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Sample records for finite elements method

  1. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  2. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  3. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  4. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  5. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  6. Finite Element Methods: Principles for Their Selection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    the finite element methods. 39 Various statements in the literature that certain mixed methods work well inspite of the fact that the LBB (BB...method, displacement and mixed methods , various adaptive approaches, etc. The examples discussed in Sections 2 and 3 show that the same computational...performance and their relation to mixed methods , SIAM J. Num. Anal., to appear. 5. F. Brezzi, On the existence uniqueness and approximation of saddle-point

  7. Finite element methods for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    An explicit finite element based solution procedure for solving the equations of compressible viscous high speed flow is presented. The method uses domain splitting to advance the solution with different timesteps on different portions of the mesh. For steady inviscid flows, adaptive mesh refinement procedures are successfully employed to enhance the definition of discontinuities. Preliminary ideas on the application of adaptive mesh refinement to the solution of problems involving steady viscous flow are presented. Sample timings are given for the performance of the finite element code on modern supercomputers.

  8. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  9. Gauge finite element method for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Weinan; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2000-12-01

    A finite element method for computing viscous incompressible flows based on the gauge formulation introduced in [Weinan E, Liu J-G. Gauge method for viscous incompressible flows. Journal of Computational Physics (submitted)] is presented. This formulation replaces the pressure by a gauge variable. This new gauge variable is a numerical tool and differs from the standard gauge variable that arises from decomposing a compressible velocity field. It has the advantage that an additional boundary condition can be assigned to the gauge variable, thus eliminating the issue of a pressure boundary condition associated with the original primitive variable formulation. The computational task is then reduced to solving standard heat and Poisson equations, which are approximated by straightforward, piecewise linear (or higher-order) finite elements. This method can achieve high-order accuracy at a cost comparable with that of solving standard heat and Poisson equations. It is naturally adapted to complex geometry and it is much simpler than traditional finite element methods for incompressible flows. Several numerical examples on both structured and unstructured grids are presented. Copyright

  10. Finite element substructuring methods for composite mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Finite element substructuring strategies are presented to obtain numerical solutions for three typical problems of interest to the composites community: (1) impact and toughness characterization of composites using Charpy's impact test specimen; (2) free-edge stress analysis of composite laminates; and (3) fracture toughness predictions of composites for individual and combined fracture of modes I, II, and III. The key issue common to these problems is the presence of singular or near singular stress fields. The regions prone to see steep stress gradients are substructured with progressively refined meshes to study the local response simultaneously with the global response. The results from the select examples indicate that finite element substructuring methods are computationally effective for composite singularity mechanics.

  11. Mixed Finite Element Method for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Arbogast, T.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium. Therefore, a numerical method must also carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. The finite element framework provides support for additional analysis of error and convergence. Moreover, both mesh refinement and anisotropy are naturally incorporated into finite elements. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. Mixed methods also produce discretely conservative fluxes that are required for the transport problem to remains stable without violating conservation of mass. Based preliminary investigations in 1D and derived energy estimates, we present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, using novel elements of lowest order and

  12. Iterative methods for mixed finite element equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.; Nagtegaal, J. C.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    Iterative strategies for the solution of indefinite system of equations arising from the mixed finite element method are investigated in this paper with application to linear and nonlinear problems in solid and structural mechanics. The augmented Hu-Washizu form is derived, which is then utilized to construct a family of iterative algorithms using the displacement method as the preconditioner. Two types of iterative algorithms are implemented. Those are: constant metric iterations which does not involve the update of preconditioner; variable metric iterations, in which the inverse of the preconditioning matrix is updated. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the numerical performance with application to linear and nonlinear model problems.

  13. Transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Koji; Nishio, Takayuki; Yamada, Takashi ); Kawase, Yoshihiro . Dept. of Information Science)

    1999-05-01

    For the next generation of high speed railway systems and automobiles new braking systems are currently under development. These braking systems take into account the eddy currents, which are produced by the movement of the conductor in the magnetic field. For their optimum design, it is necessary to know the distribution of eddy currents in the moving conductor. The finite element method (FEM) is often used to simulate them. Here, transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor is presented. Here the magnetic vector potential is interpolated at the upwind position and the time derivative term is discretized by the backward difference method. As a result, the system matrix becomes symmetric and the ICCG method is applicable to solve the matrix. This method is used to solve an eddy current rail brake system. The results demonstrate that this approach is suitable to solve transient problems involving movement.

  14. Mixed Finite Element Methods for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium so must carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. We present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, we present novel elements of lowest order and compatible with both Darcy and Stokes flow Finally, we present our 2D mixed FEM code result for solving Stokes and Darcy flow as well as the coupled Darcy-Stokes system the mid-ocean ridge or corner flow problem.

  15. Immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Adrian M.; Liu, Wing K.

    2013-07-01

    A unique simulation technique has been developed capable of modeling electric field induced detection of biomolecules such as viruses, at room temperatures where thermal fluctuations must be considered. The proposed immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method couples electrokinetics with fluctuating hydrodynamics to study the motion and deformation of flexible objects immersed in a suspending medium under an applied electric field. The force induced on an arbitrary object due to an electric field is calculated based on the continuum electromechanics and the Maxwell stress tensor. The thermal fluctuations are included in the Navier-Stokes fluid equations via the stochastic stress tensor. Dielectrophoretic and fluctuating forces acting on the particle are coupled through the fluid-structure interaction force calculated within the surrounding environment. This method was used to perform concentration and retention efficacy analysis of nanoscale biosensors using gold particles of various sizes. The analysis was also applied to a human papillomavirus.

  16. Finite element methods in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Finite-element methodology specific to the analysis of fracture mechanics problems is reviewed. Primary emphasis is on the important algorithmic developments which have enhanced the numerical modeling of fracture processes. Methodologies to address elastostatic problems in two and three dimensions, elastodynamic problems, elastoplastic problems, special considerations for three-dimensional nonlinear problems, and the modeling of stable crack growth are reviewed. In addition, the future needs of the fracture community are discussed and open questions are identified.

  17. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  18. Improved finite-element methods for rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the research directed at improving finite-element methods for rotorcraft airframes is presented. The development of a modification to the finite element method which eliminates interelement discontinuities is covered. The following subject areas are discussed: geometric entities, interelement continuity, dependent rotational degrees of freedom, and adaptive numerical integration. This new methodology is being implemented as an anisotropic, curvilinear, p-version, beam, shell, and brick finite element program.

  19. Superconvergence in the Generalized Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Galerkin method for elliptic equations based on tensor products of piecewise polynomials. RAIRO Anal. Numer., 8:61– 66, 1974. [19] M. Kř́ıžek...London, 1986. [22] P. Lesaint and M. Zlámal. Superconvergence of the gradient of finite ele- ment solutions. RAIRO Anal. Numer., 13:139–166, 1979. [23] Q

  20. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  1. Leapfrog/Finite Element Method for Fractional Diffusion Equation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhengang; Zheng, Yunying

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a fully discrete leapfrog/Galerkin finite element method for the numerical solution of the space fractional order (fractional for simplicity) diffusion equation. The generalized fractional derivative spaces are defined in a bounded interval. And some related properties are further discussed for the following finite element analysis. Then the fractional diffusion equation is discretized in space by the finite element method and in time by the explicit leapfrog scheme. For the resulting fully discrete, conditionally stable scheme, we prove an L 2-error bound of finite element accuracy and of second order in time. Numerical examples are included to confirm our theoretical analysis. PMID:24955431

  2. Cracked finite elements proposed for NASTRAN. [based on application of finite element method to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberson, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The recent introduction of special crack-tip singularity elements, usually referred to as cracked elements, has brought the power and flexibility of the finite-element method to bear much more effectively on fracture mechanics problems. This paper recalls the development of two cracked elements and presents the results of some applications proving their accuracy and economy. Judging from the available literature on numerical methods in fracture mechanics, it seems clear that the elements described have been used more extensively than any others in practical fracture mechanics applications.

  3. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  4. Adaptive finite element methods in electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gavaghan, David J; Gillow, Kathryn; Süli, Endre

    2006-12-05

    In this article, we review some of our previous work that considers the general problem of numerical simulation of the currents at microelectrodes using an adaptive finite element approach. Microelectrodes typically consist of an electrode embedded (or recessed) in an insulating material. For all such electrodes, numerical simulation is made difficult by the presence of a boundary singularity at the electrode edge (where the electrode meets the insulator), manifested by the large increase in the current density at this point, often referred to as the edge effect. Our approach to overcoming this problem has involved the derivation of an a posteriori bound on the error in the numerical approximation for the current that can be used to drive an adaptive mesh-generation algorithm, allowing calculation of the quantity of interest (the current) to within a prescribed tolerance. We illustrate the generic applicability of the approach by considering a broad range of steady-state applications of the technique.

  5. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  6. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  7. Optimal least-squares finite element method for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal least squares finite element method is proposed for two dimensional and three dimensional elliptic problems and its advantages are discussed over the mixed Galerkin method and the usual least squares finite element method. In the usual least squares finite element method, the second order equation (-Delta x (Delta u) + u = f) is recast as a first order system (-Delta x p + u = f, Delta u - p = 0). The error analysis and numerical experiment show that, in this usual least squares finite element method, the rate of convergence for flux p is one order lower than optimal. In order to get an optimal least squares method, the irrotationality Delta x p = 0 should be included in the first order system.

  8. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  9. An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    the method . Using the above definitions , the weak statement of the non-linear local problem at the kth 4 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0305 An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations Carlos Duarte UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHAMPAIGN...14-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Adaptive Multiscale Generalized Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  10. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  11. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  12. Least-squares finite element methods for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Carey, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    A method based on backward finite differencing in time and a least-squares finite element scheme for first-order systems of partial differential equations in space is applied to the Euler equations for gas dynamics. The scheme minimizes the L-sq-norm of the residual within each time step. The method naturally generates numerical dissipation proportional to the time step size. An implicit method employing linear elements has been implemented and proves robust. For high-order elements, computed solutions based on the L-sq method may have oscillations for calculations at similar time step sizes. To overcome this difficulty, a scheme which minimizes the weighted H1-norm of the residual is proposed and leads to a successful scheme with high-degree elements. Finally, a conservative least-squares finite element method is also developed. Numerical results for two-dimensional problems are given to demonstrate the shock resolution of the methods and compare different approaches.

  13. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  14. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  15. An adaptive discontinuous finite element method for the transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, J.; Walter, A.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we introduce a discontinuous finite element method. In our approach, it is possible to combine the advantages of finite element and finite difference methods. The main ingredients are numerical flux approximation and local orthogonal basis functions. The scheme is defined on arbitrary triangulations and two different error indicators are derived. Especially the second one is closely connected to our approach and able to handle arbitrary varying flow directions. Numerical results are given for boundary value problems in two dimensions. They demonstrate the performance of the scheme, combined with the two error indicators.

  16. Finite Element Method for Capturing Ultra-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    While finite element methods are used extensively by researchers solving computational fluid dynamics in fields other than astrophysics, their use in astrophysical fluid simulations has been predominantly overlooked. Current simulations using other methods such as finite difference and finite volume (based on finite difference) have shown remarkable results, but these methods are limited by their fundamental properties in aspects that are important for simulations with complex geometries and widely varying spatial and temporal scale differences. We have explored the use of finite element methods for astrophysical fluids in order to establish the validity of using such methods in astrophysical environments. We present our numerical technique applied to solving ultra-relativistic (Lorentz Factor Gamma >> 1) shocks which are prevalent in astrophysical studies including relativistic jets and gamma-ray burst studies. We show our finite element formulation applied to simulations where the Lorentz factor ranges up to 2236 and demonstrate its stability in solving ultra-relativistic flows. Our numerical method is based on the Flowfield Dependent Variation (FDV) Method, unique in that numerical diffusion is derived from physical parameters rather than traditional artificial viscosity methods. Numerical instabilities account for most of the difficulties when capturing shocks in this regime. Our method results in stable solutions and accurate results as compared with other methods.

  17. Analysis of the Performance of Mixed Finite Element Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    October 1986 SUMMARY The initial goal of this project is to analyze various mixed methods based on the p- and h-p versions of the finite element methods...The convergence of mixed methods depends on two factors: (1) Approximability of polynomial spaces used (2) Stability. In the past year, the question...significant portion of the research is geared towards the investigation of mixed methods based on the ’p’ and ’h-p’ versions of the finite element method

  18. Radiosity algorithms using higher order finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Troutman, R.; Max, N.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the current radiosity algorithms create a piecewise constant approximation to the actual radiosity. Through interpolation and extrapolation, a continuous solution is obtained. An accurate solution is found by increasing the number of patches which describe the scene. This has the effect of increasing the computation time as well as the memory requirements. By using techniques found in the finite element method, we can incorporate an interpolation function directly into our form factor computation. We can then use less elements to achieve a more accurate solution. Two algorithms, derived from the finite element method, are described and analyzed.

  19. A finite element method to study multimaterial wind towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal-Faria, P.; Dias, C.; Oliveira, M.; Alves, N.

    2017-07-01

    Wind towers are used to produce electrical energy from the wind. A significant number of towers is manufactured using tubular separately steel or concrete, having limitations such as maximum diameter and height imposed essentially by transportation limitations. Developed computational studies on structural design of towers have been mainly focused on a single material. This investigation aims to develop a finite element method able to study structural design of wind towers combining different materials. The finite element model combines solid and shell elements encompassing different geometries. Several case studies are considered to validate the proposed method and accurate results are obtained.

  20. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  1. The Constraint Method for Solid Finite Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    Sciences 13 . NUMBER S Bolling Air Force Base, DC 20332 - -Jfi’ 14. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(if different from Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CVASS...1- 4)Q2 (n) (’+C) Higher degree elements add edge modes, face modes and internal modes. More details are given in [12, 13 ]. triangular prism A...23) N2 (L2 , L3)(l-z) edge u (31) N2 (L3 ’ L)(1-z) nodes s u s (45). N2 (L1, L2 )z uso (56) N2 (L2, L3 )z K - 13 - nodal variable shape function u

  2. A weak Galerkin generalized multiscale finite element method

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we propose a general framework for weak Galerkin generalized multiscale (WG-GMS) finite element method for the elliptic problems with rapidly oscillating or high contrast coefficients. This general WG-GMS method features in high order accuracy on general meshes and can work with multiscale basis derived by different numerical schemes. A special case is studied under this WG-GMS framework in which the multiscale basis functions are obtained by solving local problem with the weak Galerkin finite element method. Convergence analysis and numerical experiments are obtained for the special case.

  3. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  4. Finite element method for non-linear dispersive wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jung-Yu; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the finite element method for the analysis of the short wave problem expressed by the Boussinesq equation. The Boussinesq equation considers the effect of wave crest curvature. The standard Galerkin finite element method is employed for the spatial discretization using the triangular finite element based on the linear interpolation function. The combination of the explicit and the quasi-explicit schemes-- i.e., the explicit scheme for the continuum equation and the quasi-explicit scheme for the momentum equation--is employed for the discretization in time. To show the applicability of the present method to the practical problem, the simulation of wave propagation in one-dimensional and two-dimensional channel flows is carried out. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results being. The practical example for Miyako Bay is presented.

  5. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  6. Finite element methods on supercomputers - The scatter-problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Certain problems arise in connection with the use of supercomputers for the implementation of finite-element methods. These problems are related to the desirability of utilizing the power of the supercomputer as fully as possible for the rapid execution of the required computations, taking into account the gain in speed possible with the aid of pipelining operations. For the finite-element method, the time-consuming operations may be divided into three categories. The first two present no problems, while the third type of operation can be a reason for the inefficient performance of finite-element programs. Two possibilities for overcoming certain difficulties are proposed, giving attention to a scatter-process.

  7. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  8. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  9. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  10. Engineering and Design: Geotechnical Analysis by the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    used it to determine stresses and movements in embank- ments, and Reyes and Deer described its application to analysis of underground openings in rock...36 Hughes, T. J. R. (1987). The Finite Element Reyes , S. F., and Deene, D. K. (1966). “Elastic Method, Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element...SM4), 1,435-1,457. Fernando Dams During the Earthquakes of February Davis, E. H., and Poulos, H. G. (1972). “Rate of Report EERC-73-2, Berkeley, CA

  11. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    SciTech Connect

    Garikipati, Krishna.; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  12. Coupling finite element and spectral methods: First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardi, Christine; Debit, Naima; Maday, Yvon

    1987-01-01

    A Poisson equation on a rectangular domain is solved by coupling two methods: the domain is divided in two squares, a finite element approximation is used on the first square and a spectral discretization is used on the second one. Two kinds of matching conditions on the interface are presented and compared. In both cases, error estimates are proved.

  13. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  14. PWSCC Assessment by Using Extended Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Suk

    2015-12-01

    The head penetration nozzle of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) is known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) due to the welding-induced residual stress. Especially, the J-groove dissimilar metal weld regions have received many attentions in the previous studies. However, even though several advanced techniques such as weight function and finite element alternating methods have been introduced to predict the occurrence of PWSCC, there are still difficulties in respect of applicability and efficiency. In this study, the extended finite element method (XFEM), which allows convenient crack element modeling by enriching degree of freedom (DOF) with special displacement function, was employed to evaluate structural integrity of the CRDM head penetration nozzle. The resulting stress intensity factors of surface cracks were verified for the reliability of proposed method through the comparison with those suggested in the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) code. The detailed results from the FE analyses are fully discussed in the manuscript.

  15. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  16. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  17. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  18. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  19. Finite element methods for integrated aerodynamic heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peraire, J.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past few years finite element based procedures for the solution of high speed viscous compressible flows were developed. The objective of this research is to build upon the finite element concepts which have already been demonstrated and to develop these ideas to produce a method which is applicable to the solution of large scale practical problems. The problems of interest range from three dimensional full vehicle Euler simulations to local analysis of three-dimensional viscous laminar flow. Transient Euler flow simulations involving moving bodies are also to be included. An important feature of the research is to be the coupling of the flow solution methods with thermal/structural modeling techniques to provide an integrated fluid/thermal/structural modeling capability. The progress made towards achieving these goals during the first twelve month period of the research is presented.

  20. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  1. A Decoupled Finite Element Heterogeneous Coarse Mesh Transport Method.

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, S. W.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2005-01-01

    In a recent paper, an original finite element (FE) method was presented for solving eigenvalue transport problems on a coarse spatial mesh. The method employed a surface Green's function expansion of the angular flux trial functions, so that heterogeneous coarse-meshes could be treated with relative ease. Numerical problems were solved using the multigroup discrete ordinates approximation in one-dimensional (1-D) slab geometry. Unfortunately, difficulties were encountered in finding solutions to the algebraic finite element equations, which led to sizeable angular flux discontinuities at coarse-mesh interfaces and significant errors. For this reason, a nonvariational iterative technique was ultimately favored for converging the angular flux distribution, and was used in conjunction with a Rayleigh quotient for converging the eigenvalue. In this paper, a new derivation of finite element equations is presented, which seems to offer a remedy for at least some of the numerical ills that plagued the previous work. First, the equations are derived in terms of a generalized response function expansion. This allows a more efficient response basis to be employed and vastly reduces the overall computational effort without a substantial loss of accuracy. Second, the tight coupling between coarse-meshes in the original equations is effectively broken by assuming that an accurate estimate of the flux distribution entering a given coarse-mesh is known. With an additional assumption that an accurate eigenvalue estimate is known, an iterative approach to solving these decoupled finite element (DFE) equations is developed. The DFE method has been applied to both 1- and 2-D heterogeneous coarse-mesh problems with a far greater degree of success than the original FE method. However, some numerical difficulties remain to be overcome before the new approach can be considered robust.

  2. Inversion method of seismic forces at fault using finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Xie, Z.; Geng, W.; Cai, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Fault slip inversion using seismic dislocation model has been discussed a lot. In this model, seismogenic fault is considered as an interface. However, geological surveys and seismic channel waves reveal that the fault usually possesses thickness. Rock compression tests also show that micro-cracks develop into a belt in which shear fracture plane takes place. Therefore, to simulate the fault as a narrow belt may be more reasonable to reflect mechanical behavior of earthquake source. This study proposes a method to inverse seismic forces at the fault with thickness. The fault is modeled by transversely isotropic material. Three-dimensional finite element models (FEMs) is used to calculate numerical Green's functions for displacements. The Green's functions are generated by imposing unit couples directly to the node pairs at the fault instead of dislocation. The unit couples are added separately in x, y, z directions of the finite element global coordinate system. A pure thrust earthquake is modeled by reducing shear modulus under tectonic stress field. Selected surface displacements induced by this earthquake are used as 'observation data' of the inversion. We combine numerical Green's functions with standard linear inverse methods with Laplace smoothing constraints to estimate seismic forces at the fault. The earthquake which is simulated by damage of shear modulus has the fault model with transversely isotropic material, therefore there exist no normal forces. When the fault material is isotropic and the earthquake is caused by the reduction of shear or Young's modulus, there are normal forces at the fault. This study shows that we can directly inverse three-dimensional seismic forces with the surface deformation caused by earthquakes. This method is feasible for heterogeneous materials and complicated geometry model. [1] Xie, Zhoumin, Inversion method of seismic stress drop by finite element scheme, Doctor Thesis, Peking University, 2013. [2] Hu, C., Zhou, Y

  3. High speed inviscid compressible flow by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zienkiewicz, O. C.; Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The finite element method and an explicit time stepping algorithm which is based on Taylor-Galerkin schemes with an appropriate artificial viscosity is combined with an automatic mesh refinement process which is designed to produce accurate steady state solutions to problems of inviscid compressible flow in two dimensions. The results of two test problems are included which demonstrate the excellent performance characteristics of the proposed procedures.

  4. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  5. Material nonlinear analysis via mixed-iterative finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors are tested using 4-node quadrilateral finite elements. The membrane result is excellent, which indicates the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate. On the other hand, further research to improve bending performance of the method seems to be warranted.

  6. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  7. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  8. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  9. Weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    A temporal finite element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is developed for dynamics and optimal control problems. The mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle contains both displacements and momenta as primary variables that are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple polynomial shape functions. Unlike other forms of Hamilton's principle, however, time derivatives of the momenta and displacements do not appear therein; instead, only the virtual momenta and virtual displacements are differentiated with respect to time. Based on the duality that is observed to exist between the mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle and variational principles governing classical optimal control problems, a temporal finite element formulation of the latter can be developed in a rather straightforward manner. Several well-known problems in dynamics and optimal control are illustrated. The example dynamics problem involves a time-marching problem. As optimal control examples, elementary trajectory optimization problems are treated.

  10. Crystal level simulations using Eulerian finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Barton, N R; Benson, D J

    2004-02-06

    Over the last several years, significant progress has been made in the use of crystal level material models in simulations of forming operations. However, in Lagrangian finite element approaches simulation capabilities are limited in many cases by mesh distortion associated with deformation heterogeneity. Contexts in which such large distortions arise include: bulk deformation to strains approaching or exceeding unity, especially in highly anisotropic or multiphase materials; shear band formation and intersection of shear bands; and indentation with sharp indenters. Investigators have in the past used Eulerian finite element methods with material response determined from crystal aggregates to study steady state forming processes. However, Eulerian and Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element methods have not been widely utilized for simulation of transient deformation processes at the crystal level. The advection schemes used in Eulerian and ALE codes control mesh distortion and allow for simulation of much larger total deformations. We will discuss material state representation issues related to advection and will present results from ALE simulations.

  11. The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.

    SciTech Connect

    Manzini, Gianmarco

    2012-07-13

    We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

  12. Generalization of mixed multiscale finite element methods with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C S

    2016-08-01

    Many science and engineering problems exhibit scale disparity and high contrast. The small scale features cannot be omitted in the physical models because they can affect the macroscopic behavior of the problems. However, resolving all the scales in these problems can be prohibitively expensive. As a consequence, some types of model reduction techniques are required to design efficient solution algorithms. For practical purpose, we are interested in mixed finite element problems as they produce solutions with certain conservative properties. Existing multiscale methods for such problems include the mixed multiscale finite element methods. We show that for complicated problems, the mixed multiscale finite element methods may not be able to produce reliable approximations. This motivates the need of enrichment for coarse spaces. Two enrichment approaches are proposed, one is based on generalized multiscale finte element metthods (GMsFEM), while the other is based on spectral element-based algebraic multigrid (rAMGe). The former one, which is called mixed GMsFEM, is developed for both Darcy’s flow and linear elasticity. Application of the algorithm in two-phase flow simulations are demonstrated. For linear elasticity, the algorithm is subtly modified due to the symmetry requirement of the stress tensor. The latter enrichment approach is based on rAMGe. The algorithm differs from GMsFEM in that both of the velocity and pressure spaces are coarsened. Due the multigrid nature of the algorithm, recursive application is available, which results in an efficient multilevel construction of the coarse spaces. Stability, convergence analysis, and exhaustive numerical experiments are carried out to validate the proposed enrichment approaches. iii

  13. Analysis of Waveguide Junction Discontinuities Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.

    1997-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine reflection and transmission coefficients of rectangular waveguide junction discontinuities. An H-plane discontinuity, an E-plane ridge discontinuity, and a step discontinuity in a concentric rectangular waveguide junction are analyzed using the FEM procedure. Also, reflection and transmission coefficients due to presence of a gap between two sections of a rectangular waveguide are determined using the FEM. The numerical results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the earlier published results. The numerical results obtained by the FEM are compared with the numerical results obtained using the Mode Matching Method (MMM) and also with the measured data.

  14. Efficient finite element method for grating profile reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruming; Sun, Jiguang

    2015-12-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of grating profiles from scattering data. The inverse problem is formulated as an optimization problem with a regularization term. We devise an efficient finite element method (FEM) and employ a quasi-Newton method to solve it. For the direct problems, the FEM stiff and mass matrices are assembled once at the beginning of the numerical procedure. Then only minor changes are made to the mass matrix at each iteration, which significantly saves the computation cost. Numerical examples show that the method is effective and robust.

  15. A simple finite element method for the Stokes equations

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2017-03-21

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a simple finite element method to solve the Stokes equations. This method is in primal velocity-pressure formulation and is so simple such that both velocity and pressure are approximated by piecewise constant functions. Implementation issues as well as error analysis are investigated. A basis for a divergence free subspace of the velocity field is constructed so that the original saddle point problem can be reduced to a symmetric and positive definite system with much fewer unknowns. The numerical experiments indicate that the method is accurate.

  16. Least-squares finite element methods for quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelsen, Christian; Brannick, J; Manteuffel, T; Mccormick, S

    2008-01-01

    A significant amount of the computational time in large Monte Carlo simulations of lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is spent inverting the discrete Dirac operator. Unfortunately, traditional covariant finite difference discretizations of the Dirac operator present serious challenges for standard iterative methods. For interesting physical parameters, the discretized operator is large and ill-conditioned, and has random coefficients. More recently, adaptive algebraic multigrid (AMG) methods have been shown to be effective preconditioners for Wilson's discretization of the Dirac equation. This paper presents an alternate discretization of the Dirac operator based on least-squares finite elements. The discretization is systematically developed and physical properties of the resulting matrix system are discussed. Finally, numerical experiments are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of adaptive smoothed aggregation ({alpha}SA ) multigrid as a preconditioner for the discrete field equations resulting from applying the proposed least-squares FE formulation to a simplified test problem, the 2d Schwinger model of quantum electrodynamics.

  17. Simulating Space Capsule Water Landing with Explicit Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    A study of using an explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element code for simulating the water landing of a space capsule was performed. The finite element model contains Lagrangian shell elements for the space capsule and Eulerian solid elements for the water and air. An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) solver and a penalty coupling method were used for predicting the fluid and structure interaction forces. The space capsule was first assumed to be rigid, so the numerical results could be correlated with closed form solutions. The water and air meshes were continuously refined until the solution was converged. The converged maximum deceleration predicted is bounded by the classical von Karman and Wagner solutions and is considered to be an adequate solution. The refined water and air meshes were then used in the models for simulating the water landing of a capsule model that has a flexible bottom. For small pitch angle cases, the maximum deceleration from the flexible capsule model was found to be significantly greater than the maximum deceleration obtained from the corresponding rigid model. For large pitch angle cases, the difference between the maximum deceleration of the flexible model and that of its corresponding rigid model is smaller. Test data of Apollo space capsules with a flexible heat shield qualitatively support the findings presented in this paper.

  18. Discontinuous finite element method for vector radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cun-Hai; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2017-03-01

    The discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) is applied to solve the vector radiative transfer in participating media. The derivation in a discrete form of the vector radiation governing equations is presented, in which the angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach with a local refined modification, and the spatial domain is discretized into finite non-overlapped discontinuous elements. The elements in the whole solution domain are connected by modelling the boundary numerical flux between adjacent elements, which makes the DFEM numerically stable for solving radiative transfer equations. Several various problems of vector radiative transfer are tested to verify the performance of the developed DFEM, including vector radiative transfer in a one-dimensional parallel slab containing a Mie/Rayleigh/strong forward scattering medium and a two-dimensional square medium. The fact that DFEM results agree very well with the benchmark solutions in published references shows that the developed DFEM in this paper is accurate and effective for solving vector radiative transfer problems.

  19. A comparison of the finite difference and finite element methods for heat transfer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Mortazavi, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The finite difference method and finite element method for heat transfer calculations are compared by describing their bases and their application to some common heat transfer problems. In general it is noted that neither method is clearly superior, and in many instances, the choice is quite arbitrary and depends more upon the codes available and upon the personal preference of the analyst than upon any well defined advantages of one method. Classes of problems for which one method or the other is better suited are defined.

  20. Large-eddy simulation using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Gresho, P.M.; Leone, J.M. Jr.; Kollmann, W.

    1993-10-01

    In a large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows, the large-scale motion is calculated explicitly (i.e., approximated with semi-empirical relations). Typically, finite difference or spectral numerical schemes are used to generate an LES; the use of finite element methods (FEM) has been far less prominent. In this study, we demonstrate that FEM in combination with LES provides a viable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a two-dimensional backward-facing step. The combination of these methodologies brings together the advantages of each: LES provides a high degree of accuracy with a minimum of empiricism for turbulence modeling and FEM provides a robust way to simulate flow in very complex domains of practical interest. Such a combination should prove very valuable to the engineering community.

  1. Scientific use of the finite element method in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Knop, Luegya; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Gandini, Marcia Regina Elisa Aparecida Schiavon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The finite element method (FEM) is an engineering resource applied to calculate the stress and deformation of complex structures, and has been widely used in orthodontic research. With the advantage of being a non-invasive and accurate method that provides quantitative and detailed data on the physiological reactions possible to occur in tissues, applying the FEM can anticipate the visualization of these tissue responses through the observation of areas of stress created from applied orthodontic mechanics. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing and discussing the stages of the finite element method application and its applicability in Orthodontics. RESULTS: FEM is able to evaluate the stress distribution at the interface between periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and the shifting trend in various types of tooth movement when using different types of orthodontic devices. Therefore, it is necessary to know specific software for this purpose. CONCLUSIONS: FEM is an important experimental method to answer questions about tooth movement, overcoming the disadvantages of other experimental methods. PMID:25992996

  2. Methods and framework for visualizing higher-order finite elements.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, William J; Bertel, François; Malaterre, Mathieu; Thompson, David; Pébay, Philippe P; O'Bara, Robert; Tendulkar, Saurabh

    2006-01-01

    The finite element method is an important, widely used numerical technique for solving partial differential equations. This technique utilizes basis functions for approximating the geometry and the variation of the solution field over finite regions, or elements, of the domain. These basis functions are generally formed by combinations of polynomials. In the past, the polynomial order of the basis has been low-typically of linear and quadratic order. However, in recent years so-called p and hp methods have been developed, which may elevate the order of the basis to arbitrary levels with the aim of accelerating the convergence of the numerical solution. The increasing complexity of numerical basis functions poses a significant challenge to visualization systems. In the past, such systems have been loosely coupled to simulation packages, exchanging data via file transfer, and internally reimplementing the basis functions in order to perform interpolation and implement visualization algorithms. However, as the basis functions become more complex and, in some cases, proprietary in nature, it becomes increasingly difficult if not impossible to reimplement them within the visualization system. Further, most visualization systems typically process linear primitives, in part to take advantage of graphics hardware and, in part, due to the inherent simplicity of the resulting algorithms. Thus, visualization of higher-order finite elements requires tessellating the basis to produce data compatible with existing visualization systems. In this paper, we describe adaptive methods that automatically tessellate complex finite element basis functions using a flexible and extensible software framework. These methods employ a recursive, edge-based subdivision algorithm driven by a set of error metrics including geometric error, solution error, and error in image space. Further, we describe advanced pretessellation techniques that guarantees capture of the critical points of the

  3. Modeling of coal stockpiles using a finite elements method

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Sensogut, C.

    2008-07-01

    In the case of coal stockpiles finding suitable environmental conditions, spontaneous combustion phenomenon will be unavoidable. In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile having a shape of triangle prism was constituted in a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC), Turkey. The parameters of time, humidity and temperature of air, atmospheric pressure, velocity and direction of wind values that are effective on coal stockpile were measured in a continuous manner. These experimental works were transferred into a computer media in order to obtain similar outcomes by carrying out 2-dimensional analysis of the stockpile with Finite Elements Method (FEM). The performed experimental studies and obtained results were then compared.

  4. The sensitivity method in finite element model updating: A tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, John E.; Link, Michael; Friswell, Michael I.

    2011-10-01

    The sensitivity method is probably the most successful of the many approaches to the problem of updating finite element models of engineering structures based on vibration test data. It has been applied successfully to large-scale industrial problems and proprietary codes are available based on the techniques explained in simple terms in this article. A basic introduction to the most important procedures of computational model updating is provided, including tutorial examples to reinforce the reader's understanding and a large scale model updating example of a helicopter airframe.

  5. The mixed finite element multigrid method for stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Muzhinji, K; Shateyi, S; Motsa, S S

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results.

  6. The Mixed Finite Element Multigrid Method for Stokes Equations

    PubMed Central

    Muzhinji, K.; Shateyi, S.; Motsa, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results. PMID:25945361

  7. Immersed finite element method and its applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wing Kam; Liu, Yaling; Farrell, David; Zhang, Lucy; Wang, X. Sheldon; Fukui, Yoshio; Patankar, Neelesh; Zhang, Yongjie; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Lee, Junghoon; Hong, Juhee; Chen, Xinyu; Hsu, Huayi

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the newly developed immersed finite element method (IFEM) and its applications to the modeling of biological systems. This work was inspired by the pioneering work of Professor T.J.R. Hughes in solving fluid–structure interaction problems. In IFEM, a Lagrangian solid mesh moves on top of a background Eulerian fluid mesh which spans the entire computational domain. Hence, mesh generation is greatly simplified. Moreover, both fluid and solid domains are modeled with the finite element method and the continuity between the fluid and solid subdomains is enforced via the interpolation of the velocities and the distribution of the forces with the reproducing Kernel particle method (RKPM) delta function. The proposed method is used to study the fluid–structure interaction problems encountered in human cardiovascular systems. Currently, the heart modeling is being constructed and the deployment process of an angioplasty stent has been simulated. Some preliminary results on monocyte and platelet deposition are presented. Blood rheology, in particular, the shear-rate dependent de-aggregation of red blood cell (RBC) clusters and the transport of deformable cells, are modeled. Furthermore, IFEM is combined with electrokinetics to study the mechanisms of nano/bio filament assembly for the understanding of cell motility. PMID:20200602

  8. Multiscale finite-element method for linear elastic geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, Nicola; Hajibeygi, Hadi; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-02-01

    The demand for accurate and efficient simulation of geomechanical effects is widely increasing in the geoscience community. High resolution characterizations of the mechanical properties of subsurface formations are essential for improving modeling predictions. Such detailed descriptions impose severe computational challenges and motivate the development of multiscale solution strategies. We propose a multiscale solution framework for the geomechanical equilibrium problem of heterogeneous porous media based on the finite-element method. After imposing a coarse-scale grid on the given fine-scale problem, the coarse-scale basis functions are obtained by solving local equilibrium problems within coarse elements. These basis functions form the restriction and prolongation operators used to obtain the coarse-scale system for the displacement-vector. Then, a two-stage preconditioner that couples the multiscale system with a smoother is derived for the iterative solution of the fine-scale linear system. Various numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate accuracy and robustness of the method.

  9. Accurate optical CD profiler based on specialized finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrero, Jesus; Perçin, Gökhan

    2012-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry is moving to very low-k1 patterning solutions, the metrology problems facing process engineers are becoming much more complex. Choosing the right optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology technique is essential for bridging the metrology gap and achieving the required manufacturing volume throughput. The critical dimension scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) measurement is usually distorted by the high aspect ratio of the photoresist and hard mask layers. CD-SEM measurements cease to correlate with complex three-dimensional profiles, such as the cases for double patterning and FinFETs, thus necessitating sophisticated, accurate and fast computational methods to bridge the gap. In this work, a suite of computational methods that complement advanced OCD equipment, and enabling them to operate at higher accuracies, are developed. In this article, a novel method for accurately modeling OCD profiles is presented. A finite element formulation in primal form is used to discretize the equations. The implementation uses specialized finite element spaces to solve Maxwell equations in two dimensions.

  10. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  11. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  12. Anisotropic adaptive finite element method for modelling blood flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Sahni, O; Li, X; Jansen, K E; Shephard, M S; Taylor, C A

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we present an adaptive anisotropic finite element method (FEM) and demonstrate how computational efficiency can be increased when applying the method to the simulation of blood flow in the cardiovascular system. We use the SUPG formulation for the transient 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations which are discretised by linear finite elements for both the pressure and the velocity field. Given the pulsatile nature of the flow in blood vessels we have pursued adaptivity based on the average flow over a cardiac cycle. Error indicators are derived to define an anisotropic mesh metric field. Mesh modification algorithms are used to anisotropically adapt the mesh according to the desired size field. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method by first applying it to pulsatile flow in a straight cylindrical vessel and then to a porcine aorta with a stenosis bypassed by a graft. We demonstrate that the use of an anisotropic adaptive FEM can result in an order of magnitude reduction in computing time with no loss of accuracy compared to analyses obtained with uniform meshes.

  13. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  14. An hybrid finite volume finite element method for variable density incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calgaro, Caterina; Creusé, Emmanuel; Goudon, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the numerical simulation of variable density incompressible flows, modeled by the Navier-Stokes system. We introduce an hybrid scheme which combines a finite volume approach for treating the mass conservation equation and a finite element method to deal with the momentum equation and the divergence free constraint. The breakthrough relies on the definition of a suitable footbridge between the two methods, through the design of compatibility condition. In turn, the method is very flexible and allows to deal with unstructured meshes. Several numerical tests are performed to show the scheme capabilities. In particular, the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability evolution is carefully investigated.

  15. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin P.; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Gillette, Andrew K.; Villongco, Christopher T.; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Holst, Michael J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  16. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Kevin P; Gonzales, Matthew J; Gillette, Andrew K; Villongco, Christopher T; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H; Holst, Michael J; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori.

  17. Finite-size scaling for quantum criticality using the finite-element method.

    PubMed

    Antillon, Edwin; Wehefritz-Kaufmann, Birgit; Kais, Sabre

    2012-03-01

    Finite size scaling for the Schrödinger equation is a systematic approach to calculate the quantum critical parameters for a given Hamiltonian. This approach has been shown to give very accurate results for critical parameters by using a systematic expansion with global basis-type functions. Recently, the finite-element method was shown to be a powerful numerical method for ab initio electronic-structure calculations with a variable real-space resolution. In this work, we demonstrate how to obtain quantum critical parameters by combining the finite-element method (FEM) with finite size scaling (FSS) using different ab initio approximations and exact formulations. The critical parameters could be atomic nuclear charges, internuclear distances, electron density, disorder, lattice structure, and external fields for stability of atomic, molecular systems and quantum phase transitions of extended systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of this approach we provide detailed calculations of applying FEM to approximate solutions for the two-electron atom with varying nuclear charge; these include Hartree-Fock, local density approximation, and an "exact" formulation using FEM. We then use the FSS approach to determine its critical nuclear charge for stability; here, the size of the system is related to the number of elements used in the calculations. Results prove to be in good agreement with previous Slater-basis set calculations and demonstrate that it is possible to combine finite size scaling with the finite-element method by using ab initio calculations to obtain quantum critical parameters. The combined approach provides a promising first-principles approach to describe quantum phase transitions for materials and extended systems.

  18. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Zapp, John; Hsa, Chang-Yu; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    An extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. With the introduction of a Fourier expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields, a coupled two dimensional system is generated and solved via the finite element method. An exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh and the fast fourier transformation (FFT) is used to evaluate the boundary integrals for low O(n) memory demand when an iterative solution algorithm is used. By virtue of the finite element method, the algorithm is applicable to structures of arbitrary material composition. Several improvements to the two dimensional algorithm are also described. These include: (1) modifications for terminating the mesh at circular boundaries without distorting the convolutionality of the boundary integrals; (2) the development of nonproprietary mesh generation routines for two dimensional applications; (3) the development of preprocessors for interfacing SDRC IDEAS with the main algorithm; and (4) the development of post-processing algorithms based on the public domain package GRAFIC to generate two and three dimensional gray level and color field maps.

  19. Calculation of protein form birefringence using the finite element method.

    PubMed Central

    Pantic-Tanner, Z; Eden, D

    1999-01-01

    An approach based on the finite element method (FEM) is employed to calculate the optical properties of macromolecules, specifically form birefringence. Macromolecules are treated as arbitrarily shaped particles suspended in a solvent of refraction index n1. The form birefringence of the solution is calculated as the difference in its refractive index when all the particles of refractive index n2 are either parallel to or normal to the direction of the polarization of light. Since the particles of interest are small compared to the wavelength of light, a quasi-static approximation for the refractive index is used, i.e., that it is equal to the square root of the dielectric constant of the suspension. The average dielectric constant of the mixture is calculated using the finite element method. This approach has been tested for ellipsoidal particles and a good agreement with theoretical results has been obtained. Also, numerical results for the motor domains of ncd and kinesin, small arbitrarily shaped proteins with known x-ray structures, show reasonable agreement with the experimental data obtained from transient electric birefringence experiments. PMID:10354422

  20. Numerical Analysis of a Finite Element/Volume Penalty Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, Bertrand

    The penalty method makes it possible to incorporate a large class of constraints in general purpose Finite Element solvers like freeFEM++. We present here some contributions to the numerical analysis of this method. We propose an abstract framework for this approach, together with some general error estimates based on the discretization parameter ɛ and the space discretization parameter h. As this work is motivated by the possibility to handle constraints like rigid motion for fluid-particle flows, we shall pay a special attention to a model problem of this kind, where the constraint is prescribed over a subdomain. We show how the abstract estimate can be applied to this situation, in the case where a non-body-fitted mesh is used. In addition, we describe how this method provides an approximation of the Lagrange multiplier associated to the constraint.

  1. High-order finite element methods for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Basabe Delgado, Jonas De Dios

    Purely numerical methods based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) are becoming increasingly popular in seismic modeling for the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in geophysical models. These methods offer a better control on the accuracy and more geometrical flexibility than the Finite Difference methods that have been traditionally used for the generation of synthetic seismograms. However, the success of these methods has outpaced their analytic validation. The accuracy of the FEMs used for seismic wave propagation is unknown in most cases and therefore the simulation parameters in numerical experiments are determined by empirical rules. I focus on two methods that are particularly suited for seismic modeling: the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and the Interior-Penalty Discontinuous Galerkin Method (IP-DGM). The goals of this research are to investigate the grid dispersion and stability of SEM and IP-DGM, to implement these methods and to apply them to subsurface models to obtain synthetic seismograms. In order to analyze the grid dispersion and stability, I use the von Neumann method (plane wave analysis) to obtain a generalized eigenvalue problem. I show that the eigenvalues are related to the grid dispersion and that, with certain assumptions, the size of the eigenvalue problem can be reduced from the total number of degrees of freedom to one proportional to the number of degrees of freedom inside one element. The grid dispersion results indicate that SEM of degree greater than 4 is isotropic and has a very low dispersion. Similar dispersion properties are observed for the symmetric formulation of IP-DGM of degree greater than 4 using nodal basis functions. The low dispersion of these methods allows for a sampling ratio of 4 nodes per wavelength to be used. On the other hand, the stability analysis shows that, in the elastic case, the size of the time step required in IP-DGM is approximately 6 times smaller than that of SEM. The results from the analysis

  2. Elastic buckling of stiffened plates by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.

    1995-09-01

    The finite element method is used to obtain the elastic buckling loads of stiffened plates. The plates are modeled by rectangular plate elements and the stiffeners which are rectangular in cross section are modeled by exact beam elements. Eccentrically located stiffeners as well as stiffeners having centroids coinciding with the middle surface of the plates are considered. The effect of the flexural rigidity of the stiffeners relative to that of the plates on the buckling load is investigated. Square plates simply supported along the four edges are considered when subjected to uniform uniaxial compressive loads. Further investigations are carried out to examine the effect of the number of stiffeners and their locations on the buckling load and the mode of buckling. Stiffeners positioned in the direction of the applied compressive load or in the transverse direction are also considered. The method used in the calculation of the buckling load is the subspace iteration technique. This method is shown to produce acceptable results for the eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors of the transidental equations for the combined stiffness and geometric matrices for the stiffened plates. The buckling loads as well as the modes of buckling are determined and compared where possible with existing solutions.

  3. Finite volume and finite element methods applied to 3D laminar and turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Louda, Petr; Příhoda, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr; Kozel, Karel

    2014-12-10

    The work deals with numerical simulations of incompressible flow in channels with rectangular cross section. The rectangular cross section itself leads to development of various secondary flow patterns, where accuracy of simulation is influenced by numerical viscosity of the scheme and by turbulence modeling. In this work some developments of stabilized finite element method are presented. Its results are compared with those of an implicit finite volume method also described, in laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that numerical viscosity can cause errors of same magnitude as different turbulence models. The finite volume method is also applied to 3D turbulent flow around backward facing step and good agreement with 3D experimental results is obtained.

  4. A responsive finite element method to aid interactive geometric modeling.

    PubMed

    Umetani, N; Takayama, K; Mitani, J; Igarashi, T

    2011-01-01

    Current computer-aided engineering systems use numerical-simulation methods mainly as offline verification tools to reject designs that don't satisfy the required constraints, rather than as tools to guide users toward better designs. However, integrating real-time finite element method (FEM) into interactive geometric modeling can provide user guidance. During interactive editing, real-time feedback from numerical simulation guides users toward an improved design without tedious trial-and-error iterations. Careful reuse of previous computation results, such as meshes and matrices, on the basis of speed and accuracy trade-offs, have helped produce fast FEM analysis during interactive editing. Several 2D example applications and informal user studies show this approach's effectiveness. Such tools could help nonexpert users design objects that satisfy physical constraints and help those users understand the underlying physical properties.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of structures. [within framework of finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H.; Pifko, A.; Levy, A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of nonlinear analysis techniques within the framework of the finite-element method is reported. Although the emphasis is concerned with those nonlinearities associated with material behavior, a general treatment of geometric nonlinearity, alone or in combination with plasticity is included, and applications presented for a class of problems categorized as axisymmetric shells of revolution. The scope of the nonlinear analysis capabilities includes: (1) a membrane stress analysis, (2) bending and membrane stress analysis, (3) analysis of thick and thin axisymmetric bodies of revolution, (4) a general three dimensional analysis, and (5) analysis of laminated composites. Applications of the methods are made to a number of sample structures. Correlation with available analytic or experimental data range from good to excellent.

  6. HIFU Induced Heating Modelling by Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, R.; Vera, A.; Leija, L.

    High intensity focused ultrasound is a thermal therapy method used to treat malignant tumors and other medical conditions. Focused ultrasound concentrates acoustic energy at a focal zone. There, temperature rises rapidly over 56 °C to provoke tissue necrosis. Device performance depends on its fabrication placing computational modeling as a powerful tool to anticipate experimentation results. Finite element method allows modeling of multiphysics systems. Therefore, induced heating was modeled considering the acoustic field produced by a concave radiator excited with electric potentials from 5 V to 20 V. Nonlinear propagation was neglected and a linear response between the acoustic fields and pressure distribution was obtained. Finally, the results showed that acoustic propagation and heating models should be improved and validated with experimental measurements.

  7. Comparison of boundary element and finite element methods in spur gear root stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, H.; Mavriplis, D.; Huston, R. L.; Oswald, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is used to compute fillet stress concentration in spur gear teeth. The results are shown to compare favorably with analogous results obtained using the finite element method (FEM). A partially supported thin rim gear is studied. The loading is applied at the pitch point. A three-dimensional analysis is conducted using both the BEM and FEM (NASTRAN). The results are also compared with those of a two-dimensional finite element model. An advantage of the BEM over the FEM is that fewer elements are needed with the BEM. Indeed, in the current study the BEM used 92 elements and 270 nodes whereas the FEM used 320 elements and 2037 nodes. Moreover, since the BEM is especially useful in problems with high stress gradients it is potentially a very useful tool for fillet stress analyses.

  8. Progress on hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Progress on the development and implementation of hybrid finite element methods for scattering by bodies of revolution are described. It was found that earlier finite element-boundary integral formulations suffered from convergence difficulties when applied to large and thin bodies of revolution. An alternative implementation is described where the finite element method is terminated with an absorbing termination boundary. In addition, an alternative finite element-boundary integral implementation is discussed for improving the convergence of the original code.

  9. Architecting the Finite Element Method Pipeline for the GPU

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhisong; Lewis, T. James; Kirby, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a widely employed numerical technique for approximating the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) in various science and engineering applications. Many of these applications benefit from fast execution of the FEM pipeline. One way to accelerate the FEM pipeline is by exploiting advances in modern computational hardware, such as the many-core streaming processors like the graphical processing unit (GPU). In this paper, we present the algorithms and data-structures necessary to move the entire FEM pipeline to the GPU. First we propose an efficient GPU-based algorithm to generate local element information and to assemble the global linear system associated with the FEM discretization of an elliptic PDE. To solve the corresponding linear system efficiently on the GPU, we implement a conjugate gradient method preconditioned with a geometry-informed algebraic multi-grid (AMG) method preconditioner. We propose a new fine-grained parallelism strategy, a corresponding multigrid cycling stage and efficient data mapping to the many-core architecture of GPU. Comparison of our on-GPU assembly versus a traditional serial implementation on the CPU achieves up to an 87 × speedup. Focusing on the linear system solver alone, we achieve a speedup of up to 51 × versus use of a comparable state-of-the-art serial CPU linear system solver. Furthermore, the method compares favorably with other GPU-based, sparse, linear solvers. PMID:25202164

  10. Architecting the Finite Element Method Pipeline for the GPU.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhisong; Lewis, T James; Kirby, Robert M; Whitaker, Ross T

    2014-02-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a widely employed numerical technique for approximating the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) in various science and engineering applications. Many of these applications benefit from fast execution of the FEM pipeline. One way to accelerate the FEM pipeline is by exploiting advances in modern computational hardware, such as the many-core streaming processors like the graphical processing unit (GPU). In this paper, we present the algorithms and data-structures necessary to move the entire FEM pipeline to the GPU. First we propose an efficient GPU-based algorithm to generate local element information and to assemble the global linear system associated with the FEM discretization of an elliptic PDE. To solve the corresponding linear system efficiently on the GPU, we implement a conjugate gradient method preconditioned with a geometry-informed algebraic multi-grid (AMG) method preconditioner. We propose a new fine-grained parallelism strategy, a corresponding multigrid cycling stage and efficient data mapping to the many-core architecture of GPU. Comparison of our on-GPU assembly versus a traditional serial implementation on the CPU achieves up to an 87 × speedup. Focusing on the linear system solver alone, we achieve a speedup of up to 51 × versus use of a comparable state-of-the-art serial CPU linear system solver. Furthermore, the method compares favorably with other GPU-based, sparse, linear solvers.

  11. Finite element methods for nonlinear acoustics in fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, weak formulations and finite element discretizations of the governing partial differential equations of three-dimensional nonlinear acoustics in absorbing fluids are presented. The fluid equations are considered in an Eulerian framework, rather than a displacement framework, since in the latter case the corresponding finite element formulations suffer from spurious modes and numerical instabilities. When taken with the governing partial differential equations of a solid body and the continuity conditions, a coupled formulation is derived. The change in solid/fluid interface conditions when going from a linear acoustic fluid to a nonlinear acoustic fluid is demonstrated. Finite element discretizations of the coupled problem are then derived, and verification examples are presented that demonstrate the correctness of the implementations. We demonstrate that the time step size necessary to resolve the wave decreases as steepening occurs. Finally, simulation results are presented on a resonating acoustic cavity, and a coupled elastic/acoustic system consisting of a fluid-filled spherical tank.

  12. Structural optimization of thin shells using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the structural optimization of thin shell structures that are subjected to stress and displacement constraints. In order to accomplish this, the structural optimization computer program DESAP1 was modified and improved. In the static analysis part of the DESAP1 computer program the torsional spring elements, which are used to analyze thin, shallow shell structures, were eliminated by modifying the membrane stiffness matrix of the triangular elements in the local coordinate system and adding a fictitious rotational stiffness matrix. This simplified the DESAP1 program input, improved the accuracy of the analysis, and saved computation time. In the optimization part of the DESAP1 program the stress ratio formula, which redesigns the thickness of each finite element of the structure, was solved by an analytical method. This scheme replaced the iterative solution that was previously used in the DESAP1 program, thus increasing the accuracy and speed of the design. The modified program was used to design a thin, cylindrical shell structure with optimum weight, and the results are reported in this paper.

  13. Nitsche Extended Finite Element Methods for Earthquake Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coon, Ethan T.

    Modeling earthquakes and geologically short-time-scale events on fault networks is a difficult problem with important implications for human safety and design. These problems demonstrate a. rich physical behavior, in which distributed loading localizes both spatially and temporally into earthquakes on fault systems. This localization is governed by two aspects: friction and fault geometry. Computationally, these problems provide a stern challenge for modelers --- static and dynamic equations must be solved on domains with discontinuities on complex fault systems, and frictional boundary conditions must be applied on these discontinuities. The most difficult aspect of modeling physics on complicated domains is the mesh. Most numerical methods involve meshing the geometry; nodes are placed on the discontinuities, and edges are chosen to coincide with faults. The resulting mesh is highly unstructured, making the derivation of finite difference discretizations difficult. Therefore, most models use the finite element method. Standard finite element methods place requirements on the mesh for the sake of stability, accuracy, and efficiency. The formation of a mesh which both conforms to fault geometry and satisfies these requirements is an open problem, especially for three dimensional, physically realistic fault. geometries. In addition, if the fault system evolves over the course of a dynamic simulation (i.e. in the case of growing cracks or breaking new faults), the geometry must he re-meshed at each time step. This can be expensive computationally. The fault-conforming approach is undesirable when complicated meshes are required, and impossible to implement when the geometry is evolving. Therefore, meshless and hybrid finite element methods that handle discontinuities without placing them on element boundaries are a desirable and natural way to discretize these problems. Several such methods are being actively developed for use in engineering mechanics involving crack

  14. Ceramic bracket design: an analysis using the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, J; Nanda, R S; Duncanson, M G; Currier, G F

    1995-12-01

    This investigation was designed to generate finite element models for selected ceramic brackets and graphically display the stress distribution in the brackets when subjected to arch wire torsion and tipping forces. Six commercially available ceramic brackets, one monocrystalline and five polycrystalline alumina, of twin bracket design for the permanent maxillary left central incisor were studied. Three-dimensional computer models of the brackets were constructed and loading forces, similar to those applied by a full-size (0.0215 x 0.028 inch) stainless steel arch wire in torsion and tipping necessary to fracture ceramic brackets, were applied to the models. Stress levels were recorded at relevant points common among the various brackets. High stress levels were observed at areas of abrupt change in geometry and shape. The design of the wire slot and wings for the Contour bracket (Class One Orthodontic Products, Lubbock, Texas) and of the outer edges of the wire slot for the Allure bracket (GAC, Central Islip, N.Y.) were found to be good in terms of even stress distribution. The brackets with an isthmus connecting the wings seemed to resist stresses better than the one bracket that did not have this feature. The design of the isthmus for the Transcend (Unitek/3M, Monrovia, Calif.) and Lumina (Ormco, Glendora, Calif.) brackets were found to be acceptable as well. The Starfire bracket ("A" Company, San Diego, Calif.) showed high stresses and irregular stress distribution, because it had sharp angles, no rounded corners, and no isthmus. The finite element method proved to be a useful tool in the stress analysis of ceramic orthodontic brackets subjected to various forces.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A Demonstration of the Method of Stochastic Finite Element Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Lfl A DENONSTATION OF THE METHO -D OF DTIC STOCHASTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS At LECTE S APR 0418 THESIS Paul R. Bryant Captain, USAF - AFIT/GA/A.A...Sample ASTROS Output) ....................... 78 Appendix D (Random Element Selection) .................... 83 Appendix E ( Weight Estimation...ensuring satisfactory performance? If weight is a concern, then the answer is yes. In the quest for higher performance aircraft and greater useful

  16. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  17. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  18. Hierarchical flux-based thermal-structural finite element analysis method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polesky, Sandra P.

    1992-01-01

    A hierarchical flux-based finite element method is developed for both a one and two dimensional thermal structural analyses. Derivation of the finite element equations is presented. The resulting finite element matrices associated with the flux based formulation are evaluated in a closed form. The hierarchical finite elements include additional degrees of freedom in the approximation of the element variable distributions by the use of nodeless variables. The nodeless variables offer increased solution accuracy without the need for defining actual nodes and rediscretizing the finite element model. Thermal and structural responses are obtained from a conventional linear finite element method and exact solutions. Results show that the hierarchical flux-based method can provide improved thermal and structural solution accuracy with fewer elements when compared to results for the conventional linear element method.

  19. Analysis of finite deformations of elastic solids by the finite element method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Key, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Finite element applications, particularly to analyses of finite deformations in elastic solids, are reviewed, along with the difficulties encountered in the formulation of certain problems and in their numerical solution. Various approaches are discussed for overcoming these and other difficulties. A computer program designed for finite elasticity problems is described, and several numerical examples are presented.

  20. 2-D magnetotelluric modeling using finite element method incorporating unstructured quadrilateral elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakorn, Weerachai

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the finite element (FE) method incorporating quadrilateral elements for solving 2-D MT modeling was presented. The finite element software was developed, employing a paving algorithm to generate the unstructured quadrilateral mesh. The accuracy, efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of our FE forward modeling are presented, compared and discussed. The numerical results indicate that our FE codes using an unstructured quadrilateral mesh provide good accuracy when the local mesh refinement is applied around sites and in the area of interest, with superior results when compared to other FE methods. The reliability of the developed codes was also confirmed when comparing both analytical solutions and COMMEMI2D model. Furthermore, our developed FE codes incorporating an unstructured quadrilateral mesh showed useful and powerful features such as handling irregular and complex subregions and providing local refinement of the mesh for a 2-D domain as closely as unstructured triangular mesh but it requires less number of elements in a mesh.

  1. Iterative methods for elliptic finite element equations on general meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolaides, R. A.; Choudhury, Shenaz

    1986-01-01

    Iterative methods for arbitrary mesh discretizations of elliptic partial differential equations are surveyed. The methods discussed are preconditioned conjugate gradients, algebraic multigrid, deflated conjugate gradients, an element-by-element techniques, and domain decomposition. Computational results are included.

  2. Relation between finite element methods and nodal methods in transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between nodal methods and finite-element methods for solving the discrete-ordinates form of the transport equation in x-y geometry. Specifically, we will examine the relation of three finite-element schemes to the linear-linear (LL) and linear-nodal (LN) nodal schemes. The three finite-element schemes are the linear-continuous-diamond-difference (DD) scheme, the linear-discontinuous (LD) scheme, and the quadratic-discontinuous (QD) scheme. A brief derivation of the (LL) and (LN) nodal schemes is given in the third section of this paper. The approximations that cause the LL scheme to reduce to the DD, LD, and QD schemes are then indicated. An extremely simple method of deriving the finite-element schemes is then introduced.

  3. A comparative analysis of finite element and finite difference methods for free surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.; Vafai, K. . Dept of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    The present work consists of the comparative evaluation of the finite element method (FEM) and the finite difference method (FDM) for the analysis of free surface transport within a hollow ampule. The phenomenon of motion reversal of the free surfaces obtained earlier by the FDM is also analyzed by the FEM. It is found that the times at which the motion reversal occurs are independent of the applied pressure difference for any fixed dimension of the hollow ampule. Furthermore, it appears that the displacement of the inner and outer free surfaces varies linearly with the magnitude of the applied pressure difference. Finally, detailed comparative discussion is presented on the differences between the results obtained by FDM and FEM.

  4. A stabilized finite element method for finite-strain three-field poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Lorenz; Bordas, Rafel; Kay, David; Tavener, Simon

    2017-07-01

    We construct a stabilized finite-element method to compute flow and finite-strain deformations in an incompressible poroelastic medium. We employ a three-field mixed formulation to calculate displacement, fluid flux and pressure directly and introduce a Lagrange multiplier to enforce flux boundary conditions. We use a low order approximation, namely, continuous piecewise-linear approximation for the displacements and fluid flux, and piecewise-constant approximation for the pressure. This results in a simple matrix structure with low bandwidth. The method is stable in both the limiting cases of small and large permeability. Moreover, the discontinuous pressure space enables efficient approximation of steep gradients such as those occurring due to rapidly changing material coefficients or boundary conditions, both of which are commonly seen in physical and biological applications.

  5. A Successive Selection Method for finite element model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Baiyong; Zhang, Weijie; Lu, Qiuhai; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Finite Element (FE) model can be updated effectively and efficiently by using the Response Surface Method (RSM). However, it often involves performance trade-offs such as high computational cost for better accuracy or loss of efficiency for lots of design parameter updates. This paper proposes a Successive Selection Method (SSM), which is based on the linear Response Surface (RS) function and orthogonal design. SSM rewrites the linear RS function into a number of linear equations to adjust the Design of Experiment (DOE) after every FE calculation. SSM aims to interpret the implicit information provided by the FE analysis, to locate the Design of Experiment (DOE) points more quickly and accurately, and thereby to alleviate the computational burden. This paper introduces the SSM and its application, describes the solution steps of point selection for DOE in detail, and analyzes SSM's high efficiency and accuracy in the FE model updating. A numerical example of a simply supported beam and a practical example of a vehicle brake disc show that the SSM can provide higher speed and precision in FE model updating for engineering problems than traditional RSM.

  6. Finite element methods of studying mechanical factors in blood flow.

    PubMed

    Davids, N

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews some biomechanical analyses of blood flow in large arteries based on a general computer modeling using the finite element method. We study the following question: What is the role played by the interrelated factors of mechanical stress, flow irregularities, and diffusion through the endothelium on the etiology of atherosclerosis or the aggravation of vascular injury. It presents the computational features of the method and stresses the physiological significance of the results, such as the effect of geometric complexities, material nonlinearities, and non-Newtonian rheology of the blood. The specific mechanical and fluid dynamic factors analyzed are wall shear stress, flow profiles, and pressure variations. After simulating tubes of circular cross section, we apply the analysis to a number of physiological situations of significance, including blood flow in the entrance region, at bifurcations, in the annular region between an inserted catheter of varying diameter and the vessel. A model study of pulsatile flow in a 60 degree bifurcated channel of velocity profiles provided corroborative measurements of these processes with special emphasis on reversed or distributed flow conditions. The corresponding analysis was extended to the situation in which flow separates and reverses in the neighborhood of stagnation points. This required developing the nonlinear expression for the convective velocity change in the medium. A computer algorithm was developed to handle simultaneous effects of pressure and viscous forces on velocity change across the element and applied to the canine prebranch arterial segment. For mean physiological flow conditions, low shear stresses (0-10 dynes/cm2) are predicted near the wall in the diverging plane, higher values (50 dynes/cm2) along the converging sides of the wall. Backflow is predicted along the outer wall, pressure recovery prior to and into the branches, and a peak shear at the divider lip.

  7. Integrated force method versus displacement method for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Berke, L.; Gallagher, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    A novel formulation termed the integrated force method (IFM) has been developed in recent years for analyzing structures. In this method all the internal forces are taken as independent variables, and the system equilibrium equations (EEs) are integrated with the global compatibility conditions (CCs) to form the governing set of equations. In IFM the CCs are obtained from the strain formulation of St. Venant, and no choices of redundant load systems have to be made, in constrast to the standard force method (SFM). This property of IFM allows the generation of the governing equation to be automated straightforwardly, as it is in the popular stiffness method (SM). In this report IFM and SM are compared relative to the structure of their respective equations, their conditioning, required solution methods, overall computational requirements, and convergence properties as these factors influence the accuracy of the results. Overall, this new version of the force method produces more accurate results than the stiffness method for comparable computational cost.

  8. Integrated force method versus displacement method for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel formulation termed the integrated force method (IFM) has been developed in recent years for analyzing structures. In this method all the internal forces are taken as independent variables, and the system equilibrium equations (EE's) are integrated with the global compatibility conditions (CC's) to form the governing set of equations. In IFM the CC's are obtained from the strain formulation of St. Venant, and no choices of redundant load systems have to be made, in constrast to the standard force method (SFM). This property of IFM allows the generation of the governing equation to be automated straightforwardly, as it is in the popular stiffness method (SM). In this report IFM and SM are compared relative to the structure of their respective equations, their conditioning, required solution methods, overall computational requirements, and convergence properties as these factors influence the accuracy of the results. Overall, this new version of the force method produces more accurate results than the stiffness method for comparable computational cost.

  9. Finite element method - A companion in experimental mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    The hybrid experimental-numerical procedure for structural analysis is described by its applications in fracture mechanics. The procedure was first verified by the excellent agreements between the dynamic stress intensity factors obtained directly by dynamic photoelasticity and those generated by the hybrid procedure where a dynamic finite element code was executed in its generation mode. The hybrid procedure was then used to determine the dynamic fracture toughness of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  10. Finite element method - A companion in experimental mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    The hybrid experimental-numerical procedure for structural analysis is described by its applications in fracture mechanics. The procedure was first verified by the excellent agreements between the dynamic stress intensity factors obtained directly by dynamic photoelasticity and those generated by the hybrid procedure where a dynamic finite element code was executed in its generation mode. The hybrid procedure was then used to determine the dynamic fracture toughness of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  11. Finite Element Method for Thermal Analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, J.

    1973-01-01

    A two- and three-dimensional, finite-element thermal-analysis program which handles conduction with internal heat generation, convection, radiation, specified flux, and specified temperature boundary conditions is presented. Elements used in the program are the triangle and tetrahedron for two- and three-dimensional analysis, respectively. The theory used in the program is developed, and several sample problems demonstrating the capability and reliability of the program are presented. A guide to using the program, description of the input cards, and program listing are included.

  12. Finite element methods for the nonlinear motion of flexible aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Victor P.

    Conventional strategies in aeroelasticity and flight dynamics for studying aircraft involve making broad assumptions based more on analytical or computational convenience rather than on physical reality. Typically in aeroelastic analyses, the study of the interaction between aircraft flexibility and aerodynamic forces, the aircraft or structural component in question is constrained in a way that is not representative of realistic flight conditions. In flight dynamics, the study of the maneuvering of aircraft, it is common to consider the vehicle as perfectly rigid. In both disciplines it is well known that such contrivances can produce incorrect results. To address these shortcomings, a finite element formulation is developed for analyzing the dynamics of flexible aircraft undergoing arbitrarily large rotation and translation. The formulation is derived in a set of body-attached axes, a frame of reference conducive to analyzing the motion and control of aircraft, and considers the structure as a whole. Several implementation issues are addressed and mitigated, including finite element interpolating functions, the use of eigenvectors as the basis for nonlinear deformation, inclusion of geometrically nonlinear effects in the strain energy, and enforcement of kinematic constraints. Numerical examples illustrate the capabilities of the latter two aspects, and a free-flying aeroelastic model problem demonstrates the overall potential of the proposed formulation. The development is approached in a general way so that the methodology can be applied to any structure that may be modeled by finite elements.

  13. Scripted Finite Element Methods Applied to Global Geomagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribaudo, J.; Constable, C.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic field observations from CHAMP, Ø rsted and SAC-C and improved techniques for comprehensive geomagnetic field modeling have generated renewed interest in using satellite and observatory data to study global scale electromagnetic induction in Earth's crust and mantle. The primary external source field derives from variations in the magnetospheric ring current, and recent studies show that over-simplified assumptions about its spatial structure lead to biased estimates of the frequency-dependent electromagnetic response functions generally used in inversions for mantle conductivity. The bias takes the form of local time dependence in the C- response estimates and highlights the need for flexible forward modeling tools for the global induction problem to accommodate 3D time-varying structure in both primary and induced fields. We are developing such tools using FlexPDE, a commercially available script-based finite element method (FEM) package for partial differential equations. Our strategy is to model the vector potential \\mathbf{A}, where \\mathbf{B} = \

  14. Finite element analysis of chip formation usingale method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, V.

    2017-05-01

    In recent times, many studies made in FEM on plain isotropic metal plate formulation. The stress analysis plays the significant role in the stability of structural safety and system. The stress and distortion estimation is very helpful for designing and manufacturing product well. Usually the residual stress and plastic strain determine the fatigue life of structure, it also plays the significant role in designing and choosing material. When the load magnitude increases the crack starts to form, decreasing the work load and the residual stress reduces the damage of the metal. The manufacturing process is a key parameter in process and forming the part of any system. However, machining operation involves complex thing like hot development, material property and other estimates based on transition of the plastic strain and residual stress. The reduction of residual stress plays the complexity role in the finite element study. This paper deals with the manufacturing process with less residual stress and strain. The results shows that, by applying the ALE method in machining we can reduce the load on the work piece hence the life type of the work piece can be increased. We also investigate the cutting tool wear and there efficiency since it is a essential machine member in fabrication technology. ABAQUS platform used to solve the machining operation

  15. Thermal analysis of disc brakes using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenudin, Jamari, J.; Tauviqirrahman, M.

    2017-01-01

    Disc brakes are components of a vehicle that serve to slow or stop the rotation of the wheel. This paper discusses the phenomenon of heat distribution on the brake disc during braking. Heat distribution on the brake disc is caused by kinetic energy changing into mechanical energy. Energy changes occur during the braking process due to friction between the surface of the disc and a disc pad. The temperature resulting from this friction rises high. This thermal analysis on brake discs is aimed to evaluate the performance of an electric car in the braking process. The aim of this study is to analyze the thermal behavior of the brake discs using the Finite Element Method (FEM) through examining the heat distribution on the brake disc using 3-D modeling. Results obtained from the FEM reflect the effects of high heat due to the friction between the disc pad with the disc rotor. Results of the simulation study are used to identify the effect of the heat distribution that occurred during the braking process.

  16. Optimization design of thumbspica splint using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tz-How; Feng, Chi-Kung; Gung, Yih-Wen; Tsai, Mei-Wun; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Lin

    2006-12-01

    De Quervain's tenosynovitis is often observed on repetitive flexion of the thumb. In the clinical setting, the conservative treatment is usually an applied thumbspica splint to immobilize the thumb. However, the traditional thumbspica splint is bulky and heavy. Thus, this study used the finite element (FE) method to remove redundant material in order to reduce the splint's weight and increase ventilation. An FE model of a thumbspica splint was constructed using ANSYS9.0 software. A maximum lateral thumb pinch force of 98 N was used as the input loading condition for the FE model. This study implemented topology optimization and design optimization to seek the optimal thickness and shape of the splint. This new design was manufactured and compared with the traditional thumbspica splint. Ten thumbspica splints were tested in a materials testing system, and statistically analyzed using an independent t test. The optimal thickness of the thumbspica splint was 3.2 mm. The new design is not significantly different from the traditional splint in the immobilization effect. However, the volume of this new design has been reduced by about 35%. This study produced a new thumbspica splint shape with less volume, but had a similar immobilization effect compared to the traditional shape. In a clinical setting, this result can be used by the occupational therapist as a reference for manufacturing lighter thumbspica splints for patients with de Quervain's tenosynovitis.

  17. Cognitive-graphic method for constructing of hierarchical forms of basic functions of biquadratic finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astionenko, I. O.; Litvinenko, O. I.; Osipova, N. V.; Tuluchenko, G. Ya.; Khomchenko, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Recently the interpolation bases of the hierarchical type have been used for the problem solving of the approximation of multiple arguments functions (such as in the finite-element method). In this work the cognitive graphical method of constructing of the hierarchical form bases on the serendipity finite elements is suggested, which allowed to get the alternative bases on a biquadratic finite element from the serendipity family without internal knots' inclusion. The cognitive-graphic method allowed to improve the known interpolation procedure of Taylor and to get the modified elements with irregular arrangement of knots. The proposed procedures are universal and are spread in the area of finite-elements.

  18. A Multifunctional Interface Method for Coupling Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods: Two-Dimensional Scalar-Field Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.

    2002-01-01

    A multifunctional interface method with capabilities for variable-fidelity modeling and multiple method analysis is presented. The methodology provides an effective capability by which domains with diverse idealizations can be modeled independently to exploit the advantages of one approach over another. The multifunctional method is used to couple independently discretized subdomains, and it is used to couple the finite element and the finite difference methods. The method is based on a weighted residual variational method and is presented for two-dimensional scalar-field problems. A verification test problem and a benchmark application are presented, and the computational implications are discussed.

  19. The constraint method: A new finite element technique. [applied to static and dynamic loads on plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C.; Szabo, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    An approch to the finite element method which utilizes families of conforming finite elements based on complete polynomials is presented. Finite element approximations based on this method converge with respect to progressively reduced element sizes as well as with respect to progressively increasing orders of approximation. Numerical results of static and dynamic applications of plates are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. Comparisons are made with plate elements in NASTRAN and the high-precision plate element developed by Cowper and his co-workers. Some considerations are given to implementation of the constraint method into general purpose computer programs such as NASTRAN.

  20. New Application of Finite Element Method to Seamount Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HA, G.; Kim, S. S.; So, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic method can be utilized in a wide range of applications, including investigation of small-scale near-surface targets and characterization of large-scale geologic structures. In particular, marine magnetic studies involve with various interpretation approaches to constrain geophysical information regarding the depth of a particular seamount, its size and shape, and the orientation and magnitude of its magnetization. The accuracy of the estimated information is normally governed by the quality and amount of available data and by the sophistication of the employed modeling techniques. Here we aim to advance geomagnetic modeling approaches using the interactive finite element solver, COMSOL Multiphysics, and improve the degree of detail that can be obtained from the measured magnetic field. First, we carried out benchmark tests by comparing the computed results using the analytic solutions for simple bodies. We built two types of synthetic models with rectangular and sphere shaped ore bodies having high intensity of magnetization and we changed magnetized direction in each calculation. Comparisons of FEM-based results with the analytic ones exhibited good agreement in general. Second, marine magnetic data obtained at seamounts can be very crucial to determine the age and location of seamount formation. Traditional magnetic methods often assume the uniformly magnetized seamounts to simplify computational efforts. However, the inner structures of seamounts constrained by seismic data show a clear distinction between the dense core and edifice layers. Here we divide the seamount into the dense core and edifice layers in a synthetic model, assign different magnetization direction and intensity to them, and optimize these parameters by minimizing differences between the observed and numerical computed data. These examined results will be valuable to understand seamount formation processes in detail. In addition, we discuss FEM-based magnetic models to mimic the

  1. Phased Array Antenna Analysis Using Hybrid Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Waveguide ; (b) Geometry Model for Method of Moments ........................ 4 2. Printed Dipole Radiator: (a) Actual Geometry with Microstrip Balun and...Finite Elem ents . ............................................. 19 11. Equivalence Model for Waveguide /Cavity Problem: (a) Original Problem; (b... Waveguide Array Active Reflection Coefficient - Comparison of Results Uscig Cavity Array (CAVIARR) and General Array (PARANA) Models . 76 45. Rectangular

  2. Deformation analysis of optical flat surface with finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Pengqiang; Ren, Boyuan; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Dewei; Zhang, Longjiang; Su, Xing

    2016-10-01

    Proposing a new method for testing the ultra-precision aerostatic spindle motion accuracy based on analyzing the online real-time dynamic interference image. Optical flat crystal as the testing standard will be installed at the end of the ultra precision aerostatic spindle and will motion along with the spindle. On the other end of the spindle, the tool will be installed for online processing. The image data of optical flat crystal collected by the high-precision dynamic interferometer will be processed for analyzing the spindle error. For collecting higher accuracy image data, the installation way of optical flat crystal is one of the key technologies. Base on this, the effects of the clamping means on the surface accuracy of optical flat crystal is studied. At first, the finite element model of the optical flat crystal`s clamping structure were established. Secondly, the influence of the material of the supporting annulus, preload lateral clamping and spindle speed on the surface accuracy of optical flat crystal had been analyzed. At last, the improved and optimized structure of the optical flat crystal has been presented. As the analysis results shown, the RMS value of reference surface is 9.47nm and the deformation values of the central region is 0.17nm which satisfies the requirement of surface accuracy and installation of optical flat crystal. It has a very important theoretical and practical significance to establish spindle online testing system and research rotary error generating mechanism of ultra-precision spindle to improve surface accuracy of ultra-precision machining.

  3. Edge-based finite element method for shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, F. L. B.; Galeão, A. C.; Landau, L.

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes an edge-based implementation of the generalized residual minimum (GMRES) solver for the fully coupled solution of non-linear systems arising from finite element discretization of shallow water equations (SWEs). The gain in terms of memory, floating point operations and indirect addressing is quantified for semi-discrete and space-time analyses. Stabilized formulations, including Petrov-Galerkin models and discontinuity-capturing operators, are also discussed for both types of discretization. Results illustrating the quality of the stabilized solutions and the advantages of using the edge-based approach are presented at the end of the paper. Copyright

  4. An implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, T. L.

    2013-07-01

    This paper provides an implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method (LD-FEM) that spans the space of (l, x, y, z). A practical implementation of LD includes 1) selecting a computationally efficient algorithm to solve the 4 x 4 matrix system Ax = b that describes the angular flux in a mesh element, and 2) choosing how to store the data used to construct the matrix A and the vector b to either reduce memory consumption or increase computational speed. To analyze the first of these, three algorithms were selected to solve the 4 x 4 matrix equation: Cramer's rule, a streamlined implementation of Gaussian elimination, and LAPACK's Gaussian elimination subroutine dgesv. The results indicate that Cramer's rule and the streamlined Gaussian elimination algorithm perform nearly equivalently and outperform LAPACK's implementation of Gaussian elimination by a factor of 2. To analyze the second implementation detail, three formulations of the discretized LD-FEM equations were provided for implementation in a transport solver: 1) a low-memory formulation, which relies heavily on 'on-the-fly' calculations and less on the storage of pre-computed data, 2) a high-memory formulation, which pre-computes much of the data used to construct A and b, and 3) a reduced-memory formulation, which lies between the low - and high-memory formulations. These three formulations were assessed in the Jaguar transport solver based on relative memory footprint and computational speed for increasing mesh size and quadrature order. The results indicated that the memory savings of the low-memory formulation were not sufficient to warrant its implementation. The high-memory formulation resulted in a significant speed advantage over the reduced-memory option (10-50%), but also resulted in a proportional increase in memory consumption (5-45%) for increasing quadrature order and mesh count; therefore, the practitioner should weigh the system memory constraints against any

  5. An hp-adaptive finite element/boundary element coupling method for electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, E. P.; Maischak, M.; Leydecker, F.

    2007-04-01

    We present an hp-version of the finite element / boundary element coupling method to solve the eddy current problem for the time-harmonic Maxwell’s equations. We use H(curl, Ω -conforming vector-valued polynomials to approximate the electric field in the conductor Ω and surface curls of continuous piecewise polynomials on the boundary Γ of Ω to approximate the twisted tangential trace of the magnetic field on Γ. We present both a priori and a posteriori error estimates together with a three-fold hp-adaptive algorithm to compute the fem/bem coupling solution with appropriate distributions of polynomial degrees on suitably refined meshes.

  6. High-Order Curvilinear Finite Element Methods for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics [High Order Curvilinear Finite Elements for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, Veselin A.; Kolev, Tzanio V.; Rieben, Robert N.

    2012-09-20

    The numerical approximation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a movingLagrangian frame is at the heart of many multiphysics simulation algorithms. Here, we present a general framework for high-order Lagrangian discretization of these compressible shock hydrodynamics equations using curvilinear finite elements. This method is an extension of the approach outlined in [Dobrev et al., Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 65 (2010), pp. 1295--1310] and can be formulated for any finite dimensional approximation of the kinematic and thermodynamic fields, including generic finite elements on two- and three-dimensional meshes with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, or hexahedral zones. We discretize the kinematic variables of position and velocity using a continuous high-order basis function expansion of arbitrary polynomial degree which is obtained via a corresponding high-order parametric mapping from a standard reference element. This enables the use of curvilinear zone geometry, higher-order approximations for fields within a zone, and a pointwise definition of mass conservation which we refer to as strong mass conservation. Moreover, we discretize the internal energy using a piecewise discontinuous high-order basis function expansion which is also of arbitrary polynomial degree. This facilitates multimaterial hydrodynamics by treating material properties, such as equations of state and constitutive models, as piecewise discontinuous functions which vary within a zone. To satisfy the Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions at a shock boundary and generate the appropriate entropy, we introduce a general tensor artificial viscosity which takes advantage of the high-order kinematic and thermodynamic information available in each zone. Finally, we apply a generic high-order time discretization process to the semidiscrete equations to develop the fully discrete numerical algorithm. Our method can be viewed as the high-order generalization of the so-called staggered

  7. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  8. Generalized Finite Element Methods: Their Performance and Their Relation to Mixed Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    internal modes or a bubble space and is charac- terized in various ways, e.g., by function values at r - 1 in- terior points of each I. or by values of the... Szymczak , An Error Analysis for the Finite Element Method Applied to Convection-Diffusion Problems. To appear in Computer Methods in Appl. Math. Eng. [4

  9. Reliability of elasto-plastic structure using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Liu; Wilson H, Tang; Jiashou, Zhuo

    2002-02-01

    A solution of probabilistic FEM for elastic-plastic materials is presented based on the incremental theory of plasticity and a modified initial stress method. The formulations are deduced through a direct differentiation scheme. Partial differentiation of displacement, stress and the performance function can be iteratively performed with the computation of the mean values of displacement and stress. The presented method enjoys the efficiency of both the perturbation method and the finite difference method, but avoids the approximation during the partial differentiation calculation. In order to improve the efficiency, the adjoint vector method is introduced to calculate the differentiation of stress and displacement with respect to random variables. In addition, a time-saving computational method for reliability index of elastic-plastic materials is suggested based upon the advanced First Order Second Moment (FOSM) and by the usage of Taylor expansion for displacement. The suggested method is also applicable to 3-D cases.

  10. Enrichment of the finite element method with reproducing kernel particle method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Liu, W.K.; Uras, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    Based on the reproducing kernel particle method on enrichment procedure is introduced to enhance the effectiveness of the finite element method. The basic concepts for the reproducing kernel particle method are briefly reviewed. By adopting the well-known completeness requirements, a generalized form of the reproducing kernel particle method is developed. Through a combination of these two methods their unique advantages can be utilized. An alternative approach, the multiple field method is also introduced.

  11. Studying apple bruise using a finite element method analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal-Faria, P.; Alves, N.

    2017-07-01

    Apple bruise damage from harvesting, handling, transporting and sorting is considered to be the major source of reduced fruit quality, resulting in a loss of profits for the entire fruit industry. Bruising is defined as damage and discoloration of fruit flesh, usually with no breach of the skin. The three factors which can physically cause fruit bruising are vibration, compression load and impact. The last one is the main source of bruise damage. Therefore, prediction of the level of damage, stress distribution and deformation of the fruits under external force has become a very important task. To address these problems a finite element analysis has been developed for studying Portuguese Royal Gala apple bruise. The results obtained will be suitable to apple distributors and sellers and will allow a reduction of the impact caused by bruise damage in apple annual production.

  12. Multi-level adaptive finite element methods. 1: Variation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, A.

    1979-01-01

    A general numerical strategy for solving partial differential equations and other functional problems by cycling between coarser and finer levels of discretization is described. Optimal discretization schemes are provided together with very fast general solvers. It is described in terms of finite element discretizations of general nonlinear minimization problems. The basic processes (relaxation sweeps, fine-grid-to-coarse-grid transfers of residuals, coarse-to-fine interpolations of corrections) are directly and naturally determined by the objective functional and the sequence of approximation spaces. The natural processes, however, are not always optimal. Concrete examples are given and some new techniques are reviewed. Including the local truncation extrapolation and a multilevel procedure for inexpensively solving chains of many boundary value problems, such as those arising in the solution of time-dependent problems.

  13. Finite element methods for integrated aerodynamic heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.

    1991-01-01

    This report gives a description of the work which has been undertaken during the second year of a three year research program. The objectives of the program are to produce finite element based procedures for the solution of the large scale practical problems which are of interest to the Aerothermal Loads Branch (ALB) at NASA Langley Research Establishment. The problems of interest range from Euler simulations of full three dimensional vehicle configurations to local analyses of three dimensional viscous laminar flow. Adaptive meshes produced for both steady state and transient problems are to be considered. An important feature of the work is the provision of specialized techniques which can be used at ALB for the development of an integrated fluid/thermal/structural modeling capability.

  14. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  15. POSTPROCESSING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT METHODS FOR SOLVING CAHN-HILLIARD EQUATION: METHODS AND ERROR ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wansheng; Chen, Long; Zhou, Jie

    2016-05-01

    A postprocessing technique for mixed finite element methods for the Cahn-Hilliard equation is developed and analyzed. Once the mixed finite element approximations have been computed at a fixed time on the coarser mesh, the approximations are postprocessed by solving two decoupled Poisson equations in an enriched finite element space (either on a finer grid or a higher-order space) for which many fast Poisson solvers can be applied. The nonlinear iteration is only applied to a much smaller size problem and the computational cost using Newton and direct solvers is negligible compared with the cost of the linear problem. The analysis presented here shows that this technique remains the optimal rate of convergence for both the concentration and the chemical potential approximations. The corresponding error estimate obtained in our paper, especially the negative norm error estimates, are non-trivial and different with the existing results in the literatures.

  16. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  17. A Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Changqing; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi equations. This method is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving conservation laws. The method has the flexibility of treating complicated geometry by using arbitrary triangulation, can achieve high order accuracy with a local, compact stencil, and are suited for efficient parallel implementation. One and two dimensional numerical examples are given to illustrate the capability of the method.

  18. Unconstrained paving and plastering method for generating finite element meshes

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven J.; Blacker, Teddy D.; Kerr, Robert

    2010-03-02

    Computer software for and a method of generating a conformal all quadrilateral or hexahedral mesh comprising selecting an object with unmeshed boundaries and performing the following while unmeshed voids are larger than twice a desired element size and unrecognizable as either a midpoint subdividable or pave-and-sweepable polyhedra: selecting a front to advance; based on sizes of fronts and angles with adjacent fronts, determining which adjacent fronts should be advanced with the selected front; advancing the fronts; detecting proximities with other nearby fronts; resolving any found proximities; forming quadrilaterals or unconstrained columns of hexahedra where two layers cross; and establishing hexahedral elements where three layers cross.

  19. An implicit finite element method for discrete dynamic fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Gerken, Jobie M.

    1999-12-01

    A method for modeling the discrete fracture of two-dimensional linear elastic structures with a distribution of small cracks subject to dynamic conditions has been developed. The foundation for this numerical model is a plane element formulated from the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The distribution of small cracks is incorporated into the numerical model by including a small crack at each element interface. The additional strain field in an element adjacent to this crack is treated as an externally applied strain field in the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The resulting stiffness matrix is that of a standard plane element. The resulting load vector is that of a standard plane element with an additional term that includes the externally applied strain field. Except for the crack strain field equations, all terms of the stiffness matrix and load vector are integrated symbolically in Maple V so that fully integrated plane stress and plane strain elements are constructed. The crack strain field equations are integrated numerically. The modeling of dynamic behavior of simple structures was demonstrated within acceptable engineering accuracy. In the model of axial and transverse vibration of a beam and the breathing mode of vibration of a thin ring, the dynamic characteristics were shown to be within expected limits. The models dominated by tensile forces (the axially loaded beam and the pressurized ring) were within 0.5% of the theoretical values while the shear dominated model (the transversely loaded beam) is within 5% of the calculated theoretical value. The constant strain field of the tensile problems can be modeled exactly by the numerical model. The numerical results should therefore, be exact. The discrepancies can be accounted for by errors in the calculation of frequency from the numerical results. The linear strain field of the transverse model must be modeled by a series of constant strain elements. This is an approximation to the true strain field, so some

  20. A FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR ELASTICITY INTERFACE PROBLEMS WITH LOCALLY MODIFIED TRIANGULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    XIE, HUI; LI, ZHILIN; QIAO, ZHONGHUA

    2013-01-01

    A finite element method for elasticity systems with discontinuities in the coefficients and the flux across an arbitrary interface is proposed in this paper. The method is based on a Cartesian mesh with local modifications to the mesh. The total degrees of the freedom of the finite element method remains the same as that of the Cartesian mesh. The local modifications lead to a quasi-uniform body-fitted mesh from the original Cartesian mesh. The standard finite element theory and implementation are applicable. Numerical examples that involve discontinuous material coefficients and non-homogeneous jump in the flux across the interface demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:24058368

  1. Domain decomposition methods for nonconforming finite element spaces of Lagrange-type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsar, Lawrence C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we consider the application of three popular domain decomposition methods to Lagrange-type nonconforming finite element discretizations of scalar, self-adjoint, second order elliptic equations. The additive Schwarz method of Dryja and Widlund, the vertex space method of Smith, and the balancing method of Mandel applied to nonconforming elements are shown to converge at a rate no worse than their applications to the standard conforming piecewise linear Galerkin discretization. Essentially, the theory for the nonconforming elements is inherited from the existing theory for the conforming elements with only modest modification by constructing an isomorphism between the nonconforming finite element space and a space of continuous piecewise linear functions.

  2. A finite element method for analysis of vibration induced by maglev trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, S. H.; Ho, Y. S.; Leong, C. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper developed a finite element method to perform the maglev train-bridge-soil interaction analysis with rail irregularities. An efficient proportional integral (PI) scheme with only a simple equation is used to control the force of the maglev wheel, which is modeled as a contact node moving along a number of target nodes. The moving maglev vehicles are modeled as a combination of spring-damper elements, lumped mass and rigid links. The Newmark method with the Newton-Raphson method is then used to solve the nonlinear dynamic equation. The major advantage is that all the proposed procedures are standard in the finite element method. The analytic solution of maglev vehicles passing a Timoshenko beam was used to validate the current finite element method with good agreements. Moreover, a very large-scale finite element analysis using the proposed scheme was also tested in this paper.

  3. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  4. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  5. Rapid simulation of electromagnetic telemetry using an axisymmetric semianalytical finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiefu; Zeng, Shubin; Dong, Qiuzhao; Huang, Yueqin

    2017-02-01

    An axisymmetric semianalytical finite element method is proposed and employed for rapid simulations of electromagnetic telemetry in layered underground formation. In this method, the layered media is decomposed into several subdomains and the interfaces between subdomains are discretized by conventional finite elements. Then a Riccati equation based high precision integration scheme is applied to exploit the homogeneity along the vertical direction in each layer. This semianalytical finite element scheme is very efficient in modeling electromagnetic telemetry in layered formation. Numerical examples as well as a field case with water based mud as drilling fluid are given to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this method.

  6. An Error Analysis for the Finite Element Method Applied to Convection Diffusion Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    D TFhG-]NOLOGY k 4b 00 \\" ) ’b Technical Note BN-962 AN ERROR ANALYSIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD APPLIED TO CONVECTION DIFFUSION PROBLEM by I...Babu~ka and W. G. Szym’czak March 1981 V.. UNVI I Of- ’i -S AN ERROR ANALYSIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD P. - 0 w APPLIED TO CONVECTION DIFFUSION ...AOAO98 895 MARYLAND UNIVYCOLLEGE PARK INST FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE--ETC F/G 12/I AN ERROR ANALYIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD APPLIED TO CONV..ETC (U

  7. Development and Application of the p-version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-21

    this property hierarchic families of finite elements. The h-version of the finite element method has been the subject of inten- sive study since the...early 1950’s and perhaps even earlier. Study of the p-version of the finite element method, on the other hand, began at Washington University in St...Louis in the early 1970’s and led to a more recent study of * .the h-p version. Research in the p-version (formerly called The Constraint Method) has

  8. The simulation of Lamb waves in a cracked plate using the scaled boundary finite element method.

    PubMed

    Gravenkamp, Hauke; Prager, Jens; Saputra, Albert A; Song, Chongmin

    2012-09-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method is applied to the simulation of Lamb waves for ultrasonic testing applications. With this method, the general elastodynamic problem is solved, while only the boundary of the domain under consideration has to be discretized. The reflection of the fundamental Lamb wave modes from cracks of different geometry in a steel plate is modeled. A test problem is compared with commercial finite element software, showing the efficiency and convergence of the scaled boundary finite element method. A special formulation of this method is utilized to calculate dispersion relations for plate structures. For the discretization of the boundary, higher-order elements are employed to improve the efficiency of the simulations. The simplicity of mesh generation of a cracked plate for a scaled boundary finite element analysis is illustrated.

  9. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  10. A Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Key, S.W.

    1998-11-12

    A method is presented for connecting dissimilar finite element meshes in three dimensions. The method combines the concept of master and slave surfaces with the uniform strain approach for surface, corrections finite elements- By modifyhg the are made to element formulations boundaries of elements on the slave such that first-order patch tests are passed. The method can be used to connect meshes which use different element types. In addition, master and slave surfaces can be designated independently of relative mesh resolutions. Example problems in three-dimensional linear elasticity are presented.

  11. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  12. Experimental Validation of Finite Element and Boundary Element Methods for Predicting Structural Vibration and Radiated Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuefeng

    1992-01-01

    The research presented in this dissertation is reported in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing, and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for finite, baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level expected to be radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis, noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  13. Comparative study of the boundary element technique and the finite element method in two dimensional eigenvalue problem

    SciTech Connect

    Baradari, F.

    1982-01-01

    In this work the applicability of a ''Boundary Element method'' for the numerical solution of the Liouville and Helmholtz eigenvalue problem for different two dimensional geometries including a typical reactor configuration was investigated. The method is based on the discretization of the unknown along the boundary and Green's function representation of the governing equation. To compare the capability of this method with the finite element method, a finite element code which uses quadratic quadrilateral isoparametric elements was developed. A boundary element code was also written. These codes were used to determine the fundamental eigenvalue for several two dimensional geometries--square, ''L'' shaped, circular, and a quarter of a typical reactor core. The results of both codes were compared with each other and with analytical solutions where available. To optimize the computer time for the code based on the boundary element method, a powerful search technique called Fibonacci search was used to determine the fundamental eigenvalues. During the course of this study, it was found that eliminating the imaginary part of the fundamental solution of the Helmholtz equation produced an instability in the result. The results show that, due to the use of the iteration procedure in the boundary element method to evaluate the determinant of the deduced matrix, more computer time is required for the boundary element solution than the finite element solution. However, the results obtained on the basis of the boundary element technique are more accurate than those from the finite element method.

  14. A parallel implementation of an EBE solver for the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.P.; Las Casas, E.B.; Carvalho, M.L.B.

    1994-12-31

    A parallel implementation using PVM on a cluster of workstations of an Element By Element (EBE) solver using the Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) method is described, along with an application in the solution of the linear systems generated from finite element analysis of a problem in three dimensional linear elasticity. The PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) system, developed at the Oak Ridge Laboratory, allows the construction of a parallel MIMD machine by connecting heterogeneous computers linked through a network. In this implementation, version 3.1 of PVM is used, and 11 SLC Sun workstations and a Sun SPARC-2 model are connected through Ethernet. The finite element program is based on SDP, System for Finite Element Based Software Development, developed at the Brazilian National Laboratory for Scientific Computation (LNCC). SDP provides the basic routines for a finite element application program, as well as a standard for programming and documentation, intended to allow exchanges between research groups in different centers.

  15. Representation of bioelectric current sources using Whitney elements in the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz Tanzer, I.; Järvenpää, Seppo; Nenonen, Jukka; Somersalo, Erkki

    2005-07-01

    Bioelectric current sources of magneto- and electroencephalograms (MEG, EEG) are usually modelled with discrete delta-function type current dipoles, despite the fact that the currents in the brain are naturally continuous throughout the neuronal tissue. In this study, we represent bioelectric current sources in terms of Whitney-type elements in the finite element method (FEM) using a tetrahedral mesh. The aim is to study how well the Whitney elements can reproduce the potential and magnetic field patterns generated by a point current dipole in a homogeneous conducting sphere. The electric potential is solved for a unit sphere model with isotropic conductivity and magnetic fields are calculated for points located on a cap outside the sphere. The computed potential and magnetic field are compared with analytical solutions for a current dipole. Relative difference measures between the FEM and analytical solutions are less than 1%, suggesting that Whitney elements as bioelectric current sources are able to produce the same potential and magnetic field patterns as the point dipole sources.

  16. Representation of bioelectric current sources using Whitney elements in the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, I Oğuz; Järvenpää, Seppo; Nenonen, Jukka; Somersalo, Erkki

    2005-07-07

    Bioelectric current sources of magneto- and electroencephalograms (MEG, EEG) are usually modelled with discrete delta-function type current dipoles, despite the fact that the currents in the brain are naturally continuous throughout the neuronal tissue. In this study, we represent bioelectric current sources in terms of Whitney-type elements in the finite element method (FEM) using a tetrahedral mesh. The aim is to study how well the Whitney elements can reproduce the potential and magnetic field patterns generated by a point current dipole in a homogeneous conducting sphere. The electric potential is solved for a unit sphere model with isotropic conductivity and magnetic fields are calculated for points located on a cap outside the sphere. The computed potential and magnetic field are compared with analytical solutions for a current dipole. Relative difference measures between the FEM and analytical solutions are less than 1%, suggesting that Whitney elements as bioelectric current sources are able to produce the same potential and magnetic field patterns as the point dipole sources.

  17. The use of Galerkin finite-element methods to solve mass-transport equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.

    1977-01-01

    The partial differential equation that describes the transport and reaction of chemical solutes in porous media was solved using the Galerkin finite-element technique. These finite elements were superimposed over finite-difference cells used to solve the flow equation. Both convection and flow due to hydraulic dispersion were considered. Linear and Hermite cubic approximations (basis functions) provided satisfactory results: however, the linear functions were computationally more efficient for two-dimensional problems. Successive over relaxation (SOR) and iteration techniques using Tchebyschef polynomials were used to solve the sparce matrices generated using the linear and Hermite cubic functions, respectively. Comparisons of the finite-element methods to the finite-difference methods, and to analytical results, indicated that a high degree of accuracy may be obtained using the method outlined. The technique was applied to a field problem involving an aquifer contaminated with chloride, tritium, and strontium-90. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Orthodontic forces generated by a simulated archwire appliance evaluated by the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Spyrakos, C C; Bernard, D O

    1990-01-01

    The finite element method has been used to determine the stress distribution generated by the initial placement of a simulated preset bracket-type orthodontic appliance utilizing titanium-nickel alloy archwire.

  19. Large-eddy simulation in complex domains using the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.C.; Kornblum, B.T.; Kollman, W.

    1996-11-12

    Finite element methods (FEM) are demonstrated in combination with large-eddy simulations (LES) as a valuable tool for the study of turbulent, separating channel flows, specifically the flow over a backward facing step.

  20. Research on Finite Element Model Generating Method of General Gear Based on Parametric Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yulong; Yan, Bo; Fu, Yao; Chen, Wei; Hou, Liguo

    2017-06-01

    Aiming at the problems of low efficiency and poor quality of gear meshing in the current mainstream finite element software, through the establishment of universal gear three-dimensional model, and explore the rules of unit and node arrangement. In this paper, a finite element model generation method of universal gear based on parameterization is proposed. Visual Basic program is used to realize the finite element meshing, give the material properties, and set the boundary / load conditions and other pre-processing work. The dynamic meshing analysis of the gears is carried out with the method proposed in this pape, and compared with the calculated values to verify the correctness of the method. The method greatly shortens the workload of gear finite element pre-processing, improves the quality of gear mesh, and provides a new idea for the FEM pre-processing.

  1. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  2. Highly Accurate Beam Torsion Solutions Using the p-Version Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James P.

    1996-01-01

    A new treatment of the classical beam torsion boundary value problem is applied. Using the p-version finite element method with shape functions based on Legendre polynomials, torsion solutions for generic cross-sections comprised of isotropic materials are developed. Element shape functions for quadrilateral and triangular elements are discussed, and numerical examples are provided.

  3. System and Method for Finite Element Simulation of Helicopter Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, R. E. (Inventor); Dulsenberg, Ken (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a turbulence model that has been developed for blade-element helicopter simulation. This model uses an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserves the statistical characteristics of the turbulence spectra over the rotor disc, while providing velocity components in real time to each of five blade-element stations along each of four blades. for a total of twenty blade-element stations. The simulator system includes a software implementation of flight dynamics that adheres to the guidelines for turbulence set forth in military specifications. One of the features of the present simulator system is that it applies simulated turbulence to the rotor blades of the helicopter, rather than to its center of gravity. The simulator system accurately models the rotor penetration into a gust field. It includes time correlation between the front and rear of the main rotor, as well as between the side forces felt at the center of gravity and at the tail rotor. It also includes features for added realism, such as patchy turbulence and vertical gusts in to which the rotor disc penetrates. These features are realized by a unique real time implementation of the turbulence filters. The new simulator system uses two arrays one on either side of the main rotor to record the turbulence field and to produce time-correlation from the front to the rear of the rotor disc. The use of Gaussian Interpolation between the two arrays maintains the statistical properties of the turbulence across the rotor disc. The present simulator system and method may be used in future and existing real-time helicopter simulations with minimal increase in computational workload.

  4. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  5. Finite element analysis in fluids; Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Finite Element Methods in Flow Problems, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Apr. 3-7, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J. (Editor); Karr, Gerald R. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are examined in reviews and reports, with an emphasis on finite-element methods. Sections are devoted to adaptive meshes, atmospheric dynamics, combustion, compressible flows, control-volume finite elements, crystal growth, domain decomposition, EM-field problems, FDM/FEM, and fluid-structure interactions. Consideration is given to free-boundary problems with heat transfer, free surface flow, geophysical flow problems, heat and mass transfer, high-speed flow, incompressible flow, inverse design methods, MHD problems, the mathematics of finite elements, and mesh generation. Also discussed are mixed finite elements, multigrid methods, non-Newtonian fluids, numerical dissipation, parallel vector processing, reservoir simulation, seepage, shallow-water problems, spectral methods, supercomputer architectures, three-dimensional problems, and turbulent flows.

  6. Efficient Preconditioning for the p-Version Finite Element Method in Two Dimensions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    paper, we study fast parallel preconditioners for systems of equations arising from the p-version finite element method. The p-version finite element...computations and the solution of a relatively small global auxiliary problem. We study two different methods. In the first (Section 3), the global...20], will be studied in the next section. Problem (3.12) is obviously much more easily solved than the original problem ,nd the procedure is highly

  7. A class of hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetics: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, J. L.; Chatterjee, A.; Gong, J.

    1993-01-01

    Integral equation methods have generally been the workhorse for antenna and scattering computations. In the case of antennas, they continue to be the prominent computational approach, but for scattering applications the requirement for large-scale computations has turned researchers' attention to near neighbor methods such as the finite element method, which has low O(N) storage requirements and is readily adaptable in modeling complex geometrical features and material inhomogeneities. In this paper, we review three hybrid finite element methods for simulating composite scatterers, conformal microstrip antennas, and finite periodic arrays. Specifically, we discuss the finite element method and its application to electromagnetic problems when combined with the boundary integral, absorbing boundary conditions, and artificial absorbers for terminating the mesh. Particular attention is given to large-scale simulations, methods, and solvers for achieving low memory requirements and code performance on parallel computing architectures.

  8. A proposed method for enhanced eigen-pair extraction using finite element methods: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Mitchell, L. D.

    1988-01-01

    The paper covers two distinct parts: theory and application. The goal of this work was the reduction of model size with an increase in eigenvalue/vector accuracy. This method is ideal for the condensation of large truss- or beam-type structures. The theoretical approach involves the conversion of a continuum transfer matrix beam element into an 'Exact' dynamic stiffness element. This formulation is implemented in a finite element environment. This results in the need to solve a transcendental eigenvalue problem. Once the eigenvalue is determined the eigenvectors can be reconstructed with any desired spatial precision. No discretization limitations are imposed on the reconstruction. The results of such a combined finite element and transfer matrix formulation is a much smaller FEM eigenvalue problem. This formulation has the ability to extract higher eigenvalues as easily and as accurately as lower eigenvalues. Moreover, one can extract many more eigenvalues/vectors from the model than the number of degrees of freedom in the FEM formulation. Typically, the number of eigenvalues accurately extractable via the 'Exact' element method are at least 8 times the number of degrees of freedom. In contrast, the FEM usually extracts one accurate (within 5 percent) eigenvalue for each 3-4 degrees of freedom. The 'Exact' element results in a 20-30 improvement in the number of accurately extractable eigenvalues and eigenvectors.

  9. Domain decomposition based iterative methods for nonlinear elliptic finite element problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, X.C.

    1994-12-31

    The class of overlapping Schwarz algorithms has been extensively studied for linear elliptic finite element problems. In this presentation, the author considers the solution of systems of nonlinear algebraic equations arising from the finite element discretization of some nonlinear elliptic equations. Several overlapping Schwarz algorithms, including the additive and multiplicative versions, with inexact Newton acceleration will be discussed. The author shows that the convergence rate of the Newton`s method is independent of the mesh size used in the finite element discretization, and also independent of the number of subdomains into which the original domain in decomposed. Numerical examples will be presented.

  10. On the Finite Element Implementation of the Generalized Method of Cells Micromechanics Constitutive Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    The Generalized Method of Cells (GMC), a micromechanics based constitutive model, is implemented into the finite element code MARC using the user subroutine HYPELA. Comparisons in terms of transverse deformation response, micro stress and strain distributions, and required CPU time are presented for GMC and finite element models of fiber/matrix unit cell. GMC is shown to provide comparable predictions of the composite behavior and requires significantly less CPU time as compared to a finite element analysis of the unit cell. Details as to the organization of the HYPELA code are provided with the actual HYPELA code included in the appendix.

  11. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number, laminar flows are presented. In both of the methods, the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element. The triangular element is contained inside the bi-quadratic isoparametric element. It has been reported previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in the velocity-pressure integrated method, yielded accurate computational results for high Reynolds number flows. It is shown that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yielded accurate velocity and pressure fields which were comparable to those obtained using the velocity-pressure integrated method. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine-grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow for Reynolds number of 10,000, a laminar backward-facing step flow, a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders, and a channel flow with an internal blockage. A finite element computer program (NSFLOW/P) for the 2-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented.

  12. Validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, and the surface vibration was used as input to the BEM to predict the sound intensity and sound power. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis. Noise predicted by the BEM was validated by sound intensity measurements. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM modeling using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by a sound intensity scan. The sound power predicted from the BEM model using measured vibration data yields an excellent prediction of radiated noise. The sound power predicted by the combined FEM/BEM model also gives a good prediction of radiated noise except for a shift of the natural frequencies that are due to limitations in the FEM model.

  13. A simple finite element method for non-divergence form elliptic equation

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2017-03-01

    Here, we develop a simple finite element method for solving second order elliptic equations in non-divergence form by combining least squares concept with discontinuous approximations. This simple method has a symmetric and positive definite system and can be easily analyzed and implemented. We could have also used general meshes with polytopal element and hanging node in the method. We prove that our finite element solution approaches to the true solution when the mesh size approaches to zero. Numerical examples are tested that demonstrate the robustness and flexibility of the method.

  14. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Decker, Rand A.

    1989-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number laminar flows are presented. In both methods the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element which is contained inside the biquadratic flow element. It has been shown previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in conjunction with the velocity-pressure integrated method, yields accurate computational results for high-Reynolds-number flows. It is shown in this paper that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yields computational results which are comparable to those of the velocity-pressure integrated method for both the velocity and the pressure fields. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two finite element methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow of Reynolds number 10000, a laminar backward-facing step flow and a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders.

  15. Simulation of thin slot spirals and dual circular patch antennas using the finite element method with mixed elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.; Nurnberger, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    This semi-annual report describes progress up to mid-January 1995. The report contains five sections all dealing with the modeling of spiral and patch antennas recessed in metallic platforms. Of significance is the development of decomposition schemes which separate the different regions of the antenna volume. Substantial effort was devoted to improving the feed model in the context of the finite element method (FEM). Finally, an innovative scheme for truncating finite element meshes is presented.

  16. A comparison of boundary element and finite element methods for modeling axisymmetric polymeric drop deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Russell; Toose, Matthijs; Macosko, Christopher W.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2001-12-01

    A modified boundary element method (BEM) and the DEVSS-G finite element method (FEM) are applied to model the deformation of a polymeric drop suspended in another fluid subjected to start-up uniaxial extensional flow. The effects of viscoelasticity, via the Oldroyd-B differential model, are considered for the drop phase using both FEM and BEM and for both the drop and matrix phases using FEM. Where possible, results are compared with the linear deformation theory. Consistent predictions are obtained among the BEM, FEM, and linear theory for purely Newtonian systems and between FEM and linear theory for fully viscoelastic systems. FEM and BEM predictions for viscoelastic drops in a Newtonian matrix agree very well at short times but differ at longer times, with worst agreement occurring as critical flow strength is approached. This suggests that the dominant computational advantages held by the BEM over the FEM for this and similar problems may diminish or even disappear when the issue of accuracy is appropriately considered. Fully viscoelastic problems, which are only feasible using the FEM formulation, shed new insight on the role of viscoelasticity of the matrix fluid in drop deformation. Copyright

  17. Analysis of the mechanical stresses on a squirrel cage induction motor by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, C.H.; Nicolas, A. )

    1999-05-01

    The mechanical deformations and stresses have been analyzed by the Finite Element Method (FEM) in 3 dimensions on the rotor bars of a small squirrel cage induction motor. The authors considered the magnetic forces and the centrifugal forces as sources which provoked the deformations and stresses on the rotor bars. The mechanical calculations have been performed after doing the electromagnetic Finite Element modeling on the motor in steady states with various slip conditions.

  18. A new approach in cascade flow analysis using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, E.; Hamed, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new approach in analyzing the potential flow past cascades and single airfoils using the finite element method is developed. In this analysis the circulation around the airfoil is not externally imposed but is directly computed in the numerical solution. Different finite element discretization patterns, orders of piecewise approximation, and grid sizes are used in the solution. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental measurements and exact solutions in cascades and single airfoils.

  19. Recent Progress in the p and h-p Version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    code PROBE which was developed recently by NOETIC Technologies, St. Louis £54]. PROBE solves two dimensional problems of linear elasticity, stationary...of the finite element method was studied in detail from various point of view. We will mention here some essential illustrative results. In one...28) Bathe, K. J., Brezzi, F., Studies of finite element procedures - the INF-SUP condition, equivalent forms and applications in Reliability of

  20. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Error estimates for the hybrid finite element/finite volume methods for linear hyperbolic and convection-dominated problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidriri, M. D.

    2003-07-01

    In this paper, we establish the error estimates for the generalized hybrid finite element/finite volume methods we have introduced in our earlier work (J. Comput. Appl. Math. 139 (2002) 323; Comm. Appl. Anal. 5(1) (2001) 91). These estimates are obtained for linear hyperbolic and convection-dominated convection-diffusion problems. Our analysis is performed for general mesh of a bounded polygonal domain of satisfying the minimum angle condition. Our errors estimates are new and represent significant improvements over the previously known error estimates established for the streamline diffusion and discontinuous Galerkin methods applied to hyperbolic and convection dominated problems (Math. Comp. 46 (1986) 1; Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng. 45 (1984) 285; in: C. de Boor (Ed.), Mathematical Aspects of Finite Elements in Partial Differential Equations, Academic Press, New York, 1974).

  2. The least-squares finite element method for low-mach-number compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sheng-Tao

    1994-01-01

    The present paper reports the development of the Least-Squares Finite Element Method (LSFEM) for simulating compressible viscous flows at low Mach numbers in which the incompressible flows pose as an extreme. Conventional approach requires special treatments for low-speed flows calculations: finite difference and finite volume methods are based on the use of the staggered grid or the preconditioning technique; and, finite element methods rely on the mixed method and the operator-splitting method. In this paper, however, we show that such difficulty does not exist for the LSFEM and no special treatment is needed. The LSFEM always leads to a symmetric, positive-definite matrix through which the compressible flow equations can be effectively solved. Two numerical examples are included to demonstrate the method: first, driven cavity flows at various Reynolds numbers; and, buoyancy-driven flows with significant density variation. Both examples are calculated by using full compressible flow equations.

  3. Error analysis of finite element method for Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuzhou; Sun, Pengtao; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang

    2016-08-01

    A priori error estimates of finite element method for time-dependent Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations are studied in this work. We obtain the optimal error estimates in L∞(H1) and L2(H1) norms, and suboptimal error estimates in L∞(L2) norm, with linear element, and optimal error estimates in L∞(L2) norm with quadratic or higher-order element, for both semi- and fully discrete finite element approximations. Numerical experiments are also given to validate the theoretical results.

  4. A bibliography on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations (1971--1997)

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This bibliography provides a list of references on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations. These references have been published in scientific journals, conference proceedings, technical reports, thesis/dissertations and as chapters in reference books from 1971 to the present. Both English and non-English references are included. All references contained in the bibliography are sorted alphabetically by the first author`s name and a subsort by date of publication. The majority of the references relate to reactor physics analysis using the finite element method. Related topics include the boundary element method, the boundary integral method, and the global element method. All aspects of reactor physics computations relating to these methods are included: diffusion theory, deterministic radiation and neutron transport theory, kinetics, fusion research, particle tracking in finite element grids, and applications. For user convenience, many of the listed references have been categorized. The list of references is not all inclusive. In general, nodal methods were purposely excluded, although a few references do demonstrate characteristics of finite element methodology using nodal methods (usually as a non-conforming element basis). This area could be expanded. The author is aware of several other references (conferences, thesis/dissertations, etc.) that were not able to be independently tracked using available resources and thus were not included in this listing.

  5. A time domain vector finite element method for the full wave simulation of nonlinear photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aaron C.

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with third order polarization terms. The method allows for discretization of complicated device geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields, and up to 4th order accurate time discretization. Additionally we have implemented a series of computational optimizations that significantly increase the scale of simulations that can be performed with this method. Among these optimizations is a new generalized mass lumping method that we developed which reduces the computational cost of the finite element system solve by a factor of 10x. In this dissertation we will present the Vector Finite Element Method, and the computational optimizations that we employed. Additionally, we will present a series of analyses and simulations that were performed to validate the method. Finally, we will present some production runs using this method, including nonlinear mode mixing in waveguides and supercontinuum generation in a photonic crystal fiber.

  6. An enriched finite element method to fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shengzhi; Lian, Yanping; Ying, Yuping; Tang, Shaoqiang; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, an enriched finite element method with fractional basis [ 1,x^{α }] for spatial fractional partial differential equations is proposed to obtain more stable and accurate numerical solutions. For pure fractional diffusion equation without advection, the enriched Galerkin finite element method formulation is demonstrated to simulate the exact solution successfully without any numerical oscillation, which is advantageous compared to the traditional Galerkin finite element method with integer basis [ 1,x] . For fractional advection-diffusion equation, the oscillatory behavior becomes complex due to the introduction of the advection term which can be characterized by a fractional element Peclet number. For the purpose of addressing the more complex numerical oscillation, an enriched Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is developed by using a dimensionless fractional stabilization parameter, which is formulated through a minimization of the residual of the nodal solution. The effectiveness and accuracy of the enriched finite element method are demonstrated by a series of numerical examples of fractional diffusion equation and fractional advection-diffusion equation, including both one-dimensional and two-dimensional, steady-state and time-dependent cases.

  7. An enriched finite element method to fractional advection-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shengzhi; Lian, Yanping; Ying, Yuping; Tang, Shaoqiang; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, an enriched finite element method with fractional basis [ 1,x^{α }] for spatial fractional partial differential equations is proposed to obtain more stable and accurate numerical solutions. For pure fractional diffusion equation without advection, the enriched Galerkin finite element method formulation is demonstrated to simulate the exact solution successfully without any numerical oscillation, which is advantageous compared to the traditional Galerkin finite element method with integer basis [ 1,x] . For fractional advection-diffusion equation, the oscillatory behavior becomes complex due to the introduction of the advection term which can be characterized by a fractional element Peclet number. For the purpose of addressing the more complex numerical oscillation, an enriched Petrov-Galerkin finite element method is developed by using a dimensionless fractional stabilization parameter, which is formulated through a minimization of the residual of the nodal solution. The effectiveness and accuracy of the enriched finite element method are demonstrated by a series of numerical examples of fractional diffusion equation and fractional advection-diffusion equation, including both one-dimensional and two-dimensional, steady-state and time-dependent cases.

  8. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  9. Identification of Molecular Laser Transitions Using the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    11-19 Numerical Solution of Schr~dinger’s Equation .......................... 11-23 Conclusion...element solution of Schr6dinger’s Equation . The purpose of this research is to extend this previous work, and develop a chemical laser engineering tool for...Schr6dinger’s Equation . The eigenvalues from these solutions are then compared to the experimental values. Through this iterative process, the best potential

  10. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA USING MIXED FINITE ELEMENT AND FINITE VOLUME METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Dong, C.; Sun, S.

    2010-03-18

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. The model is used to investigate the interaction of adsorption with transport and to extract information on effective adsorption distribution coefficients. Numerical examples in different fractured media illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model.

  11. Two-scale extended finite element method for studying crack propagation of porous bioceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Wang, Mingguo; Zhan, Nan; Ji, Xinhua

    2008-11-01

    Extended finite element method (X-FEM) is a new method to solve the discontinuous problems, the basic theory of XFEM is presented in this paper, then the X-FEM is used to simulate the crack growth process of the hydroxyapatite material by three points bending test, and its deformation and stress field distribution is analyzed. The numerical results show the effectiveness of the method, the mesh in extended finite element method is independent of the internal geometry and physical interfaces, such that the trouble of high density meshing and re-meshing in the discontinuous field can be avoided. This greatly simplifies the analysis of the crack propagation process, showing the unique advantages of the extended finite element method in fracture expansion analysis of bioceramic. We also propose a two-scale strategy for crack propagation which enables one to use a refined mesh only in the crack's vicinity where it is required.

  12. A numerical investigation of the finite element method in compressible primitive variable Navier-Stokes flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, C. H.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive numerical investigation of the basic capabilities of the finite element method (FEM) for numerical solution of compressible flow problems governed by the two-dimensional and axis-symmetric Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables are presented. The strong and weak points of the method as a tool for computational fluid dynamics are considered. The relation of the linear element finite element method to finite difference methods (FDM) is explored. The calculation of free shear layer and separated flows over aircraft boattail afterbodies with plume simulators indicate the strongest assets of the method are its capabilities for reliable and accurate calculation employing variable grids which readily approximate complex geometry and capably adapt to the presence of diverse regions of large solution gradients without the necessity of domain transformation.

  13. Efficient Finite Element Methods for Transient Nonlinear Analysis of Shells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    13. NUMiER OF PAGES L .2 0,33,;2 171 14. MONITOINm "GEN CY NAME 67AOORSS(/ different from Contorlling Office) I15. SECURITY CLASS. (o .. a thi prt...Five integration points were used through the thickness in the elastic-plastic calculations. CONCLUSIONS A four node quadrilateral applicable to...factor. Eq. (7) leads immediately to the conclusion that in *1 the present formulation, the element stiffness matrix is: bb )T bA bb)T ss K a f ( bb) D

  14. Mathematical Aspects of Finite Element Methods for Incompressible Viscous Flows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    irteir-rt In element pa ir 1: is je Tnit’ by f i F-t mii iidi rig * % % % % % % - 4* % VV 4 ~ % - ~ * .. . * *. PA - 33- Q into rectangular prisms , or...mtr.o gerier-il Iv, lrit h.-t ,- For the prpsstirp sputi-P w’e choose~ pi.p’ievi so. -- u t subregions. We subdi vIde each rectangular prism into 24 tetr...8217 Unfortunately, these boundary conditions have no PhV.- tico . meaninq. Thus the choice (4.5.1), or equivalently (4.10.1,, can only be used in conjunction

  15. Finite element method for optimal guidance of an advanced launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Bless, Robert R.; Calise, Anthony J.; Leung, Martin

    1992-01-01

    A temporal finite element based on a mixed form of Hamilton's weak principle is summarized for optimal control problems. The resulting weak Hamiltonian finite element method is extended to allow for discontinuities in the states and/or discontinuities in the system equations. An extension of the formulation to allow for control inequality constraints is also presented. The formulation does not require element quadrature, and it produces a sparse system of nonlinear algebraic equations. To evaluate its feasibility for real-time guidance applications, this approach is applied to the trajectory optimization of a four-state, two-stage model with inequality constraints for an advanced launch vehicle. Numerical results for this model are presented and compared to results from a multiple-shooting code. The results show the accuracy and computational efficiency of the finite element method.

  16. Locally Conservative, Stabilized Finite Element Methods for Variably Saturated Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-06

    mixed methods for Richards’ equation. The effectiveness of the multiscale stabilization strategy varied somewhat. For a steady-state, variably...Arbogast, Z. Chen, On the implementation of mixed methods as non- conforming methods for second order elliptic problems, Mathematics of Computation 64...211) (1995) 943–972. [53] Z. Chen, Equivalence between and multigrid algorithms for nonconform- ing and mixed methods for second order elliptic

  17. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  18. A robust finite element method for nonhomogeneous Dirichlet problems in domains with curved boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; King, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper the authors consider a simple finite element method on an approximately polygonal domain using linear elements. The Dirichlet data are transferred in a natural way and the resulting linear system can be solved using multigrid techniques. Their analysis takes into account the change in domain and data transfer, and optimal-error estimates are obtained that are robust in the regularity of the boundary data provided they are at least square integrable. It is proved that the natural extension of this finite element approximation to the original domain is optimal-order accurate.

  19. Looking-Free Mixed hp Finite Element Methods for Linear and Geometrically Nonlinear Elasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-09

    hp mixed methods has been addressed by Stenberg and Suri[20]. They identify sufficient conditions for selecting mixed method spaces on parallelogram...spaces of piecewise polynomials. Math. Modeling Num. Anal., 19:111-143, 1985. [20] R. Stenberg and M. Suri. Mixed hp finite element methods for

  20. Development of K-Version of the Finite Element Method: A Robust Mathematical and Computational Procedure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    International Journal of Computational Methods for...Fluids, in review. "* V. Prabhakar and J. N. Reddy, "Orthogonality of Modal Bases," International Journal of Computational Methods for Fluids...Least-Squares Finite Element Model for Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations," International Journal of Computational Methods for Fluids, in review.

  1. Simulating finger phenomena in porous media with a moving finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guanghui; Zegeling, Paul Andries

    2011-04-01

    The non-equilibrium Richards equation is solved using a moving finite element method in this paper. The governing equation is discretized spatially with a standard finite element method, and temporally with second-order Runge-Kutta schemes. A strategy of the mesh movement is based on the work by Li et al. [R.Li, T.Tang, P.W. Zhang, A moving mesh finite element algorithm for singular problems in two and three space dimensions, Journal of Computational Physics, 177 (2002) 365-393]. A Beckett and Mackenzie type monitor function is adopted. To obtain high quality meshes around the wetting front, a smoothing method which is based on the diffusive mechanism is used. With the moving mesh technique, high mesh quality and high numerical accuracy are obtained successfully. The numerical convergence and the advantage of the algorithm are demonstrated by a series of numerical experiments.

  2. Advanced finite element method for nano-resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zschiedrich, Lin; Burger, Sven; Kettner, Benjamin; Schmidt, Frank

    2006-02-01

    Miniaturized optical resonators with spatial dimensions of the order of the wavelength of the trapped light offer prospects for a variety of new applications like quantum processing or construction of meta-materials. Light propagation in these structures is modelled by Maxwell's equations. For a deeper numerical analysis one may compute the scattered field when the structure is illuminated or one may compute the resonances of the structure. We therefore address in this paper the electromagnetic scattering problem as well as the computation of resonances in an open system. For the simulation effcient and reliable numerical methods are required which cope with the infinite domain. We use transparent boundary conditions based on the Perfectly Matched Layer Method (PML) combined with a novel adaptive strategy to determine optimal discretization parameters like the thickness of the sponge layer or the mesh width. Further a novel iterative solver for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations is presented.

  3. Visualization of High-Order Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    Peters , Valerio Pascucci, Robert M. Kirby and Claudio T. Silva, "Topology Verification for Isosurface Extraction", IEEE Transactions on Visualization...Visualization of High-Order Methods Professor Robert M. Kirby , Mr. Robert Haimes University of Utah Office of Sponsored Programs University of Utah Salt Lake...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER Robert Kirby 801-585-3421 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26-Sep-2008

  4. P1 Nonconforming Finite Element Method for the Solution of Radiation Transport Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Kab S.

    2002-01-01

    The simulation of radiation transport in the optically thick flux-limited diffusion regime has been identified as one of the most time-consuming tasks within large simulation codes. Due to multimaterial complex geometry, the radiation transport system must often be solved on unstructured grids. In this paper, we investigate the behavior and the benefits of the unstructured P(sub 1) nonconforming finite element method, which has proven to be flexible and effective on related transport problems, in solving unsteady implicit nonlinear radiation diffusion problems using Newton and Picard linearization methods. Key words. nonconforrning finite elements, radiation transport, inexact Newton linearization, multigrid preconditioning

  5. Compressible seal flow analysis using the finite element method with Galerkin solution technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1974-01-01

    High pressure gas sealing involves not only balancing the viscous force with the pressure gradient force but also accounting for fluid inertia--especially for choked flow. The conventional finite element method which uses a Rayleigh-Ritz solution technique is not convenient for nonlinear problems. For these problems, a finite element method with a Galerkin solution technique (FEMGST) was formulated. One example, a three-dimensional axisymmetric flow formulation has nonlinearities due to compressibility, area expansion, and convective inertia. Solutions agree with classical results in the limiting cases. The development of the choked flow velocity profile is shown.

  6. A variational method for finite element stress recovery and error estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, A.; Riggs, H. R.; Macy, S. C.

    1993-01-01

    A variational method for obtaining smoothed stresses from a finite element derived nonsmooth stress field is presented. The method is based on minimizing a functional involving discrete least-squares error plus a penalty constraint that ensures smoothness of the stress field. An equivalent accuracy criterion is developed for the smoothing analysis which results in a C sup 1-continuous smoothed stress field possessing the same order of accuracy as that found at the superconvergent optimal stress points of the original finite element analysis. Application of the smoothing analysis to residual error estimation is also demonstrated.

  7. Cut finite element methods for elliptic problems on multipatch parametric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Tobias; Larson, Mats G.; Larsson, Karl

    2017-09-01

    We develop a finite element method for the Laplace--Beltrami operator on a surface described by a set of patchwise parametrizations. The patches provide a partition of the surface and each patch is the image by a diffeomorphism of a subdomain of the unit square which is bounded by a number of smooth trim curves. A patchwise tensor product mesh is constructed by using a structured mesh in the reference domain. Since the patches are trimmed we obtain cut elements in the vicinity of the interfaces. We discretize the Laplace--Beltrami operator using a cut finite element method that utilizes Nitsche's method to enforce continuity at the interfaces and a consistent stabilization term to handle the cut elements. Several quantities in the method are conveniently computed in the reference domain where the mappings impose a Riemannian metric. We derive a priori estimates in the energy and $L^2$ norm and also present several numerical examples confirming our theoretical results.

  8. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  9. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  10. Optimal higher order modeling methodology based on method of moments and finite element method for electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopf, Eve Marian

    General guidelines and quantitative recipes for adoptions of optimal higher order parameters for computational electromagnetics (CEM) modeling using the method of moments and the finite element method are established and validated, based on an exhaustive series of numerical experiments and comprehensive case studies on higher order hierarchical CEM models of metallic and dielectric scatterers. The modeling parameters considered are: electrical dimensions of elements (subdivisions) in the model (h -refinement), polynomial orders of basis and testing functions ( p-refinement), orders of Gauss-Legendre integration formulas (numbers of integration points -- integration accuracy), and geometrical orders of elements (orders of Lagrange-type curvature) in the model. The goal of the study, which is the first such study of higher order parameters in CEM, is to reduce the dilemmas and uncertainties associated with the great modeling flexibility of higher order elements, basis and testing functions, and integration procedures (this flexibility is the principal advantage but also the greatest shortcoming of the higher order CEM), and to ease and facilitate the decisions to be made on how to actually use them, by both CEM developers and practitioners. The ultimate goal is to close the large gap between the rising academic interest in higher order CEM, which evidently shows great numerical potential, and its actual usefulness and application to electromagnetics research and engineering applications.

  11. On Computing the Pressure by the p Version of the Finite Element Method for Stokes Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-15

    approximation of saddlepoint prob- lems arising from Lagrangian multipliers. RAIRO , 8:129-151, 1974. [9] M. Dauge. Stationary Stokes and Navier-Stokes systems...Jensen and M. Vogelius. Divergence stability in connection with the p version of the finite element method. RAIRO , Modelisation Math. Anal. Numer., 1990...element method for elliptic problems of order 2 1. RAIRO , Modelisation Math. Anal. Numer., 24:107-146, 1990. 1261 M. Suri. On the stability and convergence

  12. A stable cutting method for finite elements based virtual surgery simulation.

    PubMed

    Jerábková, Lenka; Jerábek, Jakub; Chudoba, Rostislav; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach for stable interactive cutting of deformable objects in virtual environments. Our method is based on the extended finite elements method, allowing for a modeling of discontinuities without remeshing. As no new elements are created, the impact on simulation performance is minimized. We also propose an appropriate mass lumping technique to guarantee for the stability of the simulation regardless of the position of the cut.

  13. A variational method for finite element stress recovery: Applications in one-dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggs, H. Ronald

    1992-01-01

    It is well-known that stresses (and strains) calculated by a displacement-based finite element analysis are generally not as accurate as the displacements. In addition, the calculated stress field is typically discontinuous at element interfaces. Because the stresses are typically of more interest than the displacements, several procedures have been proposed to obtain a smooth stress field, given the finite element stresses, and to improve the accuracy. Hinton and Irons introduced global least squares smoothing of discrete data defined on a plane using a finite element formulation. Tessler and co-workers recently developed a conceptually similar formulation for smoothing of two-dimensional data based on a discrete least square approximation with a penalty constraint. The penalty constraint results in a stress field which is C(exp 1)-continuous, a result not previously obtained. The approach requires additional, 'smoothing' finite element analysis and for their two-dimensional application, they used a conforming C(exp 0)-continuous triangular finite element based on a conforming plate element. This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation into the application of Tessler's smoothing procedure to the smoothing of finite element stresses from one-dimensional problems. Although the one-dimensional formulation has some practical applicability, such as in truss, beam, axisymmetric mechanics, and one-dimensional heat conduction, the primary motivation for developing the one-dimensional smoothing case is to explore the characteristics of the general smoothing strategy. In particular, it is used to describe the behavior of the method and to explore the suitability of criteria proposed for the smoothing analysis. Prior to presenting numerical results, the variational formulation of the smoothing strategy is presented and a criterion for the smoothing analysis is described.

  14. Modeling of dynamic crack branching by enhanced extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dandan; Liu, Zhanli; Liu, Xiaoming; Zeng, Qinglei; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2014-08-01

    The conventional extended finite element method (XFEM) is enhanced in this paper to simulate dynamic crack branching, which is a top challenge issue in fracture mechanics and finite element method. XFEM uses the enriched shape functions with special characteristics to represent the discontinuity in computation field. In order to describe branched cracks, it is necessary to set up the additional enrichment. Here we have developed two kinds of branched elements, namely the "element crossed by two separated cracks" and "element embedded by a junction". Another series of enriched degrees of freedom are introduced to seize the additional discontinuity in the elements. A shifted enrichment scheme is used to avoid the treatment of blending element. Correspondingly a new mass lumping method is developed for the branched elements based on the kinetic conservation. The derivation of the mass matrix of a four-node quadrilateral element which contains two strong discontinuities is specially presented. Then by choosing crack speed as the branching criterion, the branching process of a single mode I crack is simulated. The results including the branching angle and propagation routes are compared with that obtained by the conventionally used element deletion method.

  15. Cyclic-stress analysis of notches for supersonic transport conditions. [using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of using the finite element method to account for the effects of cyclic load and temperature on local stresses and strains at a notch was demonstrated. The behavior of a notched titanium panel was studied under variable loads and temperatures representative of flight conditions for the lower wing surface of a Supersonic Transport (SST). The analysis was performed with the use of the BOPACE finite-element computer program which provides capability to determine high temperature and large viscoplastic effects caused by cyclic thermal and mechanical loads. The analysis involves the development of the finite-element model as well as determination of the structural behavior of the notched panel. Results are presented for twelve SST flights comprised of five different load-temperature cycles. The results show the approach is feasible, but material response to cyclic loads, temperatures, and hold times requires improved understanding to allow proper modeling of the material.

  16. A finite element-boundary integral method for cavities in a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. However, due to a lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, antenna designers resort to measurement and planar antenna concepts for designing non-planar conformal antennas. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We extend this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this report, we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the shape functions, the resulting finite elements and the boundary integral equations, and the solution of the conformal finite element-boundary integral system. Some validation results are presented and we further show how this formulation can be applied with minimal computational and memory resources.

  17. Local a posteriori estimates for pointwise gradient errors in finite element methods for elliptic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demlow, Alan

    2007-03-01

    We prove local a posteriori error estimates for pointwise gradient errors in finite element methods for a second-order linear elliptic model problem. First we split the local gradient error into a computable local residual term and a weaker global norm of the finite element error (the ``pollution term''). Using a mesh-dependent weight, the residual term is bounded in a sharply localized fashion. In specific situations the pollution term may also be bounded by computable residual estimators. On nonconvex polygonal and polyhedral domains in two and three space dimensions, we may choose estimators for the pollution term which do not employ specific knowledge of corner singularities and which are valid on domains with cracks. The finite element mesh is only required to be simplicial and shape-regular, so that highly graded and unstructured meshes are allowed.

  18. API tubular ovality and stresses in horizontal wells with a finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Akgun, F. ); Mitchell, B.J.; Huttelmaier, H.P. )

    1994-06-01

    A finite-element program, ANSYS, was used to determine the change in physical dimensions of oilfield tubulars and the growth of stresses in their walls as these tubulars were run and landed into a drillhole. Ovalities and axial and tangential stresses modeled with a finite-element method (FEM) are presented in easy-to-use charts for 7- and 9 5/8-in.-OD API casing. Axial bending stresses with the FEM are compared with those under Lubinski's bending equation and the classic beam-bending equation.

  19. An explicit Lagrangian finite element method for free-surface weakly compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonesi, Massimiliano; Meduri, Simone; Perego, Umberto; Frangi, Attilio

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, an explicit finite element approach to the solution of the Lagrangian formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for weakly compressible fluids or fluid-like materials is investigated. The introduction of a small amount of compressibility is shown to allow for the formulation of a fast and robust explicit solver based on a particle finite element method. Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Bingham laws are considered. A barotropic equation of state completes the model relating pressure and density fields. The approach has been validated through comparison with experimental tests and numerical simulations of free surface fluid problems involving water and water-soil mixtures.

  20. The finite element method for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Vafaeian, B; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative ultrasound for bone assessment is based on the correlations between ultrasonic parameters and the properties (mechanical and physical) of cancellous bone. To elucidate the correlations, understanding the physics of ultrasound in cancellous bone is demanded. Micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been so far utilized as one of the approaches in this regard. However, the FDTD method accompanies two disadvantages: staircase sampling of cancellous bone by finite difference grids leads to generation of wave artifacts at the solid-fluid interface inside the bone; additionally, this method cannot explicitly satisfy the needed perfect-slip conditions at the interface. To overcome these disadvantages, the finite element method (FEM) is proposed in this study. Three-dimensional finite element models of six water-saturated cancellous bone samples with different bone volume were created. The values of speed of sound (SOS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) were calculated through the finite element simulations of ultrasound propagation in each sample. Comparing the results with other experimental and simulation studies demonstrated the capabilities of the FEM for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound in water-saturated cancellous bone.

  1. An extended finite element method for dislocations in arbitrary three-dimensional entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Jay

    A finite element method is developed for dislocations in arbitrary, three-dimensional bodies, including micro-/nano-devices, and layered materials, such as thin films. The method is also compatible with anisotropic materials, and can readily be applied to non-linear media. In this method, dislocation are modeled by adding discontinuities to extend the conventional finite element basis. Two approaches for adding discontinuities to the conventional finite element basis are proposed. In the first, a simple discontinuous enrichment imposes a constant jump in displacement across dislocation glide planes. In the second approach, the enrichments more accurately approximate the dislocations by capture the singular asymptotic behavior near the dislocation core. A basis of singular enrichments are formed from the analytical solutions to straight dislocation lines, but are applicable for more general, curved dislocation configurations. Methods for computing the configurational forces on dislocation lines within the XFEM framework have also been developed. For jump enrichments, an approach based on an energy release rate or J-integral is proposed. When singular enrichments are available, it is shown that the Peach-Koehler equation can be used to compute forces directly. This new approach differs from many existing methods for studying dislocations because it does not rely on superposition of solutions derived analytically or through Green's functions. This extended finite element approach is suitable to study dislocations in micro- and nano-devices, and in specific material micro-structures, where complicated boundaries and material interfaces are pervasive.

  2. The L sub 1 finite element method for pure convection problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The least squares (L sub 2) finite element method is introduced for 2-D steady state pure convection problems with smooth solutions. It is proven that the L sub 2 method has the same stability estimate as the original equation, i.e., the L sub 2 method has better control of the streamline derivative. Numerical convergence rates are given to show that the L sub 2 method is almost optimal. This L sub 2 method was then used as a framework to develop an iteratively reweighted L sub 2 finite element method to obtain a least absolute residual (L sub 1) solution for problems with discontinuous solutions. This L sub 1 finite element method produces a nonoscillatory, nondiffusive and highly accurate numerical solution that has a sharp discontinuity in one element on both coarse and fine meshes. A robust reweighting strategy was also devised to obtain the L sub 1 solution in a few iterations. A number of examples solved by using triangle and bilinear elements are presented.

  3. A hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-01-14

    This paper presents a hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method (WG-MFEM) which was introduced and analyzed in Wang and Ye (2014) for second order elliptic equations. The WG-MFEM method was designed by using discontinuous piecewise polynomials on finite element partitions consisting of polygonal or polyhedral elements of arbitrary shape. The key to WG-MFEM is the use of a discrete weak divergence operator which is defined and computed by solving inexpensive problems locally on each element. The hybridized formulation of this paper leads to a significantly reduced system of linear equations involving only the unknowns arising from the Lagrange multiplier in hybridization. Optimal-order error estimates are derived for the hybridized WG-MFEM approximations. In conclusion, some numerical results are reported to confirm the theory and a superconvergence for the Lagrange multiplier.

  4. A hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-01-14

    This paper presents a hybridized formulation for the weak Galerkin mixed finite element method (WG-MFEM) which was introduced and analyzed in Wang and Ye (2014) for second order elliptic equations. The WG-MFEM method was designed by using discontinuous piecewise polynomials on finite element partitions consisting of polygonal or polyhedral elements of arbitrary shape. The key to WG-MFEM is the use of a discrete weak divergence operator which is defined and computed by solving inexpensive problems locally on each element. The hybridized formulation of this paper leads to a significantly reduced system of linear equations involving only the unknowns arising frommore » the Lagrange multiplier in hybridization. Optimal-order error estimates are derived for the hybridized WG-MFEM approximations. In conclusion, some numerical results are reported to confirm the theory and a superconvergence for the Lagrange multiplier.« less

  5. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2016-11-01

    A new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method is introduced and analyzed in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. Extensive numerical experiments have been conducted to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.

  6. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments in order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.

  7. Applications of Taylor-Galerkin finite element method to compressible internal flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.; Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element method with Lapidus' artificial viscosity scheme is applied to several test cases for internal compressible inviscid flow problems. Investigations for the effect of supersonic/subsonic inlet and outlet boundary conditions on computational results are particularly emphasized.

  8. Automatic data generation scheme for finite-element method /FEDGE/ - Computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuz, F.

    1970-01-01

    Algorithm provides for automatic input data preparation for the analysis of continuous domains in the fields of structural analysis, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. The computer program utilizes the natural coordinate systems concept and the finite element method for data generation.

  9. SQA of finite element method (FEM) codes used for analyses of pit storage/transport packages

    SciTech Connect

    Russel, E.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the software quality assurance of finite element method codes used for analyses of pit storage and transport projects. This methodology utilizes the ISO 9000-3: Guideline for application of 9001 to the development, supply, and maintenance of software, for establishing well-defined software engineering processes to consistently maintain high quality management approaches.

  10. An Introduction of Finite Element Method in the Engineering Teaching at the University of Camaguey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoles, Elsa; Blanco, Ramon; Jimenez, Rafael; Mc.Pherson, Yoanka

    This paper illuminates experiences related to introducing finite element methods (FEM) in mechanical and civil engineering courses at the University of Camaguey in Cuba and provides discussion on using FEM in postgraduate courses for industry engineers. Background information on the introduction of FEM in engineering teaching is focused on…

  11. A Stimulating Approach To Teaching, Learning and Assessing Finite Element Methods: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadelis, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the benefits of introducing finite element methods into the curriculum of undergraduate courses. Analyzes the structure of the computer-assisted-design module and the extent to which it fulfills its main objectives. Discusses the efficiency of modern teaching and learning techniques used to develop skills for solving engineering problems;…

  12. Applications of Taylor-Galerkin finite element method to compressible internal flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Jeong L.; Kim, Yongmo; Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    A two-step Taylor-Galerkin finite element method with Lapidus' artificial viscosity scheme is applied to several test cases for internal compressible inviscid flow problems. Investigations for the effect of supersonic/subsonic inlet and outlet boundary conditions on computational results are particularly emphasized.

  13. Advanced finite-element methods for design and analysis of nanooptical structures: applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Sven; Zschiedrich, Lin; Pomplun, Jan; Blome, Mark; Schmidt, Frank

    2013-03-01

    An overview on recent applications of the finite-element method Maxwell-solver JCMsuite to simulation tasks in nanooptics is given. Numerical achievements in the fields of optical metamaterials, plasmonics, photonic crystal fibers, light emitting devices, solar cells, optical lithography, optical metrology, integrated optics, and photonic crystals are summarized.

  14. Error analysis of mixed finite element methods for wave propagation in double negative metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jichun

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we develop both semi-discrete and fully discrete mixed finite element methods for modeling wave propagation in three-dimensional double negative metamaterials. Optimal error estimates are proved for Nedelec spaces under the assumption of smooth solutions. To our best knowledge, this is the first error analysis obtained for Maxwell's equations when metamaterials are involved.

  15. A new strategy for stress analysis using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamat, M. P.; Vandenbrink, D.

    1983-01-01

    In the paper the authors examine the effectiveness of the Powell-Toint strategy for evaluating the Hessian of the potential energy surface of a finite element model that can be used for linear stress analysis and transient response predictions of structures. Cases for which the Powell-Toint strategy may be cost-effective with the conventional method of stress analysis are identified.

  16. Numerical research orthotropic geometrically nonlinear shell stability using the mixed finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupishin, L.; Nikitin, K.; Kolesnikov, A.

    2017-05-01

    A methodology for shell stability research and determining buckling load, based on the mixed finite element method are proposed. Axisymmetric geometrically nonlinear shallow shells made of orthotropic material are considered. The results of numerical research of stability by changing the shape of shells, ratio of elastic modulus of the material and parameters of the support contour are presented.

  17. Optimizing the seamless tube extrusion process using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Li, Li; Wang, Xiang; Ma, Xu Liang

    2010-03-01

    In order to reveal the mechanism of extrusion forming for large-scale aluminum alloy seamless pipe, in this research the rigid-viscous plastic finite element method was used to analyze the effect of the technological parameters of the aluminum alloy pipe extrusion process, consistent with the use requirements.

  18. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments in order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.

  19. Simulation of wind effects on tall structures by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Masood

    2016-06-01

    In the present study finite element method is used to predict the wind forces on a tall structure. The governing equations of mass and momentum with boundary conditions are solved. The κ- ɛ turbulence model is utilized to calculate the turbulence viscosity. The results are independent from the generated mesh. The numerical results are validated with American Society of Civil Engineering standards.

  20. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; ...

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments inmore » order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.« less

  1. A Modified Method for Evaluating the Invariant J-Integral in Finite-Element Models of Prismatic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, V. A.; Sakharov, A. S.; Maksimyuk, Yu. V.; Shkryl', A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Numerical experiments are performed to analyze the invariance and reliability of the results of evaluation of the J-integral by the modified method of reactions in problems of mixed fracture. Bodies with cracks undergoing elastoplastic deformation under static loading are considered. To demonstrate the universality of the method to finite-element schemes, prismatic bodies are considered. This allows using not only conventional finite-element schemes, but also the semi-analytical finite-element method

  2. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  3. Topology optimization for three-dimensional electromagnetic waves using an edge element-based finite-element method.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongbo; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops a topology optimization procedure for three-dimensional electromagnetic waves with an edge element-based finite-element method. In contrast to the two-dimensional case, three-dimensional electromagnetic waves must include an additional divergence-free condition for the field variables. The edge element-based finite-element method is used to both discretize the wave equations and enforce the divergence-free condition. For wave propagation described in terms of the magnetic field in the widely used class of non-magnetic materials, the divergence-free condition is imposed on the magnetic field. This naturally leads to a nodal topology optimization method. When wave propagation is described using the electric field, the divergence-free condition must be imposed on the electric displacement. In this case, the material in the design domain is assumed to be piecewise homogeneous to impose the divergence-free condition on the electric field. This results in an element-wise topology optimization algorithm. The topology optimization problems are regularized using a Helmholtz filter and a threshold projection method and are analysed using a continuous adjoint method. In order to ensure the applicability of the filter in the element-wise topology optimization version, a regularization method is presented to project the nodal into an element-wise physical density variable.

  4. Topology optimization for three-dimensional electromagnetic waves using an edge element-based finite-element method

    PubMed Central

    Korvink, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a topology optimization procedure for three-dimensional electromagnetic waves with an edge element-based finite-element method. In contrast to the two-dimensional case, three-dimensional electromagnetic waves must include an additional divergence-free condition for the field variables. The edge element-based finite-element method is used to both discretize the wave equations and enforce the divergence-free condition. For wave propagation described in terms of the magnetic field in the widely used class of non-magnetic materials, the divergence-free condition is imposed on the magnetic field. This naturally leads to a nodal topology optimization method. When wave propagation is described using the electric field, the divergence-free condition must be imposed on the electric displacement. In this case, the material in the design domain is assumed to be piecewise homogeneous to impose the divergence-free condition on the electric field. This results in an element-wise topology optimization algorithm. The topology optimization problems are regularized using a Helmholtz filter and a threshold projection method and are analysed using a continuous adjoint method. In order to ensure the applicability of the filter in the element-wise topology optimization version, a regularization method is presented to project the nodal into an element-wise physical density variable. PMID:27279766

  5. Vertical slice modelling of nonlinear Eady waves using a compatible finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroe; Shipton, Jemma; Cullen, Michael J. P.; Mitchell, Lawrence; Cotter, Colin J.

    2017-08-01

    A vertical slice model is developed for the Euler-Boussinesq equations with a constant temperature gradient in the direction normal to the slice (the Eady-Boussinesq model). The model is a solution of the full three-dimensional equations with no variation normal to the slice, which is an idealised problem used to study the formation and subsequent evolution of weather fronts. A compatible finite element method is used to discretise the governing equations. To extend the Charney-Phillips grid staggering in the compatible finite element framework, we use the same node locations for buoyancy as the vertical part of velocity and apply a transport scheme for a partially continuous finite element space. For the time discretisation, we solve the semi-implicit equations together with an explicit strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme to all of the advection terms. The model reproduces several quasi-periodic lifecycles of fronts despite the presence of strong discontinuities. An asymptotic limit analysis based on the semi-geostrophic theory shows that the model solutions are converging to a solution in cross-front geostrophic balance. The results are consistent with the previous results using finite difference methods, indicating that the compatible finite element method is performing as well as finite difference methods for this test problem. We observe dissipation of kinetic energy of the cross-front velocity in the model due to the lack of resolution at the fronts, even though the energy loss is not likely to account for the large gap on the strength of the fronts between the model result and the semi-geostrophic limit solution.

  6. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  7. Vibration band gaps for elastic metamaterial rods using wave finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, E. D.; Gautier, F.; Pelat, A.; Dos Santos, J. M. C.

    2016-10-01

    Band gaps in elastic metamaterial rods with spatial periodic distribution and periodically attached local resonators are investigated. New techniques to analyze metamaterial systems are using a combination of analytical or numerical method with wave propagation. One of them, called here wave spectral element method (WSEM), consists of combining the spectral element method (SEM) with Floquet-Bloch's theorem. A modern methodology called wave finite element method (WFEM), developed to calculate dynamic behavior in periodic acoustic and structural systems, utilizes a similar approach where SEM is substituted by the conventional finite element method (FEM). In this paper, it is proposed to use WFEM to calculate band gaps in elastic metamaterial rods with spatial periodic distribution and periodically attached local resonators of multi-degree-of-freedom (M-DOF). Simulated examples with band gaps generated by Bragg scattering and local resonators are calculated by WFEM and verified with WSEM, which is used as a reference method. Results are presented in the form of attenuation constant, vibration transmittance and frequency response function (FRF). For all cases, WFEM and WSEM results are in agreement, provided that the number of elements used in WFEM is sufficient to convergence. An experimental test was conducted with a real elastic metamaterial rod, manufactured with plastic in a 3D printer, without local resonance-type effect. The experimental results for the metamaterial rod with band gaps generated by Bragg scattering are compared with the simulated ones. Both numerical methods (WSEM and WFEM) can localize the band gap position and width very close to the experimental results. A hybrid approach combining WFEM with the commercial finite element software ANSYS is proposed to model complex metamaterial systems. Two examples illustrating its efficiency and accuracy to model an elastic metamaterial rod unit-cell using 1D simple rod element and 3D solid element are

  8. A finite-element alternating method for two-dimensional Mode-1 crack configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Fichter, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-element alternating method is presented for 2-D Mode-1 crack problems. An analytical solution for an arbitrary polynomial normal pressure distribution applied to the crack faces is obtained and used as the basic solution in the method. The method is applied to several crack problems to study its efficiency and the results are compared to accurate stress-intensity factor solutions in the literature. The method gave reasonably accurate stress-intensity factors and crack opening displacements with minimal computing effort. Because the method must model only the uncracked body, finite-element models with many degrees of freedom are not warranted and therefore, the method has been implemented on personal computers.

  9. A general algorithm using finite element method for aerodynamic configurations at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element algorithm for numerical simulation of two-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flows was developed. The Navier-Stokes equations are suitably modelled to facilitate direct solution for the essential flow parameters. A leap-frog time differencing and Galerkin minimization of these model equations yields the finite element algorithm. The finite elements are triangular with bicubic shape functions approximating the solution space. The finite element matrices are unsymmetrically banded to facilitate savings in storage. An unsymmetric L-U decomposition is performed on the finite element matrices to obtain the solution for the boundary value problem.

  10. A partially penalty immersed Crouzeix-Raviart finite element method for interface problems.

    PubMed

    An, Na; Yu, Xijun; Chen, Huanzhen; Huang, Chaobao; Liu, Zhongyan

    2017-01-01

    The elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients are often used to describe the problems of the multiple materials or fluids with different densities or conductivities or diffusivities. In this paper we develop a partially penalty immersed finite element (PIFE) method on triangular grids for anisotropic flow models, in which the diffusion coefficient is a piecewise definite-positive matrix. The standard linear Crouzeix-Raviart type finite element space is used on non-interface elements and the piecewise linear Crouzeix-Raviart type immersed finite element (IFE) space is constructed on interface elements. The piecewise linear functions satisfying the interface jump conditions are uniquely determined by the integral averages on the edges as degrees of freedom. The PIFE scheme is given based on the symmetric, nonsymmetric or incomplete interior penalty discontinuous Galerkin formulation. The solvability of the method is proved and the optimal error estimates in the energy norm are obtained. Numerical experiments are presented to confirm our theoretical analysis and show that the newly developed PIFE method has optimal-order convergence in the [Formula: see text] norm as well. In addition, numerical examples also indicate that this method is valid for both the isotropic and the anisotropic elliptic interface problems.

  11. Development of Finite Elements for Two-Dimensional Structural Analysis Using the Integrated Force Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method has been developed in recent years for the analysis of structural mechanics problems. This method treats all independent internal forces as unknown variables that can be calculated by simultaneously imposing equations of equilibrium and compatibility conditions. In this paper a finite element library for analyzing two-dimensional problems by the Integrated Force Method is presented. Triangular- and quadrilateral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary domain configurations are presented. The element equilibrium and flexibility matrices are derived by discretizing the expressions for potential and complementary energies, respectively. The displacement and stress fields within the finite elements are independently approximated. The displacement field is interpolated as it is in the standard displacement method, and the stress field is approximated by using complete polynomials of the correct order. A procedure that uses the definitions of stress components in terms of an Airy stress function is developed to derive the stress interpolation polynomials. Such derived stress fields identically satisfy the equations of equilibrium. Moreover, the resulting element matrices are insensitive to the orientation of local coordinate systems. A method is devised to calculate the number of rigid body modes, and the present elements are shown to be free of spurious zero-energy modes. A number of example problems are solved by using the present library, and the results are compared with corresponding analytical solutions and with results from the standard displacement finite element method. The Integrated Force Method not only gives results that agree well with analytical and displacement method results but also outperforms the displacement method in stress calculations.

  12. A Mixed Finite Volume Element Method for Flow Calculations in Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jim E.

    1996-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of flow in porous media is the accurate determination of the velocities that drive the flow. The large scale irregularities of the geology, such as faults, fractures, and layers suggest the use of irregular grids in the simulation. Work has been done in applying the finite volume element (FVE) methodology as developed by McCormick in conjunction with mixed methods which were developed by Raviart and Thomas. The resulting mixed finite volume element discretization scheme has the potential to generate more accurate solutions than standard approaches. The focus of this paper is on a multilevel algorithm for solving the discrete mixed FVE equations. The algorithm uses a standard cell centered finite difference scheme as the 'coarse' level and the more accurate mixed FVE scheme as the 'fine' level. The algorithm appears to have potential as a fast solver for large size simulations of flow in porous media.

  13. A Mixed Finite Volume Element Method for Flow Calculations in Porous Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jim E.

    1996-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of flow in porous media is the accurate determination of the velocities that drive the flow. The large scale irregularities of the geology, such as faults, fractures, and layers suggest the use of irregular grids in the simulation. Work has been done in applying the finite volume element (FVE) methodology as developed by McCormick in conjunction with mixed methods which were developed by Raviart and Thomas. The resulting mixed finite volume element discretization scheme has the potential to generate more accurate solutions than standard approaches. The focus of this paper is on a multilevel algorithm for solving the discrete mixed FVE equations. The algorithm uses a standard cell centered finite difference scheme as the 'coarse' level and the more accurate mixed FVE scheme as the 'fine' level. The algorithm appears to have potential as a fast solver for large size simulations of flow in porous media.

  14. Coupling finite and boundary element methods for 2-D elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) coupling method for two-dimensional elasticity problems is developed based on a weighted residual variational method in which a portion of the domain of interest is modeled by FEs and the remainder of the region by BEs. The performance of the FE-BE coupling method is demonstrated via applications to a simple 'patch test' problem and three-crack problems. The method passed the patch tests for various modeling configurations and yielded accurate strain energy release rates for the crack problems studied.

  15. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via a new integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Aiello, Robert A.; Berke, Laszlo

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  16. Improved accuracy for finite element structural analysis via an integrated force method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S. N.; Hopkins, D. A.; Aiello, R. A.; Berke, L.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to determine the accuracy of finite element analyses based on the stiffness method, a mixed method, and the new integrated force and dual integrated force methods. The numerical results were obtained with the following software: MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA for the stiffness method; an MHOST implementation method for the mixed method; and GIFT for the integrated force methods. The results indicate that on an overall basis, the stiffness and mixed methods present some limitations. The stiffness method generally requires a large number of elements in the model to achieve acceptable accuracy. The MHOST method tends to achieve a higher degree of accuracy for course models than does the stiffness method implemented by MSC/NASTRAN and ASKA. The two integrated force methods, which bestow simultaneous emphasis on stress equilibrium and strain compatibility, yield accurate solutions with fewer elements in a model. The full potential of these new integrated force methods remains largely unexploited, and they hold the promise of spawning new finite element structural analysis tools.

  17. Simulation of Electromagnetic Wave Logging Response in Deviated Wells Based on Vector Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Wei-Guo; Chu, Zhao-Tan; Zhao, Xiao-Qing; Fan, Yu-Xiu; Song, Ruo-Long; Han, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The vector finite element method of tetrahedral elements is used to model 3D electromagnetic wave logging response. The tangential component of the vector field at the mesh edges is used as a degree of freedom to overcome the shortcomings of node-based finite element methods. The algorithm can simulate inhomogeneous media with arbitrary distribution of conductivity and magnetic permeability. The electromagnetic response of well logging tools are studied in dipping bed layers with the borehole and invasion included. In order to simulate realistic logging tools, we take the transmitter antennas consisting of circular wire loops instead of magnetic dipoles. We also investigate the apparent resistivity of inhomogeneous formation for different dip angles.

  18. Polyhedral elements using an edge-based smoothed finite element method for nonlinear elastic deformations of compressible and nearly incompressible materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan; Kim, Hobeom; Kim, Jungdo; Im, Seyoung

    2017-06-01

    Polyhedral elements with an arbitrary number of nodes or non-planar faces, obtained with an edge-based smoothed finite element method, retain good geometric adaptability and accuracy in solution. This work is intended to extend the polyhedral elements to nonlinear elastic analysis with finite deformations. In order to overcome the volumetric locking problem, a smoothing domain-based selective smoothed finite element method scheme and a three-field-mixed cell-based smoothed finite element method with nodal cells were developed. Using several numerical examples, their performance and the accuracy of their solutions were examined, and their effectiveness for practical applications was demonstrated as well.

  19. Body-oriented coordinates applied to the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.A.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this research is to increase the accuracy of the finite-element method using coordinates intrinsic to the shape of the body being analyzed. We refer to these coordinates as body coordinates. Existing finite elements use Cartesian coordinates and are more accurate for solving rectangular-shaped problems than for solving nonrectangular-shaped problems. To check the feasibility of this research, we developed finite-element codes that used both cylindrical and Cartesian coordinates to solve problems in which the bodies were cylindrical-shaped. We obtained the most accurate solutions using the code that used cylindrical coordinates. Body coordinates become Cartesian coordinates for rectangular-shaped bodies and cylindrical coordinates for circular-shaped bodies. The body coordinate's finite-element formulation uses coordinate transformations from the body to the Cartesian coordinates. These transformations are developed using blending functions and boundary functions. Gradients of the Cartesian coordinates, with respect to body coordinates, are needed for stiffness calculations. Thus, the criterion for the blending function derivation is ''the nearest boundaries dominate,'' both for coordinate transformations and for gradient of coordinate transformations. For our studies, we developed two codes, one that uses body coordinates and one that uses Cartesian coordinates. These codes have been used to solve six example problems. 7 refs., 14 figs.

  20. A novel finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiheng; Du, Zhijiang; Monan, Wang

    2006-01-01

    To build a biomechanical human model can make much sense for surgical training and surgical rehearse. Especially, it will be more meaningful to develop a biomechanical model to guide the control strategy for the medical robots in HIT-Robot Assisted Orthopedic Surgery System (HIT-RAOS). In this paper, based the successful work of others, a novel reliable finite element method based biomechanical model for HIT-RAOS was developed to simulate the force needed in reposition procedure. Geometrical model was obtained from 3D reconstruction from CT images of a just died man. Using this boundary information, the finite element model of the leg including part of femur, broken upper tibia, broken lower tibia, talus, calcaneus, Kirschner nail, muscles and other soft tissues was created in ANSYS. Furthermore, as it was too difficult to reconstruct the accurate geometry model from CT images, a new simplified muscle model was presented. The bony structures and tendons were defined as linearly elastic, while soft tissues and muscle fibers were assumed to be hyper elastic. To validate this model, the same dead man was involved to simulate the patient, and a set of data of the force needed to separate the two broken bones and the distance between them in reposition procedure was recorded. Then, another set of data was acquired from the finite element analysis. After comparison, the two sets of data matched well. The Finite Element model was proved to be acceptable.

  1. A finite element method for shear stresses calculation in composite blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, B.

    1991-09-01

    A finite-element method is developed for accurately calculating shear stresses in helicopter blade models, induced by torsion and shearing forces. The method can also be used to compute the equivalent torsional stiffness of the section, their transverse shear coefficient, and the position of their center of torsion. A grid generator method which is a part of the calculation program is also described and used to discretize the sections quickly and to condition the grid data reliably. The finite-element method was validated on a few sections composed of isotropic materials and was then applied to a blade model sections made of composite materials. Good agreement was obtained between the calculated and experimental data.

  2. Discrete-ordinates finite-element method for atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstl, S. A. W.; Zardecki, A.

    1985-01-01

    The principal features of the discrete-ordinates finite-element method are reviewed, and the applicability of general-purpose discrete-ordinates codes to atmospheric radiative transfer and remote sensing problems is demonstrated. In particular, numerical results for typical problems arising in meteorology, climatology, and remote sensing are shown to be in good agreement with results from other methods and measurements. A sample two-dimensional calculation demonstrates that specific capabilities available in the discrete-ordinates code TWOTRAN can produce new results that are valuable in the characterization of atmospheric effects on remote sensing (e.g., the adjacency effect). The intrinsic limitations of the method are also considered, and it is concluded that the strengths of the discrete-ordinates finite-element method outweigh its weaknesses.

  3. Multigrid finite element method in stress analysis of three-dimensional elastic bodies of heterogeneous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    To calculate the three-dimensional elastic body of heterogeneous structure under static loading, a method of multigrid finite element is provided, when implemented on the basis of algorithms of finite element method (FEM), using homogeneous and composite threedimensional multigrid finite elements (MFE). Peculiarities and differences of MFE from the currently available finite elements (FE) are to develop composite MFE (without increasing their dimensions), arbitrarily small basic partition of composite solids consisting of single-grid homogeneous FE of the first order can be used, i.e. in fact, to use micro approach in finite element form. These small partitions allow one to take into account in MFE, i.e. in the basic discrete models of composite solids, complex heterogeneous and microscopically inhomogeneous structure, shape, the complex nature of the loading and fixation and describe arbitrarily closely the stress and stain state by the equations of three-dimensional elastic theory without any additional simplifying hypotheses. When building the m grid FE, m of nested grids is used. The fine grid is generated by a basic partition of MFE, the other m —1 large grids are applied to reduce MFE dimensionality, when m is increased, MFE dimensionality becomes smaller. The procedures of developing MFE of rectangular parallelepiped, irregular shape, plate and beam types are given. MFE generate the small dimensional discrete models and numerical solutions with a high accuracy. An example of calculating the laminated plate, using three-dimensional 3-grid FE and the reference discrete model is given, with that having 2.2 milliards of FEM nodal unknowns.

  4. Dynamic Shape Reconstruction of Three-Dimensional Frame Structures Using the Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A robust and efficient computational method for reconstructing the three-dimensional displacement field of truss, beam, and frame structures, using measured surface-strain data, is presented. Known as shape sensing , this inverse problem has important implications for real-time actuation and control of smart structures, and for monitoring of structural integrity. The present formulation, based on the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM), uses a least-squares variational principle involving strain measures of Timoshenko theory for stretching, torsion, bending, and transverse shear. Two inverse-frame finite elements are derived using interdependent interpolations whose interior degrees-of-freedom are condensed out at the element level. In addition, relationships between the order of kinematic-element interpolations and the number of required strain gauges are established. As an example problem, a thin-walled, circular cross-section cantilevered beam subjected to harmonic excitations in the presence of structural damping is modeled using iFEM; where, to simulate strain-gauge values and to provide reference displacements, a high-fidelity MSC/NASTRAN shell finite element model is used. Examples of low and high-frequency dynamic motion are analyzed and the solution accuracy examined with respect to various levels of discretization and the number of strain gauges.

  5. Finite elements of nonlinear continua.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to a broad class of practical nonlinear problems, treating both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view. The thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method are outlined, and are brought together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of the models are analyzed, and the numerical solution of the equations governing the discrete models is examined. The application of the models to nonlinear problems in finite elasticity, viscoelasticity, heat conduction, and thermoviscoelasticity is discussed. Other specific topics include the topological properties of finite element models, applications to linear and nonlinear boundary value problems, convergence, continuum thermodynamics, finite elasticity, solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete models of the nonlinear thermomechanical behavior of dissipative media.

  6. Finite elements of nonlinear continua.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to a broad class of practical nonlinear problems, treating both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view. The thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method are outlined, and are brought together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of the models are analyzed, and the numerical solution of the equations governing the discrete models is examined. The application of the models to nonlinear problems in finite elasticity, viscoelasticity, heat conduction, and thermoviscoelasticity is discussed. Other specific topics include the topological properties of finite element models, applications to linear and nonlinear boundary value problems, convergence, continuum thermodynamics, finite elasticity, solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete models of the nonlinear thermomechanical behavior of dissipative media.

  7. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method applied to the 1-D spherical neutron transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Machorro, Eric . E-mail: machorro@amath.washington.edu

    2007-04-10

    Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods are used to estimate solutions to the non-scattering 1-D spherical neutron transport equation. Various trial and test spaces are compared in the context of a few sample problems whose exact solution is known. Certain trial spaces avoid unphysical behaviors that seem to plague other methods. Comparisons with diamond differencing and simple corner-balancing are presented to highlight these improvements.

  8. RCS Predictions From a Method of Moments and a Finite-Element Code for Several Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    01803 14. ABSTRACT This report presents results of radar cross section (RCS) calculations for several interesting targets using a method-of-moments...TERMS radar cross section, method of moments, finite element, modeling 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18... radar cross section (RCS) simulation that require an exact code for solution. In this report, we compare RCS calculations with two very different

  9. A p-version finite element method for steady incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterscheidt, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    A new p-version finite element formulation for steady, incompressible fluid flow and convective heat transfer problems is presented. The steady-state residual equations are obtained by considering a limiting case of the least-squares formulation for the transient problem. The method circumvents the Babuska-Brezzi condition, permitting the use of equal-order interpolation for velocity and pressure, without requiring the use of arbitrary parameters. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and generality of the method.

  10. Application of finite element method in mechanical design of automotive parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Suohai

    2017-09-01

    As an effective numerical analysis method, finite element method (FEM) has been widely used in mechanical design and other fields. In this paper, the development of FEM is introduced firstly, then the specific steps of FEM applications are illustrated and the difficulties of FEM are summarized in detail. Finally, applications of FEM in automobile components such as automobile wheel, steel plate spring, body frame, shaft parts and so on are summarized, compared with related research experiments.

  11. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  12. Contact Stress Analysis in Wheel-Rail by Hertzian Method and Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, J. P.; Sarkar, P. K.; Ranjan, V.

    2014-10-01

    Safety and economy of railway traffic is enormously influenced by the contact stress variation caused by wheel rail contact profile changes. A change in designed surface topology may result from wear that brings in a wide change in contact geometry and stresses. To study the influence of interacting wheel and rail profile topology of standard rail UIC60, the standard wheel profile as per Indian Railway standards are considered in this paper. Rail profile radii, wheel profile radii and wheel profile taper are chosen for six different values. The analytical formulation is based on Timoshenko's approach and Finite Element Method (FEM) based simulation of the problems is undertaken. With these tools, distribution of contact zones, contact stress and contact pressure for different configuration of the wheel and rail profiles are obtained. The mesh density in contact region is found to have a direct influence on the accuracy of the solution [1]. To standardize the analysis of the contact region, mesh with an element size of 1 mm for all the configurations are chosen. Using stress response obtained through FEM analysis and multiaxial fatigue crack initiation model, the effects of vertical loading on fatigue crack initiation life are investigated. This may allow a direct design application for railways in particular.

  13. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  14. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  15. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This was due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays. As a result, the design of conformal arrays was primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We are extending this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In doing so, we will develop a mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation. It is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements.

  16. Coupling equivalent plate and finite element formulations in multiple-method structural analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.; Norwood, Keith

    1994-01-01

    A coupled multiple-method analysis procedure for use late in conceptual design or early in preliminary design of aircraft structures is described. Using this method, aircraft wing structures are represented with equivalent plate models, and structural details such as engine/pylon structure, landing gear, or a 'stick' model of a fuselage are represented with beam finite element models. These two analysis methods are implemented in an integrated multiple-method formulation that involves the assembly and solution of a combined set of linear equations. The corresponding solution vector contains coefficients of the polynomials that describe the deflection of the wing and also the components of translations and rotations at the joints of the beam members. Two alternative approaches for coupling the methods are investigated; one using transition finite elements and the other using Lagrange multipliers. The coupled formulation is applied to the static analysis and vibration analysis of a conceptual design model of a fighter aircraft. The results from the coupled method are compared with corresponding results from an analysis in which the entire model is composed of finite elements.

  17. Distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P; Hanson, Floyd B

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we present a distributed parameters deterministic model for treatment of brain tumors using Galerkin finite element method. The dynamic model comprises system of three coupled reaction-diffusion models, involving the tumor cells, the normal tissues and the drug concentration. An optimal control problem is formulated with the goal of minimizing the tumor cell density and reducing the side effects of the drug. A distributed parameters method based on the application of variational calculus is used on an integral-Hamiltonian, which is then used to obtain an optimal coupled system of forward state equations and backward co-state equations. The Galerkin finite element method is used to realistically represent the brain structure as well as to facilitate computation. Finally a three-dimensional test case is considered and partitioned into a set of spherical finite elements, using tri-linear basis functions, except for the elements affected by singularities of polar and azimuthal angles, as well as the origin.

  18. Finite element evaluation of three methods of stable fixation of condyle base fractures.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, G P; Vaz, L G; Gabrielli, M F R; Passeri, L A; V Oliveira, T; Noritomi, P Y; Jürgens, P

    2014-10-01

    The surgical treatment of mandibular condyle fractures currently offers several possibilities for stable internal fixation. In this study, a finite element model evaluation was performed of three different methods for osteosynthesis of low subcondylar fractures: (1) two four-hole straight plates, (2) one seven-hole lambda plate, and (3) one four-hole trapezoidal plate. The finite element model evaluation considered a load applied to the first molar on the contralateral side to the fracture. Results showed that, although the three methods are capable of withstanding functional loading, the lambda plate displayed a more homogeneous stress distribution for both osteosynthesis material and bone and may be a better method when single-plate fixation is the option.

  19. Scattering and radiation analysis of three-dimensional cavity arrays via a hybrid finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid numerical technique is presented for a characterization of the scattering and radiation properties of three-dimensional cavity arrays recessed in a ground plane. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods and invokes Floquet's representation to formulate a system of equations for the fields at the apertures and those inside the cavities. The system is solved via the conjugate gradient method in conjunction with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) thus achieving an O(N) storage requirement. By virtue of the finite element method, the proposed technique is applicable to periodic arrays comprised of cavities having arbitrary shape and filled with inhomogeneous dielectrics. Several numerical results are presented, along with new measured data, which demonstrate the validity, efficiency, and capability of the technique.

  20. Multi-grid finite element method used for enhancing the reconstruction accuracy in Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongbo; He, Xiaowei; Liu, Muhan; Zhang, Zeyu; Hu, Zhenhua; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT), as a promising optical molecular imaging modality, can be applied to cancer diagnostic and therapeutic. Most researches about CLT reconstruction are based on the finite element method (FEM) framework. However, the quality of FEM mesh grid is still a vital factor to restrict the accuracy of the CLT reconstruction result. In this paper, we proposed a multi-grid finite element method framework, which was able to improve the accuracy of reconstruction. Meanwhile, the multilevel scheme adaptive algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-AART) based on a modified iterative algorithm was applied to improve the reconstruction accuracy. In numerical simulation experiments, the feasibility of our proposed method were evaluated. Results showed that the multi-grid strategy could obtain 3D spatial information of Cerenkov source more accurately compared with the traditional single-grid FEM.

  1. 3D hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method: Implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrati, Soheil; Ahmadian, Hossein

    2015-10-01

    A hierarchical interface-enriched finite element method (HIFEM) is proposed for the mesh-independent treatment of 3D problems with intricate morphologies. The HIFEM implements a recursive algorithm for creating enrichment functions that capture gradient discontinuities in nonconforming finite elements cut by arbitrary number and configuration of materials interfaces. The method enables the mesh-independent simulation of multiphase problems with materials interfaces that are in close proximity or contact while providing a straightforward general approach for evaluating the enrichments. In this manuscript, we present a detailed discussion on the implementation issues and required computational geometry considerations associated with the HIFEM approximation of thermal and mechanical responses of 3D problems. A convergence study is provided to investigate the accuracy and convergence rate of the HIFEM and compare them with standard FEM benchmark solutions. We will also demonstrate the application of this mesh-independent method for simulating the thermal and mechanical responses of two composite materials systems with complex microstructures.

  2. Beyond finite elements: a comprehensive, patient-specific neurosurgical simulation utilizing a meshless method.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Horton, A; Joldes, G R; Wittek, A

    2012-10-11

    To be useful in clinical (surgical) simulations, a method must use fully nonlinear (both geometric and material) formulations to deal with large (finite) deformations of tissues. The method must produce meaningful results in a short time on consumer hardware and not require significant manual work while discretizing the problem domain. In this paper, we showcase the Meshless Total Lagrangian Explicit Dynamics Method (MTLED) which meets these requirements, and use it for computing brain deformations during surgery. The problem geometry is based on patient-specific MRI data and includes the parenchyma, tumor, ventricles and skull. Nodes are distributed automatically through the domain rendering the normally difficult problem of creating a patient-specific computational grid a trivial exercise. Integration is performed over a simple, regular background grid which does not need to conform to the geometry boundaries. Appropriate nonlinear material formulation is used. Loading is performed by displacing the parenchyma surface nodes near the craniotomy and a finite frictionless sliding contact is enforced between the skull (rigid) and parenchyma. The meshless simulation results are compared to both intraoperative MRIs and Finite Element Analysis results for multiple 2D sections. We also calculate Hausdorff distances between the computed deformed surfaces of the ventricles and those observed intraoperatively. The difference between previously validated Finite Element results and the meshless results presented here is less than 0.2mm. The results are within the limits of neurosurgical and imaging equipment accuracy (~1 mm) and demonstrate the method's ability to fulfill all of the important requirements for surgical simulation.

  3. Finite-Element Methods for Real-Time Simulation of Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay

    2003-01-01

    Two finite-element methods have been developed for mathematical modeling of the time-dependent behaviors of deformable objects and, more specifically, the mechanical responses of soft tissues and organs in contact with surgical tools. These methods may afford the computational efficiency needed to satisfy the requirement to obtain computational results in real time for simulating surgical procedures as described in Simulation System for Training in Laparoscopic Surgery (NPO-21192) on page 31 in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Simulation of the behavior of soft tissue in real time is a challenging problem because of the complexity of soft-tissue mechanics. The responses of soft tissues are characterized by nonlinearities and by spatial inhomogeneities and rate and time dependences of material properties. Finite-element methods seem promising for integrating these characteristics of tissues into computational models of organs, but they demand much central-processing-unit (CPU) time and memory, and the demand increases with the number of nodes and degrees of freedom in a given finite-element model. Hence, as finite-element models become more realistic, it becomes more difficult to compute solutions in real time. In both of the present methods, one uses approximate mathematical models trading some accuracy for computational efficiency and thereby increasing the feasibility of attaining real-time up36 NASA Tech Briefs, October 2003 date rates. The first of these methods is based on modal analysis. In this method, one reduces the number of differential equations by selecting only the most significant vibration modes of an object (typically, a suitable number of the lowest-frequency modes) for computing deformations of the object in response to applied forces.

  4. Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration Method for the S{sub N} Equations with Discontinuous Finite Element Space and Time Differencing

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, T.A.; Morel, J.E.; McGhee, J.M.

    1999-09-27

    A diffusion synthetic acceleration method is developed for the time dependent S{sub N} equations with linear discontinuous finite element time differencing and discontinuous finite element spatial differencing on unstructured grids. Both theoretical and computational results are given which demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the method.

  5. A finite element beam propagation method for simulation of liquid crystal devices.

    PubMed

    Vanbrabant, Pieter J M; Beeckman, Jeroen; Neyts, Kristiaan; James, Richard; Fernandez, F Anibal

    2009-06-22

    An efficient full-vectorial finite element beam propagation method is presented that uses higher order vector elements to calculate the wide angle propagation of an optical field through inhomogeneous, anisotropic optical materials such as liquid crystals. The full dielectric permittivity tensor is considered in solving Maxwell's equations. The wide applicability of the method is illustrated with different examples: the propagation of a laser beam in a uniaxial medium, the tunability of a directional coupler based on liquid crystals and the near-field diffraction of a plane wave in a structure containing micrometer scale variations in the transverse refractive index, similar to the pixels of a spatial light modulator.

  6. Development and Application of the p-Version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-30

    element method has been the subject of intensive study since the early 1950’s and perhaps even earlier. Study of the p-version of the finite element...method, on the other hand, began at *Washington University in St. Louis in the early 1970’s and led to a more recent study of the h-p version. Research...infinite strip to a bounded domain. 3.3 A Numerical Argument Principle In order to assure that all roots have indeed been obtained, we have studied the

  7. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  8. Sound transmission analysis of partially treated MR fluid-based sandwich panels using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmatian, M.; Sedaghati, R.

    2017-04-01

    This study aims at developing a finite element model to predict the sound transmission loss (STL) of a multilayer panel partially treated with a Magnetorheological (MR) fluid core layer. MR fluids are smart materials with promising controllable rheological characteristics in which the application of an external magnetic field instantly changes their rheological properties. Partial treatment of sandwich panels with MR fluid core layer provides an opportunity to change stiffness and damping of the structure without significantly increasing the mass. The STL of a finite sandwich panel partially treated with MR fluid is modeled using the finite element (FE) method. Circular sandwich panels with clamped boundary condition and elastic face sheets in which the core layer is segmented circumferentially is considered. The MR fluid core layer is considered as a viscoelastic material with complex shear modulus with the magnetic field and frequency dependent storage and loss moduli. Neglecting the effect of the panel's vibration on the pressure forcing function, the work done by the acoustic pressure is expressed as a function of the blocked pressure in order to calculate the force vector in the equation of the motion of the panel. The governing finite element equation of motion of the MR sandwich panel is then developed to predict the transverse vibration of the panel which can then be utilized to obtain the radiated sound using Green's function. The developed model is used to conduct a systematic parametric study on the effect of different locations of MR fluid treatment on the natural frequencies and the STL.

  9. Mixed-RKDG Finite Element Methods for the 2-D Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Zhangxin; Cockburn, Bernardo; Jerome, Joseph W.; ...

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method for numerically solving the equations of the hydrodynamic model for semiconductor devices in two space dimensions. The method combines a standard mixed finite element method, used to obtain directly an approximation to the electric field, with the so-called Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG) method, originally devised for numerically solving multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems of conservation laws, which is applied here to the convective part of the equations. Numerical simulations showing the performance of the new method are displayed, and the results compared with those obtained by using Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) finite difference schemes. Frommore » the perspective of device modeling, these methods are robust, since they are capable of encompassing broad parameter ranges, including those for which shock formation is possible. The simulations presented here are for Gallium Arsenide at room temperature, but we have tested them much more generally with considerable success.« less

  10. XFEM: Exploratory Research into the Extended Finite-Element Method, FY02 LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    MISH, K

    2003-02-26

    This report is one of two components, the first an overview document outlining the goals and results of the XFEM LDRD project, and the other (titled ''Structured Extended Finite Element Methods of Solids defined by Implicit Surfaces'') detailing the scientific advances developed under FY01/FY02 LDRD funding. The XFEM (Extended Finite-Element Method) Engineering LDRD/ER Project was motivated by three research and development goals: (1) the extensions of standard finite-element technology into important new research venues of interest to the Engineering Directorate, (2) the automation of much of the engineering analysis workflow, so as to improve the productivity of mesh-generation and problem setup processes, and (3) the development of scalable software tools to facilitate innovation in XFEM analysis and methods development. The driving principle behind this LDRD project was to demonstrate the computational technology required to perform mechanical analysis of complex solids, with minimal extra effort required on the part of mechanical analysts. This need arises both from the growing workload of LLNL analysts in problem setup and mesh generation, and from the requirement that actual as-built mechanical configurations be analyzed. Many of the most important programmatic drivers for mechanical analysis require that the actual (e.g., deformed, aged, damaged) geometric configuration of the solid be deduced and then accurately modeled: for this programmatic need, XFEM provides one of the only accurate methods available that can provide high-fidelity results.

  11. Microwave imaging using the finite-element method and a sensitivity analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Rekanos, I T; Panas, S M; Tsiboukis, T D

    1999-11-01

    A method for reconstructing the constitutive parameters of two-dimensional (2-D) penetrable scatterers from scattered field measurements is presented. This method is based on the differential formulation of the forward scattering problem, which is solved by applying the finite-element method (FEM). Given a set of scattered field measurements, the objective is to minimize a cost function which consists of two terms. The first is the standard error term, which is related to the measurements and their estimates, while the second term, which is related to the Tikhonov regularization, is used to heal the ill posedness of the inverse problem. The iterative Polak-Ribière nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm is applied to the minimization of the cost function. During each iteration of the algorithm, the direction of correction is computed by using a sensitivity analysis approach, which is carried out by an elaborate finite-element scheme. The adoption of the finite-element method results in sparse systems of equations, while the computational burden is further reduced by applying the adjoint state vector methodology. Finally, a microwave medical imaging application, which is related to the detection of proliferated bone marrow, is examined, while the robustness of the proposed technique in the presence of noise and for different regularization levels is investigated.

  12. Modified Immersed Finite Element Method For Fully-Coupled Fluid-Structure Interations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a “modified” immersed finite element method (mIFEM), a non-boundary-fitted numerical technique, to study fluid-structure interactions. Using this method, we can more precisely capture the solid dynamics by solving the solid governing equation instead of imposing it based on the fluid velocity field as in the original immersed finite element (IFEM). Using the IFEM may lead to severe solid mesh distortion because the solid deformation is been over-estimated, especially for high Reynolds number flows. In the mIFEM, the solid dynamics is solved using appropriate boundary conditions generated from the surrounding fluid, therefore produces more accurate and realistic coupled solutions. We show several 2-D and 3-D testing cases where the mIFEM has a noticeable advantage in handling complicated fluid-structure interactions when the solid behavior dominates the fluid flow. PMID:24223445

  13. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  14. Three dimensional finite element methods: Their role in the design of DC accelerator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podaru, Nicolae C.; Gottdang, A.; Mous, D. J. W.

    2013-04-01

    High Voltage Engineering has designed, built and tested a 2 MV dual irradiation system that will be applied for radiation damage studies and ion beam material modification. The system consists of two independent accelerators which support simultaneous proton and electron irradiation (energy range 100 keV - 2 MeV) of target sizes of up to 300 × 300 mm2. Three dimensional finite element methods were used in the design of various parts of the system. The electrostatic solver was used to quantify essential parameters of the solid-state power supply generating the DC high voltage. The magnetostatic solver and ray tracing were used to optimize the electron/ion beam transport. Close agreement between design and measurements of the accelerator characteristics as well as beam performance indicate the usefulness of three dimensional finite element methods during accelerator system design.

  15. Tissue Modeling and Analyzing with Finite Element Method: A Review for Cranium Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xianfang; Wang, Li; Wang, Ruonan

    2013-01-01

    For the structure mechanics of human body, it is almost impossible to conduct mechanical experiments. Then the finite element model to simulate mechanical experiments has become an effective tool. By introducing several common methods for constructing a 3D model of cranial cavity, this paper carries out systematically the research on the influence law of cranial cavity deformation. By introducing the new concepts and theory to develop the 3D cranial cavity model with the finite-element method, the cranial cavity deformation process with the changing ICP can be made the proper description and reasonable explanation. It can provide reference for getting cranium biomechanical model quickly and efficiently and lay the foundation for further biomechanical experiments and clinical applications. PMID:23476630

  16. A Time Decomposition Method to Space-Time Finite Elements for the Dirac Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun; Kurlej, Arthur; Comeau, Olivia; Stegmeier, Nicholas; Kimn, Jung-Han

    2017-01-01

    Dirac equation is a relativistic wave equation that describes spin-1/2 massive particles such as electrons and quarks. Furthermore, this system can be extended with different physical aspects such as electromagnetic interaction. However, most of these system cannot be solved analytically. Therefore, numerical simulations are required to understand the nature of these systems. In this work, we examine the behavior of the gauge free, low-mass regime Dirac equation using space-time finite elements with time decomposition method. The purpose of this research is to present a new computational way for stable parallelizable algorithm of the physical system. We discretize space and time together for the entire domain using a finite element space which does not separate time and space basis functions. We also explore the effectiveness of the time decomposition preconditioner, time-additive Schwarz preconditioner with KSP (Krylov Subspace Methods) solvers for this problem.

  17. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  18. Structural Anomaly Detection Using Fiber Optic Sensors and Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alex; Moore, Jason P.; Cooper, Eric G.; Spangler, Jan. L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a variety of techniques for mitigating aircraft accidents due to structural component failure. One technique under consideration combines distributed fiber optic strain sensing with an inverse finite element method for detecting and characterizing structural anomalies anomalies that may provide early indication of airframe structure degradation. The technique identifies structural anomalies that result in observable changes in localized strain but do not impact the overall surface shape. Surface shape information is provided by an Inverse Finite Element Method that computes full-field displacements and internal loads using strain data from in-situ fiberoptic sensors. This paper describes a prototype of such a system and reports results from a series of laboratory tests conducted on a test coupon subjected to increasing levels of damage.

  19. Band-limited Green's Functions for Quantitative Evaluation of Acoustic Emission Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Leser, William P.

    2013-01-01

    A method of numerically estimating dynamic Green's functions using the finite element method is proposed. These Green's functions are accurate in a limited frequency range dependent on the mesh size used to generate them. This range can often match or exceed the frequency sensitivity of the traditional acoustic emission sensors. An algorithm is also developed to characterize an acoustic emission source by obtaining information about its strength and temporal dependence. This information can then be used to reproduce the source in a finite element model for further analysis. Numerical examples are presented that demonstrate the ability of the band-limited Green's functions approach to determine the moment tensor coefficients of several reference signals to within seven percent, as well as accurately reproduce the source-time function.

  20. Wave characterization of cylindrical and curved panels using a finite element method.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Elisabetta; Mace, Brian R

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a wave finite element method for the numerical prediction of wave characteristics of cylindrical and curved panels. The method combines conventional finite elements and the theory of wave propagation in periodic structures. The mass and stiffness matrices of a small segment of the structure, which is typically modeled using either a single shell element or, especially for laminated structures, a stack of solid elements meshed through the cross-section, are postprocessed using periodicity conditions. The matrices are typically found using a commercial FE package. The solutions of the resulting eigenproblem provide the frequency evolution of the wavenumber and the wave modes. For cylindrical geometries, the circumferential order of the wave can be specified in order to define the phase change that a wave experiences as it propagates across the element in the circumferential direction. The method is described and illustrated by application to cylinders and curved panels of different constructions. These include isotropic, orthotropic, and laminated sandwich constructions. The application of the method is seen to be straightforward even in the complicated case of laminated sandwich panels. Accurate predictions of the dispersion curves are found at negligible computational cost.

  1. a Finite Element Method for Flow Problems with Free Surfaces and Moving Fronts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerberg, Kenneth William

    A finite element technique to model a fluid flow with a liquid-gas free surface and/or a solid-liquid phase -change boundary has been developed. These types of problems are difficult because in addition to the flow and temperature fields, the domain boundaries are also unknown. Two specific applications where such a technique is needed are formulated and discussed. The first is the development of a model for the thermal printing of bar code labels. Thermal printer paper is heated by a moving print head and a heat-activated chemical reaction takes place to change the color of the paper. The extent of the region that has reacted is governed by the same equations that govern the melting of a pure material. The second application is building a model of an electron beam metal vaporizer. A beam of electrons strikes the surface of a pool of liquid metal causing the metal to vaporize. A pool of liquid metal forms in the vicinity of the beam impact area. The problem involves both a liquid-gas free surface and a solid-liquid phase -change front as well as a tri-junction point where solid, liquid and gas phases all meet. Both models two-dimensional and time-dependent. The technique is based on a deformable finite element mesh designed to keep the interfaces on element boundaries. There is a singularity in the force balance along the liquid-gas free interface due to surface tension and a singularity in the heat balance along the solid-liquid phase-change front due to the latent heat of the phase-change. These singularities are easily handled by the finite element method provided they are kept on element boundaries. The positions of the free and moving boundaries are tracked using spines. Special linear algebra techniques are developed to solve the equation system resulting from our finite element discretization of the free or moving boundary problem.

  2. Seismic wavefield simulation by a modified finite element method with a perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Weijuan; Fu, Li-Yun

    2017-08-01

    The finite element method is a very important tool for modeling seismic wave propagation in complex media, but it usually consumes a large amount of memory which significantly decreases computational efficiency when solving large-scale seismic problems. Here, a modified finite element method (MFEM) is proposed to improve efficiency. Triangular elements are employed to mesh the topography and the discontinuous interface more flexibly. In the two-dimensional case, the Jacobian matrix is obtained by using three controlling points instead of all nodes in each element with MFEM, which separates the Jacobian matrix from the stiffness matrix. The kernel matrices of the stiffness matrix rather than the global matrix are stored, and memory requirements are thus reduced significantly. Meanwhile, the element-by-element scheme is adopted to spare large sparse matrices and make the program easily parallelized. A second-order perfectly matched layer (PML) is also implemented to eliminate artificial reflections. Finally, the accuracy and efficiency of our algorithm are validated by numerical tests.

  3. Piezoelectric effects in boron nitride nanotubes predicted by the atomistic finite element method and molecular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolladay, Mat; Ivanov, Dmitry; Allan, Neil L.; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2017-09-01

    We calculate the tensile and shear moduli of a series of boron nitride nanotubes and their piezoelectric response to applied loads. We compare in detail results from a simple molecular mechanics (MM) potential, the universal force field, with those from the atomistic finite element method (AFEM) using both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam formulations. The MM energy minimisations are much more successful than those using the AFEM, and we analyse the failure of the latter approach both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  4. Piezoelectric effects in boron nitride nanotubes predicted by the atomistic finite element method and molecular mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tolladay, Mat; Ivanov, Dmitry; Allan, Neil L; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2017-09-01

    We calculate the tensile and shear moduli of a series of boron nitride nanotubes and their piezoelectric response to applied loads. We compare in detail results from a simple molecular mechanics (MM) potential, the universal force field, with those from the atomistic finite element method (AFEM) using both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam formulations. The MM energy minimisations are much more successful than those using the AFEM, and we analyse the failure of the latter approach both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  5. Optical tomography reconstruction algorithm with the finite element method: An optimal approach with regularization tools

    SciTech Connect

    Balima, O.; Favennec, Y.; Rousse, D.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •New strategies to improve the accuracy of the reconstruction through mesh and finite element parameterization. •Use of gradient filtering through an alternative inner product within the adjoint method. •An integral form of the cost function is used to make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. •Gradient-based algorithm with the adjoint method is used for the reconstruction. -- Abstract: Optical tomography is mathematically treated as a non-linear inverse problem where the optical properties of the probed medium are recovered through the minimization of the errors between the experimental measurements and their predictions with a numerical model at the locations of the detectors. According to the ill-posed behavior of the inverse problem, some regularization tools must be performed and the Tikhonov penalization type is the most commonly used in optical tomography applications. This paper introduces an optimized approach for optical tomography reconstruction with the finite element method. An integral form of the cost function is used to take into account the surfaces of the detectors and make the reconstruction compatible with all finite element formulations, continuous and discontinuous. Through a gradient-based algorithm where the adjoint method is used to compute the gradient of the cost function, an alternative inner product is employed for preconditioning the reconstruction algorithm. Moreover, appropriate re-parameterization of the optical properties is performed. These regularization strategies are compared with the classical Tikhonov penalization one. It is shown that both the re-parameterization and the use of the Sobolev cost function gradient are efficient for solving such an ill-posed inverse problem.

  6. A strongly conservative finite element method for the coupling of Stokes and Darcy flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanschat, G.; Rivière, B.

    2010-08-01

    We consider a model of coupled free and porous media flow governed by Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition. This model is discretized using divergence-conforming finite elements for the velocities in the whole domain. Discontinuous Galerkin techniques and mixed methods are used in the Stokes and Darcy subdomains, respectively. This discretization is strongly conservative in Hdiv( Ω) and we show convergence. Numerical results validate our findings and indicate optimal convergence orders.

  7. Implementation of Nonhomogeneous Dirichlet Boundary Conditions in the p- Version of the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    Institute for Physical Science and Teennology rUniversity of Maryland o College Park, MD 20742 B. Gix) Engineering Mechanics Research Corporation Troy...OF THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD by Ivo Babuska Institute for Physical Science and Technology University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 B. Guo 2...2Research partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DMS-85-16191 during the stay at the Institute for Physical Science and

  8. Error estimations of mixed finite element methods for nonlinear problems of shallow shell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karchevsky, M.

    2016-11-01

    The variational formulations of problems of equilibrium of a shallow shell in the framework of the geometrically and physically nonlinear theory by boundary conditions of different main types, including non-classical, are considered. Necessary and sufficient conditions for their solvability are derived. Mixed finite element methods for the approximate solutions to these problems based on the use of second derivatives of the bending as auxiliary variables are proposed. Estimations of accuracy of approximate solutions are established.

  9. A Stochastic Mixed Finite Element Heterogeneous Multiscale Method for Flow in Porous Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    quickly. However, for reservoir simulation the most crucial factor is the transport prop- erties of a velocity field. That is, a large local error in the...streamline methods for reservoir simulation of large geomodels, Advances in Water Resources 28 (2005) 257 – 271. [11] P. Jenny, S. H. Lee, H. A. Tchelepi... Reservoir Simulation , 2003, pp. 23–27. [53] R. Ghanem, P. D. Spanos, Stochastic Finite Elements: A Spectral Approach, Springer - Verlag, New York

  10. A Mass Conservation Algorithm for Adaptive Unrefinement Meshes Used by Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    is an adaptive finite element method to simulate three-dimensional Navier- Stokes flow, unsaturated and saturated groundwater flow, overland flow...variables of fluid-motion simulations and are often solved at various times. It is important for the numerical model to predict accurate water depth...remove others where they are no longer required during the simulation . The AMR is proven to optimize the performance of a computed solution. However, mass

  11. Viscoplastic and Creep Crack Growth Analysis by the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Strain Matrix and Its Application for the Solution of Elastic- Plastic Problems by the Finite Element Method," Int’l Journ. of Mechani- cal Sciences, Vol...constant. Therefore only one solution is required to obtain displacements for the elastic structure. However, for elastic- plastic problems the...form as dP= ;I.3 deP~i dEYi.. (A-28) 4. ELASTIC-PLASTIC SOLUTION TECHNIQUES The procedures used to solve small displacement elastic- plastic problems incrementally

  12. Advances in the p and h-p Versions of the Finite Element Method. A survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    p versions is the code PROBE which was developed by NOETIC Technologies, St. Louis, MO [49] [60]. PROBE solves two dimensional problems of linear...p and h-p versions of the finite element method was studied in detail from various point of view. We will mention here some essential illustrative...49] PROBE - Sample Problems. Series of reports, Noetic Technologies, St. Louis, MO 63117. [50] Rank, E., Babu’ka, I., An expert system for the

  13. Laminar and turbulent incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the finite element method applied to two-dimensional incompressible fluid flow analysis with heat transfer is performed using a mixed Galerkin finite element method with the primitive variable form of the model equations. Four biquadratic, quadrilateral elements are compared in this study--the serendipity biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2(8)-Q1) and the Lagrangian biquadratic element with bilinear continuous pressure interpolation (Q2-Q1) of the Taylor-Hood form. A modified form of the Q2-Q1 element is also studied. The pressure interpolation is augmented by a discontinuous constant shape function for pressure (Q2-Q1+). The discontinuous pressure element formulation makes use of biquadratic shape functions and a discontinuous linear interpolation of the pressure (Q2-P1(3)). Laminar flow solutions, with heat transfer, are compared to analytical and computational benchmarks for flat channel, backward-facing step and buoyancy driven flow in a square cavity. It is shown that the discontinuous pressure elements provide superior solution characteristics over the continuous pressure elements. Highly accurate heat transfer solutions are obtained and the Q2-P1(3) element is chosen for extension to turbulent flow simulations. Turbulent flow solutions are presented for both low turbulence Reynolds number and high Reynolds number formulations of two-equation turbulence models. The following three forms of the length scale transport equation are studied; the turbulence energy dissipation rate ([var epsilon]), the turbulence frequency ([omega]) and the turbulence time scale (tau). It is shown that the low turbulence Reynolds number model consisting of the K - [tau] transport equations, coupled with the damping functions of Shih and Hsu, provides an optimal combination of numerical stability and solution accuracy for the flat channel flow.

  14. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    DOE PAGES

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problemmore » results are presented.« less

  15. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  16. A 3D finite element ALE method using an approximate Riemann solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, V. P.; Morgan, N. R.

    2016-08-09

    Arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian finite volume methods that solve a multidimensional Riemann-like problem at the cell center in a staggered grid hydrodynamic (SGH) arrangement have been proposed. This research proposes a new 3D finite element arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian SGH method that incorporates a multidimensional Riemann-like problem. Here, two different Riemann jump relations are investigated. A new limiting method that greatly improves the accuracy of the SGH method on isentropic flows is investigated. A remap method that improves upon a well-known mesh relaxation and remapping technique in order to ensure total energy conservation during the remap is also presented. Numerical details and test problem results are presented.

  17. An approach to parameter estimation for breast tumor by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, A.-qing; Yang, Hong-qin; Ye, Zhen; Su, Yi-ming; Xie, Shu-sen

    2009-02-01

    The temperature of human body on the surface of the skin depends on the metabolic activity, the blood flow, and the temperature of the surroundings. Any abnormality in the tissue, such as the presence of a tumor, alters the normal temperature on the skin surface due to increased metabolic activity of the tumor. Therefore, abnormal skin temperature profiles are an indication of diseases such as tumor or cancer. This study is to present an approach to detect the female breast tumor and its related parameter estimations by combination the finite element method with infrared thermography for the surface temperature profile. A 2D simplified breast embedded a tumor model based on the female breast anatomical structure and physiological characteristics was first established, and then finite element method was used to analyze the heat diffuse equation for the surface temperature profiles of the breast. The genetic optimization algorithm was used to estimate the tumor parameters such as depth, size and blood perfusion by minimizing a fitness function involving the temperature profiles simulated data by finite element method to the experimental data obtained by infrared thermography. This preliminary study shows it is possible to determine the depth and the heat generation rate of the breast tumor by using infrared thermography and the optimization analysis, which may play an important role in the female breast healthcare and diseases evaluation or early detection. In order to develop the proposed methodology to be used in clinical, more accurate anatomy 3D breast geometry should be considered in further investigations.

  18. Sensitivity analysis based preform die shape design using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Hufi, R.; Hutter, A.; Grandhi, R. V.

    1997-06-01

    This paper uses a finite element-based sensitivity analysis method to design the preform die shape for metal forming processes. The sensitivity analysis was developed using the rigid visco-plastic finite element method. The preform die shapes are represented by cubic B-spline curves. The control points or coefficients of the B-spline are used as the design variables. The optimization problem is to minimize the difference between the realized and the desired final forging shapes. The sensitivity analysis includes the sensitivities of the objective function, nodal coordinates, and nodal velocities with respect to the design variables. The remeshing procedure and the interpolation/transfer of the history/dependent parameters are considered. An adjustment of the volume loss resulting from the finite element analysis is used to make the workpiece volume consistent in each optimization iteration and improve the optimization convergence. In addition, a technique for dealing with fold-over defects during the forming simulation is employed in order to continue the optimization procedures of the preform die shape design. The method developed in this paper is used to design the preform die shape for both plane strain and axisymmetric deformations with shaped cavities. The analysis shows that satisfactory final forging shapes are obtained using the optimized preform die shapes.

  19. Modeling the mechanics of axonal fiber tracts using the embedded finite element method.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Harsha T; Kraft, Reuben H

    2016-08-08

    A subject-specific human head finite element model with embedded axonal fiber tractography obtained from diffusion tensor imaging was developed. The axonal fiber tractography finite element model was coupled with the volumetric elements in the head model using the embedded element method. This technique enables the calculation of axonal strains and real-time tracking of the mechanical response of the axonal fiber tracts. The coupled model was then verified using pressure and relative displacement-based (between skull and brain) experimental studies and was employed to analyze a head impact, demonstrating the applicability of this method in studying axonal injury. Following this, a comparison study of different injury criteria was performed. This model was used to determine the influence of impact direction on the extent of the axonal injury. The results suggested that the lateral impact loading is more dangerous compared to loading in the sagittal plane, a finding in agreement with previous studies. Through this analysis, we demonstrated the viability of the embedded element method as an alternative numerical approach for studying axonal injury in patient-specific human head models.

  20. Wave motion analysis in arch structures via wavelet finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Yongying; Miao, Huihui; He, Zhengjia

    2014-01-01

    The application of B-spline wavelet on interval (BSWI) finite element method for wave motion analysis in arch structures is presented in this paper. Instead of traditional polynomial interpolation, scaling functions at certain scales have been adopted to form the shape functions and construct wavelet-based elements. Different from other wavelet numerical methods adding wavelets directly, the element displacement field represented by the coefficients of wavelets expansions is transformed from wavelet space to physical space via the corresponding transformation matrix. The energy functional of the arch is obtained by the generalized shell theory, and the finite element model for wave motion analysis is constructed according to Hamilton's principle and the central difference method in time domain. Taking the practical application into account, damaged arch waveguides are also investigated. Proper analysis of the responses from structure damages allows one to indicate the location very precisely. This paper mainly focuses on the crack in structures. Based on Castigliano's theorem and the Pairs equation, the local flexibility of crack is formulated for BSWI element. Numerical experiments are performed to study the effect of wave propagations in arch waveguides, that is, frequency dispersion and mode spilt in the arch. The responses of the arch with cracks are simulated under the broad-band, narrow-band and chirp excitations. In order to estimate the spatial, time and frequency concentrations of responses, the reciprocal length, time-frequency transform and correlation coefficient are introduced in this investigation.

  1. A p-adaptive stabilized finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanam, Anil Kumar

    2008-10-01

    Stabilized finite element methods have been shown to yield robust, accurate numerical solutions to both the compressible and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for laminar and turbulent flows. This work presents an application of mesh entity based, hierarchical basis functions to a new stabilized finite element formulation, exploiting the capability to grade polynomial order while maintaining C0 continuity while using traditional finite element data structures. The hierarchical basis accomplishes this by starting with vertex interpolants (a linear basis) and then allowing the polynomial order to vary on each entity (edges, faces, and regions) in the mesh which are then multiplied by blends within each element to build a composite function that is locally higher order but still globally continuous. Details of this formulation and its efficient implementation will be presented. Partition weighting schemes were developed to achieve optimal load balance and scalability for parallel simulations. An application is presented, of p-refinement applied to a laminar flow past a surface mounted unit cube placed in a channel. Finally, post-processing techniques are also described for the effective visualization of higher order solutions.

  2. Shape and Stress Sensing of Multilayered Composite and Sandwich Structures Using an Inverse Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerracchio, Priscilla; Gherlone, Marco; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The marked increase in the use of composite and sandwich material systems in aerospace, civil, and marine structures leads to the need for integrated Structural Health Management systems. A key capability to enable such systems is the real-time reconstruction of structural deformations, stresses, and failure criteria that are inferred from in-situ, discrete-location strain measurements. This technology is commonly referred to as shape- and stress-sensing. Presented herein is a computationally efficient shape- and stress-sensing methodology that is ideally suited for applications to laminated composite and sandwich structures. The new approach employs the inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM) as a general framework and the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) as the underlying plate theory. A three-node inverse plate finite element is formulated. The element formulation enables robust and efficient modeling of plate structures instrumented with strain sensors that have arbitrary positions. The methodology leads to a set of linear algebraic equations that are solved efficiently for the unknown nodal displacements. These displacements are then used at the finite element level to compute full-field strains, stresses, and failure criteria that are in turn used to assess structural integrity. Numerical results for multilayered, highly heterogeneous laminates demonstrate the unique capability of this new formulation for shape- and stress-sensing.

  3. Characterization of human passive muscles for impact loads using genetic algorithm and inverse finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Chawla, A; Mukherjee, S; Karthikeyan, B

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the dynamic material properties of human passive muscle tissues for the strain rates relevant to automobile crashes. A novel methodology involving genetic algorithm (GA) and finite element method is implemented to estimate the material parameters by inverse mapping the impact test data. Isolated unconfined impact tests for average strain rates ranging from 136 s(-1) to 262 s(-1) are performed on muscle tissues. Passive muscle tissues are modelled as isotropic, linear and viscoelastic material using three-element Zener model available in PAMCRASH(TM) explicit finite element software. In the GA based identification process, fitness values are calculated by comparing the estimated finite element forces with the measured experimental forces. Linear viscoelastic material parameters (bulk modulus, short term shear modulus and long term shear modulus) are thus identified at strain rates 136 s(-1), 183 s(-1) and 262 s(-1) for modelling muscles. Extracted optimal parameters from this study are comparable with reported parameters in literature. Bulk modulus and short term shear modulus are found to be more influential in predicting the stress-strain response than long term shear modulus for the considered strain rates. Variations within the set of parameters identified at different strain rates indicate the need for new or improved material model, which is capable of capturing the strain rate dependency of passive muscle response with single set of material parameters for wide range of strain rates.

  4. A blended continuous-discontinuous finite element method for solving the multi-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, E. M.; Shumlak, U.

    2016-12-01

    The multi-fluid plasma model represents electrons, multiple ion species, and multiple neutral species as separate fluids that interact through short-range collisions and long-range electromagnetic fields. The model spans a large range of temporal and spatial scales, which renders the model stiff and presents numerical challenges. To address the large range of timescales, a blended continuous and discontinuous Galerkin method is proposed, where the massive ion and neutral species are modeled using an explicit discontinuous Galerkin method while the electrons and electromagnetic fields are modeled using an implicit continuous Galerkin method. This approach is able to capture large-gradient ion and neutral physics like shock formation, while resolving high-frequency electron dynamics in a computationally efficient manner. The details of the Blended Finite Element Method (BFEM) are presented. The numerical method is benchmarked for accuracy and tested using two-fluid one-dimensional soliton problem and electromagnetic shock problem. The results are compared to conventional finite volume and finite element methods, and demonstrate that the BFEM is particularly effective in resolving physics in stiff problems involving realistic physical parameters, including realistic electron mass and speed of light. The benefit is illustrated by computing a three-fluid plasma application that demonstrates species separation in multi-component plasmas.

  5. A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Kim S.; Oden, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    A Runge-Kutta discontinuous finite element method is developed for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws in two space variables. The discontinuous Galerkin spatial approximation to the conservation laws results in a system of ordinary differential equations which are marched in time using Runge-Kutta methods. Numerical results for the two-dimensional Burger's equation show that the method is (p+1)-order accurate in time and space, where p is the degree of the polynomial approximation of the solution within an element and is capable of capturing shocks over a single element without oscillations. Results for this problem also show that the accuracy of the solution in smooth regions is unaffected by the local projection and that the accuracy in smooth regions increases as p increases. Numerical results for the Euler equations show that the method captures shocks without oscillations and with higher resolution than a first-order scheme.

  6. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  7. A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element method for simulation of thermo-mechanical forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huetink, J.; Vanderlugt, J.

    1988-08-01

    A mixed Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element method is developed by which nodal point locations can be adapted independently from the actual material displacements. Numerical difficulties due to large element distortions, as many occur when the updated Lagrange method is applied, can be avoided by this method. Movement of (free) surfaces can be taken into account by adapting nodal surface points in a way that they remain on the surface. Hardening and other deformation path dependent properties are determined by incremental treatment of convective terms. A local and a weighed global smoothing procedure is introduced in order to avoid numerical instabilities. The method has been applied to simulations of an upsetting process, a wire drawing process and a cold rolling process. In the simulation of the rolling process, both workpiece and roll are simultaneously analyzed in order to predict the flattening of the roll. Special contact-slip elements are developed for the tool-workpiece interface.

  8. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  9. Effects of welding technology on welding stress based on the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianke; Jin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process under four different conditions of welding flat butt joints. Welding seams are simulated with birth and death elements. The size and distribution of welding residual stress is obtained in the four kinds of welding conditions by Q345 manganese steel plate butt joint of the work piece. The results shown that when using two-layers welding,the longitudinal and transverse residual stress were reduced;When welding from Middle to both sides,the residual stress distribution will change,and the residual stress in the middle of the work piece was reduced.

  10. Finite elements and the method of conjugate gradients on a concurrent processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, G. A.; Raefsky, A.; Hager, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm for the iterative solution of finite element problems on a concurrent processor is presented. The method of conjugate gradients is used to solve the system of matrix equations, which is distributed among the processors of a MIMD computer according to an element-based spatial decomposition. This algorithm is implemented in a two-dimensional elastostatics program on the Caltech Hypercube concurrent processor. The results of tests on up to 32 processors show nearly linear concurrent speedup, with efficiencies over 90% for sufficiently large problems.

  11. On the accuracy of creep-damage predictions in thinwalled structures using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenbach, H.; Kolarow, G.; Morachkovsky, O. K.; Naumenko, K.

    The constitutive model with a single damage parameter describing creep-damage behaviour of metals with respect to the different sensitivity of the damage process due to tension and compression is incorporated into the ANSYS finite element code by modifying the user defined creep material subroutine. The procedure is verified by comparison with solutions for beams and rectangular plates in bending based on the Ritz method. Various numerical tests show the sensitivity of long-term predictions to the mesh sizes and element types available for the creep analysis of thinwalled structures.

  12. A conservative stabilized finite element method for the magneto-hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Salah, Nizar; Soulaimani, Azzeddine; Habashi, Wagdi G.; Fortin, Michel

    1999-03-01

    This work presents a finite element solution of the 3D magneto-hydrodynamics equations. The formulation takes explicitly into account the local conservation of the magnetic field, giving rise to a conservative formulation and introducing a new scalar variable. A stabilization technique is used in order to allow equal linear interpolation on tetrahedral elements of all the variables. Numerical tests are performed in order to assess the stability and the accuracy of the resulting methods. The convergence rates are calculated for different stabilization parameters. Well-known MHD benchmark tests are calculated. Results show good agreement with analytical solutions. Copyright

  13. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  14. A method for determining spiral-bevel gear tooth geometry for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical method was developed to determine gear tooth surface coordinates of face-milled spiral bevel gears. The method uses the basic gear design parameters in conjunction with the kinematical aspects of spiral bevel gear manufacturing machinery. A computer program, SURFACE, was developed. The computer program calculates the surface coordinates and outputs 3-D model data that can be used for finite element analysis. Development of the modeling method and an example case are presented. This analysis method could also find application for gear inspection and near-net-shape gear forging die design.

  15. A least-squares finite element method for incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1989-01-01

    A least-squares finite element method, based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation, is developed for solving steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method leads to a minimization problem rather than to a saddle-point problem by the classic mixed method, and can thus accommodate equal-order interpolations. This method has no parameter to tune. The associated algebraic system is symmetric, and positive definite. Numerical results for the cavity flow at Reynolds number up to 10,000 and the backward-facing step flow at Reynolds number up to 900 are presented.

  16. A least-squares finite element method for incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1992-01-01

    A least-squares finite element method, based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation, is developed for solving steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method leads to a minimization problem rather than to a saddle-point problem by the classic mixed method and can thus accommodate equal-order interpolations. This method has no parameter to tune. The associated algebraic system is symmetric, and positive definite. Numerical results for the cavity flow at Reynolds number up to 10,000 and the backward-facing step flow at Reynolds number up to 900 are presented.

  17. Finite element method formulation in polar coordinates for transient heat conduction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is the formulation of the finite element method in polar coordinates to solve transient heat conduction problems. It is hard to find in the literature a formulation of the finite element method (FEM) in polar or cylindrical coordinates for the solution of heat transfer problems. This document shows how to apply the most often used boundary conditions. The global equation system is solved by the Crank-Nicolson method. The proposed algorithm is verified in three numerical tests. In the first example, the obtained transient temperature distribution is compared with the temperature obtained from the presented analytical solution. In the second numerical example, the variable boundary condition is assumed. In the last numerical example the component with the shape different than cylindrical is used. All examples show that the introduction of the polar coordinate system gives better results than in the Cartesian coordinate system. The finite element method formulation in polar coordinates is valuable since it provides a higher accuracy of the calculations without compacting the mesh in cylindrical or similar to tubular components. The proposed method can be applied for circular elements such as boiler drums, outlet headers, flux tubes. This algorithm can be useful during the solution of inverse problems, which do not allow for high density grid. This method can calculate the temperature distribution in the bodies of different properties in the circumferential and the radial direction. The presented algorithm can be developed for other coordinate systems. The examples demonstrate a good accuracy and stability of the proposed method.

  18. An Embedded Statistical Method for Coupling Molecular Dynamics and Finite Element Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.H.; Yamakov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The coupling of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with finite element methods (FEM) yields computationally efficient models that link fundamental material processes at the atomistic level with continuum field responses at higher length scales. The theoretical challenge involves developing a seamless connection along an interface between two inherently different simulation frameworks. Various specialized methods have been developed to solve particular classes of problems. Many of these methods link the kinematics of individual MD atoms with FEM nodes at their common interface, necessarily requiring that the finite element mesh be refined to atomic resolution. Some of these coupling approaches also require simulations to be carried out at 0 K and restrict modeling to two-dimensional material domains due to difficulties in simulating full three-dimensional material processes. In the present work, a new approach to MD-FEM coupling is developed based on a restatement of the standard boundary value problem used to define a coupled domain. The method replaces a direct linkage of individual MD atoms and finite element (FE) nodes with a statistical averaging of atomistic displacements in local atomic volumes associated with each FE node in an interface region. The FEM and MD computational systems are effectively independent and communicate only through an iterative update of their boundary conditions. With the use of statistical averages of the atomistic quantities to couple the two computational schemes, the developed approach is referred to as an embedded statistical coupling method (ESCM). ESCM provides an enhanced coupling methodology that is inherently applicable to three-dimensional domains, avoids discretization of the continuum model to atomic scale resolution, and permits finite temperature states to be applied.

  19. Gradient plasticity crack tip characterization by means of the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pañeda, E.; Natarajan, S.; Bordas, S.

    2017-01-01

    Strain gradient plasticity theories are being widely used for fracture assessment, as they provide a richer description of crack tip fields by incorporating the influence of geometrically necessary dislocations. Characterizing the behavior at the small scales involved in crack tip deformation requires, however, the use of a very refined mesh within microns to the crack. In this work a novel and efficient gradient-enhanced numerical framework is developed by means of the extended finite element method (X-FEM). A mechanism-based gradient plasticity model is employed and the approximation of the displacement field is enriched with the stress singularity of the gradient-dominated solution. Results reveal that the proposed numerical methodology largely outperforms the standard finite element approach. The present work could have important implications on the use of microstructurally-motivated models in large scale applications. The non-linear X-FEM code developed in MATLAB can be downloaded from http://www.empaneda.com/codes.

  20. Method for patient-specific finite element modeling and simulation of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Zrinzo, Ludvic U; Tisch, Stephen; Tripoliti, Elina; Hariz, Marwan I; Wårdell, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. Success of DBS is highly dependent on electrode location and electrical parameter settings. The aim of this study was to develop a general method for setting up patient-specific 3D computer models of DBS, based on magnetic resonance images, and to demonstrate the use of such models for assessing the position of the electrode contacts and the distribution of the electric field in relation to individual patient anatomy. A software tool was developed for creating finite element DBS-models. The electric field generated by DBS was simulated in one patient and the result was visualized with isolevels and glyphs. The result was evaluated and it corresponded well with reported effects and side effects of stimulation. It was demonstrated that patient-specific finite element models and simulations of DBS can be useful for increasing the understanding of the clinical outcome of DBS.

  1. Simulation of cylindrical cup drawing of AZ31 sheet metal with crystal plasticity finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Weiqin; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Shaorui; Peng, Yinghong

    2013-12-01

    As a light-weight structural material, magnesium alloys show good potential in improving the fuel efficiency of vehicles and reducing CO2 emissions. However, it is well known that polycrystalline Mg alloys develop pronounced crystallographic texture and plastic anisotropy during rolling, which leads to earing phenomenon during deep drawing of the rolled sheets. It is vital to predict this phenomenon accurately for application of magnesium sheet metals. In the present study, a crystal plasticity model for AZ31 magnesium alloy that incorporates both slip and twinning is established. Then the crystal plasticity model is implemented in the commercial finite element software ABAQUS/Explicit through secondary development interface (VUMAT). Finally, the stamping process of a cylindrical cup is simulated using the developed crystal plasticity finite element model, and the predicting method is verified by comparing with experimental results from both earing profile and deformation texture.

  2. A weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal guidance of an advanced launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Calise, Anthony J.; Bless, Robert R.; Leung, Martin

    1989-01-01

    A temporal finite-element method based on a mixed form of the Hamiltonian weak principle is presented for optimal control problems. The mixed form of this principle contains both states and costates as primary variables, which are expanded in terms of nodal values and simple shape functions. Time derivatives of the states and costates do not appear in the governing variational equation; the only quantities whose time derivatives appear therein are virtual states and virtual costates. Numerical results are presented for an elementary trajectory optimization problem; they show very good agreement with the exact solution along with excellent computational efficiency and self-starting capability. The feasibility of this approach for real-time guidance applications is evaluated. A simplified model for an advanced launch vehicle application that is suitable for finite-element solution is presented.

  3. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, M.; Knabner, P.

    2004-06-01

    We present adaptive mixed hybrid finite element discretizations of the Richards equation, a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation modeling the flow of water into a variably saturated porous medium. The approach simultaneously constructs approximations of the flux and the pressure head in Raviart-Thomas spaces. The resulting nonlinear systems of equations are solved by a Newton method. For the linear problems of the Newton iteration a multigrid algorithm is used. We consider two different kinds of error indicators for space adaptive grid refinement: superconvergence and residual based indicators. They can be calculated easily by means of the available finite element approximations. This seems attractive for computations since no additional (sub-)problems have to be solved. Computational experiments conducted for realistic water table recharge problems illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of the approach.

  4. Application of Finite Element Method to the structure design of the Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Yang, Shi-Mo

    2005-12-01

    Finite Element Method (FEM), the primary numerical means to process structure analysis in the modern engineering field, is adopted widely in the design of astronomical instruments at present. It can help designers to find out various characteristics of the object, to discover the weakness in stiffness and strength, and to improve and optimize the design as well. It is also used widely in many processes during the designing of the Space Solar Telescope (SST), such as in the main truss and the primary cell. From the beginning of the geometry modeling and the finite element creating, many aspects such as linear static, modal analysis, transient response and thermal analysis are demonstrated in SST. The error existing in the FEM, why it exists, and how to reduce it are discussed. Finally, the development trend of FEM in the astronomical instruments especially the space astronomical instruments is presented.

  5. Solution of the neutronics code dynamic benchmark by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvakumov, A. V.; Vabishchevich, P. N.; Vasilev, A. O.; Strizhov, V. F.

    2016-10-01

    The objective is to analyze the dynamic benchmark developed by Atomic Energy Research for the verification of best-estimate neutronics codes. The benchmark scenario includes asymmetrical ejection of a control rod in a water-type hexagonal reactor at hot zero power. A simple Doppler feedback mechanism assuming adiabatic fuel temperature heating is proposed. The finite element method on triangular calculation grids is used to solve the three-dimensional neutron kinetics problem. The software has been developed using the engineering and scientific calculation library FEniCS. The matrix spectral problem is solved using the scalable and flexible toolkit SLEPc. The solution accuracy of the dynamic benchmark is analyzed by condensing calculation grid and varying degree of finite elements.

  6. Gradient plasticity crack tip characterization by means of the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Pañeda, E.; Natarajan, S.; Bordas, S.

    2017-05-01

    Strain gradient plasticity theories are being widely used for fracture assessment, as they provide a richer description of crack tip fields by incorporating the influence of geometrically necessary dislocations. Characterizing the behavior at the small scales involved in crack tip deformation requires, however, the use of a very refined mesh within microns to the crack. In this work a novel and efficient gradient-enhanced numerical framework is developed by means of the extended finite element method (X-FEM). A mechanism-based gradient plasticity model is employed and the approximation of the displacement field is enriched with the stress singularity of the gradient-dominated solution. Results reveal that the proposed numerical methodology largely outperforms the standard finite element approach. The present work could have important implications on the use of microstructurally-motivated models in large scale applications. The non-linear X-FEM code developed in MATLAB can be downloaded from http://www.empaneda.com/codes.

  7. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  8. Parallelized Three-Dimensional Resistivity Inversion Using Finite Elements And Adjoint State Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaa, Ralf; Gross, Lutz; Du Plessis, Jaco

    2015-04-01

    The resistivity method is one of the oldest geophysical exploration methods, which employs one pair of electrodes to inject current into the ground and one or more pairs of electrodes to measure the electrical potential difference. The potential difference is a non-linear function of the subsurface resistivity distribution described by an elliptic partial differential equation (PDE) of the Poisson type. Inversion of measured potentials solves for the subsurface resistivity represented by PDE coefficients. With increasing advances in multichannel resistivity acquisition systems (systems with more than 60 channels and full waveform recording are now emerging), inversion software require efficient storage and solver algorithms. We developed the finite element solver Escript, which provides a user-friendly programming environment in Python to solve large-scale PDE-based problems (see https://launchpad.net/escript-finley). Using finite elements, highly irregular shaped geology and topography can readily be taken into account. For the 3D resistivity problem, we have implemented the secondary potential approach, where the PDE is decomposed into a primary potential caused by the source current and the secondary potential caused by changes in subsurface resistivity. The primary potential is calculated analytically, and the boundary value problem for the secondary potential is solved using nodal finite elements. This approach removes the singularity caused by the source currents and provides more accurate 3D resistivity models. To solve the inversion problem we apply a 'first optimize then discretize' approach using the quasi-Newton scheme in form of the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method (see Gross & Kemp 2013). The evaluation of the cost function requires the solution of the secondary potential PDE for each source current and the solution of the corresponding adjoint-state PDE for the cost function gradients with respect to the subsurface

  9. Fracture Capabilities in Grizzly with the extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbow, John; Zhang, Ziyu; Spencer, Benjamin; Jiang, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Efforts are underway to develop fracture mechanics capabilities in the Grizzly code to enable it to be used to perform deterministic fracture assessments of degraded reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). A capability was previously developed to calculate three-dimensional interaction- integrals to extract mixed-mode stress-intensity factors. This capability requires the use of a finite element mesh that conforms to the crack geometry. The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) provides a means to represent a crack geometry without explicitly fitting the finite element mesh to it. This is effected by enhancing the element kinematics to represent jump discontinuities at arbitrary locations inside of the element, as well as the incorporation of asymptotic near-tip fields to better capture crack singularities. In this work, use of only the discontinuous enrichment functions was examined to see how accurate stress intensity factors could still be calculated. This report documents the following work to enhance Grizzly’s engineering fracture capabilities by introducing arbitrary jump discontinuities for prescribed crack geometries; X-FEM Mesh Cutting in 3D: to enhance the kinematics of elements that are intersected by arbitrary crack geometries, a mesh cutting algorithm was implemented in Grizzly. The algorithm introduces new virtual nodes and creates partial elements, and then creates a new mesh connectivity; Interaction Integral Modifications: the existing code for evaluating the interaction integral in Grizzly was based on the assumption of a mesh that was fitted to the crack geometry. Modifications were made to allow for the possibility of a crack front that passes arbitrarily through the mesh; and Benchmarking for 3D Fracture: the new capabilities were benchmarked against mixed-mode three-dimensional fracture problems with known analytical solutions.

  10. The p-version of the finite element method in incremental elasto-plastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Stefan M.; Yosibash, Zohar

    1993-01-01

    Whereas the higher-order versions of the finite elements method (the p- and hp-version) are fairly well established as highly efficient methods for monitoring and controlling the discretization error in linear problems, little has been done to exploit their benefits in elasto-plastic structural analysis. Aspects of incremental elasto-plastic finite element analysis which are particularly amenable to improvements by the p-version is discussed. These theoretical considerations are supported by several numerical experiments. First, an example for which an analytical solution is available is studied. It is demonstrated that the p-version performs very well even in cycles of elasto-plastic loading and unloading, not only as compared to the traditional h-version but also in respect to the exact solution. Finally, an example of considerable practical importance - the analysis of a cold-worked lug - is presented which demonstrates how the modeling tools offered by higher-order finite element techniques can contribute to an improved approximation of practical problems.

  11. Stochastic finite element method for random harmonic analysis of composite plates with uncertain modal damping parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepahvand, K.

    2017-07-01

    Damping parameters of fiber-reinforced composite possess significant uncertainty due to the structural complexity of such materials. Considering the parameters as random variables, this paper uses the generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion to capture the uncertainty in the damping and frequency response function of composite plate structures. A spectral stochastic finite element formulation for damped vibration analysis of laminate plates is employed. Experimental modal data for samples of plates is used to identify and realize the range and probability distributions of uncertain damping parameters. The constructed gPC expansions for the uncertain parameters are used as inputs to a deterministic finite element model to realize random frequency responses on a few numbers of collocation points generated in random space. The realizations then are employed to estimate the unknown deterministic functions of the gPC expansion approximating the responses. Employing modal superposition method to solve harmonic analysis problem yields an efficient sparse gPC expansion representing the responses. The results show while the responses are influenced by the damping uncertainties at the mid and high frequency ranges, the impact in low frequency modes can be safely ignored. Utilizing a few random collocation points, the method indicates also a very good agreement compared to the sampling-based Monte Carlo simulations with large number of realizations. As the deterministic finite element model serves as black-box solver, the procedure can be efficiently adopted to complex structural systems with uncertain parameters in terms of computational time.

  12. Failure analysis of laminated composites by using iterative three-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Sun, C. T.

    1989-05-01

    A failure analysis of laminated composites is accomplished by using an iterative three-dimensional finite element method. Based on Tsai-Wu failure theory, three different modes of failure are proposed: fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination. The first ply failure load is then evaluated. As the applied load exceeds the first ply failure load, localized structural failure occurs and the global structural stiffness should change. The global stiffness matrix is modified by taking nonlinearity due to partial failures within a laminate into consideration. The first ply failure load is analyzed by using a iterative mixed field method in solving the linear part of the finite element equations. The progressive failure problem is solved numerically by using Newton-Raphson iterative schemes for the solution of nonlinear finite element equations. Numerical examples include angle-ply symmetric Thornel 300 graphite/934 resin epoxy laminates under uniaxial tension. First ply failure loads as well as the final failure loads are evaluated. Good correlation between analytical results and experimental data are observed. Numerical results also include the investigation of composite specimens with a centered hole, under uniaxial tension. Excellent correlation with the experimental data is observed.

  13. Face-based smoothed finite element method for real-time simulation of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendizabal, Andrea; Bessard Duparc, Rémi; Bui, Huu Phuoc; Paulus, Christoph J.; Peterlik, Igor; Cotin, Stéphane

    2017-03-01

    In soft tissue surgery, a tumor and other anatomical structures are usually located using the preoperative CT or MR images. However, due to the deformation of the concerned tissues, this information suffers from inaccuracy when employed directly during the surgery. In order to account for these deformations in the planning process, the use of a bio-mechanical model of the tissues is needed. Such models are often designed using the finite element method (FEM), which is, however, computationally expensive, in particular when a high accuracy of the simulation is required. In our work, we propose to use a smoothed finite element method (S-FEM) in the context of modeling of the soft tissue deformation. This numerical technique has been introduced recently to overcome the overly stiff behavior of the standard FEM and to improve the solution accuracy and the convergence rate in solid mechanics problems. In this paper, a face-based smoothed finite element method (FS-FEM) using 4-node tetrahedral elements is presented. We show that in some cases, the method allows for reducing the number of degrees of freedom, while preserving the accuracy of the discretization. The method is evaluated on a simulation of a cantilever beam loaded at the free end and on a simulation of a 3D cube under traction and compression forces. Further, it is applied to the simulation of the brain shift and of the kidney's deformation. The results demonstrate that the method outperforms the standard FEM in a bending scenario and that has similar accuracy as the standard FEM in the simulations of the brain-shift and of the kidney's deformation.

  14. Geometric Aspects of Discretized Classical Field Theories: Extensions to Finite Element Exterior Calculus, Noether Theorems, and the Geodesic Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamon, Joe

    In this dissertation, I will discuss and explore the various theoretical pillars re- quired to investigate the world of discretized gauge theories in a purely classical setting, with the long-term aim of achieving a fully-fledged discretization of General Relativity (GR). I will start with a brief review of differential forms, then present some results on the geometric framework of finite element exterior calculus (FEEC); in particular, I will elaborate on integrating metric structures within the framework and categorize the dual spaces of the various spaces of polynomial differential forms P rLambdak(R n). After a brief pedagogical detour on Noether's two theorems, I will apply all of the above into discretizations of electromagnetism and linearized GR. I will conclude with an excursion into the geodesic finite element method (GFEM) as a way to generalize some of the above notions to curved manifolds.

  15. A nodal discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for nonlinear elastic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Bou Matar, Olivier; Guerder, Pierre-Yves; Li, YiFeng; Vandewoestyne, Bart; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2012-05-01

    A nodal discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DG-FEM) to solve the linear and nonlinear elastic wave equation in heterogeneous media with arbitrary high order accuracy in space on unstructured triangular or quadrilateral meshes is presented. This DG-FEM method combines the geometrical flexibility of the finite element method, and the high parallelization potentiality and strongly nonlinear wave phenomena simulation capability of the finite volume method, required for nonlinear elastodynamics simulations. In order to facilitate the implementation based on a numerical scheme developed for electromagnetic applications, the equations of nonlinear elastodynamics have been written in a conservative form. The adopted formalism allows the introduction of different kinds of elastic nonlinearities, such as the classical quadratic and cubic nonlinearities, or the quadratic hysteretic nonlinearities. Absorbing layers perfectly matched to the calculation domain of the nearly perfectly matched layers type have been introduced to simulate, when needed, semi-infinite or infinite media. The developed DG-FEM scheme has been verified by means of a comparison with analytical solutions and numerical results already published in the literature for simple geometrical configurations: Lamb's problem and plane wave nonlinear propagation.

  16. A 3D moving mesh Finite Element Method for two-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, G. R.; Borhani, N.; Mangiavacchi, N.; Thome, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    A 3D ALE Finite Element Method is developed to study two-phase flow phenomena using a new discretization method to compute the surface tension forces. The computational method is based on the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation (ALE) and the Finite Element Method (FEM), creating a two-phase method with an improved model for the liquid-gas interface. An adaptive mesh update procedure is also proposed for effective management of the mesh to remove, add and repair elements, since the computational mesh nodes move according to the flow. The ALE description explicitly defines the two-phase interface position by a set of interconnected nodes which ensures a sharp representation of the boundary, including the role of the surface tension. The proposed methodology for computing the curvature leads to accurate results with moderate programming effort and computational cost. Static and dynamic tests have been carried out to validate the method and the results have compared well to analytical solutions and experimental results found in the literature, demonstrating that the new proposed methodology provides good accuracy to describe the interfacial forces and bubble dynamics. This paper focuses on the description of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the discretization of the surface tension force, the new remeshing technique, and the validation results. Additionally, a microchannel simulation in complex geometry is presented for two elongated bubbles.

  17. A Kernel-Free Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Young-Keun; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    An improved hybrid particle-finite element method has been developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems. Unlike alternative methods, the revised formulation computes the density without reference to any kernel or interpolation functions, for either the density or the rate of dilatation. This simplifies the state space model and leads to a significant reduction in computational cost. The improved method introduces internal energy variables as generalized coordinates in a new formulation of the thermomechanical Lagrange equations. Example problems show good agreement with exact solutions in one dimension and good agreement with experimental data in a three dimensional simulation.

  18. Finite element analysis of resistivity measurement with van der Pauw method in a diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowei; Gao, Chunxiao; Han, Yonghao; Li, Ming; He, Chunyuan; Hao, Aimin; Zhang, Dongmei; Yu, Cuiling; Zou, Guangtian; Ma, Yanzhang

    2007-06-01

    Using finite element analysis, the authors studied the steady current field distribution under the configuration of van der Pauw method [L. J. van der Pauw, Philips Tech. Rev. 20, 220 (1958)] for resistivity measurement in a diamond anvil cell. Based on the theoretical analysis, the authors obtained the theoretical accuracy curve of the van der Pauw method. This method provides accurate determination of sample resistivity when the ratio of sample thickness to its diameter is less than 0.45. They found that the contact area between electrode and sample is a key factor in the resistivity measurement accuracy and its size is dependent on the sample diameter for a given measurement accuracy.

  19. Permeability computation on a REV with an immersed finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Laure, P.; Puaux, G.; Silva, L.; Vincent, M.

    2011-05-04

    An efficient method to compute permeability of fibrous media is presented. An immersed domain approach is used to represent the porous material at its microscopic scale and the flow motion is computed with a stabilized mixed finite element method. Therefore the Stokes equation is solved on the whole domain (including solid part) using a penalty method. The accuracy is controlled by refining the mesh around the solid-fluid interface defined by a level set function. Using homogenisation techniques, the permeability of a representative elementary volume (REV) is computed. The computed permeabilities of regular fibre packings are compared to classical analytical relations found in the bibliography.

  20. Parallel implementation of the finite element method using compressed data structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, F. L. B.; Ferreira, I. A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a parallel implementation of the finite element method designed for coarse-grain distributed memory architectures. The MPI standard is used for message passing and tests are run on a PC cluster and on an SGI Altix 350. Compressed data structures are employed to store the coefficient matrix and obtain iterative solutions, based on Krylov methods, in a subdomain-by-subdomain approach. Two mesh partitioning schemes are compared: non-overlapping and overlapping. The pros and cons of these partitioning methods are discussed. Numerical examples of symmetric and non-symmetric problems in two and three dimensions are presented.

  1. Evaluation of Strip Footing Bearing Capacity Built on the Anthropogenic Embankment by Random Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczynska-Kozlowska, Joanna

    2014-05-01

    One of a geotechnical problem in the area of Wroclaw is an anthropogenic embankment layer delaying to the depth of 4-5m, arising as a result of historical incidents. In such a case an assumption of bearing capacity of strip footing might be difficult. The standard solution is to use a deep foundation or foundation soil replacement. However both methods generate significant costs. In the present paper the authors focused their attention on the influence of anthropogenic embankment variability on bearing capacity. Soil parameters were defined on the basis of CPT test and modeled as 2D anisotropic random fields and the assumption of bearing capacity were made according deterministic finite element methods. Many repeated of the different realizations of random fields lead to stable expected value of bearing capacity. The algorithm used to estimate the bearing capacity of strip footing was the random finite element method (e.g. [1]). In traditional approach of bearing capacity the formula proposed by [2] is taken into account. qf = c'Nc + qNq + 0.5γBN- γ (1) where: qf is the ultimate bearing stress, cis the cohesion, qis the overburden load due to foundation embedment, γ is the soil unit weight, Bis the footing width, and Nc, Nq and Nγ are the bearing capacity factors. The method of evaluation the bearing capacity of strip footing based on finite element method incorporate five parameters: Young's modulus (E), Poisson's ratio (ν), dilation angle (ψ), cohesion (c), and friction angle (φ). In the present study E, ν and ψ are held constant while c and φ are randomized. Although the Young's modulus does not affect the bearing capacity it governs the initial elastic response of the soil. Plastic stress redistribution is accomplished using a viscoplastic algorithm merge with an elastic perfectly plastic (Mohr - Coulomb) failure criterion. In this paper a typical finite element mesh was assumed with 8-node elements consist in 50 columns and 20 rows. Footings width B

  2. Simple finite element methods for approximating predator-prey dynamics in two dimensions using MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Garvie, Marcus R; Burkardt, John; Morgan, Jeff

    2015-03-01

    We describe simple finite element schemes for approximating spatially extended predator-prey dynamics with the Holling type II functional response and logistic growth of the prey. The finite element schemes generalize 'Scheme 1' in the paper by Garvie (Bull Math Biol 69(3):931-956, 2007). We present user-friendly, open-source MATLAB code for implementing the finite element methods on arbitrary-shaped two-dimensional domains with Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, mixed Robin-Neumann, mixed Dirichlet-Neumann, and Periodic boundary conditions. Users can download, edit, and run the codes from http://www.uoguelph.ca/~mgarvie/ . In addition to discussing the well posedness of the model equations, the results of numerical experiments are presented and demonstrate the crucial role that habitat shape, initial data, and the boundary conditions play in determining the spatiotemporal dynamics of predator-prey interactions. As most previous works on this problem have focussed on square domains with standard boundary conditions, our paper makes a significant contribution to the area.

  3. Finite element analysis (FEA): applying an engineering method to functional morphology in anthropology and human biology.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, O

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental research question for morphologists is how morphological variation in the skeleton relates to function. Traditional approaches have advanced our understanding of form-function relationships considerably but have limitations. Strain gauges can only record strains on a surface, and the geometry of the structure can limit where they can be bonded. Theoretical approaches, such as geometric abstractions, work well on problems with simple geometries and material properties but biological structures typically have neither of these. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a method that overcomes these problems by reducing a complex geometry into a finite number of elements with simple geometries. In addition, FEA allows strain to be modelled across the entire surface of the structure and throughout the internal structure. With advances in the processing power of computers, FEA has become more accessible and as such is becoming an increasingly popular tool to address questions about form-function relationships in development and evolution, as well as human biology generally. This paper provides an introduction to FEA including a review of the sequence of steps needed for the generation of biologically accurate finite element models that can be used for the testing of biological and functional morphology hypotheses.

  4. Simulation and evaluation of tablet-coating burst based on finite element method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Li, Juan; Miao, Kong-Song; Shan, Wei-Guang; Tang, Lan; Yu, Hai-Ning

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to simulate and evaluate the burst behavior of coated tablets. Three-dimensional finite element models of tablet-coating were established using software ANSYS. Swelling pressure of cores was measured by a self-made device and applied at the internal surface of the models. Mechanical properties of the polymer film were determined using a texture analyzer and applied as material properties of the models. The resulted finite element models were validated by experimental data. The validated models were used to assess the factors those influenced burst behavior and predict the coating burst behavior. The simulation results of coating burst and failure location were strongly matched with the experimental data. It was found that internal swelling pressure, inside corner radius and corner thickness were three main factors controlling the stress distribution and burst behavior. Based on the linear relationship between the internal pressure and the maximum principle stress on coating, burst pressure of coatings was calculated and used to predict the burst behavior. This study demonstrated that burst behavior of coated tablets could be simulated and evaluated by finite element method.

  5. Divergence Stability in Connection with the P-Version of the Finite Element Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    RAIRO 8 (1974), pp. 129-151. [8] C. Canuto, Y. Maday and A. Quarteroni, Combined Finite Element and Spectral approximation of the Navier-Stokes...R. Verfuhrt, Error estimates for a mixed finite element approximation of the Stokes equations. RAIRO , Numer. Anal., 18 (1984), pp. 175-182. (15] M

  6. Elastic buckling of plates with reinforced circular holes by the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Chow, F.Y.

    1995-09-01

    The elastic buckling loads of square plates having central circular holes is obtained by the use of the finite element method. The circular holes are reinforced around their edges by rings having rectangular cross sections and the effects of the size of hole and the amount of reinforcement of the buckling loads are determined. The finite elements used for calculating the inplane stresses in the plate prior and the instance of buckling are based on strain assumptions and the rings are presented by exact circular beam elements. The plate elements for inplane stresses have an additional degree of freedom due to inplane rotation to make them suitable for combination with the ring elements where the corresponding rotation constitute an essential external degree of freedom. The buckling loads considered are due to uniaxial, biaxial and shearing forces applied to the edges of the plates and the amount of reinforcement necessary to restore the buckling loads to those for plates not having any holes are determined.

  7. Coupling Finite Element and Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Methods for Two-Dimensional Potential Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    A coupled finite element (FE) method and meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method for analyzing two-dimensional potential problems is presented in this paper. The analysis domain is subdivided into two regions, a finite element (FE) region and a meshless (MM) region. A single weighted residual form is written for the entire domain. Independent trial and test functions are assumed in the FE and MM regions. A transition region is created between the two regions. The transition region blends the trial and test functions of the FE and MM regions. The trial function blending is achieved using a technique similar to the 'Coons patch' method that is widely used in computer-aided geometric design. The test function blending is achieved by using either FE or MM test functions on the nodes in the transition element. The technique was evaluated by applying the coupled method to two potential problems governed by the Poisson equation. The coupled method passed all the patch test problems and gave accurate solutions for the problems studied.

  8. Weak Galerkin finite element methods for Darcy flow: Anisotropy and heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Liu, Jiangguo; Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a family of weak Galerkin finite element methods (WGFEMs) for Darcy flow computation. The WGFEMs are new numerical methods that rely on the novel concept of discrete weak gradients. The WGFEMs solve for pressure unknowns both in element interiors and on the mesh skeleton. The numerical velocity is then obtained from the discrete weak gradient of the numerical pressure. The new methods are quite different than many existing numerical methods in that they are locally conservative by design, the resulting discrete linear systems are symmetric and positive-definite, and there is no need for tuning problem-dependent penalty factors. We test the WGFEMs on benchmark problems to demonstrate the strong potential of these new methods in handling strong anisotropy and heterogeneity in Darcy flow.

  9. Advanced modeling strategy for the analysis of heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics using high-order finite element method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Bahramian, Fereshteh; Wan, Wankei

    2009-11-01

    Modeling soft tissue using the finite element method is one of the most challenging areas in the field of biomechanical engineering. To date, many models have been developed to describe heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics, which are accurate to some extent. Nevertheless, there is no comprehensive method to modeling soft tissue mechanics, This is because (1) the degree of anisotropy in the heart valve leaflet changes layer by layer due to a variety of collagen fiber densities and orientations that cannot be taken into account in the model and also (2) a constitutive material model fully describing the mechanical properties of the leaflet structure is not available in the literature. In this framework, we develop a new high-order element using p-type finite element formulation to create anisotropic material properties similar to those of the heart valve leaflet tissue in only one single element. This element also takes the nonlinearity of the leaflet tissue into consideration using a bilinear material model. This new element is composed a two-dimensional finite element in the principal directions of leaflet tissue and a p-type finite element in the direction of thickness. The proposed element is easy to implement, much more efficient than standard elements available in commercial finite element packages. This study is one step towards the modeling of soft tissue mechanics using a meshless finite element approach to be applied in real-time haptic feedback of soft-tissue models in virtual reality simulation.

  10. Challenges in Integrating Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Methods for Realistic Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Zagidulin, Dmitri; Rauser, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities and expertise related to the development of links between nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) at Glenn Research Center (GRC) are demonstrated. Current tools to analyze data produced by computed tomography (CT) scans are exercised to help assess the damage state in high temperature structural composite materials. A utility translator was written to convert velocity (an image processing software) STL data file to a suitable CAD-FEA type file. Finite element analyses are carried out with MARC, a commercial nonlinear finite element code, and the analytical results are discussed. Modeling was established by building MSC/Patran (a pre and post processing finite element package) generated model and comparing it to a model generated by Velocity in conjunction with MSC/Patran Graphics. Modeling issues and results are discussed in this paper. The entire process that outlines the tie between the data extracted via NDE and the finite element modeling and analysis is fully described.

  11. A Hybrid Boundary Element-Finite Volume Method for Unsteady Transonic Airfoil Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hong; Kandil, Osama A.

    1996-01-01

    A hybrid boundary element finite volume method for unsteady transonic flow computation has been developed. In this method, the unsteady Euler equations in a moving frame of reference are solved in a small embedded domain (inner domain) around the airfoil using an implicit finite volume scheme. The unsteady full-potential equation, written in the same frame of reference and in the form of the Poisson equation. is solved in the outer domain using the integral equation boundary element method to provide the boundary conditions for the inner Euler domain. The solution procedure is a time-accurate stepping procedure, where the outer boundary conditions for the inner domain are updated using the integral equation -- boundary element solution over the outer domain. The method is applied to unsteady transonic flows around the NACA0012 airfoil undergoing pitching oscillation and ramp motion. The results are compared with those of an implicit Euler equation solver, which is used throughout a large computational domain, and experimental data.

  12. NOTE: Solving the ECG forward problem by means of a meshless finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. S.; Zhu, S. A.; He, Bin

    2007-07-01

    The conventional numerical computational techniques such as the finite element method (FEM) and the boundary element method (BEM) require laborious and time-consuming model meshing. The new meshless FEM only uses the boundary description and the node distribution and no meshing of the model is required. This paper presents the fundamentals and implementation of meshless FEM and the meshless FEM method is adapted to solve the electrocardiography (ECG) forward problem. The method is evaluated on a single-layer torso model, in which the analytical solution exists, and tested in a realistic geometry homogeneous torso model, with satisfactory results being obtained. The present results suggest that the meshless FEM may provide an alternative for ECG forward solutions.

  13. Solving the ECG forward problem by means of a meshless finite element method.

    PubMed

    Li, Z S; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2007-07-07

    The conventional numerical computational techniques such as the finite element method (FEM) and the boundary element method (BEM) require laborious and time-consuming model meshing. The new meshless FEM only uses the boundary description and the node distribution and no meshing of the model is required. This paper presents the fundamentals and implementation of meshless FEM and the meshless FEM method is adapted to solve the electrocardiography (ECG) forward problem. The method is evaluated on a single-layer torso model, in which the analytical solution exists, and tested in a realistic geometry homogeneous torso model, with satisfactory results being obtained. The present results suggest that the meshless FEM may provide an alternative for ECG forward solutions.

  14. Application of the Finite Element Method in Atomic and Molecular Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shertzer, Janine

    2007-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a numerical algorithm for solving second order differential equations. It has been successfully used to solve many problems in atomic and molecular physics, including bound state and scattering calculations. To illustrate the diversity of the method, we present here details of two applications. First, we calculate the non-adiabatic dipole polarizability of Hi by directly solving the first and second order equations of perturbation theory with FEM. In the second application, we calculate the scattering amplitude for e-H scattering (without partial wave analysis) by reducing the Schrodinger equation to set of integro-differential equations, which are then solved with FEM.

  15. Soft tissue deformation simulation in virtual surgery using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhennan; Gu, Lixu; Huang, Pengfei; Lv, Sizhe; Yu, Xiao; Kong, Xianming

    2007-01-01

    Simulation for soft tissue's realistic deformation is an important part in Virtual Surgery. For large global deformation of soft tissue, linear elastic models are inappropriate, such as Mass-Spring and linear Finite Element Method (FEM). In this paper we present a simulation for 3D soft tissue using nonlinear strain computation. To get a finer mesh for FEM, we consider meshing algorithm based on Improved Delaunay criterion. Besides, we would present Spatial Hashing Collision Detection method and some improvement for real-time computation.

  16. Residual Stress Sensitivity Analysis Using a Complex Variable Finite Element Method (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-17

    2014;141(2):04014118 . 11] Wagner D , Millwater H . 2d weight function development using a complex taylor series expansion method. Eng Fract Mech 2012;86...23–37 . 12] Millwater H, Wagner D, Baines A, Lovelady K. Improved wctse method for the generation of 2d weight functions through implementation into a...commercial finite element code. Eng Fract Mech 2013;109:302–9. doi: 10.1016/j.engfracmech.2013.07.012 . 13] Millwater H, Wagner D, Baines A, Montoya

  17. Finite element method for nonlinear Riesz space fractional diffusion equations on irregular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Yuan, Z.; Nie, Y.; Wang, J.; Zhu, X.; Liu, F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider two-dimensional Riesz space fractional diffusion equations with nonlinear source term on convex domains. Applying Galerkin finite element method in space and backward difference method in time, we present a fully discrete scheme to solve Riesz space fractional diffusion equations. Our breakthrough is developing an algorithm to form stiffness matrix on unstructured triangular meshes, which can help us to deal with space fractional terms on any convex domain. The stability and convergence of the scheme are also discussed. Numerical examples are given to verify accuracy and stability of our scheme.

  18. Method for measuring compliances and crack length by strain gauge and 3D finite element calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Riedle, J.; Wulf, J.; Schmauder, S.

    1995-05-01

    A method for determining compliances and crack lengths of round CT specimen geometries (RCT) by measuring the notch opening displacement (NOD) with strain gauges, combined with 3D finite element calculations to correlate the NOD to the loading point displacements, is presented. The method has been verified for tungsten and it is shown that measured and calculated compliances are in excellent agreement. A general equation is presented correlating compliances and NOD which allows to implicitly determine crack lengths by simply measuring the NOD of RCT specimens. 5 refs.

  19. A locking-free immersed finite element method for planar elasticity interface problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tao; Sheen, Dongwoo; Zhang, Xu

    2013-08-01

    This article proposes a nonconforming immersed finite element (IFE) method for solving planar elasticity interface problems with structured (or Cartesian) meshes even if the material interface has a nontrivial geometry. IFE functions developed in this article are applicable to arbitrary configurations of elasticity materials and interface locations. Optimal approximation capability is observed for this new IFE space. The displacement Galerkin method based on this IFE space is robust (locking-free). Numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate that the IFE solution converges optimally for both compressible and nearly incompressible materials.

  20. An efficient discontinuous Galerkin finite element method with nested domain decomposition for simulations of microresistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiefu

    2015-03-01

    A discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is employed to study the responses of microresistivity imaging tools used in the oil and gas exploration industry. The multiscale structure of an imaging problem is decomposed into several nested subdomains based on its geometric characteristics. Each subdomain is discretized independently, and numerical flux is used to couple all subdomains together. The nested domain decomposition scheme will lead to a block tridiagonal linear system, and the block Thomas algorithm is utilized here to eliminate the subdomain based iteration in the step of solving the linear system. Numerical results demonstrate the validity and efficiency of this method.

  1. Description of plastic anisotropy in AA6063-T6 using the crystal plasticity finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, S.; Engler, O.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Lademo, O. G.

    2012-07-01

    The crystal plasticity finite element method has been used in combination with crystallographic texture data to predict the plastic anisotropy of the extruded aluminium alloy AA6063 in temper T6. The results are compared with experimental data from tensile tests at different angles between the tensile and extrusion directions. Inverse modelling based on the tensile test in a reference direction is used to identify the parameters of the work-hardening model at slip system level. To investigate the influence of grain interactions, various discretizations of the grains are applied in the representative volume element modelled with finite elements. In addition, alternative homogenization schemes, such as the full-constraint Taylor and viscoplastic self-consistent methods, are used to model the behaviour of the polycrystal. It is found that the grain discretization and the homogenization scheme have only minor influence on the predicted plastic anisotropy. While the crystal plasticity-based methods all give reasonable predictions of the directional variations of flow stresses and plastic strain ratios measured experimentally, there are still significant deviations, indicating there are other sources to the plastic anisotropy than crystallographic texture.

  2. Implementation of a finite element method for the vertical discretization of KIAPS Integrated Model (KIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. R.; Choi, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    As an attempt to improve numerical accuracy of the global numerical forecast model developed in Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS), named as KIAPS Integrated Model (KIM) (Choi and Hong 2016), we have tried to implement the finite element method (FEM) for the vertical discretization. The main modifications are involved in the derivative and integral operators and the vertically no staggering grids. The vertical operators are defined using the linear and cubic splines as basis functions, the numerical accuracy of which is examined by using several idealized test cases. With combination of the horizontal spectral element and vertical FEM, the simulated results reveal that benefit of the high accuracy by FEM mainly appeared in inner domain away from the boundaries compared to the finite difference method (FDM). In 3D Hadley-like meridional advection test, for example, error norms produced by using FEM are much smaller. ReferenceChoi, S.-J. and S.-Y. Hong, 2016: A global non-hydrostatic dynamical core using the spectral element method on a cubed-sphere grid, Asia-Pac. J. Atmos. Sci., 52(3), 291-307.

  3. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Carriington, David B

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  4. Use of the iterative solution method for coupled finite element and boundary element modeling; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.

    1993-07-01

    Tunnels buried deep within the earth constitute an important class geomechanics problems. Two numerical techniques used for the analysis of geomechanics problems, the finite element method and the boundary element method, have complementary characteristics for applications to problems of this type. The usefulness of combining these two methods for use as a geomechanics analysis tool has been recognized for some time, and a number of coupling techniques have been proposed. However, not all of them lend themselves to efficient computational implementations for large-scale problems. This report examines a coupling technique that can form the basis for an efficient analysis tool for large scale geomechanics problems through the use of an iterative equation solver.

  5. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M. R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-01

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100-200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings-of the order of 1000-fold-relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688 atoms using

  6. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn–Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M.R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-15

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss–Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100–200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings—of the order of 1000-fold—relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688

  7. Extra High Voltage Shunt Reactor Loss Calculation by the Finite-Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Robert Joseph

    The prevailing marketplace favors the analytical approach of the extra high voltage (EHV) shunt reactor loss calculation over the traditional empirical approach. That is, the discrepancy between the calculated and tested reactor losses must be minimized. In addition, the highly competitive market requires a greater variation of reactor designs where the empirical approach becomes unwieldy and unreliable. The loss calculation techniques to be described in this research represent the compromise that strikes a balance between the acceptable loss model prediction and the economy of computer resource units. The components of reactor loss are separately analyzed by different finite element method formulations. The finite element method is chosen for its proven reliability to solve complex two dimensional non-linear problems. The components of the reactor loss model include the following: (1) leakage flux induced loss, (2) core block loss, (3) fringing gap loss, and (4) yoke-outer leg loss. Each of these components requires the separate finite element method formulations of the following classes of partial differential equations: (1) the axisymmetric diffusion equation, (2) the axisymmetric Poisson's equation, (3) the superpostion method of axisymmetric diffusion equation, and (4) the Cartesian non-linear anisotropic Laplace's equation. The reactor loss model is enhanced by the multiple linear regression analysis. The regression analysis is necessary due to the use of two dimensional solutions to represent the physical models and to the existing loss measurement accuracy. Although two dimensional analyses are used, a quantitative understanding of the origins of loss dissipations in EHV reactors is achieved. This research has demonstrated that certain components of reactor loss can be reduced significantly through a simple modification of design.

  8. Exact finite element method analysis of viscoelastic tapered structures to transient loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spyrakos, Constantine Chris

    1987-01-01

    A general method is presented for determining the dynamic torsional/axial response of linear structures composed of either tapered bars or shafts to transient excitations. The method consists of formulating and solving the dynamic problem in the Laplace transform domain by the finite element method and obtaining the response by a numerical inversion of the transformed solution. The derivation of the torsional and axial stiffness matrices is based on the exact solution of the transformed governing equation of motion, and it consequently leads to the exact solution of the problem. The solution permits treatment of the most practical cases of linear tapered bars and shafts, and employs modeling of structures with only one element per member which reduces the number of degrees of freedom involved. The effects of external viscous or internal viscoelastic damping are also taken into account.

  9. Numerical solutions of two moving boundary problems by both finite difference and finite element methods with applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The time dependent heat conduction equation that is solved in different coordinate systems is solved subject to various boundary conditions. Boundary conditions include surface heat flux, energy to vaporization of target materials, radiation from surface to surrounding, and possible phase change of material. This system of equations is subject to two moving boundaries. One moving boundary being the melt-solid interface because the surface heat flux may result in melting the surface of the exposed material. Another moving boundary is the receding surface as a result of evaporation of the wall material due to the continuous heating of the melted surface. Finite difference and the finite element methods are used and compared in such solution to these problems. Physical applications to these problems include high energy deposition from electron or ion beams interaction with materials for space and weapons applications, plasma disruption and energy dump on the walls or components of a fusion reactor, and high energy laser welding and annealing of materials. 23 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Parallel, Implicit, Finite Element Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, Weston; Shumlak, Uri; Meier, Eric; Marklin, George

    2007-11-01

    A parallel, implicit, finite element solver is described for solutions to the ideal MHD equations and the Pseudo-1D Euler equations. The solver uses the conservative flux source form of the equations. This helps simplify the discretization of the finite element method by keeping the specification of the physics separate. An implicit time advance is used to allow sufficiently large time steps. The Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is implemented for parallel matrix solvers and parallel data structures. Results for several test cases are described as well as accuracy of the method.

  11. Thermoelastic analysis of multiple defects with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Honggang; Nie, Yufeng

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the extended finite element method (XFEM) is adopted to analyze the interaction between a single macroscopic inclusion and a single macroscopic crack as well as that between multiple macroscopic or microscopic defects under thermal/mechanical load. The effects of different shapes of multiple inclusions on the material thermomechanical response are investigated, and the level set method is coupled with XFEM to analyze the interaction of multiple defects. Further, the discretized extended finite element approximations in relation to thermoelastic problems of multiple defects under displacement or temperature field are given. Also, the interfaces of cracks or materials are represented by level set functions, which allow the mesh assignment not to conform to crack or material interfaces. Moreover, stress intensity factors of cracks are obtained by the interaction integral method or the M-integral method, and the stress/strain/stiffness fields are simulated in the case of multiple cracks or multiple inclusions. Finally, some numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the accuracy of our proposed method.

  12. Hybrid Finite Element Method for Describing the Electrical Response of Biological Cells to Applied Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2007-01-01

    A novel hybrid finite element method for modeling the response of passive and active biological membranes to external stimuli is presented. The method is based on the differential equations that describe the conservation of electric flux and membrane currents. By introducing the electric flux through the cell membrane as an additional variable, the algorithm decouples the linear partial differential equation part from the nonlinear ordinary differential equation part that defines the membrane dynamics of interest. This conveniently results in two subproblems: a linear interface problem and a nonlinear initial value problem. The linear interface problem is solved with a hybrid finite element method. The initial value problem is integrated by a standard ordinary differential equation solver such as the Euler and Runge-Kutta methods. During time integration, these two subproblems are solved alternatively. The algorithm can be used to model the interaction of stimuli with multiple cells of almost arbitrary geometries and complex ion-channel gating at the plasma membrane. Numerical experiments are presented demonstrating the uses of the method for modeling field stimulation and action potential propagation. PMID:17405368

  13. Solution of 3D inverse scattering problems by combined inverse equivalent current and finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kılıç, Emre Eibert, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    An approach combining boundary integral and finite element methods is introduced for the solution of three-dimensional inverse electromagnetic medium scattering problems. Based on the equivalence principle, unknown equivalent electric and magnetic surface current densities on a closed surface are utilized to decompose the inverse medium problem into two parts: a linear radiation problem and a nonlinear cavity problem. The first problem is formulated by a boundary integral equation, the computational burden of which is reduced by employing the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Reconstructed Cauchy data on the surface allows the utilization of the Lorentz reciprocity and the Poynting's theorems. Exploiting these theorems, the noise level and an initial guess are estimated for the cavity problem. Moreover, it is possible to determine whether the material is lossy or not. In the second problem, the estimated surface currents form inhomogeneous boundary conditions of the cavity problem. The cavity problem is formulated by the finite element technique and solved iteratively by the Gauss–Newton method to reconstruct the properties of the object. Regularization for both the first and the second problems is achieved by a Krylov subspace method. The proposed method is tested against both synthetic and experimental data and promising reconstruction results are obtained.

  14. Combining existing numerical models with data assimilation using weighted least-squares finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Prathish K; Manteuffel, T A; Belohlavek, M; Heys, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for combining and enhancing the results from an existing computational fluid dynamics model with experimental data using the weighted least-squares finite element method (WLSFEM). Development of the approach was motivated by the existence of both limited experimental blood velocity in the left ventricle and inexact numerical models of the same flow. Limitations of the experimental data include measurement noise and having data only along a two-dimensional plane. Most numerical modeling approaches do not provide the flexibility to assimilate noisy experimental data. We previously developed an approach that could assimilate experimental data into the process of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations, but the approach was limited because it required the use of specific finite element methods for solving all model equations and did not support alternative numerical approximation methods. The new approach presented here allows virtually any numerical method to be used for approximately solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and then the WLSFEM is used to combine the experimental data with the numerical solution of the model equations in a final step. The approach dynamically adjusts the influence of the experimental data on the numerical solution so that more accurate data are more closely matched by the final solution and less accurate data are not closely matched. The new approach is demonstrated on different test problems and provides significantly reduced computational costs compared with many previous methods for data assimilation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Stability analysis of flexible wind turbine blades using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamoulakos, A.

    1982-01-01

    Static vibration and flutter analysis of a straight elastic axis blade was performed based on a finite element method solution. The total potential energy functional was formulated according to linear beam theory. The inertia and aerodynamic loads were formulated according to the blade absolute acceleration and absolute velocity vectors. In vibration analysis, the direction of motion of the blade during the first out-of-lane and first in-plane modes was examined; numerical results involve NASA/DOE Mod-0, McCauley propeller, north wind turbine and flat plate behavior. In flutter analysis, comparison cases were examined involving several references. Vibration analysis of a nonstraight elastic axis blade based on a finite element method solution was performed in a similar manner with the straight elastic axis blade, since it was recognized that a curved blade can be approximated by an assembly of a sufficient number of straight blade elements at different inclinations with respect to common system of axes. Numerical results involve comparison between the behavior of a straight and a curved cantilever beam during the lowest two in-plane and out-of-plane modes.

  16. Stability analysis of flexible wind-turbine blades using finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Kamoulakos, A.

    1982-08-01

    Static vibration and flutter analysis of a straight elastic axis blade was performed based on a finite element method solution. The total potential energy functional was formulated according to linear beam theory. The inertia and aerodynamic loads were formulated according to the blade absolute acceleration and absolute velocity vectors. In vibration analysis, the direction of motion of the blade during the first out-of-lane and first in-plane modes was examined; numerical results involve NASA/DOE Mod-0, McCauley propeller, north wind turbine and flat plate behavior. In flutter analysis, comparison cases were examined involving several references. Vibration analysis of a nonstraight elastic axis blade based on a finite element method solution was performed in a similar manner with the straight elastic axis blade, since it was recognized that a curved blade can be approximated by an assembly of a sufficient number of straight blade elements at different inclinations with respect to a common system of axes. Numerical results involve comparison between the behavior of a straight and a curved cantilever beam during the lowest two in-plane and out-of-plane modes.

  17. Integrated force method - Compatibility conditions of structural mechanics for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Berke, Laszlo; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    The equilibrium equations and the compatibility conditions are fundamental to the analyses of structures. However, anyone who undertakes even a cursory generic study of the compatibility conditions can discover, with little effort, that historically this facet of structural mechanics had not been adequately researched by the profession. Now the compatibility conditions (CC's) have been researched and are understood to a great extent. For finite element discretizations, the CC's are banded and can be divided into three distinct categories: (1) the interface CC's, (2) the cluster or field CC's, and (3) the external CC's. The generation of CC's requires the separating of a local region, then writing the deformation displacement relation (ddr) for the region, and finally, the eliminating of the displacements from the ddr. The procedure to generate all three types of CC's is presented and illustrated through examples of finite element models. The uniqueness of the CC's thus generated is shown. The utilization of CC's has resulted in the novel integrated force method (IFM). The solution that is obtained by the IFM converges with a significantly fewer number of elements, compared to the stiffness and the hybrid methods.

  18. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  19. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  20. Research on dynamic model of printed circuit board based on finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui; Xu, Liangjun

    2017-08-01

    The vibration characteristics of printed circuit boards are related to the reliability of electronic components installed on their surface. Finite element software is a powerful tool to analyze the vibration characteristics of printed circuit boards, and the correct establishment of finite element model is very important. In this paper, the dynamic model of anisotropic printed circuit board is established by analyzing the material properties of printed circuit board. The influence of boundary condition and lumped mass on the vibration characteristics of printed circuit board is analyzed. In order to establish a more realistic printed circuit The finite element model of the plate provides the necessary basis.

  1. Study on interaction between induced and natural fractures by extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, DanDan; Liu, ZhanLi; Zhuang, Zhuo; Zeng, QingLei; Wang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Fracking is one of the kernel technologies in the remarkable shale gas revolution. The extended finite element method is used in this paper to numerically investigate the interaction between hydraulic and natural fractures, which is an important issue of the enigmatic fracture network formation in fracking. The criteria which control the opening of natural fracture and crossing of hydraulic fracture are tentatively presented. Influence factors on the interaction process are systematically analyzed, which include the approach angle, anisotropy of in-situ stress and fluid pressure profile.

  2. Simulation of viscous flows using a multigrid-control volume finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Hookey, N.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses a multigrid control volume finite element method (MG CVFEM) for the simulation of viscous fluid flows. The CVFEM is an equal-order primitive variables formulation that avoids spurious solution fields by incorporating an appropriate pressure gradient in the velocity interpolation functions. The resulting set of discretized equations is solved using a coupled equation line solver (CELS) that solves the discretized momentum and continuity equations simultaneously along lines in the calculation domain. The CVFEM has been implemented in the context of both FMV- and V-cycle multigrid algorithms, and preliminary results indicate a five to ten fold reduction in execution times.

  3. Characteristics Analysis on Various Kinds of Hybrid Stepping Motors Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Maki, Kohji; Miyata, Kenji; Oonishi, Kazuo; Sakamoto, Masafumi; Abukawa, Toshimi

    We have presented a powerful scheme of investigating hybrid stepping motor characteristics by using 3D finite element method. A linear magnetic field analysis is effectively applicable to predict relative performance of several motors in an extremely short computing time. The waveforms of cogging torque by linear and nonlinear analysis resemble each other, while the wave amplitude in the linear analysis is about 2 times larger than one in the nonlinear analysis in the presented example. The overestimation factor of cogging torque is approximately constant for the same material composition.

  4. Heat analysis of thermal overload relays using 3-D finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Yoshihiro; Ichihashi, Takayuki . Dept. of Information Science); Ito, Shokichi . Dept. of Electronics)

    1999-05-01

    In designing a thermal overload relay, it is necessary to analyze thermal characteristics of several trial models. Up to now, this has been done by measuring the temperatures on a number of positions in the trial models. This experimental method is undoubtedly expensive. In this paper, the temperature distribution of a thermal overload relay is obtained by using 3-D finite element analysis taking into account the current distribution in current-carrying conductors. It is shown that the 3-D analysis is capable of evaluating a new design of thermal overload relays.

  5. Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction Modeling Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin W.; Jiang, Wen; Dolbow, John E.; Peco, Christian

    2016-09-01

    As a brittle material, the ceramic UO2 used as light water reactor fuel experiences significant fracturing throughout its life, beginning with the first rise to power of fresh fuel. This has multiple effects on the thermal and mechanical response of the fuel/cladding system. One such effect that is particularly important is that when there is mechanical contact between the fuel and cladding, cracks that extending from the outer surface of the fuel into the volume of the fuel cause elevated stresses in the adjacent cladding, which can potentially lead to cladding failure. Modeling the thermal and mechanical response of the cladding in the vicinity of these surface-breaking cracks in the fuel can provide important insights into this behavior to help avoid operating conditions that could lead to cladding failure. Such modeling has traditionally been done in the context of finite-element-based fuel performance analysis by modifying the fuel mesh to introduce discrete cracks. While this approach is effective in capturing the important behavior at the fuel/cladding interface, there are multiple drawbacks to explicitly incorporating the cracks in the finite element mesh. Because the cracks are incorporated in the original mesh, the mesh must be modified for cracks of specified location and depth, so it is difficult to account for crack propagation and the formation of new cracks at other locations. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has emerged in recent years as a powerful method to represent arbitrary, evolving, discrete discontinuities within the context of the finite element method. Development work is underway by the authors to implement XFEM in the BISON fuel performance code, and this capability has previously been demonstrated in simulations of fracture propagation in ceramic nuclear fuel. These preliminary demonstrations have included only the fuel, and excluded the cladding for simplicity. This paper presents initial results of efforts to apply XFEM to

  6. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-01

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  7. Finite element method calculations of ZnO nanowires for nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M. A.; Senz, S.; Alexe, M.; Hesse, D.; Gösele, U.

    2008-03-01

    The bending of a nonconducting piezoelectric ZnO nanowire is simulated by finite element method calculations. The top part is bent by a lateral force, which could be applied by an atomic force microscope tip. The generated electrical potential is ±0.3V. This relatively high signal is, however, difficult to measure due to the low capacitance of the ZnO nanowire (˜4×10-5pF) as compared to the capacitance of most preamplifiers (˜5pF). A further problem arises from the semiconducting properties of experimentally fabricated ZnO nanowires which causes the disappearance of the voltage signal within picoseconds.

  8. Static analysis of rectifier cabinet for nuclear power generating stations based on finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qiang; Chen, Tian-jin; Li, Wei-yang; Xiong, Ze-cheng; Ma, Rui

    2017-09-01

    In order to obtain the deformation map and equivalent stress distribution of rectifier cabinet for nuclear power generating stations, the quality distribution of structure and electrical are described, the tensile bond strengths of the rings are checked, and the finite element model of cabinet is set up by ANSYS. The transport conditions of the hoisting state and fork loading state are analyzed. The deformation map and equivalent stress distribution are obtained. The attentive problems are put forward. It is a reference for analysis method and the obtained results for the transport of rectifier cabinet for nuclear power generating stations.

  9. Computing ferrite core losses at high frequency by finite elements method including temperature influence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Ahmad, J.; Guy, G.

    1994-09-01

    A finite elements method coupled with the Preisach model of hysteresis is used to compute-the ferrite losses in medium power transformers (10--60 kVA) working at relatively high frequencies (20--60 kHz) and with an excitation level of about 0.3 Tesla. The dynamic evolution of the permeability is taken into account. The simple and doubly cubic spline functions are used to account for temperature effects respectively on electric and on magnetic parameters of the ferrite cores. The results are compared with test data obtained with 3C8 and B50 ferrites at different frequencies.

  10. Solving the Fokker-Planck equation with the finite-element method

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Roberto F.; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2008-01-01

    We apply an efficient approach from computational engineering, the finite-element method, to numerically solve the Fokker-Planck equation in two dimensions. This approach permits us to find the solution to stochastic problems that cannot be solved analytically. We illustrate our strategy with an example from neuroscience that recently has attracted considerable attention - synchronization of neural oscillators. In particular, we show that resonators (type II neural oscillators) respond and synchronize more reliably when provided correlated stochastic inputs than do integrators (type I neural oscillators). This result is consistent with recent experimental and computational work. We briefly discuss its relevance for neuroscience. PMID:18233721

  11. Domain decomposition for a mixed finite element method in three dimensions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cai, Z.; Parashkevov, R.R.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.; Ye, X.

    2003-01-01

    We consider the solution of the discrete linear system resulting from a mixed finite element discretization applied to a second-order elliptic boundary value problem in three dimensions. Based on a decomposition of the velocity space, these equations can be reduced to a discrete elliptic problem by eliminating the pressure through the use of substructures of the domain. The practicality of the reduction relies on a local basis, presented here, for the divergence-free subspace of the velocity space. We consider additive and multiplicative domain decomposition methods for solving the reduced elliptic problem, and their uniform convergence is established.

  12. Survey of the status of finite element methods for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temam, Roger

    1986-01-01

    The finite element methods (FEM) have proved to be a powerful technique for the solution of boundary value problems associated with partial differential equations of either elliptic, parabolic, or hyperbolic type. They also have a good potential for utilization on parallel computers particularly in relation to the concept of domain decomposition. This report is intended as an introduction to the FEM for the nonspecialist. It contains a survey which is totally nonexhaustive, and it also contains as an illustration, a report on some new results concerning two specific applications, namely a free boundary fluid-structure interaction problem and the Euler equations for inviscid flows.

  13. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  14. Numerical simulation and design of a fluxset sensor by finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Preis, K.; Bardi, I.; Biro, O.; Richter, K.R.; Pavo, J.; Gasparics, A.; Ticar, I.

    1998-09-01

    A 3D model of a fluxset sensor serving to measure magnetic fields arising in Eddy Current Nondestructive Testing applications is analyzed by the finite element method. The voltage induced in the pick-up coil is obtained by computing the flux of the core of the sensor for several values of the exciting current at various external fields. It is shown that the time shift of the ensuing voltage impulse depends linearly on the external field in a wide range. The behavior of the sensor is furthermore simulated in a real nondestructive testing arrangement consisting of an exciting coil located above a conducting plate with a crack.

  15. Numerical modelling of MPA-CVD reactors with the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Paul; Sime, Nathan

    2017-07-01

    In this article we develop a fully self consistent mathematical model describing the formation of a hydrogen plasma in a microwave power assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPA-CVD) reactor employed for the manufacture of synthetic diamond. The underlying multi-physics model includes constituent equations for the background gas mass average velocity, gas temperature, electromagnetic field energy and plasma density. The proposed mathematical model is numerically approximated based on exploiting the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. We demonstrate the practical performance of this computational approach on a variety of CVD reactor geometries for a range of operating conditions.

  16. Stochastic dynamics of uncoupled neural oscillators: Fokker-Planck studies with the finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Galan, Roberto F.; Urban, Nathaniel N.; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2007-11-15

    We have investigated the effect of the phase response curve on the dynamics of oscillators driven by noise in two limit cases that are especially relevant for neuroscience. Using the finite element method to solve the Fokker-Planck equation we have studied (i) the impact of noise on the regularity of the oscillations quantified as the coefficient of variation, (ii) stochastic synchronization of two uncoupled phase oscillators driven by correlated noise, and (iii) their cross-correlation function. We show that, in general, the limit of type II oscillators is more robust to noise and more efficient at synchronizing by correlated noise than type I.

  17. Stochastic dynamics of uncoupled neural oscillators: Fokker-Planck studies with the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán, Roberto F.; Ermentrout, G. Bard; Urban, Nathaniel N.

    2007-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of the phase response curve on the dynamics of oscillators driven by noise in two limit cases that are especially relevant for neuroscience. Using the finite element method to solve the Fokker-Planck equation we have studied (i) the impact of noise on the regularity of the oscillations quantified as the coefficient of variation, (ii) stochastic synchronization of two uncoupled phase oscillators driven by correlated noise, and (iii) their cross-correlation function. We show that, in general, the limit of type II oscillators is more robust to noise and more efficient at synchronizing by correlated noise than type I.

  18. [Computer simulation of the isolated lesion of tibiofibular an syndesmosis using the finite element method].

    PubMed

    Kozień, Marek S; Lorkowski, Jacek; Szczurek, Sławomir; Hładki, Waldemar; Trybus, Marek

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a computed simulation of an isolated lesion of tibiofibular syndesmosis on typical clinical range of value. The analysis was made using the method of finite elements with a simplified plain model of a bone and assuming material of bone and ankle joint as isotropic and homogeneous. The distraction processes were modelled by external generalized forces. The computed programme ANSYS was used. For evaluation obtained was the computed image of changes of anatomy in relation to forces.

  19. Study on interaction between induced and natural fractures by extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, DanDan; Liu, ZhanLi; Zhuang, Zhuo; Zeng, QingLei; Wang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    Fracking is one of the kernel technologies in the remarkable shale gas revolution. The extended finite element method is used in this paper to numerically investigate the interaction between hydraulic and natural fractures, which is an important issue of the enigmatic fracture network formation in fracking. The criteria which control the opening of natural fracture and crossing of hydraulic fracture are tentatively presented. Influence factors on the interaction process are systematically analyzed, which include the approach angle, anisotropy of in-situ stress and fluid pressure profile.

  20. Numerical study of human vocal folds vibration using Immersed Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy; Krane, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The voice production procedure is a self-oscillating, fluid-structure interaction problem. In this study, the vocal folds vibration during phonation will be simulated by self-oscillated layered-structure vocal folds model, using Immersed Finite Element Method. With the numerical results, we will find out the vocal folds vibration pattern, and also show how the lung pressure, stiffness and geometry of vocal folds will affect the vocal folds vibration. With further analysis, we shall get better understanding of the dynamics of voice production. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

  1. Method and apparatus for connecting finite element meshes and performing simulations therewith

    DOEpatents

    Dohrmann, Clark R.; Key, Samuel W.; Heinstein, Martin W.

    2003-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of connecting dissimilar finite element meshes. A first mesh, designated the master mesh, and a second mesh, designated the slave mesh, each have interface surfaces proximal the other. Each interface surface has a corresponding interface mesh comprising a plurality of interface nodes. Each slave interface node is assigned new coordinates locating the interface node on the interface surface of the master mesh. The slave interface surface is further redefined to be the projection of the slave interface mesh onto the master interface surface.

  2. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-18

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  3. Finite Element Methods and Multiphase Continuum Theory for Modeling 3D Air-Water-Sediment Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Miller, C. T.; Dimakopoulos, A.; Farthing, M.

    2016-12-01

    The last decade has seen an expansion in the development and application of 3D free surface flow models in the context of environmental simulation. These models are based primarily on the combination of effective algorithms, namely level set and volume-of-fluid methods, with high-performance, parallel computing. These models are still computationally expensive and suitable primarily when high-fidelity modeling near structures is required. While most research on algorithms and implementations has been conducted in the context of finite volume methods, recent work has extended a class of level set schemes to finite element methods on unstructured methods. This work considers models of three-phase flow in domains containing air, water, and granular phases. These multi-phase continuum mechanical formulations show great promise for applications such as analysis of coastal and riverine structures. This work will consider formulations proposed in the literature over the last decade as well as new formulations derived using the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory, an approach to deriving and closing macroscale continuum models for multi-phase and multi-component processes. The target applications require the ability to simulate wave breaking and structure over-topping, particularly fully three-dimensional, non-hydrostatic flows that drive these phenomena. A conservative level set scheme suitable for higher-order finite element methods is used to describe the air/water phase interaction. The interaction of these air/water flows with granular materials, such as sand and rubble, must also be modeled. The range of granular media dynamics targeted including flow and wave transmision through the solid media as well as erosion and deposition of granular media and moving bed dynamics. For the granular phase we consider volume- and time-averaged continuum mechanical formulations that are discretized with the finite element method and coupled to the underlying air

  4. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  5. Safety assessment of a shallow foundation using the random finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaskórski, Łukasz; Puła, Wojciech

    2015-04-01

    A complex structure of soil and its random character are reasons why soil modeling is a cumbersome task. Heterogeneity of soil has to be considered even within a homogenous layer of soil. Therefore an estimation of shear strength parameters of soil for the purposes of a geotechnical analysis causes many problems. In applicable standards (Eurocode 7) there is not presented any explicit method of an evaluation of characteristic values of soil parameters. Only general guidelines can be found how these values should be estimated. Hence many approaches of an assessment of characteristic values of soil parameters are presented in literature and can be applied in practice. In this paper, the reliability assessment of a shallow strip footing was conducted using a reliability index β. Therefore some approaches of an estimation of characteristic values of soil properties were compared by evaluating values of reliability index β which can be achieved by applying each of them. Method of Orr and Breysse, Duncan's method, Schneider's method, Schneider's method concerning influence of fluctuation scales and method included in Eurocode 7 were examined. Design values of the bearing capacity based on these approaches were referred to the stochastic bearing capacity estimated by the random finite element method (RFEM). Design values of the bearing capacity were conducted for various widths and depths of a foundation in conjunction with design approaches DA defined in Eurocode. RFEM was presented by Griffiths and Fenton (1993). It combines deterministic finite element method, random field theory and Monte Carlo simulations. Random field theory allows to consider a random character of soil parameters within a homogenous layer of soil. For this purpose a soil property is considered as a separate random variable in every element of a mesh in the finite element method with proper correlation structure between points of given area. RFEM was applied to estimate which theoretical

  6. Helicopter trim analysis by shooting and finite element methods with optimally damped Newton iterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, N. S.; Gaonkar, G. H.

    1993-01-01

    Helicopter trim settings of periodic initial state and control inputs are investigated for convergence of Newton iteration in computing the settings sequentially and in parallel. The trim analysis uses a shooting method and a weak version of two temporal finite element methods with displacement formulation and with mixed formulation of displacements and momenta. These three methods broadly represent two main approaches of trim analysis: adaptation of initial-value and finite element boundary-value codes to periodic boundary conditions, particularly for unstable and marginally stable systems. In each method, both the sequential and in-parallel schemes are used, and the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are solved by damped Newton iteration with an optimally selected damping parameter. The impact of damped Newton iteration, including earlier-observed divergence problems in trim analysis, is demonstrated by the maximum condition number of the Jacobian matrices of the iterative scheme and by virtual elimination of divergence. The advantages of the in-parallel scheme over the conventional sequential scheme are also demonstrated.

  7. Application of the Wave and Finite Element Method to Calculate Sound Transmission Through Cylindrical Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingan, Michael J.; Yang, Yi; Mace, Brian R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper concerns the prediction of sound transmission through a cylindrical structure. The problem considered is that of sound generated by a line source located exterior to a two-dimensional circular cylinder which produces sound waves which transmit through the cylinder to an internal medium. An analytical solution is presented for the case of sound transmission through a thin cylindrical shell, by modelling the shell response using the Flugge- Byrne-Lur'ye equations. This solution is then compared to calculations where the response of the cylinder is calculated using the Wave and Finite Element (WFE) method. The WFE method involves modelling a small segment of a structure using traditional finite element (FE) methods. The mass and stiffness matrices of the segment are then used to calculate the response of the structure to excitation by an acoustic field. The WFE approach for calculating sound transmission is validated by comparison with the analytic solution. Formulating analytic solutions for more complicated structures can be cumbersome whereas using a numerical technique, such as the WFE method, is relatively straightforward.

  8. Use of the finite-element method for a dielectric-constant gas-thermometry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandt, T.; Gaiser, C.; Fellmuth, B.; Haft, N.; Thiele-Krivoi, B.; Kuhn, A.

    2013-09-01

    The finite-element method is a well-established computational methodology for the numerical treatment of partial differential equations. It is primarily used for solving problems in applied engineering and science. In previous publications, we have shown that the method is suitable to solve problems in temperature metrology, for instance to predict temperature profiles and thermal equilibration processes in complex measurement setups. In this paper, the method is used for a primary thermometry experiment, namely dielectric-constant gas thermometry. Within the framework of an international project directed to the new definition of the base unit kelvin, measurements were performed at the triple point of water in order to determine the Boltzmann constant k. The finite-element method was used for the data evaluation in different ways: calculation of the effective compressibility of the measuring capacitor by describing the deformation of its electrodes under the influence of the pressure of the gas, the dielectric constant of which has to be determined; calculation of resonance frequencies for the determination of the elastic constants of the electrode material by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy; electrostatic simulations for calculating capacitance values; estimation of uncertainty components, which allowed to draw conclusions concerning the future reduction of uncertainty components.

  9. Helicopter trim analysis by shooting and finite element methods with optimally damped Newton iterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, N. S.; Gaonkar, G. H.

    1993-01-01

    Helicopter trim settings of periodic initial state and control inputs are investigated for convergence of Newton iteration in computing the settings sequentially and in parallel. The trim analysis uses a shooting method and a weak version of two temporal finite element methods with displacement formulation and with mixed formulation of displacements and momenta. These three methods broadly represent two main approaches of trim analysis: adaptation of initial-value and finite element boundary-value codes to periodic boundary conditions, particularly for unstable and marginally stable systems. In each method, both the sequential and in-parallel schemes are used, and the resulting nonlinear algebraic equations are solved by damped Newton iteration with an optimally selected damping parameter. The impact of damped Newton iteration, including earlier-observed divergence problems in trim analysis, is demonstrated by the maximum condition number of the Jacobian matrices of the iterative scheme and by virtual elimination of divergence. The advantages of the in-parallel scheme over the conventional sequential scheme are also demonstrated.

  10. Mesoscale dynamic coupling of finite- and discrete-element methods for fluid-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Yazdchi, K; Luding, S

    2014-08-06

    A new method for two-way fluid-particle coupling on an unstructured mesoscopically coarse mesh is presented. In this approach, we combine a (higher order) finite-element method (FEM) on the moving mesh for the fluid with a soft sphere discrete-element method for the particles. The novel feature of the proposed scheme is that the FEM mesh is a dynamic Delaunay triangulation based on the positions of the moving particles. Thus, the mesh can be multi-purpose: it provides (i) a framework for the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations, (ii) a simple tool for detecting contacts between moving particles, (iii) a basis for coarse-graining or upscaling, and (iv) coupling with other physical fields (temperature, electromagnetic, etc.). This approach is suitable for a wide range of dilute and dense particulate flows, because the mesh resolution adapts with particle density in a given region. Two-way momentum exchange is implemented using semi-empirical drag laws akin to other popular approaches; for example, the discrete particle method, where a finite-volume solver on a coarser, fixed grid is used. We validate the methodology with several basic test cases, including single- and double-particle settling with analytical and empirical expectations, and flow through ordered and random porous media, when compared against finely resolved FEM simulations of flow through fixed arrays of particles.

  11. A generalized finite element method with global-local enrichment functions for confined plasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.-J.; Duarte, C. A.; Proenca, S. P.

    2012-11-01

    The main feature of partition of unity methods such as the generalized or extended finite element method is their ability of utilizing a priori knowledge about the solution of a problem in the form of enrichment functions. However, analytical derivation of enrichment functions with good approximation properties is mostly limited to two-dimensional linear problems. This paper presents a procedure to numerically generate proper enrichment functions for three-dimensional problems with confined plasticity where plastic evolution is gradual. This procedure involves the solution of boundary value problems around local regions exhibiting nonlinear behavior and the enrichment of the global solution space with the local solutions through the partition of unity method framework. This approach can produce accurate nonlinear solutions with a reduced computational cost compared to standard finite element methods since computationally intensive nonlinear iterations can be performed on coarse global meshes after the creation of enrichment functions properly describing localized nonlinear behavior. Several three-dimensional nonlinear problems based on the rate-independent J 2 plasticity theory with isotropic hardening are solved using the proposed procedure to demonstrate its robustness, accuracy and computational efficiency.

  12. 2D-3D hybrid stabilized finite element method for tsunami runup simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takase, S.; Moriguchi, S.; Terada, K.; Kato, J.; Kyoya, T.; Kashiyama, K.; Kotani, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) hybrid stabilized finite element method that enables us to predict a propagation process of tsunami generated in a hypocentral region, which ranges from offshore propagation to runup to urban areas, with high accuracy and relatively low computational costs. To be more specific, the 2D shallow water equation is employed to simulate the propagation of offshore waves, while the 3D Navier-Stokes equation is employed for the runup in urban areas. The stabilized finite element method is utilized for numerical simulations for both of the 2D and 3D domains that are independently discretized with unstructured meshes. The multi-point constraint and transmission methods are applied to satisfy the continuity of flow velocities and pressures at the interface between the resulting 2D and 3D meshes, since neither their spatial dimensions nor node arrangements are consistent. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed hybrid method to simulate tsunami behavior, including offshore propagation and runup to urban areas, with substantially lower computation costs in comparison with full 3D computations.

  13. Design of ultrasonic fingerprint sensor made of 1-3 piezocomposites by finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Haejune; Roh, Yongrae

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the feasibility of an ultrasonic fingerprint sensor made of a 1-3 piezocomposite material was analyzed using the finite element method, and a fingerprint identification method suitable for the piezocomposite sensor was also determined. Two finite element models were constructed, one without acoustic walls and one with acoustic walls. Two methods for signal analysis were used to identify the ridges and valleys of a fingerprint: comparing (1) maximum peak amplitudes of the reflected waves from the ridges and valleys and (2) flight time differences of the same-ordered peaks. Both methods were applied to the two models. The maximum peak amplitude analysis of the model with acoustic walls showed the best performance in identifying the ridges and valleys. The efficacy of this identification scheme was illustrated using two three-dimensional (3D) fingerprint models: one with concentric circles and one with several concentric semicircles and curves at two corners. Results of this work can lead to the development of more efficient and sensitive ultrasonic fingerprint sensors.

  14. A Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Parabolic Problems with Modified hp-Finite Element Approximation Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    A recent paper is generalized to a case where the spatial region is taken in R(sup 3). The region is assumed to be a thin body, such as a panel on the wing or fuselage of an aerospace vehicle. The traditional h- as well as hp-finite element methods are applied to the surface defined in the x - y variables, while, through the thickness, the technique of the p-element is employed. Time and spatial discretization scheme based upon an assumption of certain weak singularity of double vertical line u(sub t) double vertical line 2, is used to derive an optimal a priori error estimate for the current method.

  15. Parallel finite element methods and iterative solution techniques for viscous incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragy, Edward Joseph

    The present work is motivated by a desire to map the solution structure of nonlinear systems of partial differential equations (PDE). Of particular interest are viscous flow problems in 2D, possibly with coupled heat transfer or species transport. Due to the nonlinearity of the governing PDE's, many complicated solution structures may arise. These may include sharp layers, multiple solutions, and the possibility of bifurcation. The existence of spurious solutions, arising from insufficiently refined meshes, underscores the need for highly accurate solution procedures. This, in turn, motivates the use of p type finite element discretizations. Continuation techniques have been developed by several authors for the solution of these types of nonlinear problems. These techniques involve the solution of linear algebraic systems arising from a Newton iteration, for many, possibly hundreds, of discrete parameter values. This large computational burden motivates the use of large scale, parallel supercomputing facilities. A study of the impact of high p finite element discretizations as applied to the continuation solution of viscous incompressible flows in two dimensions is presented. The impact of these methods is considered for a Newton type continuation method coupled with gradient type element-by-element (EBE) iterative solvers. Significant issues considered concern the effect of high p on performance for various supercomputing platforms, implementation issues for EBE schemes in a distributed memory setting, and issues of scalability in a distributed memory multiprocessor setting. These issues are examined in conjunction with the development of preconditioners appropriate for high p methods, and the development of bifurcation detection schemes appropriate for high p methods and gradient type solution schemes.

  16. Finite Element Method (FEM), Mechanobiology and Biomimetic Scaffolds in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccio, A.; Ballini, A.; Pappalettere, C.; Tullo, D.; Cantore, S.; Desiate, A.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques of bone reconstructive surgery are largely based on conventional, non-cell-based therapies that rely on the use of durable materials from outside the patient's body. In contrast to conventional materials, bone tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences towards the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve bone tissue function. Bone tissue engineering has led to great expectations for clinical surgery or various diseases that cannot be solved with traditional devices. For example, critical-sized defects in bone, whether induced by primary tumor resection, trauma, or selective surgery have in many cases presented insurmountable challenges to the current gold standard treatment for bone repair. The primary purpose of bone tissue engineering is to apply engineering principles to incite and promote the natural healing process of bone which does not occur in critical-sized defects. The total market for bone tissue regeneration and repair was valued at $1.1 billion in 2007 and is projected to increase to nearly $1.6 billion by 2014. Usually, temporary biomimetic scaffolds are utilized for accommodating cell growth and bone tissue genesis. The scaffold has to promote biological processes such as the production of extra-cellular matrix and vascularisation, furthermore the scaffold has to withstand the mechanical loads acting on it and to transfer them to the natural tissues located in the vicinity. The design of a scaffold for the guided regeneration of a bony tissue requires a multidisciplinary approach. Finite element method and mechanobiology can be used in an integrated approach to find the optimal parameters governing bone scaffold performance. In this paper, a review of the studies that through a combined use of finite element method and mechano-regulation algorithms described the possible patterns of tissue differentiation in biomimetic scaffolds for bone

  17. Finite element method (FEM), mechanobiology and biomimetic scaffolds in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Boccaccio, A; Ballini, A; Pappalettere, C; Tullo, D; Cantore, S; Desiate, A

    2011-01-26

    Techniques of bone reconstructive surgery are largely based on conventional, non-cell-based therapies that rely on the use of durable materials from outside the patient's body. In contrast to conventional materials, bone tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences towards the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve bone tissue function. Bone tissue engineering has led to great expectations for clinical surgery or various diseases that cannot be solved with traditional devices. For example, critical-sized defects in bone, whether induced by primary tumor resection, trauma, or selective surgery have in many cases presented insurmountable challenges to the current gold standard treatment for bone repair. The primary purpose of bone tissue engineering is to apply engineering principles to incite and promote the natural healing process of bone which does not occur in critical-sized defects. The total market for bone tissue regeneration and repair was valued at $1.1 billion in 2007 and is projected to increase to nearly $1.6 billion by 2014.Usually, temporary biomimetic scaffolds are utilized for accommodating cell growth and bone tissue genesis. The scaffold has to promote biological processes such as the production of extra-cellular matrix and vascularisation, furthermore the scaffold has to withstand the mechanical loads acting on it and to transfer them to the natural tissues located in the vicinity. The design of a scaffold for the guided regeneration of a bony tissue requires a multidisciplinary approach. Finite element method and mechanobiology can be used in an integrated approach to find the optimal parameters governing bone scaffold performance.In this paper, a review of the studies that through a combined use of finite element method and mechano-regulation algorithms described the possible patterns of tissue differentiation in biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue

  18. The Model Experiments and Finite Element Analysis on Deformation and Failure by Excavation of Grounds in Foregoing-roof Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotokoba, Yasumasa; Okajima, Kenji; Iida, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Tadatsugu

    We propose the trenchless box culvert construction method to construct box culverts in small covering soil layers while keeping roads or tracks open. When we use this construction method, it is necessary to clarify deformation and shear failure by excavation of grounds. In order to investigate the soil behavior, model experiments and elasto-plactic finite element analysis were performed. In the model experiments, it was shown that the shear failure was developed from the end of the roof to the toe of the boundary surface. In the finite element analysis, a shear band effect was introduced. Comparing the observed shear bands in model experiments with computed maximum shear strain contours, it was found that the observed direction of the shear band could be simulated reasonably by the finite element analysis. We may say that the finite element method used in this study is useful tool for this construction method.

  19. Optimization of the sources in local hyperthermia using a combined finite element-genetic algorithm method.

    PubMed

    Siauve, N; Nicolas, L; Vollaire, C; Marchal, C

    2004-12-01

    This article describes an optimization process specially designed for local and regional hyperthermia in order to achieve the desired specific absorption rate in the patient. It is based on a genetic algorithm coupled to a finite element formulation. The optimization method is applied to real human organs meshes assembled from computerized tomography scans. A 3D finite element formulation is used to calculate the electromagnetic field in the patient, achieved by radiofrequency or microwave sources. Space discretization is performed using incomplete first order edge elements. The sparse complex symmetric matrix equation is solved using a conjugate gradient solver with potential projection pre-conditionning. The formulation is validated by comparison of calculated specific absorption rate distributions in a phantom to temperature measurements. A genetic algorithm is used to optimize the specific absorption rate distribution to predict the phases and amplitudes of the sources leading to the best focalization. The objective function is defined as the specific absorption rate ratio in the tumour and healthy tissues. Several constraints, regarding the specific absorption rate in tumour and the total power in the patient, may be prescribed. Results obtained with two types of applicators (waveguides and annular phased array) are presented and show the faculties of the developed optimization process.

  20. Method to geometrically personalize a detailed finite-element model of the spine.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Nadine Michèle; Petit, Yvan; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Wagnac, Eric; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean

    2013-07-01

    To date, developing geometrically personalized and detailed solid finite-element models (FEMs) of the spine remains a challenge, notably due to multiple articulations and complex geometries. To answer this problem, a methodology based on a free-form deformation technique (kriging) was developed to deform a detailed reference finite-element mesh of the spine (including discs and ligaments) to the patient-specific geometry of 10- and 82-year-old asymptomatic spines. Different kriging configurations were tested: with or without smoothing, and control points on or surrounding the entire mesh. Based on the results, it is recommended to use surrounding control points and smoothing. The mean node to surface distance between the deformed and target geometries was 0.3±1.1 mm. Most elements met the mesh quality criteria (95%) after deformation, without interference at the articular facets. The method's novelty lies in the deformation of the entire spine at once, as opposed to deforming each vertebra separately, with surrounding control points and smoothing. This enables the transformation of reference vertebrae and soft tissues to obtain complete and personalized FEMs of the spine with minimal postprocessing to optimize the mesh.

  1. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  2. Finite element modeling of the non collinear mixing method for detection and characterization of closed cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanloeuil, P.; Meziane, A.

    2015-10-01

    The non-collinear mixing technique is applied for detection and characterization of closed cracks. The method is based on the nonlinear interaction of two shear waves generated with an oblique incidence. This interaction leads to the scattering of a longitudinal wave. A Finite Element model is used to demonstrate its application to a closed crack. Contact acoustic nonlinearity is the nonlinear effect considered here and is modeled using unilateral contact law with Coulomb's friction. Directivity patterns are computed using a two-step procedure. The Finite Element (FE) model provides the near-field solution on a circular boundary surrounding the closed crack. The solution in the far-field is then determined assuming that the material has a linear behavior. Directivity patterns will be used to analyze the direction of propagation of longitudinal wave(s) scattered from the closed crack. Numerical results show that the method is effective and promising when applied to a closed crack. Scattering of the longitudinal wave also enables us to image the crack, giving position and size indications. Finally, the method offers the possibility to distinguish classical nonlinearity from contact acoustic nonlinearity.

  3. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  4. Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibrations of beams using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Decha-Umphai, Kamolphan

    1987-01-01

    Multiple-mode nonlinear free and forced vibration of a beam is analyzed by the finite element method. The geometric nonlinearity is investigated. Inplane displacement and inertia (IDI) are also considered in the formulation. Harmonic force matrix is derived and explained. Nonlinear free vibration can be simply treated as a special case of the general forced vibration by setting the harmonic force matrix equal to zero. The effect of the higher modes is more pronouced for the clamped supported beam than the simply supported one. Beams without IDI yield more effect of the higher modes than the one with IDI. The effects of IDI are to reduce nonlinearity. For beams with end supports restrained from axial movement (immovable cases), only the hardening type nonlinearity is observed. However, beams of small slenderness ratio (L/R = 20) with movable end supports, the softening type nonlinearity is found. The concentrated force case yields a more severe response than the uniformly distributed force case. Finite element results are in good agreement with the solution of simple elliptic response, harmonic balance method, and Runge-Kutte method and experiment.

  5. Static Aeroelastic Analysis of Transonic Wind Tunnel Models Using Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, John R.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Valla, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A computational method for accurately predicting the static aeroelastic deformations of typical transonic transport wind tunnel models is described. The method utilizes a finite element method (FEM) for predicting the deformations. Extensive calibration/validation of this method was carried out using a novel wind-off wind tunnel model static loading experiment and wind-on optical wing twist measurements obtained during a recent wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA LaRC. Further validations were carried out using a Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver to calculate wing pressure distributions about several aeroelastically deformed wings and comparing these predictions with NTF experimental data. Results from this aeroelastic deformation method are in good overall agreement with experimentally measured values. Including the predicted deformations significantly improves the correlation between CFD predicted and experimentally measured wing & pressures.

  6. A stochastic finite element method for fatigue reliability analysis of gear teeth subjected to bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, X. Q.; Geng, Liu; Liyan, Wu; Liu, G. R.; Lam, K. Y.

    A stochastic finite element method (SFEM) is developed for accurate structural reliability analysis. Using the second-order three-moment reliability analytical model, this method takes into account such random factors as load, material parameters and especially geometry randomness. The calculation of the bending fatigue strength reliability of a cantilever beam is carried out as a numerical example to verify the present method. Monte-Carlo FEM and SFEM based on the first-order second-moment model are used in the example to compare with the proposed method. By incorporating the fatigue theory of gears, the present method is then used to analyze the bending fatigue strength reliability of a spur gear. The effects of random variables' coefficient of variation and skewness and the gear's correction factor (not random variable) on the gear's reliability are also investigated.

  7. Iterative and multigrid methods in the finite element solution of incompressible and turbulent fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, N.; Taylor, C.

    1999-07-01

    Multigrid and iterative methods are used to reduce the solution time of the matrix equations which arise from the finite element (FE) discretisation of the time-independent equations of motion of the incompressible fluid in turbulent motion. Incompressible flow is solved by using the method of reduce interpolation for the pressure to satisfy the Brezzi-Babuska condition. The k-l model is used to complete the turbulence closure problem. The non-symmetric iterative matrix methods examined are the methods of least squares conjugate gradient (LSCG), biconjugate gradient (BCG), conjugate gradient squared (CGS), and the biconjugate gradient squared stabilised (BCGSTAB). The multigrid algorithm applied is based on the FAS algorithm of Brandt, and uses two and three levels of grids with a V-cycling schedule. These methods are all compared to the non-symmetric frontal solver. Copyright

  8. Immersed smoothed finite element method for fluid-structure interaction simulation of aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianyao; Liu, G. R.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.; Zhang, Zhi-Qian

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel numerical method for simulating the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems when blood flows over aortic valves. The method uses the immersed boundary/element method and the smoothed finite element method and hence it is termed as IS-FEM. The IS-FEM is a partitioned approach and does not need a body-fitted mesh for FSI simulations. It consists of three main modules: the fluid solver, the solid solver and the FSI force solver. In this work, the blood is modeled as incompressible viscous flow and solved using the characteristic-based-split scheme with FEM for spacial discretization. The leaflets of the aortic valve are modeled as Mooney-Rivlin hyperelastic materials and solved using smoothed finite element method (or S-FEM). The FSI force is calculated on the Lagrangian fictitious fluid mesh that is identical to the moving solid mesh. The octree search and neighbor-to-neighbor schemes are used to detect efficiently the FSI pairs of fluid and solid cells. As an example, a 3D idealized model of aortic valve is modeled, and the opening process of the valve is simulated using the proposed IS-FEM. Numerical results indicate that the IS-FEM can serve as an efficient tool in the study of aortic valve dynamics to reveal the details of stresses in the aortic valves, the flow velocities in the blood, and the shear forces on the interfaces. This tool can also be applied to animal models studying disease processes and may ultimately translate to a new adaptive methods working with magnetic resonance images, leading to improvements on diagnostic and prognostic paradigms, as well as surgical planning, in the care of patients.

  9. Analysis of corner cracks at hole by a 3-D weight function method with stresses from finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Sutton, M. A.; Wu, X. R.; Shivakumar, K. N.

    1995-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for quarter-elliptical corner cracks emanating from a circular hole are determined using a 3-D weight function method combined with a 3-D finite element method. The 3-D finite element method is used to analyze uncracked configuration and provide stress distribution in the region where crack is to occur. Using this stress distribution as input, the 3-D weight function method is used to determine stress intensity factors. Three different loading conditions, i.e. remote tension, remote bending and wedge loading, are considered for a wide range in geometrical parameters. The significance in using 3-D uncracked stress distribution and the difference between single and double corner cracks are studied. Typical crack opening displacements are also provided. Comparisons are made with solutions available in the literature.

  10. A flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration method for the SN transport equations discretized with discontinuous finite elements

    DOE PAGES

    Schunert, Sebastian; Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick; ...

    2017-02-21

    This paper presents a flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) method that discretizes both the SN transport equation and the diffusion equation using the discontinuous finite element method (DFEM). The method is flexible in that the diffusion equation can be discretized on a coarser mesh with the only restriction that it is nested within the transport mesh and the FEM shape function orders of the two equations can be different. The consistency of the transport and diffusion solutions at convergence is defined by using a projection operator mapping the transport into the diffusion FEM space. The diffusion weak form is basedmore » on the modified incomplete interior penalty (MIP) diffusion DFEM discretization that is extended by volumetric drift, interior face, and boundary closure terms. In contrast to commonly used coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) methods, the presented NDA method uses a full FEM discretized diffusion equation for acceleration. Suitable projection and prolongation operators arise naturally from the FEM framework. Via Fourier analysis and numerical experiments for a one-group, fixed source problem the following properties of the NDA method are established for structured quadrilateral meshes: (1) the presented method is unconditionally stable and effective in the presence of mild material heterogeneities if the same mesh and identical shape functions either of the bilinear or biquadratic type are used, (2) the NDA method remains unconditionally stable in the presence of strong heterogeneities, (3) the NDA method with bilinear elements extends the range of effectiveness and stability by a factor of two when compared to CMFD if a coarser diffusion mesh is selected. In addition, the method is tested for solving the C5G7 multigroup, eigenvalue problem using coarse and fine mesh acceleration. Finally, while NDA does not offer an advantage over CMFD for fine mesh acceleration, it reduces the iteration count required for convergence by almost

  11. A flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration method for the SN transport equations discretized with discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schunert, Sebastian; Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick; Ortensi, Javier; Baker, Benjamin; Laboure, Vincent; Wang, Congjian; DeHart, Mark; Martineau, Richard

    2017-06-01

    This work presents a flexible nonlinear diffusion acceleration (NDA) method that discretizes both the SN transport equation and the diffusion equation using the discontinuous finite element method (DFEM). The method is flexible in that the diffusion equation can be discretized on a coarser mesh with the only restriction that it is nested within the transport mesh and the FEM shape function orders of the two equations can be different. The consistency of the transport and diffusion solutions at convergence is defined by using a projection operator mapping the transport into the diffusion FEM space. The diffusion weak form is based on the modified incomplete interior penalty (MIP) diffusion DFEM discretization that is extended by volumetric drift, interior face, and boundary closure terms. In contrast to commonly used coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) methods, the presented NDA method uses a full FEM discretized diffusion equation for acceleration. Suitable projection and prolongation operators arise naturally from the FEM framework. Via Fourier analysis and numerical experiments for a one-group, fixed source problem the following properties of the NDA method are established for structured quadrilateral meshes: (1) the presented method is unconditionally stable and effective in the presence of mild material heterogeneities if the same mesh and identical shape functions either of the bilinear or biquadratic type are used, (2) the NDA method remains unconditionally stable in the presence of strong heterogeneities, (3) the NDA method with bilinear elements extends the range of effectiveness and stability by a factor of two when compared to CMFD if a coarser diffusion mesh is selected. In addition, the method is tested for solving the C5G7 multigroup, eigenvalue problem using coarse and fine mesh acceleration. While NDA does not offer an advantage over CMFD for fine mesh acceleration, it reduces the iteration count required for convergence by almost a factor of two in

  12. A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for high Reynolds number laminar flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    A velocity-pressure integrated, mixed interpolation, Galerkin finite element method for the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. In the method, the velocity variables were interpolated using complete quadratic shape functions and the pressure was interpolated using linear shape functions. For the two dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a triangular element which is contained inside the complete biquadratic element for velocity variables; and for the three dimensional case, the pressure is defined on a tetrahedral element which is again contained inside the complete tri-quadratic element. Thus the pressure is discontinuous across the element boundaries. Example problems considered include: a cavity flow for Reynolds number of 400 through 10,000; a laminar backward facing step flow; and a laminar flow in a square duct of strong curvature. The computational results compared favorable with those of the finite difference methods as well as experimental data available. A finite elememt computer program for incompressible, laminar flows is presented.

  13. Interactive Analysis of General Beam Configurations using Finite Element Methods and JavaScript

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Christopher

    Advancements in computer technology have contributed to the widespread practice of modelling and solving engineering problems through the use of specialized software. The wide use of engineering software comes with the disadvantage to the user of costs from the required purchase of software licenses. The creation of accurate, trusted, and freely available applications capable of conducting meaningful analysis of engineering problems is a way to mitigate to the costs associated with every-day engineering computations. Writing applications in the JavaScript programming language allows the applications to run within any computer browser, without the need to install specialized software, since all internet browsers are equipped with virtual machines (VM) that allow the browsers to execute JavaScript code. The objective of this work is the development of an application that performs the analysis of a completely general beam through use of the finite element method. The app is written in JavaScript and embedded in a web page so it can be downloaded and executed by a user with an internet connection. This application allows the user to analyze any uniform or non-uniform beam, with any combination of applied forces, moments, distributed loads, and boundary conditions. Outputs for this application include lists the beam deformations and slopes, as well as lateral and slope deformation graphs, bending stress distributions, and shear and a moment diagrams. To validate the methodology of the GBeam finite element app, its results are verified using the results from obtained from two other established finite element solvers for fifteen separate test cases.

  14. Analysis of large quasistatic deformations of inelastic solids by a new stress based finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Kenneth W.

    1992-09-01

    A new hybrid stress finite element algorithm suitable for analyses of large quasistatic deformation of inelastic solids is presented. Principal variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin. The finite element equations which result are discrete versions of the equations of compatibility and angular momentum balance. Consistent reformulation of the constitutive equation and accurate and stable time integration of the stress are discussed at length. Examples which bring out the feasibility and performance of the algorithm conclude the work.

  15. Thermal buckling analysis of composite laminated plates by the finite-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Lienwen; Chen, Leiyi )

    1989-01-01

    The thermal buckling behavior of laminated plates subjected to a nonuniform temperature field is investigated by the finite-element method. Being nonuniformly distributed over the plate, the thermal stresses should be determined before solving the buckling problem. The stiffness matrix, geometry matrix, and load vector are derived based on the principle of minimum potential energy. The assumed displacement state over the middle surface of the plate element is expressed as the products of one-dimensional, first-order Hermite polynomials. Numerical results show that the thermal buckling strength of a clamped plate is higher than that of a simply supported plate, and the influence of lamination angle, plate aspect ratio, and modulus ratio on thermal buckling are found to be significant for laminated plates. 21 refs.

  16. Refined finite element modeling of a damaged bridge with virtual distortion method coupling solid superelement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Tan, Zhicheng; Yang, Changxi

    2017-09-01

    A new type of metamodel, the virtual distortion method (VDM) coupling superelement, is proposed to alleviate the calculation burden of refined finite element (FE) modeling of existing damaged bridges. First, VDM based on a beam-like element is extended to a solid superelement, and the transfer matrix and influence matrices of a complicated superelement suitable for VDM are obtained. Second, aiming at an actual damaged bridge, a two-step procedure of refined modeling based on FE model updating is presented to precisely model the local damaged regions of the structure, which is difficult to achieve in FE analysis. Finally, using the measured static deformation from the load test, a precise FE model of this damaged bridge is obtained with high efficiency by importing the VDM coupling solid superelement into the above procedure of refined modeling.

  17. Static analysis for magneto-electro-elastic plates based on the scaled boundary finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengchong; Liu, Jun; Lin, Gao

    2017-04-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM) and the precise integration algorithm (PIA) are utilized to analyze the extended displacement field in clamped or simple-supported magneto-electro-elastic plates produced by external transverse loadings. There are no limitation on boundary conditions and types of external forces. Only the in-plane dimensions are divided into 2D elements. By introducing a set of scaled boundary local coordinates, 3D governing partial differential equations are converted into the second order ordinary differential matrix equation. By means of the internal nodal force, a first order ordinary differential equation is obtained and its general solution is a matrix exponential. The PIA is introduced to calculate the matrix exponential and any desired accuracy can be obtained. Finally, several numerical examples are provided to validate the versatility of the proposed technique.

  18. Implementation of Hybrid V-Cycle Multilevel Methods for Mixed Finite Element Systems with Penalty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chen-Yao G.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the implementation of hybrid V-cycle hierarchical multilevel methods for the indefinite discrete systems which arise when a mixed finite element approximation is used to solve elliptic boundary value problems. By introducing a penalty parameter, the perturbed indefinite system can be reduced to a symmetric positive definite system containing the small penalty parameter for the velocity unknown alone. We stabilize the hierarchical spatial decomposition approach proposed by Cai, Goldstein, and Pasciak for the reduced system. We demonstrate that the relative condition number of the preconditioner is bounded uniformly with respect to the penalty parameter, the number of levels and possible jumps of the coefficients as long as they occur only across the edges of the coarsest elements.

  19. Implementation of Hybrid V-Cycle Multilevel Methods for Mixed Finite Element Systems with Penalty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chen-Yao G.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this paper is the implementation of hybrid V-cycle hierarchical multilevel methods for the indefinite discrete systems which arise when a mixed finite element approximation is used to solve elliptic boundary value problems. By introducing a penalty parameter, the perturbed indefinite system can be reduced to a symmetric positive definite system containing the small penalty parameter for the velocity unknown alone. We stabilize the hierarchical spatial decomposition approach proposed by Cai, Goldstein, and Pasciak for the reduced system. We demonstrate that the relative condition number of the preconditioner is bounded uniformly with respect to the penalty parameter, the number of levels and possible jumps of the coefficients as long as they occur only across the edges of the coarsest elements.

  20. Comparative efficiency of finite, boundary and hybrid element methods in elastostatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, C. W.; Lee, C. W.

    1986-01-01

    The comparative computational efficiencies of the finite element (FEM), boundary element (BEM), and hybrid boundary element-finite element (HBFEM) analysis techniques are evaluated for representative bounded domain interior and unbounded domain exterior problems in elastostatics. Computational efficiency is carefully defined in this study as the computer time required to attain a specified level of solution accuracy. The study found the FEM superior to the BEM for the interior problem, while the reverse was true for the exterior problem. The hybrid analysis technique was found to be comparable or superior to both the FEM and BEM for both the interior and exterior problems.

  1. Three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography based on graphics-processing-unit-accelerated finite element method.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kuan; He, Ling; Zhu, Ziqiang; Tang, Jingtian; Xiao, Jiaying

    2013-12-01

    Compared with commonly used analytical reconstruction methods, the frequency-domain finite element method (FEM) based approach has proven to be an accurate and flexible algorithm for photoacoustic tomography. However, the FEM-based algorithm is computationally demanding, especially for three-dimensional cases. To enhance the algorithm's efficiency, in this work a parallel computational strategy is implemented in the framework of the FEM-based reconstruction algorithm using a graphic-processing-unit parallel frame named the "compute unified device architecture." A series of simulation experiments is carried out to test the accuracy and accelerating effect of the improved method. The results obtained indicate that the parallel calculation does not change the accuracy of the reconstruction algorithm, while its computational cost is significantly reduced by a factor of 38.9 with a GTX 580 graphics card using the improved method.

  2. Linear-scaling multipole-accelerated Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method.

    PubMed

    Watson, Mark A; Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2008-02-07

    A linear-scaling implementation of the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method is presented for the rapid computation of the electronic Coulomb potential. The current work utilizes the fast multipole method (FMM) for the evaluation of the Poisson equation boundary condition. The FMM affords significant savings for small- and medium-sized systems and overcomes the bottleneck in the GFC method for very large systems. Compared to an exact analytical treatment of the boundary, more than 100-fold speedups are observed for systems with more than 1000 basis functions without any significant loss of accuracy. We present CPU times to demonstrate the effectiveness of the linear-scaling GFC method for both one-dimensional polyalanine chains and the challenging case of three-dimensional diamond fragments.

  3. One-dimensional finite-elements method for the analysis of whispering gallery microresonators.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Korani, Ebrahim; Mohammad-Taheri, Mahmoud; Shahabadi, Mahmoud

    2014-07-01

    By taking advantage of axial symmetry of the planar whispering gallery microresonators, the three-dimensional (3D) problem of the resonator is reduced to a two-dimensional (2D) one; thus, only the cross section of the resonator needs to be analyzed. Then, the proposed formulation, which works based on a combination of the finite-elements method (FEM) and Fourier expansion of the fields, can be applied to the 2D problem. First, the axial field variation is expressed in terms of a Fourier series. Then, a FEM method is applied to the radial field variation. This formulation yields an eigenvalue problem with sparse matrices and can be solved using a well-known numerical technique. This method takes into account both the radiation loss and the dielectric loss; hence, it works efficiently either for high number or low number modes. Efficiency of the method was investigated by comparison of the results with those of commercial software.

  4. Comparison of finite element and transfer matrix methods for numerical investigation of surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddouche, Issam; Cherbi, Lynda

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) in the visible regime at a metal/dielectric interface within two different waveguide structures, the first is a Photonic Crystal Fiber where the Full Vector Finite Element Method (FVFEM) is used and the second is a slab waveguide where the transfer matrix method (TMM) is used. Knowing the diversities between the two methods in terms of speed, simplicity, and scope of application, computation is implemented with respect to wavelength and metal layer thickness in order to analyze and compare the performances of the two methods. Simulation results show that the TMM can be a good approximation for the FVFEM and that SPPs behave more like modes propagating in a semi infinite metal/dielectric structure as metal thickness increases from about 150 nm.

  5. A Finite Element Method for Computation of Structural Intensity by the Normal Mode Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrić, L.; Pavić, G.

    1993-06-01

    A method for numerical computation of structural intensity in thin-walled structures is presented. The method is based on structural finite elements (beam, plate and shell type) enabling computation of real eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the undamped structure which then serve in evaluation of complex response. The distributed structural damping is taken into account by using the modal damping concept, while any localized damping is treated as an external loading, determined by use of impedance matching conditions and eigenproperties of the structure. Emphasis is given to aspects of accuracy of the results and efficiency of the numerical procedures used. High requirements on accuracy of the structural response (displacements and stresses) needed in intensity applications are satisfied by employing the "swept static solution", which effectively takes into account the influence of higher modes otherwise inaccessible to numerical computation. A comparison is made between the results obtained by using analytical methods and the proposed numerical procedure to demonstrate the validity of the method presented.

  6. A novel finite element method for the modeling of multiple reflections in photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ging, John A.; O'Dowd, Ronan

    2006-04-01

    The complex transverse waveguide geometries of integrated photonic devices warrant the application of intricate Numerical Methods when modelling these types of Planar Lightwave Circuits (PLC). To aggravate the problem, difficulties also arise when dealing with back-reflections at interfaces, counter-propagating signals and other associated losses. Routines such as the Finite Element Method (FEM) and Finite Difference Method (FDM) are utilised in simulating the propagation of light through the core waveguide structures of these PLCs. In this paper a novel FEM reliant upon device cross-sectional symmetry is proposed, developed and discussed in regards to its advantages in precision over other procedures. Upon completion of this analysis, the propagation constant and effective refractive indices are known and extensions may be employed to accurately model propagation through the device and outline any reflections or losses that may ensue. A clear and concise review of some of the foremost available schemes is also presented here. These techniques, such as the Bidirectional Eigenmode Propagation Method (BEP) and the Beam Propagation Method (BPM) will be discussed and an effective and precise 3-dimensional model is presented. Due to the myriad of available techniques and algorithms, a comparative study is drawn, listing the advantages and failures of the major methods while suggesting improvements to their application. Necessary considerations such as simulation time and the trade-off between computer memory requirements and accuracy of the solution are also acknowledged.

  7. Material Flow Analysis in Indentation by Two-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation and Finite Elements Method

    PubMed Central

    Bermudo, Carolina; Sevilla, Lorenzo; Castillo López, Germán

    2017-01-01

    The present work shows the material flow analysis in indentation by the numerical two dimensional Finite Elements (FEM) method and the experimental two-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method. To achieve deep indentation without cracking, a ductile material, 99% tin, is used. The results obtained from the DIC technique depend predominantly on the pattern conferred to the samples. Due to the absence of a natural pattern, black and white spray painting is used for greater contrast. The stress-strain curve of the material has been obtained and introduced in the Finite Element simulation code used, DEFORM™, allowing for accurate simulations. Two different 2D models have been used: a plain strain model to obtain the load curve and a plain stress model to evaluate the strain maps on the workpiece surface. The indentation displacement load curve has been compared between the FEM and the experimental results, showing a good correlation. Additionally, the strain maps obtained from the material surface with FEM and DIC are compared in order to validate the numerical model. The Von Mises strain results between both of them present a 10–20% difference. The results show that FEM is a good tool for simulating indentation processes, allowing for the evaluation of the maximum forces and deformations involved in the forming process. Additionally, the non-contact DIC technique shows its potential by measuring the superficial strain maps, validating the FEM results. PMID:28773038

  8. Simulation on Temperature Field of Radiofrequency Lesions System Based on Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, D.; Qian, L.; Qian, Z.; Li, W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper mainly describes the way to get the volume model of damaged region according to the simulation on temperature field of radiofrequency ablation lesion system in curing Parkinson's disease based on finite element method. This volume model reflects, to some degree, the shape and size of the damaged tissue during the treatment with all tendencies in different time or core temperature. By using Pennes equation as heat conduction equation of radiofrequency ablation of biological tissue, the author obtains the temperature distribution field of biological tissue in the method of finite element for solving equations. In order to establish damage models at temperature points of 60°C, 65°C, 70°C, 75°C, 80°C, 85°C and 90 °C while the time points are 30s, 60s, 90s and 120s, Parkinson's disease model of nuclei is reduced to uniform, infinite model with RF pin at the origin. Theoretical simulations of these models are displayed, focusing on a variety of conditions about the effective lesion size on horizontal and vertical. The results show the binary complete quadratic non-linear joint temperature-time models of the maximum damage diameter and maximum height. The models can comprehensively reflect the degeneration of target tissue caused by radio frequency temperature and duration. This lay the foundation for accurately monitor of clinical RF treatment of Parkinson's disease in the future.

  9. Material Flow Analysis in Indentation by Two-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation and Finite Elements Method.

    PubMed

    Bermudo, Carolina; Sevilla, Lorenzo; Castillo López, Germán

    2017-06-21

    The present work shows the material flow analysis in indentation by the numerical two dimensional Finite Elements (FEM) method and the experimental two-dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method. To achieve deep indentation without cracking, a ductile material, 99% tin, is used. The results obtained from the DIC technique depend predominantly on the pattern conferred to the samples. Due to the absence of a natural pattern, black and white spray painting is used for greater contrast. The stress-strain curve of the material has been obtained and introduced in the Finite Element simulation code used, DEFORM™, allowing for accurate simulations. Two different 2D models have been used: a plain strain model to obtain the load curve and a plain stress model to evaluate the strain maps on the workpiece surface. The indentation displacement load curve has been compared between the FEM and the experimental results, showing a good correlation. Additionally, the strain maps obtained from the material surface with FEM and DIC are compared in order to validate the numerical model. The Von Mises strain results between both of them present a 10-20% difference. The results show that FEM is a good tool for simulating indentation processes, allowing for the evaluation of the maximum forces and deformations involved in the forming process. Additionally, the non-contact DIC technique shows its potential by measuring the superficial strain maps, validating the FEM results.

  10. Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method for Simulation of Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengzeng; Zheng, Hong; Sun, Guanhua; Ge, Xiurun

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is widely used in the exploitation of unconventional gas (such as shale gas).Thus, the study of hydraulic fracturing is of particular importance for petroleum industry. The combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM) proposed by Munjiza is an innovative numerical technique to capture progressive damage and failure processes in rock. However, it cannot model the fracturing process of rock driven by hydraulic pressure. In this study, we present a coupled hydro-mechanical model based on FDEM for the simulation of hydraulic fracturing in complex fracture geometries, where an algorithm for updating hydraulic fracture network is proposed. The algorithm can carry out connectivity searches for arbitrarily complex fracture networks. Then, we develop a new combined finite-discrete element method numerical code (Y-flow) for the simulation of hydraulic fracturing. Finally, several verification examples are given, and the simulation results agree well with the analytical or experimental results, indicating that the newly developed numerical code can capture hydraulic fracturing process correctly and effectively.

  11. Large-scale All-electron Density Functional Theory Calculations using Enriched Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanungo, Bikash; Gavini, Vikram

    We present a computationally efficient method to perform large-scale all-electron density functional theory calculations by enriching the Lagrange polynomial basis in classical finite element (FE) discretization with atom-centered numerical basis functions, which are obtained from the solutions of the Kohn-Sham (KS) problem for single atoms. We term these atom-centered numerical basis functions as enrichment functions. The integrals involved in the construction of the discrete KS Hamiltonian and overlap matrix are computed using an adaptive quadrature grid based on gradients in the enrichment functions. Further, we propose an efficient scheme to invert the overlap matrix by exploiting its LDL factorization and employing spectral finite elements along with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature rules. Finally, we use a Chebyshev polynomial based acceleration technique to compute the occupied eigenspace in each self-consistent iteration. We demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and scalability of the proposed method on various metallic and insulating benchmark systems, with systems ranging in the order of 10,000 electrons. We observe a 50-100 fold reduction in the overall computational time when compared to classical FE calculations while being commensurate with the desired chemical accuracy. We acknowledge the support of NSF (Grant No. 1053145) and ARO (Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0158) in conducting this work.

  12. Unilateral Outer Bow Expanded Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Mortezai, Omid; Esmaily, Masomeh; Darvishpour, Hojat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Headgears are among the effective orthodontic appliances to achieve treatment goals. Unilateral molar distal movement is sometimes needed during an orthodontic treatment, which can be achieved by an asymmetric headgear. Different unilateral headgears have been introduced. The main goal of this study was to analyze the force system of unilateral expanded outer bow asymmetric headgears by the finite element method (FEM). Materials and Methods: Six 3D finite element models of a mesiodistal slice of the maxilla containing upper first molars, their periodontal ligaments (PDLs), cancellous bone, cortical bone, and a cervical headgear with expanded outer bow attached to maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 and meshed in ANSYS Workbench ver. 12.1. The models were the same except for the degree of outer bow expansion. The outer bow ends were loaded with 2 N force. The distal driving force and the net moment were evaluated. Results: A decrease in the distalizing force in the normal side molar from 1.69 N to 1.37 N was shown by increasing the degree of unilateral expansion. At the same time, the force increased from 2.19 N to 2.49 N in the expanded side molar. A net moment increasing from 2.26 N.mm to 4.64 N.mm was also shown. Conclusion: Unilateral outer bow expansion can produce different distalizing forces in molars, which increase by increasing the expansion. PMID:26622282

  13. An inverse finite element method for beam shape sensing: theoretical framework and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Shape sensing, i.e., reconstruction of the displacement field of a structure from surface-measured strains, has relevant implications for the monitoring, control and actuation of smart structures. The inverse finite element method (iFEM) is a shape-sensing methodology shown to be fast, accurate and robust. This paper aims to demonstrate that the recently presented iFEM for beam and frame structures is reliable when experimentally measured strains are used as input data. The theoretical framework of the methodology is first reviewed. Timoshenko beam theory is adopted, including stretching, bending, transverse shear and torsion deformation modes. The variational statement and its discretization with C0-continuous inverse elements are briefly recalled. The three-dimensional displacement field of the beam structure is reconstructed under the condition that least-squares compatibility is guaranteed between the measured strains and those interpolated within the inverse elements. The experimental setup is then described. A thin-walled cantilevered beam is subjected to different static and dynamic loads. Measured surface strains are used as input data for shape sensing at first with a single inverse element. For the same test cases, convergence is also investigated using an increasing number of inverse elements. The iFEM-recovered deflections and twist rotations are then compared with those measured experimentally. The accuracy, convergence and robustness of the iFEM with respect to unavoidable measurement errors, due to strain sensor locations, measurement systems and geometry imperfections, are demonstrated for both static and dynamic loadings.

  14. Applications of Parallel and Vector Algorithms in Nonlinear Structural Dynamics Using the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    the 3D isoparametric family of elements, and using a Total Lagrangian formulation and implicit integration of the global equations of motion. The...to be observed. NLDFEP, a NonLinear Dynamic Finite Element Program, is designed around the I three dimensional isoparametric family of elements...implemented in NLDFEP are the 8 and 20 node bricks. The program is structured so that additional elements, such as the 27 node brick or another family of

  15. Indentation testing and optimized property identification for viscoelastic materials using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resapu, Rajeswara Reddy

    The most common approaches to determining mechanical material properties of materials are tension and compression tests. However, tension and compression testing cannot be implemented under certain loading conditions (immovable object, not enough space to hold object for testing, etc). Similarly, tensile and compression testing cannot be performed on certain types of materials (delicate, bulk, non-machinable, those that cannot be separated from a larger structure, etc). For such cases, other material testing methods need to be implemented. Indentation testing is one such method; this approach is often non-destructive and can be used to characterize regions that are not compatible with other testing methods. However, indentation testing typically leads to force-displacement data as opposed to the direct stress-strain data normally used for the mechanical characterization of materials; this data needs to be analyzed using a suitable approach to determine the associated material properties. As such, methods to establish material properties from force-displacement indentation data need to be identified. In this work, a finite element approach using parameter optimization is developed to determine the mechanical properties from the experimental indentation data. Polymers and tissues tend to have time-dependent mechanical behavior; this means that their mechanical response under load changes with time. This dissertation seeks to characterize the properties of these materials using indentation testing under the assumption that they are linear viscoelastic. An example of a material of interest is the polymer poly vinyl chloride (PVC) that is used as the insulation of some aircraft wiring. Changes in the mechanical properties of this material over years of service can indicate degradation and a potential hazard to continued use. To investigate the validity of using indentation testing to monitor polymer insulation degradation, PVC film and PVC-insulated aircraft wiring are

  16. Simulation of nanoparticle transport in airways using Petrov-Galerkin finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Prathish; Heys, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    The transport and deposition properties of nanoparticles with a range of aerodynamic diameters ( 1 nm ≤ d ≤ 150 nm) were studied for the human airways. A finite element code was developed that solved both the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations monolithically. When modeling nanoparticle transport in the airways, the finite element method becomes unstable, and, in order resolve this issue, various stabilization methods were considered in terms of accuracy and computational cost. The stabilization methods considered here include the streamline upwind, streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin, and Galerkin least squares approaches. In order to compare the various stabilization approaches, the approximate solution from each stabilization approach was compared to the analytical Graetz solution, which is a model for monodispersed, dilute particle transport in a straight cylinder. The optimal stabilization method, especially with regard to accuracy, was found to be the Galerkin least squares approach for the Graetz problem when the Péclet number was larger than 10(4). In the human airways geometry, the Galerkin least squares stabilization approach once more provided the most accurate approximate solution for particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 nm or larger, but mesh size had a much greater effect on accuracy than the choice of stabilization method. The choice of stabilization method had a greater impact than mesh size for particles with an aerodynamic diameter 10 nm or smaller, but the most accurate stabilization method was streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin in these cases. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. An iterative finite-element collocation method for parabolic problems using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Advection-dominated flows occur widely in the transport of groundwater contaminants, the movements of fluids in enhanced oil recovery projects, and many other contexts. In numerical models of such flows, adaptive local grid refinement is a conceptually attractive approach for resolving the sharp fronts or layers that tend to characterize the solutions. However, this approach can be difficult to implement in practice. A domain decomposition method developed by Bramble, Ewing, Pasciak, and Schatz, known as the BEPS method, overcomes many of the difficulties. We demonstrate the applicability of the iterative BEPS ideas to finite-element collocation on trial spaces of piecewise Hermite bicubics. The resulting scheme allows one to refine selected parts of a spatial grid without destroying algebraic efficiencies associated with the original coarse grid. We apply the method to two dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion problems.

  18. An iterative finite-element collocation method for parabolic problems using domain decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, M.C.

    1992-11-01

    Advection-dominated flows occur widely in the transport of groundwater contaminants, the movements of fluids in enhanced oil recovery projects, and many other contexts. In numerical models of such flows, adaptive local grid refinement is a conceptually attractive approach for resolving the sharp fronts or layers that tend to characterize the solutions. However, this approach can be difficult to implement in practice. A domain decomposition method developed by Bramble, Ewing, Pasciak, and Schatz, known as the BEPS method, overcomes many of the difficulties. We demonstrate the applicability of the iterative BEPS ideas to finite-element collocation on trial spaces of piecewise Hermite bicubics. The resulting scheme allows one to refine selected parts of a spatial grid without destroying algebraic efficiencies associated with the original coarse grid. We apply the method to two dimensional time-dependent advection-diffusion problems.

  19. Dynamic mortar finite element method for modeling of shear rupture on frictional rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Yuval; Hager, Bradford H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a mortar-based finite element formulation for modeling the dynamics of shear rupture on rough interfaces governed by slip-weakening and rate and state (RS) friction laws, focusing on the dynamics of earthquakes. The method utilizes the dual Lagrange multipliers and the primal-dual active set strategy concepts, together with a consistent discretization and linearization of the contact forces and constraints, and the friction laws to obtain a semi-smooth Newton method. The discretization of the RS friction law involves a procedure to condense out the state variables, thus eliminating the addition of another set of unknowns into the system. Several numerical examples of shear rupture on frictional rough interfaces demonstrate the efficiency of the method and examine the effects of the different time discretization schemes on the convergence, energy conservation, and the time evolution of shear traction and slip rate.

  20. A parametric finite element method for solid-state dewetting problems with anisotropic surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weizhu; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Quan

    2017-02-01

    We propose an efficient and accurate parametric finite element method (PFEM) for solving sharp-interface continuum models for solid-state dewetting of thin films with anisotropic surface energies. The governing equations of the sharp-interface models belong to a new type of high-order (4th- or 6th-order) geometric evolution partial differential equations about open curve/surface interface tracking problems which include anisotropic surface diffusion flow and contact line migration. Compared to the traditional methods (e.g., marker-particle methods), the proposed PFEM not only has very good accuracy, but also poses very mild restrictions on the numerical stability, and thus it has significant advantages for solving this type of open curve evolution problems with applications in the simulation of solid-state dewetting. Extensive numerical results are reported to demonstrate the accuracy and high efficiency of the proposed PFEM.