequencies of the cracked blade...decreased significantly only when the crack was sufficiently large. However, the cracked blade dramatically changed the dynamic response of the blisk

  11. Young's experiment and the finiteness of information.

    PubMed

    Brukner, Caslav; Zeilinger, Anton

    2002-05-15

    Young's experiment is the quintessential quantum experiment. It is argued here that quantum interference is a consequence of the finiteness of information. The observer has the choice of whether that information manifests itself as path information or in the interference pattern or partly in both to the extent defined by the finiteness of information.

  12. Exploring Disks Around Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    Giant planets are thought to form in circumstellar disks surrounding young stars, but material may also accrete into a smaller disk around the planet. Weve never detected one of these circumplanetary disks before but thanks to new simulations, we now have a better idea of what to look for.Image from previous work simulating a Jupiter-mass planet forming inside a circumstellar disk. The planet has its own circumplanetary disk of accreted material. [Frdric Masset]Elusive DisksIn the formation of giant planets, we think the final phase consists of accretion onto the planet from a disk that surrounds it. This circumplanetary disk is important to understand, since it both regulates the late gas accretion and forms the birthplace of future satellites of the planet.Weve yet to detect a circumplanetary disk thus far, because the resolution needed to spot one has been out of reach. Now, however, were entering an era where the disk and its kinematics may be observable with high-powered telescopes (like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array).To prepare for such observations, we need models that predict the basic characteristics of these disks like the mass, temperature, and kinematic properties. Now a researcher at the ETH Zrich Institute for Astronomy in Switzerland, Judit Szulgyi, has worked toward this goal.Simulating CoolingSzulgyi performs a series of 3D global radiative hydrodynamic simulations of 1, 3, 5, and 10 Jupiter-mass (MJ) giant planets and their surrounding circumplanetary disks, embedded within the larger circumstellar disk around the central star.Density (left column), temperature (center), and normalized angular momentum (right) for a 1 MJ planet over temperatures cooling from 10,000 K (top) to 1,000 K (bottom). At high temperatures, a spherical circumplanetary envelope surrounds the planet, but as the planet cools, the envelope transitions around 64,000 K to a flattened disk. [Szulgyi 2017]This work explores the effects of different planet temperatures and

  13. The Recent Disk Evolution of Achernar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faes, D. M.; Carciofi, A. C.; Domiciano de Souza, A.

    2016-11-01

    Achernar is a key star to investigate the Be phemonemon. Its importance derives from the possibility of investigating in detail its photospheric and circumstellar emission due to its proximity. Since early 2013 the star entered a new outburst phase, having since then formed a large disk. Here we report our first results to model the recent disk evolution based on a recent precise photospheric characterization. The analysis combine multi-technique data, including broadband polarimetry (OPD/LNA), spectroscopy (FEROS and others) and interferometry (VLTI/AMBER and PIONIER). The radiative transfer problem is solved by the HDUST code. The preliminary results indicate that the circumstellar disk was not formed by a constant mass injection, as indicated by the large variability in small temporal scales seen in polarization. Also, the forming disk manifests noticeable azimuthal asymmetries, as seen by the V/R variations in Hα, which suggests that mass ejection from the star is also non-axisymmetric. These elements offer a rare opportunity to evaluate the evolution of a just formed Be disk in detail and derive relevant physical quantities governing the system.

  14. Astounding Jumping Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzdziol, Edward S.

    1991-01-01

    Activities involving concave rubber disks are utilized to illustrate the scientific principles of kinetic and potential energy. Provides teacher instructions and questions related to the activity. (MDH)

  15. Astounding Jumping Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzdziol, Edward S.

    1991-01-01

    Activities involving concave rubber disks are utilized to illustrate the scientific principles of kinetic and potential energy. Provides teacher instructions and questions related to the activity. (MDH)

  16. Disks in elliptical galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Rix, H.; White, S.D.M. )

    1990-10-01

    The abundance and strength of disk components in elliptical galaxies are investigated by studying the photometric properties of models containing a spheroidal r exp 1/4-law bulge and a weak exponential disk. Pointed isophotes are observed in a substantial fraction of elliptical galaxies. If these isophote distortions are interpreted in the framework of the present models, then the statistics of observed samples suggest that almost all radio-weak ellipticals could have disks containing roughly 20 percent of the light. It is shown that the E5 galaxy NGC 4660 has the photometric signatures of a disk containing a third of the light. 30 refs.

  17. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  18. Turbine disks for improved reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1977-01-01

    Advanced disk structural concepts were employed to improve the cyclic lives and reliability of turbine disks. Analytical studies were conducted to evaluate bore-entry disks as potential replacements for the existing first-stage turbine disks in the CF6-50 and JT8D-17 engines. Results of low cycle fatigue, burst, fracture mechanics, and fragment energy analyses are summarized for the advanced disk designs and the existing disk designs, with both conventional and advanced disk materials. Other disk concepts such as composite, laminated, link, multibore, multidisk, and spline disks were also evaluated for the CF6-50 engine.

  19. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  20. Reprocessing in Luminous Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. Robbins; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We develop and investigate a procedure that accounts for disk reprocessing of photons that originate in the disk itself. Surface temperatures and simple, black body spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostellar disks are calculated. In disks that flare with radius, reprocessing of stellar photons results in temperature profiles considerably shallower than r(sup -3/4). Including the disk as a radiation source (as in the case of actively secreting disks) along with the stellar source further flattens the temperature profile. Disks that flare strongly near the star and then smoothly curve over and become shadowed at some distance ("decreasing curvature" disks) exhibit nearly power-law temperature profiles which result in power-law infrared SEDs with slopes in agreement with typical observations of young stellar objects. Disk models in which the photospheric thickness is controlled by the local opacity and in which the temperature decreases with radius naturally show this shape. Uniformly flaring models do not match observations as well; progressively stronger reprocessing at larger radii leads to SEDs that flatten toward the infrared or even have a second peak at the wavelength corresponding (through the Wien law) to the temperature of the outer edge of the disk. In FU Orionis outbursting systems, the dominant source of energy is the disk itself. The details of the reprocessing depend sensitively on the assumed disk shape and emitted temperature profile. The thermal instability outburst models of Bell Lin reproduce trends in the observed SEDs of Fuors with T varies as r(sup -3/4) in the inner disk (r approx. less than 0.25au corresponding to lambda approx. less than 10 microns) and T varies as r(sup -1/2) in the outer disk. Surface irradiation during outburst and quiescence is compared in the region of planet formation (1 - 10 au). The contrast between the two phases is diminished by the importance of the reprocessing of photons from the relatively high mass

  1. Reprocessing in Luminous Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. Robbins; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We develop and investigate a procedure that accounts for disk reprocessing of photons that originate in the disk itself. Surface temperatures and simple, black body spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of protostellar disks are calculated. In disks that flare with radius, reprocessing of stellar photons results in temperature profiles considerably shallower than r(sup -3/4). Including the disk as a radiation source (as in the case of actively secreting disks) along with the stellar source further flattens the temperature profile. Disks that flare strongly near the star and then smoothly curve over and become shadowed at some distance ("decreasing curvature" disks) exhibit nearly power-law temperature profiles which result in power-law infrared SEDs with slopes in agreement with typical observations of young stellar objects. Disk models in which the photospheric thickness is controlled by the local opacity and in which the temperature decreases with radius naturally show this shape. Uniformly flaring models do not match observations as well; progressively stronger reprocessing at larger radii leads to SEDs that flatten toward the infrared or even have a second peak at the wavelength corresponding (through the Wien law) to the temperature of the outer edge of the disk. In FU Orionis outbursting systems, the dominant source of energy is the disk itself. The details of the reprocessing depend sensitively on the assumed disk shape and emitted temperature profile. The thermal instability outburst models of Bell Lin reproduce trends in the observed SEDs of Fuors with T varies as r(sup -3/4) in the inner disk (r approx. less than 0.25au corresponding to lambda approx. less than 10 microns) and T varies as r(sup -1/2) in the outer disk. Surface irradiation during outburst and quiescence is compared in the region of planet formation (1 - 10 au). The contrast between the two phases is diminished by the importance of the reprocessing of photons from the relatively high mass

  2. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Prejbisz, Aleksander; Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Januszewicz, Andrzej

    2011-11-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma, such as hypertensive emergencies, result from a rapid and massive release of catecholamines from the tumour. More rarely, patients with phaeochromocytoma present with low blood pressure or even shock that may then precede multisystem crisis. Sinus tachycardia, with palpitations as the presenting symptom, is the most prevalent abnormality of cardiac rhythm in phaeochromocytoma, but tumours can also be associated with more serious ventricular arrhythmias or conduction disturbances. Reversible dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are well established cardiac manifestations of phaeochromocytoma, with more recent attention to an increasing number of cases with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. This review provides an update on the cause, clinical presentation and treatment of the cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma. As the cardiovascular complications of phaeochromocytoma can be life-threatening, all patients who present with manifestations that even remotely suggest excessive catecholamine secretion should be screened for the disease.

  3. Atypical manifestations of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Balaji, Krishan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is an illness with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severe illness affects nearly all organ systems. Serious and potentially life-threatening clinical manifestations of acute leptospirosis are caused by both direct tissue invasion by spirochaetes and by the host immune responses. In its severe form, leptospirosis can cause multi-organ dysfunction and death in a matter of days. Therefore it is critical to suspect and recognize the disease early, in order to initiate timely treatment. While the classical presentation of the disease is easily recognized by experienced clinicians practising in endemic regions, rarer manifestations can be easily missed. In this systematic review, we summarize the atypical manifestations reported in literature in patients with confirmed leptospirosis. Awareness of these unusual manifestations would hopefully guide clinicians towards early diagnosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Protoplanetary Disks as (Possibly) Viscous Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2017-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks are believed to evolve on megayear timescales in a diffusive (viscous) manner as a result of angular momentum transport driven by internal stresses. Here we use a sample of 26 protoplanetary disks resolved by ALMA with measured (dust-based) masses and stellar accretion rates to derive the dimensionless α-viscosity values for individual objects, with the goal of constraining the angular momentum transport mechanism. We find that the inferred values of α do not cluster around a single value, but instead have a broad distribution extending from 10‑4 to 0.04. Moreover, they correlate with neither the global disk parameters (mass, size, surface density) nor the stellar characteristics (mass, luminosity, radius). However, we do find a strong linear correlation between α and the central mass accretion rate \\dot{M}. This correlation is unlikely to result from the direct physical effect of \\dot{M} on internal stress on global scales. Instead, we suggest that it is caused by the decoupling of stellar \\dot{M} from the global disk characteristics in one of the following ways: (1) The behavior (and range) of α is controlled by a yet-unidentified parameter (e.g., ionization fraction, magnetic field strength, or geometry), ultimately driving the variation of \\dot{M}. (2) The central \\dot{M} is decoupled from the global accretion rate as a result of an instability, or mass accumulation (or loss in a wind or planetary accretion) in the inner disk. (3) Perhaps the most intriguing possibility is that angular momentum in protoplanetary disks is transported nonviscously, e.g., via magnetohydrodynamic winds or spiral density waves.

  5. Thermodynamically stable vortex structures in thin superconducting disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. M.; Sobnack, M. B.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2008-04-01

    We investigate the formation of thermodynamically stable vortex structures in a small, thin superconducting disk. We formulate the Gibbs free energy of the disk with an arbitrary number of vortices as a function of applied magnetic field and valid at finite temperatures. We minimize the energy to obtain the optimal position of vortices for different applied fields and temperatures. We also analyze the stability of the different vortex states inside the disk and compare our results with available experimental observations. Our results are in very good agreement with experiments.

  6. CIRCUMPLANETARY DISK FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, William R.; Canup, Robin M.

    2010-11-15

    The development and evolution of a circumplanetary disk during the accretion of a giant planet is examined. The planet gains mass and angular momentum from infalling solar nebula material while simultaneously contracting due to luminosity losses. When the planet becomes rotationally unstable it begins to shed material into a circumplanetary disk. Viscosity causes the disk to spread to a moderate fraction of the Hill radius where it is assumed that a small fraction of the material escapes back into heliocentric orbit, carrying away most of the excess angular momentum. As the planet's contraction continues, its radius can become smaller than the spatial range of the inflow and material begins to fall directly onto the disk, which switches from a spin-out disk to an accretion disk as the planet completes its growth. We here develop a description of the circumplanetary disk, which is combined with models of the planet's contraction and the inflow rate including its angular momentum content to yield a solution for the time evolution of a planet-disk system.

  7. Manifest - Payloads and accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, Dan; Temple, John

    1990-01-01

    Developing a long-range manifest begins with the assessment of flight rate capability for the next 6 years. Payloads priorities, launch readiness, and service needs are reviewed and compatible mixed cargo flights are determined and integrated with the dedicated missions to become the manifest. Manifest development must also address Orbiter upgrades to assure that payload-related enhancements meet need dates and that new hardware integration does not adversely affect flight rate capability. A series of Space Shuttle upgrades and new capabilities are in development driven by a continuing effort to improve safety margins, support recognized payload needs, and unique SSF requirements. These enhancements include extended mission duration capability, ASRM development, extended middeck payload support capability, and improved attitude control systems.

  8. [Unusual Migraine Manifestations].

    PubMed

    Schipper, Sivan; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S

    2016-06-08

    Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder by which several systems of the central nervous system (autonomous system, affective, cognitive, sensoric and motoric system) may be affected on different levels. Around a fourth of the patients have migraine aura. The most common aura is the visual aura, followed by sensoric aura. But motoric deficits as well as deficits of higher cortical centers (disorders of thinking, orientation, coherence or concentration) may occur as well. In analogy with a headache calendar, an aura calendar can deliver important help in the diagnostic process of rare migraine manifestations and prevent underdiagnosis of unusual migraine manifestations. Complex migraine manifestations are diagnoses of exlusion, and a broad diagnostic work-up is warranted in order to exclude dangerous neurologic pathologies. There are no specific therapeutic recommendations, as there is a lack of randomized controlled studies.

  9. Manifestations of Lyme carditis.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Tomislav; Momčilović, Stefan; Perišić, Zoran D; Apostolović, Svetlana R; Cvetković, Jovana; Jovanović, Andriana; Barać, Aleksandra; Šalinger-Martinović, Sonja; Tasić-Otašević, Suzana

    2017-04-01

    The first data of Lyme carditis, a relatively rare manifestation of Lyme disease, were published in eighties of the last century. Clinical manifestations include syncope, light-headedness, fainting, shortness of breath, palpitations, and/or chest pain. Atrioventricular (AV) electrical block of varying severity presents the most common conduction disorder in Lyme carditis. Although is usually mild, AV block can fluctuates rapidly and progress from a prolonged P-R interval to a His-Purkinje block within minutes to hours and days. Rarely, Lyme disease may be the cause of endocarditis, while some studies and reports, based on serological and/or molecular investigations, have suggested possible influence of Borrelia burgdorferi on degenerative cardiac valvular disease. Myocarditis, pericarditis, pancarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and heart failure have also been described as possible manifestations of Lyme carditis. The clinical course of Lyme carditis is generally mild, short term, and in most cases, completely reversible after adequate antibiotic treatment.

  10. Thermal depth profiling of materials for defect detection using hot disk technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihiretie, B. M.; Cederkrantz, D.; Sundin, M.; Rosén, A.; Otterberg, H.; Hinton, Å.; Berg, B.; Karlsteen, M.

    2016-08-01

    A novel application of the hot disk transient plane source technique is described. The new application yields the thermal conductivity of materials as a function of the thermal penetration depth which opens up opportunities in nondestructive testing of inhomogeneous materials. The system uses the hot disk sensor placed on the material surface to create a time varying temperature field. The thermal conductivity is then deduced from temperature evolution of the sensor, whereas the probing depth (the distance the heat front advanced away from the source) is related to the product of measurement time and thermal diffusivity. The presence of inhomogeneity in the structure is manifested in thermal conductivity versus probing depth plot. Such a plot for homogeneous materials provides fairly constant value. The deviation from the homogeneous curve caused by defects in the structure is used for inhomogeneity detection. The size and location of the defect in the structure determines the sensitivity and possibility of detection. In addition, a complementary finite element numerical simulation through COMSOL Multiphysics is employed to solve the heat transfer equation. Temperature field profile of a model material is obtained from these simulations. The average rise in temperature of the heat source is calculated and used to demonstrate the effect of the presence of inhomogeneity in the system.

  11. Photon Bubbles and the Vertical Structure of Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2006-06-01

    We consider the effects of ``photon bubble'' shock trains on the vertical structure of radiation pressure-dominated accretion disks. These density inhomogeneities are expected to develop spontaneously in radiation-dominated accretion disks where magnetic pressure exceeds gas pressure, even in the presence of magnetorotational instability (MRI). They increase the rate at which radiation escapes from the disk and may allow disks to exceed the Eddington limit by a substantial factor without blowing themselves apart. To refine our earlier analysis of photon bubble transport in accretion disks, we generalize the theory of photon bubbles to include the effects of finite optical depths and radiation damping. Modifications to the diffusion law at low τ tend to ``fill in'' the low-density regions of photon bubbles, while radiation damping inhibits the formation of photon bubbles at large radii, small accretion rates, and small heights above the equatorial plane. Accretion disks dominated by photon bubble transport may reach luminosities from 10 to >100 times the Eddington limit (LEdd), depending on the mass of the central object, while remaining geometrically thin. However, photon bubble-dominated disks with α-viscosity are subject to the same thermal and viscous instabilities that plague standard radiation pressure-dominated disks, suggesting that they may be intrinsically unsteady. Photon bubbles can lead to a ``core-halo'' vertical disk structure. In super-Eddington disks the halo forms the base of a wind, which carries away substantial energy and mass, but not enough to prevent the luminosity from exceeding LEdd. Photon bubble-dominated disks may have smaller color corrections than standard accretion disks of the same luminosity. They remain viable contenders for some ultraluminous X-ray sources and may play a role in the rapid growth of supermassive black holes at high redshift.

  12. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  13. Protostellar Disk L1157

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These observations of interstellar dark cloud L1157, located in the Cepheus constellation, were made using Caltech's Owens Valley Millimeter Array near Bishop, California.

    The multi-colored area shows a dust disk surrounding a newborn star. The red-orange area at the center represents the brightest region, which contains the young star. It is surrounded by the cooler, dusty disk, which appears as yellow, green and blue. The diameter of the disk is about 20 times larger than our entire solar system.

    The white lines trace the radio wave emission of methanol. Note that the methanol emission comes only from the outer parts of the disk. That is the zone where a warm shock occurs when the cloud material moves in toward the star and meets up with the outer surface of the disk.

  14. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  15. Cutaneous Manifestations of ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Antonia J.; Leslie, Kieron S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A broad range of skin diseases occurs in patients with ESRD: from the benign and asymptomatic to the physically disabling and life-threatening. Many of them negatively impact on quality of life. Their early recognition and treatment are essential in reducing morbidity and mortality. The cutaneous manifestations can be divided into two main categories: nonspecific and specific. The nonspecific manifestations are commonly seen and include skin color changes, xerosis, half-and-half nails, and pruritus. The specific disorders include acquired perforating dermatosis, bullous dermatoses, metastatic calcification, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. This review article describes these conditions and considers the underlying pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and treatment options. PMID:24115194

  16. Thermodynamics in 'Manifest Reality'

    SciTech Connect

    Hankey, Alex

    2010-12-22

    D'Espagnat's proof that the universe is not a 'strongly objective reality' demands that all physical processes are reconsidered in that light. D'Espagnat suggests a 'Veiled Reality' as a suitable alternative. The most economical way to achieve that is to demand that 'information production' at a quantum level creates the basis for self-consistent perception of a world of macroscopic, 'manifest' entities, as opposed to self-existent objects. Such a 'manifest reality' fulfils both Wheeler's attempt at an 'IT-from-BIT' programme, and Zeilinger's suggestion that 'information is primary'.

  17. Signatures Of Secular Evolution In Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-García, Simón

    2016-09-01

    the idea that Boxy/Peanut bulges in face-on perspective manifest as barlenses, that are often identified in early-type galaxies hosting strong bars, and some of them also as inner lenses. We find that the amount of dark matter within the optical disk scales with the total stellar mass, as expected in the ΛCDM models. We also confirm that the observed inner velocity gradient is correlated with the central surface brightness, showing a strong connection between the inner shape of the potential well and the central stellar density.We show that disks and bars in early-type (T < 5 ≡ Sc) and late-type (T ≥ 5) disk galaxies, or alternatively in galaxies having total stellar masses greater or smaller than 1010 M(\\odot), are characterized by very distinct properties. Late-type disks are less centrally concentrated (many galaxies are bulge-less) and present a larger halo-to-stellar mass ratio, what probably affects the disk stability properties. The detection of bars in late-type galaxies is strongly dependent on the identification criteria. On average, bars in early-type spirals (T = 0 - 2) are longer (both in physical units and relative to the disk) and have larger density amplitudes than the intermediate type spirals (T ≍ 5), and the bar lengths among the latest-types in the S4G are also larger. In comparison to earlier types, the bars in late-type systems show larger tangential-to-radial force ratios. This result holds even when the estimated dark halo effect is included.

  18. Investigation of selected disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The large disk systems offered by IBM, UNIVAC, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Data General were examined. In particular, these disk systems were analyzed in terms of how well available operating systems take advantage of the respective disk controller's transfer rates, and to what degree all available data for optimizing disk usage is effectively employed. In the course of this analysis, generic functions and components of disk systems were defined and the capabilities of the surveyed disk system were investigated.

  19. Finite Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    The world has agreed on 17 Sustainable Development Goals, to be adopted this week. This is great progress towards acknowledging that the planet's finite resources need to be managed carefully in the face of humanity's unlimited aspirations.

  20. Hazardous Waste Manifest System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s hazardous waste manifest system is designed to track hazardous waste from the time it leaves the generator facility where it was produced, until it reaches the off-site waste management facility that will store, treat, or dispose of the waste.

  1. Destiny - Not So Manifest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Clark

    Higher education in the United States is facing a period of uncertainty, confusion, conflict, and potential change, and it has little to guide it in its past experiences. For most of its three and one-third century history, it has had a manifest destiny and through the period from 1820-1870 was marked by rapid change and some student unrest. Two…

  2. Experimental dynamic characterizations and modelling of disk vibrations for HDDs.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chee Khiang; Ong, Eng Hong; Guo, Guoxiao; Qian, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the rotational speed of spindle motors in HDDs (Hard-Disk Drives) are increasing to improve high data throughput and decrease rotational latency for ultra-high data transfer rates. However, the disk platters are excited to vibrate at their natural frequencies due to higher air-flow excitation as well as eccentricities and imbalances in the disk-spindle assembly. These factors contribute directly to TMR (Track Mis-Registration) which limits achievable high recording density essential for future mobile HDDs. In this paper, the natural mode shapes of an annular disk mounted on a spindle motor used in current HDDs are characterized using FEM (Finite Element Methods) analysis and verified with SLDV (Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer) measurements. The identified vibration frequencies and amplitudes of the disk ODS (Operating Deflection Shapes) at corresponding disk mode shapes are modelled as repeatable disturbance components for servo compensation in HDDs. Our experimental results show that the SLDV measurements are accurate in capturing static disk mode shapes without the need for intricate air-flow aero-elastic models, and the proposed disk ODS vibration model correlates well with experimental measurements from a LDV.

  3. Achondroplasia: manifestations and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Eric D; Ain, Michael C

    2009-04-01

    Achondroplasia, the most common skeletal dysplasia, is caused by a mutation of fibroblast growth factor receptor-3. This disorder is characterized by frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, otolaryngeal system dysfunction, and rhizomelic short stature. Orthopaedic manifestations are exhibited in the spine and the extremities. In the infant with achondroplasia, foramen magnum stenosis may result in brainstem compression with apnea and sudden death. Thoracolumbar kyphosis is seen in most infants, but typically it resolves when the child begins to walk. Anatomic anomalies of the vertebral column place the patient at risk for spinal stenosis as early as the first decade and especially during adulthood. Radial head dislocation is one manifestation in the upper extremity. Lower extremity alignment often is characterized by genu varum, which may require correction osteotomy. Medical and surgical options are available to increase patient height, but indications are controversial, and treatment often consumes a large portion of the child's life.

  4. Oral manifestations of menopause.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, R D

    1993-12-01

    Menopause is a normal developmental stage in a woman's life, marking the permanent cessation of menstruation. It is the result of irreversible changes in the hormonal and reproductive functions of the ovaries. Menopause is accompanied by a number of characteristic physical changes; some of which occur in the oral cavity. The two most common oral manifestations of menopause are: oral discomfort, including pain, a burning sensation, dryness, and altered taste perception; and alveolar bone loss as a result of osteoporosis. Although menopause has been recognized for centuries, it has only been recently that the study of menopause has gained much attention. The purpose of this article is to review the basic physiology of menopause, and to present the etiology of the oral manifestations associated with menopause.

  5. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Eliete Neves da Silva; Vianna, Leonora; Sobreira, Maria Nazareth; de Araújo, Flavio Nader Gross; de Melo, Nilce Santos

    2011-11-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare, inherited autosomal recessive disease caused by defects in the metabolism of glyoxylate. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria are rare. However, bone and tooth resorption may be the result of chronic inflammation and the presence of osteoclastic cells surrounding the oxalate crystal deposit. A deposit of calcium oxalate in the periodontium was identified in a patient with end-stage renal disease. Dental radiographs indicated bone loss and external tooth resorption. Radiolucent image in the inferior incisor region was observed and removed. The tissue showed granulomatous inflammation with foreign body reaction and associated crystalline deposits. When viewed in polarized light, these deposits are green and presented a birefringent aspect, which were interpreted as calcium oxalate crystals compatible with oxaluria. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria are of particular interest because of the unusual location of the oxalate crystal deposition, resulting in aggressive tooth resorption and alveolar bone loss, which may be misdiagnosed.

  6. Inflammatory Manifestations of Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Catherine L.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2017-01-01

    Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, a conservative palliative approach remains the mainstay of treatment for this disabling disease. The absence of a cure is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological changes that result in lymphedema. A histological hallmark of lymphedema is inflammatory cell infiltration and recent studies with animal models and clinical biopsy specimens have suggested that this response plays a key role in the pathology of the disease. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ongoing research in and the current understanding of the inflammatory manifestations of lymphedema. PMID:28106728

  7. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  8. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  9. Diverse manifestations of trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    McCunney, R J

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene, a solvent used in a variety of industrial settings for more than 60 years, has caused adverse health effects on the central and peripheral nervous system, the skin, liver, kidney, and heart. Three men have shown relatively unusual manifestations secondary to exposure to trichloroethylene in degreasing operations in the jewelry industry. Toxic encephalopathy, hepatitis, and carpal spasm occurred among young, healthy workers. Clinical and laboratory data, including measurement of urinary trichloroacetic acid concentrations, are presented. PMID:3342194

  10. Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis: neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lasierra, Rafael; Valencia, Ignacio; Carapeto, Francisco J; Ventura, Purificación; Samper, M Pilar; Rodríguez, Gerardo; Pérez-González, José M; Legido, Agustín

    2003-10-01

    We report a new case of encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis, a rare neurocutaneous syndrome of unknown etiology with involvement of tissues arising from the mesoderm and ectoderm: skin, eye, adipose tissue, and brain. We also review the neurologic manifestations of the syndrome, the most frequent of which include seizures, ventricular enlargement, calcifications, mental retardation, and cerebellopontine angle tumor. Our patient had an extensive extradural spinal cord lipomatous lesion, emphasizing the importance of screening for spinal abnormalities in asymptomatic patients with this condition.

  11. [Respiratory manifestations in aspergillosis].

    PubMed

    Regimbaud, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspergillus is a genus of cosmopolitan fungi with a selective pulmonary tropism. Their pathogenic role is due either to spreading in pre-existing pulmonary cavities, or to their allergizing capacity. Cavitary sequellae of tuberculosis and suppuration, particularly frequent and important in tropical environment, are elective localization for Aspergillus colonization. Surgical treatment is nowadays the only efficient one. Allergic manifestations are a more complex problem of therapy, exclusion of allergen being difficult to get in tropical environment.

  12. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  13. Planet Forming Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubow, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The project achieved many of its objectives. The main area of investigation was the interaction of young binary stars with surrounding protostellar disks. A secondary objective was the interaction of young planets with their central stars and surrounding disks. The grant funds were used to support visits by coinvestigators and visitors: Pawel Artymowicz, James Pringle, and Gordon Ogilvie. Funds were also used to support travel to meetings by Lubow and to provide partial salary support.

  14. Protostars and Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The research concentrated on high angular resolution (arc-second scale) studies of molecular cloud cores associated with very young star formation. New ways to study disks and protoplanetary systems were explored. Findings from the areas studied are briefly summarized: (1) molecular clouds; (2) gravitational contraction; (3) jets, winds, and outflows; (4) Circumstellar Disks (5) Extrasolar Planetary Systems. A bibliography of publications and submitted papers produced during the grant period is included.

  15. The Newtonian potential of thin disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huré, J.-M.; Hersant, F.

    2011-07-01

    The one-dimensional, ordinary differential equation (ODE) that satisfies the midplane gravitational potential of truncated, flat power-law disks is extended to the whole physical space. It is shown that thickness effects (i.e. non-flatness) can be easily accounted for by implementing an appropriate "softening length" λ. The solution of this "softened ODE" has the following properties: i) it is regular at the edges (finite radial accelerations); ii) it possesses the correct long-range properties; iii) it matches the Newtonian potential of a geometrically thin disk very well; and iv) it tends continuously to the flat disk solution in the limit λ → 0. As illustrated by many examples, the ODE, subject to exact Dirichlet conditions, can be solved numerically with efficiency for any given colatitude at second-order from center to infinity using radial mapping. This approach is therefore particularly well-suited to generating grids of gravitational forces in order to study particles moving under the field of a gravitating disk as found in various contexts (active nuclei, stellar systems, young stellar objects). Extension to non-power-law surface density profiles is straightforward through superposition. Grids can be produced upon request.

  16. Optic disk drusen.

    PubMed

    Auw-Haedrich, Claudia; Staubach, Flemming; Witschel, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    Optic disk drusen occur in 3.4 to 24 per 1,000 population and are bilateral in approximately 75%. Disturbance in the axonal metabolism in the presence of a small scleral canal--regardless of eyelength--is considered responsible for the development. The drusen increase in size, becoming more visible with age due to continuing calcium apposition, and they are associated with visual field defects in a considerable number of patients. Patients do not usually notice these defects, despite their progressive nature over the years, and this indicates an insidious course. A correct diagnosis of optic disk drusen is mandatory, although effective treatment is not yet available. It is most important to differentiate optic disk drusen from papilledema in order to avoid unnecessary neurological examinations, but also to avoid overlooking genuine neurologic disorders. Because optic disk drusen can cause severe visual field defects, patients require individual consultation regarding work issues and whether or not to drive. Optic disk drusen can be accompanied by vascular complications as well. In some cases these vascular changes--for example, choroidal neovascularization--are treatable. Patients with optic disk drusen should undergo regular visual field, IOP, and nerve fiber layer examinations. In patients with deteriorating visual field and borderline IOP, we recommend antiglaucomatous therapy.

  17. Disk Precession in Pleione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, R.

    2007-03-01

    From the polarimetric observation of Pleione, we found that the intrinsic polarization angle varied from 60° to 130° in 1974-2003. The Hα profile also changed dramatically from the edge-on type (shell-line profile) to the surface-on type (wine-bottle profile). These facts clearly indicate the spatial motion of the disk axis. We interpret these variations in terms of the disk precession, caused by the secondary of this spectroscopic binary with a period of 218d. We performed the χ^2 minimization for the polarization angle, assuming uniform precession with an imposed condition that the shell maximum occurred at edge-on view. The resulting precession angle is 59° with a period of 81 years. Then, we can describe chronologically the spatial motion of disk axis. We also derived the Hα disk radius from the peak separation, assuming the Keplerian disk. The precession of the disk gives natural explanation of the mysterious long-term spectroscopic behaviors of this star.

  18. Herman's Condition and Siegel Disks of Bi-Critical Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chéritat, Arnaud; Roesch, Pascale

    2016-06-01

    We extend a theorem of Herman from the case of unicritical polynomials to the case of polynomials with two finite critical values. This theorem states that Siegel disks of such polynomials, under a diophantine condition (called Herman's condition) on the rotation number, must have a critical point on their boundaries.

  19. Disk flexibility effects on the rotordynamics of the SSME high pressure turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1990-01-01

    Rotordynamical analyses are typically performed using rigid disk models. Studies of rotor models in which the effects of disk flexibility were included indicate that it may be an important effect for many systems. This issue is addressed with respect to the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure turbopumps. Finite element analyses were performed for a simplified free-free flexible disk rotor models and the modes and frequencies compared to those of a rigid disk model. Equations were developed to account for disk flexibility in rotordynamical analysis. Simulation studies were conducted to assess the influence of disk flexibility on the HPOTP. Some recommendations are given as to the importance of disk flexibility and for how this project should proceed.

  20. Fast, Capacious Disk Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Ronald M.

    1990-01-01

    Device for recording digital data on, and playing back data from, memory disks has high recording or playback rate and utilizes available recording area more fully. Two disks, each with own reading/writing head, used to record data at same time. Head on disk A operates on one of tracks numbered from outside in; head on disk B operates on track of same number in sequence from inside out. Underlying concept of device applicable to magnetic or optical disks.

  1. Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System (E-Manifest)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This webpage provides information on EPA's work toward developing a hazardous waste electronic manifest system. Information on the Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act, progress on the project and frequent questions are available.

  2. Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System (e-Manifest) Advisory Board

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page is all about the e-manifest Advisory board, formed under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, and part of the EPA's e-manifest development process. Here you can learn about the members and their meetings.

  3. Diversity of Debris Disks - Constraining the Disk Outer Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Smith, Paul; Su, Kate

    2008-03-01

    Existing Spitzer observations of debris disks show a wide range of diversity in disk morphologies and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The majority of debris disks observed with Spitzer are not resolved, resulting in very few direct constraints on disk extent. In general, SEDs alone have little diagnostic power beyond some basic statistics. However, as demonstrated by some Spitzer observations of nearby systems (beta Leo and gamma Oph), the spectra of the excess emission in the IRS and MIPS-SED wavelength range can help to put tighter constraints on disk properties such as minimum/maximum grain sizes and inner/outer disk radii. The dust continuum slopes are very useful to differentiate between various disk structures and constrain the dust mass. We need to study sufficient numbers of disks to explore their characteristics systematically. Therefore, we propose to obtain MIPS-SED observations of 27 debris disks that already have IRS-LL spectra and MIPS 24 and 70 micron photometry.

  4. Scalar gravitation: A laboratory for numerical relativity. II. Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.L.; Teukolsky, S.A. )

    1994-02-15

    While not a correct physical theory, relativistic scalar gravitation provides a simple test site for developing many of the tools of numerical relativity. Using this theory, we have built a mean-field particle simulation scheme to study the dynamical behavior of collisionless disks. Disks are one-dimensional matter sources of two-dimensional gravitational fields. One-dimensional disk sources can be evolved without excessive computational resources and yet they are able to generate nonspherical gravitational waves. We find that we are able to calculate smooth and accurate wave forms from time-varying disks, despite the stochastic representation of the matter source terms caused by sampling with a finite number of particles. A similar scheme should provide accurate wave forms in general relativity, provided sufficient computer resources are used.

  5. Determination of stresses in gas-turbine disks subjected to plastic flow and creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millenson, M B; Manson, S S

    1948-01-01

    A finite-difference method previously presented for computing elastic stresses in rotating disks is extended to include the computation of the disk stresses when plastic flow and creep are considered. A finite-difference method is employed to eliminate numerical integration and to permit nontechnical personnel to make the calculations with a minimum of engineering supervision. Illustrative examples are included to facilitate explanation of the procedure by carrying out the computations on a typical gas-turbine disk through a complete running cycle. The results of the numerical examples presented indicate that plastic flow markedly alters the elastic-stress distribution.

  6. Resonances and circuit theory for the interaction of metallic disks and annuli with an electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, S. T.; Du, J. J.; Yau, S. T.

    2014-11-01

    To understand the nature of the electromagnetic resonances of finite metallic surfaces, we formulate a rigorous and rapidly convergent circuit theory for the interaction of a metallic disk and a metallic annulus with an electromagnetic field. Expressions for the current induced and the resonance condition are derived. A new understanding of the nature of the resonances is obtained. For half of the resonances we find a divergent electric field at the edge of the disk, even though it is smooth in shape. For the disk, we compare with previous results using vector spheroidal wave functions and found good agreement for the resonance condition. Our approach can be generalized to other finite surfaces.

  7. Ophthalmologic manifestations of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Thiago Gonçalves dos Santos; Costa, Ana Luiza Fontes de Azevedo; Oyamada, Maria Kiyoko; Schor, Paulo; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects the small intestine of genetically predisposed individuals. Ophthalmic manifestations are within the extra-intestinal manifestations, and can be divided into those of autoimmune disorders or those due to absorptive disabilities. This article reviewed the ophthalmologic manifestation of celiac disease. Ophthalmic symptoms are rare, but should be investigated in patients with celiac disease and taken into consideration as the first systemic manifestation. PMID:26949627

  8. PLANETESIMAL DISK MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2009-12-10

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  9. Hematologic manifestations of babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Akel, Tamer; Mobarakai, Neville

    2017-02-15

    Babesiosis, a zoonotic parasitic infection transmitted by the Ixodes tick, has become an emerging health problem in humans that is attracting attention worldwide. Most cases of human babesiosis are reported in the United States and Europe. The disease is caused by the protozoa of the genus Babesia, which invade human erythrocytes and lyse them causing a febrile hemolytic anemia. The infection is usually asymptomatic or self-limited in the immunocompetent host, or follows a persistent, relapsing, and/or life threatening course with multi-organ failure, mainly in the splenectomized or immunosuppressed patients. Hematologic manifestations of the disease are common. They can range from mild anemia, to severe pancytopenia, splenic rupture, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC), or even hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). A 70 year old immunocompetent female patient living in New York City presented with a persistent fever, night sweats, and fatigue of 5 days duration. Full evaluation showed a febrile hemolytic anemia along with neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Blood smear revealed intraerythrocytic Babesia, which was confirmed by PCR. Bone marrow biopsy was remarkable for dyserythropoiesis, suggesting possible HLH, supported by other blood workup meeting HLH-2004 trial criteria. Human babesiosis is an increasing healthcare problem in the United States that is being diagnosed more often nowadays. We presented a case of HLH triggered by Babesia microti that was treated successfully. Also, we presented the hematologic manifestations of this disease along with their pathophysiologies.

  10. [Ocular Manifestations in Sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Walscheid, K; Tappeiner, C; Heiligenhaus, A

    2016-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory multi-organ disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterised by non-necrotising granulomata. Sarcoidosis predominantly manifests in the lung, but any other organ may be affected. Ocular involvement is present in about 25 to 50 % of patients. The most common ocular manifestation is uveitis, especially of the anterior eye segment. If ocular sarcoidosis is suspected, interdisciplinary assessment of the patient is mandatory, including laboratory tests, chest X-ray, assessment by a specialist in internal medicine and, ideally, histological evidence of granuloma formation in a tissue specimen. Other (infectious) causes of granulomatous inflammation need to be excluded, especially tuberculosis or syphilis. For the ophthalmological assessment, detection of granulomatous lesions is of particular importance, especially by visualising chorioretinal granuloma by fluorescein and indocyanin green angiography. Cystoid macular oedema and glaucoma are the most frequent complications limiting visual acuity. Corticosteroids, which can be administered either locally or systemically, are the mainstay of therapy. Depending on the clinical course and the development of ocular complications, systemic steroid-sparing immunosuppressive medication may be indicated.

  11. Rheumatologic Manifestations of Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sweiss, Nadera J.; Patterson, Karen; Sawaqed, Ray; Jabbar, Umair; Korsten, Peter; Hogarth, Kyle; Wollman, Robert; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Baughman, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic, clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by the development of granulomas. Any organ system can be involved, and patients may present with any number of rheumatologic symptoms. There are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved therapies for the treatment of sarcoidosis. Diagnosing sarcoidosis becomes challenging, particularly when its complications cause patients’ symptoms to mimic other conditions, including polymyositis, Sjögren syndrome, or vasculitis. This review presents an overview of the etiology of and biomarkers associated with sarcoidosis. We then provide a detailed description of the rheumatologic manifestations of sarcoidosis and present a treatment algorithm based on current clinical evidence for patients with sarcoid arthritis. The discussion will focus on characteristic findings in patients with sarcoid arthritis, osseous involvement in sarcoidosis, and sarcoid myopathy. Arthritic conditions that sometimes coexist with sarcoidosis are described as well. We present two cases of sarcoidosis with rheumatologic manifestations. Our intent is to encourage a multidisciplinary, translational approach to meet the challenges and difficulties in understanding and treating sarcoidosis. PMID:20665396

  12. Observational Manifestation of Chaos in Astrophysical Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A.; Marov, M.; Miller, R.

    2002-12-01

    This book addresses a broad range of problems related to observed manifestations of chaotic motions in galactic and stellar objects, by invoking basic theory, numerical modeling, and observational evidence. For the first time, methods of stochastic dynamics are applied to actually observed astronomical objects, e.g. the gaseous disc of the spiral galaxy NGC 3631. In the latter case, the existence of chaotic trajectories in the boundary of giant vortices was recently found by the calculation of the Lyapunov characteristic number of these trajectories. The reader will find research results on the peculiarities of chaotic system behaviour; a study of the integrals of motion in self-consistent systems; numerical modeling results of the evolution process of disk systems involving resonance excitation of the density waves in spiral galaxies; a review of specific formations in stars and high-energy sources demonstrating their stochastic nature; a discussion of the peculiarities of the precessional motion of the accretion disk and relativistic jets in the double system SS 433; etc. This book stands out as the first one that deals with the problem of chaos in real astrophysical objects. It is intended for graduate and post-graduate students in the fields of non-linear dynamics, astrophysics, planetary and space physics; specifically for those dealing with computer modeling of the relevant processes. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/1-4020-0935-6

  13. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  14. Supersized Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated ImageData Graph

    This illustration compares the size of a gargantuan star and its surrounding dusty disk (top) to that of our solar system. Monstrous disks like this one were discovered around two 'hypergiant' stars by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers believe these disks might contain the early 'seeds' of planets, or possibly leftover debris from planets that already formed.

    The hypergiant stars, called R 66 and R 126, are located about 170,000 light-years away in our Milky Way's nearest neighbor galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The stars are about 100 times wider than the sun, or big enough to encompass an orbit equivalent to Earth's. The plump stars are heavy, at 30 and 70 times the mass of the sun, respectively. They are the most massive stars known to sport disks.

    The disks themselves are also bloated, with masses equal to several Jupiters. The disks begin at a distance approximately 120 times greater than that between Earth and the sun, or 120 astronomical units, and terminate at a distance of about 2,500 astronomical units.

    Hypergiant stars are the puffed-up, aging descendants of the most massive class of stars, called 'O' stars. The stars are so massive that their cores ultimately collapse under their own weight, triggering incredible explosions called supernovae. If any planets circled near the stars during one of these blasts, they would most likely be destroyed.

    The orbital distances in this picture are plotted on a logarithmic scale. This means that a given distance shown here represents proportionally larger actual distances as you move to the right. The sun and planets in our solar system have been scaled up in size for better viewing. Little Dust Grains in Giant Stellar Disks The graph above of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the composition of a monstrous disk of what may be planet-forming dust circling the colossal 'hypergiant' star

  15. Spiral disk packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshikazu; Sushida, Takamichi

    2017-04-01

    It is shown that van Iterson's metric for disk packings, proposed in 1907 in the study of a centric model of spiral phyllotaxis, defines a bounded distance function in the plane. This metric is also related to the bifurcation of Voronoi tilings for logarithmic spiral lattices, through the continued fraction expansion of the divergence angle. The phase diagrams of disk packings and Voronoi tilings for logarithmic spirals are dual graphs to each other. This gives a rigorous proof that van Iterson's diagram in the centric model is connected and simply connected. It is a nonlinear analog of the duality between the phase diagrams for disk packings and Voronoi tilings on the linear lattices, having the modular group symmetry.

  16. Supersized Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated ImageData Graph

    This illustration compares the size of a gargantuan star and its surrounding dusty disk (top) to that of our solar system. Monstrous disks like this one were discovered around two 'hypergiant' stars by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers believe these disks might contain the early 'seeds' of planets, or possibly leftover debris from planets that already formed.

    The hypergiant stars, called R 66 and R 126, are located about 170,000 light-years away in our Milky Way's nearest neighbor galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The stars are about 100 times wider than the sun, or big enough to encompass an orbit equivalent to Earth's. The plump stars are heavy, at 30 and 70 times the mass of the sun, respectively. They are the most massive stars known to sport disks.

    The disks themselves are also bloated, with masses equal to several Jupiters. The disks begin at a distance approximately 120 times greater than that between Earth and the sun, or 120 astronomical units, and terminate at a distance of about 2,500 astronomical units.

    Hypergiant stars are the puffed-up, aging descendants of the most massive class of stars, called 'O' stars. The stars are so massive that their cores ultimately collapse under their own weight, triggering incredible explosions called supernovae. If any planets circled near the stars during one of these blasts, they would most likely be destroyed.

    The orbital distances in this picture are plotted on a logarithmic scale. This means that a given distance shown here represents proportionally larger actual distances as you move to the right. The sun and planets in our solar system have been scaled up in size for better viewing. Little Dust Grains in Giant Stellar Disks The graph above of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the composition of a monstrous disk of what may be planet-forming dust circling the colossal 'hypergiant' star

  17. Triaxiality in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertola, F.; Vietri, M.; Zeilinger, W.W. Roma, Osservatorio Astronomico, Rome European Southern Observatory, Garching )

    1991-06-01

    Thirty-two bulges of nearby spirals have been observed, to detect misalignment between disk and bulge apparent major axes. Such misalignment is unequivocally present in the majority of observed objects. This may be due to the triaxiality of disks, bulges, or both. The probability distribution function for the axial ratios is derived under the two extreme hypotheses, i.e., that either only disks (case I) or only bulges (case II) are triaxial: the observational data are equally well fitted by either one. Since dynamical evidence and the internal twisting of isophotes show that bulges are triaxial, case I is unlikely, but an intermediate case cannot be ruled out. These distribution functions are compared with available constraints; in particular, that of case II is projected and compared with the distribution of apparent ellipticities of minor-axis dust-lane ellipticals and of all ellipticals. Both tests show that the observed and derived distributions are consistent. 34 refs.

  18. High Temperature Burst Testing of a Superalloy Disk With a Dual Grain Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Kantzos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Elevated temperature burst testing of a disk with a dual grain structure made from an advanced nickel-base superalloy, LSHR, was conducted. The disk had a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim, produced using NASA's low cost DMHT technology. The results of the spin testing showed the disk burst at 42 530 rpm in line with predictions based on a 2-D finite element analysis. Further, significant growth of the disk was observed before failure which was also in line with predictions.

  19. Quantum size effect in the electron exchange between a H- ion and a thin metal disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Urazgildin, I. F.

    2006-11-01

    The resonant charge transfer (RCT) between a hydrogen anion and a thin aluminum disk is investigated by means of the wave-packet propagation method that does not exploit the perturbation theory. The RCT on a thin metal disk is found to exhibit quantum size effects due to the finite size of the disk. Survival amplitude of ion state has been calculated as a function of the distance to the ion-surface in a normal collision. It is shown that depending on the projectile velocity, the ion can interact with disk as if with bulk metal, thin film or nano-structure with the energy quantized by polar and normal coordinates.

  20. The structure of protostellar accretion disks and the origin of bipolar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, Mark; Koenigl, Arieh

    1993-01-01

    Equations are obtained which govern the disk-wind structure and identify the physical parameters relevant to circumstellar disks. The system of equations is analyzed in the thin-disk approximation, and it is shown that the system can be consistently reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations in z. Representative solutions are presented, and it is shown that the apparent paradox discussed by Shu (1991) is resolved when the finite thickness of the disk is taken into account. Implications of the results for the origin of bipolar flows in young stellar objects and possible application to active galactic nuclei are discussed.

  1. Theory of protostellar accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruden, S.

    1994-01-01

    I will present an overview of the current paradigm for the theory of gaseous accretion disks around young stars. Protostellar disks form from the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores. The disks evolve via outward angular momentum transport provided by several mechanisms: gravitational instabilities, thermal convective turbulence, and magnetic stresses. I will review the conditions under which these mechanisms are efficient and consistent with the observed disk evolutionary timescales of several million years. Time permitting, I will discuss outbursts in protostellar disks (FU Orionis variables), the effect of planet formation on disk structure, and the dispersal of remnant gas.

  2. Debris disks: a theorist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivov, A. V.

    2007-08-01

    Debris disks are roughly solar system-sized, optically thin, gas-poor dust disks that encircle a notable fraction of main-sequence stars at ages ranging from about 10 Myr to several Gyr. They are thought to be continuously replenished by collisions between "exoasteroids" and activity of "exocomets", small bodies left over from the planet formation process. I will first outline main physical mechanisms operating in debris disks and compare them with other dusty systems: protoplanetary disks, dusty planetary rings, and classical Saturn's rings. I will then review basic methods and essential results of debris disks modeling, covering both steady-state and stochastic models of axisymmetric and structured disks.

  3. Lupus Alma Disk Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansdell, Megan

    2016-07-01

    We present the first unbiased ALMA survey of both dust and gas in a large sample of protoplanetary disks. We surveyed 100 sources in the nearby (150-200 pc), young (1-2 Myr) Lupus region to constrain M_dust to 2 M_Mars and M_gas to 1 M_Jup. Most disks have masses < MMSN and gas-to-dust ratios < ISM. Such rapid gas depletion may explain the prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.

  4. MPP disk subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    A disk subsystem for the Massively Parallel processor (MPP) is designed to the block diagram level. The subsystem is capable of storing 4,992 megabytes of data, expandable to 39,936 megabytes. The subsystem is capable of transferring data to the MPP Staging Memory at a rate of 25 megabytes/second, expandable to 100 megabytes/second. A lower cost disk subsystem is also presented. This alternate subsystem is capable of storing 3,744 megabytes with a transfer rate of 10.6 megabyte/second.

  5. From Disks to Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    This pedagogical chapter covers the theory of planet formation, with an emphasis on the physical processes relevant to current research. After summarizing empirical constraints from astronomical and geophysical data, we describe the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks. We consider the growth of planetesimals and of larger solid protoplanets, followed by the accretion of planetary atmospheres, including the core accretion instability. We also examine the possibility that gas disks fragment directly into giant planets and/or brown dwarfs. We defer a detailed description of planet migration and dynamical evolution to other work, such as the complementary chapter in this series by Morbidelli.

  6. Secondary Disks and Disk Regrowth in S0 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffett, Amanda; Kannappan, Sheila; Norris, Mark; Khochfar, Sadegh; Berlind, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Early-type galaxies are predicted to regrow late-type disks in hierarchical models of galaxy formation, but the observational confirmation of this process remains largely indirect. We seek to approach this problem kinematically by searching for evidence of disk regrowth in the form of extended secondary disks in S0s (distinct from the small-scale KDCs identified in SAURON). In order to address the possible contribution of secondary disks not indicative of true disk regrowth and the expected variations of secondary disk frequency with mass, color, and environment, we propose deep spectroscopy of a broad sample of 60 S0 galaxies located in the RESOLVE Survey volume. With these data and similar data in hand for ~12 additional S0s, we aim both to resolve conflicting measurements of the frequency of secondary disks in early-type galaxies and to determine the incidence of disk regrowth.

  7. Ophthalmic manifestations postlightning strike.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Permesh Singh; Gupta, Mohit

    2015-03-31

    Various ophthalmic complications affecting the anterior and posterior segments have been identified due to lightning strike. We report the first case of an indirect lightning-induced full thickness macular hole formation in the UK as evidenced by slit lamp examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan in a 77-year-old woman presenting with sudden visual loss in her right eye and thermal skin injury affecting her scalp. Her best corrected visual acuities were LogMAR 0.46 and 0.12 in the right and left eyes, respectively. There were no other ocular manifestations observed in either eye. She was initially managed conservatively with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug eye drops but surgery was later advised due to minimal changes in the visual acuity and macular hole on follow-up. OCT scanning is important in diagnosing macular holes, which usually warrant surgical intervention. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  8. Manifold manifestations of ergotism.

    PubMed

    Payne, B; Sasse, B; Franzen, D; Hailemariam, S; Gemsenjäger, E

    2000-08-19

    Vasospastic side effects leading to organic manifestations are rare in ergotamine therapy. To our knowledge, combinations of more than two signs of ergotism have rarely been described in the literature so far. We present a 65-year-old male patient who as a consequence of severe migraine had developed ergotamine abuse. He was admitted to our hospital after one week of increasing abdominal pain. During laparotomy, necrotic areas of the small intestine and the sigmoid colon were resected, which on histopathologic examination revealed severe hypertrophy of the smooth musculature of mesenteric arteries, resulting from chronic vasospasms. Postoperatively, the patient developed ischaemia of the limbs which was confirmed by angiography. Before death, the patient also showed ischaemic signs in the acrae and necrosis of the tongue.

  9. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    PubMed

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Ophthalmic manifestations postlightning strike

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Permesh Singh; Gupta, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Various ophthalmic complications affecting the anterior and posterior segments have been identified due to lightning strike. We report the first case of an indirect lightning-induced full thickness macular hole formation in the UK as evidenced by slit lamp examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan in a 77-year-old woman presenting with sudden visual loss in her right eye and thermal skin injury affecting her scalp. Her best corrected visual acuities were LogMAR 0.46 and 0.12 in the right and left eyes, respectively. There were no other ocular manifestations observed in either eye. She was initially managed conservatively with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug eye drops but surgery was later advised due to minimal changes in the visual acuity and macular hole on follow-up. OCT scanning is important in diagnosing macular holes, which usually warrant surgical intervention. PMID:25827914

  11. Genitourinary manifestations of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J; Marella, Venkata K

    2003-02-01

    By the 1980s, the availability of antituberculosis chemotherapy reduced the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis. Changing patterns of population emigration and the development of large pools of immune-compromised individuals reversed the downward trend of tuberculosis. The incidence of genitourinary tuberculosis has remained constant. The manifestations of GU TB can be variable and cause a variety of clinical patterns that mimic other diseases. Adrenal insufficiency, renal disease, obstructive uropathy, and chronic cystitis are not uncommon with TB. The patient with TB may have genital disease that simulates STD or scrotal tumors. Infertility can be caused by GU tuberculosis. Awareness of environmental factors and patient history should alert the urologist to the wide array of clinical findings in the genitourinary system that can be caused by tuberculosis.

  12. GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY IN LOW MASS DISKS?

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-20

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M{sub sun} from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M{sub sun} protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (T{sub o}) temperatures. Models with T{sub o} = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with T{sub o} = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least {approx}0.043 M{sub sun} inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  13. Warm gas in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plas, Gerrit

    2010-12-01

    This thesis presents a study of warm CO, [OI] and H2 gas coming from the disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These various gas tracers are each a proxy for a different radial and vertical region of the PP disk surface. Our sample consists of disks whose shape (based on modeling of the the disk dust emission) can be divided into flaring and self-shadowed (flat). We find [1] evidence for the vertical decoupling of gas and dust in one disks (Chapter 2); [2] That disk geometry has a large influence on the spatial distribution and excitation mechanism of the CO emission (chapters 3,4); [3] Near-IR H 2 emission around 2 (out of 14) HAEBE stars, probably originating from large (±50AU) radii of the disk (chapter 5). In chapter 6 we investigate the trends between CO emission and disk geometry as noted in Chapter 3 and 4.

  14. Herniated disk repair (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of the most common causes of lower back pain. The mainstay of treatment for herniated disks is an initial period of rest with pain and anti-inflammatory medications followed by physical therapy. If pain and symptoms persist, surgery to remove ...

  15. Disk Valve For Cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight disk valve designed to have dimensions and capabilities similar to those of valve described in "Lightweight Right-Angle Valve For Cryogenics" (MSC-21889). Simple unit remains leaktight over wide range of pressures and temperatures without need for manual readjustment of packing gland. Weighs less than 60 g and made relatively inexpensively from some commercial and few simple custom-machined components.

  16. Solar disk sextant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Minott, P.; Endal, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of an instrument, called the solar disk sextant, to be used in space to measure the shape and the size of the sun and their variations. The instrumental parameters required to produce sufficient sensitivity to address the problems of solar oblateness, solar pulsations, and global size changes of climatic importance are given.

  17. Hydrodynamic Viscosity in Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Wolfgang J.; Strittmatter, Peter A.; Biermann, Peter L.

    We propose a generalized accretion disk viscosity prescription based on hydrodynamically driven turbulence at the critical effective Reynolds number. This approach is consistent with recent re-analysis by Richard & Zahn (1999) of experimental results on turbulent Couette-Taylor flows. This new β-viscosity formulation applies to both selfgravitating and non-selfgravitating disks and is shown to yield the standard α-disk prescription in the case of shock dissipation limited, non-selfgravitating disks.

  18. Kingella kingae intervertebral disk infection.

    PubMed

    Amir, J; Shockelford, P G

    1991-05-01

    Disk inflammation in children is believed to result from infection, and Staphylococcus aureus is reported to be the organism most commonly isolated from cases of intervertebral disk infection. A case of disk inflammation caused by the unusual pathogen Kingella kingae is described. The antibiotic susceptibility of other K. kingae isolates and the clinical features of 11 other previously reported cases of disk infection caused by this microorganism are reviewed.

  19. Diffusion Controlled Current at a Stationary Finite Disk Electrode. Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Koryta, H. Brezina, J. Prada, and J. Prad4ovi, "Electro- analytical Chemistry", Vol. 11, Chapt. 2, Edited by A. J. Bard, Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1979. 2 D...Minneapolis, Minnesota 55435 Dr. J. Z. Demuth IBM brporties Dr. a. P. Van Duyme Thomas J. Watson sbairch Center Chemistry Departmeat P.O. 3.. 21S

  20. Mass Distribution and Bar Formation in Growing Disk Galaxy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Sellwood, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    We report idealized simulations that mimic the growth of galaxy disks embedded in responsive halos and bulges. The disks manifested an almost overwhelming tendency to form strong bars that we found very difficult to prevent. We found that fresh bars formed in growing disks after we had destroyed the original, indicating that bar formation also afflicts continued galaxy evolution, and not just the early stages of disk formation. This behavior raises still more insistently the previously unsolved question of how some galaxies avoid bars. Since our simulations included only collisionless star and halo particles, our findings may apply to gas-poor galaxies only; however, the conundrum persists for the substantial unbarred fraction of those galaxies. Our original objective was to study how internal dynamics rearranged the distribution of mass in the disk as a generalization of our earlier study with rigid spherical components. With difficulty, we were able to construct some models that were not strongly influenced by bars, and found that halo compression and angular momentum exchange with the disk did not alter our earlier conclusion that spiral activity is largely responsible for creating smooth density profiles and rotation curves.

  1. [Pleuropulmonary manifestations of amebiasis].

    PubMed

    Mbaye, P S; Koffi, N; Camara, P; Burgel, P R; Hovette, P; Klotz, F

    1998-12-01

    Amibiasis is the third leading cause of death due to parasitic infections in the world. Amibiasis is endemic in the warm regions of the world with deficient hygiene and socio-economic situations. Entamoeba histolytica is the causal agent of invasive amibiasis, unlike Entamoeba dispar which is not a pathogen for humans. Amibian colitis and amibian abscess of the liver are the most frequent intestinal and extra-intestinal manifestations. Pleuropulmonary complications almost always occur in patients with a liver abscess, the intrathoracic contamination via transphrenic dissemination predominating. Respiratory signs are inaugural in 80% of the cases. Pleuropulmonary ambiasis designates the localization of the amibian infestation, but the clinical expression may vary: pneumonia, lung abscess, pleurisy, hepatobronchial fistulization and more infrequently pulmonary embolism. The preferential localization is the right hemithorax related to abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Left lobe abscesses lead to left-sided pleuropulmonary complications with the risk of rupture into the pericardium. Chocolate-colored pus from a pleural or abscess puncture or vomitus strongly suggests the diagnosis, which is confirmed by highly-positive serology. Metronidazole is the treatment of choice, providing cure without sequellae. In Africa, mortality and morbidity due to ambiasis are high. In Abidjan, 92% of cured patients have sequella, and mortality reaches 15%, the consequence of late diagnosis.

  2. Chemical Signposts in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleeves, I.; Bergin, E. A.; Fogel, J.

    2011-05-01

    In the era of the Kepler Mission, the detection of numerous multi-planet systems has demonstrated that planet-formation appears to be a rather ubiquitous phenomenon. Such systems are believed to form from nascent protoplanetary disks, whose environment sets the stage for initial planetary chemical composition and evolution. However, disk systems typically vary by orders of magnitude in radiation field, densities and temperatures, and thus complex disk models are necessary to fully understand this unique chemical environment. Further evidence for disks as progenitors to planetary systems comes from Spitzer surveys of young disk systems, which have revealed a class of objects known as ``transition disks''. These systems appear to have inner voids and gaps in the dust opacity, possibly indicative of planet evolution and disk clearing. This physical evolution in the dust disk will significantly impact its chemical nature, and therefore these potentially planet-forming systems in ``transition'' should have unique chemical signatures. We predict one such signature to be an active chemistry at the wall interface where the conditions are such that the disk is both heated and optically thick to the photo-dissociating UV. The net result is a wide variety of gas-phase molecules, appearing in line emission as bright molecular rings far from the central star. This behavior should also reveal a wealth of information about the physical conditions in this actively evolving zone between the inner ``cleared'' disk and the massive outer disk. For this presentation I will discuss the features of our disk chemical model pipeline and select model results of transition disk systems. I will also highlight the exciting future of protoplanetary disk chemistry in the era of ALMA, which will truly revolutionize our understanding of the chemical nature of disks.

  3. THE EVOLUTION OF INNER DISK GAS IN TRANSITION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoadley, K.; France, K.; McJunkin, M.; Alexander, R. D.; Schneider, P. C.

    2015-10-10

    Investigating the molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) provides insight into how the molecular disk environment changes during the transition from primordial to debris disk systems. We conduct a small survey of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) fluorescent emission, using 14 well-studied Classical T Tauri stars at two distinct dust disk evolutionary stages, to explore how the structure of the inner molecular disk changes as the optically thick warm dust dissipates. We simulate the observed Hi-Lyman α-pumped H{sub 2} disk fluorescence by creating a 2D radiative transfer model that describes the radial distributions of H{sub 2} emission in the disk atmosphere and compare these to observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the radial distributions that best describe the observed H{sub 2} FUV emission arising in primordial disk targets (full dust disk) are demonstrably different than those of transition disks (little-to-no warm dust observed). For each best-fit model, we estimate inner and outer disk emission boundaries (r{sub in} and r{sub out}), describing where the bulk of the observed H{sub 2} emission arises in each disk, and we examine correlations between these and several observational disk evolution indicators, such as n{sub 13–31}, r{sub in,} {sub CO}, and the mass accretion rate. We find strong, positive correlations between the H{sub 2} radial distributions and the slope of the dust spectral energy distribution, implying the behavior of the molecular disk atmosphere changes as the inner dust clears in evolving PPDs. Overall, we find that H{sub 2} inner radii are ∼4 times larger in transition systems, while the bulk of the H{sub 2} emission originates inside the dust gap radius for all transitional sources.

  4. Formation and evolution of the protoplanetary disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikina, Tamara V.; Makalkin, A. B.

    1991-01-01

    A disk formation model during collapse of the protosolar nebula, yielding a low-mass protoplanetary disk is presented. The following subject areas are covered: (1) circumstellar disks; (2) conditions for the formation of stars with disks; (3) early evolution of the protoplanetary disk; and (4) temperature conditions and the convection in the protoplanetary disk.

  5. Rolling contact deformation of 1100 aluminum disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, G. T.; Huang, Q.

    1986-09-01

    The plastic deformation produced by pure, two dimensional, rolling contacts has been studied by subjecting 1100 aluminum disks to repeated contacts with well-defined relative peak contact pressures in the range 2 ≤ P 0/ k c ≤ 6.8. Two microstructural conditions are examined: as-received (warm worked) and annealed, displaying cyclic softening and cyclic hardening, respectively. Measurements of the distortion of wire markers imbedded in the rims, microhardness values of the plastically deformed layer, and changes in disk radius and width are reported. These are used to evaluate the plastic circumferential, radial, and axial displacements of the rim surface and the depth of the plastically deformed layer. These features are compared with the classical, elastic-quasi plastic analysis of rolling, and with recent elastic-plastic finite element calculations. The results show that the rim deformation state approaches plane strain when the disk width-to-Hertzian half contact width-ratio B/w ≥ 200. The presence of a solid lubricant has no detectable influence on the character of the plane strain deformation. The measurements of the per cycle forward (circumferential) displacements for the two conditions are self-consistent and agree with the finite element calculations when the resistance to plastic deformation is attributed to the instantaneous cyclic yield stress, but not when the resistance is identified with the initial monotonie yield stress. At the same time, the extent of the plastic zone is 5× greater than predicted by the analyses. These and other results can be rationalized by drawing on the special features of the resistance to cyclic deformation. They support the view that the deformation produced by the N th rolling contact is governed by the shape of the stress-strain hysteresis loop after the corresponding number of stress-strain cycles which depends on the cycle strain amplitude, degree of reversibility, and the strain path imposed by the contact

  6. Cardiovascular manifestations of autonomic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2006-02-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic manifestations of seizures occur frequently in the epileptic population. Common manifestations include alterations in heart rate and rhythm, blood pressure, ECG changes and chest pain. The neuroanatomical and neurophysiological underpinnings of these autonomic manifestations are not been fully elucidated. Diagnostic confusion may arise when ictal symptoms are confined to the autonomic nervous system; conversely, such symptoms in association with convulsions or altered consciousness are more readily recognized as concomitant ictal features. Awareness of the diverse autonomic manifestations of epilepsy will enhance diagnosis and lead to more effective therapy of these patients.

  7. Determination of elastic stresses in gas-turbine disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S S

    1947-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of elastic stresses in symmetrical disks typical of those of a high-temperature gas turbine. The method is essentially a finite-difference solution of the equilibrium and compatibility equations for elastic stresses in a symmetrical disk. Account can be taken of point-to-point variations in disk thickness, in temperature, in elastic modulus, in coefficient of thermal expansion, in material density, and in Poisson's ratio. No numerical integration or trial-and-error procedures are involved and the computations can be performed in rapid and routine fashion by nontechnical computers with little engineering supervision. Checks on problems for which exact mathematical solutions are known indicate that the method yields results of high accuracy. Illustrative examples are presented to show the manner of treating solid disks, disks with central holes, and disks constructed either of a single material or two or more welded materials. The effect of shrink fitting is taken into account by a very simple device.

  8. Oral Manifestations of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Anitha; Masthan, Mahaboob Kader; Sankar, Leena Sankari; Narayanasamy, Aravindha Babu; Elumalai, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is one of the disorder that has social impact. Both skin and mucous membrane show depigmentation in vitiligo. Depigmentation in oral cavity can be more easily observed and the patient can be given awareness regarding the condition if they are unaware of vitiligo elsewhere in their body and can be guided for treatment. Aim and objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of occurrence of oral mucosal vitiligo in vitiligo patients and to determine the most commonly involved oral mucosal site. Materials and methods: The study sample included 100 vitiligo patients. The patients of all age groups and both genders were included. Vitiligo patients associated with systemic conditions such as thyroid disorders, juvenile diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia, Addison's disease were excluded in this study. Results: Out of 100 vitiligo patients 44 % male and 56% were female. The oral presentation of vitiligo in this study showed depigmentation of buccal mucosa in 5% of patients, labial mucosa in 5% of patients, palate in 8% of patients, gingiva in 2% of patients and alveolar mucosa 1%. Depigmentation of lip was seen in 42% of patients. Lip involvement refers to depigmentation of both the lips or either lip. Also vermilion border involvement was noted in majority of cases. In some cases, the depigmentation of lip extended to the facial skin also. Conclusion: In this study 55 patients out of 100 patients showed depigmentation in the oral cavity. Lip involvement was most common in this study showing about 42% of patients. Intraoral mucosal involvement was found in 21% of patients. Among intraoral mucosal site palate was common followed by buccal and labial mucosa, gingiva. Two patients had lip pigmentation as the only manifestation without any depigmentation in the skin. PMID:25657420

  9. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A.; Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Natta, A.; Scholz, A.

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  10. Hall Effect-Mediated Magnetic Flux Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2017-02-01

    The global evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) has recently been shown to be largely controlled by the amount of poloidal magnetic flux threading the disk. The amount of magnetic flux must also coevolve with the disk, as a result of magnetic flux transport, a process that is poorly understood. In weakly ionized gas as in PPDs, magnetic flux is largely frozen in the electron fluid, except when resistivity is large. When the disk is largely laminar, we show that the relative drift between the electrons and ions (the Hall drift), and the ions and neutral fluids (ambipolar drift) can play a dominant role on the transport of magnetic flux. Using two-dimensional simulations that incorporate the Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion (AD) with prescribed diffusivities, we show that when large-scale poloidal field is aligned with disk rotation, the Hall effect rapidly drags magnetic flux inward at the midplane region, while it slowly pushes flux outward above/below the midplane. This leads to a highly radially elongated field configuration as a global manifestation of the Hall-shear instability. This field configuration further promotes rapid outward flux transport by AD at the midplane, leading to instability saturation. In quasi-steady state, magnetic flux is transported outward at approximately the same rate at all heights, and the rate is comparable to the Hall-free case. For anti-aligned field polarity, the Hall effect consistently transports magnetic flux outward, leading to a largely vertical field configuration in the midplane region. The field lines in the upper layer first bend radially inward and then outward to launch a disk wind. Overall, the net rate of outward flux transport is about twice as fast as that of the aligned case. In addition, the rate of flux transport increases with increasing disk magnetization. The absolute rate of transport is sensitive to disk microphysics, which remains to be explored in future studies.

  11. Evolution of Accretion Disks in Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2014-04-01

    During a stellar tidal disruption event (TDE), an accretion disk forms as stellar debris returns to the disruption site and circularizes. Rather than being confined within the circularizing radius, the disk can spread to larger radii to conserve angular momentum. A spreading disk is a source of matter for re-accretion at rates that may exceed the later stellar fallback rate, although a disk wind can suppress its contribution to the central black hole accretion rate. A spreading disk is detectible through a break in the central accretion rate history or, at longer wavelengths, by its own emission. We model the evolution of TDE disk size and accretion rate by accounting for the time-dependent fallback rate, for the influence of wind losses in the early advective stage, and for the possibility of thermal instability for accretion rates intermediate between the advection-dominated and gas-pressure-dominated states. The model provides a dynamic basis for modeling TDE light curves. All or part of a young TDE disk will precess as a solid body because of the Lense-Thirring effect, and precession may manifest itself as a quasi-periodic modulation of the light curve. The precession period increases with time. Applying our results to the jetted TDE candidate Swift J1644+57, whose X-ray light curve shows numerous quasi-periodic dips, we argue that the data best fit a scenario in which a main-sequence star was fully disrupted by an intermediate mass black hole on an orbit significantly inclined from the black hole equator, with the apparent jet shutoff at t = 500 days corresponding to a disk transition from the advective state to the gas-pressure-dominated state.

  12. Evolution of accretion disks in tidal disruption events

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Matzner, Christopher D. E-mail: matzner@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-04-01

    During a stellar tidal disruption event (TDE), an accretion disk forms as stellar debris returns to the disruption site and circularizes. Rather than being confined within the circularizing radius, the disk can spread to larger radii to conserve angular momentum. A spreading disk is a source of matter for re-accretion at rates that may exceed the later stellar fallback rate, although a disk wind can suppress its contribution to the central black hole accretion rate. A spreading disk is detectible through a break in the central accretion rate history or, at longer wavelengths, by its own emission. We model the evolution of TDE disk size and accretion rate by accounting for the time-dependent fallback rate, for the influence of wind losses in the early advective stage, and for the possibility of thermal instability for accretion rates intermediate between the advection-dominated and gas-pressure-dominated states. The model provides a dynamic basis for modeling TDE light curves. All or part of a young TDE disk will precess as a solid body because of the Lense-Thirring effect, and precession may manifest itself as a quasi-periodic modulation of the light curve. The precession period increases with time. Applying our results to the jetted TDE candidate Swift J1644+57, whose X-ray light curve shows numerous quasi-periodic dips, we argue that the data best fit a scenario in which a main-sequence star was fully disrupted by an intermediate mass black hole on an orbit significantly inclined from the black hole equator, with the apparent jet shutoff at t = 500 days corresponding to a disk transition from the advective state to the gas-pressure-dominated state.

  13. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.

  14. Circumstellar disks of the most vigorously accreting young stars

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Takami, Michihiro; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Dong, Ruobing; Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Fukagawa, Misato; Tamura, Motohide; Henning, Thomas; Dunham, Michael M.; Karr, Jennifer L.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Tsuribe, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Stars may not accumulate their mass steadily, as was previously thought, but in a series of violent events manifesting themselves as sharp stellar brightening. These events can be caused by fragmentation due to gravitational instabilities in massive gaseous disks surrounding young stars, followed by migration of dense gaseous clumps onto the star. Our high-resolution near-infrared imaging has verified the presence of the key associated features, large-scale arms and arcs surrounding four young stellar objects undergoing luminous outbursts. Our hydrodynamics simulations and radiative transfer models show that these observed structures can indeed be explained by strong gravitational instabilities occurring at the beginning of the disk formation phase. The effect of those tempestuous episodes of disk evolution on star and planet formation remains to be understood. PMID:26989772

  15. Circumstellar disks of the most vigorously accreting young stars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Takami, Michihiro; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Dong, Ruobing; Vorobyov, Eduard I; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Fukagawa, Misato; Tamura, Motohide; Henning, Thomas; Dunham, Michael M; Karr, Jennifer L; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Tsuribe, Toru

    2016-02-01

    Stars may not accumulate their mass steadily, as was previously thought, but in a series of violent events manifesting themselves as sharp stellar brightening. These events can be caused by fragmentation due to gravitational instabilities in massive gaseous disks surrounding young stars, followed by migration of dense gaseous clumps onto the star. Our high-resolution near-infrared imaging has verified the presence of the key associated features, large-scale arms and arcs surrounding four young stellar objects undergoing luminous outbursts. Our hydrodynamics simulations and radiative transfer models show that these observed structures can indeed be explained by strong gravitational instabilities occurring at the beginning of the disk formation phase. The effect of those tempestuous episodes of disk evolution on star and planet formation remains to be understood.

  16. Bladed disk vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to better understand the vibratory response of bladed disk assemblies that occur in jet engines or turbopumps. Two basic problems were investigated: how friction affects flutter; and how friction, mistuning, and stage aerodynamics affect resonance. Understanding these phenomena allows a better understanding of why some stages have high vibratory stresses, how best to manage those stresses, and what to do about reducing them if they are too large.

  17. Gaseous Inner Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    spectral line diagnostics have been used as probes of the gas in inner disks. These include transitions of molecular hydrogen at UV, near-infrared, and...mid-infrared wavelengths (Sections 2.4, 2.5) and the fundamental ro-vibrational transitions of the OH molecule (Section 2.2). Additional potential...phase and sufficiently ex- cited to produce rovibrational features in the infrared. Com- plementary atomic transitions are likely to be good probes of

  18. CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, S.; Casassus, S.; Van der Plas, G.; Christiaens, V.; Ménard, F.; Roman, P.; Cieza, L.; Hales, A. S.; Pinte, C.

    2015-01-10

    Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 AU from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J = 2-1 line of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the {sup 12}CO emission is optically thick, while {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is ∼1.5-2 M {sub Jup}. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best-fit model shows that the cavity radius is much smaller in CO than it is in millimeter continuum and scattered light observations, with a gas cavity that does not extend beyond 105 AU (at 3σ). The gap wall at its outer edge is diffuse and smooth in the gas distribution, while in dust continuum it is manifestly sharper. The inclination angle, as estimated from the high velocity channel maps, is 28 ± 0.5 deg, higher than in previous estimates, assuming a fix central star mass of 2.2 M {sub ☉}.

  19. Using Finite-Element Analysis In Estimating Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; August, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Method of estimating design survivability of structural component incorporates finite-element and probabilistic properties of materials. Involves evaluation of design parameters through direct comparisons of survivability of component expressed in terms of percentages of like components that survive at various lifetimes. Probabilistic properties of materials, given in terms of Weibull parameters, coupled with stress field computed by finite-element analysis to determine fatigue life based on initiation of cracks. Method applied to rotating disk containing bolt holes, representative of disks used in aerospace propulsion turbines. Also used in early stages of design process to optimize life-based designs, reducing testing of full-sized components needed to validate designs.

  20. DISK-SATELLITE INTERACTION IN DISKS WITH DENSITY GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-10-10

    Gravitational coupling between a gaseous disk and an orbiting perturber leads to angular momentum exchange between them that can result in gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks and clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks. Understanding the co-evolution of the disk and the orbit of the perturber in these circumstances requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted by the latter on a highly non-uniform disk. Here we explore disk-satellite interaction in disks with gaps in linear approximation both in Fourier and in physical space, explicitly incorporating the disk non-uniformity in the fluid equations. Density gradients strongly displace the positions of Lindblad resonances in the disk (which often occur at multiple locations), and the waveforms of modes excited close to the gap edge get modified compared to the uniform disk case. The spatial distribution of the excitation torque density is found to be quite different from the existing prescriptions: most of the torque is exerted in a rather narrow region near the gap edge where Lindblad resonances accumulate, followed by an exponential falloff with the distance from the perturber. Despite these differences, for a given gap profile, the full integrated torque exerted on the disk agrees with the conventional uniform disk theory prediction at the level of {approx}10%. The nonlinearity of the density wave excited by the perturber is shown to decrease as the wave travels out of the gap, slowing down its nonlinear evolution and damping. Our results suggest that gap opening in protoplanetary disks and gas clearing around SMBH binaries can be more efficient than the existing theories predict. They pave the way for self-consistent calculations of the gap structure and the orbital evolution of the perturber using accurate prescription for the torque density behavior.

  1. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  2. The MANIFEST prototyping design study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Jonathan S.; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Brown, David M.; Brown, Rebecca A.; Case, Scott; Chapman, Steve; Churilov, Vladimir; Colless, Matthew; Content, Robert; Depoy, Darren; Evans, Ian; Farrell, Tony; Goodwin, Michael; Jacoby, George; Klauser, Urs; Kuehn, Kyler; Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Mali, Slavko; Marshall, Jennifer; Muller, Rolf; Nichani, Vijay; Pai, Naveen; Prochaska, Travis; Saunders, Will; Schmidt, Luke; Shortridge, Keith; Staszak, Nicholas F.; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Tims, Julia; Vuong, Minh V.; Waller, Lewis G.; Zhelem, Ross

    2016-08-01

    MANIFEST is a facility multi-object fibre system for the Giant Magellan Telescope, which uses `Starbug' fibre positioning robots. MANIFEST, when coupled to the telescope's planned seeing-limited instruments, GMACS, and G-CLEF, offers access to: larger fields of view; higher multiplex gains; versatile reformatting of the focal plane via IFUs; image-slicers; and in some cases higher spatial and spectral resolution. The Prototyping Design Study phase for MANIFEST, nearing completion, has focused on developing a working prototype of a Starbugs system, called TAIPAN, for the UK Schmidt Telescope, which will conduct a stellar and galaxy survey of the Southern sky. The Prototyping Design Study has also included work on the GMT instrument interfaces. In this paper, we outline the instrument design features of TAIPAN, highlight the modifications that will be necessary for the MANIFEST implementation, and provide an update on the MANIFEST/instrument interfaces.

  3. DVD - digital versatile disks

    SciTech Connect

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    An international standard has emerged for the first true multimedia format. Digital Versatile Disk (by its official name), you may know it as Digital Video Disks. DVD has applications in movies, music, games, information CD-ROMS, and many other areas where massive amounts of digital information is needed. Did I say massive amounts of data? Would you believe over 17 gigabytes on a single piece of plastic the size of an audio-CD? That`s the promise, at least, by the group of nine electronics manufacturers who have agreed to the format specification, and who hope to make this goal a reality by 1998. In this major agreement, which didn`t come easily, the manufacturers will combine Sony and Phillip`s one side double-layer NMCD format with Toshiba and Matsushita`s double sided Super-Density disk. By Spring of this year, they plan to market the first 4.7 gigabyte units. The question is: Will DVD take off? Some believe that read-only disks recorded with movies will be about as popular as video laser disks. They say that until the eraseable/writable DVD arrives, the consumer will most likely not buy it. Also, DVD has a good market for replacement of CD- Roms. Back in the early 80`s, the international committee deciding the format of the audio compact disk decided its length would be 73 minutes. This, they declared, would allow Beethoven`s 9th Symphony to be contained entirely on a single CD. Similarly, today it was agreed that playback length of a single sided, single layer DVD would be 133 minutes, long enough to hold 94% of all feature-length movies. Further, audio can be in Dolby`s AC-3 stereo or 5.1 tracks of surround sound, better than CD-quality audio (16-bits at 48kHz). In addition, there are three to five language tracks, copy protection and parental ``locks`` for R rated movies. DVD will be backwards compatible with current CD-ROM and audio CD formats. Added versatility comes by way of multiple aspect rations: 4:3 pan-scan, 4:3 letterbox, and 16:9 widescreen. MPEG

  4. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  5. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  6. PROPERTIES OF GRAVITOTURBULENT ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2009-10-10

    We explore the properties of cold gravitoturbulent accretion disks-non-fragmenting disks hovering on the verge of gravitational instability (GI)-using a realistic prescription for the effective viscosity caused by gravitational torques. This prescription is based on a direct relationship between the angular momentum transport in a thin accretion disk and the disk cooling in a steady state. Assuming that opacity is dominated by dust we are able to self-consistently derive disk properties for a given M-dot assuming marginal gravitational stability. We also allow external irradiation of the disk and account for a non-zero background viscosity, which can be due to the magneto-rotational instability. Spatial transitions between different co-existing disk states (e.g., between irradiated and self-luminous or between gravitoturbulent and viscous) are described and the location of the boundary at which the disk must fragment is determined in a variety of situations. We demonstrate in particular that at low enough M-dot external irradiation stabilizes the gravitoturbulent disk against fragmentation to very large distances thus providing means of steady mass transport to the central object. Implications of our results for the possibility of planet formation by GI in protoplanetary disks and star formation in the Galactic center and for the problem of feeding supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei are discussed.

  7. C/C composite brake disk nondestructive evaluation by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Tsuchin P.; Poudel, Anish; Filip, Peter

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the non-destructive evaluation of thick Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composite aircraft brake disks by using transient infrared thermography (IRT) approach. Thermal diffusivity measurement technique was applied to identify the subsurface anomalies in thick C/C brake disks. In addition, finite element analysis (FEA) modeling tool was used to determine the transient thermal response of the C/C disks that were subjected to flash heating. For this, series of finite element models were built and thermal responses with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models by using custom built in-house IRT system and commercial turnkey system. The analysis and experimental results showed good correlation between thermal diffusivity value and anomalies within the disk. It was demonstrated that the step-heating transient thermal approach could be effectively applied to obtain the whole field thermal diffusivity value of C/C composites.

  8. Structural Optimization Methodology for Rotating Disks of Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.

    1995-01-01

    In support of the preliminary evaluation of various engine technologies, a methodology has been developed for structurally designing the rotating disks of an aircraft engine. The structural design methodology, along with a previously derived methodology for predicting low-cycle fatigue life, was implemented in a computer program. An interface computer program was also developed that gathers the required data from a flowpath analysis program (WATE) being used at NASA Lewis. The computer program developed for this study requires minimum interaction with the user, thus allowing engineers with varying backgrounds in aeropropulsion to successfully execute it. The stress analysis portion of the methodology and the computer program were verified by employing the finite element analysis method. The 10th- stage, high-pressure-compressor disk of the Energy Efficient Engine Program (E3) engine was used to verify the stress analysis; the differences between the stresses and displacements obtained from the computer program developed for this study and from the finite element analysis were all below 3 percent for the problem solved. The computer program developed for this study was employed to structurally optimize the rotating disks of the E3 high-pressure compressor. The rotating disks designed by the computer program in this study were approximately 26 percent lighter than calculated from the E3 drawings. The methodology is presented herein.

  9. Imaging Debris Disks with CCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, G.; Matthews, B. C.; Isella, A.; Ricci, L.; Swift, J.

    2013-01-01

    Debris disks are sustained by the collisional grinding of planetesimals down to micron-sized particles. The mechanisms by which the planetesimals are perturbed include stirring by planetary mass bodies, which interact gravitationally to sculpt the disk by scattering dust particles out of the disk, and capturing dust in mean motion resonances as particles drift inwards from Poynting-Robertson drag or as planets migrate. Thus the location of the debris dust can trace where planetesimals have formed, as well as the dynamical history of the disk. With high angular resolution and high sensitivity at submillimeter wavelengths, CCAT will be a powerful telescope to discover and image the structure of debris disks around nearby stars. This poster will describe various surveys that CCAT will conduct to search for new debris disks.

  10. Other manifestations of HIV vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, N G; Beningfield, S J

    2009-05-01

    Descriptions of the numerous manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection affecting almost every organ system have abounded in recent publications. Multiple radiological, clinical and postmortem reports have recorded the cerebral, pulmonary, cardiac, renal, rheumatological and gastrointestinal pathologies in HIV-infected individuals, ranging from the bizarre to the mundane. Large-vessel HIV-related vascular manifestations have previously been reported in the surgical literature. We describe and review the manifestations of HIV-associated vasculopathy as it pertains to the cerebral, cardiovascular, mesenteric and renal circulations.

  11. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  12. Autoimmune manifestations in viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2013-01-01

    Infections by the viruses responsible for hepatitis B, C and D are accompanied by a number of immunopathological manifestations. A link between infection and autoimmunity is particularly well documented for the hepatitis C virus. Immunopathological manifestations range from production of autoantibodies to overt autoimmune disease, including thyroiditis and autoimmune hepatitis, and to immune-complex-mediated disorders, including cryoglobulinaemia, glomerulonephritis and vasculitis. Several of these manifestations improve with successful antiviral treatment, directly incriminating the virus in their pathogenesis. Mechanisms considered responsible for hepatitis virus-related immunopathology, including molecular mimicry, impairment of regulatory T cells and activation of B lymphocytes, will be examined in this review.

  13. Ocular manifestations of feline herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Andrew, S E

    2001-03-01

    Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) infection is ubiquitous in the domestic cat population worldwide. The most common clinical ocular manifestations of infection with FHV-1 are conjunctivitis and keratitis. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of feline herpesvirus-1 and discusses the various clinical ocular manifestations, diagnostic techniques and treatment of FHV-1-induced diseases. Ocular manifestations include: conjunctivitis, keratitis, stromal keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, ophthalmia neonatorium, symblepharon, corneal sequestrum, eosinophilic keratitis and anterior uveitis. Diagnostic techniques discussed include: virus isolation, fluorescent antibody testing, serum neutralising titers, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction. Various therapies are also discussed.

  14. Cutaneous Manifestations of Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Joshua W; Swoger, Jason M; Grandinetti, Lisa M

    2015-07-01

    Awareness of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease is increasing in dermatology and gastroenterology, with enhanced identification of entities that range from granulomatous diseases recapitulating the underlying inflammatory bowel disease to reactive conditions and associated dermatoses. In this review, the underlying etiopathology of Crohn disease is discussed, and how this mirrors certain skin manifestations that present in a subset of patients is explored. The array of extraintestinal manifestations that do not share a similar pathology, but which are often seen in association with inflammatory bowel disease, is also discussed. Treatment and pathogenetic mechanisms, where available, are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lightweight Disk Alloy Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    2001 (1982). 45. K C. Russell and J. W Eddington , JI Mat. Sci., 6, 20 (1972). 46. M. J. Lequeux, Ph.D. Thesis, Univ. de Paris-Sud (1979). 47. P S ...AD-A237 064 UGHTWEIGHT DISK ALLOY DEVELOPMENT S . M. Russel, C. C. Law and M. J. Blackburn Uted Te lowkles Corpoaton Prat & Whtney Govnment Enes...Space Propulo P. 0. Box 109600 West Palm Beach, FL 33410-9600 P. C. Clapp and D. M. Pease Istitute of Materials Science 9 ELECT Fg AW 11il S E Final

  16. The SEDs of Gapped Accretion Disks surrounding Binary Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultekin, Kayhan; Miller, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the observability of a black hole (BH) accretion disk with a gap or a hole created by a secondary BH embedded in the disk. We find that for an interesting range of parameters of BH masses 10^6-10^9 M⊙), orbital separation 1 AU to ~0.1 pc), and gap width (10-190 disk scale heights), the missing thermal emission from a gap manifests itself in an observable decrement in the spectral energy distribution (SED). The change in slope in the broken power law is strongly dependent on the width of the gap in the accretion disk, which in turn is uniquely determined by the mass ratio of the BHs (under our assumptions), such that it scales roughly as q^(5/12). Thus, one can use spectral observations of the continuum of bright AGNs to infer not only the presence of a closely separated BH binary, but also the mass ratio. When the BH merger opens an entire hole (or cavity) in the inner disk, the broadband SED of the AGNs or quasar may serve as a diagnostic. We note future directions for this research.

  17. Noncircular outer disks in unbarred S0 galaxies: NGC 502 and NGC 5485

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil'chenko, O. K.

    2016-03-01

    Highly noncircular outer stellar disks have been detected in two SA0 (unbarred) galaxies by comparing the spectroscopic data on the rotation of stars and the photometric data on the shape and orientation of isophotes. In NGC 502, the oval distortion of the disk is manifested in the shape of the inner and outer elliptical rings occupying wide radial zones between the bulge and the disk and at the outer disk edge; such a structure can be a consequence of the so-called "dry minor merger," multiple cannibalization of gas-free satellites. In NGC 5485, the stellar kinematics is absolutely unrelated to the orientation of isophotes in the disk region, and for this galaxy the conclusion about its global triaxial structure is unavoidable.

  18. Disk Evolution: Testing The Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Phil

    2016-07-01

    Models for planet formation and observable large-scale structure in protoplanetary disks are built on a foundation of gas-phase physics. In the simplest telling, it is assumed that the disk evolves due to turbulence, and that photoevaporation is the dominant driver of mass loss. How secure is this foundation to our understanding? I will review recent results from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks, which suggest a modified picture in which MHD winds and fossil magnetic flux play a critical role. I will discuss what these theoretical results may imply for observations of disks.

  19. Gravitational Instability in Planetesimal Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Bryce T.; Lithwick, Yoram; Pan, Margaret; Rein, Hanno; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-11-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) has been proposed as a method of forming giant gas planets enhanced by disk thermodynamics in a protoplanetary disk (Boss, 1997, Science 276; Durisen et al., 2007, Protostars and Planets V) and as a method of forming planetesimals through the focusing of boulders by the interaction between solids and gases in a turbulent circumstellar disk (Johansen et al., 2007, Nature 448; Youdin & Goodman, 2005, Astrophys. J. 620). GI is mediated through a gaseous circumstellar disk in each each of these scenarios. We explore the possibility of GI occurring in a planetesimal disk devoid of gas. In this regime, mutual collisions between planetesimals are required to dissipate their orbital shear and velocity dispersion enough for collapse to occur as described by the Toomre stability criterion (Toomre, 1964, Astrophys. J. 139; Toomre, 1981, Structure and Evolution of Normal Galaxies). How frequent must collisions be between planetesimals in a gravitationally stable planetesimal disk for GI to occur? Are there collisional rates where GI is postponed indefinitely in an equilibrium state between gravitational stirring and collisional cooling? We present 3D shearing sheet simulations using the REBOUND N-body code with the symplectic epicyclic integrator (Rein & Liu, 2011, A&A 537; Rein & Tremaine, 2011, MNRAS 415) in which the candidate collision rates are within a few orders of magnitude of the disk dynamical lifetime. Our simulations suggest that collisions rate directly controls disk cooling. The shape of the disk cooling curve is independent of the collision rate when scaled to the collision time.

  20. Transition circumnstellar disks in Lupus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. A.; Schreiber, M. R.; Cieza, L. A.; Rebassa-Manssergas, A.; Williams, J. P.; Merin, B.; Smith-Castelli, A.; Orellana, M.

    2011-10-01

    Based on Spitzer selected YSOs, we present a study of transition disks located in Lupus. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain their defining characteristic: an inner opacity hole and an optically thick outer disk. These processes are: planet formation, grain growth, photoevaporation, tidal truncation in close binaries. We have carried out Adaptive Optics (AO) imaging, submillimeter photometry, and echelle spectroscopy in order to observationally characterize our transition disk sample. With the analyzed data we can distinguish the four scenarios and identify candidate transition disk systems that are currently forming planets. Such objects are excellent targets to be followed-up with Herschel and ALMA.

  1. Concepts for improving turbine disk integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1976-01-01

    Advanced disk structural concepts are used to improve the cyclic lives and reliability of turbine disks. Analytical studies were conducted to evaluate bore-entry disks as potential replacements for the existing first-stage turbine disks in the CF6-50 and JT8D-17 engines. Results of low-cycle fatigue, burst, fracture mechanics, and fragment energy analyses are summarized for the advanced disk designs and the existing disk designs with both conventional and advanced disk materials. Other disk concepts such as composite, laminated, link, multibore, multidisk, and spline disks were also evaluated for the CF6-50 engine.

  2. Disk MHD generator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retallick, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    Directly-fired, separately-fired, and oxygen-augmented MHD power plants incorporating a disk geometry for the MHD generator were studied. The base parameters defined for four near-optimum-performance MHD steam power systems of various types are presented. The finally selected systems consisted of (1) two directly fired cases, one at 1920 K (2996F) preheat and the other at 1650 K (2500 F) preheat, (2) a separately-fired case where the air is preheated to the same level as the higher temperature directly-fired cases, and (3) an oxygen augmented case with the same generator inlet temperature of 2839 (4650F) as the high temperature directly-fired and separately-fired cases. Supersonic Mach numbers at the generator inlet, gas inlet swirl, and constant Hall field operation were specified based on disk generator optimization. System pressures were based on optimization of MHD net power. Supercritical reheat stream plants were used in all cases. Open and closed cycle component costs are summarized and compared.

  3. Disk storage at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascetti, L.; Cano, E.; Chan, B.; Espinal, X.; Fiorot, A.; González Labrador, H.; Iven, J.; Lamanna, M.; Lo Presti, G.; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ; Ponce, S.; Rousseau, H.; van der Ster, D.

    2015-12-01

    CERN IT DSS operates the main storage resources for data taking and physics analysis mainly via three system: AFS, CASTOR and EOS. The total usable space available on disk for users is about 100 PB (with relative ratios 1:20:120). EOS actively uses the two CERN Tier0 centres (Meyrin and Wigner) with 50:50 ratio. IT DSS also provide sizeable on-demand resources for IT services most notably OpenStack and NFS-based clients: this is provided by a Ceph infrastructure (3 PB) and few proprietary servers (NetApp). We will describe our operational experience and recent changes to these systems with special emphasis to the present usages for LHC data taking, the convergence to commodity hardware (nodes with 200-TB each with optional SSD) shared across all services. We also describe our experience in coupling commodity and home-grown solution (e.g. CERNBox integration in EOS, Ceph disk pools for AFS, CASTOR and NFS) and finally the future evolution of these systems for WLCG and beyond.

  4. Cutaneous manifestations of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Kos, Liborka; Shwayder, Tor

    2006-01-01

    Dermatologists and child abuse are not frequently associated in the minds of most physicians. Yet the most common manifestations of child abuse are cutaneous. This article reviews cutaneous manifestations of physical abuse, including bruises, lacerations, abrasions, human bites, and burns. It also discusses ways that dermatologists can differentiate abusive injuries from accidental ones as well as from the many dermatologic conditions that can mimic child abuse. Finally, we review what actions the dermatologist should take when suspecting abuse in a patient.

  5. [Oral manifestations in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Jensen, Siri Beier

    2010-11-01

    Systemic diseases may affect the oral tissues, i.e. oral mucosa, salivary glands, teeth or bone, and oral manifestations will frequently present early, i.e. in association with (non-fulminant) systemic disease. Thus, recognition and proper diagnosis is essential to initiate appropriate treatment schedules. Key examples of systemic disease groups with oral manifestations include dermatological, inflammatory connective tissue diseases, haematological and inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases, as well as neurological and endocrine diseases.

  6. The disk(s) of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concejo, J.; Stanchev, O.; Georgiev, Ts. B.

    2013-09-01

    We present a review of formation of the Milky Way's disk(s). We discuss the most recent disk formation and evolution scenarios that can be probed by the orbital eccentricities of stellar populations. These scenarios are included in two different frames, namely violent origin and secular evolution. They are also arranged in four main models: (i) accretion and disruption of satellites, (ii) disk heating by a minor merger, (iii) in situ formation during/after a gas-rich merger, and (iv) stellar migration (radial and vertical). The majority of the models have been developed according to the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) cosmogony and are based on advanced numerical simulations. They aim to explain the observational data- chemical (e.g., abundances gradients and the [α/Fe] ratio) and kinematic/dynamical (e.g., rotational velocities and velocity dispersions). Models reproduce only some aspects of the Galaxy disk system because all of them are limited by numerous preliminary assumptions, inevitable numerical artifacts, etc. Here, we concentrate on the importance of stellar migration (radial and vertical), which definitively plays an essential role in the formation of the Galaxy's thick disk and gives different interpretation on the structure of the Galaxy's disk(s).

  7. Imperfections, impacts, and the singularity of Euler's disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranyai, Tamás; Várkonyi, Péter L.

    2017-09-01

    The motion of a rigid, spinning disk on a flat surface ends with a dissipation-induced finite-time singularity. The problem of finding the dominant energy absorption mechanism during the last phase of the motion generated a lively debate during the past two decades. Various candidates including air drag and different types of friction have been considered, nevertheless impacts have not been examined until now. We investigate the effect of impacts caused by geometric imperfections of the disk and of the underlying flat surface, through analyzing the dynamics of polygonal disks with unilateral point contacts. Similarly to earlier works, we determine the rate of energy absorption under the assumption of a regular pattern of motion analogous to precession-free motion of a rolling disk. In addition, we demonstrate that the asymptotic stability of this motion depends on parameters of the impact model. In the case of instability, the emerging irregular motion is investigated numerically. We conclude that there exists a range of model parameters (small radii of gyration or small restitution coefficients) in which absorption by impacts dominates all previously investigated mechanisms during the last phase of motion. Nevertheless the parameter values associated with a homogeneous disk on a hard surface are typically not in this range, hence the effect of impacts is in that case not dominant.

  8. A twisted disk equation that describes warped galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, K.

    1994-01-01

    Warped H1 gas layers in the outer regions of spiral galaxies usually display a noticeably twisted structure. This structure is thought to arise primarily as a result of differential precession in the H1 disk as it settles toward a 'preferred orientation' in an underlying dark halo potential well that is not spherically symmetric. In an attempt to better understand the structure and evolution of these twisted, warped disk structures, we have utilized the 'twist-equation' formalism. Specifically, we have generalized the twist equation to allow the treatment of non-Keplerian disks and from it have derived the steady-state structure of twisted disks that develop from free precession in a nonspherical, logarithmic halo potential. This generalized equation can also be used to examine the time-evolutionary behavior of warped galaxy disks.

  9. Onset of bonding plasmon hybridization preceded by gap modes in dielectric splitting of metal disks.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Maj; Bochenkov, Vladimir E; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Sutherland, Duncan S

    2013-01-01

    Dielectric splitting of nanoscale disks was studied experimentally and via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations through systematic introduction of multiple ultrathin dielectric layers. Tunable, hybridized dark bonding modes were seen with first-order gap modes preceding the appearance of bonding dipole-dipole disk modes. The observed bright dipolar mode did not show the energy shift expected from plasmon hybridization but activated dark higher order gap modes. Introducing lateral asymmetry was shown to remodel the field distribution resulting in 3D asymmetry that reoriented the dipole orientation away from the dipole of the elementary disk modes.

  10. Primary nucleosynthesis in the galactic disk

    SciTech Connect

    Twarog, B.A.; Wheeler, J.C.

    1982-10-15

    New data on the history of production of C, O, Mg, and Fe are used to reexamine the production of heavy elements in the galactic disk. A standard infall model is used to show that a constant rate of production of heavy elements is consistent with the data and to derive net absolute amounts for several elements. Various models for nucleosynthesis by massive stars are considered. Current models are inconsistent with the simplest picture in which all stars above some limit approx.12 M/sub sun/ explode. Adopting a finite upper or lower mass cutoff to the massive stars which contribute to nucleosynthesis provides a better agreement. Any conclusions that massive stars in a particular mass range explode seem premature, especially when consideration is given to potentially significant contributions to C, O, and Fe production from Type I supernovae.

  11. Evaluation of the solar disk sextant concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the viability of the solar disk sextant concept is evaluated, the optimum parameters required to carry out solar variability studies, which are the mission objectives, are derived. The experimental environment is first discussed, followed by the application of the finite Fourier transform definition (FFTD) to the detector array data. The requirements on the optical system are studied next. A computer program was carried out simulating solar edge data and FFTD. From this study, it is concluded that the required accuracy of measurement may be reached using currently available detector array technology, a focal ratio of the optical system in excess of 90, and an entrance aperture of 22 cm. The guidance error must be small enough to require no more than a correction rate of 0.1 arcsec/sec. All these conditions are well within current technology.

  12. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    SciTech Connect

    Shtemler, Yu. Liverts, E. Mond, M.

    2016-06-15

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads, EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of an MRI mode with stable Alfvén–Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  13. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  14. Disks around Main Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John

    1995-07-01

    About 30 other nearby stars have been shown (Aumann 1985,1988 Sadakane and Nishida 1986) to emit excess infrared flux relative to that expected from their photospheres. It is believed that such emission is the rule rather than the exception and that the limited number is caused by the IRAS detection limits. We propose to observe the prototypical objects Alpha Lyrae. If an optical counterpart to the infrared emission is observed, then the same analysis as that performed on the Beta Pictoris disk will be possible. If not, because of the low scattered light levels in the wings of the HST PSF, stringent limits on the albedo of the disk should be obtained. Only one circumstellar disk has been directly observed around a main sequence star. On the other hand, it is believed that disks are typical byproducts of star formation, and that these disks are the sites where planetary systems are formed. Both of these hypotheses will be tested with the observations proposed here. Firstly, the observations, if they detect the material will constrain its spatial distribution, and test the disk hypothesis. The material surrounding the target stars is presumed but not known to be distributed in a disk. There is not significant extinction towards these targets, but a shell of optically thin material can also fit the existing IRAS observations. The observations also only loosely constrain the radial distribution of the particles. Given a detection, it should be possible to distinguish a disk from

  15. Selected Papers on Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. R.; Cassen, P. M.; Wasson, J. T.; Woolum, D. S.; Klahr, H. H.; Henning, Th.

    2004-01-01

    Three papers present studies of thermal balances, dynamics, and electromagnetic spectra of protoplanetary disks, which comprise gas and dust orbiting young stars. One paper addresses the reprocessing, in a disk, of photons that originate in the disk itself in addition to photons that originate in the stellar object at the center. The shape of the disk is found to strongly affect the redistribution of energy. Another of the three papers reviews an increase in the optical luminosity of the young star FU Orionis. The increase began in the year 1936 and similar increases have since been observed in other stars. The paper summarizes astronomical, meteoric, and theoretical evidence that these increases are caused by increases in mass fluxes through the inner portions of the protoplanetary disks of these stars. The remaining paper presents a mathematical-modeling study of the structures of protostellar accretion disks, with emphasis on limits on disk flaring. Among the conclusions reached in the study are that (1) the radius at which a disk becomes shadowed from its central stellar object depends on radial mass flow and (2) most planet formation has occurred in environments unheated by stellar radiation.

  16. Circumstellar disks and planetary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huélamo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Circumstellar disks are very common around young intermediate-, low-mass stars, and brown dwarfs. They are the cradle of planetary systems, although the mechanism to form planets is still unknown. In this text I review some advances in the field of circumstellar disks and planetary formation coming from observations.

  17. Scattering from Thin Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectric properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T is sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes (T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  18. Scattering from thin dielectric disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectic properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes, T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  19. Quantum memories at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Benjamin J.; Loss, Daniel; Pachos, Jiannis K.; Self, Chris N.; Wootton, James R.

    2016-10-01

    To use quantum systems for technological applications one first needs to preserve their coherence for macroscopic time scales, even at finite temperature. Quantum error correction has made it possible to actively correct errors that affect a quantum memory. An attractive scenario is the construction of passive storage of quantum information with minimal active support. Indeed, passive protection is the basis of robust and scalable classical technology, physically realized in the form of the transistor and the ferromagnetic hard disk. The discovery of an analogous quantum system is a challenging open problem, plagued with a variety of no-go theorems. Several approaches have been devised to overcome these theorems by taking advantage of their loopholes. The state-of-the-art developments in this field are reviewed in an informative and pedagogical way. The main principles of self-correcting quantum memories are given and several milestone examples from the literature of two-, three- and higher-dimensional quantum memories are analyzed.

  20. Mass distributions in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Thomas; Verheijen, Marc; Bershady, Matthew; Westfall, Kyle; Andersen, David; Swaters, Rob

    2017-03-01

    We present results on luminous and dark matter mass distributions in disk galaxies from the DiskMass Survey. As expected for normal disk galaxies, stars dominate the baryonic mass budget in the inner region of the disk; however, at about four optical scale lengths (hR ) the atomic gas starts to become the dominant contributor. Unexpectedly, we find the total baryon to dark-matter fraction within a galaxy stays nearly constant with radius from 1hR out to at least 6hR , with a baryon fraction of 15-50% among galaxies. On average, only one third of the mass within 2.2hR in a disk galaxy is baryonic and these baryons appear to have had only a minor effect on the distribution of the dark matter.

  1. Debris Disks and Hidden Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    When a planet orbits inside a debris disk like the disk around Vega or Beta Pictoris, the planet may be invisible, but the patterns it creates in the disk may give it away. Observing and decoding these patterns may be the only way we can detect exo-Neptunes orbiting more than 20 AU from their stars, and the only way we can spot planets in systems undergoing the late stages of planet formation. Fortunately, every few months, a new image of a debris disk appears with curious structures begging for explanation. I'll describe some new ideas in the theory of these planet-disk interactions and provide a buyers guide to the latest models (and the planets they predict).

  2. Evolution of magnetized protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the global evolution of a turbulent protoplanetary disk in its viscous stage, incorporating the effects of Maxwell stress due to a large-scale magnetic field permeating disk. We assume that the viscous stress is given by an alpha model. A magnetic field is produced contemporaneously by an alpha omega dynamo mechanism and the resultant Maxwell stress assists the viscous stress in providing the means for disk evolution. The aim of this work is to compare the evolution of magnetized and nonmagnetized disks driven by turbulent viscosity of the same magnitude and thus assess the effects of a self-generated magnetic field on the structure and dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks. Two illustrative examples corresponding to two different initial conditions are considered: a high-mass case that starts with a disk of 0.245 solar mass and angular momentum of 5.6 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s, and a low-mass that case starts with a disk of 0.11 solar mass and angular momentum of 1.8 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s. For each of these two cases the radial development of a disk is calculated numerically assuming a fiducial value of the dimensionless viscosity parameter alpha(sub ss) = 0.01, as well as alpha(sub ss) = 2 x 10(exp -3). In all cases the central star has a mass equal to 1 solar mass. The most striking feature of magnetized disk evolution is the presence of the surface density bulge located in the region of the disk where the dynamo mechanism cannot support a magnetic field. The bulge persists for a time of the order of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) yr. The presence and persistence of the surface density bulge may have important implications for the process of planet formation and the overall characteristics of resultant planetary systems.

  3. Evolution of magnetized protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the global evolution of a turbulent protoplanetary disk in its viscous stage, incorporating the effects of Maxwell stress due to a large-scale magnetic field permeating disk. We assume that the viscous stress is given by an alpha model. A magnetic field is produced contemporaneously by an alpha omega dynamo mechanism and the resultant Maxwell stress assists the viscous stress in providing the means for disk evolution. The aim of this work is to compare the evolution of magnetized and nonmagnetized disks driven by turbulent viscosity of the same magnitude and thus assess the effects of a self-generated magnetic field on the structure and dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks. Two illustrative examples corresponding to two different initial conditions are considered: a high-mass case that starts with a disk of 0.245 solar mass and angular momentum of 5.6 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s, and a low-mass that case starts with a disk of 0.11 solar mass and angular momentum of 1.8 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s. For each of these two cases the radial development of a disk is calculated numerically assuming a fiducial value of the dimensionless viscosity parameter alpha(sub ss) = 0.01, as well as alpha(sub ss) = 2 x 10(exp -3). In all cases the central star has a mass equal to 1 solar mass. The most striking feature of magnetized disk evolution is the presence of the surface density bulge located in the region of the disk where the dynamo mechanism cannot support a magnetic field. The bulge persists for a time of the order of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) yr. The presence and persistence of the surface density bulge may have important implications for the process of planet formation and the overall characteristics of resultant planetary systems.

  4. Multiwavelength search for protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Schmidt-Kaler, Theodor

    1994-01-01

    Infrared emission of circumstellar dust was observed for almost one hundred T Tauri stars. This dust is interpreted to be part of a protoplanetary disk orbiting the central star. T Tauri stars are young stellar objects and evolve into solar type stars. Planets are believed to form in these disks. The spectral energy distribution of a disk depends on its temperature profile. Different disk regions emit at different wavelengths. The disk-star boundary layer is hot and emits H(alpha) radiation. Inner disk regions at around 1 AU with a temperature of a few hundred Kelvin can be probed in near infrared wavelength regimes. Outer disk regions at around 100 AU distance from the star are colder and emit far infrared and sub-millimeter radiation. Also, X-ray emission from the stellar surface can reveal information on disk properties. Emission from the stellar surface and the boundary layer may be shielded by circumstellar gas and dust. T Tauri stars with low H(alpha) emission, i.e. no boundary layer, show stronger X-ray emission than classical T Tauri stars, because the inner disk regions of weak emission-line T Tauri stars may be clear of material. In this paper, first ROSAT all sky survey results on the X-ray emission of T Tauri stars and correlations between X-ray luminosity and properties of T Tauri disks are presented. Due to atmospheric absorption, X-ray and most infrared observations cannot be carried out on Earth, but from Earth orbiting satellites (e.g. IRAS, ROSAT, ISO) or from lunar based observatories, which would have special advantages such as a stable environment.

  5. Stochastic disks that roll.

    PubMed

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda

    2016-11-01

    We study a model of rolling particles subject to stochastic fluctuations, which may be relevant in systems of nano- or microscale particles where rolling is an approximation for strong static friction. We consider the simplest possible nontrivial system: a linear polymer of three disks constrained to remain in contact and immersed in an equilibrium heat bath so the internal angle of the polymer changes due to stochastic fluctuations. We compare two cases: one where the disks can slide relative to each other and the other where they are constrained to roll, like gears. Starting from the Langevin equations with arbitrary linear velocity constraints, we use formal homogenization theory to derive the overdamped equations that describe the process in configuration space only. The resulting dynamics have the formal structure of a Brownian motion on a Riemannian or sub-Riemannian manifold, depending on if the velocity constraints are holonomic or nonholonomic. We use this to compute the trimer's equilibrium distribution with and without the rolling constraints. Surprisingly, the two distributions are different. We suggest two possible interpretations of this result: either (i) dry friction (or other dissipative, nonequilibrium forces) changes basic thermodynamic quantities like the free energy of a system, a statement that could be tested experimentally, or (ii) as a lesson in modeling rolling or friction more generally as a velocity constraint when stochastic fluctuations are present. In the latter case, we speculate there could be a "roughness" entropy whose inclusion as an effective force could compensate the constraint and preserve classical Boltzmann statistics. Regardless of the interpretation, our calculation shows the word "rolling" must be used with care when stochastic fluctuations are present.

  6. RAID 7 disk array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Lloyd

    1993-01-01

    Each RAID level reflects a different design architecture. Associated with each is a backdrop of imposed limitations, as well as possibilities which may be exploited within the architectural constraints of that level. There are three unique features that differentiate RAID 7 from all other levels. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to usage of I/O data paths. Each I/O drive (includes all data and one parity drives) as well as each host interface (there may be multiple host interfaces) has independent control and data paths. This means that each can be accessed completely, independently, of the other. This is facilitated by a separate device cache for each device/interface as well. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to device hierarchy and data bus utilization. Each drive and each interface is connected to a high speed data bus controlled by the embedded operating system to make independent transfers to and from central cache. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to the operation of an embedded real time process oriented operating system. This means that exclusive and independent of the host, or multiple host paths, the embedded OS manages all I/O transfers asynchronously across the data and parity drives. A key factor to consider is that of the RAID 7's ability to anticipate and match host I/O usage patterns. This yields the following benefits over RAID's built around micro-code based architectures. RAID 7 appears to the host as a normally connected Big Fast Disk (BFD). RAID 7 appears, from the perspective of the individual disk devices, to minimize the total number of accesses and optimize read/write transfer requests. RAID 7 smoothly integrates the random demands of independent users with the principles of spatial and temporal locality. This optimizes small, large, and time sequenced I/O requests which results in users having an I/O performance which approaches performance to that of main memory.

  7. Stochastic disks that roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda

    2016-11-01

    We study a model of rolling particles subject to stochastic fluctuations, which may be relevant in systems of nano- or microscale particles where rolling is an approximation for strong static friction. We consider the simplest possible nontrivial system: a linear polymer of three disks constrained to remain in contact and immersed in an equilibrium heat bath so the internal angle of the polymer changes due to stochastic fluctuations. We compare two cases: one where the disks can slide relative to each other and the other where they are constrained to roll, like gears. Starting from the Langevin equations with arbitrary linear velocity constraints, we use formal homogenization theory to derive the overdamped equations that describe the process in configuration space only. The resulting dynamics have the formal structure of a Brownian motion on a Riemannian or sub-Riemannian manifold, depending on if the velocity constraints are holonomic or nonholonomic. We use this to compute the trimer's equilibrium distribution with and without the rolling constraints. Surprisingly, the two distributions are different. We suggest two possible interpretations of this result: either (i) dry friction (or other dissipative, nonequilibrium forces) changes basic thermodynamic quantities like the free energy of a system, a statement that could be tested experimentally, or (ii) as a lesson in modeling rolling or friction more generally as a velocity constraint when stochastic fluctuations are present. In the latter case, we speculate there could be a "roughness" entropy whose inclusion as an effective force could compensate the constraint and preserve classical Boltzmann statistics. Regardless of the interpretation, our calculation shows the word "rolling" must be used with care when stochastic fluctuations are present.

  8. Comparison of Thin Disk and Thick Disk Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, M. M.; Carney, B. W.

    2003-12-01

    If the Milky Way's thick disk is the antecedent of the thin disk, there should be continuity in the chemical and dynamical evolution. Also, there should be continuity in the chemical evolution as showed through element-to-iron ratios compared to [Fe/H]. Previous results (i.e. Prochaska et al. 2000) suggest that the thick and thin disks do not share a common chemical history. Prior results have compared abundance analyses of thick disk stars with literature values for thin disk stars. We have selected two dozen stars, half from each population, based on kinematics and obtained high-resolution blue and red spectra for stars with similar temperatures. The stars are cool enough that their life expectancies exceed the age of the Galaxy. The stellar metallicities range from solar to one-tenth solar. The stars are analyzed using the same sets of absorption lines so that direct comparision can be made between the thick and thin disks. Abundances of alpha elements as well as s- and r- process elements confirm that the thick and thin disks appear to have experienced independent chemical histories.

  9. Finite sun effect on the interpretation of solar aureole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1981-01-01

    Although it is usually assumed that solar radiation falls on the earth's atmosphere in the form of plane waves, the finite angular size of the solar disk contradicts this assumption. For most purposes, this finite sun effect on computed or measured radiation quantities is negligible. However, in the region of the solar aureole, which is dominated by aerosol diffraction scattering, measurable effects may be obtained. In this paper, we show that the finite sun effect is related to derivatives of the scattering phase function and that a 1% effect may be obtained close to the sun if enough large particles are present in the atmosphere.

  10. Low-state disks and low-beta disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineshige, Shin; Kusnose, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    1995-01-01

    Stellar black hole candidates (BHCs) exhibit bimodal spectral states. We calculate nonthermal disk spectra, demonstrating that a large photon index (alpha (sub x) approximately 2-3) observed in the soft (high) state is due to a copious soft photon supply, whereas soft photon starvation leads to a smaller index (alpha (sub x) approximately 1.5-2) in the hard (low) state. Thus, the absence of the soft component flux in the low state cannot be due to obscuration. A possible disk configuration during the low state is discussed. We proposed that a low-state disk may be a low-beta disk in which magnetic pressure may exceed gas pressure becuase of the suppression of field escape by a strong shear. As a result, disk material will take the form of blobs constricted by mainly toroidal magnetic fields. Fields are dissipated mainly by occasional reconnection events with a huge energy release. This will account for large-amplitude, aperiodic X-ray variations (flickering) and high-energy radiation with small alpha(sub x) from hard state BHCs and possibly from active galactic nuclei. Further, we propose a hysteretic relation between the mass-flow rate and plasma-beta, a ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure, for the spectral evolution of transient BHCs. The disk is in the low-beta state in quiescence and early rise. The low-beta disk is optically thin and affected by advection. A hard-to-soft transition occurs before the peak luminosity, since there is no advection-dominated branch at higher luminosities. An optically thick, high-beta disk appears at small radii. In the decay phase of the light curve, the standard-type disk becomes effectively optically thin, when a soft-hard transition is triggered. High-beta plasmas in the main body shrink to form minute blobs, and low-beta coronal plasma fills interblob space.

  11. Low-state disks and low-beta disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineshige, Shin; Kusnose, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    1995-01-01

    Stellar black hole candidates (BHCs) exhibit bimodal spectral states. We calculate nonthermal disk spectra, demonstrating that a large photon index (alpha (sub x) approximately 2-3) observed in the soft (high) state is due to a copious soft photon supply, whereas soft photon starvation leads to a smaller index (alpha (sub x) approximately 1.5-2) in the hard (low) state. Thus, the absence of the soft component flux in the low state cannot be due to obscuration. A possible disk configuration during the low state is discussed. We proposed that a low-state disk may be a low-beta disk in which magnetic pressure may exceed gas pressure becuase of the suppression of field escape by a strong shear. As a result, disk material will take the form of blobs constricted by mainly toroidal magnetic fields. Fields are dissipated mainly by occasional reconnection events with a huge energy release. This will account for large-amplitude, aperiodic X-ray variations (flickering) and high-energy radiation with small alpha(sub x) from hard state BHCs and possibly from active galactic nuclei. Further, we propose a hysteretic relation between the mass-flow rate and plasma-beta, a ratio of gas pressure to magnetic pressure, for the spectral evolution of transient BHCs. The disk is in the low-beta state in quiescence and early rise. The low-beta disk is optically thin and affected by advection. A hard-to-soft transition occurs before the peak luminosity, since there is no advection-dominated branch at higher luminosities. An optically thick, high-beta disk appears at small radii. In the decay phase of the light curve, the standard-type disk becomes effectively optically thin, when a soft-hard transition is triggered. High-beta plasmas in the main body shrink to form minute blobs, and low-beta coronal plasma fills interblob space.

  12. The Gas Disk: Evolution and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rab, Christian; Baldovin-Saavedra, Carla; Dionatos, Odysseas; Vorobyov, Eduard; Güdel, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the birthplaces of planetary systems. The evolution of the star-disk system and the disk chemical composition determines the initial conditions for planet formation. Therefore a comprehensive understanding of the main physical and chemical processes in disks is crucial for our understanding of planet formation. We give an overview of the early evolution of disks, discuss the importance of the stellar high-energy radiation for disk evolution and describe the general thermal and chemical structure of disks. Finally we provide an overview of observational tracers of the gas component and disk winds.

  13. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  14. Neurocutaneous Manifestations of Genetic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    van Steensel, Maurice A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mosaicism is defined as the presence of two or more genetically distinct cell populations in a single individual. Ever more disorders are found to be manifestations of mosaicism and together constitute a significant proportion of the morbidity confronting pediatric specialists. An emerging category is that of overgrowth syndromes with skin manifestations and neurological or developmental abnormalities, such as the well-known Proteus syndrome. In recent years, we have seen dramatic advances in our understanding of these disorders and we now know the genetic basis of many of them. This has profound consequences for diagnosis, counselling, and even treatment, with therapies targeted to specific pathways becoming available for clinical use. Recognizing such overgrowth syndromes, therefore, is more important than ever. Fortunately, their skin manifestations can provide important diagnostic clues when evaluated in the entire phenotypic context. In this review, I provide an overview of the most frequently seen mosaic neurocutaneous phenotypes and discuss their molecular basis. PMID:27617125

  15. [Cardiovascular manifestations of human toxocariasis].

    PubMed

    Bolívar-Mejía, Adrián; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto E; Delgado, Olinda

    2013-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection produced by helminths that cannot reach their adult stage in humans. For their etiological species (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), man is a paratenic host. Infection by such helminths can produce a variety of clinical manifestations, such as: visceral larvae migrans syndrome, ocular larvae migrans syndrome and covert toxocariasis. In the visceral larvae migrans syndrome, the organs that are mainly involved include liver, lungs, skin, nervous system, muscles, kidneys and the heart. Regarding the latter, the importance of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, as well as its clinical relevance, has increasingly begun to be recognized. The current article is based on a systematic information search, focused mainly on the clinical and pathological aspects of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, including its pathophysiology, laboratory findings, diagnosis and therapeutical options, with the objective of highlighting its importance as a zoonosis and its relevance to the fields of cardiovascular medicine in adults and children.

  16. Articular manifestations of familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Mathon, G; Gagné, C; Brun, D; Lupien, P J; Moorjani, S

    1985-01-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia is characterised by a decreased removal of low density lipoproteins and premature coronary artery disease. Tendinous xanthomata are a hallmark of the disease. The affected joints may also be the sites of inflammation and pain. Arthropathy has been associated mainly with the homozygous form of familial hypercholesterolaemia, but it is also known to occur in the heterozygous form. We report on the articular manifestations in 73 patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia. About 40% of these patients had at least one episode of articular symptoms. The observed articular manifestations may be classified into four types: Achilles pain (18%), Achilles tendinitis (11%), oligoarticular arthritis (7%), polyarticular or rheumatic fever-like arthritis (4%). It is concluded that in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia articular manifestations are frequent, diverse, and may be the first symptom of this metabolic disorder. Images PMID:4037885

  17. Cutaneous manifestations of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Gavignet, Béatrice; Piarroux, Renaud; Aubin, François; Millon, Laurence; Humbert, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic disease characterized by the presence of larvae of the genus Toxocara in human tissues. T canis and T cati, the adult roundworms of which are found in dog and cat intestines, respectively, are the most common causative agents of the disease. Toxocaral larvae usually cause two severe syndromes: visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, depending on the location of the larvae. Two other syndromes, covert toxocariasis and common toxocariasis, which are less typical and not as severe, have also been described. During the last two decades, cutaneous manifestations such as chronic urticaria, chronic pruritus, and miscellaneous eczema, in patients with Toxocara antibodies, have been studied by different authors. In some cases, these cutaneous manifestations are the only signs indicating the presence of the disease, and they are cured after antihelmintic treatment when there is good patient compliance. In this review, we focus on these particular skin manifestations regarding their clinical description, diagnosis, and treatment.

  18. STABILITY OF THE OUTER PLANETS IN MULTIRESONANT CONFIGURATIONS WITH A SELF-GRAVITATING PLANETESIMAL DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Aceves, H.; Chavez, C. E.

    2015-05-10

    We study the effect of a massive planetesimal disk on the dynamical stability of the outer planets in a system representing the early solar system assuming, as has been suggested recently, that these planets were initially locked in a compact and multiresonant configuration as a result of gas-driven migration in a protoplanetary disk. The planetesimal disk is represented by an ensemble of 2000 lunar mass bodies for which the gravitational interaction is calculated self-consistently using the Mercury6.5 code. Several initial multiresonant configurations and planetesimal disk models are considered. Under such conditions a strong dynamical instability, manifested as a rapid giant planet migration and planetesimal disk dispersal, develops on a timescale of less than 40 Myr in most cases. Dynamical disk heating due to the gravitational interactions among planetesimals leads to more frequent interactions between the planetesimals and the ice giants, in comparison to models in which planetesimal–planetesimal interactions are neglected. The number of particles used to represent the planetesimal disk has implications for our results, and although our studies represent the first self-consistent calculations of unstable planetesimal-driven migration, our results point toward the need for using more realistic treatments of the planetesimal disk. Finally, in the framework of our model, we discuss the possible implications of our results on the early evolution of the solar system.

  19. Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E (Editor); Stepinski, T. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars was to bring together workers on accretion disks in the western Gulf region (Texas and Louisiana). Part 2 presents the workshop program, a list of poster presentations, and a list of workshop participants. Accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of these disks form around compact stars, such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes that are members of binary systems and reveal themselves as a power source, especially in the x-ray and gamma regions of the spectrum. On the other hand, protostellar disks are believed to be accretion disks associated with young, pre-main-sequence stars and manifest themselves mostly in infrared and radio observations. These disks are considered to be a natural outcome of the star formation process. The focus of this workshop included theory and observations relevant to accretion disks around compact objects and newly forming stars, with the primary purpose of bringing the two communities together for intellectual cross-fertilization. The nature of the workshop was exploratory, to see how much interaction is possible between distinct communities and to better realize the local potential in this subject. A critical workshop activity was identification and documentation of key issues that are of mutual interest to both communities.

  20. A study of the effects of disk flexibility on the rotordynamics of the space shuttle main engine turbo-pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1989-01-01

    Rotor dynamical analyses are typically performed using rigid disk models. Studies of rotor models in which the effects of disk flexibility were included indicate that is may be an important effect for many systems. This issue is addressed with respect to the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure turbo-pumps. Finite element analyses have been performed for a simplified free-free flexible disk rotor model and the modes and frequencies compared to those of a rigid disk model. The simple model was then extended to a more sophisticated HPTOP rotor model and similar results were observed. Equations were developed that are suitable for modifying the current rotordynamical analysis program to account for disk flexibility. Some conclusions are drawn from the results of this work as to the importance of disk flexibility on the HPTOP rotordynamics and some recommendations are given for follow-up research in this area.

  1. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Eating Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bern, Elana M; Woods, Elizabeth R; Rodriguez, Leonel

    2016-11-01

    Individuals with eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, may present with a range of gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations. The oral cavity, salivary glands, GI tract, pancreas, and liver can be impacted by nutritional restrictive and binge/purging behaviors. Complications are often reversible with appropriate nutritional therapy. At times, however, the complications in these disorders may be severe, irreversible and even life threatening. Given the often covert nature of eating disorders, the practitioner must be attentive to subtle clues that may indicate their presence. Extensive diagnostic evaluations of the GI manifestations of eating disorders should be used only when nutritional rehabilitation does not remedy the problems.

  2. Hematological manifestations of nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Emadi, Ashkan; Burns, Kathleen H; Confer, Bradley; Borowitz, Michael J; Streiff, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    Pancytopenia is an uncommon manifestation of cystinosis, a congenital lysosomal storage disease. We describe a 34-year-old patient with nephropathic cystinosis with multisystem involvement who developed progressive bone marrow failure after renal transplantation. Bone marrow examination demonstrated widespread deposition of cystine crystals in histiocytes and in the background. We review the literature on the hematologic manifestations of cystinosis and discuss the available treatment options for patients with bone marrow failure secondary to cystine accumulation. The availability of effective oral therapy and the limited activity of hematopoietic growth factors in these patients highlight the importance of bone marrow examination early in the evaluation of cystinosis patients with abnormal blood counts.

  3. Skin manifestations of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Ermertcan, Aylin Turel; Ertan, Pelin

    2010-01-01

    Child abuse is a major public health problem all over the world. There are four major types of abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect. The most common manifestations of child abuse are cutaneous and their recognition; and differential diagnosis is of great importance. Clinicians, especially dermatologists, should be alert about the skin lesions of child abuse. In the diagnosis and management of child abuse, a multidisciplinary approach with ethical and legal procedures is necessary. In this manuscript, cutaneous manifestations of physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect are reviewed and discussed.

  4. Cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, L; Proietti, I; Leggio, L; Ferrulli, A; Vonghia, L; Capizzi, R; Rotoli, M; Amerio, PL; Gasbarrini, G; Addolorato, G

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gluten-dependent enteropathy characterized by atrophy of intestinal villi that improves after gluten-free diet (GFD). CD is often associated with extra-intestinal manifestations; among them, several skin diseases are described in CD patients. The present review reports all CD-associated skin manifestations described in the literature and tries to analyze the possible mechanisms involved in this association. The opportunity to evaluate the possible presence of CD in patients affected by skin disorders is discussed. PMID:16521210

  5. Dermatologic Manifestations of Systemic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Maryn Anne; Isamah, Nwamaka; Northway, Rebecca M

    2015-12-01

    Dermatologic complaints are encountered frequently by the primary care provider. Patients often are required as well as want to see their primary care provider before referral to a specialist. Therefore, primary care providers must be skilled in a variety of topics including dermatology. Certain dermatologic manifestations are associated with, or indicative of, systemic diseases. Primary care providers must be knowledgeable in diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of dermatologic conditions, as well as when to appropriately refer. This article reviews common dermatologic manifestations of systemic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Atypical manifestations of tinea corporis.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Mirjana; Seyfarth, Florian; Elsner, Peter; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2007-01-01

    Tinea corporis classically presents as an erythematous annular plaque with a scaly, centrifugally advancing border. However, sometimes vesicles and pustules are observed. Occasionally, even frank bullae appear secondary to severe inflammation. Diagnostic difficulties arise when atypical manifestations mimic other inflammatory skin diseases, including atopic or seborrheic dermatitis, subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus, or vesicular diseases. We report five cases of atypical tinea corporis, where the initial clinical diagnosis was different from dermatophytosis. The differential diagnoses and the diagnostic difficulties related to atypical manifestations of fungal infections are discussed. Moreover, our cases emphasise the importance of conventional histological examination, which enables a fast, correct diagnosis.

  7. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; Yorke, Harold W.; Johnstone, Doug; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) by ultraviolet radiation. We focus on 3) and 4) and describe the quasi-steady state appearance and the overall evolution of disks under the influence of winds and radiation from the central star and of radiation from external OB stars. Viscous accretion likely dominates disk dispersal in the, inner disk (r approx. less than A 10 AU), while photoevaporation is the principal process of disk dispersal outside of r approximately greater than 10 AU. Disk dispersed timescales are compared and discussed in relation to theoretical estimates for planet formation timescales. Photoevaporation may explain the large differences in the hydrogen content of the giant planets in the solar system. The commonly held belief that our early sun's stellar wind dispersed the solar nebula is called into question.

  8. Magnetically Torqued Thin Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluźniak, W.; Rappaport, S.

    2007-12-01

    We compute the properties of a geometrically thin, steady accretion disk surrounding a central rotating, magnetized star. The magnetosphere is assumed to entrain the disk over a wide range of radii. The model is simplified in that we adopt two (alternate) ad hoc, but plausible, expressions for the azimuthal component of the magnetic field as a function of radial distance. We find a solution for the angular velocity profile tending to corotation close to the central star and smoothly matching a Keplerian curve at a radius where the viscous stress vanishes. The value of this ``transition'' radius is nearly the same for both of our adopted B-field models. We then solve analytically for the torques on the central star and for the disk luminosity due to gravity and magnetic torques. When expressed in a dimensionless form, the resulting quantities depend on one parameter alone, the ratio of the transition radius to the corotation radius. For rapid rotators, the accretion disk may be powered mostly by spin-down of the central star. These results are independent of the viscosity prescription in the disk. We also solve for the disk structure for the special case of an optically thick alpha disk. Our results are applicable to a range of astrophysical systems including accreting neutron stars, intermediate polar cataclysmic variables, and T Tauri systems.

  9. Rotating flexible disk under shaft temperature increment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yong-Chen; He, Ling; Wang, Ji-Xin

    2010-08-01

    A rotating flexible annular thin disk subjected to the temperature increment of the shaft clamping the disk was modeled in this paper. At disk top and bottom surfaces and free outer edge, the heat convection boundaries were assumed. Disk transverse deflection was considered as a function of both disk radial and circumferential coordinates, and temperature distribution was solved along disk thickness and radial directions simultaneously. As a result, the shaft temperature increment causes thermo-elastic instability of some disk modes. Effects of the shaft temperature increment, ratio of disk convective heat transfer coefficient to thermal conductivity, disk thickness, nodal circle and diameter numbers of disk mode on the natural frequencies, thermo-elastic instability and critical angular speed of the disk were discussed.

  10. DiskJockey: Protoplanetary disk modeling for dynamical mass derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekala, Ian

    2016-03-01

    DiskJockey derives dynamical masses for T Tauri stars using the Keplerian motion of their circumstellar disks, applied to radio interferometric data from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The package relies on RADMC-3D (ascl:1202.015) to perform the radiative transfer of the disk model. DiskJockey is designed to work in a parallel environment where the calculations for each frequency channel can be distributed to independent processors. Due to the computationally expensive nature of the radiative synthesis, fitting sizable datasets (e.g., SMA and ALMA) will require a substantial amount of CPU cores to explore a posterior distribution in a reasonable timeframe.

  11. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  12. Disk tides and accretion runaway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.; Hahn, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    It is suggested that tidal interaction of an accreting planetary embryo with the gaseous preplanetary disk may provide a mechanism to breach the so-called runaway limit during the formation of the giant planet cores. The disk tidal torque converts a would-be shepherding object into a 'predator,' which can continue to cannibalize the planetesimal disk. This is more likely to occur in the giant planet region than in the terrestrial zone, providing a natural cause for Jupiter to predate the inner planets and form within the O(10(exp 7) yr) lifetime of the nebula.

  13. KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF THE PROTOSTELLAR DISK AROUND RADIO SOURCE I IN THE ORION KLEINMANN-LOW NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sitarski, Breann N.; Morris, Mark R.; Becklin, E. E.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Lu, Jessica R.; Duchene, Gaspard; Stolte, Andrea; Zinnecker, Hans

    2013-06-20

    We have made the first detection of a near-infrared counterpart associated with the disk around Radio Source ''I'', a massive protostar in the Kleinmann-Low nebula in Orion, using imaging with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. The infrared emission is evident in images acquired using L' (3.8 {mu}m) and Ms (4.7 {mu}m) filters and is not detectable at K' (2.1 {mu}m). The observed morphology strongly suggests that we are seeing some combination of scattered and thermal light emanating from the disk. The disk is also manifest in the L'/Ms flux ratio image. We interpret the near-infrared emission as the illuminated surface of a nearly edge-on disk, oriented so that only the northern face is visible; the opposite surface remains hidden by the disk. We do not see infrared radiation associated directly with the star proposed to be associated with Source ''I''. The data also suggest that there is a cavity above and below the disk that is oriented perpendicular to the disk and is sculpted by the known, strong outflow from the inner disk of Source I. We compare our data to models of a protostar with a surrounding disk, envelope, and wind-blown cavity in order to elucidate the nature of the disk around Radio Source I.

  14. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 1; An Analytical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system s center of mass occurs. Finite element analyses were conducted concerning a notched disk in order to define the sensitivity of the method. The notch was used to simulate an actual crack and will be the method utilized for upcoming experiments. Various notch sizes were studied. The geometric deformations and shifts of center of mass were documented as a function of rotational speed. In addition, a rotordynamic analysis of a 2-bearing, disk and shaft system was conducted. The overall response of the system was required in order to design the experimental system for operation beyond the first critical. The results of the FE analyses of the disk indicated that the overall changes in the disk s geometry and center of mass were rather small. The difference between the maximum centrifugal radial displacements between the undamaged and damaged disks at 8000 RPM was 0.00014 in. for a 0.963 in. notch length. The shift in center of mass was also of this magnitude. The next step involves running experiments to verify the analysis.

  15. Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Aiello, S.; Belleni-Morante, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Protoplanetary disks are the precursors of planetary systems. All building materials needed to assembly the planetary systems are supplied by these reservoirs, including many organic molecules [1,2]. Thus, the physical and chemical properties in Protoplanetary disks set the boundary conditions for the formation and evolution of planets and other solar system bodies. In standard radiative scenario structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depend strongly on the nature of central star around which they formed. The dust temperature is manly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the whole disk depends on the UV and X ray fluxes [3,4,6,8]. Therefore, a knowledge as accurate as possible of the radiative transfer (RT) inside disks is a prerequisite for their modelling. Actually, real disks are complex, stratified and inhomogeneous environments requiring a detailed dust mixture modelling and the ability to follow the radiation transfer across radial and vertical gradients. Different energetic processes as the mass accretion processes onto the star surface, the viscous dissipative heating dominating the midplane region, and the flared atmospheres radiation reprocessing, have a significant role in the disk structuring [4,5,8]. During the last 10 years many authors suggested various numerical and analytical techniques to resolve the disk temperature structure providing vertical temperature profiles and disk SED databases [4,6]. In this work we present the results of our semi analytical and numerical model solving the radiative transfer problem in two separate interesting disk regions: 1) Disk atmospheres at large radius, r > 10 AU. 2) Vertical disk structure over 1 < r < 10 AU and 10 < r < 100 AU. A simplified analytical approach based on P-N approximation [7] for a rectified disk surface (suitable for limited range of r) is compared and contrasted with a more accurate Monte Carlo integration [5]. Our code can handle arbitrary dust

  16. ENT manifestations of Wegeners granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arpit; Deshmukh, Shraddha; Dabholkar, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    Wegeners granulomatosis is a necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis with multisystemic involvement. We present two cases of Wegener's presenting with otological manifestations as the first symptom. These symptoms are subtle and diagnosis may be easily overlooked. Hence a high index of suspicion is required. Early diagnosis and treatment goes a long way in improving the outcomes and in preventing further complications.

  17. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Cowden's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kundoor Vinay Kumar; Anusha, Amarthuluri; Maloth, Kotya Naik; Sunitha, Kesidi; Thakur, Moni

    2016-01-01

    Cowden's syndrome is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with variable orofacial and systemic manifestations. Here we present one such classical case of Cowden's syndrome in a 45-year-old female patient with features such as multiple cutaneous papillomatosis, oral fibromas, and fibromas involving multiple organs such as gastrointestinal tract (multiple polyps), thyroid disorders, and breast cancer. PMID:27990388

  18. Cardiac Manifestation in Dengue Fever.

    PubMed

    Arora, Mohit; Patil, Rekha S

    2016-07-01

    To study the cardiac manifestations of the dengue fever. This one year descriptive study was undertaken at KLES Dr. Prabhakar Kore Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Belgaum under the Department of Medicine. A total of 120 patients with either dengue IgM or IgM and IgG were studied. The assessment of cardiac manifestations was done based on electrocardiogram, 2D echocardiography and cardiac enzymes. Of the 120 patients, 85 (70.83%) were males and the male to female ratio was 2.4:1. The mean age of the patients was 33.02 ± 12.71 years. The commonest clinical presentation was myalgia (97.5%) followed by fever (92.5%). On clinical examination 33.33% of the patients had petecheia and only 9 patients having active bleeding manifestation at the time of presentation. A raised CK-MB and Troponin I was observed in 33.3% and 26.7% patients ECG findings revealed normal rhythm among 95% with 15.8% of them having an abnormal heart rate. Rhythm disturbance was noted in 5% of the patients with AV block being the most common (66.67%). Cardiac manifestation in the form of myocarditis was observed in 37.50% of the patients with a positive correlation with the severity of the dengue fever defined as by W.H.O. criteria. Patients with dengue fever are at high risk of developing myocarditis and rhythm disturbance and therefore require a close cardiac monitoring.

  19. Articular manifestations of systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Bensen, W G

    1983-11-01

    Many systemic diseases present with articular manifestations. An understanding of the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of these diseases can lead to early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. This article describes the articular presentation and management of four generalized disorders: idiopathic hemachromatosis; sarcoidosis; hepatitis-B virus-induced arthritis, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis induced arthritis.

  20. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  1. [Intradural lumbar disk hernia].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Bartolomé, P; Canga, A; Vázquez-Barquero, A; García-Valtuille, R; Abascal, F; Cerezal, L

    2001-04-01

    Intradural disc herniation is a rare complication of degenerative disc disease. A correct diagnosis of this process is frequently difficult. If this entity is not preoperatively diagnosed and is omitted at surgery, severe neurologic sequels may be provoked. We report a case of a pathologically proven intradural disc herniation preoperatively diagnosed by MR imaging. Clinically, it was manifested by sudden onset of right leg ciatalgia and progressive right lower extremity weakness. The patient also referred a one-month history of sexual dysfunction. MR imaging revealed interruption of the low signal of the anulus fibrosus and of the posterior longitudinal ligament at L2-L3 level and a voluminous disc fragment migrated in the dural sac that showed rim enhancement with gadolinium.The clinical, neuroradiological, and surgical management of lumbar intradural disc herniation are reviewed.

  2. 40 CFR 761.215 - Manifest discrepancies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... delivery of the waste to the first transporter designated on the manifest prepared under paragraph (e) or... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.215 Manifest discrepancies. (a) Manifest... quantity or type of PCB waste designated on the manifest or shipping paper, and the quantity and type...

  3. Accretion Disks around Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, Paola

    1996-04-01

    A method to calculate the structure and brightness distribution of accretion disks surrounding low and intermediate mass young stars is introduced and discussed. The method includes a realistic treatment of the energy transport mechanisms and disk heating by radiation from external sources. The disk is assumed steady, geometrically thin and in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The turbulent viscosity coefficient is expressed using the α prescription and the α parameter and the mass accretion rate are assumed to be constant through the disk. Energy is transported in the vertical direction by: (a) a turbulent flux, computed self-consistently with the viscosity coefficient used to describe the viscous energy dissipation, (b) radiation, using the first moments of the transfer equation, the Eddington approximation, and the Rosseland and Planck Mean Opacities, and (c) convection, taking into account that the convective elements, not necessarily optically thick, lose energy by radiation and turbulent flux. This treatment of the energy transport mechanisms differs from previous work in this field, allowing one to extend, with confidence, the calculation of the disk structure to optically thin regimes. The heating mechanisms considered, which affect the disk's structure and emission, are stellar radiation and a circumstellar envelope which reprocesses and scatters radiation from the star and from the disk itself. In addition to a detailed numerical calculation, an analytical self-consistent formulation of the irradiation of the disk is given. This analytical formulation allows one to understand and extend the numerical results. To evaluate the potential of the method presented in this thesis, a set of models of viscous non-irradiated and irradiated disks are computed. Their predictions are compared with observations of young stellar sources likely to have disks. Given the disk structure and specifying its orientation with respect to the line of sight, the specific

  4. Gravitational instabilities in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric stability of self-gravitating, geometrically thick accretion disks has been studied for protostellar systems having a wide range of disk-to-central object mass ratios. Global eigenmodes with four distinctly different characters were identified using numerical, nonlinear hydrodynamic techniques. The mode that appears most likely to arise in normal star formation settings, however, resembles the 'eccentric instability' that was identified earlier in thin, nearly Keplerian disks: It presents an open, one-armed spiral pattern that sweeps continuously in a trailing direction through more than 2-pi radians, smoothly connecting the inner and outer edges of the disk, and requires cooperative motion of the point mass for effective amplification. This particular instability promotes the development of a single, self-gravitating clump of material in orbit about the point mass, so its routine appearance in our simulations supports the conjecture that the eccentric instability provides a primary route to the formation of short-period binaries in protostellar systems.

  5. Theoretical restrictions on accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. F.; Xie, G. Z.; Ji, K. F.

    1994-10-01

    We construct a standard thin disk model taking into account the pressure from both gas and radiation, the opacity contributed by both electron scattering and absorption, and the gravity from both a central object and disk. A simple and powerful technique for solving the non-linear equations is presented. Through a numerical algorithm for the two equations for beta, gamma, xi, all the disk quantities are expressed as the analytical function of beta, gamma, xi. We also discuss the solutions in the limit cases as beta approaches 0, as beta approaches 1, and the parameter range of the lienar approximation. From the numerical solutions and limit analyses, we found that it is not necessary to include the self-gravity of the disk.

  6. Degenerative disease of the lumbosacral spine: disk herniation and stenosis.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Costantini, A M; Guglielmi, G; Tancioni, V; Moschini, M

    2000-01-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disk complex begins early in life and is a consequence of a variety of environmental factors as well as of normal aging. Degeneration of bone and soft tissue spinal elements is the most common cause of spinal stenosis. The term "degeneration" as commonly applied to the spine covers such a wide variety of clinical, radiological and pathological manifestations that the word is really only a symbol of our ignorance. Computed tomography and myelography have long been used for diagnosing the effects of degenerative diseases' of the lumbar spine. Despite the continuous improvement in magnetic resonance scanning for this purpose, computed tomography can provide excellent screening for disk herniation and spinal stenosis.

  7. Water vapor in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banzatti, Andrea

    2013-03-01

    This thesis is devoted to a study of the conditions and evolution of the planet formation region in young circumstellar disks, by means of spectroscopic observations of molecular gas emission. The main focus of this work is the infrared spectrum of water (H2O), which provides thousands of emission lines tracing the warm and dense gas inward of the water snow line in disks. The analysis includes also emission from some organic molecules that trace the carbon chemistry, C2H2, HCN, and CO2, as well as emission from OH that is connected to the formation and destruction of the water molecule. Two are the main directions explored in this work, for which we used spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope (IRS) and the Very Large Telescope (VISIR and X-shooter). The first is to investigate how variable accretion phenomena occurring during the T Tauri phase affect the molecular environments in the planet formation region of disks. By monitoring T Tauri stars in different phases of accretion, we found that outbursts can remarkably affect their mid-infrared molecular emission. We propose a scenario where accretion flares trigger a recession of the water snow line, increasing water emission from the disk, when the accretion luminosity keeps higher over long enough timescales for the thermal structure of the disk to change (at least a few weeks, as observed in the strongly variable EX Lupi). In addition, enhanced UV radiation is found to produce OH from photodissociation of water in the disk. Organic molecules instead disappear during a strong outburst, and we are currently investigating the long-term evolution of these effects. A second direction was taken to tackle another fundamental problem: the origin of water vapor in inner disks. Some models predict that water is produced by evaporation of icy solids migrating inward of the snow line. One way to probe this scenario is by measuring the abundance of water vapor in the inner disk, and compare it to the oxygen abundance

  8. Parallel Readout of Optical Disks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    block. Since the optical disks we use store only unipolar binary amplitude infor- mation, a space-bandwidth product (SBP) penalty must be paid to...through a crossed po- larizer and decoded as a logical 1 or 0. Depending on the setting of the polarizers, the amplitude of the light corresponding to... amplitude error since it only becomes significant when the position error e(x,y) is comparable to the distance between the disk and the image

  9. Rewriteable optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Thomas A.; Rinsland, Pamela L.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA program to develop a high performance (high rate, high capability) rewriteable optical disk recorder for spaceflight applications is presented. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk Drive modules and a modular Controller. Drive performance goals are 10 gigabyte capacity are up to 1.8 gigabits per second rate with concurrent I/O, synchronous data transfer, and 2 to 5 years operating life in orbit. Technology developments, design concepts, current status, and future plans are presented.

  10. CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Catherine; Millar, T. J.; Nomura, Hideko

    2010-10-20

    We have developed a high-resolution combined physical and chemical model of a protoplanetary disk surrounding a typical T Tauri star. Our aims were to use our model to calculate the chemical structure of disks on small scales (submilliarcsecond in the inner disk for objects at the distance of Taurus, {approx}140 pc) to investigate the various chemical processes thought to be important in disks and to determine potential molecular tracers of each process. Our gas-phase network was extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry to which we added gas-grain interactions including freezeout and thermal and non-thermal desorption (cosmic-ray-induced desorption, photodesorption, and X-ray desorption), and a grain-surface network. We find that cosmic-ray-induced desorption has the least effect on our disk chemical structure while photodesorption has a significant effect, enhancing the abundances of most gas-phase molecules throughout the disk and affecting the abundances and distribution of HCN, CN, and CS, in particular. In the outer disk, we also see enhancements in the abundances of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}. X-ray desorption is a potentially powerful mechanism in disks, acting to homogenize the fractional abundances of gas-phase species across the depth and increasing the column densities of most molecules, although there remain significant uncertainties in the rates adopted for this process. The addition of grain-surface chemistry enhances the fractional abundances of several small complex organic molecules including CH{sub 3}OH, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} to potentially observable values (i.e., a fractional abundance of {approx}>10{sup -11}).

  11. Heating of protostellar accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, R. R.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2017-07-01

    The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is believed to be the mechanism responsible for a magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence that could lead to the accretion observed in protoplanetary disks. The need of a minimum amount of ionization in protostellar accretion disks is necessary for the MRI to take place. There are in the literature several studies that include the damping of Alfvén waves as an additional heating source besides the viscous heating mechanism in a geometrically thin and optically thick disk. The damping of the waves transfers energy to the disk increasing the temperature and consequently its ionization fraction, making possible the presence of the MRI in a large part of the disk. We analyzed the contribution of non-ideal effects such as Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion for the disk heating and compare these heating rates with those obtained by damping of Alfvén waves. In order to study these non-ideal effects, we have estimated the radiation emission of each effect through the energy conservation equation, and associated each emission with a black body radiation, which enabled us to assign a temperature contribution of each effect. Using the ATHENA code we were able to simulate the disk at different radial distances, and estimate the electric current density needed to calculate the radiation emission associated with each effect. Once we have those data, we were able to compare the results with other heating sources, like viscosity and Alfvén waves damping, and we concluded that the Ohmic and ambipolar diffusions do not heat the disk in any significant way.

  12. How to Buy a Disk System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Ivan

    1982-01-01

    Describes floppy disk information storage systems and discusses capabilities and advantages of floppy disks for microcomputer users. The functions of disk operating systems (DOS) are reviewed and the effect of DOS formats on the choice of an appropriate disk drive system is outlined. (JL)

  13. Disk brake squeal prediction using the ABLE algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, G.; Wu, T. W.; Bai, Z.

    2004-05-01

    Disk brake squeal noise is mainly due to unstable friction-induced vibration. A typical disk brake system includes two pads, a rotor, a caliper and a piston. In order to predict if a disk brake system will generate squeal, the finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the system. At the contact interfaces between the pads and the rotor, the normal displacement is continuous and Coulomb's friction law is applied. Thus, the resulting FEM matrices of the dynamic system become unsymmetric, which will yield complex eigenvalues. Any complex eigenvalue with a positive real part indicates an unstable mode, which may result in squeal. In real-world applications, the FEM model of a disk brake system usually contains tens of thousands of degrees of freedom (d.o.f.s). Therefore any direct eigenvalue solver based on the dense matrix data structure cannot efficiently perform the analysis, mainly due to its huge memory requirement and long computation time. It is well known that the FEM matrices are generally sparse and hence only the non-zeros of the matrices need to be stored for eigenvalue analysis. A recently developed iterative method named ABLE is used in this paper to search for any unstable modes within a certain user-specified frequency range. The complex eigenvalue solver ABLE is based on an adaptive block Lanczos method for sparse unsymmetric matrices. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the formulation and the eigenvalues are compared to the results from the component modal synthesis (CMS).

  14. Electro-rheological disk pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Vincent M.; Loy, Luke W.

    1993-02-01

    The invention is directed to a device for pumping electro-rheological fluids comprising a casing that defines an inner rotor chamber having a central inlet opening and a peripheral discharge opening. Rotatably disposed within said chamber is a rotor for imparting energy to the pumped electro-rheological fluid comprising of a plurality of non-conducting coaxial substantially parallel spaced disks. On one face of each disk are embedded one or more electrodes and on the opposing face of each disk are attached one or more conductive surfaces. By selectively applying an electric charge to the embedded electrodes, an electric field is produced between the electrodes and the conducting surfaces of adjacent disks. As a result, the viscosity of the electro-rheological fluid exposed to the applied electric field is increased thereby producing electro-rheological fluid vanes between adjacent disks. When the rotor is placed in rotation and a voltage is applied to the embedded electrodes, the electro-rheological fluid that is not exposed to the applied electric field, it is accelerated from the center of the rotor towards the outer periphery by the combined action of the electro-rheological fluid vanes and the friction force acting between the fluid and the rotating disks.

  15. Dynamical Processes in Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beust, H.

    2010-01-01

    Debris disks are dusty and/or gasous disk that are viewed in scattered light and thermal emission around stars around 107-108 yr. It is well known that the dust in these system is not primodial. It is short lived and must be continuously replenished by colliding planetesimals. Most of them appear distorted by the gravitational pertubations by inner planets or stellar companions. This is why these systems are viewed today as young planetary systems. Debris disks are collisional systems. Thanks to collisional cascade towards smaller size, the dust particles are transported outwards by radiation or stellar wind pressure. Below a given blow-off size they escape the system. This model explains the radial density profiles observed. The various asymmetries, clumps and other dynamical structures such as spiral arms are though to originate in gravitational perturbations by planets and/or companions. Planets usually create gaps in disks, but they also sculpt disks via their mean-motion resonances. Clumpy structures are often invoked as resulting from such an interaction. Stellar companions usually truncate the disk, sometimes confining them to thin annular structures. They also help creating spiral patterns, either tidally or by secular interaction. In this context, the situation is different whether the perturbing companions are bound or just passing stars. In any case, dynamical studies (often specific to each system) can greatly help constraining the configuration and the past history of these systems.

  16. Fragmentation of Kozai-Lidov Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the gravitational instability (GI) of a locally isothermal inclined disk around one component of a binary system. Such a disk can undergo global Kozai-Lidov (KL) cycles if the initial disk tilt is above the critical KL angle (of about 40◦). During these cycles, an initially circular disk exchanges its inclination for eccentricity, and vice versa. Self-gravity may suppress the cycles under some circumstances. However, with hydrodynamic simulations that include self-gravity, we show that for a sufficiently high initial disk tilts and for certain disk masses, disks can undergo KL oscillations and fragment due to GI, even when the Toomre Q value for an equivalent undisturbed disk is well within the stable regime (Q> 2). We suggest that KL triggered disk fragmentation provides a mechanism for the efficient formation of giant planets in binary systems and may enhance the fragmentation of disks in massive black hole binaries.

  17. GROWTH OF GRAINS IN BROWN DWARF DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Meru, Farzana; Galvagni, Marina; Olczak, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    We perform coagulation and fragmentation simulations using the new physically motivated model by Garaud et al. to determine growth locally in brown dwarf disks. We show that large grains can grow and that if brown dwarf disks are scaled-down versions of T Tauri disks (in terms of stellar mass, disk mass, and disk radius) growth at an equivalent location with respect to the disk truncation radius can occur to the same size in both disks. We show that similar growth occurs because the collisional timescales in the two disks are comparable. Our model may therefore potentially explain the recent observations of grain growth to millimeter sizes in brown dwarf disks, as seen in T Tauri disks.

  18. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  19. Vascular complication involving the conus medullaris or cauda equina after vertebral manipulation for an L4-L5 disk herniation.

    PubMed

    Balblanc, J C; Pretot, C; Ziegler, F

    1998-04-01

    A case of injury to the cauda equina or conus medullaris after lumbar vertebral manipulation is reported. In contrast to all other previously reported cases, no migrated disk fragment was demonstrated. Similar to experience at the cervical spine, lumbar vertebral manipulation may carry a risk of vascular injury. The neurological manifestations in our patient were consistent with compression of the Desproges-Gotteron artery by a small L4-L5 disk herniation.

  20. Charged annular disks and Reissner-Nordstroem type black holes from extremal dust

    SciTech Connect

    Lora-Clavijo, F. D.; Ospina-Henao, P. A.; Pedraza, J. F.

    2010-10-15

    We present the first analytical superposition of a charged black hole with an annular disk of extremal dust. In order to obtain the solutions, we first solve the Einstein-Maxwell field equations for sources that represent disklike configurations of matter in confomastatic spacetimes by assuming a functional dependence among the metric function, the electric potential, and an auxiliary function, which is taken as a solution of the Laplace equation. We then employ the Lord Kelvin inversion method applied to models of finite extension in order to obtain annular disks. The structures obtained extend to infinity, but their total masses are finite and all the energy conditions are satisfied. Finally, we observe that the extremal Reissner-Nordstroem black hole can be embedded into the center of the disks by adding a boundary term in the inversion.

  1. Signatures of disk structure from line profile variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Stacie; Latham, D. W.; Irwin, M.; Bouvier, J.; Clarke, C.; Facchini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the abundance of FU Orionis objects (FUors) in the solar neighborhood and the implied repetitive nature of this episodic accretion phenomenon in low-mass stars, the triggering mechanism within the disk, propagation from the disk to the wind and the implications of these outbursts on planet formation remain unclear. FUors are young stars where disk accretion increases from 10-7 to 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 within a decade, with a slow decline of over 100 years. These systems provide a unique opportunity to observe the inner disk photosphere in optical light. Previous observations of the prototype FU Orionis by Herbig et al. (2003) suggest that the wind and disk photospheric lines are modulated with periods of 14.54 and 3.54 days, respectively. We have re-observed the system at higher resolution with SOPHIE and TRES, by monitoring variations of optical line profiles over 21 nights in 2007 and 35 nights in 2012-13. We detect wind periods of 13 days and 10 days (present in the latter epoch only), which are manifested not only in blueshifted Hα absorption, as found previously, but also in redshifted emission of Hα and Hβ, as well as in blueshifted absorption of Na I D, Li I and Fe II λ5018. We discuss the potential configurations responsible for the two distinct wind modulations in this system. In addition the disk photospheric lines show periods of 3.6 and 3.2 days in 2007 and 2012-13, respectively. Remarkably, this implies variability mechanisms that are stable against shear over at least 15 years (>1000 orbits); we tentatively ascribe this to an orbiting hotspot in the disk. We have monitored the velocity shift of these periodic variations for the first time, which are confined to the blue wing of the line profiles and centered on velocities of -9 and -60 km s-1 in 2007 and 2013, respectively. We discuss the possibility of an embedded hot Jupiter precessing on an inclined orbit relative to the disk to explain the different velocities of the detected periodic signal

  2. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical manifestations of synovial cysts.

    PubMed

    Burt, T B; MacCarter, D K; Gelman, M I; Samuelson, C O

    1980-08-01

    Although synovial cysts are most commonly associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, they may occur in many other conditions. The clinical manifestations of these cysts are numerous and may result from pressure, dissection or acute rupture. Vascular phenomena occur when popliteal cysts compress vessels, and result in venous stasis with subsequent lower extremity edema or thrombophlebitis. Rarely, popliteal cysts may cause arterial compromise with intermittent claudication. Neurological sequelae include pain, paresthesia, sensory loss, and muscle weakness or atrophy. When synovial cysts occur as mass lesions they may mimic popliteal aneurysms or hematomas, adenopathy, tumors or even inguinal hernias. Cutaneous joint fistulas, septic arthritis or osteomyelitis, and spinal cord and bladder compression are examples of other infrequent complications. Awareness of the heterogeneous manifestations of synovial cysts may enable clinicians to avoid unnecessary diagnostic studies and delay in appropriate management. Arthrography remains the definitive diagnostic procedure of choice, although ultrasound testing may be useful.

  4. Neurologic Manifestation of Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, Kate

    2017-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a RNA arbovirus that typically causes fevers and arthralgias, but reports of neurologic findings have become increasingly common. This article reviews our current understanding of CHIKV-associated neurologic manifestations. In the last 5 years, CHIKV endemicity has spread to the Americas and the number of cases of CHIKV-related disease has dramatically increased. Evidence suggests increasing neurovirulence of the virus, particularly among the critically ill. The spectrum of neurologic manifestations of the disease includes encephalitis, myelitis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome, but isolated reports of cranial neuropathies and cognitive deficits associated with recent infection also are reported. Though neurologic symptoms associated with CHIKV remain relatively uncommon, their frequency appears to be increasing. Clinicians treating patients with neurologic symptoms from CHIKV endemic areas should be aware of the growing association between CHIKV and neurologic sequelae to help guide diagnostics. Research into the optimal treatment of the disease is needed to inform treatment practices.

  5. Otolaryngic manifestations of Cushing disease.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Edward C; Peng, Kevin A; Suh, Jeffrey D; Bergsneider, Marvin; Wang, Marilene B

    2017-08-01

    Cushing disease is a relatively rare cause of Cushing syndrome secondary to a hyperfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In addition to signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism, Cushing disease may present with diverse otolaryngic manifestations, which may guide diagnosis and management. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who were found to have Cushing disease and who underwent transnasal transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenomas between January 1, 2007, and July 1, 2014, at a tertiary academic medical center. There were 37 consecutive patients in this series with Cushing disease caused by a pituitary adenoma. Fifteen (41%) patients complained of visual changes. Five (14%) patients suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. Four (11%) patients had thyroid disease. Other symptoms included hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, epistaxis, dysphagia, and salivary gland swelling. Although Cushing disease traditionally presents with classic "Cushingoid" systemic features, it also may present with various otolaryngic manifestations. A thorough workup by otolaryngologists is critical in the comprehensive management of these patients.

  6. Orofacial manifestations of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Veale, B J; Jablonski, R Y; Frech, T M; Pauling, J D

    2016-09-23

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology characterised by microangiopathy, dysregulated immune function and tissue remodelling, which commonly involves the oral cavity. Orofacial manifestations of SSc contribute greatly to overall disease burden and yet are regularly overlooked and under-treated. This may reflect a pre-occupation amongst rheumatology clinicians on potentially life-threatening internal organ involvement, but is also a consequence of insufficient engagement between rheumatologists and dental professionals. A high proportion of SSc patients report difficulty accessing a dentist with knowledge of the disease and there is recognition amongst dentists that this could impact negatively on patient care. This review shall describe the clinical features and burden of orofacial manifestations of SSc and the management of such problems. The case is made for greater collaborative working between rheumatologists and dental professionals with an interest in SSc in both the research and clinical setting.

  7. Cardiopulmonary Manifestations of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Mahnaz; Taylor, Nora; Tehrani, Mahsa

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory condition that usually affects young men. Cardiac dysfunction and pulmonary disease are well-known and commonly reported extra-articular manifestation, associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). AS has also been reported to be specifically associated with aortitis, aortic valve diseases, conduction disturbances, cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease. The pulmonary manifestations of the disease include fibrosis of the upper lobes, interstitial lung disease, ventilatory impairment due to chest wall restriction, sleep apnea, and spontaneous pneumothorax. They are many reports detailing pathophysiology, hypothesized mechanisms leading to these derangements, and estimated prevalence of such findings in the AS populations. At this time, there are no clear guidelines regarding a stepwise approach to screen these patients for cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. PMID:21547038

  8. [Extrahepatic manifestations of HCV infection].

    PubMed

    Husa, Petr

    Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) are very common. The most common of these is mixed cryoglobulinaemia. Anti-HCV antibodies and viral ribonucleic acid, HCV RNA, can be found in the cryoprecipitates, together with the rheumatoid factor. Cryoglobulins consist of a complex of immunoglobulins that in vitro precipitate upon the cooling bellow the human body temperature. Vasculitis is caused by the deposition of such immune complexes in the small blood vessels. A link with the HCV infection is considered to be established with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, lymphoproliferative disorders (in particular B cell lymphoma), Sjögren and sicca syndrome, lichen planus, porfyria cutanea tarda and diabetes mellitus. Very probable is the relationship of chronic HCV infection and thyroid disease, arthralgias, otherwise unexplained fatigue and autoimmune hepatitis.Key words: direct acting antivirals - extrahepatic manifestations - chronic hepatitis C - mixed cryoglobulinaemia.

  9. Myriad manifestations of Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bagul, Pritish K; Borgaonkar, Devendra V; Jaiswal, Vinay; Phadke, Milind S; Lanjewar, Charan P; Kerkar, Prafulla G

    2015-01-01

    4 months male child presented with failure to thrive. On general examination child had normal O2 saturation with characteristic elfin facies. Further evaluation of the patient showed major manifestations of Williams syndrome in form of supravalvar aortic stenosis, branched pulmonary artery stenosis along with cardiomyopathy. Although the entity is known, this article shows comprehensive diagnostic workup with the aid of multimodality imaging techniques. The genetic diagnosis of Williams syndrome was confirmed using fluroscent in situ hybridisation techniques (FISH). In this patient most of the manifestations of elastin vasculopathy were noted in the form of involvement of ascending aorta, pulmonary arteries and myocardium. We also want to emphasis the importance of echocardiography in newborn patients with dysmorphic facies as Williams syndrome can be easily missed in neonatal period. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of Parkinson Disease Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurologic condition that causes motor and non-motor manifestations. Treatment provides symptomatic benefit but no current treatment has been proven to slow disease progression. Research studies of PD require a means of rating the severity of disease by measurement of motor manifestations, assessment of ability to perform daily functional activities, and symptomatic response to medication. The most common rating scales are the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hoehn and Yahr staging, and the Schwab and England rating of activities of daily living. Each of these rating scales are described, including detailed instructions on how to implement these ratings. Although these are the most widely applied rating scales of PD, there are still substantial limitations to these scales that must be considered when using them for research. Finally, some common applications of these scales are described. PMID:19802812

  11. Grain Growth in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Munoz, Laura Maria

    The majority of young, low-mass stars are surrounded by optically thick accretion disks. These circumstellar disks provide large reservoirs of gas and dust that will eventually be transformed into planetary systems. Theory and observations suggest that the earliest stage toward planet formation in a protoplanetary disk is the growth of particles, from sub-micron-sized grains to centimeter- sized pebbles. Theory indicates that small interstellar grains are well coupled into the gas and are incorporated to the disk during the proto-stellar collapse. These dust particles settle toward the disk mid-plane and simultaneously grow through collisional coagulation in a very short timescale. Observationally, grain growth can be inferred by measuring the spectral energy distribution at long wavelengths, which traces the continuum dust emission spectrum and hence the dust opacity. Several observational studies have indicated that the dust component in protoplanetary disks has evolved as compared to interstellar medium dust particles, suggesting at least 4 orders of magnitude in particle-size growth. However, the limited angular resolution and poor sensitivity of previous observations has not allowed for further exploration of this astrophysical process. As part of my thesis, I embarked in an observational program to search for evidence of radial variations in the dust properties across a protoplanetary disk, which may be indicative of grain growth. By making use of high angular resolution observations obtained with CARMA, VLA, and SMA, I searched for radial variations in the dust opacity inside protoplanetary disks. These observations span more than an order of magnitude in wavelength (from sub-millimeter to centimeter wavelengths) and attain spatial resolutions down to 20 AU. I characterized the radial distribution of the circumstellar material and constrained radial variations of the dust opacity spectral index, which may originate from particle growth in these circumstellar

  12. Infrequent cardiac manifestations of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Said; Briasoulis, Alexandros; Afonso, Luis

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is found in 2-7% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis (SS). Its diagnosis and treatment is challenging, notwithstanding the poor prognosis and treatment. Hereby, we present a case of systemic sarcoidosis with rare cardiac manifestations of severe mitral incompetence and large coronary aneurysm in a previously healthy woman. She underwent successful mitral valve replacement and coronary artery bypass surgery and was maintained on low dose glucocorticoid therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Oral manifestations of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, R D

    1995-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychological compulsive eating disorder that appears to be affecting a growing number of young women. It is characterized by repeated episodes of binge-eating followed by vomiting or some other purging behavior. Bulimia is accompanied by a number of physiological disturbances, some of which occur in the oral cavity. The present article reviews the major characteristics of bulimia nervosa, and describes the most significant oral manifestations of this disorder along with their reported incidences and etiologies.

  14. [Neurologic manifestations in Ollier's disease].

    PubMed

    Neretin, V Ia; Kir'iakov, V A; Skorochkina, L V; Loseva, T V

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe a case of Ollier's syndrome which developed in a 31-year-old female patient. The patient manifested hypertrophy of osseous and soft tissues, deformity of the dorsum sellae and of the walls of the cavernous sinus and siphon of the internal carotid artery. In the clinical picture of the disease, one could see symptoms of the impairment of pairs III and VI of the craniocerebral nerves, pains due to the irritation of the first branch of nerve V.

  15. Articular Manifestations of Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bensen, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    Many systemic diseases present with articular manifestations. An understanding of the clinical, laboratory and radiological features of these diseases can lead to early diagnosis and appropriate therapy. This article describes the articular presentation and management of four generalized disorders: idiopathic hemachromatosis; sarcoidosis; hepatitis-B virus-induced arthritis, and polymyositis-dermatomyositis induced arthritis. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21283470

  16. Diverse clinical manifestations of pheochromocytomas.

    PubMed

    Badui, E; Mancilla, R; Szymanski, J J; Garcia-Rubi, D; Estañol, B

    1982-03-01

    Many difficulties are encountered by clinicians in attempting to diagnose pheochromocytomas. We describe several patients with unusual clinical features. These include sudden death, cerebral hemorrhage, refractory congestive heart failure, acute abdominal pain, and hypercalcemia. In 2 patients, the rare association of this tumor and pregnancy was observed. Two subjects had sudden death, 1 during a pneumoencephalogram and another during an epidural block. The clinicians should be aware of these manifestations of pheochromocytomas.

  17. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered.

  18. Rheumatic manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lebiedz-Odrobina, Dorota; Kay, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DM is associated with various musculoskeletal manifestations. The strength of this relationship varies among the various musculoskeletal disorders; the associations are based mostly on epidemiologic data. For most of these conditions, definitive pathophysiologic correlates are lacking.Hand and shoulder disorders occur more frequently than other musculoskeletal manifestations of DM. Recognition of the association between DM and shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, and stenosing flexor tenosynovitis facilitates their correct diagnosis in the setting of DM and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment, which may include optimizing glycemic control. Conversely, awareness and identification of the characteristic musculoskeletal manifestations of DM may facilitate earlier diagnosis of DM and initiation of glucose-lowering therapy to retard the development of diabetic complications.Much less has been published about the musculoskeletal complications of DM than about its micro- and macrovascular complications. Prospective case-control cohort studies are needed to establish the true prevalence of musculoskeletal complications of DM and the metabolic syndrome, especially in this era of tighter glycemic control.The potential relationship between DM and the development of OA needs to be clarified in large, prospective, case-control cohort studies. The effect on musculoskeletal manifestations of various therapeutic regimens to manage DM should be studied prospectively. Treatment regimens for some musculoskeletal conditions associated with DM, such as DISH, should be studied in larger prospective, randomized,controlled clinical trials.At the molecular level, further studies are warranted to clarify the potential contribution of AGEs and adipokines to the development of OA and diabetic musculoskeletal syndromes, such as shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, and LJM. Identification of such molecular targets for therapy would promote the development of

  19. Neurological manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Carlos E M; Carvalho, Jozélio F; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2010-04-01

    Neurologic disorders are among the most common and important clinical manifestations associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). It is characterized by diverse neurological manifestations. These include stroke, transient ischaemic attack, Sneddon's syndrome, convulsions/epilepsy, dementia, cognitive deficits, headaches/migraine, chorea, multiple sclerosis-like, transverse myelitis, ocular symptoms and Guillain-Barré syndrome. We review the latest data about neurologic disorders and APS. In patients under 45 years of age, 20% of strokes are potentially associated with APS. Our study group recently reported a correlation between primary APS and peripheral neuropathy. Only one study investigated the occurrence of peripheral neuropathy in patients diagnosed with PAPS through electrophysiological study and showed alterations in 35% of patients. The mechanism of nervous system involvement in APS is considered to be primarily thrombotic. However, other mechanisms have been described, such as antiphospholipid antibodies that bind to the neural tissue, deregulating their functions and having an immediate pathogenic effect. This review summarizes the latest data regarding the clinical aspects, radiological and therapeutic of major neurologic manifestations associated with antiphospholipid antibodies.

  20. [Pulmonary manifestations of antisynthetase syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jouneau, S; Hervier, B; Jutant, E-M; Decaux, O; Kambouchner, M; Humbert, M; Delaval, P; Montani, D

    2015-06-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is an inflammatory myopathy frequently associated with pulmonary manifestations, especially interstitial lung diseases, and uncommonly pulmonary hypertension. In the context of a suggestive clinical and radiological picture, positive anti-RNA synthetase antibodies confirm the diagnosis. Anti-Jo1, anti-PL7, and anti-PL12 antibodies are the more commonly encountered. The presence of a number of extra-thoracic manifestations in association with pulmonary disease may suggest the diagnosis. These include: myalgia or muscular deficit, Raynaud's phenomenon, polyarthritis, fever, mechanics hands. Serum creatine kinase levels are usually increased. Electromyogram, muscular magnetic resonance imaging or muscle pathology are not mandatory to make the diagnosis. There is a high variability in symptoms and severity, between patients but also during the course of the disease in the same patient. The presence of an interstitial lung disease is a major prognostic factor and an indication for more intensive treatment, principally with systemic corticosteroids with or without immunosuppressive drugs. Improving respiratory physicians' knowledge of this disease, which is often revealed by its pulmonary manifestations, should help diagnosis, therapeutic management, and possibly prognosis.

  1. THE ORIGIN OF THE NEGATIVE TORQUE DENSITY IN DISK-SATELLITE INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Petrovich, Cristobal

    2012-03-01

    Tidal interaction between a gaseous disk and a massive orbiting perturber is known to result in angular momentum exchange between them. Understanding astrophysical manifestations of this coupling such as gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks or clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted on the disk by a perturber. Recent hydrodynamical simulations by Dong et al have shown evidence for the tidal torque density produced in a uniform disk to change sign at the radial separation of Almost-Equal-To 3.2 scale heights from the perturber's orbit, in clear conflict with the previous studies. To clarify this issue, we carry out a linear calculation of the disk-satellite interaction putting special emphasis on understanding the behavior of the perturbed fluid variables in physical space. Using analytical as well as numerical methods, we confirm the reality of the negative torque density phenomenon and trace its origin to the overlap of Lindblad resonances in the vicinity of the perturber's orbit-an effect not accounted for in previous studies. These results suggest that calculations of the gap and cavity opening in disks by planets and binary SMBHs should rely on more realistic torque density prescriptions than the ones used at present.

  2. The evolution of the inner regions of viscous accretion disks surrounding neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, R. E.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and evolution of the inner regions of an accretion disk around a neutron star have been investigated with respect to variations in the mass flow rate. In order to examine the sensitivity of the general response of the disk to the form of viscous dissipation, several theoretical constraints on disk evolution are proposed on the basis of current accretion disk theory. It is shown through a series of calculations that under certain circumstances nonlocal radial energy transfer can stabilize regions of the disk which appear to be unstable by local analysis. When viscous stress was scaled with the total pressure of the disk, global analysis was found to be consistent with local analysis, and instability was manifested in luminosity fluctuations and in bursts of less than 10 s. Analysis of the bursts in their limit cycles showed that the disk remained optically thick and geometrically thin throughout its evolution. Substantial agreement was found between the theoretical results and the available observational data.

  3. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  4. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV) wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness), the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution), a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014). 2nd Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  5. Ω-slow Solutions and Be Star Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, I.; Jones, C. E.; Curé, M.; Silaj, J.; Cidale, L.; Granada, A.; Jiménez, A.

    2017-09-01

    As the disk formation mechanism(s) in Be stars is(are) as yet unknown, we investigate the role of rapidly rotating radiation-driven winds in this process. We implemented the effects of high stellar rotation on m-CAK models accounting for the shape of the star, the oblate finite disk correction factor, and gravity darkening. For a fast rotating star, we obtain a two-component wind model, i.e., a fast, thin wind in the polar latitudes and an Ω-slow, dense wind in the equatorial regions. We use the equatorial mass densities to explore Hα emission profiles for the following scenarios: (1) a spherically symmetric star, (2) an oblate star with constant temperature, and (3) an oblate star with gravity darkening. One result of this work is that we have developed a novel method for solving the gravity-darkened, oblate m-CAK equation of motion. Furthermore, from our modeling we find that (a) the oblate finite disk correction factor, for the scenario considering the gravity darkening, can vary by at least a factor of two between the equatorial and polar directions, influencing the velocity profile and mass-loss rate accordingly, (b) the Hα profiles predicted by our model are in agreement with those predicted by a standard power-law model for following values of the line-force parameters: 1.5≲ k≲ 3,α ∼ 0.6, and δ ≳ 0.1, and (c) the contribution of the fast wind component to the Hα emission line profile is negligible; therefore, the line profiles arise mainly from the equatorial disks of Be stars.

  6. Densification of a thick disk preform with silicon carbide matrix by CVI process

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, T.; Burkland, C.V.; Bustamante, B.

    1991-10-01

    A chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process was used to fabricate a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) bladed rotor. The demonstration article was based on an uncooled design for an expendable turbine engine. A thick-disk preform of 2-D polar woven Nicalon fiber was densified with silicon carbide matrix by CVI process. The composite disk was densified to 90 +/- 2 percent of the theoretical density (about 2.94 g/cu cm). The densified composite disk was ultrasonically machined into net shape per design configuration. The machining operation included conventional surface grinding and computerized ultrasonic machining of the blades. The evaluation of the CMC rotor included NDE, microstructural analysis, micromechanical material modeling, finite element disk analysis, and a cold spin test. 2 refs.

  7. A thermal, thermoelastic, and wear analysis of high-energy disk brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.; Wu, J. J.; Ling, F. F.

    1974-01-01

    A thermomechanical investigation of the sliding contact problem encountered in high-energy disk brakes is described. The analysis includes a modelling, using the finite element method of the thermoelastic instabilities that cause transient changes in contact area to occur on the friction surface. In order to include the effect of wear at the contact surface, a wear criterion is proposed that results in the prediction of wear rates for disk brakes that are quite close to experimentally determined wear rates. The thermal analysis shows that the transient temperature distribution in a disk brake assembly can be determined more accurately by use of this thermomechanical analysis than by a more conventional analysis that assumes constant contact conditions. It also shows that lower, more desirable, temperatures in disk brakes can be attained by increasing the volume, the thermal conductivity, and, especially, the heat capacity of the brake components.

  8. Modeling self-subtraction in angular differential imaging: Application to the HD 32297 debris disk

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, Thomas M.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We present a new technique for forward-modeling self-subtraction of spatially extended emission in observations processed with angular differential imaging (ADI) algorithms. High-contrast direct imaging of circumstellar disks is limited by quasi-static speckle noise, and ADI is commonly used to suppress those speckles. However, the application of ADI can result in self-subtraction of the disk signal due to the disk's finite spatial extent. This signal attenuation varies with radial separation and biases measurements of the disk's surface brightness, thereby compromising inferences regarding the physical processes responsible for the dust distribution. To compensate for this attenuation, we forward model the disk structure and compute the form of the self-subtraction function at each separation. As a proof of concept, we apply our method to 1.6 and 2.2 μm Keck adaptive optics NIRC2 scattered-light observations of the HD 32297 debris disk reduced using a variant of the 'locally optimized combination of images' algorithm. We are able to recover disk surface brightness that was otherwise lost to self-subtraction and produce simplified models of the brightness distribution as it appears with and without self-subtraction. From the latter models, we extract radial profiles for the disk's brightness, width, midplane position, and color that are unbiased by self-subtraction. Our analysis of these measurements indicates a break in the brightness profile power law at r ≈ 110 AU and a disk width that increases with separation from the star. We also verify disk curvature that displaces the midplane by up to 30 AU toward the northwest relative to a straight fiducial midplane.

  9. A millimeter Continuum Size-Luminosity Relationship for Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Anjali; Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, Tilman; Wilner, David J.

    2017-08-01

    We present a survey at subarcsecond resolution of the 340 GHz dust continuum emission from 50 nearby protoplanetary disks, based on new and archival observations with the Submillimeter Array. The observed visibility data were modeled with a simple prescription for the radial surface brightness profile. The results were used to extract intuitive, empirical estimates of the emission “size” for each disk, {R}{eff}, defined as the radius that encircles a fixed fraction of the total continuum luminosity, {L}{mm}. We find a significant correlation between the sizes and luminosities, such that {R}{eff}\\propto {L}{mm}0.5, providing a confirmation and quantitative characterization of a putative trend that was noted previously. This correlation suggests that these disks have roughly the same average surface brightness interior to their given effective radius, ˜0.2 Jy arcsec-2 (or 8 K in brightness temperature). The same trend remains, but the 0.2 dex of dispersion perpendicular to this relation essentially disappears, when we account for the irradiation environment of each disk with a crude approximation of the dust temperatures based on the stellar host luminosities. We consider two (not mutually exclusive) explanations for the origin of this size-luminosity relationship. Simple models of the growth and migration of disk solids can account for the observed trend for a reasonable range of initial conditions, but only on timescales that are much shorter than the nominal ages present in the sample. An alternative scenario invokes optically thick emission concentrated on unresolved scales, with filling factors of a few tens of percent, which is perhaps a manifestation of localized particle traps.

  10. Ultrafast disk lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Dirk H.; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Bauer, Dominik; Wolf, Martin; Tan, Chuong; Gebs, Raphael; Budnicki, Aleksander; Wagenblast, Philipp; Weiler, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Disk lasers with multi-kW continuous wave (CW) output power are widely used in manufacturing, primarily for cutting and welding applications, notably in the automotive industry. The ytterbium disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency, and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Fundamental mode picosecond disk lasers are well established in micro machining at high throughput and perfect precision. Following the world's first market introduction of industrial grade 50 W picosecond lasers (TruMicro 5050) at the Photonics West 2008, the second generation of the TruMicro series 5000 now provides twice the average power (100 W at 1030 nm, or 60 W frequency doubled, green output) at a significantly reduced footprint. Mode-locked disk oscillators achieve by far the highest average power of any unamplified lasers, significantly exceeding the 100 W level in laboratory set-ups. With robust long resonators their multi-microjoule pulse energies begin to compete with typical ultrafast amplifiers. In addition, significant interest in disk technology has recently come from the extreme light laser community, aiming for ultra-high peak powers of petawatts and beyond.

  11. Simultaneity on the Rotating Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koks, Don

    2017-04-01

    The disk that rotates in an inertial frame in special relativity has long been analysed by assuming a Lorentz contraction of its peripheral elements in that frame, which has produced widely varying views in the literature. We show that this assumption is unnecessary for a disk that corresponds to the simplest form of rotation in special relativity. After constructing such a disk and showing that observers at rest on it do not constitute a true rotating frame, we choose a "master" observer and calculate a set of disk coordinates and spacetime metric pertinent to that observer. We use this formalism to resolve the "circular twin paradox", then calculate the speed of light sent around the periphery as measured by the master observer, to show that this speed is a function of sent-direction and disk angle traversed. This result is consistent with the Sagnac Effect, but constitutes a finer analysis of that effect, which is normally expressed using an average speed for a full trip of the periphery. We also use the formalism to give a resolution of "Selleri's paradox".

  12. Lightcurves of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Meng, Huan; Su, Kate

    2012-12-01

    We have recently discovered that some planetary debris disks with extreme fractional luminosities are variable on the timescale of a few years. This behavior opens a new possibility to understand planet building. Two of the known variable disks are around solar-like stars in the age range of 30 to 100+ Myr, which is the expected era of the final stages of terrestrial planet building. Such variability can be attributed to violent collisions (up to ones on the scale of the Moon-forming event between the proto-Earth and another proto-planet). The collisional cascades that are the aftermaths of these events can produce large clouds of tiny dust grains, possibly even condensed from silica vapor. A Spitzer pilot program has obtained the lightcurve of such a debris disk and caught two minor outbursts. Here we propose to continue the lightcurve monitoring with higher sampling rates and to expand it to more disks. The proposed time domain observations are a new dimension of debris disk studies that can bring unique insight to their evolution, providing important constraints on the collisional and dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation.

  13. Studies of Circumstellar Disk Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2004-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope infrared data for our program on disk evolution has been taken (the main IRAC - 3-8 micron exposures; the 24 and 70 micron MIPS data are to come later). We now have deep maps in the four IRAC bands of the 3-Myr-old cluster Trumpler 37, and the 10-Myr-old cluster NGC 7160. Analysis of these data has now begun. We will be combining these data with our ground-based photometric and spectroscopic data to obtain a complete picture of disk frequency as a function of mass through this important age range, which spans the likely epoch of (giant) planet formation in most systems. Analysis of the SIRTF data, and follow-on ground-based spectroscopy on the converted MMT telescope using the wide-field, fiber-fed, multiobject spectrographs, Hectospec and Hectochelle, will be the major activity during the next year.Work was also performed on the following: protoplanetary disk mass accretion rates in very low-mass stars; the inner edge of T Tauri disks; accretion in intermediate-mass T Tauri stars (IMPS); and the near-infrared spectra of the rapidly-accreting protostellar disks FU Ori and V1057 Cyg.

  14. Hydrodynamical Modeling of Large Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, P.; Krtǐcka, J.

    2016-11-01

    Direct centrifugal ejection from a critically or near-critically rotating surface forms a gaseous equatorial decretion disk. Anomalous viscosity provides the efficient mechanism for transporting the angular momentum outwards. The outer part of the disk can extend up to a very large distance from the parent star. We study the evolution of density, radial and azimuthal velocity, and angular momentum loss rate of equatorial decretion disks out to very distant regions. We investigate how the physical characteristics of the disk depend on the distribution of temperature and viscosity. We also study the magnetorotational instability, which is considered to be the origin of anomalous viscosity in outflowing disks. We use analytical calculations to study the stability of outflowing disks submerged to the magnetic field. At large radii the instability disappears in the region where the disk orbital velocity is roughly equal to the sound speed. Therefore, the disk sonic radius can be roughly considered as an outer disk radius.

  15. Diffusion Disk Susceptibility Testing with Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Shadomy, Smith; Carver, Melinda

    1978-01-01

    The reliability of the standardized 30-μg cephalothin disk and that of an experimental 30-μg cefaclor disk in predicting probable clinical susceptibility to cefaclor were compared. Quantitative determinations of cefaclor susceptibility were measured by the World Health Organization International Collaborative Study agar dilution procedure; diffusion disk tests were performed by the standardized U.S. Food and Drug Administration disk test. The cephalothin disk erred in predicting probable susceptibility in 52% of isolates of Enterococcus spp. resistant to 16 μg or less of cefaclor per ml; the cefaclor disk did not. The cephalothin disk erred in correctly predicting susceptibility in only 20% of cefaclor-susceptible isolates of Enterobacter spp.; the cefaclor disk correctly predicted susceptibility for 70%. These results indicate the need for further evaluation of a separate cefaclor disk for use in susceptibility testing with this new cephalosporin. PMID:646345

  16. Vortices in stratified protoplanetary disks. From baroclinic instability to vortex layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barge, P.; Richard, S.; Le Dizès, S.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Large-scale vortices could play a key role in the evolution of protoplanetary disks, particularly in the dead-zone where no turbulence associated with magnetic field is expected. Their possible formation by the subcritical baroclinic instability is a complex issue because of the vertical structure of the disk and the elliptical instability. Aims: In 2D disks the baroclinic instability is studied as a function of the thermal transfer efficiency. In 3D disks we explore the importance of radial and vertical stratification on the processes of vortex formation and amplification. Methods: Numerical simulations are performed using a fully compressible hydrodynamical code based on a second-order finite volume method. We assume a perfect gas law in inviscid disk models in which heat transfer is due to either relaxation or diffusion. Results: In 2D, the baroclinic instability with thermal relaxation leads to the formation of large-scale vortices, which are unstable with respect to the elliptic instability. In the presence of heat diffusion, hollow vortices are formed which evolve into vortical structures with a turbulent core. In 3D, the disk stratification is found to be unstable in a finite layer which can include the mid-plane or not. When the unstable layer contains the mid-plane, the 3D baroclinic instability with thermal relaxation is found to develop first in the unstable layer as in 2D, producing large-scale vortices. These vortices are then stretched out in the stable layer, creating long-lived columnar vortical structures extending through the width of the disk. They are also found to be the source of internal vortex layers that develop across the whole disk along baroclinic critical layer surfaces, and form new vortices in the upper region of the disk. Conclusions: In 3D disks, vortices can survive for a very long time if the production of vorticity by the baroclinic amplification balances the destruction of vorticity by the elliptical instability

  17. Angular momentum transport in thin accretion disks and intermittent accretion.

    PubMed

    Coppi, B; Coppi, P S

    2001-07-30

    The plasma modes, transporting angular momentum in accretion disks, under minimally restrictive conditions when the magnetic energy density is significant relative to the thermal energy density, are shown to be singular if the ideal MHD approximation is adopted. A similarity with the modes producing magnetic reconnection in current carrying plasmas is established. The combined effects of finite plasma temperature, of plasma compressibility, of the gradient of the rotation frequency, and of appropriate transport processes (outside ideal MHD) are involved in the onset of these nonaxisymmetric and locally corotating modes.

  18. Phase behavior of active Brownian disks, spheres, and dimers.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Jonathan Tammo; Letz, Janina; Speck, Thomas; Virnau, Peter

    2017-02-07

    In this paper we provide high precision estimates of the phase diagram of active Brownian particles. We extract coexisting densities from simulations of phase separated states in an elongated box (slab geometry) which minimizes finite-size effects and allows for precise determination of points on the binodal lines. Using this method, we study the influence of both shape and dimensionality on the two-phase region. Active spheres and dimers of active particles are compared to the known phase diagram of active Brownian disks. In the case of dimers, both correlated and uncorrelated propulsion of the two beads are studied. The influence of correlations is discussed through a simple mapping.

  19. Convective overstability in radially stratified accretion disks under thermal relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Klahr, Hubert; Hubbard, Alexander

    2014-06-10

    This paper expands the stability criterion for radially stratified, vertically unstratified accretion disks incorporating thermal relaxation. We find a linear amplification of epicyclic oscillations in these disks that depends on the effective cooling time, i.e., an overstability. The growth rates of the overstability vanish for both extreme cases, e.g., infinite cooling time and instantaneous cooling, i.e., the adiabatic and fully isothermal cases. However, for thermal relaxation times τ on the order of the orbital frequency, τΩ ∼ 1, modes grow at a rate proportional to the square of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. The overstability is based on epicyclic motions, with the thermal relaxation causing gas to heat while radially displaced inward and cool while radially displaced outward. This causes the gas to have a lower density when moving outward compared to when it moves inward, so it feels the outward-directed pressure force more strongly on that leg of the journey. We suggest the term 'convective overstability' for the phenomenon which has already been studied numerically in the nonlinear regime in the context of amplifying vortices in disks under the name 'subcritical baroclinic instability'. The aim of the present paper is to make clear that vortex formation in three-dimensional disks is not necessarily subcritical, i.e., does not need a finite perturbation, nor is it baroclinic in the sense of geophysical fluid dynamics, which requires on vertical shear. We find that convective overstability is a linear instability that will operate under a wide range of physical conditions for circumstellar disks.

  20. Peptide Aggregation in Finite Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurpreet; Brovchenko, Ivan; Oleinikova, Alla; Winter, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Universal features of the peptide aggregation process suggest a common mechanism, with a first-order phase transition in aqueous solutions of the peptides being the driving force. Small system sizes strongly affect the stability of the minor phase in the two-phase region. We show manifestations of this effect in aqueous solutions of fragments of the islet amyloid polypeptide, using computer simulation methods and invoking various approaches in characterizing clustering and aggregate formation. These systems with peptide concentrations deeply inside the immiscibility region show two distinct stable states, which interchange with time: one state contains a peptide aggregate; and the other state has an aggregate that is noticeably dissolved. The first state is relevant for macroscopic systems, whereas the second one is artificial. At a fixed concentration, the occurrence probability of the aggregate state vanishes upon decreasing the system size, thus indicating the necessity to apply a finite size-scaling for meaningful studies of peptide aggregation by simulations. The effect observed may be one of the factors responsible for the difference between intracellular and extracellular aggregation and fibrillization of polypeptides. The finite size of biological cells or their compartments may be playing a decisive role in hampering intracellular aggregation of highly insoluble amyloidogenic proteins, whereas aggregation is unavoidable in the extracellular space at the same peptide concentration. PMID:18621830

  1. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  2. Clinical manifestation of mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Magner, Martin; Kolářová, Hana; Honzik, Tomáš; Švandová, Ivana; Zeman, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MD) represent a clinically, biochemically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases associated with dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Our aim was to illustrate the most common clinical presentation of MD on the example of selected diseases and syndromes. The minimal prevalence of MD is estimated as 1 to 5,000. MD may manifest at any age since birth until late-adulthood with acute manifestation or as a chronic progressive disease. Virtually any organ may be impaired, but the organs with the highest energetic demands are most frequently involved, including brain, muscle, heart and liver. Some MD may manifest as a characteristic cluster of clinical features (e.g. MELAS syndrome, Kearns-Sayre syndrome). Diagnostics includes detailed history, the comprehensive clinical examination, results of specialized examinations (especially cardiology, visual fundus examination, brain imaging, EMG), laboratory testing of body fluids (lactate, aminoacids, organic acids), and analysis of bioptic samples of muscle, skin, and liver, eventually. Normal lactate level in blood does not exclude the possibility of MD. Although the aimed molecular genetic analyses may be indicated in some of mitochondrial diseases, the methods of next generation sequencing come into focus. Examples of treatment are arginine supplementation in MELAS syndrome, ketogenic diet in pyruvate oxidation disorders or quinone analogs in patients with LHON. Conclusion: The clinical suspicion of a mitochondrial disorder is often delayed, or the disease remains undiagnosed. The correct diagnosis and adequate treatment can improve prognosis of the patient. Access to genetic counseling is also of great importance.

  3. [Vectorcardiographic manifestations of atrial enlargements].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A; Medrano, G A

    1990-01-01

    Rational interpretation of changes of the P loop due to atrial enlargements must to rely on the magnitude and spatial orientation of main resultant vectors of the activation sequence of the atria. Under normal conditions, these vectors give rise to a mean vector oriented to the left downward and discretely forward with respect to their point of origin. In the presence of right atrial enlargement, the manifestation of the first vector of atrial depolarization, oriented downward and forward, is increased. This one moves in the same direction as the mean vector of atrial depolarization, originating an elongated P loop of more than 100 mcv in the three planes. Nevertheless, in the horizontal plane, increase of the P loop voltage predominates when hypertrophy exists, while augmentation of its area predominates when dilatation exists. In left atrial enlargement, the manifestation of the second vector of atrial depolarization, oriented to the left and backward, is augmented, and it moves in the same direction as the mean vector of atrial depolarization. For this, the PF loop acquires a characteristic aspect of a boxing glove, an the PH loop becomes diphasic, with its posterior area more or less prominent, or with a typical figure-eight conformation. If a biatrial enlargement is present, the manifestation of both the main resultant vectors of atrial depolarization is accentuated. Therefore the voltage of the diphasic P loop increases. Moreover the Ps loop has a triangular configuration, with its base of 30 msc or more, located below its point of origin. Generally disturbances of interatrial and intraatrial conduction coexist owing to myocardial damage.

  4. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Stansbury, Robert C; Strollo, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  5. Secchi disk theory: a reexamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Iosif M.; Radomyslskaya, Tamara M.

    2007-04-01

    The possibility of the retrieval of the water's inherent optical properties (IOP) from Secchi disk observations is discussed. The paper directly addresses objections to the use of Secchi disks raised by Preisendorfer in 1986. A new version of Secchi depth theory is given, which in contrast to conventional Secchi disk theories includes the effects of light reflection from the sea surface and treats measurements from both the sunny and shaded sides of a vessel. Empirical correlations between different IOP are used to estimate not only the attenuation coefficient, but also the single scattering albedo and the backscattering probability at 550 nm from Secchi depth data. The theory is compared with measurements made in the Black Sea.

  6. Galaxy Mergers and Disk Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naab, Thorsten; Burkert, Andreas

    We present results from high resolution N-body/SPH simulations of merging gas-rich disk galaxies. The simulations were performed using a newly developed parallel TREE-algorithm in combination with the special purpose hardware GRAPE-5. We find that the presence of gas changes the kinematical properties of the resulting merger remnants, resulting in shapes of the velocity profiles that are in good agreement with observed boxy, non-rotating and disky, fast-rotating elltiptical galaxies. We find large scale disk-like components in unequal mass merger remnants which form by late gas infall. In addition we explore limits on gas infall and the starformation rate during the merging epoch as a function of the mass ratio and the geometry of the merging disk galaxies.

  7. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  8. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    PubMed

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  9. [Corneal manifestations in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Zarranz Ventura, J; De Nova, E; Moreno-Montañés, J

    2008-01-01

    Systemic diseases affecting the cornea have a wide range of manifestations. The detailed study of all pathologies that cause corneal alteration is unapproachable, so we have centered our interest in the most prevalent or characteristic of them. In this paper we have divided these pathologies in sections to facilitate their study. Pulmonar and conective tissue (like colagen, rheumatologic and idiopathic inflamatory diseases), dermatologic, cardiovascular, hematologic, digestive and hepatopancreatic diseases with corneal alteration are described. Endocrine and metabolic diseases, malnutrition and carential states are also studied, as well as some otorhinolaryngologic and genetic diseases that affect the cornea. Finally, a brief report of ocular toxicity induced by drugs is referred.

  10. Rheumatologic manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Crispin, José C; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge

    2003-06-15

    Diabetes mellitus has been linked to disorders of bones and joints, including neuroarthropathy, limited joint mobility, and hyperostosis. Some of the relations have known pathogenic mechanisms, but most are based on epidemiologic findings. This article reviews the associations between diabetes mellitus and its putative rheumatologic manifestations, and proposes a classification composed of four categories: consequences of diabetic complications, consequences of metabolic derangements inherent to diabetes, syndromes that may share etiologic mechanisms with microvascular disease, and probable associations. This approach may facilitate a clearer understanding of the musculoskeletal conditions that are prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer.

  12. Nonthermal accretion disk models around neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, M.; Liang, Edison P.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the structure and emission spectra of nonthermal accretion disks around both strongly and weakly magnetized neutron stars. Such disks may be dissipating their gravitational binding energy and transferring their angular momentum via semicontinuous magnetic reconnections. We consider specifically the structure of the disk-stellar magnetospheric boundary where magnetic pressure balances the disk pressure. We consider energy dissipation via reconnection of the stellar field and small-scale disk turbulent fields of opposite polarity. Constraints on the disk emission spectrum are discussed.

  13. Circumstellar Disks in Very Young Embedded Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariñas, Naibí; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Teixeira, Paula S.; Lada, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    We used FLAMINGOS near-IR photometry and spectroscopy and Spitzer mid-IR photometry to study disk fractions in the 1 to 2 Myr old NGC2264 clusters. We find that stars with masses < 0.3 solar masses have lower disk fractions than stars of solar mass or higher at these early ages. We also find that most disks disappear within the first 4 Myr, which is consistent with previous studies of disk lifetimes. Our study suggests that either some very low mass stars form without disks or that their disks are less massive and/or colder than predicted from models and not detected with Spitzer/Flamingos sensitivities.

  14. Molecular Therapy for Disk Degeneration and Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disk contains high amounts of the proteoglycan aggrecan, which confers the disk with a remarkable ability to resist compression. Other molecules such as collagens and noncollagenous proteins in the extracellular matrix are also essential for function. During disk degeneration, aggrecan and other molecules are lost due to proteolysis. This can result in loss of disk height, which can ultimately lead to pain. Biological therapy of intervertebral disk degeneration aims at preventing or restoring primarily aggrecan content and other molecules using therapeutic molecules. The purpose of the article is to review recent advances in biological repair of degenerate disks and pain. PMID:24436869

  15. ALMA observations of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogerheijde, Michiel

    2015-08-01

    The Universe is filled with planetary systems, as recent detections of exo-planets have shown. Such systems grow out of disks of gas and dust that surround newly formed stars. The ground work for our understanding of the structure, composition, and evolution of such disks has been laid with infrared telescopes in the 1980's, 1990's, and 2000's, as well as with millimeter interferometers operating in the United States, France, and Japan. With the construction of the Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array, a new era of studying planet-forming disks has started. The unprecedented leap in sensitivity and angular resolution that ALMA offers, has truely revolutionized our understanding of disks. No longer featureless objects consisting of gas and smalll dust, they are now seen to harbor a rich structure and chemistry. The ongoing planet-formation process sculpts many disks into systems of rings and arcs; grains grown to millimeter-sizes collect in high-pressure areas where they could grow out to asteroids or comets or further generations of planets. This wealth of new information directly addresses bottlenecks in our theoretical understanding of planet formation, such as the question how grains can grow past the 'meter-sized' barrier or overcome the 'drift barrier', and how gas and ice evolve together and ultimately determine the elemental compositions of both giant and terrestrial planets. I will review the recent ALMA results on protoplanetary disks, presenting results on individual objects and from the first populations studies. I will conclude with a forward look, on what we might expect from ALMA in this area for the years and decades to come.

  16. Star-Planet-Disk Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    Observations of exoplanetary systems containing hot Jupiters have revealed a number of outstanding puzzles that beg for theoretical understanding. Magnetic interactions between young stars and proto-planetary disks and tidal interactions between stars and planets play an important role in shaping the observed properties of planets and planetary systems. We propose a multifaceted theoretical/computational program devoted to understanding these interactions. (1) We will study a novel “magnetic misalignment” effect in protostar-disk systems. Our recent work shows that magnetic star-disk interactions can produce secular changes in the stellar spin direction through magnetic torques, so that the stellar spin may not always be perpendicular to the disk. Our proposed research will consider more realistic models of star-disk interactions, including 3D numerical simulations. We will examine how spin- disk misalignment may explain the small (7 degree) spin-orbit misalignment in the Solar System and contribute to the recently observed spin-orbit misalignments in exoplanetary systems. (2) We will study dynamical tides (including thermal forcing) in hot Jupiters and explore how they may contribute to the observed planetary radius “anomaly”. We will also study dynamical tides in the host star raised by a hot Jupiter in an inclined orbit to understand how tidal dissipations may affect the spin-orbit misalignment angles and planetary orbital decay. This proposal is highly relevant to several goals of the Origins of Solar Systems program, including (a) characterization of other planetary systems, (b) interpretation of observations related to the formation and evolution of planetary systems, and (c) theoretical investigations related to the formation and evolution of planetary systems. The proposed research will contribute to the NASA vision statement and goal to “Advance scientific knowledge of the origin and history of the solar system ...”.

  17. The Stability of Galaxy Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, D. R.; Bershady, M. A.; Martinsson, T.; Swaters, R. A.; Verheijen, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Using measurements of velocity dispersion and mass surface density for both the gas and stellar components, we calculate the multi-component stability (Q) for 30 galaxy disks observed by the DiskMass Survey. Despite their sub-maximality (Bershady et al. 2011, ApJL, 739, 47), we find all disks to be stable with roughly 85% falling in the range 1disk stability and other galaxy properties such as star-formation rate, gas mass fraction, disk maximality, and Hubble type to understand their interdependencies within the context of the secular evolution of galaxy disks. We acknowledge support for this work from the National Science Foundation (AST-0307417, AST-0607516, OISE-0754437, AST-1009491), The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (grant 614.000.807), the UW Graduate School (PRJ13SL, 050167, and the Vilas Associate award), the Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds, and NASA/JPL/Spitzer (GO-30894).

  18. Dermatitis Herpetiformis: Skin Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a chronic, intensely itchy, blistering skin manifestation of gluten-sensitive enteropathy, commonly known as celiac disease. DH ... external manifestation of an abnormal immune response to gluten, in which IgA antibodies form against the skin ...

  19. Optical mode confinement in the Al/SiO2 disk nanocavities with hyperbolic dispersion in the infrared spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacco, Carla; Kelly, Priscilla; Kuznetsova, Lyuba

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical study of the optical mode confinement in whispering gallery mode disk nanocavities with hyperbolic dispersion using nanolayered Al/SiO2 hyperbolic metamaterial with different Al fill fractions. The fundamental properties of the optical modes and resonance frequencies for the disk nanocavities are studied using the numerical finite-element method. Numerical simulations show that light can be well confined in a disk nanocavity with a radius of up to an order of magnitude smaller than free-space resonant wavelength. This paper will also focus on how Purcell factor and quality factor of the disk nanocavities are affected by the fill fraction of the aluminum in the nanolayered metamaterial. Potential future applications for disk nanocavities with hyperbolic dispersion include silicon photonics optical communications networks, ultrafast LEDs, and biological nanoparticles sensing.

  20. Nonaxisymmetric evolution in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1994-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional, multigridded hydrodynamical simulation of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating, 1 solar mass protostellar cloud, which forms a resolved, hydrotastic disk. The code includes the effects of physical viscosity, radiative transfer and radiative acceleration but not magnetic fields. We examine how the disk is affected by the inclusion of turbulent viscosity by comparing a viscous simulation with an inviscid model evolved from the same initial conditions, and we derive a disk evolutionary timescale on the order of 300,000 years if alpha = 0.01. Effects arising from non-axisymmetric gravitational instabilities in the protostellar disk are followed with a three-dimensional SPH code, starting from the two-dimensional structure. We find that the disk is prone to a series of spiral instabilities with primary azimulthal mode number m = 1 and m = 2. The torques induced by these nonaxisymmetric structures elicit material transport of angular momentum and mass through the disk, readjusting the surface density profile toward more stable configurations. We present a series of analyses which characterize both the development and the likely source of the instabilities. We speculate that an evolving disk which maintains a minimum Toomre Q-value approximately 1.4 will have a total evolutionary span of several times 10(exp 5) years, comparable to, but somewhat shorter than the evolutionary timescale resulting from viscous turbulence alone. We compare the evolution resulting from nonaxisymmetric instabilities with solutions of a one-dimensional viscous diffusion equation applied to the initial surface density and temperature profile. We find that an effective alpha-value of 0.03 is a good fit to the results of the simulation. However, the effective alpha will depend on the minimum Q in the disk at the time the instability is activated. We argue that the major fraction of the transport characterized by the value of alpha is due to the action of

  1. Forging Long Shafts On Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilghman, Chris; Askey, William; Hopkins, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Isothermal-forging apparatus produces long shafts integral with disks. Equipment based on modification of conventional isothermal-forging equipment, required stroke cut by more than half. Enables forging of shafts as long as 48 in. (122 cm) on typical modified conventional forging press, otherwise limited to making shafts no longer than 18 in. (46cm). Removable punch, in which forged material cools after plastic deformation, essential novel feature of forging apparatus. Technology used to improve such products as components of gas turbines and turbopumps and of other shaft/disk parts for powerplants, drive trains, or static structures.

  2. Theory of Protostellar Disk Fromation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during the hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, the rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in strict ideal MHD for the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe," and review possible resolutions to this problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and especially turbulence.

  3. THE KOZAI–LIDOV MECHANISM IN HYDRODYNAMICAL DISKS. II. EFFECTS OF BINARY AND DISK PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  4. The Kozai-Lidov mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. II. Effects of binary and disk parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2015-07-01

    Martin et al. (2014b) showed that a substantially misaligned accretion disk around one component of a binary system can undergo global damped Kozai–Lidov (KL) oscillations. During these oscillations, the inclination and eccentricity of the disk are periodically exchanged. However, the robustness of this mechanism and its dependence on the system parameters were unexplored. In this paper, we use three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations to analyze how various binary and disk parameters affect the KL mechanism in hydrodynamical disks. The simulations include the effect of gas pressure and viscosity, but ignore the effects of disk self-gravity. We describe results for different numerical resolutions, binary mass ratios and orbital eccentricities, initial disk sizes, initial disk surface density profiles, disk sound speeds, and disk viscosities. We show that the KL mechanism can operate for a wide range of binary-disk parameters. We discuss the applications of our results to astrophysical disks in various accreting systems.

  5. [Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Ivanović, Mirjana; Jovcić, Olivera; Mandić, Jelena; Bogetić, Dusko; Maddalone, Marcello

    2011-01-01

    Acute leukaemia is the most common form of childhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  6. [Respiratory manifestations of Marfan's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Neuville, M; Jondeau, G; Crestani, B; Taillé, C

    2015-02-01

    Marfan's syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by a mutation of the gene FBN1, coding for the protein fibrillin-1. Cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and ophthalmic manifestations are the most commonly observed, but minor diagnostic criteria also include pulmonary manifestations. Pneumothorax, frequently relapsing, affects 5 to 11% of patients. Rib cage abnormalities (pectus excavatum or pectus carinatum) and apical blebs may contribute to their occurrence. Treatment does not require any specific procedure but there is an increased risk of recurrence. Pectus excavatum affects up to 60% of the patients, without any functional impairment in most cases. Surgery may be required (using the Nuss procedure) in case of cardiovascular or psychological symptoms. Marfan's syndrome is frequently associated with obstructive sleep apnoea, which may itself contribute to aortic dilatation. Some studies suggest a potential role of craniofacial abnormalities in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea in these patients. Pulmonologists should consider Marfan's syndrome when treating patients for recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax or rib cage abnormalities, since early detection of cardiac abnormalities improves the prognosis significantly. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Coronal manifestations of preflare activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, E. J.; Webb, D. F.; Woodgate, B.; Waggett, P.; Bentley, R.; Hurford, G.; Schadee, A.; Schrijver, J.; Harrison, R.; Martens, P.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of coronal manifestations of precursors or preheating for flares are discussed. Researchers found that almost everyone with a telescope sees something before flares. Whether an all-encompassing scenario will ever be developed is not at all clear at present. The clearest example of preflare activity appears to be activated filaments and their manifestations, which presumably are signatures of a changing magnetic field. But researchers have seen two similar eruptions, one without any evidence of emerging flux (Kundu et al., 1985) and the other with colliding poles (Simon et al., 1984). While the reconnection of flux is generally agreed to be required to energize a flare, the emergence of flux from below (at least on short timescales and in compact regions) does not appear to be a necessary condition. In some cases the cancelling of magnetic flux (Martin, 1984) by horizontal motions instead may provide the trigger (Priest, 1985) Researchers found similarities and some differences between these and previous observations. The similarities, besides the frequent involvement of filaments, include compact, multiple precursors which can occur both at and near (not at) the flare site, and the association between coronal sources and activity lower in the atmosphere (i.e., transition zone and chromosphere).

  8. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burakoff, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease are prevalent in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The most common manifestations involve the musculoskeletal and dermatologic systems. Other manifestations involve the hepatopan-creatobiliary system (eg, primary sclerosing cholangitis) as well as the ocular, renal, and pulmonary systems. A multidisciplinary team approach is often needed for effective management, and emergency situations require prompt evaluation. PMID:21857821

  9. 40 CFR 761.210 - Manifest discrepancies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 761.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.210 Manifest discrepancies. (a) Manifest discrepancies are differences between the quantity or type of PCB waste designated on the manifest or...

  10. 40 CFR 761.215 - Manifest discrepancies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 761.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.215 Manifest discrepancies. (a) Manifest... quantity or type of PCB waste designated on the manifest or shipping paper, and the quantity and type...

  11. 40 CFR 761.210 - Manifest discrepancies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 761.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.210 Manifest discrepancies. (a) Manifest discrepancies are differences between the quantity or type of PCB waste designated on the manifest or...

  12. 40 CFR 761.210 - Manifest discrepancies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 761.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.210 Manifest discrepancies. (a) Manifest discrepancies are differences between the quantity or type of PCB waste designated on the manifest or...

  13. A Bayesian Analysis of Finite Mixtures in the LISREL Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Hong-Tu; Lee, Sik-Yum

    2001-01-01

    Proposes a Bayesian framework for estimating finite mixtures of the LISREL model. The model augments the observed data of the manifest variables with the latent variables and allocation variables and uses the Gibbs sampler to obtain the Bayesian solution. Discusses other associated statistical inferences. (SLD)

  14. Incorporating finite element analysis into component life and reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1991-01-01

    A method for calculating a component's design survivability by incorporating finite element analysis and probabilistic material properties was developed. The method evaluates design parameters through direct comparisons of component survivability expressed in terms of Weibull parameters. The analysis was applied to a rotating disk with mounting bolt holes. The highest probability of failure occurred at, or near, the maximum shear stress region of the bolt holes. Distribution of failure as a function of Weibull slope affects the probability of survival. Where Weibull parameters are unknown for a rotating disk, it may be permissible to assume Weibull parameters, as well as the stress-life exponent, in order to determine the disk speed where the probability of survival is highest.

  15. Simple Finite Jordan Pseudoalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We consider the structure of Jordan H-pseudoalgebras which are linearly finitely generated over a Hopf algebra H. There are two cases under consideration: H = U(h) and H = U(h) # C[Γ], where h is a finite-dimensional Lie algebra over C, Γ is an arbitrary group acting on U(h) by automorphisms. We construct an analogue of the Tits-Kantor-Koecher construction for finite Jordan pseudoalgebras and describe all simple ones.

  16. Fast vortex oscillations in a ferrimagnetic disk near the angular momentum compensation point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically study the oscillatory dynamics of a vortex core in a ferrimagnetic disk near its angular momentum compensation point, where the spin density vanishes but the magnetization is finite. Due to the finite magnetostatic energy, a ferrimagnetic disk of suitable geometry can support a vortex as a ground state similar to a ferromagnetic disk. In the vicinity of the angular momentum compensation point, the dynamics of the vortex resemble those of an antiferromagnetic vortex, which is described by equations of motion analogous to Newton's second law for the motion of particles. Owing to the antiferromagnetic nature of the dynamics, the vortex oscillation frequency can be an order of magnitude larger than the frequency of a ferromagnetic vortex, amounting to tens of GHz in common transition-metal based alloys. We show that the frequency can be controlled either by applying an external field or by changing the temperature. In particular, the latter property allows us to detect the angular momentum compensation temperature, at which the lowest eigenfrequency attains its maximum, by performing ferromagnetic resonance measurements on the vortex disk. Our work proposes a ferrimagnetic vortex disk as a tunable source of fast magnetic oscillations and a useful platform to study the properties of ferrimagnets.

  17. Electronic Teaching: Hard Disks and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Samuel F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes floppy-disk and hard-disk based networks, electronic systems linking microcomputers together for the purpose of sharing peripheral devices, and presents points to remember when shopping for a network. (MBR)

  18. Evolution of Circumstellar and Circumplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, P. R.; Umurhan, O. M.; Gorti, U.

    2017-02-01

    The rapid discovery of exoplanets along with unprecedented imaging of protoplanetary disks is improving our understanding of the various stages of disk evolution leading up to and including planet formation and by association satellite formation.

  19. Optical Digital Disks as Mass Storage Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Richard W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the optical digital disk, which stores machine-readable information in digitized form, and discusses their production, cost, present and future applications. The major companies currently active in the disk field are noted. (MBR)

  20. Optical Digital Disks as Mass Storage Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Richard W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the optical digital disk, which stores machine-readable information in digitized form, and discusses their production, cost, present and future applications. The major companies currently active in the disk field are noted. (MBR)

  1. Molecular Gas In Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila

    2016-07-01

    Debris disks are generally thought to be the gas poor descendants of protoplanetary disks. While this characteristic may be true for most debris systems, recent surveys in rotational transitions of carbon monoxide led to a growing sample of debris disks where gas has been detected. The origin of gas in these disks is unclear yet. It may be secondary, i.e., similarly to dust grains it is continuously replenished via erosion of larger bodies. However, because of their youth, one cannot exclude that some disks may be hybrid in the sense that they retain their residual primordial gas, while the dust component may predominantly be second generation. The first observations of gaseous debris disks with ALMA provided examples of both types. This talk will review the currently known CO-rich debris disks with special emphasis on the origin of gas and on the commonly shared disk/host star properties.

  2. Electronic Teaching: Hard Disks and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Samuel F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes floppy-disk and hard-disk based networks, electronic systems linking microcomputers together for the purpose of sharing peripheral devices, and presents points to remember when shopping for a network. (MBR)

  3. Turbulent Mixing Chemistry in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.

    2006-11-01

    A gas-grain chemical model with surface reaction and 1D/2D turbulent mixing is available for protoplanetary disks and molecular clouds. Current version is based on the updated UMIST'95 database with gas-grain interactions (accretion, desorption, photoevaporation, etc.) and modified rate equation approach to surface chemistry (see also abstract for the static chemistry code).

  4. Spaceflight optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, Stephen G.; Hines, Glenn D.; Shull, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Mass memory systems based on rewriteable optical disk media are expected to play an important role in meeting the data system requirements for future NASA spaceflight missions. NASA has established a program to develop a high performance (high rate, large capacity) optical disk recorder focused on use aboard unmanned Earth orbiting platforms. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk drive modules and a modular controller. Drive performance goals are 10 gigabyte capacity, 300 megabit/s transfer rate, 10 exp -12 corrected bit error rate, and 150 millisec access time. This performance is achieved by writing eight data tracks in parallel on both sides of a 14 in. optical disk using two independent heads. System goals are 160 gigabyte capacity, 1.2 gigabits/s data rate with concurrent I/O, 250 millisec access time, and two to five year operating life on orbit. The system can be configured to meet various applications. This versatility is provided by the controller. The controller provides command processing, multiple drive synchronization, data buffering, basic file management, error processing, and status reporting. Technology developments, design concepts, current status including a computer model of the system and a Controller breadboard, and future plans for the Drive and Controller are presented.

  5. TREC Document Database: Disk 4

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST TREC Document Database: Disk 4 (PC database for purchase)   NIST TREC Document Databases (Special Database 22) are distributed for the development and testing of information retrieval (IR) systems and related natural language processing research. The document collections consist of the full text of various newspaper and newswire articles plus government proceedings.

  6. TREC Document Database: Disk 5

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST TREC Document Database: Disk 5 (PC database for purchase)   NIST TREC Document Databases (Special Database 23) are distributed for the development and testing of information retrieval (IR) systems and related natural language processing research. The document collections consist of the full text of various newspaper and newswire articles plus government proceedings.

  7. Accretion disks around black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramowicz, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    The physics of accretion flow very close to a black hole is dominated by several general relativistic effects. It cannot be described by the standard Shakura Sunyaev model or by its relativistic version developed by Novikov and Thome. The most important of these effects is a dynamical mass loss from the inner edge of the disk (Roche lobe overflow). The relativistic Roche lobe overflow induces a strong advective cooling, which is sufficient to stabilize local, axially symmetric thermal and viscous modes. It also stabilizes the non-axially-symmetric global modes discovered by Papaloizou and Pringle. The Roche lobe overflow, however, destabilizes sufficiently self-gravitating accretion disks with respect to a catastrophic runaway of mass due to minute changes of the gravitational field induced by the changes in the mass and angular momentum of the central black hole. One of the two acoustic modes may become trapped near the inner edge of the disk. All these effects, absent in the standard model, have dramatic implications for time-dependent behavior of the accretion disks around black holes.

  8. TURBULENT DISKS ARE NEVER STABLE: FRAGMENTATION AND TURBULENCE-PROMOTED PLANET FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Christiansen, Jessie L.

    2013-10-10

    A fundamental assumption in our understanding of disks is that when the Toomre Q >> 1, the disk is stable against fragmentation into self-gravitating objects (and so cannot form planets via direct collapse). But if disks are turbulent, this neglects a spectrum of stochastic density fluctuations that can produce rare, high-density mass concentrations. Here, we use a recently developed analytic framework to predict the statistics of these fluctuations, i.e., the rate of fragmentation and mass spectrum of fragments formed in a turbulent Keplerian disk. Turbulent disks are never completely stable: we calculate the (always finite) probability of forming self-gravitating structures via stochastic turbulent density fluctuations in such disks. Modest sub-sonic turbulence above Mach number M∼0.1 can produce a few stochastic fragmentation or 'direct collapse' events over ∼Myr timescales, even if Q >> 1 and cooling is slow (t{sub cool} >> t{sub orbit}). In transsonic turbulence this extends to Q ∼ 100. We derive the true Q-criterion needed to suppress such events, which scales exponentially with Mach number. We specify to turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability, convection, or spiral waves and derive equivalent criteria in terms of Q and the cooling time. Cooling times ∼> 50 t{sub dyn} may be required to completely suppress fragmentation. These gravo-turbulent events produce mass spectra peaked near ∼(Q M{sub disk}/M{sub *}){sup 2} M{sub disk} (rocky-to-giant planet masses, increasing with distance from the star). We apply this to protoplanetary disk models and show that even minimum-mass solar nebulae could experience stochastic collapse events, provided a source of turbulence.

  9. Planet Masses from Disk Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Young, forming planets can generate immense spiral structures within their protoplanetary disks. A recent study has shown that observations of these spiral structures may allow astronomers to measure the mass of the planets that create them.Spirals From WavesSnapshots of the surface density of a protoplanetary disk in a 2D simulation, 3D simulation, and synthesized scattered-light image. Click for a closer look! [Fung Dong, 2015]Recent studies have shown that a single planet, if it is massive enough, can excite multiple density waves within a protoplanetary disk as it orbits. These density waves can then interfere to produce a multiple-armed spiral structure in the disk inside of the planets orbit a structure which can potentially be observed in scattered-light images of the disk.But what do these arms look like, and what factors determine their structure? In a recently published study, Jeffrey Fung and Ruobing Dong, two researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, have modeled the spiral arms in an effort to answer these questions.Arms Provide AnswersA useful parameter for describing the structure is the azimuthal separation (sep) between the primary and secondary spiral arms. If you draw a circle within the disk and measure the angle between the two points where the primary and secondary arms cross it, thats sep.Azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary spiral arms, as a function of the planet-to-star mass ratio q. The different curves represent different disk aspect ratios. [Fung Dong, 2015]The authors find thatsep stays roughly constant for different radii, but its strongly dependent on the planets mass: for larger planets, sep increases. They discover that sep scales as a power of the planet mass for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses, orbiting around a solar-mass star. For larger, brown-dwarf-size companions, sep is a constant 180.If this new theory is confirmed, it could have very interesting implications for

  10. Diskoseismology: Probing relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael Allen

    1992-08-01

    Helioseismology has provided a wealth of information about the structure of the solar atmosphere. Little is known, however, about the structure of accretion disks that are thought to exist around black holes and neutron stars. In this thesis we present calculations of modes that are trapped in thin Keplerian accretion disks. We hope to use observations of thes modes to elucidate the structure of the inner relativistic regions of accretion disks. Our calculations assume that the thin disk is terminated by an innermost stable orbit, as would occur around a slowly rotating black hole or weakly magnetized compact neutron star. The dominant relativistic effects, which allow modes to be trapped within the inner region of the disk, are approximated via a modified Newtonian potential. Using the Lagrangian formulation of Friedman and Schutz, we develop a general formalism for investigating the adiabatic oscillations of arbitrary unperturbed disk models. First we consider the special case of acoustic waves in disks with isothermal atmospheres. Next we describe the Lagrangian perturbation vectors in terms of the derivatives of a scalar potential, as has been done by Ipser and Lindblom. Using this potential, we derive a single partial differential equation governing the oscillations of a disk. The eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of a variety of disk models are found to fall into two main classes which are analogous to the p-modes and g-modes in the sun. Specifically we use the potential formalism to compute the g-modes for disks with isothermal atmospheres. Physical arguments show that both the p-modes and g-modes belong to the same family of modes as the p-modes and g-modes in the sun, just viewed in a different parameter regime. With the aid of the Lagrangian formalism we consider possible growth or damping mechanisms and compute the (assumed) relatively small rates of growth or damping of the modes. Specifically, we consider gravitational radiation reaction and

  11. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tkac, Peter; Rotsch, David A.; Stepinski, Dominique; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Harvey, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  12. Strongly Magnetized Accretion Disks Around Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2017-01-01

    Recent observations are suggestive of strongly magnetized accretion disks around black holes. Performing local (shearing box) simulations of accretion disks, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. We demonstrate that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion disks. We also show that black hole spin measurements can become unconstrained if magnetic fields provide a significant contribution to the vertical pressure support of the accretion disk atmosphere.

  13. Fabrication of Large YBCO Superconducting Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczor, Ronald J.; Noever, David A.; Robertson, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    We have undertaken fabrication of large bulk items to develop a repeatable process and to provide test articles in laboratory experiments investigating reported coupling of electromagnetic fields with the local gravity field in the presence of rotating superconducting disks. A successful process was developed which resulted in fabrication of 30 cm diameter annular disks. The disks were fabricated of the superconductor YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Various material parameters of the disks were measured.

  14. HYPERACCRETING NEUTRON STAR DISKS AND NEUTRINO ANNIHILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dong; Dai, Z. G. E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.c

    2009-09-20

    Newborn neutron stars surrounded by hyperaccreting and neutrino-cooled disks may exist in some gamma-ray bursts and/or supernovae. In this paper, we further study the structure of such a neutron star disk based on the two-region (i.e., inner and outer) disk scenario following our previous work, and calculate the neutrino annihilation luminosity from the disk in various cases. We investigate the effects of the viscosity parameter {alpha}, energy parameter {epsilon} (measuring the neutrino cooling efficiency of the inner disk), and outflow strength on the structure of the entire disk as well as the effect of emission from the neutron star surface boundary emission on the total neutrino annihilation rate. The inner disk satisfies the entropy-conservation self-similar structure for the energy parameter {epsilon} {approx_equal} 1 and the advection-dominated structure for {epsilon} < 1. An outflow from the disk decreases the density and pressure but increases the thickness of the disk. Moreover, compared with the black hole disk, the neutrino annihilation luminosity above the neutron star disk is higher, and the neutrino emission from the boundary layer could increase the neutrino annihilation luminosity by about one order of magnitude higher than the disk without boundary emission. The neutron star disk with the advection-dominated inner disk could produce the highest neutrino luminosity while the disk with an outflow has the lowest. Although a heavily mass-loaded outflow from the neutron star surface at early times of neutron star formation prevents the outflow material from being accelerated to a high bulk Lorentz factor, an energetic ultrarelativistic jet via neutrino annihilation can be produced above the stellar polar region at late times if the disk accretion rate and the neutrino emission luminosity from the surface boundary layer are sufficiently high.

  15. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  16. Atypical Cutaneous Manifestations in Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Ivars Lleó, M; Clavo Escribano, P; Menéndez Prieto, B

    2016-05-01

    Although the diversity of the clinical manifestations of syphilis is well-known, atypical presentations can also occur. Such atypical presentations are associated with a high risk of transmission as a result of diagnostic confusion and treatment delays owing to the disease's ability to mimic other common skin diseases, deviate from classic clinical presentations, and adopt unique forms. Cases of atypical syphilis have been described most frequently in patients with concomitant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the incidence of syphilis has been growing over recent years -particularly in patients with HIV co-infection- dermatologists need to be familiar with the less well-known clinical presentations of this venereal disease. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Protracted rheumatologic manifestations in travelers].

    PubMed

    Levy, Tali; Kivity, Shaye; Schwartz, Eli

    2010-09-01

    Protracted rheumatological manifestations especially arthralgia and or polyarthritis may occur as a consequence of a wide range of pathogens including viral, bacterial and parasites. Few pathogenetic mechanisms leading to these clinical presentations have been suggested including a direct invasion of the synovial cells by the pathogens, immune complex formation, and others. The natural history of infectious arthritis/arthralgia is altogether benign, with full recovery and without sequelae, albeit sometimes very long. Diagnosis of infections-related arthralgia/arthritis is important since these diseases have a better prognosis, and can relieve anxiety among patients who are afraid of developing a chronic rheumatic disease. Since many patients will seek medical advice with these chronic complaints a long time after travel, physicians should be aware of the possible association between these complaints and remote travel. Thus, travel history should be mandatory, even in a rheumatologic setting.

  18. Cardiac manifestations in Behcet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Demirelli, Selami; Degirmenci, Husnu; Inci, Sinan; Arisoy, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Summary Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder, with vasculitis underlying the pathophysiology of its multisystemic effects. Venous pathology and thrombotic complications are hallmarks of BD. However, it has been increasingly recognised that cardiac involvement and arterial complications are also important aspects of the course of the disease. Cardiac lesions include pericarditis, endocarditis, intracardiac thrombosis, myocardial infarction, endomyocardial fibrosis, and myocardial aneurysm. Treatment of cardiovascular involvement in BD is largely empirical, and is aimed towards suppressing the vasculitis. The most challenging aspect seems to be the treatment of arterial aneurysms and thromboses due to the associated risk of bleeding. When the prognosis of cardiac involvement in BD is not good, recovery can be achieved through oral anticoagulation, immunosuppressive therapy, and colchicine use. In this review, we summarise the cardiovascular involvement, different manifestations, and treatment of BD. PMID:25984424

  19. Genital manifestations of tropical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Richens, J

    2004-01-01

    Genital symptoms in tropical countries and among returned travellers can arise from a variety of bacterial, protozoal, and helminthic infections which are not usually sexually transmitted. The symptoms may mimic classic sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by producing ulceration (for example, amoebiasis, leishmaniasis), wart-like lesions (schistosomiasis), or lesions of the upper genital tract (epididymo-orchitis caused by tuberculosis, leprosy, and brucellosis; salpingitis as a result of tuberculosis, amoebiasis, and schistosomiasis). A variety of other genital symptoms less suggestive of STI are also seen in tropical countries. These include hydrocele (seen with filariasis), which can be no less stigmatising than STI, haemospermia (seen with schistosomiasis), and hypogonadism (which may occur in lepromatous leprosy). This article deals in turn with genital manifestations of filariasis, schistosomiasis, amoebiasis, leishmaniasis, tuberculosis and leprosy and gives clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:14755029

  20. MUCOCUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS OF CHIKUNGUNYA FEVER

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Chikungunya fever (CF) is an arboviral acute febrile illness transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. After a quiescence of more than three decades, CF has recently re-emerged as a major public health problem of global scale. CF is characterized by an acute onset of high fever associated with a severe disabling arthritis often accompanied by prominent mucocutaneous manifestations. The disease is usually self-limiting, but the joint symptoms and some of the cutaneous features may persist after the defervescence. A wide range of mucocutaneous changes has been described to occur in association with CF during the current epidemic. Besides a morbilliform erythema, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, excoriated papules, aphthous-like ulcers, vesiculobullous and lichenoid eruptions, and exacerbation of pre-existing or quiescent dermatoses had been observed frequently. These unusual features may help in the clinical differential diagnosis of acute viral exanthems mimicking CF. PMID:20418982

  1. Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, Manole; COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multifaceted autoimmune inflammatory disease that can affect any part of the body. SLE is a disease of unknown aetiology with a variety of presenting features and manifestations. Interest in the disease has been stimulated in recent years, and improved methods of diagnosis have resulted in a significant increase in the number of cases recognized. It is apparent that it can no longer be regarded as a rare disease. The majority of the pathology in SLE is related to deposits of immune complexes in various organs, which triggers complement and other mediators of inflammation. Symptoms vary from person to person, and may come and go, depend on what part of the body is affected, can be mild, moderate, or severe. Diagnosis can be difficult because lupus mimics many other diseases; it requires clinical and serologic criteria. PMID:22879850

  2. Hematologic manifestations of celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Litzow, Mark R.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common systemic disorder that can have multiple hematologic manifestations. Patients with celiac disease may present to hematologists for evaluation of various hematologic problems prior to receiving a diagnosis of celiac disease. Anemia secondary to malabsorption of iron, folic acid, and/or vitamin B12 is a common complication of celiac disease and many patients have anemia at the time of diagnosis. Celiac disease may also be associated with thrombocytosis, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, venous thromboembolism, hyposplenism, and IgA deficiency. Patients with celiac disease are at increased risk of being diagnosed with lymphoma, especially of the T-cell type. The risk is highest for enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and B-cell lymphoma of the gut, but extraintestinal lymphomas can also be seen. ETL is an aggressive disease with poor prognosis, but strict adherence to a gluten-free diet may prevent its occurrence. PMID:16973955

  3. Cutaneous manifestations of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, Cindy England

    2016-06-01

    Skin findings can serve as a clue to internal disease. In this article, cutaneous manifestations of underlying lung malignancy are reviewed. Paraneoplastic dermatoses are rare, but when recognized early, can lead to early diagnosis of an underlying neoplasm. Malignancy-associated dermatoses comprise a broad group of hyperproliferative and inflammatory disorders, disorders caused by tumor production of hormonal or metabolic factors, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, among others. In this review, paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung malignancy are discussed, including ectopic ACTH syndrome, bronchial carcinoid variant syndrome, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy/digital clubbing, erythema gyratum repens, malignant acanthosis nigricans, sign of Leser-Trélat, tripe palms, hypertrichosis lanuginosa, acrokeratosis paraneoplastica, and dermatomyositis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. PSOCT studies of intervertebral disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matcher, Stephen J.; Winlove, Peter C.; Gangnus, Sergey V.

    2004-07-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is an emerging optical imaging technique that is sensitive to the birefringence properties of tissues. It thus has applications in studying the large-scale ordering of collagen fibers within connective tissues. This ordering not only provides useful insights into the relationship between structure and function for various anatomical structures but also is an indicator of pathology. Intervertebral disk is an elastic tissue of the spine and possesses a 3-D collagen structure well suited to study using PSOCT. Since the outer layer of the disk has a lamellar structure with collagen fibers oriented in a trellis-like arrangement between lamellae, the birefringence fast-axis shows pronounced variations with depth, on a spatial scale of about 100 μm. The lamellar thickness varies with age and possibly with disease. We have used a polarisation-sensitive optical coherence tomography system to measure the birefringence properties of freshly excised, hydrated bovine caudal intervertebral disk and compared this with equine flexor tendon. Our results clearly demonstrate the ability of PSOCT to detect the outer three lamellae, down to a depth of at least 700 μm, via discontinuities in the depth-resolved retardance. We have applied a simple semi-empirical model based on Jones calculus to quantify the variation in the fast-axis orientation with depth. Our data and modeling is in broad agreement with previous studies using x-ray diffraction and polarization microscopy applied to histological sections of dehydrated disk. Our results imply that PSOCT may prove a useful tool to study collagen organisation within intervertebral disk in vitro and possibly in vivo and its variation with age and disease.

  5. PROTOPLANETARY DISK RESONANCES AND TYPE I MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, David

    2011-11-10

    Waves reflected by the inner edge of a protoplanetary disk are shown to significantly modify Type I migration, even allowing the trapping of planets near the inner disk edge for small planets in a range of disk parameters. This may inform the distribution of planets close to their central stars, as observed recently by the Kepler mission.

  6. Accretion Disks in Algols: Progenitors and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rensbergen, W.; de Greve, J. P.

    2017-02-01

    There are only a few Algols with derived accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems. With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution were calculated. For six Algols with accretion disks we found initial systems that evolve closely into the presently observed system parameters and disk characteristics.

  7. Air-lubrication of magnetic disk sliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreßler, B.; Graichen, K.; Bärwolff, G.; Jehring, L.; Seifert, G.

    1993-03-01

    Steady-state and dynamic flying of a self-acting magnetic disk slider over a hard disk are considered. Some tasks for computations are formulated and the possibilities of developed numerical codes are illustrated. Numerical results of dynamic flying over a disk surface with an obstacle are in agreement with experimental data.

  8. Microporous Carbon Disks For Sorption Refrigerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munukutla, Lakshmi V.; Moore, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Slow, carefully controlled pyrolysis found to turn polyvinylidene chloride disks into carbon disks having small pores and large surface areas. Disks exhibit high adsorptivities making them useful in krypton-sorption refrigerators. Carbons made from polyvinylidene chloride have greater adsorptive capacities. Thermal instability controlled and variability of product reduced by careful control of rates of heating, heating times, and rate of final cooling.

  9. NASA Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foxworth, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program is designed for K-12 classroom educators who work in K-12 schools, museums, libraries, or planetariums. Educators have to be certified to borrow the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks by attending a NASA Certification Workshop provided by a NASA Authorized Sample Disk Certifier.

  10. Optical Disk Formats: A Briefing. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schamber, Linda

    This digest begins with a brief description and review of the development of optical disks. Optical disk formats are then described by capability: Read Only Memory (ROM), Write Once, Read Many (WORM), Interactive (I), and Erasable (E); forms of information (audio, text or data, video or graphics, or a combination); and disk size (most often 12 or…

  11. Methods of Stress Calculation in Rotating Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumarkin, S.

    1944-01-01

    The paper describes nethods of computing the stresses in disks of a given profile as well as methods of choosing the disk profiles for a given stress distribution for turhines, turbo blowers, and so forth. A new method of in tegrating the differential equations of Stodola leads to a simplification of the computation for disks of hyperbolic profile.

  12. Basics of Videodisc and Optical Disk Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Judith

    1983-01-01

    Outlines basic videodisc and optical disk technology describing both optical and capacitance videodisc technology. Optical disk technology is defined as a mass digital image and data storage device and briefly compared with other information storage media including magnetic tape and microforms. The future of videodisc and optical disk is…

  13. A Complete Guide to the Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Char, Carlene

    1983-01-01

    Focusing on the 5-1/4" floppy disk commonly used with microcomputers, this guide to magnetic disks gives a description of their physical appearance and how they function as information storage devices and provides suggestions for their care and maintenance. A glossary of disk-related terms is included. (EAO)

  14. The dynamics of particle disks. II - Effects of spin degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araki, Suguru

    1988-01-01

    The present treatment of the thermal equilibria of differentially-rotating, axisymmetric disks consisting of identical, spin-possessing as well as translational DOF-possessing hard sphere particles characterizes these disks' dynamics by means of two novel parameters: (1) the tangential restitution coefficient, and (2) the dimensionless moment of inertia. It is established that rings composed of spinning particles can generally be thermally balanced within more restricted ranges of the optical depth, as well as at higher values of the normal restitution coefficient, than spinless rings. Mean spin is indefinite in the present framework of neglected finite particle-size effects.

  15. Elastic Contact Analysis of Functionally Graded Brake Disks Subjected to Thermal and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzamanian, M. M.; Sahari, B. B.; Bayat, M.; Mustapha, F.; Ismarrubie, Z. N.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, finite element contact analysis of a functionally graded (FG) brake disk in contact with a pad, subjected to rotation, contact pressure, and frictional heat, is presented. The material properties vary through the thickness according to a power-law characterized by a grading index, n. The contact surfaces are full-ceramic with full-metal free surface. The effects of n on the displacement, contact status, strain and stress are investigated. From the analysis, thermo-elastic and contact results are extremely dependent on n. Hence, n is an important criteria for the design of FG brake disks for automotive and aircraft applications.

  16. The dynamics of particle disks. II - Effects of spin degrees of freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araki, Suguru

    1988-01-01

    The present treatment of the thermal equilibria of differentially-rotating, axisymmetric disks consisting of identical, spin-possessing as well as translational DOF-possessing hard sphere particles characterizes these disks' dynamics by means of two novel parameters: (1) the tangential restitution coefficient, and (2) the dimensionless moment of inertia. It is established that rings composed of spinning particles can generally be thermally balanced within more restricted ranges of the optical depth, as well as at higher values of the normal restitution coefficient, than spinless rings. Mean spin is indefinite in the present framework of neglected finite particle-size effects.

  17. Thermal effects of pulsed pumping in semiconductor disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Dai, Teli; Liang, Yiping; Fan, Siqiang; Zhang, Yu

    2012-11-01

    It has been demonstrated experimentally that pulsed pumping can significantly improve the thermal management in an optically-pumped semiconductor disk laser, and the output power of semiconductor disk lasers under pulsed pumping can be upgraded to times of those under continuous pumping. This paper presents numerical analysis of the thermal effects of pulsed pumping in semiconductor disk lasers, so to theoretically disclose the details of the thermal processes of pulsed pumping. In the simulation, the parabolic heat conduction equation, which is widely employed to describe the transient thermal transfer processes, is solved under cylindrical coordinates by the use of the finite element method, a periodic pump pulses train is assumed, and the maximum temperature rise in the multiple quantum wells active region is focused. The influences of the duty cycle, the repetition rate, and the pulse width of the pump pulses on the maximum temperature rise are investigated, and the results are compared with the case of continuous-wave pumping. Some simulation results are compared with reported data, and the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  18. Segmentally structured disk triboelectric nanogenerator for harvesting rotational mechanical energy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long; Wang, Sihong; Xie, Yannan; Jing, Qingshen; Niu, Simiao; Hu, Youfan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-06-12

    We introduce an innovative design of a disk triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) with segmental structures for harvesting rotational mechanical energy. Based on a cyclic in-plane charge separation between the segments that have distinct triboelectric polarities, the disk TENG generates electricity with unique characteristics, which have been studied by conjunction of experimental results with finite element calculations. The role played by the segmentation number is studied for maximizing output. A distinct relationship between the rotation speed and the electrical output has been thoroughly investigated, which not only shows power enhancement at high speed but also illuminates its potential application as a self-powered angular speed sensor. Owing to the nonintermittent and ultrafast rotation-induced charge transfer, the disk TENG has been demonstrated as an efficient power source for instantaneously or even continuously driving electronic devices and/or charging an energy storage unit. This work presents a novel working mode of TENGs and opens up many potential applications of nanogenerators for harvesting even large-scale energy.

  19. Warm Disks from Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    In the process of searching for exoplanetary systems, weve discovered tens of debris disks close around distant stars that are especially bright in infrared wavelengths. New research suggests that we might be looking at the late stages of terrestrial planet formation in these systems.Forming Terrestrial PlanetsAccording to the widely-accepted formation model for our solar-system, protoplanets the size of Mars formed within a protoplanetary disk around our Sun. Eventually, the depletion of the gas in the disk led the orbits of these protoplanets to become chaotically unstable. Finally, in the giant impact stage, many of the protoplanets collided with each other ultimately leading to the formation of the terrestrial planets and their moons as we know them today.If giant impact stages occur in exoplanetary systems, too leading to the formation of terrestrial exoplanets how would we detect this process? According to a study led by Hidenori Genda of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, we might be already be witnessing this stage in observations of warm debris disks around other stars. To test this, Genda and collaborators model giant impact stages and determine what we would expect to see from a system undergoing this violent evolution.Modeling CollisionsSnapshots of a giant impact in one of the authors simulations. The collision causes roughly 0.05 Earth masses of protoplanetary material to be ejected from the system. Click for a closer look! [Genda et al. 2015]The collaborators run a series of simulations evolving protoplanetary bodies in a solar system. The simulations begin 10 Myr into the lifetime of the solar system, i.e., after the gas from the protoplanetary disk has had time to be cleared and the protoplanetary orbits begin to destabilize. The simulations end when the protoplanets are done smashing into each other and have again settled into stable orbits, typically after ~100 Myr.The authors find that, over an average giant impact stage, the total amount of

  20. Finite Control in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kum Young

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores finite control in Korean. An overview of the previous studies of control shows that the mainstream literature on control has consistently argued that referential dependence between an overt matrix argument and an embedded null subject is characteristic of non-finite clauses which contain a PRO subject. Moreover, although some…

  1. QUARKONIUM AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    UMEDA, T.

    2006-06-09

    Lattice QCD studies on charmonium at finite temperature are presented After a discussion about problems for the Maximum Entropy Method applied to finite temperature lattice QCD, I show several results on charmonium spectral functions. The 'wave function' of charmonium is also discussed to study the spatial correlation between quark and anti-quark in deconfinement phase.

  2. Declustering databases on heterogeneous disk systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling T.; Rotem, D.; Seshadri, S.

    1995-04-01

    Declustering is a well known strategy to achieve maximum I/O parallelism in multi-disk systems. Many declustering methods have been proposed for symmetrical disk systems, i.e., multi-disk systems in which all disks have the same speed and capacity. This work deals with the problem of adapting such declustering methods to work in heterogeneous environments. In such environments these are many types of disks and servers with a large range of speeds and capacities. We deal first with the case of perfectly declustered queries, i.e., queries which retrieve a fixed proportion of the answer from each disk. We show that the fraction of the dataset which must be allocated to each disk is affected by both the relative speed and capacity of the disk. Furthermore, the hierarchical structure of most distributed systems, where groups of disks are placed in servers, imposes further complications due to variations . in server and network bandwidths which may affect the actual achievable transfer rates. We propose an algorithm which determines the fraction of the dataset which must be loaded on each disk. The algorithm may be tailored to find disk loading for minimal response time for a given database size, or to compute a system profile showing the optimal loading of the disks for all possible ranges of database sizes. Next we look at the probabilistic aspects of this problem and show how to optimize the expected retrieval time when the Proportions of the data retrieved from each disk axe random variables. We show the rather surprising result that in this case to achieve optimality, the fraction of the data loaded on each disk must not simply be proportional to its speed but rather some compensation must be made with bias towards the faster disks. The methods proposed here are general and can be used in conjunction with most known symmetric declustering methods.

  3. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kirkhus, Eva; Arvidsson, Linda Z; Smith, Hans-Jørgen; Flatø, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O; Larheim, Tore A

    2016-03-01

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  4. The EXoplanetary Circumstellar Disk Environments and Disk Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn; Guyon, O.; Science Mission, EXCEDE; Technology Team

    2012-01-01

    We present an overview of the EXoplanetary Circumstellar Environments and Disk Explorer (EXCEDE), selected by NASA for technology development and maturation. EXCEDE will study the formation, evolution and architectures of exoplanetary systems, and characterize circumstellar environments into stellar habitable zones. EXCEDE provides contrast-limited scattered-light detection sensitivities 1000x greater than HST or JWST coronagraphs at a much smaller effective inner working angle (IWA), thus enabling the exploration and characterization of exoplanetary CS disks in currently inaccessible domains. EXCEDE will utilize a laboratory demonstrated high-performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodized Coronagraph (PIAA-C) integrated with a 70 cm diameter unobscured aperture visible light telescope. The EXCEDE PIAA-C will deliver star-to-disk augmented image contrasts of < 10E-8 and a 1.2 lambda/D IWA of 0.14” with a wavefront control system utilizing a 64x64 element MEMS DM and fast steering mirror. EXCEDE will provide 144 mas spatial resolution at 0.4 microns with dust detection sensitivity to levels of a few tens of zodis with two-band imaging polarimetry. EXCEDE is a science-driven technology pathfinder that will advance our understanding of the formation and evolution of exoplanetary systems, placing our solar system in broader astrophysical context, and will demonstrate the high contrast technologies required for larger-scale follow-on and multi-wavelength investigations on the road to finding and characterizing exo-Earths in the years ahead.

  5. Flux distributions and colors of accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacharintanakul, P.; Katz, J. I.

    1980-01-01

    The disk model of Shakura and Sunyaev (1973) and Novikov and Thorne (1973) is used to calculate temperature distributions and integrated spectral fluxes for disks around a typical white dwarf and a typical neutron star, under the assumption that each element of the disk locally radiates as a blackbody. In addition, the disks' integrated UBV colors are calculated using the grid colors for real model atmospheres calculated by Buser and Kurucz (1978) and the observed colors given by Allen (1973). In all the calculations the effect of radiation from one part of the disk on all the other parts is included.

  6. Kinematic Dynamo In Turbulent Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Many circumstellar disks associated with objects ranging from protoplanetary nebulae, to accretion disks around compact stars allow for the generation of magnetic fields by an (alpha)omega dynamo. We have applied kinematic dynamo formalism to geometrically thin accretion disks. We calculate, in the framework of an adiabatic approximation, the normal mode solutions for dynamos operating in disks around compact stars. We then describe the criteria for a viable dynamo in protoplanetary nebulae, and discuss the particular features that make accretion disk dynamos different from planetary, stellar, and galactic dynamos.

  7. Vibration Based Crack Detection in a Rotating Disk. Part 2; Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Martin, Richard E.; Haase, Wayne C.; Baaklini, George

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results concerning the detection of a crack in a rotating disk. The goal was to utilize blade tip clearance and shaft vibration measurements to monitor changes in the system's center of mass and/or blade deformation behaviors. The concept of the approach is based on the fact that the development of a disk crack results in a distorted strain field within the component. As a result, a minute deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a change in the system's center of mass occurs. Here, a notch was used to simulate an actual crack. The vibration based experimental results failed to identify the existence of a notch when utilizing the approach described above, even with a rather large, circumferential notch (l.2 in.) located approximately mid-span on the disk (disk radius = 4.63 in. with notch at r = 2.12 in.). This was somewhat expected, since the finite element based results in Part 1 of this study predicted changes in blade tip clearance as well as center of mass shifts due to a notch to be less than 0.001 in. Therefore, the small changes incurred by the notch could not be differentiated from the mechanical and electrical noise of the rotor system. Although the crack detection technique of interest failed to identify the existence ofthe notch, the vibration data produced and captured here will be utilized in upcoming studies that will focus on different data mining techniques concerning damage detection in a disk.

  8. Escape conditions of radiative-driven strati from luminous accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Takuya; Fukue, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We examine the dynamical motion and escape conditions of continuum-driven strati (flat cloud) with finite optical depth from luminous accretion disks around a black hole. We adopt the near-disk approximation, and treat the problem in the framework of special relativity, where the radiation drag force as well as the radiation pressure are included. We find that the optically thin strati are easy to accelerate, compared with the particles, and the escape condition of the stratus is reduced. That is, when the disk luminosity is around the Eddington luminosity, the optically thin strati can escape from the inner disk (≲ 20 rg; rg being the Schwarzschild radius). When the disk luminosity is about half the Eddington luminosity, it can escape at around 5 rg. This is due to the translucent effect. In addition, the trajectories of the strati are not vertical, but a funnel-like shape due to the centrifugal force. Stratus outflow could easily blow out from usual accretion disks with sub-Eddington luminosities, and this may explain outflows observed in broad absorption line quasars and ultra-fast outflow objects.

  9. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, E; Paparrigopoulos, Th

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease affecting 1-2% of the population over 60. Although diagnosed by its characteristic motor manifestations, PD may be preceded, and is frequently accompanied, by a wide range of psychiatric and cognitive symptoms. These symptoms are often more debilitating than its motor complications and it is nowadays appreciated that they can be an important cause of excess disability in PD, frequently necessitating hospitalization and institutionalization. Despite their frequent occurrence, most PD-related neuropsychiatric symptoms remain under-recognized and undertreated in clinical practice and their diagnosis is challenging because of the overlap of the somatic features of the psychiatric disorders and the motor symptoms of PD. Even when identified, there is a common perception that many of these symptoms are untreatable. Their recognition is essential not only for ascertaining the functional status of patients but also for better appreciating the nature of the neurodegenerative process in PD. These symptoms may precede the onset of motor symptoms and can be used as screening tools allowing for very early disease identification and for trials of possible diseasemodifying interventions. The pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD involves complex and multifactorial mechanisms, including disease-related and psychological factors. Alterations in neurotransmitters like dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, involving subcortical projections and synaptic and neuronal changes involving limbic and cortical structures combine to result in these nonmotor symptoms. Potentially earlier evaluation and treatment of comorbid psychiatric and cognitive disorders in PD could improve quality of life and patient productivity, reduce morbidity and caregiver burden, and minimize healthcare costs. Management strategies include adjustment of dopaminergic medication, use of psychotropic

  10. Warped Circumbinary Disks in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-07-01

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10-2 pc to 10-4 pc for 107 M ⊙ black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  11. Warped circumbinary disks in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-07-20

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10{sup –2} pc to 10{sup –4} pc for 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  12. Magnetic interchange instability of accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaisig, M.; Tajima, T.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the magnetic interchange or buoyancy instability of a differentially rotating disk threaded by an ordered vertical magnetic field is investigated. A 2D ideal fluid in the equatorial plane of a central mass in the corotating frame of reference is considered as a model for the disk. If the rotation rate of the disk is Keplerian, the disk is found to be stable. If the vertical magnetic field is sufficiently strong, and the field strength decreases with distance from the central object, and thus the rotation of the disk deviates from Keplerian, if is found that an instability develops. The magnetic flux and disk matter expand outward in certain ranges of azimuth, while disk matter with less magnetic flux moves inward over the remaining range of azimuth, showing a characteristic development of an interchange instability.

  13. Accretion disks in Algols: Progenitors and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Rensbergen, W.; De Greve, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Context. There are only a few Algols with measured accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems, narrowing down the initial parameter space. Aims: We investigate the origin and evolution of six Algol systems with accretion disks to find the initial parameters and evolutionary constraints for them. Methods: With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution are calculated to obtain the best match for observed individual systems. Results: Initial parameters for six Algol systems with accretion disks were determined matching both the present system parameters and the observed disk characteristics. Conclusions: When Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) starts during core hydrogen burning of the donor, the disk lifetime was found to be short. The disk luminosity is comparable to the luminosity of the gainer during a large fraction of the disk lifetime.

  14. Disk-planet interactions: Implications for planetary systems formation and evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Wm. R.

    2000-10-01

    The coherent wavelike response of disk systems to perturbations from nearby or embedded gravitating objects is a subject of vigorous study. The internal disk forces accounting for the organized behavior can be either pressure (resulting in acoustic or short waves) or self-gravity (producing gravity or long waves). In addition to their well-known applications to stellar and planetary ring systems, wave phenomena have relevance to protoplanet interactions with their precursor gaseous nebula and with any residual planetesimal disk. The disk exchanges angular momentum with a perturber via resonant torques. In the absence of collective behavior, only a thin annulus of disk material at each resonance participates in the exchange and can saturate quickly, driving the torque to zero. However, a key trait of waves is their ability to transport angular momentum. Wave action can prevent saturation by transporting angular momentum away from the resonance zone to more distant parts of the disk; this results in a sustained torque that can significantly modify the perturber's orbit. This talk will review recent changes in the cosmogonic paradigm brought about by ongoing efforts to incorporate disk-planet interactions into models of planetary formation. One dramatic development has been the realization that massive, planet-sized bodies may exhibit a substantial degree of mobility in the presence of their precursor nebula. Not only does this relate to accretion timescales and the provenance of planetary material, but it also has important implications for the origin of close stellar companions and the ultimate survival of planetary systems. Wave action can also manifest itself in the planetesimal disk, even after the dissipation of the nebula. The long-term evolution of residual populations such as the Kuiper and asteroid belts may have been strongly influence by this mechanism. We will outline some of the outstanding problems that have yet to be explored concerning this important

  15. Spaceflight optical disk recorder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Thomas A.; Rinsland, Pamela L.

    1990-01-01

    A NASA program to develop a high performance (high rate, high capacity) rewriteable optical disk recorder for spaceflight applications is presented. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk drive modules and a modular controller. Drive performance goals are 10 Gbyte capacity, 300 Mb transfer rate, 10 to the -12th corrected bit-error rate, and 150 msec access time. The preliminary design for an expandable controller is presented. System goals are up to 160 Gbyte capacity at up to 1.8 Gb/sec rate with concurrent I/O, asynchronous data transfer, and 2-5-year operating life in orbit. Projected system environment and operational scenarios based on Polar Orbiting Platform applications are discussed.

  16. Advanced optical disk storage technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haritatos, Fred N.

    1996-01-01

    There is a growing need within the Air Force for more and better data storage solutions. Rome Laboratory, the Air Force's Center of Excellence for C3I technology, has sponsored the development of a number of operational prototypes to deal with this growing problem. This paper will briefly summarize the various prototype developments with examples of full mil-spec and best commercial practice. These prototypes have successfully operated under severe space, airborne and tactical field environments. From a technical perspective these prototypes have included rewritable optical media ranging from a 5.25-inch diameter format up to the 14-inch diameter disk format. Implementations include an airborne sensor recorder, a deployable optical jukebox and a parallel array of optical disk drives. They include stand-alone peripheral devices to centralized, hierarchical storage management systems for distributed data processing applications.

  17. Herschel evidence for disk flattening or gas depletion in transitional disks

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J. T.; Pascucci, I.; Espaillat, C.; Woitke, P.; Andrews, S.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Meeus, G.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2014-06-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission, with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [O I] 63.18 μm for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program ({sup G}as in Protoplanetary Systems{sup )} by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS in this wavelength. [O I] 63.18 μm traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities ∼2 times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self-consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g., bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g., disk dust mass, etc.) that could influence the [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosity, and we find no correlations that can explain the lower [O I] 63.18 μm line luminosities in transitional disks. Using a grid of thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk models, we conclude that either transitional disks are less flared than full disks or they possess lower gas-to-dust ratios due to a depletion of gas mass. This result suggests that transitional disks are more evolved than their full disk counterparts, possibly even at large radii.

  18. Oral manifestations of asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Ghapanchi, Janan; Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Kamali, Fereshte; Rezaee, Mostafa; Ghodrati, Maryam; Amanpour, Sara

    2015-11-01

    The effect of asthma on oral health is the subject of debate among dental practitioners. The current study was planned to investigate the oral manifestations of asthmatics compared to healthy subjects. The study group composed of 100 asthmatics and 100 age-matched healthy controls. The caries status based on Decayed/Missing/Filled Teeth (DMFT) criteria and oral lesion were evaluated in all subjects. The mean age of the asthmatics group was 47.5±3.5 years and in the control group it was 43.5±3.0 years. Asthmatics included 45(45%) males and 55(55%) females. There was no statistical difference between caries prevalence in both groups. The most prevalent oral lesions in asthmatics group were geographic tongue 10(10%), fissured tongue 13(13%), chronic atrophic candidiasis13(13%), and in the control group were fissured tongue(11%) and lichenoid reaction(2%). The dental professional must be familiar with all signs and symptoms of this disease in order to offer effective and safe treatment.

  19. Rheumatological manifestations in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, Angela; Cerinic, Marco Matucci; De Giorgio, Francesca; Minari, Chiara; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Rheumatological manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus may be classified in: non articular, articular and bone conditions. Among non articular conditions, diabetic cheiroarthropathy, frequent in type I diabetes, the most important disorder related to limited joint mobility, results in stiff skin and joint contractures. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, flexor tenosynovitis, and Duputryen's and Peyronie's diseases are also linked to limited joint mobility. Diffuse skeletal hyperostosis, due to calcification at entheses, is frequent and early, particularly in type 2 diabetes. Neuropathies cause some non articular conditions, mainly neuropathic arthritis, a destructive bone and joint condition more common in type I diabetes. Algodistrophy, shoulder-hand and entrapment syndromes are also frequent. Mononeuropathy causes diabetic amyotrophy, characterised by painless muscle weakness. Among muscle conditions, diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, sometimes severe, condition. Among articular conditions, osteoarthritis is frequent and early in diabetes, in which also chondrocalcinosis and gout occur. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes I have a common genetic background and the presence of diabetes gives to RA an unfavourable prognosis. Among bone conditions, osteopenia and osteoporosis may occur early in type 1 diabetes. Contrarily, in type 2 diabetes, bone mineral density is similar or, sometimes, higher than in non diabetic subjects, probably due to hyperinsulinemia.

  20. Retinal manifestations in fibromuscular dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Meire, F M; De Laey, J J; Van Thienen, M N; Schuddinck, L

    1991-01-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia of the arteries (FMD) is a segmental angiopathy which may produce obstruction of the carotid, cerebral, renal, mesenteric, coronary or iliac arteries. Except for lesions related to arterial hypertension, retinal manifestations have not yet been reported. This paper describes the case of a 10-year-old boy with progressive deafness, a history of an unexplained stroke and progressive occlusions of the retinal arterioles in the fundus periphery. This resulted in retinal neovascularization and recurrent retinal and vitreous hemorrhages. Despite repeated photo- and cryocoagulation the eyes progressed to a tractional retinal detachment which was successfully treated by vitrectomy and scleral buckling. The diagnosis of FMD was made on the basis of a histopathological examination of a temporal artery biopsy. The child also presented an asymptomatic but severe aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta and CT scan and MRI showed dilated cerebral arteries. The father of our patient had died at the age of 27 years either from myocardial infarction or rupture of a dissecting aortic aneurysm. He was highly myopic and had lost one eye from retinal detachment. The younger brother of our patient also presents aneurysmal dilatation of the aorta and tortuous cerebral vessels. Ocular examination is still normal. The findings in this family are compatible with an autosomal dominant inheritance with variable expression.

  1. Skin manifestations of drug allergy

    PubMed Central

    Ardern-Jones, Michael R; Friedmann, Peter S

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions range from mild to severe and from those localized only to skin to those associated with systemic disease. It is important to distinguish features of cutaneous drug reactions which help classify the underlying mechanism and likely prognosis as both of these influence management decisions, some of which necessarily have to be taken rapidly. Severe cutaneous reactions are generally T cell-mediated, yet this immunological process is frequently poorly understood and principles for identification of the culprit drug are different to those of IgE mediated allergic reactions. Furthermore, intervention in severe skin manifestations of drug allergy is frequently necessary. However, a substantial literature reports on success or otherwise of glucocorticoids, cyclophsphamide, ciclosporin, intravenous immunoglobulin and anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy for the treatment of toxic epidermal necrolysis without clear consensus. As well as reviewing the recommended supportive measures and evidence base for interventions, this review aims to provide a mechanistic overview relating to a proposed clinical classification to assist the assessment and management of these complex patients. PMID:21480947

  2. Neurologic manifestations of Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thibert, Ronald L; Larson, Anna M; Hsieh, David T; Raby, Annabel R; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2013-04-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by the loss or reduction of the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A enzyme. Angelman syndrome results from a deletion or mutation of the maternally inherited 15q11.2-13.1 region, paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, or an imprinting error. Epilepsy is common and may present with multiple seizure types, including nonconvulsive status epilepticus. Seizures are often intractable and typically require broad-spectrum antiepileptic medications. Dietary therapy has also proved successful in Angelman syndrome. Electroencephalographic patterns include notched δ and rhythmic θ activity and epileptiform discharges. Sleep disorders are also common, often characterized by abnormal sleep-wake cycles. Movement disorders are nearly universal in Angelman syndrome, most frequently presenting with ataxia and tremor. Neurocognitive impairment is always present to varying degrees, and expressive speech is typically severely affected. Individuals with Angelman syndrome often manifest psychiatric comorbidities including hyperactivity, anxiety, and challenging behaviors such as aggression and self-injury. We focus on a comprehensive whole-child approach to the diagnosis and long-term clinical care of individuals with Angelman syndrome.

  3. [EEG manifestations in metabolic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2005-09-01

    Normal brain function depends on normal neuronal metabolism, which is closely related to systemic homeostasis of metabolites, such as glucose, electrolytes, amino acids and ammonia. "Metabolic encephalopathy" indicates diffuse brain dysfunction caused by various systemic derangements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used to evaluate metabolic encephalopathy since 1937, when Berger first observed slow brain activity induced by hypoglycemia. EEG is most useful in differentiating organic from psychiatric conditions, identifying epileptogenicity, and providing information about the degree of cortical or subcortical dysfunction. In metabolic encephalopathy, EEG evolution generally correlates well with the severity of encephalopathy. However, EEG has little specificity in differentiating etiologies in metabolic encephalopathy. For example, though triphasic waves are most frequently mentioned in hepatic encephalopathy, they can also be seen in uremic encephalopathy, or even in aged psychiatric patients treated with lithium. Spike-and-waves may appear in hyper- or hypo-glycemia, uremic encephalopathy, or vitamin deficiencies, etc. Common principles of EEG changes in metabolic encephalopathy are (1) varied degrees of slowing, (2) assorted mixtures of epileptic discharge, (3) high incidence of triphasic waves, and (4), as a rule, reversibility after treatment of underlying causes. There are some exceptions to the above descriptions in specific metabolic disorders and EEG manifestations are highly individualized.

  4. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies.

  5. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases.

    PubMed

    Lencu, Codruţa; Alexescu, Teodora; Petrulea, Mirela; Lencu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary - cortical, and involuntary - metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthyroidism, patients develop ventilation disorders, obstructive and central sleep apnea, and pleural collection. The respiratory abnormalities in hyperthyroidism as a result of the hypermetabolic action of thyroid hormones are hyperventilation, myopathy and cardiovascular involvement; recent studies have reported pulmonary arterial hypertension in Graves' disease, as a result of the association of several mechanisms. Thyroid hypertrophy can induce through compression of the upper airways dyspnea, stridor, wheezing and cough. The respiratory disorders in acromegaly are ventilatory dysfunction and sleep apnea, which contribute to an unfavorable evolution of the disease. Respiratory changes in parathyroid, adrenal and reproductive system diseases have been described. Respiratory disorders should be recognized, investigated and monitored by medical practitioners of various specialties (family physicians, internists, endocrinologists, pneumologists, cardiologists). They are frequently severe, causing an unfavorable evolution of the associated endocrine and respiratory disease.

  6. Respiratory manifestations in endocrine diseases

    PubMed Central

    LENCU, CODRUŢA; ALEXESCU, TEODORA; PETRULEA, MIRELA; LENCU, MONICA

    2016-01-01

    The control mechanisms of respiration as a vital function are complex: voluntary – cortical, and involuntary – metabolic, neural, emotional and endocrine. Hormones and hypothalamic neuropeptides (that act as neurotrasmitters and neuromodulators in the central nervous system) play a role in the regulation of respiration and in bronchopulmonary morphology. This article presents respiratory manifestations in adult endocrine diseases that evolve with hormone deficit or hypersecretion. In hyperthyroidism, patients develop ventilation disorders, obstructive and central sleep apnea, and pleural collection. The respiratory abnormalities in hyperthyroidism as a result of the hypermetabolic action of thyroid hormones are hyperventilation, myopathy and cardiovascular involvement; recent studies have reported pulmonary arterial hypertension in Graves’ disease, as a result of the association of several mechanisms. Thyroid hypertrophy can induce through compression of the upper airways dyspnea, stridor, wheezing and cough. The respiratory disorders in acromegaly are ventilatory dysfunction and sleep apnea, which contribute to an unfavorable evolution of the disease. Respiratory changes in parathyroid, adrenal and reproductive system diseases have been described. Respiratory disorders should be recognized, investigated and monitored by medical practitioners of various specialties (family physicians, internists, endocrinologists, pneumologists, cardiologists). They are frequently severe, causing an unfavorable evolution of the associated endocrine and respiratory disease. PMID:27857512

  7. [Collagen diseases with gastrointestinal manifestations].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Ohara, Mikiko; Imai, Kohzoh

    2004-06-01

    Collagen vascular diseases are known to present with a diverse array of gastrointestinal manifestations. These can be classified as: 1) gastrointestinal damage due to the collagen vascular disease itself; 2) adverse events caused by pharmacotherapies; or 3) gastrointestinal infections following immunosuppression due to corticosteroid (CS) administration. The first group includes lupus enteritis and protein-losing gastroenteropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), reflux esophagitis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and pneumatosis cystoids intestinalis in systemic sclerosis, amyloidosis in rheumatoid arthritis, bowel ulcer and bleeding in rheumatoid vasculitis and microscopic polyangiitis, and ileocecal ulcer in Behcet disease. In particular, colonic ulcers associated with SLE represent refractory lesions resistant to CS. Analysis of reported cases showing colonic lesions with SLE (22 cases in Japan) revealed that mean duration of SLE was 9.9 years and 77% of colonic lesions were observed in the rectum and sigmoid colon. Half of the patients developed intestinal perforation or penetration, and 6 of the 11 patients with perforation died. The second group includes lesions in the small and large intestine due to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and CSs, in addition to peptic ulcers. As perforation in CS-treated patients displays relatively high incidence with poor prognosis, careful attention to such complications is needed. The third group includes candidal esophagitis and cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis. Prompt diagnosis is required to prevent colonic bleeding and perforation due to CMV.

  8. Solar disk sextant optical configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Sofia, S.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a plausible configuration for the solar disk sextant, an instrument to be used to monitor the solar diameter, is evaluated. Overall system requirements are evaluated, and tolerable uncertainties are obtained. It is concluded that by using a beam splitting wedge, a folded optics design can be used to measure the solar diameter to an accuracy of 10 to the -6th, despite the greater aberrations present in such optical systems.

  9. Universal Disk Controller for Microcomputers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    The research accomplished for this project was not aimed at solving the entire problem, but was focussed on an area which was manageable, and most...CP/M files. CP/M is an operating system for CI microcomputers produced by Digital Research . There are versions of CP/M for a wide variety of...its own disk controller for its domestic file activities. Orer-o Presentation Thefolowig captrsdiscuss the research , design, and implementation of the

  10. Accretion outbursts in self-gravitating protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Nelson, Richard P. E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu E-mail: r.p.nelson@qmul.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    We improve on our previous treatments of the long-term evolution of protostellar disks by explicitly solving disk self-gravity in two dimensions. The current model is an extension of the one-dimensional layered accretion disk model of Bae et al. We find that gravitational instability (GI)-induced spiral density waves heat disks via compressional heating (i.e., PdV work), and can trigger accretion outbursts by activating the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the magnetically inert disk dead zone. The GI-induced spiral waves propagate well inside of the gravitationally unstable region before they trigger outbursts at R ≲ 1 AU where GI cannot be sustained. This long-range propagation of waves cannot be reproduced with the previously used local α treatments for GI. In our standard model where zero dead-zone residual viscosity (α{sub rd}) is assumed, the GI-induced stress measured at the onset of outbursts is locally as large as 0.01 in terms of the generic α parameter. However, as suggested in our previous one-dimensional calculations, we confirm that the presence of a small but finite α{sub rd} triggers thermally driven bursts of accretion instead of the GI + MRI-driven outbursts that are observed when α{sub rd} = 0. The inclusion of non-zero residual viscosity in the dead zone decreases the importance of GI soon after mass feeding from the envelope cloud ceases. During the infall phase while the central protostar is still embedded, our models stay in a 'quiescent' accretion phase with M-dot {sub acc}∼10{sup −8}--10{sup −7} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} over 60% of the time and spend less than 15% of the infall phase in accretion outbursts. While our models indicate that episodic mass accretion during protostellar evolution can qualitatively help explain the low accretion luminosities seen in most low-mass protostars, detailed tests of the mechanism will require model calculations for a range of protostellar masses with some constraint on the initial core

  11. Accretion Outbursts in Self-gravitating Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Jaehan; Hartmann, Lee; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Nelson, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    We improve on our previous treatments of the long-term evolution of protostellar disks by explicitly solving disk self-gravity in two dimensions. The current model is an extension of the one-dimensional layered accretion disk model of Bae et al. We find that gravitational instability (GI)-induced spiral density waves heat disks via compressional heating (i.e., PdV work), and can trigger accretion outbursts by activating the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the magnetically inert disk dead zone. The GI-induced spiral waves propagate well inside of the gravitationally unstable region before they trigger outbursts at R <~ 1 AU where GI cannot be sustained. This long-range propagation of waves cannot be reproduced with the previously used local α treatments for GI. In our standard model where zero dead-zone residual viscosity (αrd) is assumed, the GI-induced stress measured at the onset of outbursts is locally as large as 0.01 in terms of the generic α parameter. However, as suggested in our previous one-dimensional calculations, we confirm that the presence of a small but finite αrd triggers thermally driven bursts of accretion instead of the GI + MRI-driven outbursts that are observed when αrd = 0. The inclusion of non-zero residual viscosity in the dead zone decreases the importance of GI soon after mass feeding from the envelope cloud ceases. During the infall phase while the central protostar is still embedded, our models stay in a "quiescent" accretion phase with \\dot{M}_acc˜ 10-8{--}10-7 M⊙ yr-1 over 60% of the time and spend less than 15% of the infall phase in accretion outbursts. While our models indicate that episodic mass accretion during protostellar evolution can qualitatively help explain the low accretion luminosities seen in most low-mass protostars, detailed tests of the mechanism will require model calculations for a range of protostellar masses with some constraint on the initial core angular momentum, which affects the length of time

  12. Development report for dual-burst disks

    SciTech Connect

    Fusco, A.M.

    1996-11-01

    Burst disks, commonly used in pressure relief applications, were studied as single-use valves. A dual-burst disk design was chosen for primary investigation for systems involving separation of gases of two significantly different pressures. The two disks are used to seal either end of a piston cavity that has a different cross-sectional area on each side. Different piston surface areas are used to maintain hydrostatic equilibrium, P{sub 1}A{sub 1} = P{sub 2}A{sub 2}. The single-use valve functions when the downstream pressure is reduced to approximately atmospheric pressure, creating a pressure differential that causes the burst disks to fail. Several parameters were studied to determine the optimum design of the burst disk. These parameters include thickness, diameter, area/pressure ratio, scoring, and disk geometry. The disk material was limited to 304L stainless steel. Factors that were considered essential to the optimization of the design were robustness, manufacturability, and burst pressure variability. The thicknesses of the disks that were studied range from 0.003 in. to 0.010 in. A model for predicting burst pressures of the burst disks was derived. The model combines membrane stress theory with force/displacement data to predict the burst pressure of various designs to within {+-}10%. This model results from studies that characterize the behavior of individual small and large disks. Welding techniques used to join the dual-disk assembly are discussed. Laser welds are used to join and seal the disks to the bulkhead. These welds were optimized for repeatability and robustness. Resistance upset welding is suggested for joining the dual-disk assembly to the pressure vessel body. Resistance upset weld parameters were developed for this particular design so as to minimize the side effects on the burst-disk performance and to provide high-quality welds.

  13. A Pulsar and a Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  14. The WEAVE disk dynamics survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famaey, B.; Antoja, T.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Siebert, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Di Matteo, P.; Figueras, F.; Fragkoudi, F.; Garzon-Lopez, F.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.; Martinez-Valpuesta, I.; Monari, G.; Mor-Crespo, R.; Hill, V.

    2016-12-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope. It consists of a multi-object fibre spectrograph with a 2°-diameter field of view that can obtain ˜ 1000 spectra simultaneously. The "WEAVE Galactic Archaeology survey" is the survey focused on the Milky Way, as a complement to the Gaia space mission, and will start operating in early 2018. This survey is subdivided in four sub-surveys, among which the "WEAVE disk dynamics survey". This survey plans to measure the radial velocities (and abundances as far as possible) of ˜ 10^6 stars with magnitude 15disk to unravel the detailed features of its gravitational potential. In particular, the non-axisymmetric perturbations such as the bar and spiral arms, are among the main drivers of the evolution of the Galactic disks. Questions (i) about their nature - e.g., are these features transient, quasi-stationary, or do both types co-exist? - (ii) about their detailed structure and dynamics - e.g., is the bar short or long, what is its pattern speed? -, as well as (iii) about their influence on secular processes such as stellar radial migration are essential elements for a better understanding of the chemo-dynamical evolution of our Galaxy, and of galaxies in general. This survey is designed to answer these questions.

  15. Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Erika; Horne, David; Shenoy, Sachindev; Blake, Daniel; van Brunt, Kari; Brittain, Sean; Rettig, Terrence

    2008-08-01

    We propose to use NIRSPEC to search for organic molecules in circumstellar disks toward nearly edge-on T Tauri stars. The feasibility of this study has been recently illustrated by the NIRSPEC detection of HCN toward two edge-on T Tauri stars, GV Tau (Gibb et al. 2007) and IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006), and Spitzer detections of C_2H_2, HCN, and CO_2 toward IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006) and AA Tau (Carr & Najita 2008). We have selected 10 molecules that are predicted to be abundant based on chemical models, observations of high and low mass star forming regions, and comet comae. We will investigate compositional variations among the T Tauri population and compare that to comets and chemical models of disk chemistry. Through this, we can explore the chemistry occurring in the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks and investigate the evolution of organic volatiles, which can help establish the mechanism and timescale for planet formation.

  16. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Methods This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Results Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patients with posterior versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. The most common ocular manifestation was retinal microvasculopathy (15.0%), followed by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (14.2%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (9.4%), cytomegalovirus retinitis (3.1%), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (2.4%), and blepharitis (1.6%). Retinal microvasculopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis were common in patients with CD4+ counts <200 cells/µL, while keratoconjunctivitis sicca and conjunctival microvasculopathy were common in patients with CD4+ counts of 200 to 499 cells/µL. There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between ocular manifestation and CD4+ count or age. Conclusions The introduction of HAART has changed the landscape of ocular presentations in patients with AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations

  17. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong; Lee, Sung Jin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the patients with posterior versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. The most common ocular manifestation was retinal microvasculopathy (15.0%), followed by keratoconjunctivitis sicca (14.2%), conjunctival microvasculopathy (9.4%), cytomegalovirus retinitis (3.1%), herpes zoster ophthalmicus (2.4%), and blepharitis (1.6%). Retinal microvasculopathy and cytomegalovirus retinitis were common in patients with CD4+ counts <200 cells/µL, while keratoconjunctivitis sicca and conjunctival microvasculopathy were common in patients with CD4+ counts of 200 to 499 cells/µL. There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between ocular manifestation and CD4+ count or age. The introduction of HAART has changed the landscape of ocular presentations in patients with AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations versus anterior segment ocular

  18. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  19. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus can cause acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis and has been associated with a range of extrahepatic manifestations. Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis are the main neurological manifestations associated with acute and chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Renal injuries have been also reported, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with or without cryoglobulinemia and membranous glomerulonephritis. Acute pancreatitis, haematological disorders and other autoimmune extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus, such as myocarditis and thyroiditis, have been also reported. In this comprehensive article, we review all published reports describing hepatitis E virus-associated extrahepatic manifestations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Connecting the shadows: probing inner disk geometries using shadows in transitional disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, M.; Stolker, T.; Dominik, C.; Benisty, M.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: Shadows in transitional disks are generally interpreted as signs of a misaligned inner disk. This disk is usually beyond the reach of current day high contrast imaging facilities. However, the location and morphology of the shadow features allow us to reconstruct the inner disk geometry. Methods: We derive analytic equations of the locations of the shadow features as a function of the orientation of the inner and outer disk and the height of the outer disk wall. In contrast to previous claims in the literature, we show that the position angle of the line connecting the shadows cannot be directly related to the position angle of the inner disk. Results: We show how the analytic framework derived here can be applied to transitional disks with shadow features. We use estimates of the outer disk height to put constraints on the inner disk orientation. In contrast with the results from Long et al. (2017, ApJ, 838, 62), we derive that for the disk surrounding HD 100453 the analytic estimates and interferometric observations result in a consistent picture of the orientation of the inner disk. Conclusions: The elegant consistency in our analytic framework between observation and theory strongly support both the interpretation of the shadow features as coming from a misaligned inner disk as well as the diagnostic value of near infrared interferometry for inner disk geometry.

  1. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    all stages of HIV infection. Fifty-six percent of the cases of ocular toxoplasmosis had simultaneous toxoplasmic cerebritis. Ocular toxoplasmosis responded to standard anti-microbial therapy. Varicella zoster virus retinitis, when manifested by the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) syndrome, responded to intravenous acyclovir therapy. Conversely, in a limited number of patients with the progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome, the disease responded poorly to intravenous acyclovir therapy, but appeared to respond to combination foscarnet and acyclovir therapy. Neuro-ophthalmic lesions were present in 6% of the patients with AIDS. The most common cause of a neuro-ophthalmic lesion was cryptococcal meningitis, and 25% of the patients with cryptococcal meningitis developed a neuro-ophthalmic complication. CONCLUSIONS: Ocular manifestations are common in patients with AIDS. CMV retinitis represented a major vision-threatening problem in these patients. While available therapy was successful in initially controlling the retinitis, the phenomenon of relapse resulted in some degree of long-term visual loss. Preservation of the patient's visual acuity in at least one eye was generally successful. Other opportunistic ocular infections were substantially less common than CMV retinitis but require aggressive therapy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8719695

  2. Cardiac manifestations of parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Guimarães Júnior, Milton Henriques; Diamantino, Adriana Costa; Gelape, Claudio Leo; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2017-05-01

    The heart may be affected directly or indirectly by a variety of protozoa and helminths. This involvement may manifest in different ways, but the syndromes resulting from impairment of the myocardium and pericardium are the most frequent. The myocardium may be invaded by parasites that trigger local inflammatory response with subsequent myocarditis or cardiomyopathy, as occurs in Chagas disease, African trypanosomiasis, toxoplasmosis, trichinellosis and infection with free-living amoebae. In amoebiasis and echinococcosis, the pericardium is the structure most frequently involved with consequent pericardial effusion, acute pericarditis, cardiac tamponade or constrictive pericarditis. Chronic hypereosinophilia due to helminth infections, especially filarial infections, has been associated with the development of tropical endomyocardial fibrosis, a severe form of restrictive cardiomyopathy. Schistosomiasis-associated lung vasculature involvement may cause pulmonary hypertension (PH) and cor pulmonale Tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, which is characterised by progressive interstitial fibrosis and restrictive lung disease, may lead to PH and its consequences may occur in the course of filarial infections. Intracardiac rupture of an Echinococcus cyst can cause membrane or secondary cysts embolisation to the lungs or organs supplied by the systemic circulation. Although unusual causes of cardiac disease outside the endemic areas, heart involvement by parasites should be considered in the differential diagnosis especially of myocardial and/or pericardial diseases of unknown aetiology in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. In this review, we updated and summarised the current knowledge on the major heart diseases caused by protozoan and metazoan parasites, which either involve the heart directly or otherwise influence the heart adversely. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  3. [Neurologic manifestations of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Hannachi, N; Béard, T; Ben Ismail, M

    1991-01-01

    Thirty out of 287 patients (10.4%) admitted to hospital for infective endocarditis between December 1970 and January 1990 had neurological complications. Twenty-three patients had native valve infectious endocarditis and 7 had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The clinical features were characterized by the frequency of aortic valve involvement (23 out of 30) and other complications, especially cardiac failure (16 cases) and peripheral vascular manifestations (7 cases). The commonest organism was the staphylococcus (53% of identified organisms) but the number of negative blood cultures was high (50% of cases). The neurological complication was often the presenting symptom of the endocarditis (19 cases) but it occurred after bacteriological cure in 4 cases. The complications observed were cerebral ischemia (16 cases), cerebral haemorrhage (11 cases), coma (2 cases), and one peripheral neuropathy causing a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. These complications presented with hemiplegia in 17 cases, a meningeal syndrome in 8 cases, a convulsion in 1 case, a Von Wallenberg syndrome in 1 case, and a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome in 1 case. Twelve patients had a transient or permanent neurological coma. Cerebral CT scan showed ischemic lesions in 7 cases and haemorrhagic lesions in 10 cases. Carotid angiography demonstrated mycotic aneurysms in 6 patients. Twelve patients died: the cause of death was neurological coma (7 cases), low cardiac output (4 cases) and haemorrhagic shock (1 case). Four patients underwent neurosurgery: 3 for clipping a mycotic aneurysm and 1 for drainage of an intracerebral haematoma. Poor prognostic factors were: coma, cardiac failure, cardiac valve prosthesis and, above all, the extent and multiplicity of the neurological lesions. The authors propose the following measures to improve the prognosis: early surgery in cases of large and/or mobile vegetations especially when the infecting organism is a staphylococcus and when a systemic embolism has

  4. High power disk lasers: advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrilla, David; Holzer, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Though the genesis of the disk laser concept dates to the early 90's, the disk laser continues to demonstrate the flexibility and the certain future of a breakthrough technology. On-going increases in power per disk, and improvements in beam quality and efficiency continue to validate the genius of the disk laser concept. As of today, the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over monolithic architectures. With well over 1000 high power disk lasers installations, the disk laser has proven to be a robust and reliable industrial tool. With advancements in running cost, investment cost and footprint, manufacturers continue to implement disk laser technology with more vigor than ever. This paper will explain important details of the TruDisk laser series and process relevant features of the system, like pump diode arrangement, resonator design and integrated beam guidance. In addition, advances in applications in the thick sheet area and very cost efficient high productivity applications like remote welding, remote cutting and cutting of thin sheets will be discussed.

  5. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory.

    PubMed

    Abramowicz, Marek A; Fragile, P Chris

    2013-01-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks), Shakura-Sunyaev (thin) disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs).

  6. Gas Dynamic Simulations of Inner Regions of Protoplanetary Disks in Young Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateeva, A. M.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Kaygorodov, P. V.; Sytov, A. Y.

    2012-04-01

    We have carried out 2D and 3D numerical simulations (Kaigorodov et al 2010, Fateeva et al. 2011, Sytov et al. 2011) of accretion processes in binary T Tauri stars (TTSs) DQ Tau, UZ Tau E, V4046 Sgr, GW Ori, RoXs 42C using a finite-difference Roe-Osher-Einfeld TVD scheme. The morphology of the flow pattern for UZ Tau E is shown in Fig. 1 (left panel). The flow structure includes accretion disks surrounding the components, bow-shocks in front of both the components, a shock wave (``bridge'') between the circumstellar accretion disks and a gap containing rarefied gas in the inner part of the protoplanetary disk.

  7. Equivalent circuit method for resonant magnetoelectric effect in disk-shaped laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ru; Wu, Gaojian; Zhang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model based on equivalent circuit analytical method has been presented for the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in disk-shaped laminated composites. The derived expressions for the ME voltage coefficient can be used to describe the frequency response of ME effect under both open circuit and finite electrical resistance load conditions. It was shown that the resonance frequency and resonant ME voltage coefficient increase with the increase in electrical resistance load in disk-shaped ME laminated composite, which is consistent with the observations for plate-shaped one. The theoretical results show good agreement with the experimental results in Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.92 (Terfenol-D)/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)/Terfenol-D disk-shaped sandwich laminated composite. This work is significant for designing ME devices and their signal-processing and electronic circuits.

  8. Continuum percolation on nonorientable surfaces: the problem of permeable disks on a Klein bottle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Grekhov, A. M.; Tronin, V. N.; Tronin, I. V.

    2015-11-01

    The percolation threshold and wrapping probability (R ∞) for the two-dimensional problem of continuum percolation on the surface of a Klein bottle have been calculated by the Monte Carlo method with the Newman-Ziff algorithm for completely permeable disks. It has been shown that the percolation threshold of disks on the Klein bottle coincides with the percolation threshold of disks on the surface of a torus, indicating that this threshold is topologically invariant. The scaling exponents determining corrections to the wrapping probability and critical concentration owing to the finite-size effects are also topologically invariant. At the same time, the quantities R ∞ are different for percolation on the torus and Klein bottle and are apparently determined by the topology of the surface. Furthermore, the difference between the R ∞ values for the torus and Klein bottle means that at least one of the percolation clusters is degenerate.

  9. Reduction of edge effect on disk electrodes by optimized current waveform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Boshuo; Petrossians, Artin; Weiland, James D

    2014-08-01

    Rectangular pulses applied to disk electrodes result in high current density at the edges of the disk, which can lead to electrode corrosion and tissue damage. We explored a method for reducing current density and corrosion, by varying the leading edge of the current pulse. Finite-element modeling and mathematical analysis were used to predict an optimal waveform that reduces current density at the edge while also maintaining short pulse duration. An approximation of the optimized waveform was implemented experimentally and applied to platinum disk electrodes. Surface analysis using energy-dispersive spectroscopy showed significant reduction of corrosion on the periphery of these electrodes after pulsing, compared to those pulsed with the control rectangular waveform.

  10. The early evolution of protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.; Korycansky, D. G.; Brothers, Maxwell J.; Touma, Jihad

    1994-01-01

    We consider the origin and intital growth of the disks that form around protostars during the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores. These disks are assumed to be inviscid and pressure free, and to have masses small compared to those of their central stars. We find that there exist three distinct components-an outer disk, in which shocked gas moves with comparable azimuthal and radical velocities; and inner disk, where material follows nearly circular orbits, but spirals slowly toward the star because of the drag exerted by adjacent onfalling matter, and a turbulent ring adjoining the first two regions. Early in the evolution, i.e., soon after infalling matter begins to miss the star, only the outer disk is present, and the total mass acceration rate onto the protostar is undiminished. Once the outer disk boundary grows to more than 2.9 times the stellar radius, first the ring, and then the inner disk appear. Thereafter, the radii of all three components expand as t(exp 3). The mass of the ring increase with time and is always 13% of the total mass that has fallen from the cloud. Concurrently with the buildup of the inner disk and ring, the accretion rate onto the star falls off. However, the protostellar mass continue to rise, asymptotically as t(exp 1/4). We calculated the radiated flux from the inner and outer disk components due to the release of gravitational potential energy. The flux from the inner disk is dominant and rises steeply toward the stellar surface. We also determine the surface temperature of the inner disk as a function of radius. The total disk luminosity decreases slowly with time, while the contributions from the ring and inner disk both fall as t(exp -2).

  11. Generalized Similarity for Accretion/Decretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-10-01

    Decretion (or external) disks are gas disks freely expanding to large radii due to their internal stresses. They are expected to naturally arise in tidal disruption events, around Be stars, in mass-losing post-main-sequence binaries, as a result of supernova fallback, etc. Their evolution is theoretically understood in two regimes: when the central object does not exert torque on the disk (a standard assumption for conventional accretion disks) or when no mass inflow (or outflow) occurs at the disk center. However, many astrophysical objects—circumbinary disks, Be stars, neutron stars accreting in a propeller regime, etc.—feature non-zero torque simultaneously with the non-zero accretion (or ejection of mass) at the disk center. We provide a general description for the evolution of such disks (both linear and nonlinear) in the self-similar regime, to which the disk should asymptotically converge with time. We identify a similarity parameter λ, which is uniquely related to the degree, to which the central mass accretion is suppressed by the non-zero central torque. The known decretion disk solutions correspond to the two discrete values of λ, while our new solutions cover a continuum of its physically allowed values, corresponding to either accretion or mass ejection by the central object. A direct relationship between λ and central \\dot{M} and torque is also established. We describe the time evolution of the various disk characteristics for different λ, and show that the observable properties (spectrum and luminosity evolution) of the decretion disks, in general, are different from the standard accretion disks with no central torque.

  12. DUSTY DISKS AROUND WHITE DWARFS. I. ORIGIN OF DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Ruobing; Wang Yan; Lin, D. N. C.; Liu, X.-W. E-mail: yuw123@psu.ed E-mail: liuxw@bac.pku.edu.c

    2010-06-01

    A significant fraction of the mature FGK stars have cool dusty disks at least an order of magnitude brighter than the solar system's outer zodiacal light. Since such dusts must be continually replenished, they are generally assumed to be the collisional fragments of residual planetesimals analogous to the Kuiper-Belt objects. At least 10% of solar-type stars also bear gas giant planets. The fraction of stars with known gas giants or detectable debris disks (or both) appears to increase with the stellar mass. Here, we examine the dynamical evolution of systems of long-period gas giant planets and residual planetesimals as their host stars evolve off the main sequence, lose mass, and form planetary nebula around remnant white dwarf cores. The orbits of distant gas giant planets and super-km-size planetesimals expand adiabatically. During the most intense asymptotic giant branch mass-loss phase, sub-meter-size particles migrate toward their host stars due to the strong hydrodynamical drag by the intense stellar wind. Along their migration paths, gas giant planets capture and sweep up sub-km-size planetesimals onto their mean-motion resonances. These planetesimals also acquire modest eccentricities which are determined by the mass of the perturbing planets, and the rate and speed of stellar mass loss. The swept-up planetesimals undergo disruptive collisions which lead to the production of grains with an extended size range. The radiation drag on these particles is ineffective against the planets' resonant barrier and they form 30-50 AU size rings which can effectively reprocess the stellar irradiation in the form of FIR continuum. We identify the recently discovered dust ring around the white dwarf WD 2226-210 at the center of the Helix nebula as a prototype of such disks and suggest such rings may be common.

  13. Competition for finite resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, L. Jonathan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2012-05-01

    The resources in a cell are finite, which implies that the various components of the cell must compete for resources. One such resource is the ribosomes used during translation to create proteins. Motivated by this example, we explore this competition by connecting two totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes (TASEPs) to a finite pool of particles. Expanding on our previous work, we focus on the effects on the density and current of having different entry and exit rates.

  14. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  15. An Observational Perspective of Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espaillat, C.; Muzerolle, J.; Najita, J.; Andrews, S.; Zhu, Z.; Calvet, N.; Kraus, S.; Hashimoto, J.; Kraus, A.; D'Alessio, P.

    Transitional disks are objects whose inner disk regions have undergone substantial clearing. The Spitzer Space Telescope produced detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of transitional disks that allowed us to infer their radial dust disk structure in some detail, revealing the diversity of this class of disks. The growing sample of transitional disks also opened up the possibility of demographic studies, which provided unique insights. There now exist (sub)millimeter and infrared images that confirm the presence of large clearings of dust in transitional disks. In addition, protoplanet candidates have been detected within some of these clearings. Transitional disks are thought to be a strong link to planet formation around young stars and are a key area to study if further progress is to be made on understanding the initial stages of planet formation. Here we provide a review and synthesis of transitional disk observations to date with the aim of providing timely direction to the field, which is about to undergo its next burst of growth as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reaches its full potential. We discuss what we have learned about transitional disks from SEDs, color-color diagrams, and imaging in the (sub)millimeter and infrared. We note the limitations of these techniques, particularly with respect to the sizes of the clearings currently detectable, and highlight the need for pairing broadband SEDs with multi-wavelength images to paint a more detailed picture of transitional disk structure. We review the gas in transitional disks, keeping in mind that future observations with ALMA will give us unprecedented access to gas in disks, and also observed infrared variability pointing to variable transitional disk structure, which may have implications for disks in general. We then distill the observations into constraints for the main disk-clearing mechanisms proposed to date (i.e., photoevaporation, grain growth, and companions) and

  16. Frequent Questions about the Manifest Registry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FAQs Including Can I submit multiple form samples to the EPA Registry for approval? Must I submit a continuation sheet sample to the Manifest Registry under section 262.21(d)? Can I typeset the form after I am approved to print the manifest?

  17. 40 CFR 761.208 - Obtaining manifests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.208 Obtaining manifests. (a)(1) A generator may use... print the manifest under 40 CFR 262.21 (c) and (e). A registered source may be a: (i) State agency; (ii) Commercial printer; (iii) PCB waste generator, transporter or, designated facility; or (iv) PCB waste...

  18. Teaching about Manifest Destiny: Clarifying the Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiodo, John J.

    2000-01-01

    Provides information on Manifest Destiny and the expansionist ideals of the United States, especially during the 19th century. Offers a lesson plan that will help students understand the concept of Manifest Destiny, including an assessment activity, how to expand the lesson, an appendix, and references. (CMK)

  19. [Arthrogryposis: clinical manifestations and management].

    PubMed

    Ayadi, K; Trigui, M; Abid, A; Cheniour, A; Zribi, M; Keskes, H

    2015-08-01

    Arthrogryposis is a condition existing at birth, seen in different diseases that have in common the existence of multiple joint stiffness. The clinical presentation is diversified and the functional prognosis depends on the etiology, which makes therapeutic options different from one case to another. The objective of this study was to describe clinical manifestations observed in arthrogrypotic patients and show the different therapeutic methods and functional results. This was a retrospective study over a period of 12 years from 2000 to 2012, based on clinical examinations of 23 patients with arthrogryposis. The mean age of the patients was 6.6 years. The four limbs were involved in 19 cases and only the lower limbs in four cases. The etiology was amyoplasia in nine patients, distal arthrogryposis in three, peripheral neuropathy in two, and muscular atrophy in one infantile patient. Foot deformities were observed in 22 cases, with 25 talipes equinovarus deformities (clubfoot), six convex feet, and five valgus feet. The Ponseti method was applied in 12 clubfeet with recurrence in eight cases. The other clubfeet had functional treatment and necessitated surgical release in 11 cases. Deformation of the knee was seen in 15 patients, flessum in 16 knees, restriction of flexion in eight cases, genu recurvatum in three, stiffness in extension in two, and agenesis of the patella in one case. Surgical treatment was carried out in only one case. Other cases of deformity of the knee were treated by rehabilitation with slight improvement. Deformation of the hip was seen in 15 patients, with 16 hips dislocated and four hips in flessum. The dislocation of the hip was treated orthopaedically in two cases and surgically in six cases, with reduction in all cases but persistence of stiffness. Involvement of the shoulders was observed in eight cases, the elbow in seven cases, the wrist in ten cases, and the fingers in 16 cases. The treatment was based on physical therapy and

  20. Residual stress and plastic anisotropy in indented 2024-T351 aluminum disks

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Bjorn; Prime, Michael B; Saurabh, Kabra; Brown, Donald W; Pagliaro, Pierluigi; Backlund, Peter; Shaw, Sanjiv; Criss, Everett

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proven that generating a well defined residual stress state using the indented disk approach is an excellent way to validate experimental and modeling techniques for measuring and predicting residual stresses. The previous studies dealt with indented stainless steel disks, and included experimental determination of residual stresses using the Contour Method and neutron diffraction measurements. The measured residual stress states showed good agreement between the techniques, and a Finite Element Model predicted residual stress state based upon material properties determined form standard tension and compression/tension tests was also in good agreement with the measurements. In the present work, disks of 2024-T351 Aluminum were investigated. As before, the residual stress profile was measured using neutron diffraction and the Contour Method and Finite Element Modeling was employed to predict the residual stress profile. Analysis and comparison of the three techniques were complicated by the fact that the experimental data shows evidence of plastic anisotropy and strong Bauschinger effect within the indented disks.

  1. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  2. Analytical Solution for Whirling Speeds and Mode Shapes of a Distributed-Mass Shaft With Arbitrary Rigid Disks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jong-Shyong; Lin, Foung-Tang; Shaw, Huei-Jou

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for replacing the effects of each rigid disk mounted on the spin shaft by a lumped mass together with a frequency-dependent equivalent mass moment of inertia so that the whirling motion of a rotating shaft-disk system is similar to the transverse free vibration of a stationary beam and the technique for the free vibration analysis of a stationary beam with multiple concentrated elements can be used to determine the forward and backward whirling speeds, along with mode shapes of a distributed-mass shaft carrying arbitrary rigid disks. Numerical results reveal that the characteristics of whirling motions are significantly dependent on the slopes of the associated natural mode shapes at the positions where the rigid disks are located. Furthermore, the results obtained from the presented analytical method and those obtained from existing literature or the finite element method (FEM) are in good agreement.

  3. Correlation of experimental data and three-dimensional finite element modeling of a spinning quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, W. L.; Lieu, D. K.; Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Rossing, T. D.

    A permanent magnet quadrupole spinning over an aluminum disk was constructed, and drag torque was measured for various speeds and gap sizes. The experiment was modeled using a three-dimensional finite element program. Experimental and analytical results were compared, and the effect of magnet polarity was determined.

  4. Non-Isothermal effects on Be Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R. G.; Carciofi, A. C.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the viscous decretion disk model has emerged as the new paradigm for Be star disks. In this contribution, we propose a simple analytical model to estimate the continuum infrared excess arising from these circumstellar disks, in the light of the currently accepted scenario. We demonstrate that the disk can be satisfactorily described by a two component system: an inner optically thick region, which we call the pseudo-photosphere, and a diffuse outer part. In particular, a direct connexion between the disk brightness profile and the thermal structure is derived, and then confronted to realistic numerical simulations. This result quantifies how the non-isothermality of the disk ultimately affects both infrared measured fluxes and visibilities.

  5. When did M31's disk form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Heather

    2004-07-01

    The recent discovery of THIN disk globular clusters in M31 provides a unique opportunity to determine the age of M31's disk. The globular cluster kinematics imply that the disk has not been significantly heated or destroyed by a merger since they were formed. Thus the cluster ages provide a lower limit to the disk age. This limit will complement the high-redshift data, where few disk galaxies are currently known because of their relatively low surface brighness. We propose to obtain BV ACS imaging of seven disk clusters to below the level of the horizontal branch {HB} to determine the distribution of evolved stars in the color-magnitude diagram. The contribution of evolved stars, particularly blue HB stars, is crucial to estimating the age of the globular cluster from both color-magnitude diagrams and the high S/N integrated spectra which we will obtain from the ground.

  6. Recognition of lumbar disk herniation with NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, N.I.; Genant, H.K.; Moon, K.L.; Helms, C.A.; Morris, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    Fifteen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 14 patients with herniated lumbar intervertebral disks were performed on the UCSF NMR imager. Computed tomographic (CT) scans done on a GE CT/T 8800 or comparable scanner were available at the time of NMR scan interpretation. Of the 16 posterior disk ruptures seen at CT, 12 were recognized on NMR. Diminished nucleus pulposus signal intensity was present in all ruptured disks. In one patient, NMR scans before and after chymopapain injection showed retraction of the protruding part of the disk and loss of signal intensity after chemonucleolysis. Postoperative fibrosis demonstrated by CT in one patient and at surgery in another showed intermediate to high signal intensity on NMR, easily distinguishing it from nearby thecal sac and disk. While CT remains the method of choice for evaluation of the patient with suspected lumbar disk rupture, the results of this study suggest that NMR may play a role in evaluating this common clinical problem.

  7. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  8. [Neurological manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Suárez Alvarez, Luisa; Hughes, Graham R V; Khamashta, Munther A

    2005-04-30

    Antiphospholipid syndrome can be associated with several neurological manifestations. The most common symptom is headache. It has also been associated with cognitive dysfunction, probably due to ischemia. A high prevalence of antiphospholipid antibodies has been found in patients with epilepsy and in transverse myelitis. The most common thrombotic manifestation is stroke. Venous thrombosis can also be found, yet it is less frequent. A stroke in a young person obliges to rule out the antiphospholipid syndrome. The neurological manifestations can mimic multiple sclerosis. Thus, determination of antiphospholipid antibodies is recommended in the study of patients with atypical manifestations of multiple sclerosis. Other manifestations associated with antiphospholipid antibodies include chorea, neurosensorial deafness, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and psychotic disorders.

  9. On-Disk Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolin, Patrick; Vissers, Gregal; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc

    2012-10-01

    Small and elongated, cool and dense blob-like structures are being reported with high resolution telescopes in physically different regions throughout the solar atmosphere. Their detection and the understanding of their formation, morphology, and thermodynamical characteristics can provide important information on their hosting environment, especially concerning the magnetic field, whose understanding constitutes a major problem in solar physics. An example of such blobs is coronal rain, a phenomenon of thermal non-equilibrium observed in active region loops, which consists of cool and dense chromospheric blobs falling along loop-like paths from coronal heights. So far, only off-limb coronal rain has been observed, and few reports on the phenomenon exist. In the present work, several data sets of on-disk Hα observations with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish 1- m Solar Telescope (SST) are analyzed. A special family of on-disk blobs is selected for each data set, and a statistical analysis is carried out on their dynamics, morphology, and temperature. All characteristics present distributions which are very similar to reported coronal rain statistics. We discuss possible interpretations considering other similar blob-like structures reported so far and show that a coronal rain interpretation is the most likely one. The chromospheric nature of the blobs and the projection effects (which eliminate all direct possibilities of height estimation) on one side, and their small sizes, fast dynamics, and especially their faint character (offering low contrast with the background intensity) on the other side, are found as the main causes for the absence until now of the detection of this on-disk coronal rain counterpart.

  10. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  11. ON THE FORMATION OF GALACTIC THICK DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Minchev, I.; Streich, D.; Scannapieco, C.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Martig, M.

    2015-05-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations in the Milky Way suggest that the chemically defined thick disk (stars that have high [α/Fe] ratios and are thus old) has a significantly smaller scale-length than the thin disk. This is in apparent contradiction with observations of external edge-on galaxies, where the thin and thick components have comparable scale-lengths. Moreover, while observed disks do not flare (scale-height does not increase with radius), numerical simulations suggest that disk flaring is unavoidable, resulting from both environmental effects and secular evolution. Here we address these problems by studying two different suites of simulated galactic disks formed in the cosmological context. We show that the scale-heights of coeval populations always increase with radius. However, the total population can be decomposed morphologically into thin and thick disks, which do not flare. We relate this to the disk inside-out formation, where younger populations have increasingly larger scale-lengths and flare at progressively larger radii. In this new picture, thick disks are composed of the imbedded flares of mono-age stellar populations. Assuming that disks form inside out, we predict that morphologically defined thick disks must show a decrease in age (or [α/Fe] ratios) with radius and that coeval populations should always flare. This also explains the observed inversion in the metallicity and [α/Fe] gradients for stars away from the disk midplane in the Milky Way. The results of this work are directly linked to, and can be seen as evidence of, inside-out disk growth.

  12. MOLECULAR GAS IN YOUNG DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Kiss, Cs.; Juhasz, A.; Kospal, A.; Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Henning, Th.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-10-10

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old ({approx}>8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordial origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesimals can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk of HD21997.

  13. Transonic disk accretion onto black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P. T.; Thompson, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    The solution for the radial drift velocity of thin disk accretion onto black holes must be transonic, and is analogous to the critical solution in spherical Bondi accretion, except for the presence of angular momentum. The transonic requirement yields a correct treatment of the inner region of the disk not found in the conventional Keplerian models and may lead to significantly different overall disk structures. Possible observational consequences, relevant to the black hole hypothesis for Cyg X-1 and other candidates, are discussed.

  14. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  15. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  16. Accretion disk thermal instability in galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineshige, S.; Shields, G. A.

    1990-03-01

    The nonlinear evolution and spatial propagation of the thermal instability in accretion disks in galactic nuclei are investigated. Integrations of the vertical structure of the disks are described for different alpha prescriptions, and the thermal stability is examined. Global time-dependent calculations of the unstable disks are performed which show that there are two distinct types of behavior according to the assumed prescription for the viscosity parameter: the 'purr' type and the 'roar' type. The roar type is analyzed in some detail.

  17. Meridional circulation in optically thick accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, W.; Savedoff, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal imbalances in stars due to rotation are known to drive mass motions in the meridional plane. A preliminary analytic investigation has been made of a similar effect in optically thick accretion disks using conventional thin-disk approximations. It is found that estimated circulation times can be as short as thermal timescales, resulting in rapid transport of heat and angular momentum. This indicates that the simple approximations commonly used are incomplete with regard to detailed, two-dimensional disk structure.

  18. Forced response of mistuned bladed disk assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Brian C.; Kamat, Manohar P.; Murthy, Durbha V.

    1993-01-01

    A complete analytic model of mistuned bladed disk assemblies, designed to simulate the dynamical behavior of these systems, is analyzed. The model incorporates a generalized method for describing the mistuning of the assembly through the introduction of specific mistuning modes. The model is used to develop a computational bladed disk assembly model for a series of parametric studies. Results are presented demonstrating that the response amplitudes of bladed disk assemblies depend both on the excitation mode and on the mistune mode.

  19. Transonic disk accretion onto black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P. T.; Thompson, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    The solution for the radial drift velocity of thin disk accretion onto black holes must be transonic, and is analogous to the critical solution in spherical Bondi accretion, except for the presence of angular momentum. The transonic requirement yields a correct treatment of the inner region of the disk not found in the conventional Keplerian models and may lead to significantly different overall disk structures. Possible observational consequences, relevant to the black hole hypothesis for Cyg X-1 and other candidates, are discussed.

  20. Vibrations of Bladed Disk Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-29

    OF PI"iPONMING ONGANIZATION W OFFICE SYMSOL 7a. NAPAG d1rmoNiTo.iNG OAGANIZATION Purdue Research Foundation LOOAGSS IC41Y. Staff .A&R ZIP Code) 7b...8217 PRF grant #670-1667. The objective of the proposed research was to gain a fundamental understanding of how and why periodically configured mechanical...bladed-disk research literature, numerical studies which show that uneven amplitudes of vibration in perturbed cyclic systems can arise both under strong

  1. Optical disk based neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Taiwei; Choi, Kyusun; Wu, Shudong; Xu, Xin; Yu, Francis T. S.

    1989-11-01

    An optical disk (OD)-based optical neural network architecture for high-speed and large-capacity associative processing is proposed. The information storage by the OD is described, and an optical neural network using an OD for large-capacity storage of interconnection weight matrices (IWMs) is shown and discussed. The ways that optical interconnections are established between the IWM and the input pattern is shown, as is the way that the loop is closed. The operation of the OD in the network is examined.

  2. Giant Exoplanet and Debris Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-11

    This artist's rendering shows a giant exoplanet causing small bodies to collide in a disk of dust. A study in The Astronomical Journal finds that giant exoplanets with long-period orbits are more likely to be found around young stars that have a disk of dust and debris than those without disks. The study focused on planets more than five times the mass of Jupiter. The astronomers are conducting the largest survey to date of stars with dusty debris disks, and finding the best evidence yet that giant planets are responsible for keeping that material in check. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA22082

  3. Stellar Multiplicity in the DEBRIS disk sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.; Duchene, Gaspard; Tom, Henry; Kennedy, Grant; Matthews, Brenda C.; Butner, Harold M.

    2015-01-01

    Circumstellar disks around young stars serve as the sites of planet formation. A common outcome of the star formation process is that of stellar binary systems. How does the presence of multiple stars affect the properties of disks, and thus of planet formation? To examine the frequency of disks around stellar binaries we carried out a multiplicity survey on stars in the DEBRIS sample. This sample consists of 451 stars of spectral types A-M observed with the Herschel Space Telescope. We have examined the stellar multiplicity of this sample by gathering information from the literature and performing an adaptive optics imaging survey at Lick Observatory. We identify 189 (42%) binary or multiple star systems.In our sample, we find that debris disks are less common around binaries than single stars, though the disk detection frequency is comparable among A stars regardless of multiplicity. Nevertheless, the period distribution of disk-bearing binaries is consistent with that of non-disk binaries and with comparison field samples. Although the frequency of disk-bearing binaries may be lower than in single star systems, the processes behind disk formation are comparable among both single and multiple-star populations.This work is supported in part by a Chile Fondecy grant #3130520.

  4. Disk's Spiral Arms Point to Possible Planets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Simulations of young stellar systems suggest that planets embedded in a circumstellar disk can produce many distinctive structures, including rings, gaps and spiral arms. This video compares comput...

  5. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  6. Modeling sgB[e] Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, P.; Feldmeier, A.; Krtička, J.

    2017-02-01

    During their evolution, massive stars are characterized by a significant loss of mass either via spherically symmetric stellar winds or by aspherical mass-loss mechanisms, namely outflowing equatorial disks. However, the scenario that leads to the formation of a disk or rings of gas and dust around these objects is still under debate. Is it a viscous disk or an ouftlowing disk-forming wind or some other mechanism? It is also unclear how various physical mechanisms that act on the circumstellar environment of the stars affect its shape, density, kinematic, and thermal structure. We assume that the disk-forming mechanism is a viscous transport within an equatorial outflowing disk of a rapidly or even critically rotating star. We study the hydrodynamic and thermal structure of optically thick dense parts of outflowing circumstellar disks that may form around, e.g., Be stars, sgB[e] stars, or Pop III stars. We calculate self-consistent time-dependent models of the inner dense region of the disk that is strongly affected either by irradiation from the central star and by contributions of viscous heating effects. We also simulate the dynamic effects of collision between expanding ejecta of supernovae and circumstellar disks that may be form in sgB[e] stars and, e.g., LBVs or Pop III stars.

  7. The Mass-independence of Specific Star Formation Rates in Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Louis E.; Kelson, Daniel D.; Dressler, Alan; Poggianti, Bianca; Gladders, Michael D.; Oemler, Augustus, Jr.; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2014-04-01

    The slope of the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (the SFR "Main Sequence"; SFR-M *) is not quite unity: specific star formation rates (SFR/M *) are weakly but significantly anti-correlated with M *. Here we demonstrate that this trend may simply reflect the well-known increase in bulge mass-fractions—portions of a galaxy not forming stars—with M *. Using a large set of bulge/disk decompositions and SFR estimates derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we show that re-normalizing SFR by disk stellar mass (sSFRdisk ≡ SFR/M *, disk) reduces the M * dependence of SF efficiency by ~0.25 dex per dex, erasing it entirely in some subsamples. Quantitatively, we find log sSFRdisk-log M * to have a slope βdisk in [ - 0.20, 0.00] ± 0.02 (depending on the SFR estimator and Main Sequence definition) for star-forming galaxies with M * >= 1010 M ⊙ and bulge mass-fractions B/T <~ 0.6, generally consistent with a pure-disk control sample (βcontrol = -0.05 ± 0.04). That langSFR/M *, diskrang is (largely) independent of host mass for star-forming disks has strong implications for aspects of galaxy evolution inferred from any SFR-M * relation, including manifestations of "mass quenching" (bulge growth), factors shaping the star-forming stellar mass function (uniform dlog M */dt for low-mass, disk-dominated galaxies), and diversity in star formation histories (dispersion in SFR(M *, t)). Our results emphasize the need to treat galaxies as composite systems—not integrated masses—in observational and theoretical work.

  8. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  9. Systemic manifestations of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gaddam, Samson Sujit Kumar; Buell, Thomas; Robertson, Claudia S

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects functioning of various organ systems in the absence of concomitant non-neurologic organ injury or systemic infection. The systemic manifestations of TBI can be mild or severe and can present in the acute phase or during the recovery phase. Non-neurologic organ dysfunction can manifest following mild TBI or severe TBI. The pathophysiology of systemic manifestations following TBI is multifactorial and involves an effect on the autonomic nervous system, involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, release of inflammatory mediators, and treatment modalities used for TBI. Endocrine dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, and respiratory manifestations are common following TBI. The influence of TBI on systemic immune response, coagulation cascade, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, and other systems is becoming more evident through animal studies and clinical trials. Systemic manifestations can independently act as risk factors for mortality and morbidity following TBI. Some conditions like neurogenic pulmonary edema and disseminated intravascular coagulation can adversely affect the outcome. Early recognition and treatment of systemic manifestations may improve the clinical outcome following TBI. Further studies are required especially in the field of neuroimmunology to establish the role of various biochemical cascades, not only in the pathophysiology of TBI but also in its systemic manifestations and outcome.

  10. Nickel Base Superalloy Turbine Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P. (Inventor); Gauda, John (Inventor); Telesman, Ignacy (Inventor); Kantzos, Pete T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A low solvus, high refractory alloy having unusually versatile processing mechanical property capabilities for advanced disks and rotors in gas turbine engines. The nickel base superalloy has a composition consisting essentially of, in weight percent, 3.0-4.0 N, 0.02-0.04 B, 0.02-0.05 C, 12.0-14.0 Cr, 19.0-22.0 Co, 2.0-3.5 Mo, greater than 1.0 to 2.1 Nb, 1.3 to 2.1 Ta,3.04.OTi,4.1 to 5.0 W, 0.03-0.06 Zr, and balance essentially Ni and incidental impurities. The superalloy combines ease of processing with high temperature capabilities to be suitable for use in various turbine engine disk, impeller, and shaft applications. The Co and Cr levels of the superalloy can provide low solvus temperature for high processing versatility. The W, Mo, Ta, and Nb refractory element levels of the superalloy can provide sustained strength, creep, and dwell crack growth resistance at high temperatures.

  11. Secular evolution in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, J. H.

    2013-05-01

    The detailed study of the different structural components of nearby galaxies can supply vital information about the secular, or internal, evolution of these galaxies which they may have undergone since their formation. We highlight a series of new studies based on the analysis of mid-infrared images of over 2000 local galaxies which we are collecting within the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S^4G). In particular, we discuss new results on the thick and thin disk components of galaxies, which turn out to be roughly equally massive, and whose properties indicate that the thick disks mostly formed in situ, and to a lesser degree as a result of galaxy-galaxy interactions and secular evolution. We then briefly review recent research into rings in galaxies, which are common and closely linked to secular evolution of galaxies. Finally, we report on the research into local galaxy morphology, kinematics and stellar populations that we will perform over the coming four years within the EU-funded initial training network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of GALaxies).

  12. ON THE TRANSITIONAL DISK CLASS: LINKING OBSERVATIONS OF T TAURI STARS AND PHYSICAL DISK MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Espaillat, C.; Andrews, S.; Qi, C.; Wilner, D.; Ingleby, L.; Calvet, N.; Hernandez, J.; Furlan, E.; D'Alessio, P.; Muzerolle, J. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dwilner@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: Elise.Furlan@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: muzerol@stsci.edu

    2012-03-10

    Two decades ago 'transitional disks' (TDs) described spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of T Tauri stars with small near-IR excesses, but significant mid- and far-IR excesses. Many inferred this indicated dust-free holes in disks possibly cleared by planets. Recently, this term has been applied disparately to objects whose Spitzer SEDs diverge from the expectations for a typical full disk (FD). Here, we use irradiated accretion disk models to fit the SEDs of 15 such disks in NGC 2068 and IC 348. One group has a 'dip' in infrared emission while the others' continuum emission decreases steadily at all wavelengths. We find that the former have an inner disk hole or gap at intermediate radii in the disk and we call these objects 'transitional disks' and 'pre-transitional disks' (PTDs), respectively. For the latter group, we can fit these SEDs with FD models and find that millimeter data are necessary to break the degeneracy between dust settling and disk mass. We suggest that the term 'transitional' only be applied to objects that display evidence for a radical change in the disk's radial structure. Using this definition, we find that TDs and PTDs tend to have lower mass accretion rates than FDs and that TDs have lower accretion rates than PTDs. These reduced accretion rates onto the star could be linked to forming planets. Future observations of TDs and PTDs will allow us to better quantify the signatures of planet formation in young disks.

  13. The physical and chemical evolution of protostellar disks. The growth of protostellar disks: Progress to date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1993-01-01

    This study constitutes one part of our multi-disciplinary approach to the evolution of planet-forming disks. The goal is to establish the disks' thermal and mechanical properties as they grow by the infall of their parent interstellar clouds. Thus far, significant advances toward establishing the evolving surface density of such disks was made.

  14. Numerical Studies on Time-Varying Stiffness of Disk-Drum Type Rotor with Bolt Loosening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhaoye; Chu, Fulei

    2015-07-01

    Disk-drum type rotors are widely used in industry for their high stiffness and low weight properties. In disk-drum type rotors, the adjacent disks and drums are commonly connected by bolted joints. Those rotating joint interfaces are subjected to numerous combinations of loads during normal operation, where loosening of the connecting bolts might occur. The bolt loosening will change the local stiffness of the rotor, which in turn affect the rotor dynamics and even result in structural failures. In this paper, the local stiffness of a disk- drum rotor with bolt loosening is investigated numerically. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model for the bolted disk-drum joint is established in ANSYS, where the bolt loosening is simulated by reducing the preloads of certain bolts, and removing those bolts as the limiting case. Simulations are performed on the FE model to evaluate the joint behaviour under static loads. Periodic variations of the joint deflections with respect to the rotation angle of the shaft are obtained, which implies the appearance of the time-varying local stiffness in the rotor system. The studies in this paper help accurate prediction of the rotor dynamics and early detection of bolt loosening.

  15. Alignments Of Black Holes with Their Warped Accretion Disks and Episodic Lifetimes of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Warped accretion disks have attracted intense attention because of their critical role in shaping the spin of supermassive massive black holes (SMBHs) through the Bardeen-Petterson effect, a general relativistic effect that leads to final alignments or anti-alignments between black holes and warped accretion disks. We study such alignment processes by explicitly taking into account the finite sizes of accretion disks and the episodic lifetimes of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that delineate the duration of gas fueling onto accretion disks. We employ an approximate global model to simulate the evolution of accretion disks, allowing us to determine the gravitomagnetic torque that drives the alignments in a simple way. We then track down the evolutionary paths for mass and spin of black holes both in a single activity episode and over a series of episodes. Given with randomly and isotropically oriented gas fueling over episodes, we calculate the spin evolution with different episodic lifetimes and find that it is quite sensitive to the lifetimes. We therefore propose that the spin distribution of SMBHs can place constraints on the episodic lifetimes of AGNs and vice versa. The applications of our results on the observed spin distributions of SMBHs and the observed episodic lifetimes of AGNs are discussed, although both measurements at present are too ambiguous for us to draw a firm conclusion. Our prescription can be easily incorporated into semi-analytic models for black hole growth and spin evolution.

  16. Clumpy Disks as a Testbed for Feedback-regulated Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio; Tamburello, Valentina; Lupi, Alessandro; Keller, Ben; Wadsley, James; Madau, Piero

    2016-10-01

    We study the dependence of fragmentation in massive gas-rich galaxy disks at z > 1 on stellar feedback schemes and hydrodynamical solvers, employing the GASOLINE2 SPH code and the lagrangian mesh-less code GIZMO in finite mass mode. Non-cosmological galaxy disk runs with the standard delayed-cooling blastwave feedback are compared with runs adopting a new superbubble feedback, which produces winds by modeling the detailed physics of supernova-driven bubbles and leads to efficient self-regulation of star formation. We find that, with blastwave feedback, massive star-forming clumps form in comparable number and with very similar masses in GASOLINE2 and GIZMO. Typical clump masses are in the range 107-108 M ⊙, lower than in most previous works, while giant clumps with masses above 109 M ⊙ are exceedingly rare. By contrast, superbubble feedback does not produce massive star-forming bound clumps as galaxies never undergo a phase of violent disk instability. In this scheme, only sporadic, unbound star-forming overdensities lasting a few tens of Myr can arise, triggered by non-linear perturbations from massive satellite companions. We conclude that there is severe tension between explaining massive star-forming clumps observed at z > 1 primarily as the result of disk fragmentation driven by gravitational instability and the prevailing view of feedback-regulated galaxy formation. The link between disk stability and star formation efficiency should thus be regarded as a key testing ground for galaxy formation theory.

  17. Vibration Analysis of a Rotating FGM Thermoelastic Axisymmetric Circular Disk Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J. N.; Sharma, Dinkar; Kumar, Sheo

    2013-04-01

    This paper studies the thermoelastic displacements, stresses, and strains in a thin, circular, functionally graded material (FGM) disk subjected to thermal load by taking into account an inertia force due to rotation of the disk. The material properties of the FGM disk have been assumed to vary exponentially in the radial direction. Based on the two-dimensional thermoelasticity theory, the axisymmetric problem is formulated in terms of a second-order ordinary differential equation, which is solved by employing the finite element method (FEM). The temperature profile has been modeled with the help of a heat conduction equation. The model has been solved numerically to attain stresses, strains, and displacements in an Al2O3/Al FGM circular disk and the computer-simulated results are presented graphically. The effect of Kibel Number on stresses, strains, and displacement has also been discussed. The numerical results reveal that these quantities are significantly influenced by temperature distribution, thickness, and angular speed of the disk.

  18. ALIGNMENTS OF BLACK HOLES WITH THEIR WARPED ACCRETION DISKS AND EPISODIC LIFETIMES OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Qiu, Jie; Cheng, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Warped accretion disks have attracted intense attention because of their critical role in shaping the spin of supermassive massive black holes (SMBHs) through the Bardeen–Petterson effect, a general relativistic effect that leads to final alignments or anti-alignments between black holes and warped accretion disks. We study such alignment processes by explicitly taking into account the finite sizes of accretion disks and the episodic lifetimes of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) that delineate the duration of gas fueling onto accretion disks. We employ an approximate global model to simulate the evolution of accretion disks, allowing us to determine the gravitomagnetic torque that drives the alignments in a simple way. We then track down the evolutionary paths for mass and spin of black holes both in a single activity episode and over a series of episodes. Given with randomly and isotropically oriented gas fueling over episodes, we calculate the spin evolution with different episodic lifetimes and find that it is quite sensitive to the lifetimes. We therefore propose that the spin distribution of SMBHs can place constraints on the episodic lifetimes of AGNs and vice versa. The applications of our results on the observed spin distributions of SMBHs and the observed episodic lifetimes of AGNs are discussed, although both measurements at present are too ambiguous for us to draw a firm conclusion. Our prescription can be easily incorporated into semi-analytic models for black hole growth and spin evolution.

  19. The influence of stiffening ribs on the natural frequencies of butterfly valve disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursoniu, C.; Pepa, D.; Tufoi, M.; Gillich, R. N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a study regarding the influence of the ribs shape on the dynamic behavior of butterfly valves, in terms of natural frequency variation, is presented. This behavior is important because the valve disk vibrates due to fluid flow when it is fully or partially open. If the disk is “locked in”, which means that frequency of oscillation is equal to the frequency of vortex shedding, the negative effect of resonance occurs, and harming of the structure is expected. The phenomenon is undesired and can be avoided by designing the disk in order to have the natural frequencies higher as the shedding frequencies. The study is performed via the finite element method (FEM) and first concerns in finding the proper disk thickness for the valve’s geometrical input parameters by static analysis. Afterward, modal analysis on disks with stiffness ribs of various shapes and positions is made. As a result, guidelines for designing the disk’s stiffening elements are provided.

  20. Improving the thin-disk models of circumstellar disk evolution. The 2+1-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav N.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks of gas and dust are naturally formed from contracting pre-stellar molecular cores during the star formation process. To study various dynamical and chemical processes that take place in circumstellar disks prior to their dissipation and transition to debris disks, the appropriate numerical models capable of studying the long-term disk chemodynamical evolution are required. Aims: We improve the frequently used 2D hydrodynamical model for disk evolution in the thin-disk limit by employing a better calculation of the disk thermal balance and adding a reconstruction of the disk vertical structure. Together with the hydrodynamical processes, the thermal evolution is of great importance since it influences the strength of gravitational instability and the chemical evolution of the disk. Methods: We present a new 2+1-dimensional numerical hydrodynamics model of circumstellar disk evolution, where the thin-disk model is complemented with the procedure for calculating the vertical distributions of gas volume density and temperature in the disk. The reconstruction of the disk vertical structure is performed at every time step via the solution of the time-dependent radiative transfer equations coupled to the equation of the vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. Results: We perform a detailed comparison between circumstellar disks produced with our previous 2D model and with the improved 2+1D approach. The structure and evolution of resulting disks, including the differences in temperatures, densities, disk masses, and protostellar accretion rates, are discussed in detail. Conclusions: The new 2+1D model yields systematically colder disks, while the in-falling parental clouds are warmer. Both effects act to increase the strength of disk gravitational instability and, as a result, the number of gravitationally bound fragments that form in the disk via gravitational fragmentation as compared to the purely 2D thin-disk simulations with a simplified