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Sample records for finite frequency zonal

  1. Effects of finite poloidal gyroradius, shaping, and collisions on the zonal flow residual

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yong; Catto, Peter J.; Dorland, William

    2007-05-15

    Zonal flow helps reduce and regulate the turbulent transport level in tokamaks. Rosenbluth and Hinton have shown that zonal flow damps to a nonvanishing residual level in collisionless [M. Rosenbluth and F. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] and collisional [F. Hinton and M. Rosenbluth, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, A653 (1999)] banana regime plasmas. Recent zonal flow advances are summarized including the evaluation of the effects on the zonal flow residual by plasma cross-section shaping, shorter wavelengths including those less than an electron gyroradius, and arbitrary ion collisionality relative to the zonal low frequency. In addition to giving a brief summary of these new developments, the analytic results are compared with GS2 numerical simulations [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1991)] to demonstrate their value as benchmarks for turbulence codes.

  2. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by finite-amplitude waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlon, Laila; Kaladze, Tamaz

    2016-07-01

    We review the generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled electromagnetic (EM) ULF waves in the Earth's ionospheric E layer. It is shown that under the typical ionospheric E-layer conditions different planetary low-frequency waves can couple with each other. Propagation of coupled internal-gravity-Alfvén (CIGA), coupled Rossby-Khantadze (CRK) and coupled Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze (CRAK) waves is revealed and studied. A set of appropriate equations describing the nonlinear interaction of such waves with sheared zonal flow is derived. The conclusion on the instability of short wavelength turbulence of such coupled waves with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbation of the sheared zonal flow and sheared magnetic field is deduced. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is based on the parametric triple interaction of finite amplitude coupled waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown. Obtained growth rates are discussed for each case of the considered coupled waves.

  3. Generation of zonal magnetic fields by low-frequency dispersive electromagnetic waves in a nonuniform dusty magnetoplasma.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K

    2004-04-01

    It is shown that zonal magnetic fields can be parametrically excited by low-frequency dispersive driftlike compressional electromagnetic (DDCEM) modes in a nonuniform dusty magnetoplasma. For this purpose, we derive a pair of coupled equations which exhibits the nonlinear coupling between DDCEM modes and zonal magnetic fields. The coupled mode equations are Fourier analyzed to derive a nonlinear dispersion relation. The latter depicts that zonal magnetic fields are nonlinearly generated at the expense of the low-frequency DDCEM wave energy. The relevance of our investigation to the transfer of energy from short scale DDCEM waves to long scale zonal magnetic field structures in dark molecular clouds is discussed.

  4. Low-frequency intraseasonal variability in a zonally symmetric aquaplanet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Surajit; Sengupta, Debasis; Chakraborty, A.; Sukhatme, Jai; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-04-01

    We use the aquaplanet version of the community atmospheric model, with perpetual spring equinox forcing and zonally symmetric sea surface temperature (SST), to study tropical intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs). In the first two experiments, we specify zonally symmetric SST profiles that mimic observed climatological July and January SSTs as surface boundary conditions. In the January SST simulation, we find a zonal wavenumber 1 mode with dominant period of 60 days, moving east at about 6 m s-1. This mode, which resembles the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), is absent in the July SST case, although convectively coupled Kelvin waves are prominent in both experiments. To further investigate the influence of tropical SST on ISO and convectively coupled equatorial waves, we conduct experiments with idealised symmetric SST profiles having different widths of warm ocean centered at the equator. In the narrowest SST experiment, the variance of moist activity is predominantly in weather-scale Kelvin waves. When the latitudinal extent of warm SST is comparable to or larger than the equatorial Rossby radius, we find a dominant low frequency (50-80 days) eastward mode that resembles the MJO, as in the January SST experiment. We also find westward propagating waves with intraseasonal (30-120 days) periods and zonal wavenumber 1-3; the structure of these signals projects onto equatorially trapped Rossby waves with meridional mode numbers 1, 3 and 5, associated with convection that is symmetric about the equator. In addition, the model generates 30-80 days westward moving signals with zonal wavenumber 4-7, particularly in the narrow SST experiment. Although these waves are seen in the wavenumber-frequency spectra in the equatorial region, they have largest amplitude in the middle and high latitudes. Thus, our study shows that wider, meridionally symmetric SST profiles support a strong MJO-like eastward propagation, and even in an aquaplanet setting, westward propagating Rossby

  5. The global atmospheric response to low-frequency tropical forcing: Zonally averaged basic states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Long; Nathan, Terrence R.

    1994-01-01

    The extratropical response to localized, low-frequency tropical forcing is examined using a linearized, non-divergent barotropic model on a sphere. Zonal-mean basic states characterized by solid-body rotation or critical latitudes are considered. An analytical analysis based on WKB and ray tracing methods shows that, in contrast to stationary Rossby waves, westward moving, low-frequency Rossby waves can propagate through the tropical easterlies into the extratropics. It is shown analytically that the difference between the stationary and low-frequency ray paths is proportional to the forcing frequency and inversely proportional to the zonal wavenumber cubed. An expression for the disturbance amplitude is derived that shows the ability of the forced waves to maintain their strength well into middle latitudes depends on their meridional wave scale and northward group velocity, both of which are functions of the slowly varying background flow. A local energetics analysis shows that the combination of energy dispersion from the forcing region and energy extraction from the equatorward flank of the midlatitude jet produces disturbances that have the greatest impact on the extratropical circulation. Under the assumption that the forcing amplitude is independent of frequency, this impact is largest when the tropical forcing period is in the range 10-20 days.

  6. Intraseasonal oscillations of the zonal wind near the mesopause observed with medium-frequency and meteor radars in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoda, Fusako; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Nakamura, Takuji; Vincent, R. A.; Reid, I. M.; Achmad, Effendy; Sadewo, Adi; Nuryanto, Agus

    2004-11-01

    We studied the behavior of intraseasonal oscillations (ISO) of the zonal wind velocity in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) using simultaneous observations during 500 days from 1 January 1996 with a meteor radar at Jakarta (6°S, 107°E) and two medium-frequency radars at Pontianak (0°N, 109°E) and Christmas Island (2°N, 157°W). Cross-correlation analysis of the ISO at 88 km indicated that the phase difference of the ISO between Pontianak and Christmas Island is, on average, small in spite of the longitudinal difference of ˜90°. Therefore the ISO in the equatorial MLT region seems to be a variation of zonal mean flow. At Jakarta the amplitude of the ISO of the zonal wind at 88 km was somewhat smaller than that observed at the other two equatorial sites. The peak of the ISO amplitude appears at ˜88 km at both Pontianak and Christmas Island, but the peak seemed to be slightly lower at Jakarta. We also investigated long-term variation of the ISO of the zonal wind at 84 km using Jakarta meteor radar data observed from January 1993 to October 1999. Biennial variations are dominant in the ISO amplitude of the mesospheric zonal winds and the zonal amplitude variations of the diurnal tide. A relation between the ISO of the zonal wind and tidal amplitude is suggested. However, gravity wave activity in the MLT region did not correlate with the ISO in the zonal wind. We employed the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in the tropical troposphere as an index for excitation intensity of the atmospheric waves. The long-term variations of the ISO components in the OLR over the western Pacific were characterized by the tropospheric biennial oscillations, which seems to correlate with the ISO of the mean zonal winds and diurnal tides in the mesosphere.

  7. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. II. Intermittent transport associated with low-frequency zonal flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-15

    We address the mechanisms underlying low-frequency zonal flow generation in turbulent system and the associated intermittent regime of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) turbulence. This model is in connection with the recent observation of quasi periodic zonal flow oscillation at a frequency close to 2 kHz, at the low-high transition, observed in the ASDEX Upgrade [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)] and EAST tokamak [Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 107, 125001 (2011)]. Turbulent bursts caused by the coupling of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) driven shear flows with trapped ion modes (TIMs) were investigated by means of reduced gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that ITG turbulence can be regulated by low-frequency meso-scale zonal flows driven by resonant collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs), through parametric-type scattering, a process in competition with the usual KH instability.

  8. Finite frequency tomography: the checkerboard test revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercerat, E. D.; Zaroli, C.; Nolet, G.

    2011-12-01

    We address some consequences of the application of finite frequency theory for seismic tomography by revisiting the classical checkerboard test. We use a simple borehole-to-borehole experiment set-up in order to have complete control of the situation and to avoid complicating factors such as crustal corrections that still hamper global tomography. We are particularly interested in the feasibility of using ray-based finite frequency kernels in the inversion of travel time perturbations measured by crosscorrelation, in the cross-dependence between S wave velocity perturbations and the measured P travel times, and in the benefits of using finite-frequency theory on one or multiple frequency bands. We have done a 3D checkerboard test to assess the influence of these issues. Full-waveform synthetic seismograms are calculated using the spectral elements method up to 2 kHz maximum frequency. The computational domain extends 200 m x 120 m x 120 m and the target velocity model is a checkerboard with 12 m x 12 m x 12 m blocks of velocities 5% slower and faster than the background (homogeneous, Vp=6 km/s) model. First, we make a comparison between finite-frequency kernels calculated by ray theory with those based on the spectral elements method (adjoint technique), in terms of resolution, accuracy, but also computational cost. From synthetic seismograms calculated for the 3D checkerboard model as well as for the homogeneous model, we measure crosscorrelation travel times at different frequency bands and invert them with classical ray theory as well as with finite frequency theory. Several interesting features are highlighted in our multi-band data set, such as the wavefront healing effect. For instance, we observe that the delay times, in absolute value, are usually larger at short (0.5 ms) than long (4 ms) periods. This can be explained by the presence of the "doughnut hole" along the geometrical ray path in the sensitivity kernels, whose diameter is proportional to the

  9. Shear-flow trapped-ion-mode interaction revisited. I. Influence of low-frequency zonal flow on ion-temperature-gradient driven turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizzo, A.; Palermo, F.

    2015-08-15

    Collisionless trapped ion modes (CTIMs) turbulence exhibits a rich variety of zonal flow physics. The coupling of CTIMs with shear flow driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability has been investigated. The work explores the parametric excitation of zonal flow modified by wave-particle interactions leading to a new type of resonant low-frequency zonal flow. The KH-CTIM interaction on zonal flow growth and its feedback on turbulence is investigated using semi-Lagrangian gyrokinetic Vlasov simulations based on a Hamiltonian reduction technique, where both fast scales (cyclotron plus bounce motions) are gyro-averaged.

  10. Broadband Finite Frequency Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K.; Yang, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) has become a popular method to study the crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the earth in recent years due to its exclusive capability to extract short-period surface wave signals. Most of ANT are based on ray theory that assumes interstation surface waves from ambient noise are mainly sensitive to a narrow zone alone the ray path from one station to the other. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that long-period Rayleigh wave signal with high SNR can be obtained from cross-correlation of ambient noise data and could be used to do long period surface ware tomography. In order to obtain accurate phase velocity maps using long period surface waves from ambient noise, frequency effects must be considered in tomography. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of finite frequency ANT by calculating 2-D phase sensitivity kernel based on Born approximation. In calculating 2D sensitivity kernels for empirical Green's functions extracted from cross-correlations between a pair of stations, one station is regarded as receiver and the other as virtual source. Based on the 2D finite frequency sensitivity kennels, we develop a finite frequency ambient noise tomography method to construct Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps. To demonstrate the feasibility of our developed method, we apply the method to empirical Green's functions extracted from cross-correlations of USArray noise data to construct phase velocity maps at 20-150 sec periods. Our resulting phase velocity maps are very similar to earthquake-based phase velocity maps with almost zero means and 20-30 m/s stand deviations of differences. Major tectonic features in USA are well revealed in our phase velocity maps.

  11. Surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimman, W. P.

    2016-07-01

    Static time-delay corrections are frequency independent and ignore velocity variations away from the assumed vertical ray path through the subsurface. There is therefore a clear potential for improvement if the finite frequency nature of wave propagation can be properly accounted for. Such a method is presented here based on the Born approximation, the assumption of surface consistency and the misfit of instantaneous phase. The concept of instantaneous phase lends itself very well for sweep-like signals, hence these are the focus of this study. Analytical sensitivity kernels are derived that accurately predict frequency-dependent phase shifts due to P-wave anomalies in the near surface. They are quick to compute and robust near the source and receivers. An additional correction is presented that re-introduces the nonlinear relation between model perturbation and phase delay, which becomes relevant for stronger velocity anomalies. The phase shift as function of frequency is a slowly varying signal, its computation therefore does not require fine sampling even for broad-band sweeps. The kernels reveal interesting features of the sensitivity of seismic arrivals to the near surface: small anomalies can have a relative large impact resulting from the medium field term that is dominant near the source and receivers. Furthermore, even simple velocity anomalies can produce a distinct frequency-dependent phase behaviour. Unlike statics, the predicted phase corrections are smooth in space. Verification with spectral element simulations shows an excellent match for the predicted phase shifts over the entire seismic frequency band. Applying the phase shift to the reference sweep corrects for wavelet distortion, making the technique akin to surface consistent deconvolution, even though no division in the spectral domain is involved. As long as multiple scattering is mild, surface consistent finite frequency phase corrections outperform traditional statics for moderately large

  12. Observation of fluctuation-driven particle flux reduction by low-frequency zonal flow in a linear magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.; Xie, J. L. Yu, C. X.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Zhang, S. B.; Kong, D. F.; Hu, G. H.

    2015-01-15

    Low-frequency zonal flow (ZF) has been observed in a linear magnetic plasma device, exhibiting significant intermittency. Using the conditional analysis method, a time-averaged fluctuation-induced particle flux was observed to consistently decrease as ZF increased in amplitude. A dominant fraction of the flux, which is driven by drift-wave harmonics, is reversely modulated by ZF in the time domain. Spectra of the flux, together with each of the related turbulence properties, are estimated subject to two conditions, i.e., when potential fluctuation series represents a strong ZF intermittency or a very weak ZF component. Comparison of frequency-domain results demonstrates that ZF reduces the cross-field particle transport primarily by suppressing the density fluctuation as well as decorrelating density and potential fluctuations.

  13. Fine structure zonal flow excitation by beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Chen, Liu; Zonca, Fulvio

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear excitation of low frequency zonal structure (LFZS) by beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that electrostatic zonal flow (ZF), rather than zonal current, is preferentially excited by finite amplitude BAE. In addition to the well-known meso-scale radial envelope structure, ZF is also found to exhibit fine radial structure due to the localization of BAE with respect to mode rational surfaces. Specifically, the zonal electric field has an even mode structure at the rational surface where radial envelope peaks.

  14. Finite difference modeling of Biot's poroelastic equations atseismic frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, Y.J.; Pride, S.R.; Nihei, K.T.

    2006-02-24

    Across the seismic band of frequencies (loosely defined as<10 kHz), a seismic wave propagating through a porous material willcreate flow in the pore space that is laminar; that is, in thislow-frequency "seismic limit," the development of viscous boundary layersin the pores need not be modeled. An explicit time steppingstaggered-grid finite difference scheme is presented for solving Biot'sequations of poroelasticity in this low-frequency limit. A key part ofthis work is the establishment of rigorous stability conditions. It isdemonstrated that over a wide range of porous material properties typicalof sedimentary rock and despite the presenceof fluid pressure diffusion(Biot slow waves), the usual Courant condition governs the stability asif the problem involved purely elastic waves. The accuracy of the methodis demonstrated by comparing to exact analytical solutions for both fastcompressional waves and slow waves. Additional numerical modelingexamples are also presented.

  15. Good-Turing frequency estimation in a finite population.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wen-Han; Lin, Chih-Wei; Shen, Tsung-Jen

    2015-03-01

    Good-Turing frequency estimation (Good, ) is a simple, effective method for predicting detection probabilities of objects of both observed and unobserved classes based on observed frequencies of classes in a sample. The method has been used widely in several disciplines, such as information retrieval, computational linguistics, text recognition, and ecological diversity estimation. Nevertheless, existing studies assume sampling with replacement or sampling from an infinite population, which might be inappropriate for many practical applications. In light of this limitation, this article presents a modification of the Good-Turing estimation method to account for finite population sampling. We provide three practical extensions of the modified method, and we examine performance of the modified method and its extensions in simulation experiments.

  16. Finite frequency external cloaking with complementary bianisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Gralak, Boris; McPhedran, Ross C; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2014-07-14

    We investigate the twofold functionality of a cylindrical shell consisting of a negatively refracting heterogeneous bianisotropic (NRHB) medium deduced from geometric transforms. The numerical simulations indicate that the shell enhances their scattering by a perfect electric conducting (PEC) core, whereas it considerably reduces the scattering of electromagnetic waves by closely located objects when the shell surrounds a bianisotropic core. The former can be attributed to a homeopathic effect, whereby a small PEC object scatters like a large one as confirmed by numerics, while the latter can be attributed to space cancellation of complementary bianisotropic media underpinning anomalous resonances counteracting the field emitted by small objects (external cloaking). Space cancellation is further used to cloak a NRHB finite size object located nearby a slab of NRHB with a hole of same shape and opposite refracting index. Such a finite frequency external cloaking is also achieved with a NRHB cylindrical lens. Finally, we investigate an ostrich effect whereby the scattering of NRHB slabs and cylindrical lenses with simplified parameters hide the presence of small electric antennas in the quasi-static limit. PMID:25090552

  17. Finite-frequency model reduction of continuous-time switched linear systems with average dwell time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Da-Wei; Du, Xin

    2016-11-01

    This paper deals with the model reduction problem of continuous-time switched linear systems with finite-frequency input signals. The objective of the paper is to propose a finite-frequency model reduction method for such systems. A finite-frequency ? performance index is first defined in frequency domain, and then a finite-frequency performance analysis condition is derived by Parseval's theorem. Combined with the average dwell time approach, sufficient conditions for the existence of exponentially stable reduced-order models are derived. An algorithm is proposed to construct the desired reduced-order models. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by a numerical example.

  18. I. Thermal evolution of Ganymede and implications for surface features. II. Magnetohydrodynamic constraints on deep zonal flow in the giant planets. III. A fast finite-element algorithm for two-dimensional photoclinometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal evolution of Ganymede from a hot start is modeled. On cooling ice I forms above the liquid H/sub 2/O and dense ices at higher entropy below it. A novel diapiric instability is proposed to occur if the ocean thins enough, mixing these layers and perhaps leading to resurfacing and groove formation. Rising warm-ice diapirs may cause a dramatic heat pulse and fracturing at the surface, and provide material for surface flows. Timing of the pulse depends on ice rheology but could agree with crater-density dates for resurfacing. Origins of the Ganymede-Callisto dichotomy in light of the model are discussed. Based on estimates of the conductivity of H/sub 2/ (Jupiter, Saturn) and H/sub 2/O (Uranus, Neptune), the zonal winds of the giant planets will, if they penetrate below the visible atmosphere, interact with the magnetic field well outside the metallic core. The scaling argument is supported by a model with zonal velocity constant on concentric cylinders, the Lorentz torque on each balanced by viscous stresses. The problem of two-dimensional photoclinometry, i.e. reconstruction of a surface from its image, is formulated in terms of finite elements and a fast algorithm using Newton-SOR iteration accelerated by multigridding is presented.

  19. Reprint of : Finite-frequency noise in a topological superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Stefano; Governale, Michele; Fazio, Rosario; Taddei, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the finite-frequency current cross-correlations for a topological superconducting nanowire attached to two terminals at one of its ends. Using an analytic 1D model we show that the presence of a Majorana bound state yields vanishing cross-correlations for frequencies larger than twice the applied transport voltage, in contrast to what is found for a zero-energy ordinary Andreev bound state. Zero cross-correlations at high frequency have been confirmed using a more realistic tight-binding model for finite-width topological superconducting nanowires. Finite-temperature effects have also been investigated.

  20. Physics of Zonal Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2005-10-01

    This talk describes an overview of zonal flow physics, covering the theory, simulation and experiment. The zonal flows are excited nonlinearly by drift wave fluctuations, and suppress the turbulence and transport, so as to realize a self-regulating state for turbulence and mesoscale structure. This recognition is the central of recent paradigm shift in plasma physics, i.e., the preceding linear, local and deterministic pictures of instability and transport have been taken over by the new nonlinear, nonlocal (in real and wavenumber spaces) and statistical pictures of them. The zonal flow phenomenon, i.e., the global axial vector fields are generated by the release of global free energy in scalar fields through exciting turbulence, is a typical example of the fundamental issues in modern physics. In this review, the progresses made by theory and simulations, such as the linear damping rate, nonlinear mechanisms for growth and saturation, law of energy partition between turbulence and flow, life time of zonal flow, and so on, are explained. The transport by drift wave fluctuations, which are dressed by zonal flows, is discussed. Then experimental observations and verifications, which have been piled up rapidly in basic plasma experiments and confinement research, are explained, highlighting the integration with theory and simulation. Generalization to include magnetic field (zonal field) is addressed, in the light of the study of dynamo. Zonal flows in both laboratory and planetary-solar circumstances are discussed as well. This presentation illustrates the fast evolution of the physics of turbulence and structure formation of plasmas in the nature and laboratory. In collaboration with S.-I. Itoh, P. H. Diamond, T. S. Hahm, A. Fujisawa, G. R. Tynan and M. Yagi.

  1. A mixed finite element domain decomposition method for nearly elastic wave equations in the frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiaobing

    1996-12-31

    A non-overlapping domain decomposition iterative method is proposed and analyzed for mixed finite element methods for a sequence of noncoercive elliptic systems with radiation boundary conditions. These differential systems describe the motion of a nearly elastic solid in the frequency domain. The convergence of the iterative procedure is demonstrated and the rate of convergence is derived for the case when the domain is decomposed into subdomains in which each subdomain consists of an individual element associated with the mixed finite elements. The hybridization of mixed finite element methods plays a important role in the construction of the discrete procedure.

  2. On natural frequencies of non-uniform beams modulated by finite periodic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yanlong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Wang, Wei; Wang, Longqi; Peng, Fujun; Li, Bin

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that an infinite periodic beam can support flexural wave band gaps. However, in real applications, the number of the periodic cells is always limited. If a uniform beam is replaced by a non-uniform beam with finite periodicity, the vibration changes are vital by mysterious. This paper employs the transfer matrix method (TMM) to study the natural frequencies of the non-uniform beams with modulation by finite periodic cells. The effects of the amounts, cross section ratios, and arrangement forms of the periodic cells on the natural frequencies are explored. The relationship between the natural frequencies of the non-uniform beams with finite periodicity and the band gap boundaries of the corresponding infinite periodic beam is also investigated. Numerical results and conclusions obtained here are favorable for designing beams with good vibration control ability.

  3. Finite-number-of-periods holographic gratings with finite-width incident beams: analysis using the finite-difference frequency-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun-Der; Glytsis, Elias N.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of finite number of periods (FNP) and finite incident beams on the diffraction efficiencies of holographic gratings are investigated by the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method. Gratings comprising 20, 15, 10, 5, and 3 periods illuminated by TE and TM incident light with various beam sizes are analyzed with the FDFD method and compared with the rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Both unslanted and slanted gratings are treated in transmission as well as in reflection configurations. In general, the effect of the FNP is a decrease in the diffraction efficiency with a decrease in the number of periods of the grating. Similarly, a decrease in incident-beam width causes a decrease in the diffraction efficiency. Exceptions appear in off-Bragg incidence in which a smaller beam width could result in higher diffraction efficiency. For beam widths greater than 10 grating periods and for gratings with more than 20 periods in width, the diffraction efficiencies slowly converge to the values predicted by the RCWA (infinite incident beam and infinite-number-of-periods grating) for both TE and TM polarizations. Furthermore, the effects of FNP holographic gratings on their diffraction performance are found to be comparable to their counterparts of FNP surface-relief gratings. 2002 Optical Society of America

  4. Strong scintillations in astrophysics. 4. Cross-correlation between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The cross correlation of the intensity fluctuations between different frequencies and finite bandwidth effects on the intensity correlations based on the Markov approximation were calculated. Results may be applied to quite general turbulence spectra for an extended turbulent medium. Calculations of the cross-correlation function and of finite bandwidth effects are explicitly carried out for both Gaussian and Kolmogorov turbulence spectra. The increases of the correlation scale of intensity fluctuations are different for these two spectra and the difference can be used to determine whether the interstellar turbulent medium has a Gaussian or a Kolmogorov spectrum.

  5. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-10-01

    > We review the generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled electromagnetic ultra-low-frequency waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer. It is shown that, under typical ionospheric E-layer conditions, different planetary low-frequency waves can couple with each other. Propagation of coupled internal-gravity-Alfvén, coupled Rossby-Khantadze and coupled Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze waves is revealed and studied. A set of appropriate equations describing the nonlinear interaction of such waves with sheared zonal flow is derived. The conclusion on the instability of short-wavelength turbulence of such coupled waves with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbation of the sheared zonal flow and sheared magnetic field is deduced. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is based on the parametric triple interaction of finite-amplitude coupled waves leading to the inverse energy cascade towards longer wavelength. The possibility of generation of an intense mean magnetic field is shown. Obtained growth rates are discussed for each case of the considered coupled waves.

  6. Reliable Finite Frequency Filter Design for Networked Control Systems with Sensor Faults

    PubMed Central

    Ju, He-Hua; Long, Yue; Wang, Heng

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the reliable finite frequency filter design for networked control systems (NCSs) subject to quantization and data missing. Taking into account quantization, possible data missing and sensor stuck faults, NCSs are modeled in the framework of discrete time-delay switched systems, and the finite frequency l2 gain is adopted for the filter design of discrete time-delay switched systems, which is converted into a set of linear matrix inequality (LMI) conditions. By the virtues of the derived conditions, a procedure of reliable filter synthesis is presented. Further, the filter gains are characterized in terms of solutions to a convex optimization problem which can be solved by using the semi-definite programme method. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:22969382

  7. Robust fault-tolerant H∞ control of active suspension systems with finite-frequency constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongrong; Jing, Hui; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Chen, Nan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the robust fault-tolerant (FT) H∞ control problem of active suspension systems with finite-frequency constraint is investigated. A full-car model is employed in the controller design such that the heave, pitch and roll motions can be simultaneously controlled. Both the actuator faults and external disturbances are considered in the controller synthesis. As the human body is more sensitive to the vertical vibration in 4-8 Hz, robust H∞ control with this finite-frequency constraint is designed. Other performances such as suspension deflection and actuator saturation are also considered. As some of the states such as the sprung mass pitch and roll angles are hard to measure, a robust H∞ dynamic output-feedback controller with fault tolerant ability is proposed. Simulation results show the performance of the proposed controller.

  8. Computing ferrite core losses at high frequency by finite elements method including temperature influence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Ahmad, J.; Guy, G.

    1994-09-01

    A finite elements method coupled with the Preisach model of hysteresis is used to compute-the ferrite losses in medium power transformers (10--60 kVA) working at relatively high frequencies (20--60 kHz) and with an excitation level of about 0.3 Tesla. The dynamic evolution of the permeability is taken into account. The simple and doubly cubic spline functions are used to account for temperature effects respectively on electric and on magnetic parameters of the ferrite cores. The results are compared with test data obtained with 3C8 and B50 ferrites at different frequencies.

  9. Zonal jets in the Madagascar plankton bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; von Kameke, A.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Beronavera, F. B.

    2012-04-01

    We study the relation between advection by mesoscale eddies and jets and the remarkable eastward propagation of the Madagascar plankton bloom. Analyzing geostrophic velocity fields from altimetry with state-of-the-art Lagrangian techniques, we find fast coherent zonal jets in the recently discovered South Indian Ocean Countercurrent (SICC) at the exact position of the bloom. The coherent jets have a length of up to 1500km and provide a fast transport to the east. We use a new simple Lagrangian metric, the Finite-Time Zonal Drift (FTZD) to quantify the zonal transport and find that the jets can partly explain the explosive eastward propagation seen in the evolution of the Madagascar plankton bloom. Numerical experiments with a passive tracer concentration released at a known upwelling region south of Madagascar also supports the hypothesis that an important nutrient source of the plankton bloom could be located in that area. Until now, the reasons for the eastward propagation of the bloom's front remained totally unclear and even a propagation against the mean flow had been suggested. Moreover, we extract zonal jet-like Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) from fields of the well-established Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) that can be identified with barriers to meridional transport. Comparing these LCS with fields of chlorophyll concentration of the Madagascar plankton bloom measured by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of view Sensor (SeaWiFS), we show that the location of jet-like LCS coincide with the boundaries of the plankton bloom, e.g. an LCS prevents cross-transport and confines the bloom to one side of the LCS. Phytoplankton is one of the few natural tracers that can be used to verify if the ubiquitous zonal mesoscale jets act as transport barriers. In the case of the Madagascar plankton bloom, we find clear evidence that the zonal jets in the SICC indeed represent transport barriers to the ambient flow and shape the northern boundary of the chlorophyll

  10. Fault detection for singular switched linear systems with multiple time-varying delay in finite frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Ding; Lu, Anyang; Li, Jinghao; Zhang, Qingling

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the problem of the fault detection (FD) for continuous-time singular switched linear systems with multiple time-varying delay. In this paper, the actuator fault is considered. Besides, the systems faults and unknown disturbances are assumed in known frequency domains. Some finite frequency performance indices are initially introduced to design the switched FD filters which ensure that the filtering augmented systems under switching signal with average dwell time are exponentially admissible and guarantee the fault input sensitivity and disturbance robustness. By developing generalised Kalman-Yakubovic-Popov lemma and using Parseval's theorem and Fourier transform, finite frequency delay-dependent sufficient conditions for the existence of such a filter which can guarantee the finite-frequency H- and H∞ performance are derived and formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Four examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed finite frequency method.

  11. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for the Convective Wave Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Kreider, K. L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in ducts. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  12. Finite Difference Time Marching in the Frequency Domain: A Parabolic Formulation for Aircraft Acoustic Nacelle Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Kreider, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    An explicit finite difference iteration scheme is developed to study harmonic sound propagation in aircraft engine nacelles. To reduce storage requirements for large 3D problems, the time dependent potential form of the acoustic wave equation is used. To insure that the finite difference scheme is both explicit and stable, time is introduced into the Fourier transformed (steady-state) acoustic potential field as a parameter. Under a suitable transformation, the time dependent governing equation in frequency space is simplified to yield a parabolic partial differential equation, which is then marched through time to attain the steady-state solution. The input to the system is the amplitude of an incident harmonic sound source entering a quiescent duct at the input boundary, with standard impedance boundary conditions on the duct walls and duct exit. The introduction of the time parameter eliminates the large matrix storage requirements normally associated with frequency domain solutions, and time marching attains the steady-state quickly enough to make the method favorable when compared to frequency domain methods. For validation, this transient-frequency domain method is applied to sound propagation in a 2D hard wall duct with plug flow.

  13. Finite-Element Modeling of Viscoelastic Cells During High-Frequency Cyclic Strain

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Jaques S.; Grol, Matthew W.; Beaucage, Kim L.; Dixon, S. Jeffrey; Holdsworth, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to local loads and forces. The process of mechanotransduction plays an important role both in maintaining tissue viability and in remodeling to repair damage; moreover, it may be involved in the initiation and progression of diseases such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. An understanding of the mechanisms by which cells respond to surrounding tissue matrices or artificial biomaterials is crucial in regenerative medicine and in influencing cellular differentiation. Recent studies have shown that some cells may be most sensitive to low-amplitude, high-frequency (i.e., 1–100 Hz) mechanical stimulation. Advances in finite-element modeling have made it possible to simulate high-frequency mechanical loading of cells. We have developed a viscoelastic finite-element model of an osteoblastic cell (including cytoskeletal actin stress fibers), attached to an elastomeric membrane undergoing cyclic isotropic radial strain with a peak value of 1,000 µstrain. The results indicate that cells experience significant stress and strain amplification when undergoing high-frequency strain, with peak values of cytoplasmic strain five times higher at 45 Hz than at 1 Hz, and peak Von Mises stress in the nucleus increased by a factor of two. Focal stress and strain amplification in cells undergoing high-frequency mechanical stimulation may play an important role in mechanotransduction. PMID:24956525

  14. Computing traveltime and amplitude sensitivity kernels in finite-frequency tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yue; Montelli, Raffaella; Nolet, Guust; Dahlen, F. A.

    2007-10-01

    The efficient computation of finite-frequency traveltime and amplitude sensitivity kernels for velocity and attenuation perturbations in global seismic tomography poses problems both of numerical precision and of validity of the paraxial approximation used. We investigate these aspects, using a local model parameterization in the form of a tetrahedral grid with linear interpolation in between grid nodes. The matrix coefficients of the linear inverse problem involve a volume integral of the product of the finite-frequency kernel with the basis functions that represent the linear interpolation. We use local and global tests as well as analytical expressions to test the numerical precision of the frequency and spatial quadrature. There is a trade-off between narrowing the bandpass filter and quadrature accuracy and efficiency. Using a minimum step size of 10 km for S waves and 30 km for SS waves, relative errors in the quadrature are of the order of 1% for direct waves such as S, and a few percent for SS waves, which are below data uncertainties in delay time or amplitude anomaly observations in global seismology. Larger errors may occur wherever the sensitivity extends over a large volume and the paraxial approximation breaks down at large distance from the ray. This is especially noticeable for minimax phases such as SS waves with periods >20 s, when kernels become hyperbolic near the reflection point and appreciable sensitivity extends over thousands of km. Errors becomes intolerable at epicentral distance near the antipode when sensitivity extends over all azimuths in the mantle. Effects of such errors may become noticeable at epicentral distances > 140°. We conclude that the paraxial approximation offers an efficient method for computing the matrix system for finite-frequency inversions in global tomography, though care should be taken near reflection points, and alternative methods are needed to compute sensitivity near the antipode.

  15. Application of a finite-element model to low-frequency sound insulation in dwellings.

    PubMed

    Maluski, S P; Gibbs, B M

    2000-10-01

    The sound transmission between adjacent rooms has been modeled using a finite-element method. Predicted sound-level difference gave good agreement with experimental data using a full-scale and a quarter-scale model. Results show that the sound insulation characteristics of a party wall at low frequencies strongly depend on the modal characteristics of the sound field of both rooms and of the partition. The effect of three edge conditions of the separating wall on the sound-level difference at low frequencies was examined: simply supported, clamped, and a combination of clamped and simply supported. It is demonstrated that a clamped partition provides greater sound-level difference at low frequencies than a simply supported. It also is confirmed that the sound-pressure level difference is lower in equal room than in unequal room configurations. PMID:11051501

  16. Zonal spherical aberration correction utilizing axial electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Liang C.

    2005-01-01

    Spherical aberration is important in focused ion beam applications where large aperture angles are needed to obtain high beam currents because it results in large tails on the current density distribution. Merwe has shown that for coaxial lenses, negative spherical aberration can be found for rays pass through zonal regions. Merwe"s calculation is valid only for periodic or quasi-periodic lenses and requires a constant axial potential distribution. We have calculated zonal focusing properties of lenses with axial electrodes using nine-point finite difference method and direct ray tracing. Our calculation results indicate that an axial electrode protruding partially into the lens can correct the spherical aberration. When a three-element electrostatic lens is operated at deceleration mode, the introduction of an axial electrode creates zonal regions where the spherical aberration is negative. At deceleration mode, the induced surface charges on the axial electrode have an opposite sign relative to the primary beam. This is in agreement with our previous findings on the study of the correction of spherical aberration utilizing space charges. Same phenomenon was found when an axial electrode is used in conjunction with a cathode lens.

  17. A wide-range programmable frequency synthesizer based on a finite state machine filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alser, Mohammed H.; Assaad, Maher M.; Hussin, Fawnizu A.

    2013-11-01

    In this article, an FPGA-based design and implementation of a fully digital wide-range programmable frequency synthesizer based on a finite state machine filter is presented. The advantages of the proposed architecture are that, it simultaneously generates a high frequency signal from a low frequency reference signal (i.e. synthesising), and synchronising the two signals (signals have the same phase, or a constant difference) without jitter accumulation issue. The architecture is portable and can be easily implemented for various platforms, such as FPGAs and integrated circuits. The frequency synthesizer circuit can be used as a part of SERDES devices in intra/inter chip communication in system-on-chip (SoC). The proposed circuit is designed using Verilog language and synthesized for the Altera DE2-70 development board, with the Cyclone II (EP2C35F672C6) device on board. Simulation and experimental results are included; they prove the synthesizing and tracking features of the proposed architecture. The generated clock signal frequency of a range from 19.8 MHz to 440 MHz is synchronized to the input reference clock with a frequency step of 0.12 MHz.

  18. Kuramoto model with uniformly spaced frequencies: Finite-N asymptotics of the locking threshold.

    PubMed

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H

    2016-06-01

    We study phase locking in the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators in the special case where the number of oscillators, N, is large but finite, and the oscillators' natural frequencies are evenly spaced on a given interval. In this case, stable phase-locked solutions are known to exist if and only if the frequency interval is narrower than a certain critical width, called the locking threshold. For infinite N, the exact value of the locking threshold was calculated 30 years ago; however, the leading corrections to it for finite N have remained unsolved analytically. Here we derive an asymptotic formula for the locking threshold when N≫1. The leading correction to the infinite-N result scales like either N^{-3/2} or N^{-1}, depending on whether the frequencies are evenly spaced according to a midpoint rule or an end-point rule. These scaling laws agree with numerical results obtained by Pazó [D. Pazó, Phys. Rev. E 72, 046211 (2005)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.72.046211]. Moreover, our analysis yields the exact prefactors in the scaling laws, which also match the numerics. PMID:27415267

  19. Kuramoto model with uniformly spaced frequencies: Finite-N asymptotics of the locking threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-06-01

    We study phase locking in the Kuramoto model of coupled oscillators in the special case where the number of oscillators, N , is large but finite, and the oscillators' natural frequencies are evenly spaced on a given interval. In this case, stable phase-locked solutions are known to exist if and only if the frequency interval is narrower than a certain critical width, called the locking threshold. For infinite N , the exact value of the locking threshold was calculated 30 years ago; however, the leading corrections to it for finite N have remained unsolved analytically. Here we derive an asymptotic formula for the locking threshold when N ≫1 . The leading correction to the infinite-N result scales like either N-3 /2 or N-1, depending on whether the frequencies are evenly spaced according to a midpoint rule or an end-point rule. These scaling laws agree with numerical results obtained by Pazó [D. Pazó, Phys. Rev. E 72, 046211 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevE.72.046211]. Moreover, our analysis yields the exact prefactors in the scaling laws, which also match the numerics.

  20. Finite-frequency noise in a non-interacting quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamoum, Redouane; Lavagna, Mireille; Crépieux, Adeline

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the non-symmetrized finite-frequency NS-FF noise for a single-level quantum dot connected to reservoirs in the spinless non-interacting case. The calculations are performed within the framework of the Keldysh Green’s function formalism in the wide band approximation limit. We establish the general formula for NS-FF noise for any values of temperature, frequency and bias voltage. The electron transfer processes from one to the other reservoir act via the transmission amplitude and transmission coefficient depending on the energy. By taking the symmetrized version of this expression, we show that our result coincides with the expression of the finite frequency noise obtained by Büttiker using the scattering theory. We also give the explicit analytical expression for the NS-FF noise in the zero temperature limit. Finally, by performing numerical calculations, we discuss the evolution of the NS-FF noise spectrum with varying temperature, dot energy level, and coupling strength to the reservoirs, revealing a large variety of behaviors such as different symmetry properties and changes of sign in the excess noise.

  1. Studies on the effect of finite geometrical asymmetry in dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, B.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, dual capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) glow discharge plasma has been widely studied in the laboratory because of its simpler design and high efficiency for different material processing applications such as thin-film deposition, plasma etching, sputtering of insulating materials etc. The main objective of studies on dual frequency CCRF plasma has been the independent control of ion energy and ion flux using an electrical asymmetry effect (EAE). Most studies have been reported in electrode configurations that are either geometrically symmetric (both electrodes are equal) or completely asymmetric (one electrode is infinitely bigger than the other). However, it seems that most of the laboratory CCRF plasmas have finite electrode geometry. In addition, plasma series resonance (PSR) and electron bounce resonance (EBR) heating also come into play as a result of geometrical asymmetry as well as EAE. In this study, a dual frequency CCRF plasma has been studied in which the dual frequency CCRF has been coupled to the lumped circuit model of the plasma and the time-independent fluid model of the plasma sheath, in order to study the effect of finite geometrical asymmetry on the generation of dc-self bias and plasma heating. The dc self-bias is found to strongly depend on the ratio of the area between the electrodes. The dc self-bias is found to depend on the phase angle between the two applied voltage waveforms. The EAE and geometrical asymmetry are found to work differently in controlling the dc self-bias. It can be concluded that the phase angle between the two voltage waveforms in dual CCRF plasmas has an important role in determining the dc self-bias and may be used for controlling the plasma properties in the dual frequency CCRF plasma.

  2. A study of finite volume effect on the multiple-frequencies coherence of VHF radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tsai-Yuan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    1993-08-01

    In the past few years, the technique of frequency domain interferometry (FDI) has been developed on VHF radar. By using this technique, the characteristics of a very thin atmospheric lay structure, which is embedded in the radar volume and cannot be solved by conventional VHF radar with only one operational frequency, can be determined through the calculation of the coherence and the phase from the two echo signals with different operational frequencies. According to FDI theory, assuming that the range and antenna beam weighting effect can be ignored, the coherence will approach zero if the layer thickness is fairly greater than the radar volume. However, in this study, it will be shown that if a rectangular pulse is transmitted and the atmospheric refractivity irregularities are distributed uniformly in the radar volume, that is, there is no narrow layer structure existing in the scattering volume, the coherence of two signals with different operational frequencies is still high and its behavior can be described by the equation C is approximately equal to Sinc((Delta)k L)/(l + N/S), where C is the coherence, Delta K is the wavenumber difference between two carrier frequencies, L is the effective scale of scattering volume, and N/S is the noise-to-signal power ratio. This feature can be interpreted physically by the finite volume filtering effect on the turbulent wavenumber spectrum. This theoretical prediction has been compared with the FDI experiments carried out by the Chung-Li VHF radar, and the results are quite reasonable. Thus, it is suggested that when the FDI technique is applied to estimate the thickness and the position of a thin layer, the finite volume filtering effect should be taken into account.

  3. Low-frequency oscillations of forced barotropic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, Terrence R.; Barcilon, Albert

    1994-01-01

    Jin and Ghil demonstrate that for topographically resonant flow, low-frequency finite-amplitude oscillations may arise from wave -- wave interactions and topographic form drag. Their model is extended to include a zonally asymmetric vorticity source, which is shown to interact with the perturbation field to produce zonally rectified wave fluxes that dramatically alter the Hopf bifurcation from stationary solutions to low-frequency oscillations. The frequency, intensity, and general character of these oscillations are shown to depend crucially upon the phasing and relative strength of the forcings.

  4. Low-frequency oscillations of forced barotropic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, T.R.; Barcilon, A. The Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL )

    1994-02-01

    Jin and Ghil demonstrate that for topographically resonant flow, low-frequency finite-amplitude oscillations may arise from wave -- wave interactions and topographic form drag. Their model is extended to include a zonally asymmetric vorticity source, which is shown to interact with the perturbation field to produce zonally rectified wave fluxes that dramatically alter the Hopf bifurcation from stationary solutions to low-frequency oscillations. The frequency, intensity, and general character of these oscillations are shown to depend crucially upon the phasing and relative strength of the forcings.

  5. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1994-06-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion-ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this ``resonance.``

  6. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  7. Finite element analysis of the dynamic behavior of a laminated windscreen with frequency dependent viscoelastic core.

    PubMed

    Bouayed, Kaïss; Hamdi, Mohamed-Ali

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents numerical and experimental validation of results obtained by a shell finite element, which has been developed for modeling of the dynamic behavior of sandwich multilayered structures with a viscoelastic core. The proposed shell finite element is very easy to implement in existing finite element solvers, since it uses only the displacements as degrees of freedom at external faces and at inter-layer interfaces. The displacement field is linearly interpolated in the thickness direction of each layer, and analytical integration is made in the thickness direction in order to avoid meshing of each sandwich layer by solid elements. Only the two dimensional mid-surface of reference is meshed, facilitating the mesh generation task. A simplified modal approach using a real modal basis is also proposed to efficiently calculate the dynamic response of the sandwich structure. The proposed method reduces the memory size and computing time and takes into account the frequency-dependence of the polymer core mechanical properties. Results obtained by the proposed element in conjunction with the simplified modal method have been numerically and experimentally validated by comparison to results obtained by commercial software codes (MSC/NASTRAN and ESI/RAYON-VTM), and to measurements done on automobile windscreens. PMID:22894198

  8. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-01

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  9. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-15

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  10. Zonal flows in tokamaks with anisotropic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Zonal flows (ZFs) in a tokamak plasma with anisotropic pressure are investigated. The dynamics of perpendicular and parallel pressures are determined by the Chew-Goldberger-Low double equations and low-β condition is adopted, where β is the ratio of plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure. The dispersion relation is analytically derived and illustrates two branches of ZFs. The low frequency zonal flow (LFZF) branch becomes unstable when χ, the ratio of the perpendicular pressure to the parallel one, is greater than a threshold value χc, which is about 3.8. In the stable region, its frequency increases first and then decreases with increasing χ. For χ = 1, the frequency of LFZF agrees well with the experimental observation. For the instability, the growth rate of LFZF increases with χ. The geodesic acoustic mode branch is shown to be always stable with a frequency increasing with χ. The safety factor is shown to diminish the frequencies of both branches or the growth rate of LFZF.

  11. Multiscale Finite-frequency Seismic Imaging of the Southern Alaska Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Hung, S. H.; Tong, P.; Liu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Alaska is one of the most seismically active regions in north America as the Pacific plate subducts northward beneath North America plate along the Aleutian trench. In this study, we determine 3-D variations of P- and S-wave speed and Possion's ratio (Vp/Vs) perturbations of the southern Alaska subduction zone based on broadband tele-seismic data recorded by 198 seismic stations for about 2000 events with magnitudes greater than 5.5 during the period from June 2000 to December 2014. Relative arrival times of P and S phases bwtween stations are accurately measured by adapting the efficient multi-channel cross-correlation (MCCC) technique. The obtained arrival-time data are then used to tomographically image the Vp and Vs structures beneath the stations based on 3-D finite-frequency sensitivity kernels and a wavelet-based multi-scale model parameterization. Our results show strong positive velocity anomalies in the crust and upper mantle starting at a depth of about 50km and extending to northwestward down to a depth of 200 km and covering about 350 km in horizontal distance. The high velocity feature interpreted as a cold slab has a thickness of about 50km and a subducting angle of about 45o, consistent with some previous studies of southern Alaska. We also plan to further obtain high-resolution seismic imaging of southern Alaska subduction zone by utilizing the converted and coda waves of tele-seismic main phases (e.g., P and S) based on a hybrid tomographic technique combining spectral-element method (SEM) and frequency-wavenumber (FK) method. The 3D Vp and Vs models obtained from finite-frequency traveltime tomography thus can serve as a proper starting velocity model for the hybrid SEM-FK imaging to further reveal high-resolution details of the subduction zone.

  12. Analysis and Design of Robust H∞ Fault Estimation Observer With Finite-Frequency Specifications for Discrete-Time Fuzzy Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Xu, Jinfa

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of fault estimation observer design with finite-frequency specifications for discrete-time Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy systems. First, for such T-S fuzzy models, an H∞ fault estimation observer with pole-placement constraint is proposed to achieve fault estimation. Based on the generalized Kalman-Yakubovich-Popov lemma, the given finite-frequency observer possesses less conservatism compared with the design of the entire-frequency domain. Furthermore, the performance of the presented fault estimation observer is further enhanced by adding the degree of freedom. Finally, two examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  13. Equatorial zonal circulations: Historical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastenrath, Stefan

    2007-04-01

    The changing perceptions on zonal circulations in the equatorial belt are traced for (a) stratospheric wind regimes, and (b) vertical-zonal circulation cells in the troposphere. (a) Observations from the Krakatoa eruption 1883 and Berson's 1908 expedition to East Africa, along with later soundings over Batavia (Jakarta) led to the notion of "Krakatoa easterlies" around 30 km (10 mb) and "Berson westerlies" around 20 km (50 mb). Prompted by contrary observations since the late 1950s, this dogma was replaced by the notion of easterlies alternating with westerlies in the equatorial stratosphere at a rhythm of about 26 months. (b) Stimulated by Bjerknes' postulate of a "Walker circulation" along the Pacific Equator, a multitude of such cells have been hypothesized at other longitudes, in part from zonal contrasts of temperature and cloudiness. Essential for the diagnosis of equatorial zonal circulation cells is the continuity following the flow between the centers of ascending and subsiding motion. Evaluation of the recent NCEP-NCAR and ECMWF Reanalysis upper-air datasets reveals equatorial zonal circulation cells over the Pacific all year round, over the Atlantic only in boreal winter, and over the Indian Ocean only in autumn, all being seasons and oceanic longitudes with strong zonal flow in the lower troposphere.

  14. Finite-difference modeling of Biot's poroelastic equations across all frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, Y.J.; Pride, S.R.

    2009-10-22

    An explicit time-stepping finite-difference scheme is presented for solving Biot's equations of poroelasticity across the entire band of frequencies. In the general case for which viscous boundary layers in the pores must be accounted for, the time-domain version of Darcy's law contains a convolution integral. It is shown how to efficiently and directly perform the convolution so that the Darcy velocity can be properly updated at each time step. At frequencies that are low enough compared to the onset of viscous boundary layers, no memory terms are required. At higher frequencies, the number of memory terms required is the same as the number of time points it takes to sample accurately the wavelet being used. In practice, we never use more than 20 memory terms and often considerably fewer. Allowing for the convolution makes the scheme even more stable (even larger time steps might be used) than it is when the convolution is entirely neglected. The accuracy of the scheme is confirmed by comparing numerical examples to exact analytic results.

  15. Low frequency finite element models of the acoustical behavior of earmuffs.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Sylvain; Doutres, Olivier; Sgard, Franck; Laville, Frédéric; Boutin, Jérôme

    2015-05-01

    This paper compares different approaches to model the vibroacoustic behavior of earmuffs at low frequency and investigates their accuracy by comparison with objective insertion loss measurements recently carried out by Boyer et al. [(2014). Appl. Acoust. 83, 76-85]. Two models based on the finite element (FE) method where the cushion is either modeled as a spring foundation (SF) or as an equivalent solid (ES), and the well-known lumped parameters model (LPM) are investigated. Modeling results show that: (i) all modeling strategies are in good agreement with measurements, providing that the characterization of the cushion equivalent mechanical properties are performed with great care and as close as possible to in situ loading, boundary, and environmental conditions and that the frequency dependence of the mechanical properties is taken into account, (ii) the LPM is the most simple modeling strategy, but the air volume enclosed by the earmuff must be correctly estimated, which is not as straightforward as it may seem, (iii) similar results are obtained with the SF and the ES FE-models of the cushion, but the SF should be preferred to predict the earmuff acoustic response at low frequency since it requires less parameters and a less complex characterization procedure. PMID:25994693

  16. Spectrum of Finite Frequency Pump Kinetic Alfvén Wave in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, K. V.; Sharma, R. P.; Gaur, Nidhi

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction between the kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) and the slow magnetosonic wave is studied. The dynamical equation for the slow magnetosonic wave, in the presence of a ponderomotive force due to finite frequency KAW (ω0<ω_{ci}, where ω0 is the frequency of the KAW and ω_{ci} is the ion gyro frequency) is developed and then numerically solved for the solar wind parameters around 1 AU. Three different propagation angles of the slow magnetosonic wave (θ = 70°, 75°, and 85°) are considered. Our results reveal that due to the nonlinear interplay between the waves, the nature of the formation of localised structures becomes complex and depends on the different propagation angles of the slow magnetosonic wave. The power spectrum of a KAW shows the Kolmogorov scaling in larger scales but exhibits steepening in smaller scales. The scaling index of the power spectrum of the KAW depends on the propagation angles of the slow magnetosonic wave. Therefore, the heating of plasma particles in the solar wind may show such dependence. The present results are consistent with the observation of the Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU.

  17. Effect of Finite Pulse Length and Laser Frequency Chirp on HGHG and EEHG Seeding

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-18

    Theoretical studies of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) often start from a simplified model in which the beam is assumed infinitely long and longitudinally uniform and the laser induced energy modulation is perfectly sinusoidal and of infinite duration. In such a model the resulting seed has a spectrum consisting of a collection of delta-functions (of zero width) located at the harmonics of the laser frequency. Being a useful tool for study of the seed bunching amplitudes, such a model cannot be used for realistic analysis the spectral properties of the seed. In this paper we take into account the finite duration of the laser pulse as well as some possible laser phase errors to study their effect on the spectrum of the seed.

  18. Finite-frequency traveltime tomography of San Francisco Bay region crustal velocity structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.

    2007-01-01

    Seismic velocity structure of the San Francisco Bay region crust is derived using measurements of finite-frequency traveltimes. A total of 57 801 relative traveltimes are measured by cross-correlation over the frequency range 0.5-1.5 Hz. From these are derived 4862 'summary' traveltimes, which are used to derive 3-D P-wave velocity structure over a 341 ?? 140 km2 area from the surface to 25 km depth. The seismic tomography is based on sensitivity kernels calculated on a spherically symmetric reference model. Robust elements of the derived P-wave velocity structure are: a pronounced velocity contrast across the San Andreas fault in the south Bay region (west side faster); a moderate velocity contrast across the Hayward fault (west side faster); moderately low velocity crust around the Quien Sabe volcanic field and the Sacramento River delta; very low velocity crust around Lake Berryessa. These features are generally explicable with surface rock types being extrapolated to depth ???10 km in the upper crust. Generally high mid-lower crust velocity and high inferred Poisson's ratio suggest a mafic lower crust. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  19. Source implementation to eliminate low-frequency artifacts in finite difference time domain room acoustic simulation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyok; Lam, Yiu Wai

    2012-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is a numerical technique that is straight forward to implement for the simulation of acoustic propagation. For room acoustics applications, the implementation of efficient source excitation and frequency dependent boundary conditions on arbitrary geometry can be seen as two of the most significant problems. This paper deals with the source implementation problem. Among existing source implementation methods, the hard source implementation is the simplest and computationally most efficient. Unfortunately, it generates a large low-frequency modulation in the measured time response. This paper presents a detailed investigation into these side effects. Surprisingly, some of these side effects are found to exist even if a transparent source implementation is used. By combing a time limited approach with a class of more natural source pulse function, this paper develops a source implementation method in FDTD that is as simple and computationally as efficient as a hard source implementation and yet capable of producing results that are virtually the same as a true transparent source. It is believed that the source implementation method developed in this paper will provide an improvement to the practical usability of the FDTD method for room acoustic simulation. PMID:22280589

  20. Finite-frequency sensitivity kernels of seismic waves to fault zone structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, A. A.; Tape, C.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We analyse the volumetric sensitivity of fault zone seismic head and trapped waves by constructing finite-frequency sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels for these phases using a suite of idealized and tomographically derived velocity models of fault zones. We first validate numerical calculations by waveform comparisons with analytical results for two simple fault zone models: a vertical bimaterial interface separating two solids of differing elastic properties, and a `vertical sandwich' with a vertical low velocity zone surrounded on both sides by higher velocity media. Establishing numerical accuracy up to 12 Hz, we compute sensitivity kernels for various phases that arise in these and more realistic models. In contrast to direct P body waves, which have little or no sensitivity to the internal fault zone structure, the sensitivity kernels for head waves have sharp peaks with high values near the fault in the faster medium. Surface wave kernels show the broadest spatial distribution of sensitivity, while trapped wave kernels are extremely narrow with sensitivity focused entirely inside the low-velocity fault zone layer. Trapped waves are shown to exhibit sensitivity patterns similar to Love waves, with decreasing width as a function of frequency and multiple Fresnel zones of alternating polarity. In models that include smoothing of the boundaries of the low velocity zone, there is little effect on the trapped wave kernels, which are focused in the central core of the low velocity zone. When the source is located outside a shallow fault zone layer, trapped waves propagate through the surrounding medium with body wave sensitivity before becoming confined. The results provide building blocks for full waveform tomography of fault zone regions combining high-frequency head, trapped, body, and surface waves. Such an imaging approach can constrain fault zone structure across a larger range of scales than has previously been possible.

  1. Investigation of the Statistics of Pure Tone Sound Power Injection from Low Frequency, Finite Sized Sources in a Reverberant Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne Farrior

    1973-01-01

    The effect of finite source size on the power statistics in a reverberant room for pure tone excitation was investigated. Theoretical results indicate that the standard deviation of low frequency, pure tone finite sources is always less than that predicted by point source theory and considerably less when the source dimension approaches one-half an acoustic wavelength or greater. A supporting experimental study was conducted utilizing an eight inch loudspeaker and a 30 inch loudspeaker at eleven source positions. The resulting standard deviation of sound power output of the smaller speaker is in excellent agreement with both the derived finite source theory and existing point source theory, if the theoretical data is adjusted to account for experimental incomplete spatial averaging. However, the standard deviation of sound power output of the larger speaker is measurably lower than point source theory indicates, but is in good agreement with the finite source theory.

  2. Finite beta effects on low- and high-frequency magnetosonic waves in a two-ion-species plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Mieko; Aota, Yukio

    2013-08-15

    A magnetosonic wave propagating perpendicular to a magnetic field in a two-ion-species plasma has two branches, high-frequency and low-frequency modes. The finite beta effects on these modes are analyzed theoretically on the basis of the three-fluid model with finite ion and electron pressures. First, it is shown that the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the low-frequency mode is valid for amplitudes ε<ε{sub max}, where the upper limit of the amplitude ε{sub max} is given as a function of β (β is the ratio of the kinetic and magnetic energy densities), the density ratio, and the cyclotron frequency ratio of two ion species. Next, the linear dispersion relation and KdV equation for the high-frequency mode are derived, including β as a factor. In addition, the theory for heavy ion acceleration by the high-frequency mode pulse and the pulse damping due to this energy transfer in a finite beta plasma are presented.

  3. Multiscale finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography of the Kaapvaal craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, S.; Zhao, L.

    2007-04-01

    We have measured phase delays of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves for 12 events recorded by the Southern Africa Seismic Experiment at frequencies between 0.005 and 0.035 Hz. A novel multiscale finite-frequency tomographic method based on wavelet decomposition of 3-D sensitivity kernels for the phase of Rayleigh waves is used to map the shear velocities in the upper mantle beneath southern Africa. The kernels are computed by summing coupled normal modes over a very fine grid surrounding the seismic array. To estimate and minimize the biases in the model resulting from structures outside the tomographic grid, a jackknife inversion method is implemented. The contribution of heterogeneities outside the target volume is significant, but produces artefacts in the tomographic model that are easily identified and discarded before interpretation. With structures on length scales as short as 100 km retrieved beneath the array, the deep structure of the Kaapvaal craton is revealed with unprecedented detail. Outside the array, the corresponding resolution is 200 km. High velocity cratonic roots are confined to the Archean craton, and extend to depths of at least 250 km. Confirming earlier surface structural studies, we recognize two distinct units in the Kaapvaal craton. The eastern Witwatersrand block and the western Kimberley block are separated by a major near-vertical translithospheric boundary which coincides with the Colesberg Lineament. Lower than average velocities south and east of the Kaapvaal craton reveal extensive metasomatism and heating of the lithosphere, probably related to the Karoo magmatic event and to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean.

  4. 2D Global Rayleigh Wave Attenuation Model Using Finite Frequency Focusing and Defocusing Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z.; Masters, G.; Dalton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed an efficient technique to process and measure surface-wave amplitude and phase from a large collection of seismic waveforms. These amplitude and phase data sets are used to jointly invert for 2D phase velocity and attenuation maps. As demonstrated by Dalton and Ekstrom (2006), correcting for the effects of focusing and defocusing by elastic structure is crucial in order to obtain reliable attenuation structures. A robust theory that can reliably predict focusing-defocusing effects and is insensitive to the details of making the phase velocity maps is preferred. Great circle ray theory can give useful predictions for the focusing-defocusing effects if careful attention is paid to how the phase velocity model is smoothed. However, the predictions of the finite frequency kernels are more robust at the low-intermediate frequency range (below 25mHz) and suggest that they are better suited as a basis for inversion.We invert for the phase velocity, attenuation, source, and receiver terms simultaneously. Our models provide 60-70% variance reduction to the raw data though the source terms are the biggest contribution to the fit of the data. The attenuation maps show structures that correlate well with surface tectonics and the age-dependent trend of attenuation is clearly seen in the ocean basins. We have also identified problematic stations and earthquake sources as a by-product of our data selection process. Although our approach was developed for a global study, it can be extended to regional studies. Our first regional-scale application of this approach is to the Atlantic upper mantle.

  5. Finite element model correlation of a composite UAV wing using modal frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Joseph A.; Kosmatka, John B.; Hemez, François M.; Farrar, Charles R.

    2007-04-01

    The current work details the implementation of a meta-model based correlation technique on a composite UAV wing test piece and associated finite element (FE) model. This method involves training polynomial models to emulate the FE input-output behavior and then using numerical optimization to produce a set of correlated parameters which can be returned to the FE model. After discussions about the practical implementation, the technique is validated on a composite plate structure and then applied to the UAV wing structure, where it is furthermore compared to a more traditional Newton-Raphson technique which iteratively uses first-order Taylor-series sensitivity. The experimental testpiece wing comprises two graphite/epoxy prepreg and Nomex honeycomb co-cured skins and two prepreg spars bonded together in a secondary process. MSC.Nastran FE models of the four structural components are correlated independently, using modal frequencies as correlation features, before being joined together into the assembled structure and compared to experimentally measured frequencies from the assembled wing in a cantilever configuration. Results show that significant improvements can be made to the assembled model fidelity, with the meta-model procedure producing slightly superior results to Newton-Raphson iteration. Final evaluation of component correlation using the assembled wing comparison showed worse results for each correlation technique, with the meta-model technique worse overall. This can be most likely be attributed to difficultly in correlating the open-section spars; however, there is also some question about non-unique update variable combinations in the current configuration, which lead correlation away from physically probably values.

  6. Frontier of the underthrusting Indian lithosphere beneath the central Tibet from finite frequency tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yun; Tian, Xiaobo; Wang, Minling; Xu, Tao; Sun, Changqing; Si, Shaokun; Lan, Haiqiang; Teng, Jiwen

    2015-04-01

    Combining the new collected teleseismic body waves recorded by TIBET-31N passive seismic array with waveforms from several previous temporary seismic arrays, we carried out finite-frequency tomographic inversions to image three-dimensional velocity structures beneath southern-central Tibet to examine the roles of the upper mantle in the formation of the Tibetan plateau. Strong low P- and S-wave velocity anomalies that extend from the lower crust to about 200 km depth beneath the Comei rift, Yadong-Gulu rift, Tangra Yum Co rift, suggesting that rifting in southern Tibet is probably a process that involves the entire lithosphere. At the same time there is only the low velocity close to Yadong-Gulu rift extending further north and connecting with the massive upper mantle low velocity beneath central Tibet, and moreover, the other two are limited in southern Tibet. This observation implies that the previous proposed fragmentation of underthrusting Indian lithosphere might not happen underneath all the north-south trending rifts. Instead, it only happens close to Yadong-Gulu rift, then hot temperature upwelling materials fill up this lithospheric crack and might stuff the other weak zones in shallow depths beneath southern Tibet. Continuous high velocities are observed beneath Himalayas and Lhasa Terrance with a moderate northward inclination angle. We interpret this anomaly as the subducting/underthrusting Indian continental lithosphere.

  7. Effects of Collisional Zonal Flow Damping on Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    P.H. Diamond; T.S. Hahm; W.M. Tang; W.W. Lee; Z. Lin

    1999-10-01

    Results from 3D global gyrokinetic particle simulations of ion temperature gradient driven microturbulence in a toroidal plasma show that the ion thermal transport level in the interior region exhibits significant dependence on the ion-ion collision frequency even in regimes where the instabilities are collisionless. This is identified as arising from the Coulomb collisional damping of turbulence-generated zonal flows.

  8. A finite-difference frequency-domain code for electromagnetic induction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R M; Berryman, J G; Buettner, H M; Champagne, N J.,II; Grant, J B

    1998-12-17

    We are developing a new 3D code for application to electromagnetic induction tomography and applications to environmental imaging problems. We have used the finite-difference frequency- domain formulation of Beilenhoff et al. (1992) and the anisotropic PML (perfectly matched layer) approach (Berenger, 1994) to specify boundary conditions following Wu et al. (1997). PML deals with the fact that the computations must be done in a finite domain even though the real problem is effectively of infinite extent. The resulting formulas for the forward solver reduce to a problem of the form Ax = y, where A is a non-Hermitian matrix with real values off the diagonal and complex values along its diagonal. The matrix A may be either symmetric or nonsymmetric depending on details of the boundary conditions chosen (i.e., the particular PML used in the application). The basic equation must be solved for the vector x (which represents field quantities such as electric and magnetic fields) with the vector y determined by the boundary conditions and transmitter location. Of the many forward solvers that could be used for this system, relatively few have been thoroughly tested for the type of matrix encountered in our problem. Our studies of the stability characteristics of the Bi-CG algorithm raised questions about its reliability and uniform accuracy for this application. We have found the stability characteristics of Bi-CGSTAB [an alternative developed by van der Vorst (1992) for such problems] to be entirely adequate for our application, whereas the standard Bi-CG was quite inadequate. We have also done extensive validation of our code using semianalytical results as well as other codes. The new code is written in Fortran and is designed to be easily parallelized, but we have not yet tested this feature of the code. An adjoint method is being developed for solving the inverse problem for conductivity imaging (for mapping underground plumes), and this approach, when ready, will

  9. Zonal flow dynamics in the double tearing mode with antisymmetric shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Aohua; Li, Jiquan; Liu, Jinyuan; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2014-05-15

    The generation dynamics and the structural characteristics of zonal flows are investigated in the double tearing mode (DTM) with antisymmetric shear flows. Two kinds of zonal flow oscillations are revealed based on reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, which depend on the shear flow amplitudes corresponding to different DTM eigen mode states, elaborated by Mao et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 022114 (2013)]. For the weak shear flows below an amplitude threshold, v{sub c}, at which two DTM eigen states with antisymmetric or symmetric magnetic island structure are degenerated, the zonal flows grow oscillatorily in the Rutherford regime during the nonlinear evolution of the DTMs. It is identified that the oscillation mechanism results from the nonlinear interaction between the distorted islands and the zonal flows through the modification of shear flows. However, for the medium shear flows above v{sub c} but below the critical threshold of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, an oscillatory growing zonal flow occurs in the linear phase of the DTM evolution. It is demonstrated that the zonal flow oscillation originates from the three-wave mode coupling or a modulation instability pumped by two DTM eigen modes with the same frequency but opposite propagating direction. With the shear flows increasing, the amplitude of zonal flow oscillation increases first and then decreases, whilst the oscillation frequency as twice of the Doppler frequency shift increases. Furthermore, impacts of the oscillatory zonal flows on the nonlinear evolution of DTM islands and the global reconnection are also discussed briefly.

  10. Separation-bubble flow solution using Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach with downstream compatibility conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Wong, T. C.; Kandil, O. A.

    1988-01-01

    The two-dimensional flow over a blunt leading-edge plate is simulated on the basis of an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal scheme. The scheme uses an implicit upwind finite-volume scheme, which is based on the van Leer flux-vector splitting. It is shown that the Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal scheme with downstream boundary-layer compatibility conditions is accurate and efficient.

  11. Splitting intensity measurements of North America and finite-frequency modeling of upper mantle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongsresawat, Sutatcha

    micro terranes with both continental and oceanic origins throughout its accretion history making it a very complex geological setting including the presence of the north-striking western Idaho shear zone (WISZ) in the middle. We deployed 85 temporary seismic stations with station-spacing of ˜30 km during 2011--2013 and passively recorded seismic data for an average duration of 1.5 years. The SKS phase of the seismogram is used to obtain splitting intensity, which we use to model realistic 3-D upper-mantle anisotropy. There are two parts in this study, first SKS splitting intensity measurements were made from seismograms recorded at 83 IDOR seismic stations and 45 USArray-TA stations, which consist of analyzing more than 75,000 individual traces. As a result, we obtain high-resolution and spatially coherent shear-wave splitting dataset of the IDOR region. Second, we use back-azimuthal variations of splitting intensity at all stations to model for 3-D anisotropy using the finite-frequency approach. Preliminary models show depth-dependent behaviors of both fast polarization direction and strength of anisotropy down to ˜150 km where the model starts to show poor resolution due to the size of the SKS fresnel zone. Last, we show preliminary inverted models for 3-D upper-mantle anisotropy of North America as well as our progress of spherical coordinate inversion of the USArray-TA splitting measurements. This will set up a starting point for performing a joint-inversion with surface wave dataset that will be measured at exact seismic stations. This last task will be exercised by the help of 3-D finite-frequency Frechet sensitivity kernels for surface waveforms based on the Born approximation with a model parametrized for hexagonal symmetry. Their formulation will provide a complementary approach to invert surface wave data in combination with our SI data for upper mantle anisotropy model of North America with highest resolution for the first time.

  12. Imaging a Remnant Slab Beneath Southeastern US: New Results from Teleseismic, Finite-frequency Tomography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, C. B.; Wagner, L. S.; Fischer, K. M.; Hawman, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Our new results from teleseismic, finite-frequency, body-wave tomography analysis reveal a relatively steep east-dipping fast velocity anomaly beneath the Southeastern US. The resolving power of our dataset is good enough to retrieve major mantle anomalies, such as this fast velocity body, owing to the dense receiver coverage provided by US Transportable Array (TA) and the SouthEastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment (SESAME). Various resolution and recovery tests demonstrate the robustness of this anomaly in our tomographic model between the depths of 60 and 660 km. Our images reveal that the dip of this structure decreases significantly in the mantle transition zone where it terminates. We also observe major gaps in the lateral continuity of this structure. Based on the amplitude, location and geometry of the velocity perturbation, we interpret this anomaly as remnant subducted lithosphere, suspended in the upper mantle after a subduction phase as young as 100-110 Ma or as old as 1Ga. Basic calculations and evaluations on the geometry and location of this anomaly help us to narrow down the origin of this slab to the Farallon flat-slab subduction in the west and Grenville Subduction during assembly of supercontinent Rodinia. Our images reveal possible mechanisms that would allow this slab to remain in the upper mantle without sinking into deeper mantle for such extended periods of time. We believe the flat geometry of the slab near the transition zone and the fragmented nature provide important clues about processes that could delay/resist the sinking while providing necessary time for it to transform into a more neutrally buoyant state. In this respect, we believe our results have broad implications for subduction processes and piece-meal slab failure, as well as tectonic implications for characteristics of former subduction zones that help shape North American Plate.

  13. Global Rayleigh wave phase-velocity maps from finite-frequency tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kui; Zhou, Ying

    2016-04-01

    We report global phase-velocity maps of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves at periods between 25 and 100 s based on finite-frequency tomography. Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements are made using a multitaper technique for both minor-arc and major-arc wave trains. The global phase-velocity maps confirm many features associated with surface tectonics including the ocean-continent dichotomy and the signature of lithospheric cooling in oceanic plates. In addition, the high-resolution phase-velocity maps reveal a major change in the distribution of small-scale anomalies in the Pacific at different wave periods. We calculate the global average of Rayleigh wave phase velocity in major tectonic regions and show that large discrepancies exist between our model and global crustal and mantle models: (1) In oceanic regions, short-period (<˜40 s) Rayleigh waves are faster than calculations based on models CRUST2.0 and S40RTS. The discrepancies could be explained by a thinner crust or faster wave speeds in the crust or upper mantle. The implementation of model CRUST1.0 significantly improves the agreement, with phase-velocity discrepancies less than 0.5 per cent on average. (2) In Archean cratons, Rayleigh wave phase velocities in our model are faster than calculations based on model S40RTS at periods longer than ˜40 s; and the global average in orogenic belts is ˜1-2 per cent slower than CRUST1.0 at periods shorter than ˜50 s.

  14. Factors Controlling the Evolution of Anatolia: Clues from Teleseismic Finite-Frequency Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, C. B.; Beck, S. L.; Zandt, G.; Ozacar, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The complex and sinusoidal pattern of subduction zones of the Mediterranenan region plays an important role in controlling the current tectonic framework of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The Anatolian region is part of this belt and it displays the complex characteristics of the interplay between continent collision in the east and subduction-rollback related backarc extension in the west. The ongoing northward subduction of the African Plate beneath the Anatolian Plate contributes significantly to the emergence of the current tectonic setting of this region. Despite its crucial effect on the tectonics of Anatolia, there are only a few studies that focus on the deeper extent of this zone. In this study we provide higher resolution tomographic images of the subducting African lithosphere beneath Anatolia. Our approach is based on analysis of teleseismic body-wave travel-time data using a finite-frequency seismic tomography algorithm. The data for our analysis comes from multiple permanent and temporary networks deployed in the region. A major part of our dataset is formed by the multiple frequency-band picks of P-wave arrival times recorded at more than 100 broadband and short-period seismic stations of the National Earthquake Monitoring Center and 39 broadband seismic stations of the North Anatolian Passive Seismic Experiment network. The results of our analysis indicates the presence of large and smaller scale gaps in the subducting African Lithosphere, that are interpreted as slab tears. The most significant tear is located beneath western Anatolia with a maximum width of ~250 km. This tear is marked by lack of intermediate to deep seismicity and is associated with slow seismic speed perturbations that we interpret as ascending hot, buoyant asthenosphere. The configuration of the edges of this gap at depths between 50 to 200 km provides clues about how the impediments on the subducting seafloor could have an influence on rates of roll-back on both sides

  15. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled internal-gravity and alfvén waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, Tamaz; Kahlon, Laila

    Nonlinear dynamics of coupled internal-gravity (IG) and alfven electromagnetic planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated. Under such coupling new type of alfven waves is revealed. It is shown that such short wavelength turbulence of IG and alfvén waves is unstable with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbations of the zonal flow and magnetic field. A set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of coupled IG and alfven waves with zonal flows is derived. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is driven by the advection of vorticity and is based on the parametric excitation of convective cells by finite-amplitude coupled IG and alfven waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The growth rates of the corresponding instability and the conditions for driving them are determined. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown.

  16. Seismic imaging beneath southwest Africa based on finite-frequency body wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, Mohammad; Yuan, Xiaohui; Tilmann, Frederik; Heit, Benjamin; Weber, Michael; Jokat, Wilfried; Geissler, Wolfram; Laske, Gabi

    2016-04-01

    We present a seismic model of southwest Africa from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S- wave data recorded by an amphibious temporary seismic network. The area of study is located at the intersection of the Walvis Ridge with the continental margin of northern Namibia, and extends into the Congo craton. Utilizing 3D finite-frequency sensitivity kernels, we invert traveltime residuals of the teleseismic body waves to image seismic structures in the upper mantle. To test the robustness of our tomographic imaging, we employed various resolution assessments that allow us to inspect the extent of smearing effects and to evaluate the optimum regularization weights (i.e., damping and smoothness). These tests include applying different (ir)regular parameterizations, classical checkerboard and anomaly tests and squeezing modeling. Furthermore, we performed different kinds of weighing schemes for the traveltime dataset. These schemes account for balancing between the picks data amount with their corresponding events directions. Our assessment procedure involves also a detailed investigation of the effect of the crustal correction on the final velocity image, which strongly influenced the image resolution for the mantle structures. Our model can resolve horizontal structures of 1° x 1° below the array down to 300-350 km depth. The resulting model is mainly dominated by the difference in the oceanic and continental mantle lithosphere beneath the study area, with second-order features related to their respective internal structures. The fast lithospheric keel of the Congo Craton reaches a depth of ~250 km. The orogenic Damara Belt and continental flood basalt areas are characterized by low velocity perturbations down to a depth of ~150 km, indicating a normal fertile mantle. High velocities in the oceanic lithosphere beneath the Walvis Ridge appear to show signatures of chemical depletion. A pronounced anomaly of fast velocity is imaged underneath continental NW

  17. Generation of magnetoacoustic zonal flows by Alfven waves in a rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Lominadze, J. G.; Churikov, A. P.; Erokhin, N. N.; Tsypin, V. S.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2007-08-15

    Analytical theory of nonlinear generation of magnetoacoustic zonal flows in a rotating plasma is developed. As the primary modes causing such a generation, a totality of the Alfven waves are considered, along with the kinetic, inertial, and rotational. It is shown that in all these cases of the Alfven waves the generation is possible if the double plasma rotation frequency exceeds the zonal flow frequency.

  18. Multi-scale Finite-frequency Traveltime Tomography of the Lithospheric Structure Beneath North Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Hung, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, W.

    2010-12-01

    Left-lateral shearing along the Red River shear zone (RRSZ) that runs through North Vietnam has been considered closely linked with the continental extrusion of southeast Asia resulting from the northward indention of India into Asia. In this model, the deformation was primarily accommodated by the large strike-slip offsets along the translithospheric fault (Tapponnier et al., 1990). However, the dating of magmatic rocks indicates that the metamorphism and emplacement of granites occurred prior to the shearing motion along the RRSZ. An alternative model thus advocates that the shortening between two colliding continents caused distributed thickening and internal deformation of the Asian lithosphere and the upper crust was decoupled from the thickened mantle lithosphere by a rheologically-weak mid or lower crust (Searle, 2006). Since December 2005, Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica has deployed a regional broadband array with station spacing of ~40 km in Vietnam for earthquake and seismic structure studies. We collect data from teleseismic earthquakes with magnitude > 5.5 between 2005 and 2007. Using this new dataset, we report results of 3-D, tomographic inversion of P-wave (including P, PKIKP and PcP) and S-wave (including S and ScS) relative travel time residuals, as measured by inter-station cross-correlation of waveforms at both high- and low-frequencies. Physically realistic 3-D sensitivity kernels for finite-frequency traveltime data and multi-scale parameterization employed in the inversion lead to the resulting 3-D velocity models with spatially-varying, data-adaptive resolutions. The resolution tests demonstrate that the anomalously low or high velocity structure with the scale length of ~150 km can be resolved down to the depth of 300 km beneath North Vietnam. The P velocity model reveals an elongated fast anomaly about 50-80 km wide which strikes parallel to the RRSZ and subvertically extends to the depth of over 100 km. The other fast anomaly

  19. Zonal flow formation in the Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    2010-02-11

    Zonal jets are very common in nature. Well-known examples are those in the atmospheres of giant planets and the alternating jet streams found in the Earth's world ocean. Zonal flow formation in nuclear fusion devices is also well studied. A common feature of these zonal flows is that they are spontaneously generated in turbulent systems. Because the Earth's outer core is believed to be in a turbulent state, it is possible that there is zonal flow in the liquid iron of the outer core. Here we report an investigation at the current low-viscosity limit of numerical simulations of the geodynamo. We find a previously unknown convection regime of the outer core that has a dual structure comprising inner, sheet-like radial plumes and an outer, westward cylindrical zonal flow. We numerically confirm that the dual-convection structure with such a zonal flow is stable under a strong, self-generated dipole magnetic field.

  20. Validity of the Rytov Approximation in the Form of Finite-Frequency Sensitivity Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenjun; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Geng, Jianhua

    2015-06-01

    The first-order (or linear) Rytov or Born approximation is the foundation for formulation of wave-equation tomography and waveform inversion, so the validity of the Rytov/Born approximation can substantially affect the applicability of these theories. However, discussions and research reported in literature on this topic are insufficient or limited. In this paper we introduce five variables in scattering theory to help us discuss conditions under which the Rytov approximation, in the form of the finite frequency sensitivity kernels (RFFSK), the basis of waveform inversion and tomography, is valid. The five variables are propagation length L, heterogeneity scale a, wavenumber k, anisotropy ratio ξ, and perturbation strength ɛ. Combined with theoretical analysis and numerical experiments, we conclude that varying the conditions used to establish the Rytov approximation can lead to uninterpretable or undesired results. This conclusion has two consequences. First, one cannot rigorously apply the linear Rytov approximation to all theoretical or practical cases without discussing its validity. Second, the nonlinear Rytov approximation is essential if the linear Rytov approximation is not valid. Different from previous literature, only phase (or travel time) terms for the whole wavefield are discussed. The time shifts of two specific events between the background and observed wavefields measured by cross-correlation will serve as a reference for evaluation of whether the time shifts predicted by the FFSKs are reasonably acceptable. Significantly, the reference "cross-correlation" should be regarded as reliable only if the condition "two specific similar signals" is satisfied. We cannot expect it to provide a reasonable result if this condition is not met. This paper reports its reliability and experimental limitations. Using cross-correlation (CC) samples as the X axis and sensitivity kernel (SK) or ray tracing (RT) samples as the Y axis, a chart of cross validation

  1. Localized Single Frequency Lasing States in a Finite Parity-Time Symmetric Resonator Chain

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Sendy; Vukovic, Ana; Creagh, Stephen C.; Sewell, Phillip D.; Gradoni, Gabriele; Benson, Trevor M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a practical case of a finite periodic Parity Time chain made of resonant dielectric cylinders is considered. The paper analyzes a more general case where PT symmetry is achieved by modulating both the real and imaginary part of the material refractive index along the resonator chain. The band-structure of the finite periodic PT resonator chains is compared to infinite chains in order to understand the complex interdependence of the Bloch phase and the amount of the gain/loss in the system that causes the PT symmetry to break. The results show that the type of the modulation along the unit cell can significantly affect the position of the threshold point of the PT system. In all cases the lowest threshold is achieved near the end of the Brillouin zone. In the case of finite PT-chains, and for a particular type of modulation, early PT symmetry breaking is observed and shown to be caused by the presence of termination states localized at the edges of the finite chain resulting in localized lasing and dissipative modes at each end of the chain. PMID:26848095

  2. Finite-frequency measurements of conventional and core-diffracted P-waves (P and Pdiff) for waveform tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Kasra; Sigloch, Karin; Staehler, Simon C.

    2014-05-01

    In its lowermost 200-300 km, the mantle has a complex structure resulting from accumulations of downwellings (subducted slabs), upwellings (LLSVPs and plumes), and probably phase transitions; seismic velocities and density show large variations but are not tightly constrained. Core-diffracted body waves are the seismic phases that sample the lowermost mantle extensively and are prime candidates to be used in tomography for enhancing resolution in this depth range. Since they are diffracted along the core-mantle boundary, their behavior is highly dispersive and cannot be modeled satisfactory using ray theory, nor early versions of finite-frequency modeling. Hence they have rarely been used for tomography so far, and where they have been, large imaging blur can be expected. We present a processing scheme to measure finite-frequency travel-time anomalies of arbitrary seismic body-wave phases in a fully automated way, with an initial focus on core-diffracted P waves. The aim is to extract a maximum of information from observed broadband seismograms using multi-frequency techniques. Using a matched-filtering approach, predicted and observed waveforms are compared in a cross-correlation sense in eight overlapping frequency passbands, with dominant periods ranging between 30 and 2.7sec. This method was applied to a global data set of ≡2000 teleseismic events in our waveform archive, which resulted in 1,616,184 P and 536,190 Pdiff usable multi-frequency measurements of high cross-correlation coefficient (≥ 0.8). The measurements are analyzed statistically in terms of goodness of fit, effects of epicentral distance, and frequency-dependent behavior of P and Pdiff phases. The results for Pdiff waves are displayed by projecting the measured travel time anomalies onto the phase's nominal grazing segments along the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Analysis of nonlinear frequency mixing in 1D waveguides with a breathing crack using the spectral finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, D. M.; Mitra, M.

    2015-11-01

    A breathing crack, due to its bilinear stiffness characteristics, modifies the frequency spectrum of a propagating dual-frequency elastic wave, and gives rise to sidebands around the probing frequency. This paper presents an analytical-numerical method to investigate such nonlinear frequency mixing resulting from the modulation effects induced by a breathing crack in 1D waveguides, such as axial rods and the Euler-Bernoulli beams. A transverse edge-crack is assumed to be present in both the waveguides, and the local flexibility caused by the crack is modeled using an equivalent spring approach. A simultaneous treatment of both the waveguides, in the framework of the Fourier transform based spectral finite element method, is presented for analyzing their response to a dual frequency excitation applied in the form of a tone-burst signal. The intermittent contact between the crack surfaces is accounted for by introducing bilinear contact forces acting at the nodes of the damage spectral element. Subsequently, an iterative approach is outlined for solving the resulting system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. Applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by considering several test cases. The existence of sidebands and the higher order harmonics is confirmed in the frequency domain response of both the waveguides under investigation. A qualitative comparison with the previous experimental observations accentuates the utility of the proposed solution method. Additionally, the influence of the two constituent frequencies in the dual frequency excitation is assessed by varying the relative strengths of their amplitudes. A brief parametric study is performed for bringing out the effects of the relative crack depth and crack location on the degree of modulation, which is quantified in terms of the modulation parameter. Results of the present investigation can find their potential use in providing an analytical-numerical support to the studies geared towards the

  4. Numerical analysis of curved frequency selective surface by finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin-yi; Wang, Jian-bo; Chen, Gui-bo; Sun, Guan-cheng; Lu, Jun

    2011-08-01

    Frequency selective surface is a monolayer or multilayer 2D periodic structure which is composed of multiple resonance units scattering by a two-dimensional periodic array on dielectric layer. FSS can't absorb radio frequency energy, but can filter the frequency which is therefore applied in microwave technique or stealth technology. The relative research on curved FSS is relatively scarce since the curved FSS structure can be obtained only when FSS is attached on the materials surfaces of curved structures in engineering application. However, curved FSS is widely applied in practical engineering; therefore, the research on curved FSS structure has important significance. In this paper, a curved FSS structure model of Y-pore unit is established and numerical simulated by means of FDTD. The influence of curvature on FSS transmission characteristics is studied according to the analysis on the changing of radar cross section (RCS). The results show: the center frequency point of the plane band pass FSS structure drifts after the curve surface deformation of the structure; the center frequency point of the curved band pass FSS structure drifts with the changing of the curvature radius, i. e. with the decreasing of curvature radius, the frequency point drifts towards high points and the transmittance decreases. The design of FSS radome demands of accurate and stable center resonance frequency; therefore, the actual situation of curved surface should be considered in practical engineering application when band pass FSS is made into frequency selection filtering radome. The curvature radius should be long enough to avoid center frequency drifting and transmittance deceasing.

  5. Rapid Frequency Chirps of TAE mode due to Finite Orbit Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Herb; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    The tip model for the TAE mode in the large aspect ratio limit, conceived by Rosenbluth et al. in the frequency domain, together with an interaction term in the frequency domain based on a map model, has been extended into the time domain. We present the formal basis for the model, starting with the Lagrangian for the particle wave interaction. We shall discuss the formal nonlinear time domain problem and the procedure that needs to obtain solutions in the adiabatic limit.

  6. Optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Han, B.; Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate an optimal fourth-order staggered-grid finite-difference scheme for 3D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modeling. An anti-lumped mass strategy is incorporated to minimize the numerical dispersion. The optimal finite-difference coefficients and the mass weighting coefficients are obtained by minimizing the misfit between the normalized phase velocities and the unity. An iterative damped least-squares method, the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, is utilized for the optimization. Dispersion analysis shows that the optimal fourth-order scheme presents less grid dispersion and anisotropy than the conventional fourth-order scheme with respect to different Poisson's ratios. Moreover, only 3.7 grid-points per minimum shear wavelength are required to keep the error of the group velocities below 1%. The memory cost is then greatly reduced due to a coarser sampling. A parallel iterative method named CARP-CG is used to solve the large ill-conditioned linear system for the frequency-domain modeling. Validations are conducted with respect to both the analytic viscoacoustic and viscoelastic solutions. Compared with the conventional fourth-order scheme, the optimal scheme generates wavefields having smaller error under the same discretization setups. Profiles of the wavefields are presented to confirm better agreement between the optimal results and the analytic solutions.

  7. The sound insulation of single leaf finite size rectangular plywood panels with orthotropic frequency dependent bending stiffness.

    PubMed

    Wareing, Robin R; Davy, John L; Pearse, John R

    2016-01-01

    Current theories for predicting the sound insulation of orthotropic materials are limited to a small range of infinite panels. This paper presents a method that allows for the prediction of the sound insulation of a finite size orthotropic panel. This method uses an equation for the forced radiation impedance of a finite size rectangular panel. This approach produces an equation that has three nested integrals. The long numerical calculation times were reduced by using approximate formulas for the azimuthally averaged forced radiation impedance. This reduced the number of nested integrals from three to two. The resulting predictions are compared to results measured using two sample sizes of four different thicknesses of plywood and one sample size of another three different thicknesses of plywood. Plywood was used for all the tests because it is somewhat orthotropic. It was found during testing that the Young's moduli of the plywood were dependent on the frequency of excitation. The influence of the frequency dependent Young's moduli was then included in the prediction method. The experimental results were also compared with a simple isotropic prediction method. PMID:26827045

  8. The sound insulation of single leaf finite size rectangular plywood panels with orthotropic frequency dependent bending stiffness.

    PubMed

    Wareing, Robin R; Davy, John L; Pearse, John R

    2016-01-01

    Current theories for predicting the sound insulation of orthotropic materials are limited to a small range of infinite panels. This paper presents a method that allows for the prediction of the sound insulation of a finite size orthotropic panel. This method uses an equation for the forced radiation impedance of a finite size rectangular panel. This approach produces an equation that has three nested integrals. The long numerical calculation times were reduced by using approximate formulas for the azimuthally averaged forced radiation impedance. This reduced the number of nested integrals from three to two. The resulting predictions are compared to results measured using two sample sizes of four different thicknesses of plywood and one sample size of another three different thicknesses of plywood. Plywood was used for all the tests because it is somewhat orthotropic. It was found during testing that the Young's moduli of the plywood were dependent on the frequency of excitation. The influence of the frequency dependent Young's moduli was then included in the prediction method. The experimental results were also compared with a simple isotropic prediction method.

  9. Spectral-Element Simulations of Wave Propagation in Porous Media: Finite-Frequency Sensitivity Kernels Based Upon Adjoint Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morency, C.; Tromp, J.

    2008-12-01

    The mathematical formulation of wave propagation in porous media developed by Biot is based upon the principle of virtual work, ignoring processes at the microscopic level, and does not explicitly incorporate gradients in porosity. Based on recent studies focusing on averaging techniques, we derive the macroscopic porous medium equations from the microscale, with a particular emphasis on the effects of gradients in porosity. In doing so, we are able to naturally determine two key terms in the momentum equations and constitutive relationships, directly translating the coupling between the solid and fluid phases, namely a drag force and an interfacial strain tensor. In both terms, gradients in porosity arise. One remarkable result is that when we rewrite this set of equations in terms of the well known Biot variables us, w), terms involving gradients in porosity are naturally accommodated by gradients involving w, the fluid motion relative to the solid, and Biot's formulation is recovered, i.e., it remains valid in the presence of porosity gradients We have developed a numerical implementation of the Biot equations for two-dimensional problems based upon the spectral-element method (SEM) in the time domain. The SEM is a high-order variational method, which has the advantage of accommodating complex geometries like a finite-element method, while keeping the exponential convergence rate of (pseudo)spectral methods. As in the elastic and acoustic cases, poroelastic wave propagation based upon the SEM involves a diagonal mass matrix, which leads to explicit time integration schemes that are well-suited to simulations on parallel computers. Effects associated with physical dispersion & attenuation and frequency-dependent viscous resistance are addressed by using a memory variable approach. Various benchmarks involving poroelastic wave propagation in the high- and low-frequency regimes, and acoustic-poroelastic and poroelastic-poroelastic discontinuities have been

  10. Low frequency eddy current finite element model validation and benchmark studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, M.; Knopp, J.; Mooers, R.; Boehnlein, T.; Aldrin, J. C.; Sabbagh, H. A.

    2011-06-23

    A finite element method (FEM) model was created to calculate the change in impedance of a coil due to the presence of a notch in a plate. The rectangular notches were created via electrical discharge machining (EDM) in a thick aluminum plate and were positioned at normal and oblique angles (10, 20, and 30 degrees) with respect to the vertical axis of the coil. The FEM method was chosen for this model due to its ability to solve problems in complicated geometries with the use of irregular mesh elements to discretize the solution domain. The change in impedance was calculated from the field variables in the simulation for each probe position along the parallel axis of the plate. The error between the model and the experimental data was approximately 5% for the majority of cases. The validated model was used to investigate more complex problems.

  11. Finite Difference Time Domain Electromagnetic Scattering from Frequency-Dependent Lossy Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebbers, Raymond J.; Beggs, John H.

    1991-01-01

    During this effort the tasks specified in the Statement of Work have been successfully completed. The extension of Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) to more complicated materials has been made. A three-dimensional FDTD code capable of modeling interactions with both dispersive dielectric and magnetic materials has been written, validated, and documented. This code is efficient and is capable of modeling interesting targets using a modest computer work station platform. However, in addition to the tasks in the Statement of Work, a significant number of other FDTD extensions and calculations have been made. RCS results for two different plate geometries have been reported. The FDTD method has been extended to computing far zone time domain results in two dimensions. Finally, the capability to model nonlinear materials has been incorporated into FDTD and validated. The FDTD computer codes developed have been supplied, along with documentation, and preprints describing the other FDTD advances have been included with this report as attachments.

  12. Low Frequency Eddy Current Finite Element Model Validation and Benchmark Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherry, M.; Mooers, R.; Knopp, J.; Aldrin, J. C.; Sabbagh, H. A.; Boehnlein, T.

    2011-06-01

    A finite element method (FEM) model was created to calculate the change in impedance of a coil due to the presence of a notch in a plate. The rectangular notches were created via electrical discharge machining (EDM) in a thick aluminum plate and were positioned at normal and oblique angles (10, 20, and 30 degrees) with respect to the vertical axis of the coil. The FEM method was chosen for this model due to its ability to solve problems in complicated geometries with the use of irregular mesh elements to discretize the solution domain. The change in impedance was calculated from the field variables in the simulation for each probe position along the parallel axis of the plate. The error between the model and the experimental data was approximately 5% for the majority of cases. The validated model was used to investigate more complex problems.

  13. Confidence intervals for population allele frequencies: the general case of sampling from a finite diploid population of any size.

    PubMed

    Fung, Tak; Keenan, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The estimation of population allele frequencies using sample data forms a central component of studies in population genetics. These estimates can be used to test hypotheses on the evolutionary processes governing changes in genetic variation among populations. However, existing studies frequently do not account for sampling uncertainty in these estimates, thus compromising their utility. Incorporation of this uncertainty has been hindered by the lack of a method for constructing confidence intervals containing the population allele frequencies, for the general case of sampling from a finite diploid population of any size. In this study, we address this important knowledge gap by presenting a rigorous mathematical method to construct such confidence intervals. For a range of scenarios, the method is used to demonstrate that for a particular allele, in order to obtain accurate estimates within 0.05 of the population allele frequency with high probability (> or = 95%), a sample size of > 30 is often required. This analysis is augmented by an application of the method to empirical sample allele frequency data for two populations of the checkerspot butterfly (Melitaea cinxia L.), occupying meadows in Finland. For each population, the method is used to derive > or = 98.3% confidence intervals for the population frequencies of three alleles. These intervals are then used to construct two joint > or = 95% confidence regions, one for the set of three frequencies for each population. These regions are then used to derive a > or = 95%% confidence interval for Jost's D, a measure of genetic differentiation between the two populations. Overall, the results demonstrate the practical utility of the method with respect to informing sampling design and accounting for sampling uncertainty in studies of population genetics, important for scientific hypothesis-testing and also for risk-based natural resource management. PMID:24465792

  14. Mid-Frequency Acoustic Backscattering from Finite Cylindrical Shells, and, the Influence of Helical Membrane Waves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrado, Charles N., Jr.

    The measurements and analyses were conducted over a mid-frequency range of 2 < ka < 12 corresponding to about 1/2 to 3 times the ring frequency of the empty shell. The measurements were all conducted with the use of wide-band pulses yielding good time resolution of propagating waves. Various time and frequency domain representations of the scattered field are presented to illustrate the evolution of observed backscattering processes. Although the field measured at all aspect angles is reviewed, emphasis is placed on interpretation of the backscatter observed over a range within 30 degrees of beam aspect where phase matched (coincident) excitation of membrane waves occurs. Coincident shear wave radiation is the dominant source of backscatter generated by the empty shell at oblique angles of incidence within 30^circ of beam aspect. Peak levels of backscatter are generally found at combinations of aspect angle and frequency where coincidence and peak levels of length-scale modulation coexist. Coincident back radiation of shear waves remains evident in the backscatter of the ring stiffened shell, but the backscatter is smeared in time and frequency because the rings directly scatter energy to the acoustic medium, as well as from one membrane wave type to another, and to subsonic flexural waves. The decay rate of the empty shell backscatter exceeds that of the ring stiffened shell by a factor of 2-3 because the rings scatter energy to poorly radiating waves. Although details of the backscatter produced by the empty and ring stiffened shells differ, peak levels of target strength consistently fall within a range of -20 to -15 dB re 1 m. The internal loading further impairs coincident radiation but increases the target strength by about 2 dB for ka > 5.5. The damping provided by the resilient mounts increases backscatter decay rates by roughly 1.2 to 1.4 relative to those of the ring stiffened shell. Bistatic measurements of the internally loaded shell also demonstrate

  15. Zonal flows and magnetic fields driven by large-amplitude Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze waves in the E-layer ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Pokhotelov, O.; Onishchenko, O.

    2013-12-01

    waves and vortices in the weakly ionized ionospheric E layer are dominated by the Hall conductivity that couples the Rossby and Alfvén dynamics giving rise to what are called Rossby-Alfvén-Khantadze electromagnetic structures. At finite amplitudes we show that the nonlinearities in the dynamics generate sheared zonal-flow velocities and zonal magnetic field fluctuations. The zonal-flow mechanism is based on the parametric excitation of the zonal variations through three-wave mode coupling in the planetary-scale waves. The coupled dynamics of the nonlinear 3-D incompressible flows and the magnetic field fluctuations are derived and used to derive the structure and growth rates for the zonal flows and zonal magnetic fields. Large-amplitude planetary waves are shown to drive up magnetic fluctuations up to 100 nT.

  16. Filtering of high modal frequencies for stable real-time explicit integration of deformable objects using the Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga, Iker; Fierz, Basil; Spillmann, Jonas; Harders, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    The behavior, performance, and run-time of mechanical simulations in interactive virtual surgery depend heavily on the type of numerical differential equation solver used to integrate in time the dynamic equations obtained from simulation methods, such as the Finite Element Method. Explicit solvers are fast but only conditionally stable. The condition number of the stiffness matrix limits the highest possible time step. This limit is related to the geometrical properties of the underlying mesh, such as element shape and size. In fact, it can be governed by a small set of ill-shaped elements. For many applications this issue can be solved a priori by a careful meshing. However, when meshes are cut during interactive surgery simulation, it is difficult and computationally expensive to control the quality of the resulting elements. As an alternative, we propose to modify the elemental stiffness matrices directly in order to ensure stability. In this context, we first investigate the behavior of the eigenmodes of the elemental stiffness matrix in a Finite Element Method. We then propose a simple filter to reduce high model frequencies and thus allow larger time steps, while maintaining the general mechanical behavior. PMID:20869390

  17. Finite size effect on spread of resonance frequencies in arrays of coupled vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Andreas; Drews, André; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2011-01-25

    Dynamical properties of magnetic vortices in arrays of magnetostatically coupled ferromagnetic disks are studied by means of a broadband ferromagnetic-resonance (FMR) setup. Magnetic force microscopy and magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy are used to image the core polarizations and the chiralities which are both found to be randomly distributed. The resonance frequency of vortex-core motion strongly depends on the magnetostatic coupling between the disks. The parameter describing the relative broadening of the absorption peak observed in the FMR transmission spectra for a given normalized center-to-center distance between the elements is shown to depend on the size of the array.

  18. Finite element method analysis of band gap and transmission of two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Elif; Landais, Pascal

    2013-10-20

    Photonic band gap and transmission characteristics of 2D metallic photonic crystals at THz frequencies have been investigated using finite element method (FEM). Photonic crystals composed of metallic rods in air, in square and triangular lattice arrangements, are considered for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. The modes and band gap characteristics of metallic photonic crystal structure are investigated by solving the eigenvalue problem over a unit cell of the lattice using periodic boundary conditions. A photonic band gap diagram of dielectric photonic crystal in square lattice array is also considered and compared with well-known plane wave expansion results verifying our FEM approach. The photonic band gap designs for both dielectric and metallic photonic crystals are consistent with previous studies obtained by different methods. Perfect match is obtained between photonic band gap diagrams and transmission spectra of corresponding lattice structure. PMID:24216592

  19. Finite element method analysis of band gap and transmission of two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Degirmenci, Elif; Landais, Pascal

    2013-10-20

    Photonic band gap and transmission characteristics of 2D metallic photonic crystals at THz frequencies have been investigated using finite element method (FEM). Photonic crystals composed of metallic rods in air, in square and triangular lattice arrangements, are considered for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations. The modes and band gap characteristics of metallic photonic crystal structure are investigated by solving the eigenvalue problem over a unit cell of the lattice using periodic boundary conditions. A photonic band gap diagram of dielectric photonic crystal in square lattice array is also considered and compared with well-known plane wave expansion results verifying our FEM approach. The photonic band gap designs for both dielectric and metallic photonic crystals are consistent with previous studies obtained by different methods. Perfect match is obtained between photonic band gap diagrams and transmission spectra of corresponding lattice structure.

  20. A hybrid absorbing boundary condition for frequency-domain finite-difference modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiming; Liu, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Liu and Sen (2010 Geophysics 75 A1-6 2012 Geophys. Prospect. 60 1114-32) proposed an efficient hybrid scheme to significantly absorb boundary reflections for acoustic and elastic wave modelling in the time domain. In this paper, we extend the hybrid absorbing boundary condition (ABC) into the frequency domain and develop specific strategies for regular-grid and staggered-grid modelling, respectively. Numerical modelling tests of acoustic, visco-acoustic, elastic and vertically transversely isotropic (VTI) equations show significant absorptions for frequency-domain modelling. The modelling results of the Marmousi model and the salt model also demonstrate the effectiveness of the hybrid ABC. For elastic modelling, the hybrid Higdon ABC and the hybrid Clayton and Engquist (CE) ABC are implemented, respectively. Numerical simulations show that the hybrid Higdon ABC gets better absorption than the hybrid CE ABC, especially for S-waves. We further compare the hybrid ABC with the classical perfectly matched layer (PML). Results show that the two ABCs cost the same computation time and memory space for the same absorption width. However, the hybrid ABC is more effective than the PML for the same small absorption width and the absorption effects of the two ABCs gradually become similar when the absorption width is increased.

  1. Frequency analysis of finite beams on nonlinear Kelvin-Voight foundation under moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, M.; Esmailzadeh, E.; Younesian, D.

    2011-03-01

    The vibration of an Euler-Bernoulli beam, resting on a nonlinear Kelvin-Voight viscoelastic foundation, traversed by a moving load is studied in the frequency domain. The objective is to obtain the frequency responses of the beam and the effects of different parameters on the system response. The parameters include the magnitude and speed of the moving load and the foundation nonlinearity and its damping coefficient. The solution is obtained by using the Galerkin method in conjunction with the multiple scales method (MSM). The governing nonlinear partial differential equations of motion are discretized into sets of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Subsequently, the solution is calculated for different harmonics by using the MSM as one of the powerful perturbation techniques. The steady-state responses of the main harmonic as well as its two super-harmonics are then obtained. As a case study, a conventional railway track is dynamically simulated and the jump phenomenon in the response is observed for three harmonics. Moreover, a thorough stability analysis of the system is carried out.

  2. EQUATORIAL ZONAL JETS AND JUPITER's GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D.; Liao, X.; Zhang, K.; Schubert, G.

    2014-08-20

    The depth of penetration of Jupiter's zonal winds into the planet's interior is unknown. A possible way to determine the depth is to measure the effects of the winds on the planet's high-order zonal gravitational coefficients, a task to be undertaken by the Juno spacecraft. It is shown here that the equatorial winds alone largely determine these coefficients which are nearly independent of the depth of the non-equatorial winds.

  3. Processed Movie of Zonal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This movie is a manipulated sequence showing motions in Jupiter's atmosphere over the course of five days beginning Oct. 1, 2000, as seen by a camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft, using a blue filter.

    Beginning with seven images taken at uneven time intervals, this sequence was made by using information on wind speeds derived from actual Jupiter images to create evenly spaced time steps throughout. The final result is a smooth movie sequence consisting of both real and false frames.

    The view is of the opposite side of the planet from Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The region shown reaches from 50 degrees north to 50 degrees south of Jupiter's equator, and extends 100 degrees east-to-west, about one-quarter of Jupiter's circumference. The smallest features are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across.

    Towards the end of the sequence, a shadow appears from one of Jupiter's moons, Europa.

    The movie shows the remains of a historic merger that began several years ago, when three white oval storms that had existed for 60 years merged into two, then one. The resulting oval is visible in the lower left portion of the movie.

    The movie also shows zonal jets that circle the planet on constant latitudes. Winds seen moving toward the left (westward) correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than Jupiter's magnetic field, and winds moving the opposite direction correspond to features that are rotating a little faster than the magnetic field. Since Jupiter has no solid surface, the rotation of the magnetic field is the point of reference for the rotation of the planet.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  4. Long-range correlations induced by the self-regulation of zonal flows and drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2010-11-15

    By means of a unique probe array, the interaction between zonal flows and broad-band drift-wave turbulence has been investigated experimentally in a magnetized toroidal plasma. Homogeneous potential fluctuations on a magnetic flux surface, previously reported as long range correlations, could be traced back to a predator-prey-like interaction between the turbulence and the zonal flow. At higher frequency the nonlocal transfer of energy to the zonal flow is dominant and the low-frequency oscillations are shown to result from the reduced turbulence activity due to this energy loss. This self-regulation process turns out to be enhanced with increased background shear flows.

  5. Novel frequency domain techniques and advances in Finite Difference Time domain (FDTD) method for efficient solution of multiscale electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayappan, Kadappan

    With the advent of sub-micron technologies and increasing awareness of Electromagnetic Interference and Compatibility (EMI/EMC) issues, designers are often interested in full- wave solutions of complete systems, taking to account a variety of environments in which the system operates. However, attempts to do this substantially increase the complexities involved in computing full-wave solutions, especially when the problems involve multi- scale geometries with very fine features. For such problems, even the well-established numerical methods, such as the time domain technique FDTD and the frequency domain methods FEM and MoM, are often challenged to the limits of their capabilities. In an attempt to address such challenges, three novel techniques have been introduced in this work, namely Dipole Moment (DM) Approach, Recursive Update in Frequency Domain (RUFD) and New Finite Difference Time Domain ( vFDTD). Furthermore, the efficacy of the above techniques has been illustrated, via several examples, and the results obtained by proposed techniques have been compared with other existing numerical methods for the purpose of validation. The DM method is a new physics-based approach for formulating MoM problems, which is based on the use of dipole moments (DMs), as opposed to the conventional Green's functions. The absence of the Green's functions, as well as those of the vector and scalar potentials, helps to eliminate two of the key sources of difficulties in the conventional MoM formulation, namely the singularity and low-frequency problems. Specifically, we show that there are no singularities that we need to be concerned with in the DM formulation; hence, this obviates the need for special techniques for integrating these singularities. Yet another salutary feature of the DM approach is its ability to handle thin and lossy structures, or whether they are metallic, dielectric-type, or even combinations thereof. We have found that the DM formulation can handle these

  6. Emergence of nanoscale inhomogeneity and finite frequency superfluid response in disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2015-03-01

    The notion of spontaneous formation of an inhomogeneous superconducting state is at the heart of most theories attempting to understand the superconducting state in the presence of strong disorder. Using a combination of low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy and high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, we experimentally demonstrate that under the competing effects of strong homogeneous disorder and superconducting correlations, the superconducting state of a conventional superconductor, NbN, spontaneously segregates into domains. Tracking the superconducting state as a function of temperature we show that these superconducting domains persist across the bulk superconducting transition, Tc, and disappear close to the pseudogap temperature, T*, where signatures of superconducting correlations disappear from the tunneling spectrum and the superfluid response of the system. These results along with complementary measurements of the superfluid stiffness at microwave frequencies underpins the importance of phase fluctuations in strongly disordered s-wave superconductors.

  7. Zonal-flow-driven nonlinear energy transfer in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2007-05-15

    Using a newly developed algorithm, the nonlinear transfer of internal fluctuation energy vertical bar n-tilde vertical bar{sup 2} due to convection of drift-wave turbulence by a geodesic acoustic mode (GAM, a finite-frequency zonal flow) has now been measured directly in a high-temperature plasma. By combining spatially resolved density fluctuation measurements obtained via an upgraded beam emission spectroscopy system in the edge region of the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] with a velocity inference algorithm, the convection of turbulent fluctuations by the GAM has been measured. Taken together, the results strongly suggest that GAM convection of turbulence leads to a transfer of internal fluctuation energy from low to high frequencies, in agreement with expectations from theory and simulation. In addition, the GAM is found to modulate the intensity of the density fluctuations. Calculations of the measured nonlinear interactions in the gyrokinetic code GYRO are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Multiscale, finite-frequency P and S tomography of the upper mantle in the southwestern Fennoscandian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstrup, Marianne L.; Hung, Shu-Huei; Maupin, Valerie

    2015-07-01

    We image the P- and S-wave structure of the upper mantle in southwestern Scandinavia using a wavelet-based, multiscale parametrization and finite-frequency theory to model wave propagation. Relative traveltime residuals of direct P and S waves are measured in a high- and low-frequency band and are corrected for crustal structure using a detailed model for the study area. A range of resolution tests are used to find optimal damping values not only for variations in VP and VS separately, but also for perturbations in their ratio VP/VS. The tests show that features down to a size of 100 (150) km can be well resolved in the P (S) tomography. To ease comparison with previous studies we also perform ray-theoretical multiscale tomographies, and to test the degree of vertical smearing we evaluate different parametrizations in the vertical direction (wavelet-based multiscale and convolutional quelling). Our finite-frequency, multiscale images of variations in VP and VS confirm the existence of low velocities below southern Norway and Denmark and high velocities beneath the shield proper in Sweden, as seen in previous studies, but add more details to this simplified picture. The low velocities below southern Norway and Denmark are confined to a channel-like structure at about 100-200 km depth, and the lateral transition from low to high velocities follows zones of Carboniferous-Permian extension and magmatism very closely. A deeper low-velocity anomaly below central southern Norway emerges from the channel at 150 km depth and extends to a depth of 350 km. In the Swedish area we infer high-velocity anomalies in VP and VS, and negative anomalies in VP/VS that indicate a strongly depleted mantle. We propose that the episodic erosion and convective removal of an originally thick mantle lithosphere below southern Norway to its current thickness of about 100 km could have been a trigger for episodic uplift in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic.

  9. Finite-difference modeling and dispersion analysis of high-frequency love waves for near-surface applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    Love-wave propagation has been a topic of interest to crustal, earthquake, and engineering seismologists for many years because it is independent of Poisson's ratio and more sensitive to shear (S)-wave velocity changes and layer thickness changes than are Rayleigh waves. It is well known that Love-wave generation requires the existence of a low S-wave velocity layer in a multilayered earth model. In order to study numerically the propagation of Love waves in a layered earth model and dispersion characteristics for near-surface applications, we simulate high-frequency (>5 Hz) Love waves by the staggered-grid finite-difference (FD) method. The air-earth boundary (the shear stress above the free surface) is treated using the stress-imaging technique. We use a two-layer model to demonstrate the accuracy of the staggered-grid modeling scheme. We also simulate four-layer models including a low-velocity layer (LVL) or a high-velocity layer (HVL) to analyze dispersive energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that: (1) the staggered-grid FD code and stress-imaging technique are suitable for treating the free-surface boundary conditions for Love-wave modeling, (2) Love-wave inversion should be treated with extra care when a LVL exists because of a lack of LVL information in dispersions aggravating uncertainties in the inversion procedure, and (3) energy of high modes in a low-frequency range is very weak, so that it is difficult to estimate the cutoff frequency accurately, and "mode-crossing" occurs between the second higher and third higher modes when a HVL exists. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  10. Finite Frequency Traveltime Tomography of Lithospheric and Upper Mantle Structures beneath the Cordillera-Craton Transition in Southwestern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Gu, Y. J.; Hung, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Based on finite-frequency theory and cross-correlation teleseismic relative traveltime data from the USArray, Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN) and Canadian Rockies and Alberta Network (CRANE), we present a new tomographic model of P-wave velocity perturbations for the lithosphere and upper mantle beneath the Cordillera-cration transition region in southwestern Canada. The inversion procedure properly accounts for the finite-volume sensitivities of measured travel time residuals, and the resulting model shows a greater resolution of upper mantle velocity heterogeneity beneath the study area than earlier approaches based on the classical ray-theoretical approach. Our model reveals a lateral change of P velocities from -0.5% to 0.5% down to ~200-km depth in a 50-km wide zone between the Alberta Basin and the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, which suggests a sharp structural gradient along the Cordillera deformation front. The stable cratonic lithosphere, delineated by positive P-velocity perturbations of 0.5% and greater, extends down to a maximum depth of ~180 km beneath the Archean Loverna Block (LB). In comparison, the mantle beneath the controversial Medicine Hat Block (MHB) exhibits significantly higher velocities in the uppermost mantle and a shallower (130-150 km depth) root, generally consistent with the average depth of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary beneath Southwest Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). The complex shape of the lithospheric velocities under the MHB may be evidence of extensive erosion or a partial detachment of the Precambrian lithospheric root. Furthermore, distinct high velocity anomalies in LB and MHB, which are separated by 'normal' mantle block beneath the Vulcan structure (VS), suggest different Archean assembly and collision histories between these two tectonic blocks.

  11. The Galileo probe Doppler wind experiment: Measurement of the deep zonal winds on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Pollack, James B.; Seiff, Alvin

    1998-09-01

    During its descent into the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, the Galileo probe transmitted data to the orbiter for 57.5 min. Accurate measurements of the probe radio frequency, driven by an ultrastable oscillator, allowed an accurate time history of the probe motions to be reconstructed. Removal from the probe radio frequency profile of known Doppler contributions, including the orbiter trajectory, the probe descent velocity, and the rotation of Jupiter, left a measurable frequency residual due to Jupiter's zonal winds, and microdynamical motion of the probe from spin, swing under the parachute, atmospheric turbulence, and aerodynamic buffeting. From the assumption of the dominance of the zonal horizontal winds, the frequency residuals were inverted and resulted in the first in situ measurements of the vertical profile of Jupiter's deep zonal winds. A number of error sources with the capability of corrupting the frequency measurements or the interpretation of the frequency residuals were considered using reasonable assumptions and calibrations from prelaunch and in-flight testing. It is found that beneath the cloud tops (about 700 mbar) the winds are prograde and rise rapidly to 170 m/s at 4 bars. Beyond 4 bars to the depth at which the link with the probe was lost, nearly 21 bars, the winds remain constant and strong. Corrections for the high temperatures encountered by the probe have recently been completed and provide no evidence of diminishing or strengthening of the zonal wind profile in the deeper regions explored by the Galileo probe.

  12. Finite-pulse radio frequency driven recoupling with phase cycling for 2D 1H/1H correlation at ultrafast MAS frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yusuke; Zhang, Rongchun; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-06-01

    The first-order recoupling sequence radio frequency driven dipolar recoupling (RFDR) is commonly used in single-quantum/single-quantum homonuclear correlation 2D experiments under magic angle spinning (MAS) to determine homonuclear proximities. From previously reported analysis of the use of XY-based super-cycling schemes to enhance the efficiency of the finite-pulse-RFDR (fp-RFDR) pulse sequence, XY814 phase cycling was found to provide the optimum performance for 2D correlation experiments on low-γ nuclei. In this study, we analyze the efficiency of different phase cycling schemes for proton-based fp-RFDR experiments. We demonstrate the advantages of using a short phase cycle, XY4, and its super-cycle XY414 that only recouples the zero-quantum homonuclear dipolar coupling, for the fp-RFDR sequence in 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies. The dipolar recoupling efficiencies of XY4, XY414 and XY814 phase cycling schemes are compared based on results obtained from 2D 1H/1H correlation experiments, utilizing the fp-RFDR pulse sequence, on powder samples of U-13C,15N-L-alanine, N-acetyl-15N-L-valyl-15N-L-leucine, and glycine. Experimental results and spin dynamics simulations show that XY414 performs the best when a high RF power is used for the 180° pulse, whereas XY4 renders the best performance when a low RF power is used. The effects of RF field inhomogeneity and chemical shift offsets are also examined. Overall, our results suggest that a combination of fp-RFDR-XY414 employed in the recycle delay with a large RF-field to decrease the recycle delay, and fp-RFDR-XY4 in the mixing period with a moderate RF-field, is a robust and efficient method for 2D single-quantum/single-quantum 1H/1H correlation experiments at ultrafast MAS frequencies.

  13. Finite-element modeling method for the study of dielectric relaxation at high frequencies of heterostructures made of multilayered particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourn, Cédric; Lasquellec, Sophie; Brosseau, Christian

    2007-12-01

    There has been much recent interest in how morphological descriptors may affect the electromagnetic wave transport in particulate composite mediums. In this work, we present results of finite-element simulations that model the permittivity of two-dimensional (or cross sections of infinite three-dimensional parallel, infinitely long, identical, circular cylinders, where the properties and characteristics are invariant along the perpendicular cross-sectional plane) three-phase heterostructures made of a multilayered discoidal particle. While strictly valid only in a direct current situation, our analysis can be extended to treat electric fields that oscillate with time provided that the wavelengths and attenuation lengths associated with the fields are much larger than the microstructure dimension in order that the homogeneous (effective medium) representation of the composite structure makes sense. From simulations over a range of parameters, our analysis evaluates the effect of the surface fraction of inclusion, the conductivity, and thickness (relative to the particle radius) of the particle conductive coating on the effective complex permittivity of isotropic heterostructures in which the filler particles have a core-shell structure. Four main effects are found. First, the importance of the surface fraction of inclusion on the effective complex permittivity at high frequencies (from microwave to infrared) is illustrated over a broad range of coating thicknesses and conductivities. Second, the encapsulation phase (metallic coating) conductivity is identified as the key property controlling the dielectric relaxation due to interfacial polarization. Third, a simple parametrization of the high-frequency effective permittivity spectrum allowed us to obtain a reliable modelization of the Debye-type relaxation processes. From the least-squares fit of the effective complex permittivity data, we extract information on these relaxation processes, i.e., relaxation

  14. Upper mantle structure beneath southern African cratons from seismic finite-frequency P- and S-body wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, M.; Thybo, H.; Artemieva, I. M.; Levander, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present a 3D high-resolution seismic model of the southern African cratonic region from teleseismic tomographic inversion of the P- and S-body wave dataset recorded by the Southern African Seismic Experiment (SASE). Utilizing 3D sensitivity kernels, we invert traveltime residuals of teleseismic body waves to calculate velocity anomalies in the upper mantle down to a 700 km depth with respect to the ak135 reference model. Various resolution tests allow evaluation of the extent of smearing effects and help defining the optimum inversion parameters (i.e., damping and smoothness) for regularizing the inversion calculations. The fast lithospheric keels of the Kaapvaal and Zimbabwe cratons reach depths of 300-350 km and 200-250 km, respectively. The paleo-orogenic Limpopo Belt is represented by negative velocity perturbations down to a depth of ˜ 250 km, implying the presence of chemically fertile material with anomalously low wave speeds. The Bushveld Complex has low velocity down to ˜ 150 km, which is attributed to chemical modification of the cratonic mantle. In the present model, the finite-frequency sensitivity kernels allow to resolve relatively small-scale anomalies, such as the Colesberg Magnetic Lineament in the suture zone between the eastern and western blocks of the Kaapvaal Craton, and a small northern block of the Kaapvaal Craton, located between the Limpopo Belt and the Bushveld Complex.

  15. Stability of Shallow Jovian Atmospheric Zonal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Dowling, T. E.; Showman, A. P.

    2007-10-01

    Jupiter's cloud-level zonal jets are remarkably steady in time despite their sharp curvature (i.e., second latitudinal derivative of the zonal wind profile). The stable jets must be supported by a proper sub-cloud wind and thermal structure; however, the large-scale deep structure of the zonal jets and temperature remain a major unknown in the gas-giant planet atmospheres. Past studies suggest two end-point scenarios of deep wind structures that allow stable cloud-level jets. The first shows that the jets are stable if they penetrate through the molecular hydrogen layer (Ingersoll and Pollard, 1982), although they do not address how the deep flow may be coupled to the cloud-level wind. Many other studies, though they may not directly address the shear instabilities, support this "deep jet” scenario (e.g. Heimpel and Aurnou, 2007); however, they do not rule out the possibility that the jets are shallow. Gierasch (2004) introduced a notable alternative to this "deep” picture. Through linear stability analysis, he showed that an isolated eastward jet that reaches a point of zero motion at 100-bar level, with Jupiter-like speeds and widths at the top, can be stable under certain conditions. However, his analysis contained several untested assumptions, and whether such flows are actually stable in a more realistic setting remains an open question. The possibility of stable shallow zonal jets on Jupiter remains largely unexplored, and this possibility deserves a thorough consideration. We present full-3D nonlinear simulations that test the stability of shallow zonal jets. We use Richardson number as a measure of vertical flow scale, and aim to show whether shallow jets are consistent with the observed jets and place theoretical constraints on the sub-cloud wind structure. Our study uses the EPIC model (Dowling et al., 1998, 2006). The research has been supported by NASA Planetary Atmosphere grants to APS and TED.

  16. Self-organized zonal flow in the flute-mode turbulence of a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Y.; Pavlenko, V.P.

    1988-04-11

    Flute-mode turbulence has a forward spectral cascade unlike the case of drift-wave turbulence. Therefore the linear flute instability may be reduced by this energy cascading toward large wave numbers. As a consequence of three-wave cascade processes derivable from model equations including the effects of density gradient and finite ion Larmor radius the formation of zonal flows in flute mode turbulence is predicted.

  17. Successive bifurcations in a simple model of atmospheric zonal-flow vacillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Seongjoon; Ghil, Michael

    2002-06-01

    Low-frequency variability of the atmospheric flow in the Southern Hemisphere is dominated by irregular changes in the latitude and intensity of the mid-latitude eastward jet about its climatological mean state. This phenomenon, known as atmospheric zonal-flow vacillation, is characterized by the existence of two persistent states of the zonal (i.e., east-west oriented) jet and irregular transitions between them. Nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the waves play a key role in the dynamics of this vacillation. In the present study, we develop a low-order, deterministic model for the nonlinear dynamics of atmospheric zonal-flow vacillation. Multiple equilibria arise in this model's zonal-mean flow, that is, in the longitudinal flow averaged along a given latitude circle. These equilibria bear a strong resemblance to the two persistent flow regimes found in Southern Hemisphere observations. The two equilibrium states are maintained by wave forcing against surface drag, as in the observations. Successive bifurcations to periodic and chaotic zonal-mean flow regimes occur as the model's dissipation parameter is reduced.

  18. Zonally uniform tidal oscillations in the tropical middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, T.; Sasaki, T.; Shiotani, M.; Tomikawa, Y.; Kinnison, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric tides have an important role in the vertical coupling of the atmosphere. Since tides are mainly excited in the lower atmosphere, it is necessary to understand the tidal characteristics in these altitude regions. Of all tidal components, this study focuses on the non-Sun-synchronous components, i.e., nonmigrating tides. Sakazaki et al. (2015, J.G.R.) extracted nonmigrating tides using a composite as a function of universal time in physical space, without performing a zonal wave-number decomposition. With this method, it was demonstrated that tropical nonmigrating tides from the troposphere to the lower mesosphere were regarded as gravity waves excited by diabatic heating enhanced over two major continents, specifically Africa and South America. The present study discovered that as well the above mentioned gravity-wave patterns, zonally uniform tidal signals are clearly seen in the tropical middle atmosphere particularly during the Northern Hemisphere summer, by using data from climate chemistry models (CCMs), reanalyses, and satellite measurements (SABER and GPS-RO). Antisymmetric components with respect to the equator are dominant and are characterized by a vertical wavelength of ~15 km and a diurnal frequency. The observed latitudinal and vertical structures can be explained by the second, propagating, antisymmetric Hough mode.

  19. Isotope effect on gyro-fluid edge turbulence and zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, O. H. H.; Kendl, A.

    2016-11-01

    The role of ion polarisation and finite Larmor radius on the isotope effect on turbulent tokamak edge transport and flows is investigated by means of local electromagnetic multi-species gyro-fluid computations. Transport is found to be reduced with the effective plasma mass for protium, deuterium and tritium mixtures. This isotope effect is found for both cold and warm ion models, but significant influence of finite Larmor radius and polarisation effects are identified. Sheared flow reduction of transport through self generated turbulent zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes in the present model (not including neoclassical flows) is found to play only a minor role on regulating isotopically improved confinement.

  20. Penetrative Convection and Zonal Flow on Jupiter

    PubMed

    Zhang; Schubert

    1996-08-16

    Measurements by the Galileo probe support the possibility that the zonal winds in Jupiter's atmosphere originate from convection that takes place in the deep hydrogen-helium interior. However, according to models based on recent opacity data and the probe's temperature measurements, there may be radiative and nonconvective layers in the outer part of the jovian interior, raising the question of how deep convection could extend to the surface. A theoretical model is presented to demonstrate that, because of predominant rotational effects and spherical geometry, thermal convection in the deep jovian interior can penetrate into any outer nonconvective layer. These penetrative convection rolls interact nonlinearly and efficiently in the model to generate and sustain a mean zonal wind with a larger amplitude than that of the nonaxisymmetric penetrative convective motions, a characteristic of the wind field observed at the cloud level on Jupiter. PMID:8688074

  1. The Dynamics of Baroclinic Zonal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple alternating zonal jets are a ubiquitous feature of planetary atmospheres and oceans. However, most studies to date have focused on the special case of barotropic jets. Here, the dynamics of freely evolving baroclinic jets are investigated using a two-layer quasigeostrophic annulus model with sloping topography. In a suite of 15 numerical simulations, the baroclinic Rossby radius and baroclinic Rhines scale are sampled by varying the stratification and root-mean-square eddy velocity, respectively. Small-scale eddies in the initial state evolve through geostrophic turbulence and accelerate zonally as they grow in horizontal scale, first isotropically and then anisotropically. This process leads ultimately to the formation of jets, which take about 2500 rotation periods to equilibrate. The kinetic energy spectrum of the equilibrated baroclinic zonal flow steepens from a -3 power law at small scales to a -5 power law near the jet scale. The conditions most favorable for producing multiple alternating baroclinic jets are large baroclinic Rossby radius (i.e., strong stratification) and small baroclinic Rhines scale (i.e., weak root-mean-square eddy velocity). The baroclinic jet width is diagnosed objectively and found to be 2.2-2.8 times larger than the baroclinic Rhines scale, with a best estimate of 2.5 times larger. This finding suggests that Rossby wave motions must be moving at speeds of approximately 6 times the turbulent eddy velocity in order to be capable of arresting the isotropic inverse energy cascade.

  2. Generalized Quasilinear Approximation: Application to Zonal Jets.

    PubMed

    Marston, J B; Chini, G P; Tobias, S M

    2016-05-27

    Quasilinear theory is often utilized to approximate the dynamics of fluids exhibiting significant interactions between mean flows and eddies. We present a generalization of quasilinear theory to include dynamic mode interactions on the large scales. This generalized quasilinear (GQL) approximation is achieved by separating the state variables into large and small zonal scales via a spectral filter rather than by a decomposition into a formal mean and fluctuations. Nonlinear interactions involving only small zonal scales are then removed. The approximation is conservative and allows for scattering of energy between small-scale modes via the large scale (through nonlocal spectral interactions). We evaluate GQL for the paradigmatic problems of the driving of large-scale jets on a spherical surface and on the beta plane and show that it is accurate even for a small number of large-scale modes. As GQL is formally linear in the small zonal scales, it allows for the closure of the system and can be utilized in direct statistical simulation schemes that have proved an attractive alternative to direct numerical simulation for many geophysical and astrophysical problems. PMID:27284660

  3. Building an Anisotropic Meniscus with Zonal Variations

    PubMed Central

    Higashioka, Michael M.; Chen, Justin A.; Hu, Jerry C.

    2014-01-01

    Toward addressing the difficult problems of knee meniscus regeneration, a self-assembling process has been used to re-create the native morphology and matrix properties. A significant problem in such attempts is the recapitulation of the distinct zones of the meniscus, the inner, more cartilaginous and the outer, more fibrocartilaginous zones. In this study, an anisotropic and zonally variant meniscus was produced by self-assembly of the inner meniscus (100% chondrocytes) followed by cell seeding the outer meniscus (coculture of chondrocytes and meniscus cells). After 4 weeks in culture, the engineered, inner meniscus exhibited a 42% increase in both instantaneous and relaxation moduli and a 62% increase in GAG/DW, as compared to the outer meniscus. In contrast, the circumferential tensile modulus and collagen/DW of the outer zone was 101% and 129% higher, respectively, than the values measured for the inner zone. Furthermore, there was no difference in the radial tensile modulus between the control and zonal engineered menisci, suggesting that the inner and outer zones of the engineered zonal menisci successfully integrated. These data demonstrate that not only can biomechanical and biochemical properties be engineered to differ by the zone, but they can also recapitulate the anisotropic behavior of the knee meniscus. PMID:23931258

  4. Generation of zonal flow and magnetic field by coupled internal-gravity and alfvén waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kaladze, D. T.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of coupled internal-gravity (IG) and alfvén electromagnetic planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated. Under such coupling new type of alfvén waves is revealed. It is shown that such short wavelength turbulence of IG and alfvén waves is unstable with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbations of the zonal flow and magnetic field. A set of coupled equations describing the nonlinear interaction of coupled IG and alfvén waves with zonal flows is derived. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is driven by the advection of vorticity and is based on the parametric excitation of convective cells by finite-amplitude coupled IG and alfvén waves leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The growth rates of the corresponding instability and the conditions for driving them are determined. The possibility of generation of the intense mean magnetic field is shown.

  5. Energy Finite Element Analysis for Computing the High Frequency Vibration of the Aluminum Testbed Cylinder and Correlating the Results to Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas

    2005-01-01

    The Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) is a finite element based computational method for high frequency vibration and acoustic analysis. The EFEA solves with finite elements governing differential equations for energy variables. These equations are developed from wave equations. Recently, an EFEA method for computing high frequency vibration of structures either in vacuum or in contact with a dense fluid has been presented. The presence of fluid loading has been considered through added mass and radiation damping. The EFEA developments were validated by comparing EFEA results to solutions obtained by very dense conventional finite element models and solutions from classical techniques such as statistical energy analysis (SEA) and the modal decomposition method for bodies of revolution. EFEA results have also been compared favorably with test data for the vibration and the radiated noise generated by a large scale submersible vehicle. The primary variable in EFEA is defined as the time averaged over a period and space averaged over a wavelength energy density. A joint matrix computed from the power transmission coefficients is utilized for coupling the energy density variables across any discontinuities, such as change of plate thickness, plate/stiffener junctions etc. When considering the high frequency vibration of a periodically stiffened plate or cylinder, the flexural wavelength is smaller than the interval length between two periodic stiffeners, therefore the stiffener stiffness can not be smeared by computing an equivalent rigidity for the plate or cylinder. The periodic stiffeners must be regarded as coupling components between periodic units. In this paper, Periodic Structure (PS) theory is utilized for computing the coupling joint matrix and for accounting for the periodicity characteristics.

  6. The Effects of Variable Mass and Geometry, Pretwist, Shear Deformation and Rotatory Inertia on the Resonant Frequencies of Intact Long Bones: A Finite Element Model Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Donald R.; Orne, David

    1976-01-01

    The influence of pretwist, nonuniformities in mass and flexural stiffness, rotatory inertia and shear deformation on the natural frequencies of intact bones is evaluated by means of a linear elastic, finite-element model which has been programmed for solution on the digital computer. Theoretical results are compared to the results on the forced vibration of intact canine radii obtained experimentally by Thompson. Surprisingly, inclusion of fairly large pretwist angles (from -14 to 12 deg for one specimen) had little affect on the first three frequencies of transverse vibration in either the cranial or lateral directions. Inclusion of shear deformation reduced the third-mode frequency in the stiffest (lateral) direction by about six percent, otherwise shear deformation played a minor role in determining natural frequencies. Similarly. rotatory inertia had negligible influence up to the third natural frequency. The predominant influence on the first three natural frequencies of transverse vibration could be attributed to the variations in mass and flexural stiffness along the length of the test specimens. Different effective moduli of elasticity are required to yield correct absolute values for the frequencies which correspond to experimental findings. thus implying the presence of some inhomogeneities in material properties around the bone cross-section and/or along its length.

  7. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinell, Julio J.; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego

    2013-02-01

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E × B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E × B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E × B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  8. Gyroaverage effects on chaotic transport by drift waves in zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Martinell, Julio J.; Castillo-Negrete, Diego del

    2013-02-15

    Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E Multiplication-Sign B test particle chaotic transport in the presence of zonal flows is studied. The FLR effects are introduced by the gyro-average of a simplified E Multiplication-Sign B guiding center model consisting of the linear superposition of a non-monotonic zonal flow and drift waves. Non-monotonic zonal flows play a critical role on transport because they exhibit robust barriers to chaotic transport in the region(s) where the shear vanishes. In addition, the non-monotonicity gives rise to nontrivial changes in the topology of the orbits of the E Multiplication-Sign B Hamiltonian due to separatrix reconnection. The present study focuses on the role of FLR effects on these two signatures of non-monotonic zonal flows: shearless transport barriers and separatrix reconnection. It is shown that, as the Larmor radius increases, the effective zonal flow profile bifurcates and multiple shearless regions are created. As a result, the topology of the gyro-averaged Hamiltonian exhibits very complex separatrix reconnection bifurcations. It is also shown that FLR effects tend to reduce chaotic transport. In particular, the restoration of destroyed transport barriers is observed as the Larmor radius increases. A detailed numerical study is presented on the onset of global chaotic transport as function of the amplitude of the drift waves and the Larmor radius. For a given amplitude, the threshold for the destruction of the shearless transport barrier, as function of the Larmor radius, exhibits a fractal-like structure. The FLR effects on a thermal distribution of test particles are also studied. In particular, the fraction of confined particles with a Maxwellian distribution of gyroradii is computed, and an effective transport suppression is found for high enough temperatures.

  9. ZASPE: Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahm, Rafael; Jordan, Andres; Hartman, Joel; Bakos, Gaspar

    2016-07-01

    ZASPE (Zonal Atmospheric Stellar Parameters Estimator) computes the atmospheric stellar parameters (Teff, log(g), [Fe/H] and vsin(i)) from echelle spectra via least squares minimization with a pre-computed library of synthetic spectra. The minimization is performed only in the most sensitive spectral zones to changes in the atmospheric parameters. The uncertainities and covariances computed by ZASPE assume that the principal source of error is the systematic missmatch between the observed spectrum and the sythetic one that produces the best fit. ZASPE requires a grid of synthetic spectra and can use any pre-computed library minor modifications.

  10. Simulation of seismic wave propagation in 2D poroelastic media using weighted-averaging finite difference stencils in the frequency-space domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingjie; Mao, Weijian

    2016-10-01

    The poroelastodynamic equations are used to describe the dynamic solid-fluid interaction in the reservoir. To obtain the intrinsic properties of reservoir rocks from geophysical data measured in both laboratory and field, we need an accurate solution of the wave propagation in porous media. At present, the poroelastic wave equations are mostly solved in the time domain, which involves a difficult and complicated time convolution. In order to avoid the issues caused by the time convolution, we propose a frequency-space domain method. The poroelastic wave equations are composed of a linear system in the frequency domain, which easily takes into account the effects of all frequencies on the dispersion and attenuation of seismic wave. A 25-point weighted-averaging finite different scheme is proposed to discretize the equations. For the finite model, the perfectly matched layer technique is applied at the model boundaries. We validated the proposed algorithm by testing three numerical examples of poroelastic models, which are homogenous, two-layered and heterogeneous with different fluids, respectively. The testing results are encouraging in the aspects of both computational accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Zonal flow formation in the presence of ambient mean shear

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-02-15

    The effect of mean shear flows on zonal flow formation is considered in the contexts of plasma drift wave turbulence and quasi-geostrophic turbulence models. The generation of zonal flows by modulational instability in the presence of large-scale mean shear flows is studied using the method of characteristics as applied to the wave kinetic equation. It is shown that mean shear flows reduce the modulational instability growth rate by shortening the coherency time of the wave spectrum with the zonal shear. The scalings of zonal flow growth rate and turbulent vorticity flux with mean shear are determined in the strong shear limit.

  12. Titan's zonal winds in its lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Schinder, Paul J.

    2016-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere near 80 km (20 mbar) marks the transition between lower altitudes, where radiative damping times are large and seasonal variations are muted, and higher higher altitudes, where the damping times are much smaller and temperatures and winds vary significantly over the year. Cassini radio occultation soundings at high northern latitudes in winter have indicated a sharp transition from a highly stable temperature profile in the lower stratosphere to a layer between 80 and 100 km where temperatures decrease with altitude. The cause of this destabilization may be associated with the enhanced infrared opacity of a cloud of organic ices. It is curious that 20 mbar is also the level where the Doppler Wind Experiment on the Huygens Probe at 10° S observed a deep minimum in the zonal wind profile. Application of the gradient wind relation to the altitude-pressure profiles obtained from the Cassini radio occultation soundings have shown that this minimum is global. More recent soundings, obtained as Titan's southern hemisphere moves toward winter, indicate that this structure persists. The cause of this peculiar behavior is not really understood, but the the deceleration of the zonal winds observed in the lower stratosphere may be caused by radiative damping of vertically propagating atmospheric waves in a region where the damping time decreases rapidly with altitude.

  13. Validation of the geostrophic method for estimating zonal currents at the equator from Geosat altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picaut, Joel; Camusat, Bruno; Busalacchi, Antonio J.; Mcphaden, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of satellite altimeter data for estimating zonal current variability at the equator is assessed using the meriodionally differenced form of the geostrophic balance. Estimates of geostrophic zonal flow anomalies in the equatorial Pacific have been deduced from 17-day collinear altimeter data during the first year of the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission. Altimeter-derived geostrophic estimates agree well with in situ zonal current variability. Comparison of flow-frequency near-surface zonal current observed from equatorial moorings at 165 deg E, 140 deg W, and 110 deg W yield correlations of 0.83, 0.85, and 0.51, respectively, with a mean rms difference of 23 cm/sec. The inclusion of up to 11 ascending and descending Geosat tracks within the 9-deg band for every 17-day repeat effectively reduced the temporal sampling interval to 1.5 days at 165 deg E and 140 deg W. The 6.8-km along track spacing of the altimeter measurements provides sufficient resolution for the effective filtering of small-scale meridional noise, both instrumental and oceanic.

  14. A finite-difference, frequency-domain numerical scheme for the solution of the linearized unsteady Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.; Atassi, Hafiz M.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for solving periodic, three-dimensional, vortical flows around lifting airfoils in subsonic flow. The first-order method, that is presented, fully accounts for the distortion effects of the nonuniform mean flow on the convected upstream vortical disturbances. The unsteady velocity is split into a vortical component which is a known function of the upstream flow conditions and the Lagrangian coordinates of the mean flow, and an irrotational field whose potential satisfies a nonconstant-coefficient, inhomogeneous, convective wave equation. Using an elliptic coordinate transformation, the unsteady boundary value problem is solved in the frequency domain on grids which are determined as a function of the Mach number and reduced frequency. Extensive comparisons are made with known solutions to unsteady vortical flow problems, and it is seen that the agreement is generally very good for reduced frequencies ranging from 0 up to 4.

  15. ZONAL FLOWS AND LONG-LIVED AXISYMMETRIC PRESSURE BUMPS IN MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, A.; Youdin, A.; Klahr, H. E-mail: youd@cita.utoronto.ca

    2009-06-01

    We study the behavior of magnetorotational turbulence in shearing box simulations with a radial and azimuthal extent up to 10 scale heights. Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are found to increase by more than a factor of 2 when increasing the box size beyond two scale heights in the radial direction. Further increase of the box size has little or no effect on the statistical properties of the turbulence. An inverse cascade excites magnetic field structures at the largest scales of the box. The corresponding 10% variation in the Maxwell stress launches a zonal flow of alternating sub- and super-Keplerian velocity. This, in turn, generates a banded density structure in geostrophic balance between pressure and Coriolis forces. We present a simplified model for the appearance of zonal flows, in which stochastic forcing by the magnetic tension on short timescales creates zonal flow structures with lifetimes of several tens of orbits. We experiment with various improved shearing box algorithms to reduce the numerical diffusivity introduced by the supersonic shear flow. While a standard finite difference advection scheme shows signs of a suppression of turbulent activity near the edges of the box, this problem is eliminated by a new method where the Keplerian shear advection is advanced in time by interpolation in Fourier space.

  16. The Linear Study of Zonally Asymmetric Barotropic Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuojun

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The loss of orthogonality between unstable normal modes is general for any kind of eigen-analysis. In particular for an observed climatological mean flow this is found to be very significant for the development of perturbations. A small perturbation can have a very large projection onto the most unstable normal mode. The adjoint eigenmode is most efficient at exciting the normal mode. The "gain" on projection is described by the projectibility. In general, growthrate and frequency information should be augmented with the projectibility and eigenvectors should be augmented by the corresponding adjoint eigenvectors. For the 300mb January climatological mean flow, the maximum projectibility is found to be 7.8 and the adjoint mode corresponding to the most unstable normal mode has large amplitude over the subtropical Indian Ocean and southeast Asia. The adjoint mode when used as an initial perturbation yields an energy increase of a factor of 50 within 10 days even when a damping is added to make the system stable. Both the initial value problems and forcing problems show that the linear barotropic vorticity equation gives important ideas on atmospheric low-frequency variability and the role of the tropics. The sensitivity of linear analysis to details of flow is studied. It is found that the instability is much more sensitive to the strength of the zonal flow component than to that of the wave components. The variation of leading unstable modes with respect to the strength of the waves is easily traced, as it is also in a simple system which contains only a zonal flow and a wave. Instability depends upon the assumption of the maintenance of the basic state. The sensitivity to basic states maintained by a divergent wind forcing and an equivalent orographic forcing are studied. It is found that the instability is more sensitive to the equivalent orographic forcing than to the divergent wind forcing. The

  17. ON THE VARIATION OF ZONAL GRAVITY COEFFICIENTS OF A GIANT PLANET CAUSED BY ITS DEEP ZONAL FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Kong Dali; Zhang Keke; Schubert, Gerald E-mail: kzhang@ex.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    Rapidly rotating giant planets are usually marked by the existence of strong zonal flows at the cloud level. If the zonal flow is sufficiently deep and strong, it can produce hydrostatic-related gravitational anomalies through distortion of the planet's shape. This paper determines the zonal gravity coefficients, J{sub 2n}, n = 1, 2, 3, ..., via an analytical method taking into account rotation-induced shape changes by assuming that a planet has an effective uniform density and that the zonal flows arise from deep convection and extend along cylinders parallel to the rotation axis. Two different but related hydrostatic models are considered. When a giant planet is in rigid-body rotation, the exact solution of the problem using oblate spheroidal coordinates is derived, allowing us to compute the value of its zonal gravity coefficients J-bar{sub 2n}, n=1,2,3,..., without making any approximation. When the deep zonal flow is sufficiently strong, we develop a general perturbation theory for estimating the variation of the zonal gravity coefficients, {Delta}J{sub 2n}=J{sub 2n}-J-bar{sub 2n}, n=1,2,3,..., caused by the effect of the deep zonal flows for an arbitrarily rapidly rotating planet. Applying the general theory to Jupiter, we find that the deep zonal flow could contribute up to 0.3% of the J{sub 2} coefficient and 0.7% of J{sub 4}. It is also found that the shape-driven harmonics at the 10th zonal gravity coefficient become dominant, i.e., {Delta}J{sub 2n}>=J-bar{sub 2n} for n {>=} 5.

  18. Exploring the Origin of High-frequency Coherent Radiation Imaged from Back Projection, Using Stochastic Finite-fault Earthquake Rupture Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satriano, C.; Ruiz, J. A.; Bernard, P.; Vilotte, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Back projection (BP) has recently emerged as a tool for imaging the spatio-temporal distribution of high-frequency (HF) emission during the earthquake rupture. BP images are typically constructed from HF-filtered, far field velocity waveforms, shifted and stacked according to the predicted travel-time from each node of a source grid. The underlying assumption is that the radiated wave field is coherent across the recording array, so that waveforms sum up constructively when the correct source point is selected. For regional arrays, at teleseismic distance, this assumption is generally valid up to 2-3 Hz. BP is an inherently HF method (resolution degrades at lower frequencies), and has been often used in conjunction with kinematic slip modeling (inherently low-frequency) to discuss the variability of rupture behavior with frequency. Many studies have evidenced that HF emissions occur at the border of large slip asperities and/or are associated with abrupt changes in rupture velocity. Here we perform a systematic investigation of the relationship between rupture properties and BP images of HF emission through the analysis of synthetic finite-source models, using a kinematic k-2 source model. This approach is based on a composite source description, with sub-events following a fractal distribution of sizes. Each elementary source is activated by the macro scale rupture front, with rupture duration proportional to its size. This approach generates, in the far-field approximation, ground displacements that follow the ω-2 model with frequency-dependent directivity effects. For a large earthquake rupture (M~9), synthetic far field recordings can be generated up to 4 Hz, with reasonable computing time. We study several scenarios, exploring the spatial variability of rupture velocity, fractal properties (slip heterogeneity) and source directivity, and analyze the effect of the relative position between the recording teleseismic array and the fault.

  19. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R.; Miller, James G.

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (cg) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (α') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (cp) and attenuation coefficient (α) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for cg and α' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  20. Causal determination of acoustic group velocity and frequency derivative of attenuation with finite-bandwidth Kramers-Kronig relations.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Joel; Waters, Kendall R; Miller, James G

    2005-07-01

    Kramers-Kronig (KK) analyses of experimental data are complicated by the extrapolation problem, that is, how the unexamined spectral bands impact KK calculations. This work demonstrates the causal linkages in resonant-type data provided by acoustic KK relations for the group velocity (c(g)) and the derivative of the attenuation coefficient (alpha') (components of the derivative of the acoustic complex wave number) without extrapolation or unmeasured parameters. These relations provide stricter tests of causal consistency relative to previously established KK relations for the phase velocity (c(p)) and attenuation coefficient (alpha) (components of the undifferentiated acoustic wave number) due to their shape invariance with respect to subtraction constants. For both the group velocity and attenuation derivative, three forms of the relations are derived. These relations are equivalent for bandwidths covering the entire infinite spectrum, but differ when restricted to bandlimited spectra. Using experimental data from suspensions of elastic spheres in saline, the accuracy of finite-bandwidth KK predictions for c(g) and alpha' is demonstrated. Of the multiple methods, the most accurate were found to be those whose integrals were expressed only in terms of the phase velocity and attenuation coefficient themselves, requiring no differentiated quantities.

  1. Zonal winds near Venus' cloud top level - An analytic model of the equatorial wind speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leovy, Conway B.

    1987-01-01

    A consequence of the presently hypothesized maintenance of the equatorial wind speed near the cloud top level of Venus by a balance between the semidiurnal tide's pumping and the Hadley circulation's vertical advection (both integrated across the thermal driving region) is that the maximum equatorial zonal wind speed is proportional to the product of the buoyancy frequency and the magnitude of the driving region's thickness. The proportionality constant is characterized as a weakly increasing function of the heating rate, and a decreasing function of the product of an inverse length, expressing the mean zonal wind shear, and the driving region thickness. For the class of solutions thus treated, there is a threshold heating rate value below which no equilibrium satisfies the prescribed balance.

  2. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Chan, V. S.; Lao, L. L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Green, D.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, F.; Park, J. M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Liu, D.; Podesta, M.; Harvey, R.; Smithe, D. N.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-05-15

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF[M. Choi et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments.

  3. Iterated finite-orbit Monte Carlo simulations with full-wave fields for modeling tokamak ion cyclotron resonance frequency wave heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, M.; Green, David L; Heidbrink, W. W.; Harvey, R. W.; Liu, D.; Chan, V. S.; Berry, Lee A; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Lao, L.L.; Pinsker, R. I.; Podesta, M.; Smithe, D. N.; Park, J. M.; Bonoli, P.

    2010-01-01

    The five-dimensional finite-orbit Monte Carlo code ORBIT-RF [M. Choi , Phys. Plasmas 12, 1 (2005)] is successfully coupled with the two-dimensional full-wave code all-orders spectral algorithm (AORSA) [E. F. Jaeger , Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101 (2006)] in a self-consistent way to achieve improved predictive modeling for ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave heating experiments in present fusion devices and future ITER [R. Aymar , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The ORBIT-RF/AORSA simulations reproduce fast-ion spectra and spatial profiles qualitatively consistent with fast ion D-alpha [W. W. Heidbrink , Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 49, 1457 (2007)] spectroscopic data in both DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono , Nucl. Fusion 41, 1435 (2001)] high harmonic ICRF heating experiments. This work verifies that both finite-orbit width effect of fast-ion due to its drift motion along the torus and iterations between fast-ion distribution and wave fields are important in modeling ICRF heating experiments. (C) 2010 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3314336

  4. Fuzzy interval Finite Element/Statistical Energy Analysis for mid-frequency analysis of built-up systems with mixed fuzzy and interval parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hui; Yu, Dejie; Yin, Shengwen; Xia, Baizhan

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces mixed fuzzy and interval parametric uncertainties into the FE components of the hybrid Finite Element/Statistical Energy Analysis (FE/SEA) model for mid-frequency analysis of built-up systems, thus an uncertain ensemble combining non-parametric with mixed fuzzy and interval parametric uncertainties comes into being. A fuzzy interval Finite Element/Statistical Energy Analysis (FIFE/SEA) framework is proposed to obtain the uncertain responses of built-up systems, which are described as intervals with fuzzy bounds, termed as fuzzy-bounded intervals (FBIs) in this paper. Based on the level-cut technique, a first-order fuzzy interval perturbation FE/SEA (FFIPFE/SEA) and a second-order fuzzy interval perturbation FE/SEA method (SFIPFE/SEA) are developed to handle the mixed parametric uncertainties efficiently. FFIPFE/SEA approximates the response functions by the first-order Taylor series, while SFIPFE/SEA improves the accuracy by considering the second-order items of Taylor series, in which all the mixed second-order items are neglected. To further improve the accuracy, a Chebyshev fuzzy interval method (CFIM) is proposed, in which the Chebyshev polynomials is used to approximate the response functions. The FBIs are eventually reconstructed by assembling the extrema solutions at all cut levels. Numerical results on two built-up systems verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  5. Numerical solution of Maxwell equations by a finite-difference time-domain method in a medium with frequency and spatial dispersion.

    PubMed

    Potravkin, N N; Perezhogin, I A; Makarov, V A

    2012-11-01

    We propose an alternative method of integration of Maxwell equations. This method is the generalization of a finite-difference time-domain method with an auxiliary differential equation for the case of a linear optical medium with a frequency dispersion and an arbitrary source of spatial dispersion. We apply this method to the problem of the propagation of short plane-wave linearly polarized light pulses in such a medium. It is shown that some features of their propagation are completely different from those that are generally recognized for the linear optical activity phenomenon. For example, in some cases an initially linearly polarized light pulse becomes elliptically polarized during the propagation. This effect is more prominent in the front part of the pulse. PMID:23214905

  6. Finite difference calculations of current densities in a homogeneous model of a man exposed to extremely low frequency electric fields.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, P J

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents three-dimensional finite difference calculations of induced current densities in a grounded, homogeneous, realistically human-shaped phantom. Comparison is made with published experimental values of current density at 60 Hz, measured in conducting saline manikins with their arms down by the side. The congruence between calculation and experiment gives confidence in the applicability of the numerical method and phantom shape to other configurations. The effect of raising both arms above the head is to reduce the current densities in the head and neck by approximately 50% and to increase those from the thorax downwards by 20-30%. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the shape and dimensions of the phantom, from a 45-kg, 1.5-m-tall person to a 140-kg, 1.9-m-tall person. When the phantom is grounded through both feet the current densities range from 50 to 90 microAm-2 in the head (all values for a 60-Hz, 1-kVm-1, vertical applied field), 70 to 140 microAm-2 in the thorax, 150 to 440 microAm-2 at the crotch, and 500 to 2,230 microAm-2 in the ankle. When grounded through only one foot the current densities at the crotch range from 400 to 1,000 microAm-2 and from 1,000 to 4,400 microAm-2 in the ankle of the grounded leg. Scale transformations of the short-circuit current with phantom height, weight, and surface area are confirmed. PMID:3122768

  7. High-resolution imaging of the Kaapvaal Craton using P and S wave receiver functions and P- and S- finite frequency tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssof, M.; Thybo, H.; Levander, A.; Artemieva, I. M.

    2012-12-01

    We are investigating the Kaapvaal craton with Ps- and Sp-wave receiver functions and P- and S- finite-frequency body wave tomography. We have produced 3D common conversion point (CCP) stacks of Ps and Sp receiver functions image volumes for comparison to 3D body wave finite-frequency travel-time inversions. These two methods together provide high vertical and lateral resolution of the upper mantle beneath the Kaapvaal craton. For a conversion point d, we have calculated the ray path of converted phases PdS and Sdp and their arrival times relative to P and S, respectively, by ray tracing the 1D AK135 velocity model. About ~1000 individual S-wave receiver functions and ~7000 P-wave receiver functions have been converted to depth and laterally migrated to their conversion point in 3D using the 1D reference velocity model, with signals stacked for signal enhancement. Converted wave imaging and traveltime tomography complement one another: The tomograms provide the laterally variable velocity structures needed for image focusing. The converted wave images provide higher resolution images of both lateral and vertical impedance changes, removing some of the smearing inherent in tomographic methods. In our particular case of investigating the Kaapvaal craton, the seismic imaging has confirmed the existence of a boundary beneath the Kaapvaal at 350 km, which we speculate is an unusually deep Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB). The topography of the LAB varies considerably from shallow depths (150 km) beneath the non-Archean regions to the deepest point (350 km) beneath the center of the Kaapvaal craton. In the receiver functions the LAB appears as a strong negative amplitude (in comparison to the Moho) beneath the Kaapvaal craton including under its edges, but it is a much weaker signal under the surrounding mobile belts. Our new model of Kaapvaal craton enhances the evidence for the existence of extremely deep cratonic keel, which reach 350 km with clear layered

  8. Enhancement of the finite-frequency superfluid response in the pseudogap regime of strongly disordered superconducting films

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Mintu; Kamlapure, Anand; Ganguli, Somesh Chandra; Jesudasan, John; Bagwe, Vivas; Benfatto, Lara; Raychaudhuri, Pratap

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of a soft gap in the density of states above the superconducting transition temperature Tc, the pseudogap, has long been thought to be a hallmark of unconventional high-temperature superconductors. However, in the last few years this paradigm has been strongly revised by increasing experimental evidence for the emergence of a pseudogap state in strongly-disordered conventional superconductors. Nonetheless, the nature of this state, probed primarily through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements, remains partly elusive. Here we show that the dynamic response above Tc, obtained from the complex ac conductivity, is highly modified in the pseudogap regime of strongly disordered NbN films. Below the pseudogap temperature, T*, the superfluid stiffness acquires a strong frequency dependence associated with a marked slowing down of critical fluctuations. When translated into the length-scale of fluctuations, our results suggest a scenario of thermal phase fluctuations between superconducting domains in a strongly disordered s-wave superconductor. PMID:23446946

  9. Finite-frequency wave propagation through outer rise fault zones and seismic measurements of upper mantle hydration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Nathaniel; Lizarralde, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Effects of serpentine-filled fault zones on seismic wave propagation in the upper mantle at the outer rise of subduction zones are evaluated using acoustic wave propagation models. Modeled wave speeds depend on azimuth, with slowest speeds in the fault-normal direction. Propagation is fastest along faults, but, for fault widths on the order of the seismic wavelength, apparent wave speeds in this direction depend on frequency. For the 5–12 Hz Pn arrivals used in tomographic studies, joint-parallel wavefronts are slowed by joints. This delay can account for the slowing seen in tomographic images of the outer rise upper mantle. At the Middle America Trench, confining serpentine to fault zones, as opposed to a uniform distribution, reduces estimates of bulk upper mantle hydration from ~3.5 wt % to as low as 0.33 wt % H2O.

  10. Elasticity in drift-wave-zonal-flow turbulence.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z B; Diamond, P H; Kosuga, Y; Gürcan, Ö D

    2014-04-01

    We present a theory of turbulent elasticity, a property of drift-wave-zonal-flow (DW-ZF) turbulence, which follows from the time delay in the response of DWs to ZF shears. An emergent dimensionless parameter |〈v〉'|/Δωk is found to be a measure of the degree of Fickian flux-gradient relation breaking, where |〈v〉'| is the ZF shearing rate and Δωk is the turbulence decorrelation rate. For |〈v〉'|/Δωk>1, we show that the ZF evolution equation is converted from a diffusion equation, usually assumed, to a telegraph equation, i.e., the turbulent momentum transport changes from a diffusive process to wavelike propagation. This scenario corresponds to a state very close to the marginal instability of the DW-ZF system, e.g., the Dimits shift regime. The frequency of the ZF wave is ΩZF=±γd1/2γmodu1/2, where γd is the ZF friction coefficient and γmodu is the net ZF growth rate for the case of the Fickian flux-gradient relation. This insight provides a natural framework for understanding temporally periodic ZF structures in the Dimits shift regime and in the transition from low confined mode to high confined mode in confined plasmas. PMID:24827182

  11. Finite frequency effects on apparent S-wave splitting in the D″ layer: comparison between ray theory and full-wave synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2016-10-01

    We conduct a numerical experiment to investigate potential bias in measurements of S-wave splitting (apparent differences between the arrival times of SH and SV phases) for waves propagating close to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in the D″ layer. The bias is defined as the discrepancy between shear wave splitting measured from finite frequency synthetic seismograms (`apparent splitting') and the splitting predicted by ray theory, which is a high-frequency approximation. For simple isotropic models, we find biases which are typically between 0.5 and 4 s, depending on the model, the Q structure and the dominant period of the synthetics. The bias increases for lower frequencies or lower Q values. The epicentral distance at which the bias starts depends on the frequency and the Q structure. We also compute synthetics for models based on mineral physics (using the elastic constants under lower-mantle pressure and temperature conditions, taking into account the phase transition from Mg-perovskite to Mg-post-perovskite) and geodynamics (the thermal boundary layer) and find that the depth of the positive velocity jump associated with the phase transition and the depth range over which the velocity decreases (due to temperature increases) in the thermal boundary layer significantly influence the wavefield in the lowermost mantle. For example, in cold regions beneath subduction zones, wavefields for SH and SV differ greatly due to the steep velocity decrease close to the CMB. For complex models, apparent splitting can also arise from the possibility that low amplitude direct phases might be overlooked, and larger amplitude later phases might instead incorrectly be picked as the direct arrival. Biases of the type investigated in this study combine with other sources of uncertainty for splitting in D″ (e.g. the correction for upper-mantle anisotropy and the difference between SH and SV ray paths) to make a precise evaluation of the anisotropy in D″ difficult.

  12. Finite frequency effects on apparent S-wave splitting in the D″ layer: comparison between ray theory and full-wave synthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgeaud, Anselme F. E.; Konishi, Kensuke; Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2016-07-01

    We conduct a numerical experiment to investigate potential bias in measurements of S-wave splitting (apparent differences between the arrival times of SH and SV phases) for waves propagating close to the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in the D″ layer. The bias is defined as the discrepancy between shear wave splitting measured from finite frequency synthetic seismograms ("apparent splitting") and the splitting predicted by ray theory, which is a high-frequency approximation. For simple isotropic models, we find biases which are typically between 0.5 s and 4 s, depending on the model, the Q structure, and the dominant period of the synthetics. The bias increases for lower frequencies or lower Q values. The epicentral distance at which the bias starts depends on the frequency and the Q structure. We also compute synthetics for models based on mineral physics (using the elastic constants under lower mantle pressure and temperature conditions, taking into account the phase transition from Mg-perovskite to post-perovskite) and geodynamics (the thermal boundary layer) and find that the depth of the positive velocity jump associated with the phase transition and the depth range over which the velocity decreases (due to temperature increases) in the thermal boundary layer significantly influence the wavefield in the lowermost mantle. For example, in cold regions beneath subduction zones, wavefields for SH and SV differ greatly due to the steep velocity decrease close to the CMB. For complex models, apparent splitting can also arise from the possibility that low amplitude direct phases might be overlooked, and larger amplitude later phases might instead incorrectly be picked as the direct arrival. Biases of the type investigated in this study combine with other sources of uncertainty for splitting in D″ (e.g., the correction for upper mantle anisotropy and the difference between SH and SV raypaths) to make a precise evaluation of the anisotropy in D″ difficult.

  13. Average vertical and zonal F region plasma drifts over Jicamarca

    SciTech Connect

    Fejer, B.G.; Gonzalez, S.A. ); de Paula, E.R. Utah State Univ., Logan ); Woodman, R.F. )

    1991-08-01

    The seasonal averages of the equatorial F region vertical and zonal plasma drifts are determined using extensive incoherent scatter radar observations from Jicamarca during 1968-1988. The late afternoon and nighttime vertical and zonal drifts are strongly dependent on the 10.7-cm solar flux. The authors show that the evening prereversal enhancement of vertical drifts increases linearly with solar flux during equinox but tends to saturate for large fluxes during southern hemisphere winter. They examine in detail, for the first time, the seasonal variation of the zonal plasma drifts and their dependence on solar flux and magnetic activity. The seasonal effects on the zonal drifts are most pronounced in the midnight-morning sector. The nighttime eastward drifts increase with solar flux for all seasons but decrease slightly with magnetic activity. The daytime westward drifts are essentially independent of season, solar cycle, and magnetic activity.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics and frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method coupling for the interaction between microwaves and plasma in rocket plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Kinefuchi, K.; Funaki, I.; Shimada, T.; Abe, T.

    2012-10-15

    Under certain conditions during rocket flights, ionized exhaust plumes from solid rocket motors may interfere with radio frequency transmissions. To understand the relevant physical processes involved in this phenomenon and establish a prediction process for in-flight attenuation levels, we attempted to measure microwave attenuation caused by rocket exhaust plumes in a sea-level static firing test for a full-scale solid propellant rocket motor. The microwave attenuation level was calculated by a coupling simulation of the inviscid-frozen-flow computational fluid dynamics of an exhaust plume and detailed analysis of microwave transmissions by applying a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method with the Drude dispersion model. The calculated microwave attenuation level agreed well with the experimental results, except in the case of interference downstream the Mach disk in the exhaust plume. It was concluded that the coupling estimation method based on the physics of the frozen plasma flow with Drude dispersion would be suitable for actual flight conditions, although the mixing and afterburning in the plume should be considered depending on the flow condition.

  15. Finite-frequency tomography of P and S waves in the Carpathian-Pannonian region: Implications for geodynamics of the continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Stuart, G. W.; Houseman, G. A.; Dando, B. D.; Ionescu, C.; Hegedus, E.; Radovanovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Carpathian-Pannonian system which is the most tectonically active region in Eastern and Central Europe, represents an unique geodynamical case in continental collision zone for studying the interaction between the surface tectonic processes and the deep lithospheric and mantle processes. Particularly, the geodynamical processes involved in the formation of both Pannonian basin and Vrancea seismogenic zone are still debated today. Here, we present high-resolution upper mantle structures beneath the region from finite-frequency tomography using P and S waves in order to bring constraints on geodynamical models. We have selected teleseismic earthquakes with magnitude greater than 5.5, which occurred between 2005 and 2010. The data were recorded on 57 temporary stations deployed in the South Carpathian Project, 56 temporary stations deployed in the earlier Carpathian Basins Project (CBP), and 50 permanent broadband stations. The differential travel times are measured in high, intermediate and low frequencies (0.5-2.0 Hz, 0.1-0.5 Hz and 0.03-0.1 Hz for both P-wave, 0.1-0.5 Hz, 0.05-0.1 Hz and 0.02-0.05 Hz for S-wave), and are inverted according to the 3-D finite-frequency formulation to produce P and S-wave velocity maps at different depths in the mantle. Our images show the presence of a sub-vertical fast material beneath the eastern Alps which extends across the centre of the Pannonian region below ~ 300 km depth. It extends downward into the mantle transition zone and appears to spread outward beneath the entire basin. The upper mantle below the Pannonian basin is dominated by a slow anomaly extending down to ~ 300 km depth. We suggest that a late stage of gravitational instability with detachment of cold mantle lithospheric downwellings is occurring beneath the eastern Alps in the present-day. The same mechanism could also have occurred below the Pannonian basin in the past and though explain the mantle lithospheric extension. In the Vrancea Zone, the seismicity

  16. The Congo basin zonal overturning circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Naresh

    2016-06-01

    The Gulf of Guinea in the equatorial Atlantic is characterized by the presence of strong subsidence at certain times of the year. This subsidence appears in June and becomes well established from July to September. Since much of theWest African monsoon flow originates over the Gulf, Guinean subsidence is important for determining moisture sources for the monsoon. Using reanalysis products, I contribute to a physical understanding of what causes this seasonal subsidence, and how it relates to precipitation distributions across West Africa. There is a seasonal zonal overturning circulation above the Congo basin and the Gulf of Guinea in the ERA-Interim, ERA-40, NCEP2, and MERRA reanalyses. The up-branch is located in the Congo basin around 20°E. Mid-tropospheric easterly flows constitute the returning-branch and sinking over the Gulf of Guinea forms the down-branch, which diverges at 2°W near the surface, with winds to the east flowing eastward to complete the circulation. This circulation is driven by surface temperature differences between the eastern Gulf and Congo basin. Land temperatures remain almost uniform, around 298 K, throughout a year, but the Guinean temperatures cool rapidly from 294 K in May to about 290 K in August. These temperature changes increase the ocean/land temperature contrast, up to 8 K, and drive the circulation. I hypothesize that when the overturning circulation is anomalously strong, the northward moisture transport and Sahelian precipitation are also strong. This hypothesis is supported by ERA-Interim and PERSIANN-CDR (Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Climate Data Record) data.

  17. Analyzing the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals based on a modified finite-difference frequency-domain method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Ding, Guo-Wen; Lin, Yi-Bing; Chen, Yu-Qing

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, the properties of acceptor mode in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (2D PPCs) composed of the homogeneous and isotropic dielectric cylinders inserted into nonmagnetized plasma background with square lattices under transverse-magnetic wave are theoretically investigated by a modified finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method with supercell technique, whose symmetry of every supercell is broken by removing a central rod. A new FDFD method is developed to calculate the band structures of such PPCs. The novel FDFD method adopts a general function to describe the distribution of dielectric in the present PPCs, which can easily transform the complicated nonlinear eigenvalue equation to the simple linear equation. The details of convergence and effectiveness of proposed FDFD method are analyzed using a numerical example. The simulated results demonstrate that the enough accuracy of the proposed FDFD method can be observed compared to the plane wave expansion method, and the good convergence can also be obtained if the number of meshed grids is large enough. As a comparison, two different configurations of photonic crystals (PCs) but with similar defect are theoretically investigated. Compared to the conventional dielectric-air PCs, not only the acceptor mode has a higher frequency but also an additional photonic bandgap (PBG) can be found in the low frequency region. The calculated results also show that PBGs of proposed PPCs can be enlarged as the point defect is introduced. The influences of the parameters for present PPCs on the properties of acceptor mode are also discussed in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the acceptor mode in the present PPCs can be easily tuned by changing those parameters. Those results can hold promise for designing the tunable applications in the signal process or time delay devices based on the present PPCs.

  18. Joint inversion of normal-mode and finite-frequency S-wave data using an irregular tomographic grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroli, Christophe; Lambotte, Sophie; Lévêque, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Global-scale tomographic models should aim at satisfying the full seismic spectrum. For this purpose, and to better constrain isotropic 3-D variations of shear velocities in the mantle, we tackle a joint inversion of spheroidal normal-mode structure coefficients and multiple-frequency S-wave delay times. In all previous studies for which normal modes were jointly inverted for, with body and/or surface waves, the mantle was laterally parametrized with uniform basis functions, such as spherical harmonics, equal-area blocks and evenly spaced spherical splines. In particular, spherical harmonics naturally appear when considering the Earth's free oscillations. However, progress towards higher resolution joint tomography requires a movement away from such uniform parametrization to overcome its computational inefficiency to adapt to local variations in resolution. The main goal of this study is to include normal modes into a joint inversion based upon a non-uniform parametrization that is adapted to the spatially varying smallest resolving length of the data. Thus, we perform the first joint inversion of normal-mode and body-wave data using an irregular tomographic grid, optimized according to ray density. We show how to compute the projection of 3-D sensitivity kernels for both data sets onto our parametrization made up of spherical layers spanned with irregular Delaunay triangulations. This approach, computationally efficient, allows us to map into the joint model multiscale structural informations from data including periods in the 10-51 s range for body waves and 332-2134 s for normal modes. Tomographic results are focused on the 400-2110 km depth range, where our data coverage is the most relevant. We discuss the potential of a better resolution where the grid is fine, compared to spherical harmonics up to degree 40, as the number of model parameters is similar. Our joint model seems to contain coherent structural components beyond degree 40, such as those related

  19. Finite frequency P-wave traveltime measurements on ocean bottom seismometers and hydrophones in the western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekhmistrenko, Maria; Sigloch, Karin; Hosseini, Kasra; Barruol, Guilhem

    2016-04-01

    From 2011 to 2014, the RHUM-RUM project (Reunion Hotspot Upper Mantle - Reunions Unterer Mantel) instrumented a 2000x2000km2 area of Indian Ocean seafloor, islands and Madagascar with broadband seismometers and hydrophones. The central component was a 13-month deployment of 57 German and French Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) in 2300-5600 m depth. This was supplemented by 2-3 year deployments of 37 island stations on Reunion, Mauritius, Rodrigues, the southern Seychelles, the Iles Eparses and southern Madagascar. Two partner projects contributed another 30+ stations on Madagascar. Our ultimate objective is multifrequency waveform tomography of the entire mantle column beneath the Reunion hotspot. Ideally we would use all passbands that efficiently transmit body waves but this meets practical limits in the noise characteristics of ocean-bottom recordings in particular. Here we present the preliminary data set of frequency-dependent P-wave traveltime measurements on seismometers and hydrophones, obtained by cross-correlation of observed with predicted waveforms. The latter are synthesized from fully numerical Green's functions and carefully estimated, broadband source time functions. More than 200 teleseismic events during the 13-month long deployment yielded usable P-waveform measurements. We present our methods and discuss data yield and quality of ocean-bottom versus land seismometers, and of OBS versus broadband hydrophones. Above and below the microseismic noise band, data yields are higher than within it, especially for OBS. The 48 German OBS, equipped with Guralp 60 s sensors, were afflicted by relatively high self-noise compared to the 9 French instruments equipped with Nanometrics Trillium 240 s sensors. The HighTechInc (model HTI-01 and HTI-04-PCA/ULF) hydrophones (100 s corner period) functioned particularly reliably but their waveforms are relatively more challenging to model due to reverberations in the water column. We obtain ~15000 combined cross

  20. Shape, zonal winds and gravitational field of Jupiter: a fully self-consistent, multi-layered model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Gerald; Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke

    2016-10-01

    We construct a three-dimensional, finite-element, fully self-consistent, multi-layered,non-spheroidal model of Jupiter consisting of an inner core, a metallic electrically conducting dynamo region and an outer molecular electrically insulating envelope. We assume that the Jovian zonal winds are on cylinders parallel to the rotation axis but, due to the effect of magnetic braking, are confined within the outer molecular envelope. Two related calculations are carried out. The first provides an accurate description of the shape and internal density profile of Jupiter; the effect of rotational distortion is not treated as a small perturbation on a spherically symmetric state. This calculation determines the density, size and shape of the inner core, the irregular shape of the 1-bar pressure level, and the internal structure of Jupiter; the full effect of rotational distortion, without the influence of the zonal winds, is accounted for. Our multi-layered model is able to produce the known mass, the known equatorial and polar radii, and the known zonal gravitational coefficient J2 of Jupiter within their error bars; it also yields the coefficients J4 and J6 within about 5% accuracy, and the core equatorial radius 0.09RJ containing 3.73 Earth masses.The second calculation determines the variation of the gravitational field caused solely by the effect of the zonal winds on the rotationally distorted non-spheroidal Jupiter. Four different cases, ranging from a deep wind profile to a very shallow profile, are considered and implications for accurate interpretation of the zonal gravitational coefficients expected from the Juno mission are discussed.

  1. The Importance of Zonal Asymmetry in the Southern Hemisphere Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, A. L.; Polvani, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric circulation in the Southern Hemisphere is considered a good example of a zonally symmetric jet, but recent papers have questioned the accuracy of this approximation. Numerous studies of the southern annular mode and the budget of zonal-mean momentum have sought to understand the timescales and causes of variability, as well as trends associated with climate change. This raises a question: when does taking the zonal mean give you the wrong answer? To address this question we employ the CESM-Large Ensemble, a 30-member, fully coupled set of simulations, suitable for assessing both the forced response and natural variability of the climate system. We find that in DJF, 20th century trends associated with the ozone hole are uniform with longitude and height, and far exceed the natural variability of the system. In contrast, the JJA circulation and its trends have a longitudinal structure that is obscured by zonal averaging. The consequence is that a significant regional deceleration of the jet stream predicted for the coming century, presumably driven by increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, is completely eliminated in the zonal mean.

  2. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Alfven Eigenmodes with Zonal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixuan

    2012-03-01

    Effects of collective Shear Alfven wave instabilities on the energetic particle confinement in tokamak depend ultimately on the nonlinear evolution of the turbulence with spontaneously generated zonal fields (zonal flows and zonal currents). In this work, we study nonlinear interaction of Alfv'en eigenmodes with zonal fields using global gyrokinetic toroidal code GTC. We choose to start from the simplest case, linear electrostatic eigenmodes in cylindrical geometry, and then gradually extend our study into electromagnetic eigenmode in toroidal geometry. We have verified GTC for linear simulation in cylindrical geometry with the ExB flow shear. Ion temperature gradient instability is observed to be suppressed when ExB flow shear is strong enough. A good agreement has also been achieved between our simulation result of kinetic Alfv'en wave and LAPD experimental result. Now we are doing TAE (torodicity-induced Alfv'en eigenmodes) simulation using the DIII-D equilibrium data. Linear simulation result agrees well with DIII-D data. Our next step is to include nonlinear effects to study the interaction between zonal fields and TAEs. Work supported by DOE SciDAC GSEP Center and Plasma Science Center.

  3. Numerical Simulation on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Mass

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuguang; Wang, Yuan; Mei, Yu; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration phenomenon was confirmed and its mechanism is revealed. It is found to be the result of circular fracture which develops within surrounding rock mass under the high geostress. The fractured shape of zonal disintegration was determined, and the radii of the fractured zones were found to fulfill the relationship of geometric progression. The numerical results were in accordance with the model test findings. The mechanism of the zonal disintegration was revealed by theoretical analysis based on fracture mechanics. The fractured zones are reportedly circular and concentric to the cavern. Each fracture zone ruptured at the elastic-plastic boundary of the surrounding rocks and then coalesced into the circular form. The geometric progression ratio was found to be related to the mechanical parameters and the ground stress of the surrounding rocks. PMID:24592166

  4. Centrilobular zonal necrosis as a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Hiroshi; Sugita, Tomonori; Seki, Nobuyoshi; Chuganji, Yoshimichi; Furumoto, Youhei; Sakata, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Centrilobular zonal necrosis (CZN) is a known histological variant of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). However, the significance of CZN is yet to be fully elucidated. This study aimed to determine whether CZN is a hallmark of a distinctive subtype of AIH. Methods Histological changes in the centrilobular zones of liver biopsies from 113 AIH patients were assessed by a single pathologist and classified into three categories: typical zonal necrosis defined as CZN (15 patients); other necroinflammatory change (NIC; 24 patients); and absence of necrosis (non-NIC; 74 patients). The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of CZN patients were then assessed. Results The clinicopathological features of AIH with CZN were distinct from other types of AIH, including a higher frequency of acute onset, lower frequency of antinuclear antibodies, lower antinuclear antibody titers, lower serum immunoglobulin G levels, lower grade interface hepatitis, less prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and lower AIH score. Increased and decreased frequencies of HLA-DR9 and HLA-DR4, respectively, were identified as immunogenetic features of AIH with CZN. Conversely, the clinicopathological characteristics of AIH with NIC were similar to those of non-NIC AIH, including the majority of the AIH patients. The therapeutic outcomes of AIH with CZN were excellent when precise diagnoses were made without delay. Conclusion The clinicopathological features and immunogenetic background of AIH with CZN differed from AIH without CZN. CZN may be a hallmark of a distinct subtype of AIH. PMID:26657454

  5. A dynamo driven by zonal winds at the upper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guervilly, C.; Cardin, P.

    2009-12-01

    In a first approximation, Jupiter is made of two fluid layers: a deep metallic hydrogen layer where the jovian dynamo is generated and a superficial “atmospheric” non metallic envelope of approximately 10,000 km depth (10-20% of the total radius of the planet). Recent numerical simulations of three-dimensional rotating convection in a relatively thin spherical shell modelling the atmospheric layer of Jupiter reproduce zonal winds similar to the bands visible on Jupiter’s surface [1]. The simulated flow displays a quasi two-dimensional structure aligned with axis of rotation. Thus [1] suggests that the zonal winds may be “deep rooted” within Jupiter’s interior. These zonal winds are believed to be damped within the deep metallic hydrogen layer [2]. The main question that leads to our work is simple: can the external forcing created by the zonal winds at the top of the metallic hydrogen region drive a dynamo? The external zonal winds generate geostrophic shear layers inside which may lead to non-axisymmetric hydrodynamic instabilities. Such instabilities are known to excite dynamo action [3], [4] and the jovian dynamo will be discussed following these ideas. [1] Heimpel, M.H., Aurnou, J.M., Wicht, J., 2005. Simulation of equatorial and high-latitude jets on Jupiter in a deep convection model. Nature 438, 193-196. [2] Kirk, R.L., Stevenson, D.J., 1987. Hydromagnetic constraints on deep zonal flow in the giant planets. Astrophys. J. 316, 816-846 [3] Guervilly C. and Cardin P., 2009. Numerical simulations of dynamos generated in spherical Couette flows, submitted to Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. [4] Schaeffer, N. and Cardin, P., 2006. Quasi-geostrophic kinematic dynamos at low magnetic Prandtl number. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 245, 595-604.

  6. EDITORIAL: Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.

    2006-04-01

    There has been remarkable progress made in the research of structure formation by turbulence in nonequilibrium plasmas. One of the highlights has been the physics of zonal flow and drift wave turbulence in toroidal plasmas. Extensive theoretical as well as computational studies have revealed the various mechanisms in the system of turbulence and zonal flows, as highlighted in the recent review paper `Zonal flows in plasma—a review' by P H Diamond et al (2005 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion} 47 R35). There has also been increasing research in experimental studies of zonal flows, geodesic acoustic modes, and the generation of global electric field by turbulence. In recognition of this a cluster Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion occasionally publishes a small collection of articles on a specific topic. These special sections highlight a specific area of research that is of importance to the journal either as a new or growing research area. The subjects are selected by the Editorial Board and managed by a Guest Editor, Professor Itoh in this case. of 15 papers on `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence' is presented in this issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. Each paper in this special cluster describes the present research status and new scientific knowledge/results on the authors' machine involved, on the subject of experimental studies of zonal flows, electric field and nonlinear interactions with turbulence (including studies of Reynolds-Maxwell stresses, etc). Readers of, and contributors to, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion have been facing a new phase of plasma physics, with the expanding application of plasma physics to the explosive growth of our knowledge of the astronomical, space and laboratory plasmas, and the approach of ITER. The evolution of modern plasma physics into the new arena is backed up by extensive research as illustrated by this cluster of papers and review papers. We believe that this group of articles will

  7. Magnetic Field Generation and Zonal Flows in the Gas Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, L.; Wicht, J.; Gastine, T.

    2013-12-01

    The surface dynamics of Jupiter and Saturn is dominated by a banded system of fierce zonal winds. The depth of these winds remains unclear but they are thought to be confined to the very outer envelopes where hydrogen remains molecular and the electrical conductivity is negligible. The dynamo responsible for the dipole dominated magnetic fields of both Gas Giants, on the other hand, likely operates in the deeper interior where hydrogen assumes a metallic state. We present numerical simulations that attempt to model both the zonal winds and the interior dynamo action in an integrated approach. Using the anelastic version of the MHD code MagIC, we explore the effects of density stratification and radial electrical conductivity variations. The electrical conductivity is assumed to remain constant in the thicker inner metallic region and decays exponentially towards the outer boundary throughout the molecular envelope. Our results show that the combination of stronger density stratification (Δρ≈55) and a weaker conducting outer layer is essential for reconciling dipole dominated dynamo action and a fierce equatorial zonal jet. Previous simulations with homogeneous electrical conductivity show that both are mutually exclusive, with solutions either having strong zonal winds and multipolar magnetic fields or weak zonal winds and dipole dominated magnetic fields. The particular setup explored here allows the equatorial jet to remain confined to the weaker conducting region where is does not interfere with the deeper seated dynamo action. The equatorial jet can afford to remain geostrophic and reaches throughout the whole shell. This is not an option for the additional mid to higher latitude jets, however. In dipole dominated dynamo solutions, appropriate for the Gas Giants, zonal flows remain very faint in the deeper dynamo region but increase in amplitude in the weakly conducting outer layer in some of our simulations. This suggests that the mid to high latitude jets

  8. Measurement of a zonal wind profile on Titan by Doppler tracking of the Cassini entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Pollack, J. B.; Seiff, A.

    1990-01-01

    A program, called the Cassini mission, intended to study the Saturn system by utilizing a Saturn orbiter and a probe descending to the surface of Titan, is discussed. Winds are expected to cause perturbations to the probe local horizontal velocity, resulting in an anomalous drift in the probe location and a shift in the frequency of the probe telemetry, due to the Doppler effect. By using an iterative algorithm, in which the time variation of the probe telemetry frequency is monitored throughout the descent, and the probe trajectory is updated to reflect the effect of wind on the probe location, a highly accurate relative wind profile can be recovered. By adding a single wind velocity, measured by independent means, an absolute wind profile can be obtained. However, the accuracy of the zonal winds recovery is limited by errors in trajectory, and frequency.

  9. Observations of zonal flows in electrode biasing experiments on the Joint Texas Experimental tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. G.; Lan, T.; Chen, Z. P.; Kong, D. F.; Zhao, H. L.; Wu, J.; Sun, X.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Xu, M.; Sun, Y.; Liu, H.; Wang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-04-01

    Zonal flows (ZFs) are observed during the electrode biasing (EB) high confinement mode (H-mode) using Langmuir probe arrays on the edge of J-TEXT tokamak. The long-distance correlation characteristics of floating potentials and interactions with turbulence are studied. During positive biasing H-mode, either the geodesic acoustic mode or low frequency ZF increases. Strong suppression of radial transport by ZFs is found in the low frequency region. The components of the radial particle flux without and with EB are compared in the frequency domain. The interaction between ZFs and ambient turbulence is also discussed. The results show that the rate of ZFs' shear is comparable with that of E × B shear, suggesting that ZFs could be the trigger of the biasing H-mode.

  10. The fractionation of nuclei from mammalian cells by zonal centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. R.; Mathias, A. P.; Pennington, F.; Ridge, D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Purified liver nuclei from adult rats separate into two main zones when centrifuged in the slow-speed zonal rotor. One zone contains diploid nuclei, the other tetraploid. 2. The effect of age on the pattern of rat liver ploidy was examined. Tetraploid nuclei are virtually absent from young animals. They increase in proportion steadily with age. Partial hepatectomy disturbs the pattern of ploidy. 3. The zonal centrifuge permits the separation of diploid, tetraploid, octaploid and hexadecaploid nuclei from mouse liver. 4. Rat liver nuclei are isopycnic with sucrose solutions of density 1·35 at 5°. ImagesFig. 1.PLATE 1Fig. 9. PMID:4876099

  11. Zonal flows and turbulence in fluids and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey Bok-Cheung

    In geophysical and plasma contexts, zonal flows are well known to arise out of turbulence. We elucidate the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence without zonal flows to statistically inhomogeneous turbulence with steady zonal flows. Starting from the Hasegawa--Mima equation, we employ both the quasilinear approximation and a statistical average, which retains a great deal of the qualitative behavior of the full system. Within the resulting framework known as CE2, we extend recent understanding of the symmetry-breaking 'zonostrophic instability'. Zonostrophic instability can be understood in a very general way as the instability of some turbulent background spectrum to a zonally symmetric coherent mode. As a special case, the background spectrum can consist of only a single mode. We find that in this case the dispersion relation of zonostrophic instability from the CE2 formalism reduces exactly to that of the 4-mode truncation of generalized modulational instability. We then show that zonal flows constitute pattern formation amid a turbulent bath. Zonostrophic instability is an example of a Type I s instability of pattern-forming systems. The broken symmetry is statistical homogeneity. Near the bifurcation point, the slow dynamics of CE2 are governed by a well-known amplitude equation, the real Ginzburg-Landau equation. The important features of this amplitude equation, and therefore of the CE2 system, are multiple. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. In an idealized, infinite system, there is a continuous band of zonal flow wavelengths that allow a nonlinear equilibrium. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets. These behaviors are shown numerically to hold in the CE2 system, and we calculate a stability diagram. The stability diagram is in agreement with direct numerical simulations of the quasilinear

  12. The modulational instability in the extended Hasegawa-Mima equation with a finite Larmor radius

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, S.; Hnat, B.; Rowlands, G.; Connaughton, C.; Nazarenko, S.

    2012-12-15

    The effects of the finite Larmor radius on the generation of zonal flows by the four-wave modulational instability are investigated using an extended form of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. Growth rates of the zonal mode are quantified using analytical predictions from a four-mode truncated model, as well as from direct numerical simulation of the nonlinear extended Hasegawa-Mima equation. We not only consider purely zonal flows but also examine the generic oblique case and show that, for small Larmor radii, off-axis modes may become dominant. We find a key parameter M{sub {rho}} which characterises the behaviour of the system due to changes in the Larmor radius. We find that, similarly to previous results obtained by changing the driving wave amplitude, two separate dynamical regimes can be accessed. These correspond to oscillatory energy transfer between zonal flows and a driving wave and the fully saturated zonal flow.

  13. The modulational instability in the extended Hasegawa-Mima equation with a finite Larmor radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, S.; Hnat, B.; Connaughton, C.; Nazarenko, S.; Rowlands, G.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of the finite Larmor radius on the generation of zonal flows by the four-wave modulational instability are investigated using an extended form of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. Growth rates of the zonal mode are quantified using analytical predictions from a four-mode truncated model, as well as from direct numerical simulation of the nonlinear extended Hasegawa-Mima equation. We not only consider purely zonal flows but also examine the generic oblique case and show that, for small Larmor radii, off-axis modes may become dominant. We find a key parameter Mρ which characterises the behaviour of the system due to changes in the Larmor radius. We find that, similarly to previous results obtained by changing the driving wave amplitude, two separate dynamical regimes can be accessed. These correspond to oscillatory energy transfer between zonal flows and a driving wave and the fully saturated zonal flow.

  14. Adaptive beamforming at very low frequencies in spatially coherent, cluttered noise environments with low signal-to-noise ratio and finite-averaging times

    PubMed

    Nuttall; Wilson

    2000-11-01

    Realistic simulations with spatially coherent noise have been run in order to compare the performance of adaptive beamforming (ABF), inverse beamforming (IBF), and conventional beamforming (CBF) for the case of finite-averaging times, where the actual spatial coherence of the acoustic field, or covariance matrix, is not known a priori, but must be estimated. These estimation errors cause large errors in the ABF estimate of the directionality of the acoustic field, partly because ABF is a highly nonlinear algorithm. In addition, it is shown that ABF is fundamentally limited in its suppression capability at very low frequency (VLF), based on the sidelobe level of the conventional beampattern in the direction of the noise interferer [G. L. Mohnkern, "Effects of Errors and Limitations on Interference Suppression," NOSC Technical Document 1478, Naval Ocean Systems Center (1989)]. The simulations include a low-level plane wave signal of interest, a stronger noise plane wave interferer, and spatially random background noise. Both IBF and ABF performed significantly better than CBF, and IBF's performance was slightly better than ABF's performance. The performances of IBF and the ABF algorithm, the minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) [A. H. Nuttall and D. W. Hyde, "Unified Approach to Optimum and Suboptimum Processing for Arrays," USL Report Number 992, Naval Underwater Systems Center, New London, CT (22 April 1969)] were recently compared independently [J. S. D. Solomon, A. J. Knight, and M. V. Greening, "Sonar Array Signal Processing for Sparse Linear Arrays," Defense Science and Technology Organization (DSTO) Technical Report (June 1999)] using measured data, with the result that IBF outperformed MVDR. This result is significant because MVDR requires orders of magnitude more processing power than IBF or CBF.

  15. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic waves in a steady zonal circulation for a shallow fluid shell on the surface of a rotating sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, Y. Q.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers two-dimensional nonlinear MHD waves of large horizontal spatial scales for a thin magnetofluid layer on the surface of a rotating sphere. The 'shallow fluid' hydrodynamic equations are generalized to include the effects of magnetic fields, and it is shown that the resulting MHD equations can be reduced to a single scalar equation for a stream function involving several free functions. For special choices of these free functions, two kinds of finite-amplitude MHD waves are obtained, propagating in the azimuthal direction relative to the uniformly rotating background atmosphere in the presence of a background zonal magnetic field and a steady differential zonal flow. These two kinds of MHD waves are fundamentally due to the joint effects of the uniform rotation of the background atmosphere and background magnetic field; the first is an inertial wave of the Rossby (1939) and Haurwitz (1940) type, modified by the presence of the background zonal magnetic field, while the second is a magnetic Alfven-like wave which is modified by the uniform rotation of the background atmosphere.

  16. Impact of Stratospheric Ozone Zonal Asymmetries on the Tropospheric Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweedy, Olga; Waugh, Darryn; Li, Feng; Oman, Luke

    2015-01-01

    The depletion and recovery of Antarctic ozone plays a major role in changes of Southern Hemisphere (SH) tropospheric climate. Recent studies indicate that the lack of polar ozone asymmetries in chemistry climate models (CCM) leads to a weaker and warmer Antarctic vortex, and smaller trends in the tropospheric mid-latitude jet and the surface pressure. However, the tropospheric response to ozone asymmetries is not well understood. In this study we report on a series of integrations of the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM) to further examine the effect of zonal asymmetries on the state of the stratosphere and troposphere. Integrations with the full, interactive stratospheric chemistry are compared against identical simulations using the same CCM except that (1) the monthly mean zonal mean stratospheric ozone from first simulation is prescribed and (2) ozone is relaxed to the monthly mean zonal mean ozone on a three day time scale. To analyze the tropospheric response to ozone asymmetries, we examine trends and quantify the differences in temperatures, zonal wind and surface pressure among the integrations.

  17. Can zonally symmetric inertial waves drive an oscillating mean flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelig, Torsten; Harlander, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In the presentation [5] zonal mean flow excitation by inertial waves is studied in analogy to mean flow excitation by gravity waves [3] that plays an important role for the quasi-biennial oscillation in the equatorial atmosphere. In geophysical flows that are stratified and rotating, pure gravity and inertial waves correspond to the two limiting cases: gravity waves neglect rotation, inertial waves neglect stratification. The former are more relevant for fluids like the atmosphere, where stratification is dominant, the latter for the deep oceans or planet cores, where rotation dominates. In the present study a hierarchy of simple analytical and numerical models of zonally symmetric inertial wave-mean flow interactions is considered and the results are compared with data from a laboratory experiment [4]. The main findings can be summarised as follows: (i) when the waves are decoupled from the mean flow they just drive a retrograde (eastward) zonal mean flow, independent of the sign of the meridional phase speed; (ii) when coupling is present and the zonal mean flow is assumed to be steady, the waves can drive vertically alternating jets, but still, in contrast to the gravity wave case, the structure is independent of the sign of the meridional phase speed; (iii) when coupling is present and time-dependent zonal mean flows are considered the waves can drive vertically and temporarily oscillating mean flows. The comparison with laboratory data from a rotating annulus experiment shows a qualitative agreement. It appears that the experiment captures the basic elements of the inertial wave mean flow coupling. The results might be relevant to understand how the Equatorial Deep Jets can be maintained against dissipation [1, 2], a process currently discussed controversially. [1] Greatbatch, R., Brandt, P., Claus, M., Didwischus, S., Fu, Y.: On the width of the equatorial deep jets. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 42, 1729-1740 (2012) [2] Muench, J.E., Kunze, E.: Internal wave

  18. Observed variability in the upper layers at the Equator, 90°E in the Indian Ocean during 2001-2008, 1: zonal currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. R.; Horii, T.; Masumoto, Y.; Mizuno, K.

    2016-06-01

    The observed variability of zonal currents (ZC) at the Equator, 90°E shows a strong seasonal cycle in the near-surface 40-350 m water column with periodic east-west reversals most pronounced at semiannual frequency. Superposed on this, a strong intraseasonal variability of 30-90 day periodicity is also prominently seen in the near-surface layer (40-80 m) almost throughout the year with the only exception of February-March. An eastward flowing equatorial undercurrent (EUC) is present in the depth range of 80-160 m during March-April and October-November. The observed intraseasonal variability in the near-surface layer is primarily determined by the equatorial zonal westerly wind bursts (WWBs) through local frictional coupling between the zonal flow in the surface layer and surface zonal winds and shows large interannual variability. The eastward flowing EUC maintained by the ZPG set up by the east-west slope of the thermocline remotely controlled by the zonal wind (ZW) and zonally propagating wave fields also shows significant interannual variability. This observed variability on interannual time scales appears to be controlled by the corresponding variability in the alongshore winds off the Somalia coast during the preceding boreal winter, the ZW field along the equator, and the associated zonally propagating Kelvin and Rossby waves. The salinity induced vertical stratification observed in the near-surface layer through barrier layer thickness (BLT) effects also shows a significant influence on the ZC field on intraseasonal time scale. Interestingly, among all the 8 years (2001-2008), relatively weaker annual cycle is seen in both ZC in the 40-350 m water column and boreal spring sea surface temperature (SST) only during 2001 and 2008 along the equator caused through propagating wave dynamics.

  19. Response of the intertropical convergence zone to zonally asymmetric subtropical surface forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Tiffany A.; Voigt, Aiko; Kang, Sarah M.; Seo, Jeongbin

    2015-11-01

    The energetic framework predicts no shift of the zonal mean Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in response to zonally asymmetric forcings (zonal warming and cooling regions with zero zonal mean) assuming radiative feedbacks are linear. Here we show the ITCZ shifts southward in response to a zonally asymmetric forcing in the Northern Hemisphere subtropics in a slab ocean aquaplanet model. The southward shift is consistent with decreased zonal mean energy input to the atmosphere due to cloud radiative effect changes in the cooling region. When cloud-radiative feedbacks are disabled the ITCZ shifts northward consistent with changes in the warming region where increased energy input via surface heat fluxes and stationary Rossby-wave transport dominate. Competition between cooling and warming regions leads to changes in gross moist stability. Our results show rectification of zonally asymmetric forcings play an important role in zonal mean ITCZ dynamics and highlight the importance of assessing the momentum budget when interpreting ITCZ shifts.

  20. Modeling the Interaction of Moist Convection with the Zonal Jets of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2004-11-01

    We use a reduced-gravity quasi-geostrophic model with a parameterization of moist convection that is based on Galileo and Cassini observations of lightning and convective storms (Little et al., 1999; Gierasch et al., 2000; Porco et al., 2003). The features of the jets we want to reproduce in the model include: (1) the curvature of the zonal jet profile, which violates the barotropic stability criterion near many of the westward jets (Ingersoll et al., 1981; Li et al., 2004), (2) the speed of the zonal jets, which is related to their width, given that the jets marginally violate the barotropic stability criterion, and (3) the sign of the eddy momentum flux, which is into the jets and tends to sustain them (Beebe et al., 1979; Ingersoll et al., 1981; Salyk et al., 2004). The features of moist convective storms that are taken from observation include: (1) the tendency of the storms to occur in the cyclonic belts, (2) the rapid divergence of horizontal velocity near the cloud tops, and (3) the lifetime of the storms, which is on average 4-5 days (Li et al., 2004). We find that moist convection leads to zonal jets in the upper layer, but the jets violate the barotropic stability criterion only if the flow in the deep underlying layer is westward. We can reproduce the chevron shape on the sides of the jets if we postulate that the clouds persist longer than the storms that produce them. We can reproduce the number and frequency of moist convection storms by assuming that they carry most of the planet's vertical heat flux (Gierasch et al., 2000). The NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program supported this research.

  1. Broadband finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR) with (XY8)4(1) super-cycling for homo-nuclear correlations in very high magnetic fields at fast and ultra-fast MAS frequencies.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Hu, Bingwen; Lafon, Oliver; Trébosc, Julien; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, Jean-Paul

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate that inter-residue (13)C-(13)C proximities (of about 380 pm) in uniformly (13)C-labeled proteins can be probed by applying robust first-order recoupling during several milliseconds in single-quantum single-quantum dipolar homo-nuclear correlation (SQ-SQ D-HOMCOR) 2D experiments. We show that the intensity of medium-range homo-nuclear correlations in these experiments is enhanced using broadband first-order finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven recoupling (fp-RFDR) NMR sequence with a nested (XY8)4(1) super-cycling. The robustness and the efficiency of the fp-RFDR-(XY8)4(1) method is demonstrated at high magnetic field (21.1T) and high Magic-Angle Spinning (MAS) speeds (up to 60 kHz). The introduced super-cycling, formed by combining phase inversion and a global four-quantum phase cycle, improves the robustness of fp-RFDR to (i) chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), (ii) spread in isotropic chemical shifts, (iii) rf-inhomogeneity and (iv) hetero-nuclear dipolar couplings for long recoupling times. We show that fp-RFDR-(XY8)4(1) is efficient sans (1)H decoupling, which is beneficial for temperature-sensitive biomolecules. The efficiency and the robustness of fp-RFDR-(XY8)4(1) is investigated by spin dynamics numerical simulations as well as solid-state NMR experiments on [U-(13)C]-L-histidine·HCl, a tetra-peptide (Fmoc-[U-(13)C,(15)N]-Val-[U-(13)C,(15)N]-Ala-[U-(13)C,(15)N]-Phe-Gly-t-Boc) and Al(PO(3))(3).

  2. First observation of a new zonal-flow cycle state in the H-mode transport barrier of the experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Guo, H. Y.; Zhang, W.; Chang, J. F.; Wang, L.; Chen, R.; Liu, S. C.; Ding, S. Y.; Shao, L. M.; Xiong, H.; Naulin, V.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G. R.; Xu, M.; Yan, N.; Zhao, H. L.

    2012-12-15

    A new turbulence-flow cycle state has been discovered after the formation of a transport barrier in the H-mode plasma edge during a quiescent phase on the EAST superconducting tokamak. Zonal-flow modulation of high-frequency-broadband (0.05-1 MHz) turbulence was observed in the steep-gradient region leading to intermittent transport events across the edge transport barrier. Good confinement (H{sub 98y,2} {approx} 1) has been achieved in this state, even with input heating power near the L-H transition threshold. A novel model based on predator-prey interaction between turbulence and zonal flows reproduced this state well.

  3. Resonant frequency analysis of a Lamé-mode resonator on a quartz plate by the finite-difference time-domain method using the staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takashi; Hasegawa, Koji; Hirayama, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method using a staggered grid with the collocated grid points of velocities (SGCV) was formulated for elastic waves propagating in anisotropic solids and for a rectangular SGCV. Resonant frequency analysis of Lamé-mode resonators on a quartz plate was carried out to confirm the accuracy and validity of the proposed method. The resonant frequencies for the fundamental and higher-order Lamé-modes calculated by the proposed method agreed very well with their theoretical values.

  4. Changes in the zonal propagation of El Niño-related SST anomalies: a possible link to the PDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antico, Pablo L.; Barros, Vicente R.

    2016-03-01

    Long-term variability of El Niño (EN) cycle has been the topic of several studies, mainly because of its impacts on climate around the globe. This variability has been mainly described by changes in the intensity and frequency of EN events. In this study, interdecadal changes in the zonal evolution of EN-related sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) and their possible link with a well-known mode of Pacific interdecadal variability are analyzed. EN events are classified according to the sense of zonal propagation of SSTA along the equatorial Pacific during the period 1900-2012. As a result, two types of EN are defined: eastward-directed and westward-directed EN. It is found that EN-related SSTA preferably evolves to the east (west) during the warm (cold) phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Hence, this study offers new insights into the possible causes of long-term EN changes.

  5. Response of the Earth system to zonal tidal forcing examined by VLBI based dUT1 variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, S.; Schuh, H.

    2011-10-01

    The VLBI group at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics of Vienna University of Technology is developing the software VieVS (Vienna VLBI software) for the analysis of geodetic VLBI data. VieVS incorporates the most recent models recommended by the IERS Conventions and in contrast to other VLBI software uses a parameterization with piece-wise linear offsets at integer hours. Thus it provides more flexibility for combination or comparison with time series from other space geodetic techniques or of geophysical origin. We employed this new software to re-process all available geodetic VLBI sessions from 1984 till 2010, suitable for the determination of the Earth rotation parameters (ERP), i.e. dUT1 (UT1-UTC) and the polar motion coordinates xp and yp. Zonal tidal signals with periods from 5 to 35 days in the derived dUT1 long-time series were then used to estimate the so-called zonal response coefficient κ defined by Agnew and Farrell (1978). The frequency dependent zonal response coefficient is an extension to the concept of the Love number k2 which allows for a response of the Earth to tidal forcing, deviating from purely elastic behaviour and thus taking into account effects of ocean tides, a fluid core and mantle anelasticity. A tidally induced change of the rotation rate of the Earth and consequently of dUT1 is proportional to the tide-generating potential through the zonal response coefficient κ. The values estimated for κ for different tidal frequencies from VLBI observations of dUT1 were compared to theory and to the results of previous determinations of κ from observations of space geodetic techniques.

  6. Behavior of zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio and its relationship with zonal mean temperature during the winter 1978-1979 stratospheric warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P.-H.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio in the lower stratosphere near 75 deg N and its relationship with the zonal mean temperature during the January-February 1979 stratospheric sudden warming have been investigated based on the satellite sensor SAM II (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement) and auxiliary meteorological measurements. The results indicate that distinct changes in the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio occurred during this stratospheric sudden warming. It is also found that horizontal eddy transport due to planetary waves may have played a significant role in determining the distribution of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio.

  7. Coherent structures in ion temperature gradient turbulence-zonal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R.; Kaw, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear stationary structure formation in the coupled ion temperature gradient (ITG)-zonal flow system is investigated. The ITG turbulence is described by a wave-kinetic equation for the action density of the ITG mode, and the longer scale zonal mode is described by a dynamic equation for the m = n = 0 component of the potential. Two populations of trapped and untrapped drift wave trajectories are shown to exist in a moving frame of reference. This novel effect leads to the formation of nonlinear stationary structures. It is shown that the ITG turbulence can self-consistently sustain coherent, radially propagating modulation envelope structures such as solitons, shocks, and nonlinear wave trains.

  8. Global variations of zonal mean ozone during stratospheric warming events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Eight years of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone data are examined to study zonal mean variations associated with stratospheric planetary wave (warming) events. These fluctuations are found to be nearly global in extent, with relatively large variations in the tropics, and coherent signatures reaching up to 50 deg in the opposite (summer) hemisphere. These ozone variations are a manifestation of the global circulation cells associated with stratospheric warming events; the ozone responds dynamically in the lower stratosphere to transport, and photochemically in the upper stratosphere to the circulation-induced temperature changes. The observed ozone variations in the tropics are of particular interest because transport is dominated by zonal-mean vertical motions (eddy flux divergences and mean meridional transports are negligible), and hence, substantial simplifications to the governing equations occur. The response of the atmosphere to these impulsive circulation changes provides a situation for robust estimates of the ozone-temperature sensitivity in the upper stratosphere.

  9. Zonal isolation and evaluation for cemented horizontal liners

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, H; Summers, T.D.; Cocking, D.A.; Greaves, C.

    1996-12-01

    This paper discusses the novel application of technology in the cementing and bond evaluation from the world-record breaking extended-reach drilling (ERD) wells in Wytch Farm, where horizontal liners of the order of 800 to 1,300 m at TVD of approximately 1,600 m have been successfully cemented and perforated. Detailed analysis of the conditions by a multidisciplinary team provided some practical procedures that enabled the authors to achieve their objectives of zonal isolation and cement bond evaluation successfully. Important aspects of zonal isolation, such as the use of spiral-blade centralizers, rotating the liner, and trials of the external casing packer (ECP), are discussed in detail. Cement bond evaluation is also detailed, involving coiled tubing (CT) deployment and various bond-logging tools, including ultrasonic tools. The cement bond log (CBL) was found to be surprisingly reliable if used correctly.

  10. Statistical properties of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Johan; Botha, G. J. J.

    2015-05-01

    A theoretical interpretation of numerically generated probability density functions (PDFs) of intermittent plasma transport events in unforced zonal flows is provided within the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model. The governing equation is solved numerically with various prescribed density gradients that are designed to produce different configurations of parallel and anti-parallel streams. Long-lasting vortices form whose flow is governed by the zonal streams. It is found that the numerically generated PDFs can be matched with analytical predictions of PDFs based on the instanton method by removing the autocorrelations from the time series. In many instances, the statistics generated by the CHM dynamics relaxes to Gaussian distributions for both the electrostatic and vorticity perturbations, whereas in areas with strong nonlinear interactions it is found that the PDFs are exponentially distributed.

  11. Statistical properties of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima zonal flows

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Johan; Botha, G. J. J.

    2015-05-15

    A theoretical interpretation of numerically generated probability density functions (PDFs) of intermittent plasma transport events in unforced zonal flows is provided within the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model. The governing equation is solved numerically with various prescribed density gradients that are designed to produce different configurations of parallel and anti-parallel streams. Long-lasting vortices form whose flow is governed by the zonal streams. It is found that the numerically generated PDFs can be matched with analytical predictions of PDFs based on the instanton method by removing the autocorrelations from the time series. In many instances, the statistics generated by the CHM dynamics relaxes to Gaussian distributions for both the electrostatic and vorticity perturbations, whereas in areas with strong nonlinear interactions it is found that the PDFs are exponentially distributed.

  12. Analysis of Venusian Zonal Winds Using Venus Express Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, Ryan M.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Blalock, John J.; Peralta, Javier; Gray, Candace L.; McGouldrick, Kevin; Imamura, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    We measure the zonal mean wind structure of Venus between 2006 and 2013 in the ultraviolet images captured by the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) onboard the ESA Venus Express spacecraft. Our wind measurements employ the digital two-dimensional Correlation Imaging Velocimetry method to track cloud motions. Our current focus is on understanding the short- and long-term dynamics of Venus's atmospheric superrotation, in which the equatorial atmosphere rotates with a period of approximately 4-5 days (~60 times faster than the solid planet). The Venusian atmospheric superrotation's forcing and maintenance mechanisms remain to be explained. A number of studies have been published on the cloud-tracking wind measurements on Venus, however, those different measurements have not reached a consensus on the temporal evolution of the zonal wind structure (e.g., Kouyama et al 2013, Khatuntsev et al 2013, Patsaeva et al. 2015). Temporal evolution of the zonal wind could reveal the transport of energy and momentum and eventually shed a light on mechanisms that maintain the superrotation. Our first goal is to characterize the temporal dynamics of Venus's zonal wind profile and two-dimensional wind field, in which we will search for equatorial waves (in particular the so-called "Y-feature") that may force the Venusian atmospheric superrotation.Kouyama, T. et al (2013), J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 118, 37–46, doi:10.1029/2011JE004013.Khatuntsev et al. (2013), Icarus, 226, 140-158, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.05.018.Patsaeva,M.V.,et al. (2015), Planetary and Space Science, 113, 100-108, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2015.01.013.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics research in three-dimensional zonal techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    Patched-grid algorithms for the analysis of complex configurations with an implicit, upwind-biased Navier-Stokes solver were investigated. Conservative and non-conservative approaches for performing zonal interpolations were implemented. The latter approach yields the most flexible technique in that it can handle both patched and overlaid grids. Results for a two-dimensional blunt body problem show that either approach yield accurate steady-state shock locations and jump conditions. In addition, calculations of the turbulent flow through a hypersonic inlet on a three-zone grid show that the numerical prediction is in good agreement with the experimental results. Through the use of a generalized coordinate transformation at the zonal interface between two or more blocks, the algorithm can be applied to highly stretched viscous grids and to arbitrarily-shaped zonal boundaries. Applications were made to the F-18 aircraft at subsonic, high-alpha conditions, in support of the NASA High-Alpha Research Program. The calculations were compared to ground-based and flight test experiments and were used as a guide to understanding the ground-based tests, which are laminar and transitional, and their relationship to flight. Calculations about a complete reconnaissance aircraft were also performed in order to further demonstrate the capability of the patched-grid algorithm.

  14. Nonstationary Gravity Wave Forcing of the Stratospheric Zonal Mean Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The role of gravity wave forcing in the zonal mean circulation of the stratosphere is discussed. Starting from some very simple assumptions about the momentum flux spectrum of nonstationary (non-zero phase speed) waves at forcing levels in the troposphere, a linear model is used to calculate wave propagation through climatological zonal mean winds at solstice seasons. As the wave amplitudes exceed their stable limits, a saturation criterion is imposed to account for nonlinear wave breakdown effects, and the resulting vertical gradient in the wave momentum flux is then used to estimate the mean flow forcing per unit mass. Evidence from global, assimilated data sets are used to constrain these forcing estimates. The results suggest the gravity-wave-driven force is accelerative (has the same sign as the mean wind) throughout most of the stratosphere above 20 km. The sense of the gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere is thus opposite to that in the mesosphere, where gravity wave drag is widely believed to play a principal role in decelerating the mesospheric jets. The forcing estimates are further compared to existing gravity wave parameterizations for the same climatological zonal mean conditions. Substantial disagreement is evident in the stratosphere, and we discuss the reasons for the disagreement. The results suggest limits on typical gravity wave amplitudes near source levels in the troposphere at solstice seasons. The gravity wave forcing in the stratosphere appears to have a substantial effect on lower stratospheric temperatures during southern hemisphere summer and thus may be relevant to climate.

  15. Zonal subdivision of marine sequences: achievements and discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladenkov, Yuri

    2010-05-01

    It was 150 years ago when a notion of zone was introduced into stratigraphy. By the present time zonal units with a duration of 0.3-3.0 M.y. in average have been established virtually for all systems and stages of the Phanerozoic. Their quantity reached 300. It is not a chance that zonal stratigraphy is considered to be one of the most significant achievement of the modern geology. There are different interpretations of essence and goals of zonal stratigraphy, techniques of separation of zones, and evaluation of zones as stratigraphic units. Particularly it is reflected in International Stratigraphic Guide (Murphy, Salvador, 1999), Russian Stratigraphic Code (Zhamoida, 2006), and a number of stratigraphic reports of the last years. It concerns different approaches to: (a) establishment of different types of zones (biostratigraphic zones and chronozones, oppel-zones and biohorizons, etc.); (b) assessment of spatial distribution of zones (global or provincial) and a role of sedimentological factor; (c) definition of zones as stratigraphic units (relationships with geostratigraphic units of the standard and regional scales). The latest publications show that because of the different interpretations of zones, authors should explain usage of certain type of zone (for example, when they use the terms "interval-zone" or "assemblage-zone", what limitations stem from application of datum-levels, and others). It is common opinion, that biostratigraphic zones used widely by paleontologists and stratigraphers cannot be a final goal of stratigraphy although they provide a base for solution of many important problems (definition of certain stratigraphic levels, correlation of different biofacies, and others). At the same time, the most important stratigraphic units are chronozones, which correspond to stages or phases of geological evolutio of basins and are marked by distinct fossil assemblages and other properties (magnetic and other characteristics) in the type sections

  16. Potential Vorticity Dynamics and Models of Zonal Flow Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Chun

    We describe the general theory of anisotropic flow formation in quasi two- dimensional turbulence from the perspective on the potential vorticity (PV) trans- port in real space. The aim is to calculate the vorticity or PV flux. In Chapter 2, the general structure of PV flux is deduced non-perturbatively using two relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total po- tential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The analyses show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This structure of the relaxed state is consistent with PV staircases. The homog- enized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from a joint reflection symmetry principle, which constrains the PV flux driven by the deviation from the self- organized state. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. The nonlinear convective term, how- ever, can be viewed as a generalized diffusion, on account of the gradient-dependent ballistic transport in avalanche-like systems. For both cases, the detailed transport coefficients can be calculated using perturbation theory in Chapter 3. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modula- tional calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric in- stability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to

  17. Effects of Zonal Wind on Stratospheric Ozone Variations over Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidinma Okoro, Eucharia,

    2016-07-01

    The effects of zonal wind on stratospheric ozone variation over Nigeria have been studied. The areas covered in this study include; Maiduguri, Ikeja, Port-Harcourt, Calabar, Makurdi, Ilorin, Akure, Yola, Minna, Jos, Kano and Enugu in Nigeria, from 1986 to 2008. Zonal wind was computed from the iso-velocity map employing MATLAB software. The mean monthly variations of AAM and LOD at pressure levels of 20, 30 and 50 mb in the atmosphere depict a trend of maximum amplitude between April and September, and minimum amplitude between December and March. The trend observed in seasonal variation of O3 column data in the low latitude had maximum amount from May through August and minimum values from December through February. The mean monthly maximum O3 concentrations was found to be 284.70 Du (Kano) occurring in May 1989 while, an average monthly minimum O3 concentration was found to be 235.60 Du (Port-Harcourt and Calabar) occurring in January 1998. It has been established in this study that, the variation in atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) caused by variation of the universal time or length of day (LOD) transfer ozone (O3) by means of zonal wind from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere in the stations understudy. The strong effect of the pressure levels of the atmosphere on O3 variation could be attributed to its effect on the AAM and LOD. Variation in the LOD is significant in the tropics, suggesting that, the effects of the extra-tropical suction pump (ETSP) action is not the only driver responsible for O3 transportation from the tropics to extra-tropical zones. Consequently, these findings lead to a deduction that weather pattern alteration observed due to these changes could lead to climate change. Keywords: ozone variations; dynamical processes; harmattan wind; ETSP; and climatic variability

  18. Magnetic Flux Concentration and Zonal Flows in Magnetorotational Instability Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2014-11-01

    Accretion disks are likely threaded by external vertical magnetic flux, which enhances the level of turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Using shearing-box simulations, we find that such external magnetic flux also strongly enhances the amplitude of banded radial density variations known as zonal flows. Moreover, we report that vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated toward low-density regions of the zonal flow. Mean vertical magnetic field can be more than doubled in low-density regions, and reduced to nearly zero in high-density regions in some cases. In ideal MHD, the scale on which magnetic flux concentrates can reach a few disk scale heights. In the non-ideal MHD regime with strong ambipolar diffusion, magnetic flux is concentrated into thin axisymmetric shells at some enhanced level, whose size is typically less than half a scale height. We show that magnetic flux concentration is closely related to the fact that the turbulent diffusivity of the MRI turbulence is anisotropic. In addition to a conventional Ohmic-like turbulent resistivity, we find that there is a correlation between the vertical velocity and horizontal magnetic field fluctuations that produces a mean electric field that acts to anti-diffuse the vertical magnetic flux. The anisotropic turbulent diffusivity has analogies to the Hall effect, and may have important implications for magnetic flux transport in accretion disks. The physical origin of magnetic flux concentration may be related to the development of channel flows followed by magnetic reconnection, which acts to decrease the mass-to-flux ratio in localized regions. The association of enhanced zonal flows with magnetic flux concentration may lead to global pressure bumps in protoplanetary disks that helps trap dust particles and facilitates planet formation.

  19. Zonal drifts of irregularities imparted by meridional winds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, H.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    In a uniform ionosphere, meridional winds cause only meridional motions of irregularities. It is shown, however, that, if F-region irregularities are considered in a real ionosphere in which there is a highly conductive E-layer, zonal motions occur. During the day a substantial westward drift takes place, while at night the drift is eastward but smaller, owing to the much smaller E-layer conductivity. Thus, the effect of meridional winds is to impart a net westward drift to small irregularities in the ionization, provided such irregularities persist long enough.

  20. Zonal flow regimes in rotating anelastic spherical shells (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Heimpel, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    The surface zonal winds observed in the giant planets form a complex jet pattern with alternating prograde and retrograde direction. While the main equatorial band is prograde on the gas giants, both ice giants have a pronounced retrograde equatorial jet. The depth of these jets is however poorly known and highly debated. Theoretical scenarios range from "shallow models", that assume that these zonal flows are restricted to the outer stably stratified layer; to "deep models" that hypothesise that the surface winds are the signature of deep-seated convection. Most of the numerical models supporting the latter idea employed the Boussinesq approximation where compressibility effects are ignored. While this approximation is suitable for modelling the liquid iron core of terrestrial planets, this becomes questionable in the gas giants interiors, where density increases by several orders of magnitude. To tackle this problem, several numerical models using the "anelastic approximation" have been recently developed to study the compressibility effects while filtering out the fast acoustic waves. Here, we consider such anelastic models of rapidly-rotating spherical shells to explore the properties of the zonal winds in different regimes where either rotation or buoyancy dominates the force balance. We conduct several parameter studies to quantify the dependence of zonal flows on the background density stratification and the driving of convection. We find that the direction of the equatorial wind is controlled by the ratio of buoyancy and Coriolis force. The prograde equatorial band maintained by Reynolds stresses is found in the rotation-dominated regime. At low Ekman numbers, several alternating jets form at high latitude in a similar way to some previous Boussinesq calculations. In cases where buoyancy dominates Coriolis force, the angular momentum per unit mass is homogenised and the equatorial band is retrograde, reminiscent to those observed in the ice giants

  1. Time- and frequency-domain models for Smith-Purcell radiation from a two-dimensional charge moving above a finite length grating

    SciTech Connect

    Kesar, Amit S.; Hess, Mark; Korbly, Stephen E.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Smith-Purcell radiation (SPR), formed by an electron beam traveling above a grating, is a very promising source of coherent radiation from the THz to the optical regime. We present two theoretical calculations of the SPR from a two-dimensional bunch of relativistic electrons passing above a grating of finite length. The first calculation uses the finite-difference time-domain approach with the total-field/scattered-field procedure for fields incident on the grating. This calculation allows good physical insight into the radiation process and also allows arbitrary geometries to be treated. The second calculation uses an electric-field integral equation method. Good agreement is obtained between these two calculations. The results of these theoretical calculations are then compared with a theoretical formalism based on an infinite-length grating. The latter formalism allows periodic boundary conditions to be rigorously applied. For gratings with less than {approx}50 periods, a significant error in the strength of the radiated field is introduced by the infinite-grating approximation. It is shown that this error disappears asymptotically as the number of periods increases. The Wood-Rayleigh anomalies, predicted in the infinite-grating approximation, were not seen in our finite-grating calculations. The SPR resonance condition is the same in all three formalisms. Numerical examples are presented for an {approx}18 MeV, 50 nC/m, 200 {mu}m bunch traveling 0.6 mm above a ten-period echelle grating having a 2.1-mm periodicity.

  2. Overview of gyrokinetic studies of finite-β microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. W.; Carmody, D.; Doerk, H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hatch, D. R.; Hegna, C. C.; Ishizawa, A.; Jenko, F.; Nevins, W. M.; Predebon, I.; Pueschel, M. J.; Sarff, J. S.; Whelan, G. G.

    2015-10-01

    Recent results on electromagnetic turbulence from gyrokinetic studies in different magnetic configurations are overviewed, detailing the physics of electromagnetic turbulence and transport, and the effect of equilibrium magnetic field scale lengths. Ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence is shown to produce magnetic stochasticity through nonlinear excitation of linearly stable tearing-parity modes. The excitation, which is catalyzed by the zonal flow, produces an electron heat flux proportional to β2 that deviates markedly from quasilinear theory. Above a critical beta known as the non-zonal transition (NZT), the magnetic fluctuations disable zonal flows by allowing electron streaming that shorts zonal potential between flux surfaces. This leads to a regime of very high transport levels. Kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) saturation is described. For tokamaks saturation involves twisted structures arising from magnetic shear; for helical plasmas oppositely inclined convection cells interact by mutual shearing. Microtearing modes are unstable in the magnetic geometry of tokamaks and the reversed field pinch (RFP). In NSTX instability requires finite collisionality, large beta, and is favored by increasing magnetic shear and decreasing safety factor. In the RFP, a new branch of microtearing with finite growth rate at vanishing collisionality is shown from analytic theory to require the electron grad-B/curvature drift resonance. However, gyrokinetic modeling of experimental MST RFP discharges at finite beta reveals turbulence that is electrostatic, has large zonal flows, and a large Dimits shift. Analysis shows that the shorter equilibrium magnetic field scale lengths increase the critical gradients associated with the instability of trapped electron modes, ITG and microtearing, while increasing beta thresholds for KBM instability and the NZT.

  3. Implementing Multidisciplinary and Multi-Zonal Applications Using MPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineberg, Samuel A.

    1995-01-01

    Multidisciplinary and multi-zonal applications are an important class of applications in the area of Computational Aerosciences. In these codes, two or more distinct parallel programs or copies of a single program are utilized to model a single problem. To support such applications, it is common to use a programming model where a program is divided into several single program multiple data stream (SPMD) applications, each of which solves the equations for a single physical discipline or grid zone. These SPMD applications are then bound together to form a single multidisciplinary or multi-zonal program in which the constituent parts communicate via point-to-point message passing routines. Unfortunately, simple message passing models, like Intel's NX library, only allow point-to-point and global communication within a single system-defined partition. This makes implementation of these applications quite difficult, if not impossible. In this report it is shown that the new Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard is a viable portable library for implementing the message passing portion of multidisciplinary applications. Further, with the extension of a portable loader, fully portable multidisciplinary application programs can be developed. Finally, the performance of MPI is compared to that of some native message passing libraries. This comparison shows that MPI can be implemented to deliver performance commensurate with native message libraries.

  4. Non-axisymmetric instabilities in discs with imposed zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanon, R.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2016-09-01

    We conduct a linear stability calculation of an ideal Keplerian flow on which a sinusoidal zonal flow is imposed. The analysis uses the shearing sheet model and is carried out both in isothermal and adiabatic conditions, with and without self-gravity (SG). In the non-SG regime a structure in the potential vorticity (PV) leads to a non-axisymmetric Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability; in the short-wavelength limit its growth rate agrees with the incompressible calculation by Lithwick (2007), which only considers perturbations elongated in the streamwise direction. The instability's strength is analysed as a function of the structure's properties, and zonal flows are found to be stable if their wavelength is ≳ 8H, where H is the disc's scale height, regardless of the value of the adiabatic index γ. The non-axisymmetric KH instability can operate in Rayleigh-stable conditions, and it therefore represents the limiting factor to the structure's properties. Introducing SG triggers a second non-axisymmetric instability, which is found to be located around a PV maximum, while the KH instability is linked to a PV minimum, as expected. In the adiabatic regime, the same gravitational instability is detected even when the structure is present only in the entropy (not in the PV) and the instability spreads to weaker SG conditions as the entropy structure's amplitude is increased. This eventually yields a non-axisymmetric instability in the non-SG regime, albeit of weak strength, localised around an entropy maximum.

  5. Zonal harmonics of the gravity field in DEF-variables.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, I.; Floría, L.

    In order to be in a position to take advantage of the linear and regular formulation and treatment of Celestial Mechanics problems, in a recent paper Sharaf & Saad (1997) have given an analytical expansion of the Earth's zonal potential in terms of Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) regular elements (Kustaanheimo & Stiefel 1965; Stiefel & Scheifele 1971), putting special emphasis on the consideration of elliptic-type two-body orbits. In the present paper we carry out an application of the so-called focal method (Burdet 1969) to derive the expression, in terms of the linearizing DEF-variables (Deprit, Elipe & Ferrer 1994, S S 4.1), of any zonal harmonic of the gravitational field created by a central body, and obtain the corresponding equations of motion for any value of the eccentricity. To this end, we will follow a variant of the focal method canonical approach based on the (weakly) canonical extension of the projective-decomposition point-transformation proposed by these authors.

  6. Zonal Flows from Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking of Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Krommes, John

    2013-10-01

    To study how zonal flows (ZF) arise, we examine one of the simplest possible models, the stochastically forced Hasegawa-Mima equation, which displays the bifurcation of steady ZFs from a state of homogeneous turbulence; thus a statistical treatment is required. Here an approach is adopted in which the ZFs are treated as mean fields that spontaneously break the background symmetry. The resulting inhomogeneous ensemble is treated self-consistently without assuming weak inhomogeneity. Closed statistical equations are obtained by ignoring the drift-wave self-interactions while fully retaining the drift-wave-ZF nonlinearities. We show that from the statistical point of view ZF generation can be understood as pattern formation. This leads to the surprising result that in a saturated turbulent state the ZF wavelength is not unique; a continuous band of ZF scales is allowed. Only those within a smaller sub-band are linearly stable. That stability is analyzed and the stability diagram in parameter space is calculated and successfully compared with simulations. The stability concept provides a way of interpreting the merging of zonal jets, a phenomenon commonly observed in observations and numerical studies. Work supported by U.S DOE Contract No DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  7. Finite frequency f-sum rule for assessment of number density of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Kramers-Kronig relation for refractive index of colloidal gold.

    PubMed

    Kontturi, Ville; Silfsten, Pertti; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2011-07-01

    Absorption spectra from colloids containing different concentrations of spherical gold nanoparticles in water were measured with a spectrophotometer. The absorption spectra were used to calculate the number density of nanoparticles (NPs) with the aid of an unconventional finite spectral band f-sum rule applied for gold colloid. Good correlation between the number density of dispersion electrons, obtained from the f-sum rule, and the number density of nanoparticles was found. The effective absolute refractive index of the gold colloid was obtained with the aid of a singly subtractive Kramers-Kronig relation, and in addition the refractive index change due to the nanoparticles was obtained with the aid of a conventional Kramers-Kronig relation. Such optical properties are valuable in studies of light interaction with nanoparticles.

  8. Finite element analysis and frequency shift studies for the bridge coupler of the coupled cavity linear accelerator of the spallation neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron scattering research facility. The linear accelerator (linac) is the principal accelerating structure and divided into a room-temperature linac and a superconducting linac. The normal conducting linac system that consists of a Drift Tube Linac (DTL) and a Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) is to be built by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The CCL structure is 55.36-meters long. It accelerates H- beam from 86.8 Mev to 185.6 Mev at operating frequency of 805 MHz. This side coupled cavity structure has 8 cells per segment, 12 segments and 11 bridge couplers per module, and 4 modules total. A 5-MW klystron powers each module. The number 3 and number 9 bridge coupler of each module are connected to the 5-MW RF power supply. The bridge coupler with length of 2.5 {beta}{gamma} is a three-cell structure and located between the segments and allows power flow through the module. The center cell of each bridge coupler is excited during normal operation. To obtain a uniform electromagnetic filed and meet the resonant frequency shift, the RF induced heat must be removed. Thus, the thermal deformation and frequency shift studies are performed via numerical simulations in order to have an appropriate cooling design and predict the frequency shift under operation. The center cell of the bridge coupler also contains a large 4-inch slug tuner and a tuning post that used to provide bulk frequency adjustment and field intensity adjustment, so that produce the proper total field distribution in the module assembly.

  9. Harmonic Analysis of Zonal Density Structures in Martian Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, P.; Bougher, S. W.; Keating, G. M.

    2001-05-01

    Mars Global Surveyor Accelerometer measurements of density in the martian upper atmosphere during aerobraking are now available via the PDS [Keating et al, 2001]. We are continuing our investigations of variations in density with longitude at fixed local solar time, latitude, and season, concentrating on Phase 2 of aerobraking. We find that, contrary to previous suspicions, the zonal structure is not dominated solely by wave-2 harmonics. The dominant harmonics are as follows: wave-3 in the northern extratropics, wave-2 and wave-3 in the tropics, and no clearly dominant harmonic in the southern extratropics. The relative amplitudes of the various harmonics vary with latitude. However, their phases remain very stable, despite large changes in the phasing of the corresponding harmonic of zonal topography. Relative to the mean density, the amplitudes of the various harmonics decrease as altitude increases. This is opposite to the behaviour predicted by a simple, dissipation-less model of the martian upper atmosphere, in which deviations from the background state of the atmosphere are proportional to the inverse of the square root of pressure, and indicates the presence of damping in the upper atmosphere. When the martian day was an integer multiple of the spacecraft orbital period, the accelerometer measured densities at the same latitude, local solar time, season, and longitude each martian day. This period of resonance lasted for several days as the spacecraft orbital period decreased through the critical value due to drag. This permits us to examine the true variability of the martian upper atmosphere without the complications of the zonal variability. An accurate estimate of this essentially unpredictable variability is crucial for effective and efficient aerobraking of future spacecraft missions. At an altitude of 130 km, variabilities of 15 percent were typical, though values of 30 percent were observed. This variability also decreased as altitude increased, an

  10. Effect of chlorofluoromethane infrared radiation on zonal atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. E.; Donahue, T. M.; Liu, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Estimates are made of changes in the atmospheric climate due to the radiative effects of 10 ppb of chlorofluoromethanes (CFM's). The estimates are derived on the basis of a 12-layer stratospheric general circulation model with a specified change of ocean temperature. Two tropical maxima in zonal average temperature change were observed: one in the upper troposphere and one centered at the tropopause. The temperature change exceeds the surface temperature change by a factor of at least two. If the 1975 CFM emission rate were to continue indefinitely, stratospheric water-vapor concentrations would increase by up to 60% due to CFM radiative effects. This would reduce ozone concentrations by an additional 4% of the natural ozone column.

  11. Convection driven zonal flows and vortices in the major planets.

    PubMed

    Busse, F. H.

    1994-06-01

    The dynamical properties of convection in rotating cylindrical annuli and spherical shells are reviewed. Simple theoretical models and experimental simulations of planetary convection through the use of the centrifugal force in the laboratory are emphasized. The model of columnar convection in a cylindrical annulus not only serves as a guide to the dynamical properties of convection in rotating sphere; it also is of interest as a basic physical system that exhibits several dynamical properties in their most simple form. The generation of zonal mean flows is discussed in some detail and examples of recent numerical computations are presented. The exploration of the parameter space for the annulus model is not yet complete and the theoretical exploration of convection in rotating spheres is still in the beginning phase. Quantitative comparisons with the observations of the dynamics of planetary atmospheres will have to await the consideration in the models of the effects of magnetic fields and the deviations from the Boussinesq approximation. PMID:12780095

  12. Computing rare transitions between zonal mid-latitude jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonnet, Eric; Bouchet, Freddy

    2016-04-01

    Zonal jets are known to naturally emerge from beta-plane turbulence due to the arrest of inverse energy cascade by Rossby waves.Transitions between jets of different wavenumber are indeed observed in particular regimes showing a striking example of bimodality in the context of 2-D turbulence. As the Rayleigh dissipation and stochastic forcing are decreased these transitions become more and more rare. The aim of this talk is to show that it is possible to compute large ensembles of reactive trajectories connecting the different metastable states even at very low probability regimes when direct numerical simulations are not possible. We use an adaptive version of multilevel splitting algorithms on a barotropic quasi geostrophic model of mid-latitude atmosphere. We are able to obtain a detailed statistical description of the high-dimensional phase space as well as the typical transitions. A large-deviation result is also obtained.

  13. A technique for inferring zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of intensity (S4) and phase (σφ) scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, Charles S.; Groves, Keith M.; Rino, Charles L.; Doherty, Patricia H.

    2016-08-01

    The zonal drift of ionospheric irregularities at low latitudes is most commonly measured by cross-correlating observations of a scintillating satellite signal made with a pair of closely spaced antennas. The Air Force Research Laboratory-Scintillation Network Decision Aid (AFRL-SCINDA) network operates a small number of very high frequency (VHF) spaced-receiver systems at low latitudes for this purpose. A far greater number of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) scintillation monitors are operated by the AFRL-SCINDA network (25-30) and the Low-Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (35-50), but the receivers are too widely separated from each other for cross-correlation techniques to be effective. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that leverages the weak scatter scintillation theory to infer the zonal irregularity drift from single-station GNSS measurements of S4, σφ, and the propagation geometry. Unlike the spaced-receiver technique, this approach requires assumptions regarding the height of the scattering layer (which introduces a bias in the drift estimates) and the spectral index of the irregularities (which affects the spread of the drift estimates about the mean). Nevertheless, theory and experiment suggest that the ratio of σφ to S4 is less sensitive to these parameters than it is to the zonal drift. We validate the technique using VHF spaced-receiver measurements of zonal irregularity drift obtained from the AFRL-SCINDA network. While the spaced-receiver technique remains the preferred way to monitor the drift when closely spaced antenna pairs are available, our technique provides a new opportunity to monitor zonal irregularity drift using regional or global networks of widely separated GNSS scintillation monitors.

  14. Comparison of Photoacoustic Signals in Photosynthetic and Nonphotosynthetic Leaf Tissues of Variegated Pelargonium zonale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljović-Jovanović, S.; Vidović, M.; Morina, F.; Prokić, Lj.; Todorović, D. M.

    2016-09-01

    Green-white variegated leaves of Pelargonium zonale were studied using the photoacoustic method. Our aim was to characterize photosynthetically active green tissue and nonphotosynthetically active white tissue by the photoacoustic amplitude signals. We observed lower stomatal conductance and higher leaf temperature in white tissue than in green tissue. Besides these thermal differences, significantly higher absorbance in green tissue was based on chlorophyll and carotenoids which were absent in white tissue. However, optical properties of epidermal layers of both tissues were equal. The photoacoustic amplitude of white tissue was over four times higher compared to green tissue, which was correlated with lower stomatal conductance. In addition, at frequencies >700 Hz, the significant differences between the photoacoustic signals of green and white tissue were obtained. We identified the photoacoustic signal deriving from photosynthetic oxygen evolution in green tissue, using high intensity of red light modulated at 10 Hz. Moreover, the photoacoustic amplitude of green tissue increased progressively with time which corresponded to the period of induction of photosynthetic oxygen evolution. For the first time, very high frequencies (1 kHz to 5 kHz) were applied on leaf material.

  15. Self-limiting feedback between baroclinic waves and a NAO-like sheared zonal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro

    2009-04-01

    The eddy-mean flow interaction associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is examined by using the baroclinic wave life cycle experiments. When a sheared zonal flow perturbation akin to the NAO-related dipole wind anomaly is added to the basic state, momentum fluxes due to baroclinic waves tend to reinforce the initial zonal flow dipole in the upper troposphere both for the anticyclonic and cyclonic shears. The eddy feedback is stronger for the anticyclonic shear because the node of the dipole flow is asymmetric about the basic jet, suggesting that the positive NAO is more favored by the eddy feedback. For the zonal wind anomaly with extremely large amplitude, the baroclinic wave breaking cannot efficiently intensify the zonal flow dipole, indicating a self-limitation in the positive eddy feedback to the NAO-like zonal flow anomaly.

  16. The residual zonal flow in tokamak plasmas toroidally rotating at arbitrary velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2014-08-15

    Zonal flows, initially driven by ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, may evolve due to the neoclassic polarization in a collisionless tokamak plasma. In our previous work [D. Zhou, Nucl. Fusion 54, 042002 (2014)], the residual zonal flow in a tokamak plasma rotating toroidally at sonic speed is found to have the same form as that of a static plasma. In the present work, the form of the residual zonal flow is presented for tokamak plasmas rotating toroidally at arbitrary velocity. The gyro-kinetic equation is analytically solved for low speed rotation to give the expression of residual zonal flows, and the expression is then generalized for cases with arbitrary rotating velocity through interpolation. The zonal flow level decreases as the rotating velocity increases. The numerical evaluation is in good agreement with the former simulation result for high aspect ratio tokamaks.

  17. Effect of zonal asymmetries in stratospheric ozone on simulated Southern Hemisphere climate trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, D. W.; Oman, L.; Newman, P. A.; Stolarski, R. S.; Pawson, S.; Nielsen, J. E.; Perlwitz, J.

    2009-09-01

    Stratospheric ozone is represented in most climate models by prescribing zonal-mean fields. We examine the impact of this on Southern Hemisphere (SH) trends using a chemistry climate model (CCM): multi-decadal simulations with interactive stratospheric chemistry are compared with parallel simulations using the same model in which the zonal-mean ozone is prescribed. Prescribing zonal-mean ozone results in a warmer Antarctic stratosphere when there is a large ozone hole, with much smaller differences at other times. As a consequence, Antarctic temperature trends for 1960 to 2000 and 2000 to 2050 in the CCM are underestimated when zonal-mean ozone is prescribed. The impacts of stratospheric changes on the tropospheric circulation (i.e., summertime trends in the SH annular mode) are also underestimated. This shows that SH trends related to ozone depletion and recovery are underestimated when interactions between stratospheric ozone and climate are approximated by an imposed zonal-mean ozone field.

  18. The zonal motion of equatorial plasma bubbles relative to the background ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Hyosub; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Kwak, Young-Sil; Zhang, Yongliang; Paxton, Larry J.; Milla, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The zonal motions of plasmas inside equatorial plasma bubbles are different from those in the background ionosphere. The difference was explained in terms of the tilt of bubbles by recent studies, but observational evidence of this hypothesis has not yet been provided. We examine this hypothesis and, at the same time, look for an alternative explanation on the basis of the coincident satellite and radar observations over Jicamarca (11.95°S, 76.87°W) in Peru. In the observations at premidnight by the first Republic of China satellite (altitude: 600 km, inclination: 35°), plasmas inside bubbles drift westward relative to ambient plasmas. The same phenomenon is identified by radar observations. However, the relative westward plasma motions inside bubbles occur regardless of the tilt of bubbles, and therefore, the tilt is not the primary cause of the deviation of the plasma motions inside bubbles. The zonal plasma motions in the topside are characterized by systematic eastward drifts, whereas the zonal motions of plasmas in the bottomside backscatter layer show a mixture of eastward and westward drifts. The zonal plasma motions inside backscatter plumes resemble those in the bottomside backscatter layer. These observations indicate that plasmas inside bubbles maintain the properties of the zonal plasma motions in the bottomside where the bubbles originate. With this assumption, the deviation of the zonal motions of plasmas inside bubbles from those of ambient plasmas is understood in terms of the difference of the zonal plasma flows in the bottomside and topside.

  19. Titan's Temperature and Zonal Wind Structure and Seasonal Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flasar, F.; Achterberg, Richard; Schinder, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Titan's atmosphere near 80 km (20 mbar) marks the transition between large radiative damping times at lower altitudes, where seasonal variations are muted, and small damping times higher up, where temperatures and winds vary significantly over the year. Cassini CIRS and Radio-Occultation measurements obtained in 2004-2016 have tracked the evolution of temperatures and winds in Titan's atmosphere from early northern winter to late spring. In winter, the northern hemisphere was characterized by cold temperatures at high latitudes in the lower stratosphere and a strong circumpolar vortex that extended to subtropical northern latitudes. At high altitudes over the north pole, there was an elevated stratopause with a temperature roughly 30 K above the seasonal average, associated with subsidence and adiabatic warming. As the northern hemisphere has moved toward summer the dissolution of the circumpolar vortex has been gradual, and there is no evidence of rapid distortion and disruption forced by planetary waves like that seen on Earth. During this time, the southern hemisphere has cooled fairly abruptly at high latitudes. A circumpolar vortex has formed in the stratosphere, but it is more compact than seen in the north, with maximum winds at 60°S. Potential vorticity maps now indicate steep meridional gradients at high southern latitudes, implying a barrier to efficient mixing between the polar region and lower latitudes. One of the curious features of Titan's temperatures has been the destabilization seen in the winter north polar region, where negative temperature gradients were observed between 80 and 100 km. As the southern hemisphere moves toward winter, temperatures retrieved from radio occultation soundings have shown the early development this phenomenon at high southernlatitudes. The cause of the destabilization in winter may be associated with a cloud of organic ices. However, the transition region near 80 km is also where the zonal winds exhibit a sharp

  20. A mechanism for the formation of non-zonal striations in the thermocline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Flierl, G.; Wunsch, C. I.

    2011-12-01

    Striations--banded structures in the temporal average of spatially high-pass filtered zonal velocity--have recently been identified in both observations and numerical models. The striations are non-zonal in the thermocline of the Central and East North Pacific regions (Figure 1). The mechanism of the formation of these non-zonal striations is still unknown. Several hypotheses have been proposed, such as those related to the Rhines jet mechanism, the net effect of eddy propagation, and radiating instabilities of an eastern boundary current. A mechanism for the formation of non-zonal thermocline striations in the subtropical gyre is investigated. Rhines found zonal bands in decaying barotropic turbulence on a beta plane. However, the thermocline striations are more complicated: they are embedded in the large-scale gyre flow and gyre-structured potential vorticity (Figure 1). Motivated by this, a simple theoretical model for thermocline striations is developed using a 1.5 layer model but with large scale flow and PV gradients from the Sverdrup relation. This model is solved numerically to study how the striations are formed in a subtropical gyre and a mechanism has been identified. In the subtropical gyre, the eddy propagation direction is non-zonal due to the presence of the large-scale gyre flow and non-zonal PV. The striations arise as a net effect of many eddies propagating in the same direction, as proposed by Schlax and Chelton (2008). Thus, the striations follow the eddy propagation direction and are therefore non-zonal. This mechanism, identified from the simple theoretical model, is relevant to the formation of non-zonal thermocline striations in the ECCO2 state estimate. The implications of the striations on mixing, transport and eddy-mean flow interaction are now also being explored.

  1. Fluid simulation of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence with zonal flow closure model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Osamu; Sugama, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear fluid simulation of turbulence driven by ion temperature gradient modes in the tokamak fluxtube configuration is performed by combining two different closure models. One model is a gyrofluid model by Beer and Hammett [Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)], and the other is a closure model to reproduce the kinetic zonal flow response [Sugama et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 022502 (2007)]. By including the zonal flow closure, generation of zonal flows, significant reduction in energy transport, reproduction of the gyrokinetic transport level, and nonlinear upshift on the critical value of gradient scale length are observed.

  2. Advances and Current Challenges in the Theory of Zonal-Flow Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, John A.

    2010-11-23

    Some remarks are made about the use of modern statistical formalism in the calculation of the zonal-flow growth rate and the backreaction of zonal flows on drift waves. The intimate connection between the zonal growth-rate calculation and the derivation of a statistical formula for eddy viscosity in two-dimensional neutral fluids is emphasized, as is the the role of Casimir invariants in disparate-scale expansion. Also stressed is the importance of random Galilean invariance in the calculation of the triad interaction time between short-wavelength drift waves and long-wavelength flows.

  3. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation: Merging Jets and the Ultimate Jet Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey B. Parker and John A. Krommes

    2013-01-30

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. It is shown that for statisti- cally averaged equations of quasigeostrophic turbulence on a beta plane, zonal flows and inhomoge- neous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  4. Empirical models of storm time equatorial zonal electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, Bela G.; Scherliess, Ludger

    1997-10-01

    Ionospheric plasma drifts often show highly complex and variable signatures during geomagnetically active periods due to the effects of different disturbance processes. We describe initially a methodology for the study of storm time dependent ionospheric electric fields. We present empirical models of equatorial disturbance zonal electric fields obtained using extensive F region vertical plasma drift measurements from the Jicamarca Observatory and auroral electrojet indices. These models determine the plasma drift perturbations due to the combined effects of short-lived prompt penetration and longer lasting disturbance dynamo electric fields. We show that the prompt penetration drifts obtained from a high time resolution empirical model are in excellent agreement with results from the Rice Convection Model for comparable changes in the polar cap potential drop. We also present several case studies comparing observations with results obtained by adding model disturbance drifts and season and solar cycle dependent average quiet time drift patterns. When the disturbance drifts are largely due to changes in magnetospheric convection and to disturbance dynamo effects, the measured and modeled drift velocities are generally in good agreement. However, our results indicate that the equatorial disturbance electric field pattern can be strongly affected by variations in the shielding efficiency, and in the high-latitude potential and energy deposition patterns which are not accounted for in the model. These case studies and earlier results also suggest the possible importance of additional sources of plasmaspheric disturbance electric fields.

  5. Equatorial superrotation in a thermally driven zonally symmetric circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.

    1981-01-01

    Near the equator where the Coriolis force vanishes, the momentum balance for the axially symmetric circulation is established between horizontal and vertical diffusion, which, a priori, does not impose constraints on the direction or magnitude of the zonal winds. Solar radiation absorbed at low latitudes is a major force in driving large scale motions with air rising near the equator and falling at higher latitudes. In the upper leg of the meridional cell, angular momentum is redistributed so that the atmosphere tends to subrotate (or corotate) at low latitudes and superrotate at high latitudes. In the lower leg, however, the process is reversed and produces a tendency for the equatorial region to superrotate. The outcome depends on the energy budget which is closely coupled to the momentum budget through the thermal wind equation; a pressure (temperature) maximum is required to sustain equatorial superrotation. Such a condition arises in regions which are convectively unstable and the temperature lapse rate is superadiabatic. It should arise in the tropospheres of Jupiter and Saturn; planetary energy from the interior is carried to higher altitudes where radiation to space becomes important. Upward equatorial motions in the direct and indirect circulations (Ferrel-Thomson type) imposed by insolation can then trap dynamic energy for equatorial heating which can sustain the superrotation of the equatorial region.

  6. Status of surface processes in the LLNL zonally symmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P.J. )

    1989-09-30

    A surface package has been developed for use in the LLNL zonally symmetric model (ZSM). Surface energy balances are computed for both land and ocean. The ocean is modeled as a well-mixed slab, the land as a single layer with constant thermal conductivity. A land surface moisture budget includes rain, evaporation, sublimation, snowfall, snowmelt and runoff. There is a highly simplified parameterization of surface albedo for freezing oceans and snow covered land. Land and sea air is instantly mixed' by averaging pertinent land and sea surface variables (weighted by their respective areas in each zone) before use in subsequent atmospheric computations. Initial tests have demonstrated that the surface package is working properly. It has been demonstrated that the model produces a reasonable annually averaged' climate. There are some aspects of ZSM which need to be improved, most notably that of cloud cover. The next stage in the development is to test the model in seasonal mode. An improved treatment of surface albedo is currently being coded. When ZSM has been tested in seasonal mode, a sea ice routine will be added to the surface package. There are also plans to implement a method which accounts for the interaction between land and sea air. 5 refs., 15 figs.

  7. A cyclostrophic transformed Eulerian zonal mean model for the middle atmosphere of slowly rotating planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. F.; Yao, K.; Taketa, C.; Zhang, X.; Liang, M. C.; Jiang, X.; Newman, C. E.; Tung, K. K.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    With the advance of modern computers, studies of planetary atmospheres have heavily relied on general circulation models (GCMs). Because these GCMs are usually very complicated, the simulations are sometimes difficult to understand. Here we develop a semi-analytic zonally averaged, cyclostrophic residual Eulerian model to illustrate how some of the large-scale structures of the middle atmospheric circulation can be explained qualitatively in terms of simple thermal (e.g. solar heating) and mechanical (the Eliassen-Palm flux divergence) forcings. This model is a generalization of that for fast rotating planets such as the Earth, where geostrophy dominates (Andrews and McIntyre 1987). The solution to this semi-analytic model consists of a set of modified Hough functions of the generalized Laplace's tidal equation with the cyclostrohpic terms. As examples, we apply this model to Titan and Venus. We show that the seasonal variations of the temperature and the circulation of these slowly-rotating planets can be well reproduced by adjusting only three parameters in the model: the Brunt-Väisälä bouyancy frequency, the Newtonian radiative cooling rate, and the Rayleigh friction damping rate. We will also discuss the application of this model to study the meridional transport of photochemically produced tracers that can be observed by space instruments.

  8. A cyclostrophic transformed Eulerian zonal mean model for the middle atmosphere of slowly rotating planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, King-Fai; Yao, Kaixuan; Taketa, Cameron; Zhang, Xi; Liang, Mao-Chang; Jiang, Xun; Newman, Claire; Tung, Ka-Kit; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-04-01

    With the advance of modern computers, studies of planetary atmospheres have heavily relied on general circulation models (GCMs). Because these GCMs are usually very complicated, the simulations are sometimes difficult to understand. Here we develop a semi-analytic zonally averaged, cyclostrophic residual Eulerian model to illustrate how some of the large-scale structures of the middle atmospheric circulation can be explained qualitatively in terms of simple thermal (e.g. solar heating) and mechanical (the Eliassen-Palm flux divergence) forcings. This model is a generalization of that for fast rotating planets such as the Earth, where geostrophy dominates (Andrews and McIntyre 1987). The solution to this semi-analytic model consists of a set of modified Hough functions of the generalized Laplace's tidal equation with the cyclostrohpic terms. As an example, we apply this model to Titan. We show that the seasonal variations of the temperature and the circulation of these slowly-rotating planets can be well reproduced by adjusting only three parameters in the model: the Brunt-Väisälä bouyancy frequency, the Newtonian radiative cooling rate, and the Rayleigh friction damping rate. We will also discuss an application of this model to study the meridional transport of photochemically produced tracers that can be observed by space instruments.

  9. Zonal Flow Velocimetry using Acoustic Modes in Experimental Models of a Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Mautino, A. R.; Stone, D.; Triana, S. A.; Lekic, V.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Rotating hydromagnetic experiments can serve as models of planetary cores, matching some of the dimensionless parameters relevant to planets. One challenge with such experiments is determining the flows present. The opacity of the fluids used in these experiments (e.g. liquid sodium) prevents direct flow visualization techniques from being employed. One method allowing determination of zonal flows in such experiments is acoustic mode velocimetry. In this technique, the rotational splittings of acoustic mode spectra are used to infer the azimuthal velocity profile of the flow. Here we present the use of this technique to study flows in experimental models of the Earth's core. Most of these results were obtained in a 60 cm diameter spherical Couette device, with a 20 cm diameter inner sphere, and using nitrogen gas as the working fluid. Turbulent flow is driven in the system via differential rotation of the outer shell and inner sphere. Acoustic modes are excited in the fluid volume using a speaker, and microphones are used to measure the frequencies and rotational splittings of the modes. We compare the observed splittings with those predicted by theory as a way of validating the method, and infer mean flows from these observations. We also present some preliminary results of acoustic studies in the 3 m diameter liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment. Finally, we discuss future prospects for this experimental technique.

  10. Investigating the zonal wind response to SST warming using transient ensemble AGCM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palipane, Erool; Lu, Jian; Staten, Paul; Chen, Gang; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2016-04-01

    The response of the atmospheric circulation to greenhouse gas-induced SST warming is investigated using large ensemble experiments with two AGCMs, with a focus on the robust feature of the poleward shift of the eddy driven jet. In these experiments, large ensembles of simulations are conducted by abruptly switching the SST forcing on from January 1st to focus on the wintertime circulation adjustment. A hybrid, finite amplitude wave activity budget analysis is performed to elucidate the nonlinear and irreversible aspects of the eddy-mean flow interaction during the adjustment of the zonal wind towards a poleward shifted state. The results confirm the results from earlier more idealized studies, particularly the importance of reduced dissipation of wave activity, in which the midlatitude decrease of effective diffusivity appears to be dominant. This reduction in dissipation increases the survival of midlatitude waves. These surviving waves, when reaching the upper propagation level in the upper troposphere, are subject to the influence of the increase of reflection phase speed at the poleward side of the mean jet, and thus more waves are reflected equatorward across the jet, giving rise to a poleward transport of momentum and thus an eddy momentum flux convergence for the poleward shift. The relative importance of wave breaking-induced PV mixing versus diabatic PV source in the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient is also investigated. The former plays the dominant role in the PV gradient formation during the initial phase of the jet shift, while the latter actually opposes the evolution of the Lagrangian PV gradient at times.

  11. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-01-15

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  12. Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves driven by sheared zonal winds in the E-layer ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T. D.

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear simulations of electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a shearless and sheared zonal flows in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer are carried out. The simulations show that the nonlinear action of the vortex structures keeps the solitary character in the presence of shearless zonal winds as well as the ideal solutions of solitary vortex in the absence of zonal winds. In the presence of sheared zonal winds, the zonal flows result in breaking into separate multiple smaller pieces. A passively convected scalar field is shown to clarify the transport associated with the vortices. The work shows that the zonal shear flows provide an energy source into the vortex structure according to the shear rate of the zonal winds.

  13. Parameterization of eddy sensible heat transports in a zonally averaged dynamic model of the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genthon, Christophe; Le Treut, Herve; Sadourny, Robert; Jouzel, Jean

    1990-01-01

    A Charney-Branscome based parameterization has been tested as a way of representing the eddy sensible heat transports missing in a zonally averaged dynamic model (ZADM) of the atmosphere. The ZADM used is a zonally averaged version of a general circulation model (GCM). The parameterized transports in the ZADM are gaged against the corresponding fluxes explicitly simulated in the GCM, using the same zonally averaged boundary conditions in both models. The Charney-Branscome approach neglects stationary eddies and transient barotropic disturbances and relies on a set of simplifying assumptions, including the linear appoximation, to describe growing transient baroclinic eddies. Nevertheless, fairly satisfactory results are obtained when the parameterization is performed interactively with the model. Compared with noninteractive tests, a very efficient restoring feedback effect between the modeled zonal-mean climate and the parameterized meridional eddy transport is identified.

  14. Stationary Zonal Flows during the Formation of the Edge Transport Barrier in the JET Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hillesheim, J C; Delabie, E; Meyer, H; Maggi, C F; Meneses, L; Poli, E; Jet Contributors

    2016-02-12

    High spatial resolution Doppler backscattering measurements in JET have enabled new insights into the development of the edge Er. We observe fine-scale spatial structures in the edge Er well with a wave number krρi≈0.4-0.8, consistent with stationary zonal flows, the characteristics of which vary with density. The zonal flow amplitude and wavelength both decrease with local collisionality, such that the zonal flow E×B shear increases. Above the minimum of the L-H transition power threshold dependence on density, the zonal flows are present during L mode and disappear following the H-mode transition, while below the minimum they are reduced below measurable amplitude during L mode, before the L-H transition.

  15. Regulation of electron temperature gradient turbulence by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes

    SciTech Connect

    Asahi, Y. Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent transport caused by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that the ETG turbulence can be regulated by meso-scale zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs), which are excited with much smaller growth rates than those of ETG modes. The zonal flows of which radial wavelengths are in between the ion and the electron banana widths are not shielded by trapped ions nor electrons, and hence they are effectively driven by the TEMs. It was also shown that an E × B shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is larger than or comparable to the growth rates of long-wavelength ETG modes and TEMs, which make a main contribution to the turbulent transport before excitation of the zonal flows.

  16. Thermodynamic and dynamic controls on changes in the zonally anomalous hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Robert C.; Byrne, Michael P.; Schneider, Tapio

    2016-05-01

    The wet gets wetter, dry gets drier paradigm explains the expected moistening of the extratropics and drying of the subtropics as the atmospheric moisture content increases with global warming. Here we show, using precipitation minus evaporation (P - E) data from climate models, that it cannot be extended to apply regionally to deviations from the zonal mean. Wet and dry zones shift substantially in response to shifts in the stationary-eddy circulations that cause them. Additionally, atmospheric circulation changes lead to a smaller increase in the zonal variance of P - E than would be expected from atmospheric moistening alone. The P - E variance change can be split into dynamic and thermodynamic components through an analysis of the atmospheric moisture budget. This reveals that a weakening of stationary-eddy circulations and changes in the zonal variation of transient-eddy moisture fluxes moderate the strengthening of the zonally anomalous hydrological cycle with global warming.

  17. Stationary Zonal Flows during the Formation of the Edge Transport Barrier in the JET Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Delabie, E.; Meyer, H.; Maggi, C. F.; Meneses, L.; Poli, E.; JET Contributors; EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB, United Kingdom

    2016-02-01

    High spatial resolution Doppler backscattering measurements in JET have enabled new insights into the development of the edge Er. We observe fine-scale spatial structures in the edge Er well with a wave number krρi≈0.4 -0.8 , consistent with stationary zonal flows, the characteristics of which vary with density. The zonal flow amplitude and wavelength both decrease with local collisionality, such that the zonal flow E ×B shear increases. Above the minimum of the L -H transition power threshold dependence on density, the zonal flows are present during L mode and disappear following the H -mode transition, while below the minimum they are reduced below measurable amplitude during L mode, before the L -H transition.

  18. Theory of Fine-scale Zonal Flow Generation From Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wang and T.S. Hahm

    2009-06-11

    Most existing zonal flow generation theory has been developed with a usual assumption of qrρθ¡ << 1 (qr is the radial wave number of zonal flow, and ρθ¡ is the ion poloidal gyrora- dius). However, recent nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence exhibit a relatively short radial scale of the zonal flows with qrρθ¡ ~ 1 [Z. Lin et al., IAEA-CN/TH/P2-8 (2006); D. Ernst et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 055906 (2009)]. This work reports an extension of zonal flow growth calculation to this short wavelength regime via the wave kinetics approach. A generalized expression for the polarization shielding for arbitrary radial wavelength [Lu Wang and T.S. Hahm, to appear in Phys. Plasmas (2009)] which extends the Rosenbluth-Hinton formula in the long wavelength limit is applied.

  19. Stationary zonal flows during the formation of the edge transport barrier in the JET tokamak

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Meyer, H.; Maggi, C. F.; Meneses, L.; Poli, E.; Delabie, E.

    2016-02-10

    In this study, high spatial resolution Doppler backscattering measurements in JET have enabled new insights into the development of the edge Er. We observe fine-scale spatial structures in the edge Er well with a wave number krρi ≈ 0.4-0.8, consistent with stationary zonal flows, the characteristics of which vary with density. The zonal flow amplitude and wavelength both decrease with local collisionality, such that the zonal flow E x B shear increases. Above the minimum of the L-H transition power threshold dependence on density, the zonal flows are present during L mode and disappear following the H-mode transition, while belowmore » the minimum they are reduced below measurable amplitude during L mode, before the L-H transition.« less

  20. Studies of Zonal Flows Driven by Drift Mode Turbulence in Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, R.; Trines, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J. A.; Bamford, R. A.; Mendonca, J. T.; Silva, L. O.; Shukla, P. K.; Vaivads, A.; Mori, W. B.; Tynan, G.

    2008-10-15

    The interaction between broadband drift mode turbulence and zonal flows is an important topic associated with transport at plasma boundaries. The generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability of broad band drift waves has resulted in the observation of self organized solitary wave structures at the magnetopause. To understand these structures and their importance to future burning plasmas and space plasmas we have developed a unique numerical simulation code that describes drift wave--zonal flow turbulence. We show that observations by cluster spacecraft confirms the role of drift wave zonal flow turbulence at the Earth's magnetopause and further demonstrates that the magnetopause boundary acts in a s similar manner to transport barriers in tokamak fusion devices. Thus cementing the relationship between the plasma physics of laboratory devices and space plasmas.

  1. Ion Layer Separation and Equilibrium Zonal Winds in Midlatitude Sporadic E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earle, G. D.; Kane, T. J.; Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In-situ observations of a moderately strong mid-latitude sporadic-E layer show a separation in altitude between distinct sublayers composed of Fe(+), Mg(+), and NO(+). From these observations it is possible to estimate the zonal wind field consistent with diffusive equilibrium near the altitude of the layer. The amplitude of the zonal wind necessary to sustain the layer against diffusive effects is less than 10 meters per second, and the vertical wavelength is less than 10 km.

  2. Fluctuating zonal flows in the I-mode regime in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cziegler, I.; Diamond, P. H.; Fedorczak, N.; Manz, P.; Tynan, G. R.; Xu, M.; Churchill, R. M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Lipschultz, B.; Sierchio, J. M.; Terry, J. L.; Theiler, C.

    2013-05-01

    Velocity fields and density fluctuations of edge turbulence are studied in I-mode [F. Ryter et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 40, 725 (1998)] plasmas of the Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] tokamak, which are characterized by a strong thermal transport barrier in the edge while providing little or no barrier to the transport of both bulk and impurity particles. Although previous work showed no clear geodesic-acoustic modes (GAM) on C-Mod, using a newly implemented, gas-puff-imaging based time-delay-estimate velocity inference algorithm, GAM are now shown to be ubiquitous in all I-mode discharges examined to date, with the time histories of the GAM and the I-mode specific [D. Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)] Weakly Coherent Mode (WCM, f = 100-300 kHz, Δf/f≈0.5, and kθ≈1.3 cm-1) closely following each other through the entire duration of the regime. Thus, the I-mode presents an example of a plasma state in which zero frequency zonal flows and GAM continuously coexist. Using two-field (density-velocity and radial-poloidal velocity) bispectral methods, the GAM are shown to be coupled to the WCM and to be responsible for its broad frequency structure. The effective nonlinear growth rate of the GAM is estimated, and its comparison to the collisional damping rate seems to suggest a new view on I-mode threshold physics.

  3. Atmospheric Response to Zonal Variations in Midlatitude SST: Transient and Stationary Eddies and Their Feedback(.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatsu, Masaru; Mukougawa, Hitoshi; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2003-10-01

    Midwinter storm track response to zonal variations in midlatitude sea surface temperatures (SSTs) has been investigated using an atmospheric general circulation model under aquaplanet and perpetual-January conditions. Zonal wavenumber-1 SST variations with a meridionally confined structure are placed at various latitudes. Having these SST variations centered at 30°N leads to a zonally localized storm track, while the storm track becomes nearly zonally uniform when the same SST forcing is moved farther north at 40° and 50°N. Large (small) baroclinic energy conversion north of the warm (cold) SST anomaly near the axis of the storm track (near 40°N) is responsible for the large (small) storm growth. The equatorward transfer of eddy kinetic energy by the ageostrophic motion and the mechanical damping are important to diminish the storm track activity in the zonal direction.Significant stationary eddies form in the upper troposphere, with a ridge (trough) northeast of the warm (cold) SST anomaly at 30°N. Heat and vorticity budget analyses indicate that zonally localized condensational heating in the storm track is the major cause for these stationary eddies, which in turn exert a positive feedback to maintain the localized storm track by strengthening the vertical shear near the surface. These results indicate an active role of synoptic eddies in inducing deep, tropospheric-scale response to midlatitude SST variations. Finally, the application of the model results to the real atmosphere is discussed.

  4. The effects of zonal atmospheric currents on the spectra of rotating early-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Collins, George W., II

    1993-01-01

    We suggest the existence of zonal currents in the atmospheres of rapidly rotating stars analogous to those found in planetary atmospheres. The zonal flow is assumed to be characterized by 'thin' atmospheric, nearly geostrophic flow which does not change the gravity darkening and stellar shape determined by the underlying uniformly rotating model. The contribution that such flows make to the continuum spectra of such stars is investigated. The additional rotationally induced Doppler displacement resulting from such zonal wind belts can distort the rotationally broadened stellar lines leading to significant departures from the line profiles predicted by the classical model of rotating stars. Our estimates of the zonal flow velocity stem from the assumption of a relation between it and the latitudinal wavenumber of the zonal velocity field. It is thus possible to create barotropic atmosphere models which, in turn, enable the modeling of the stellar spectrum including important spectral lines. In addition, the radiative transfer equations for the Stokes parameters I and Q are solved for the locally plane-parallel atmospheres so that the polarization structure of the radiation field is determined. We find that the presence of zonal wind belts leads to significant changes in the photospheric polarization from those characteristic of a uniformly rotating model.

  5. Tightly linked zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients over the past five million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Alexey V.; Burls, Natalie J.; Lawrence, Kira T.; Peterson, Laura C.

    2015-12-01

    The climate of the tropics and surrounding regions is defined by pronounced zonal (east-west) and meridional (equator to mid-latitudes) gradients in sea surface temperature. These gradients control zonal and meridional atmospheric circulations, and thus the Earth’s climate. Global cooling over the past five million years, since the early Pliocene epoch, was accompanied by the gradual strengthening of these temperature gradients. Here we use records from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, including a new alkenone palaeotemperature record from the South Pacific, to reconstruct changes in zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients since the Pliocene, and assess their connection using a comprehensive climate model. We find that the reconstructed zonal and meridional temperature gradients vary coherently over this time frame, showing a one-to-one relationship between their changes. In our model simulations, we systematically reduce the meridional sea surface temperature gradient by modifying the latitudinal distribution of cloud albedo or atmospheric CO2 concentration. The simulated zonal temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific adjusts proportionally. These experiments and idealized modelling indicate that the meridional temperature gradient controls upper-ocean stratification in the tropics, which in turn controls the zonal gradient along the equator, as well as heat export from the tropical oceans. We conclude that this tight linkage between the two sea surface temperature gradients posits a fundamental constraint on both past and future climates.

  6. Model test of anchoring effect on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock masses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  7. Model Test of Anchoring Effect on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Masses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration. PMID:23997683

  8. Excitation of zonal flow and magnetic field by Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of Rossby-Khantadze electromagnetic planetary waves in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer is investigated. Along with the prevalent effect of Hall conductivity for these waves, the latitudinal inhomogeneity of both the Earth's angular velocity and the geomagnetic field becomes essential. It is shown that such short wavelength turbulence of Rossby-Khantadze waves is unstable with respect to the excitation of low-frequency and large-scale perturbations of the zonal flow and magnetic field. The nonlinear mechanism of the instability is driven by the advection of vorticity, leading to the inverse energy cascade toward the longer wavelength. The growth rate of the corresponding instability is found. It is shown that the generation of the intense mean magnetic field is caused by the latitudinal gradient of the geomagnetic field.

  9. Suppression of drift wave turbulence and zonal flow formation by changing axial boundary conditions in a cylindrical magnetized plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Xu Min; Manz, Peter; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Tynan, George R.; Holland, Chris

    2013-01-15

    For drift wave turbulence, due to charge conservation, the divergence of the parallel current is coupled to the divergence of the perpendicular polarization current, which determines the effective radial momentum flux, i.e., the Reynolds stress. Changes in the current flow patterns also affect the nonlinear energy transfer from smaller to larger scales. Here, we show that by changing the end plate boundary conditions in a cylindrical plasma device, the radial currents through the plasma and hence the net momentum transport and the nonlinear coupling for the inverse energy transfer are strongly modified. The transition to drift wave turbulence and the formation of low frequency zonal flows can be either suppressed with conducting boundaries or enhanced with insulating boundaries.

  10. Zonal Flow Magnetic Field Interaction in the Semi-Conducting Region of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hao; Stevenson, David J.

    2016-10-01

    All four giant planets in the Solar System feature zonal flows on the order of 100 m/s in the cloud deck, and large-scale intrinsic magnetic fields on the order of 1 Gauss near the surface. The vertical structure of the zonal flows remains obscure. The end-member scenarios are shallow flows confined in the radiative atmosphere and deep flows throughout the planet with constant velocity along the direction of the spin-axis. The electrical conductivity increases smoothly as a function of depth inside Jupiter and Saturn, while a discontinuity of electrical conductivity inside Uranus and Neptune cannot be ruled out. Deep zonal flows will inevitably interact with the magnetic field, at depth with even modest electrical conductivity. Here we investigate the interaction between zonal flows and magnetic fields in the semi-conducting region of giant planets. Employing mean-field electrodynamics, we show that the interaction will generate detectable poloidal magnetic field perturbations spatially correlated with the deep zonal flows. Assuming the peak amplitude of the dynamo α-effect to be 0.1 mm/s, deep zonal flows on the order of 0.1 – 1 m/s in the semi-conducting region of Jupiter and Saturn would generate poloidal magnetic perturbations on the order of 0.01 % – 1 % of the background dipole field. These poloidal perturbations should be detectable with the in-situ magnetic field measurements from the upcoming Juno mission and the Cassini Grand Finale. This implies that magnetic field measurements can be employed to constrain the properties of deep zonal flows in the semi-conducting region of giant planets.

  11. Including outer scale effects in zonal adaptive optics calculations.

    PubMed

    Ellerbroek, B L

    1997-12-20

    Mellin transform techniques are applied to evaluate the covariance of the integrated turbulence-induced phase distortions along a pair of ray paths through the atmosphere from two points in a telescope aperture to a pair of sources at finite or infinite range. The derivation is for the case of a finite outer scale and a von Karman turbulence spectrum. The Taylor hypothesis is assumed if the two phase distortions are evaluated at two different times and amplitude scintillation effects are neglected. The resulting formula for the covariance is a power series in one variable for the case of a fixed atmospheric wind velocity profile and a power series in two variables for a fixed wind-speed profile with a random and uniformly distributed wind direction. These formulas are computationally efficient and can be easily integrated into computer codes for the numerical evaluation of adaptive optics system performance. Sample numerical results are presented to illustrate the effect of a finite outer scale on the performance of natural and laser guide star adaptive optics systems for an 8-m astronomical telescope. A hypothetical outer scale of 10 m significantly reduces the magnitude of tilt anisoplanatism, thereby improving the performance of a laser guide star adaptive optics system if the auxiliary natural star used for full-aperture tip/tilt sensing is offset from the science field. The reduction in higher-order anisoplanatism that is due to a 10-m outer scale is smaller, and the off-axis performance of a natural guide star adaptive optics system is not significantly improved.

  12. Zonal shear and super-rotation in a magnetized spherical Couette flow experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, D.; Alboussière, T.; Cardin, P.; Gagnière, N.; Jault, D.; La Rizza, P.; Masson, J.; Nataf, H.; Schmitt, D.

    2011-12-01

    We present measurements performed in a spherical shell filled with liquid sodium, where a 74 mm-radius inner sphere is rotated while a 210 mm-radius outer sphere is at rest. The inner sphere holds a dipolar magnetic field and acts as a magnetic propeller when rotated. In this experimental set-up called DTS, direct measurements of the velocity are performed by ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. Differences in electric potential and the induced magnetic field are also measured to characterize the magnetohydrodynamic flow. Rotation frequencies of the inner sphere are varied between -30 Hz and +30 Hz, the magnetic Reynolds number based on measured sodium velocities and on the shell radius reaching to about 33. We have investigated the mean axisymmetric part of the flow, which consists of differential rotation. Strong super-rotation of the fluid with respect to the rotating inner sphere is directly measured. It is found that the organization of the mean flow does not change much throughout the entire range of parameters covered by our experiment. The direct measurements of zonal velocity give a nice illustration of Ferraro's law of isorotation in the vicinity of the inner sphere where magnetic forces dominate inertial ones. The transition from a Ferraro regime in the interior to a geostrophic regime, where inertial forces predominate, in the outer regions has been well documented. It takes place where the local Elsasser number is about 1. A quantitative agreement with non-linear numerical simulations is obtained when keeping the same Elsasser number. The experiments also reveal a region that violates Ferraro's law just above the inner sphere.

  13. The role of zonal flows in the saturation of multi-scale gyrokinetic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J.; Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.

    2016-06-01

    The 2D spectrum of the saturated electric potential from gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that include both ion and electron scales (multi-scale) in axisymmetric tokamak geometry is analyzed. The paradigm that the turbulence is saturated when the zonal (axisymmetic) ExB flow shearing rate competes with linear growth is shown to not apply to the electron scale turbulence. Instead, it is the mixing rate by the zonal ExB velocity spectrum with the turbulent distribution function that competes with linear growth. A model of this mechanism is shown to be able to capture the suppression of electron-scale turbulence by ion-scale turbulence and the threshold for the increase in electron scale turbulence when the ion-scale turbulence is reduced. The model computes the strength of the zonal flow velocity and the saturated potential spectrum from the linear growth rate spectrum. The model for the saturated electric potential spectrum is applied to a quasilinear transport model and shown to accurately reproduce the electron and ion energy fluxes of the non-linear gyrokinetic multi-scale simulations. The zonal flow mixing saturation model is also shown to reproduce the non-linear upshift in the critical temperature gradient caused by zonal flows in ion-scale gyrokinetic simulations.

  14. Indian Ocean zonal mode activity in 20th century observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbeck, Anja; Mölg, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The Indian Ocean zonal mode (IOZM) is a coupled ocean-atmosphere system with anomalous cooling in the east, warming in the west and easterly wind anomalies, resulting in a complete reversal of the climatological zonal sea surface temperature (SST) gradient. The IOZM has a strong influence on East African climate by causing anomalously strong October - December (OND) precipitation. Using observational data and historical CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5) model output, the September - November (SON) dipole mode index (DMI), OND East African precipitation and SON zonal wind index (ZWI) are calculated. We pay particular attention to detrending SSTs for calculating the DMI, which seems to have been neglected in some published research. The ZWI is defined as the area-averaged zonal wind component at 850 hPa over the central Indian Ocean. Regression analysis is used to evaluate the models' capability to represent the IOZM and its impact on east African climate between 1948 and 2005. Simple correlations are calculated between SST, zonal wind and precipitation to show their interdependence. High correlation in models implies a good representation of the influence of IOZM on East African climate variability and our goal is to detect the models with the highest correlation coefficients. In future research, these model data might be used to investigate the impact of IOZM on the East African climate variability in the late 20's century with regard to anthropogenic causes and internal variability.

  15. Planetesimal Formation in Zonal Flows Arising in Magneto-Rotationally-Unstable Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Karsten; Klahr, Hubert; Johansen, Anders

    2014-04-01

    Recent simulations show long -lived sub- and super-Keplerian flows in protoplanetary disks. These so-called zonal flows are found in local as well as global simulations of magneto-rotationally unstable disks. We investigate the strength and life-time of the resulting long-lived gas over- and under-densities as well as particle concentrations function of the azimuthal and radial size of the local shearing box. Changes in the azimuthal extent do not affect the zonal flow features. However, strength and life-time of zonal flows increase with increasing radial box sizes. Our simulations show indications, and support earlier results, that zonal flows have a natural length scale of approximately 5 pressure scale heights. For the first time, the reaction of dust particles in boxes with zonal flows are studied. We show that particles of some centimeters in size reach a hundred-fold higher density than initially, without any self-gravitating forces acting on the point masses. We further investigate collision velocities of dust grains in a turbulent medium.

  16. Gyrokinetic study of the spatial entropy dynamics in turbulent plasmas with zonal flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imadera, Kenji; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Li, Jiquan; Utsumi, Takayuki

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a new computational algorithm based on the IDO-CF (Conservative Form of Interpolated Differential Operator) scheme [1], which is efficient in capturing sharp domain structure in long time scale, for solving full-f Gyrokineitc Vlasov-Poisson system. By using the developed code, we have performed the ITG simulation focusing on entropy dynamics and associated zonal flow formation. Here, we have introduced the modified local entropy defined asδSm(x)=<δf^2/ 2f0(-1+v||^2 /T) >yzdv , which retains the spatial information. It is found that the entropy balances with the acoustic coupling driven by ITG mode in the linear stage, and then the zonal flows expel the entropy to outside region via its convection. The spatial structure of the entropy is regulated by the zonal flows, and finally, the quasi-steady state where the entropy and zonal flows have similar structure is established. This indicates that the zonal flows couple with the entropy spatially [1] Y.Imai et al., J. Comput. Phys. 227 (2008) 2263.

  17. An implicit, conservative, zonal-boundary scheme for Euler equation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    A zonal, or patched, grid approach is one in which the flow region of interest is divided into subregions which are then discretized independently, using existing grid generators. The equations of motion are integrated in each subregion in conjunction with zonal boundary schemes which allow proper information transfer across interfaces that separate subregions. The zonal approach greatly simplifies the treatment of complex geometries and also the addition of grid points to selected regions of the flow. A conservative, zonal boundary condition that could be used with explicit schemes was extended so that it can be used with existing second order accurate implicit integration schemes such as the Beam-Warming and Osher schemes. In the test case considered, the implicit schemes increased the rate of convergence considerably (by a factor of about 30 over that of the explicit scheme). Results demonstrating the time accuracy of the zonal scheme and the feasibility of performing calculations on zones that move relative to each other are also presented.

  18. North South Asymmetry of Zonal and Meridional Flows Determined From Ring Diagram Analysis of Gong ++ Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaatri, A.; Komm, R.; González Hernández, I.; Howe, R.; Corbard, T.

    2006-07-01

    We study the North South asymmetry of zonal and meridional components of horizontal, solar subsurface flows during the years 2001 2004, which cover the declining phase of solar cycle 23. We measure the horizontal flows from the near-surface layers to 16 Mm depth by analyzing 44 consecutive Carrington rotations of Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Doppler images with a ring-diagram analysis technique. The meridional flow and the errors of both flow components show an annual variation related to the B 0-angle variation, while the zonal flow is less affected by the B 0-angle variation. After correcting for this effect, the meridional flow is mainly poleward but it shows a counter cell close to the surface at high latitudes in both hemispheres. During the declining phase of the solar cycle, the meridional flow mainly increases with time at latitudes poleward of about 20˚, while it mainly decreases at more equatorward latitudes. The temporal variation of the zonal flow in both hemispheres is significantly correlated at latitudes less than about 20˚. The zonal flow is larger in the southern hemisphere than the northern one, and this North South asymmetry increases with depth. Details of the North South asymmetry of zonal and meridional flow reflect the North South asymmetry of the magnetic flux. The North South asymmetries of the flows show hints of a variation with the solar cycle.

  19. Numerical aspects and implementation of a two-layer zonal wall model for LES of compressible turbulent flows on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Moin, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on numerical and practical aspects associated with a parallel implementation of a two-layer zonal wall model for large-eddy simulation (LES) of compressible wall-bounded turbulent flows on unstructured meshes. A zonal wall model based on the solution of unsteady three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations on a separate near-wall grid is implemented in an unstructured, cell-centered finite-volume LES solver. The main challenge in its implementation is to couple two parallel, unstructured flow solvers for efficient boundary data communication and simultaneous time integrations. A coupling strategy with good load balancing and low processors underutilization is identified. Face mapping and interpolation procedures at the coupling interface are explained in detail. The method of manufactured solution is used for verifying the correct implementation of solver coupling, and parallel performance of the combined wall-modeled LES (WMLES) solver is investigated. The method has successfully been applied to several attached and separated flows, including a transitional flow over a flat plate and a separated flow over an airfoil at an angle of attack.

  20. Convergence acceleration for a three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, J.

    1985-01-01

    A fast diagonal algorithm is coupled with a zonal approach to solve the three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. Transonic viscous solutions are obtained on a 150,000 point mesh for a NACA 0012 wing. The new computational approach yields a speedup by as much as a factor of 40 over the standard Beam-Warming algorithm/zonal method originally coded. A three-order-of-magnitude drop in the L2-norm of the residual requires approximately 500 iterations, which takes about 45 min of CPU time on a Cray-XMP. The numerically computed solutions are in good agreement with experimental results. Effects on convergence rate owing to increasing the zonal boundary overlap regions, different stretching distributions in the viscous regions, and different CFL values are also explored.

  1. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-15

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  2. Conservative zonal schemes for patched grids in 2 and 3 dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hessenius, Kristin A.

    1987-01-01

    The computation of flow over complex geometries, such as realistic aircraft configurations, poses difficult grid generation problems for computational aerodynamicists. The creation of a traditional, single-module grid of acceptable quality about an entire configuration may be impossible even with the most sophisticated of grid generation techniques. A zonal approach, wherein the flow field is partitioned into several regions within which grids are independently generated, is a practical alternative for treating complicated geometries. This technique not only alleviates the problems of discretizing a complex region, but also facilitates a block processing approach to computation thereby circumventing computer memory limitations. The use of such a zonal scheme, however, requires the development of an interfacing procedure that ensures a stable, accurate, and conservative calculation for the transfer of information across the zonal borders.

  3. Calculation of Zonal Winds using Accelerometer and Rate Data from Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Darren T.; Tolson, Robert; Bougher, Stephen; Steers, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft was initially placed into a high eccentricity, nearly polar orbit about Mars with a 45-hour period. To accomplish the science objectives of the mission, a 2-hour, circular orbit was required. Using a method known as aerobraking, numerous passes through the upper atmosphere slowed the spacecraft, thereby reducing the orbital period and eccentricity. To successfully perform aerobraking, the spacecraft was designed to be longitudinally, aerodynamically stable in pitch and yaw. Since the orbit is nearly polar, the yaw orientation of the spacecraft was sensitive to disturbances caused by the zonal components of wind (east-to-west or west-to-east) acting on the spacecraft at aerobraking altitudes. Zonal wind velocities were computed by equating the aerodynamic and inertia-related torques acting on the spacecraft. Comparisons of calculated zonal winds with those computed from the Mars Thermospheric Global Circulation Model are discussed.

  4. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, H.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Kosuga, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Kasuya, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave – zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow. PMID:27628894

  5. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, H.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Kosuga, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Kasuya, N.; Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-09-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave – zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow.

  6. Zonal flow generation and its feedback on turbulence production in drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Andrey V.; Bos, Wouter J. T.; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma turbulence described by the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations is simulated numerically for different models and values of the adiabaticity parameter C. It is found that for low values of C turbulence remains isotropic, zonal flows are not generated and there is no suppression of the meridional drift waves and particle transport. For high values of C, turbulence evolves towards highly anisotropic states with a dominant contribution of the zonal sector to the kinetic energy. This anisotropic flow leads to a decrease of turbulence production in the meridional sector and limits the particle transport across the mean isopycnal surfaces. This behavior allows to consider the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations a minimal PDE model, which contains the drift-wave/zonal-flow feedback loop mechanism.

  7. Eddy, drift wave and zonal flow dynamics in a linear magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, H; Inagaki, S; Sasaki, M; Kosuga, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kasuya, N; Nagashima, Y; Yamada, T; Lesur, M; Fujisawa, A; Itoh, K; Itoh, S-I

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence and its structure formation are universal in neutral fluids and in plasmas. Turbulence annihilates global structures but can organize flows and eddies. The mutual-interactions between flow and the eddy give basic insights into the understanding of non-equilibrium and nonlinear interaction by turbulence. In fusion plasma, clarifying structure formation by Drift-wave turbulence, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasma, is an important issue. Here, a new mutual-interaction among eddy, drift wave and flow in magnetized plasma is discovered. A two-dimensional solitary eddy, which is a perturbation with circumnavigating motion localized radially and azimuthally, is transiently organized in a drift wave - zonal flow (azimuthally symmetric band-like shear flows) system. The excitation of the eddy is synchronized with zonal perturbation. The organization of the eddy has substantial impact on the acceleration of zonal flow. PMID:27628894

  8. Zonally averaged model of dynamics, chemistry and radiation for the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, K. K.

    1985-01-01

    A nongeostrophic theory of zonally averaged circulation is formulated using the nonlinear primitive equations on a sphere, taking advantage of the more direct relationship between the mean meridional circulation and diabatic heating rate which is available in isentropic coordinates. Possible differences between results of nongeostrophic theory and the commonly used geostrophic formulation are discussed concerning: (1) the role of eddy forcing of the diabatic circulation, and (2) the nonlinear nearly inviscid limit vs the geostrophic limit. Problems associated with the traditional Rossby number scaling in quasi-geostrophic formulations are pointed out and an alternate, more general scaling based on the smallness of mean meridional to zonal velocities for a rotating planet is suggested. Such a scaling recovers the geostrophic balanced wind relationship for the mean zonal flow but reveals that the mean meridional velocity is in general ageostrophic.

  9. Thermodynamic and dynamic controls on the amplitude of the zonally anomalous hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Robert; Byrne, Michael; Schneider, Tapio

    2016-04-01

    The "wet gets wetter, dry gets drier" paradigm is a useful starting point for under- standing zonal-mean changes in precipitation minus evaporation (P-E). It can explain the expected moistening of the high latitudes and drying of the subtropics in response to global warming. We examine P-E changes over the next century in comprehensive climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). We show that "wet gets wetter, dry gets drier" can not be extended to apply to regional variations about the zonal mean, which account for the majority of the spatial variability of P-E in the modern climate. Wet and dry zones shift substantially in response to shifts in the stationary-eddy circulations that cause them. The largest changes are in the tropical oceans where wet zones get drier and dry zones get wetter in response to a restructuring and decrease in strength of tropical circulations such as the Walker circulation. Further progress can be made by examining changes in the zonal variance of P-E. The zonal variance of P-E increases robustly at all latitudes in the Representative Concentration Pathways RCP8.5 scenario, but with a smaller fractional increase than the moisture content of the atmosphere. The variance change can be split into dynamic and thermodynamic components by relating it to changes in surface specific humidity, stationary-eddy divergent circulations, and transient-eddy fluxes. The modeled sub Clausius-Clapeyron change of zonal P-E variance gives evidence of a decrease in stationary-eddy overturning and in zonally anomalous transient-eddy moisture flux convergence with global warming.

  10. Saturn’s Zonal Winds at Cloud Level between 2004-2013 from Cassini ISS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Ingersoll , Andrew P.

    2014-11-01

    We examine images of Saturn returned by Cassini orbiter’s Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) camera between 2004 to 2013 to analyze the temporal evolution of the zonal mean wind speed as a function of latitude. Our study primarily examines the images captured in the 752-nm continuum band using the CB2 filter. Images captured using the CB2 filter sense the upper troposphere of Saturn between 350 mbar and 500 mbar (Pérez-Hoyos and Sánchez-Lavega, 2006; Sánchez-Lavega et al, 2006; García-Melendo et al, 2009). We measure the wind speed using a two-dimensional Correlation Imaging Velocimetry (CIV) technique. The wind vectors are computed using pairs of images separated in time by up to two planetary rotations, and binned in latitude to determine the zonal mean wind profile, which typically covers a limited range of latitude. To achieve pole-to-pole coverage, we systematically merge all the wind measurements during each of the calendar years in order to compile a yearly, near-global record of Saturn's zonal wind structure. Using our wind measurements, we analyze the temporal evolution of the zonal wind. We specifically focus on changes in the wind profile after the 2009 equinox; we predict that changes in the insolation pattern caused by the shifting ring shadows affect the horizontal temperature gradient, and change the zonal mean wind through the thermal wind relationship. Furthermore, we also extend the zonal wind analysis by Sayanagi et al (2013), who detected changes in the zonal wind related to the Great Storm of 2010-2011, to study the subsequent evolution of the region affected by the storm. We compare our results with previously published zonal wind profiles obtained from Voyager 1 and 2 (Sánchez-Lavega et al, 2000) and Cassini (García-Melendo et al, 2011). Out study is supported by the Cassini Project, and our investigation is funded by NASA Outer Planets Research Program grant NNX12AR38G and NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics grant 1212216 to KMS.

  11. On the normal modes of Laplace's tidal equations for zonal wavenumber zero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, H. L.; Kasahara, Akira

    1992-01-01

    The characteristic differences between two different rotational modes of Laplace's tidal equations for wavenumber m = 0, called the K- and the S-modes, are compared in their energy ratio and structures. It is shown that the K-mode representation captures most of the observed zonal energy with a few terms, whereas the S-mode representation requires many terms. For small vertical scale components, the K-mode series converges faster than the S-mode series. Attention is also given to the differences between the energy spectra projected upon the K- and S-modes and the merits of each set as expansion functions for the zonal atmospheric motions.

  12. Electromagnetic interchange-like mode and zonal flow in electron-magnetohydrodynamic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2006-10-15

    A numerical simulation of the nonlinear state of interchange instability associated with electron inertia in an unmagnetized plasma is studied. It is shown that a self-consistent sheared transverse electron current flow is generated due to nonlinear mechanisms. This zonal flow can reduce the growth rate of the magnetic interchange-like instability and reach a steady state. The zonal flow generation mechanisms are discussed by truncated Fourier mode representation. In the truncated model, three mode equations are considered that have an exact analytic solution that matches well with the numerical solution. The effect of different boundary conditions in such investigations is also discussed.

  13. Triple Cascade Behavior in Quasigeostrophic and Drift Turbulence and Generation of Zonal Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarenko, Sergey; Quinn, Brenda

    2009-09-11

    We study quasigeostrophic (QG) and plasma drift turbulence within the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima (CHM) model. We focus on the zonostrophy, an extra invariant in the CHM model, and on its role in the formation of zonal jets. We use a generalized Fjoertoft argument for the energy, enstrophy, and zonostrophy and show that they cascade anisotropically into nonintersecting sectors in k space with the energy cascading towards large zonal scales. Using direct numerical simulations of the CHM equation, we show that zonostrophy is well conserved, and the three invariants cascade as predicted by the Fjoertoft argument.

  14. Comparison of Global Distributions of Zonal-Mean Gravity Wave Variance Inferred from Different Satellite Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Offermann, Dirk; Jackman, Charles H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity wave temperature fluctuations acquired by the CRISTA instrument are compared to previous estimates of zonal-mean gravity wave temperature variance inferred from the LIMS, MLS and GPS/MET satellite instruments during northern winter. Careful attention is paid to the range of vertical wavelengths resolved by each instrument. Good agreement between CRISTA data and previously published results from LIMS, MLS and GPS/MET are found. Key latitudinal features in these variances are consistent with previous findings from ground-based measurements and some simple models. We conclude that all four satellite instruments provide reliable global data on zonal-mean gravity wave temperature fluctuations throughout the middle atmosphere.

  15. Zonal Winds Between 25 and 120 Km Retrieved from Solar Occultation Spectra. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancleef, Garrett Warren; Shaw, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric winds at heights between 25 and 120 km have been retrieved with precisions of 5/ms from the Doppler shifts of atmospheric absorption lines measured from a satellite-borne instrument. Lines of the upsilon 3 CO2 and upsilon 2 H2O rotation-vibration bands caused by gases in the instrument allowed the instrumental frequency scale to be absolutely calibrated so that accurate relative speeds could be obtained. By comparing the positions of both sets of instrumental lines the calibration of the frequency scale was determined to be stable to a precision of less than 2 x 10(-5) cm during the course of each occultation. It was found that the instrumental resolution of 0.015 cm after apodization, the signal to noise ratio of about 100 and stable calibration allowed relative speeds to be determined to a precision of 5 ms or better by using small numbers of absorption lines between 1600 and 3200 cm. Absolute absorption line positions were simultaneously recovered to precisions of 5 x 10(-5) cm or better. The wind speed profiles determined from four sunset occultations and one sunrise occultation show remarkable similarities in the magnitudes and directions of the zonal wind velocities as functions of height. These wind profiles appear to be manifestations of atmospheric tides.

  16. Characteristics of geodesic acoustic mode zonal flow and ambient turbulence at the edge of the HL-2A tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K. J.; Dong, J. Q.; Yan, L. W.; Hong, W. Y.; Lan, T.; Liu, A. D.; Qian, J.; Cheng, J.; Yu, D. L.; Huang, Y.; He, H. D.; Liu, Yi.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Song, X. M.; Ding, X. T.; Liu, Y.

    2007-12-15

    The three-dimensional characteristics of the geodesic acoustic mode zonal flows (GAMZFs) and the ambient turbulence (AT) at the edge of the HuanLiuqi-2A tokamak [Y. Liu et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S203 (2005)] are investigated with Langmuir probe arrays and the results are presented in detail. The toroidal and poloidal symmetries, and the radial scale of the GAMZFs are simultaneously identified. The envelopes of the high frequency components of the AT in the presence of the GAMZFs are analyzed. The GAM frequency components (GAMFCs) of the coherent envelopes are also shown to have poloidal and toroidal symmetries, and similar radial scales as the GAMZF does. The correlation between the GAMFCs of the envelopes and the GAMs is high, with phase shifts between {pi}/2 to {pi}, indicating that the GAMZFs may regulate the AT and the regulation is embodied in the envelopes. Three-wave coupling between GAM and AT is found to be a plausible formation mechanism for the former, which acts on the whole spectra of the latter within its scale length. The temporal evolutions of the total fluctuation power, the GAM and the AT powers show that the AT power decreases when GAM power increases and vice versa, indicating possible regulating effects of the latter on the former.

  17. The latitude dependence of the variance of zonally averaged quantities. [in polar meteorology with attention to geometrical effects of earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Bell, T. L.; Cahalan, R. F.; Moeng, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    Geometric characteristics of the spherical earth are shown to be responsible for the increase of variance with latitude of zonally averaged meteorological statistics. An analytic model is constructed to display the effect of a spherical geometry on zonal averages, employing a sphere labeled with radial unit vectors in a real, stochastic field expanded in complex spherical harmonics. The variance of a zonally averaged field is found to be expressible in terms of the spectrum of the vector field of the spherical harmonics. A maximum variance is then located at the poles, and the ratio of the variance to the zonally averaged grid-point variance, weighted by the cosine of the latitude, yields the zonal correlation typical of the latitude. An example is provided for the 500 mb level in the Northern Hemisphere compared to 15 years of data. Variance is determined to increase north of 60 deg latitude.

  18. Educational Change Leadership through a New Zonal Theory Lens: Using Mathematics Curriculum Change as the Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Janeen; Branson, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines actions that educational change leaders can take to better meet their curriculum change obligations and responsibilities. In order to do this we extend Vygotsky's (1978) zonal theory and its many extensions and elaborations by positioning educational change leadership within this theory. We rename the zones to Zone of Principal…

  19. OCT Angiography Identification of Choroidal Neovascularization Secondary to Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Levison, Ashleigh L; Baynes, Kimberly; Lowder, Careen Y; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy presented with a new lesion suspicious for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in her right eye. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) confirmed the presence of CNV. OCTA is a new imaging technique that may help guide diagnosis and management of choroidal neovascular membranes in uveitic diseases.

  20. Analysis of antifungal and anticancer effects of the extract from Pelargonium zonale.

    PubMed

    Lewtak, Kinga; Fiołka, Marta J; Szczuka, Ewa; Ptaszyńska, Aneta A; Kotowicz, Natalia; Kołodziej, Przemysław; Rzymowska, Jolanta

    2014-11-01

    The extract from Pelargonium zonale stalks exhibits activity against Candida albicans and exerts an effect on the HeLa cell line. The action against C. albicans cells was analysed using light, CLSM, SEM, and TEM microscopes. The observations indicate that the extract influenced fungal cell morphology and cell metabolic activity. The morphological changes include cell wall damage, deformations of cell surfaces, and abnormalities in fungal cell shape and size. Cells of C. albicans treated with the extract exhibited disturbances in the budding pattern and a tendency to form agglomerates and multicellular chains. The P. zonale extract caused a significant decrease in the metabolic activity of C. albicans cells. Cells died via both apoptosis and necrosis. The antitumor activity of the extract was analysed using the MTT assay. The P. zonale extract exhibited minor cytotoxicity against the HeLa cell line but a dose-dependent cytopathic effect was noticed. The P. zonale extract is a promising source for the isolation of antifungal and anticancer compounds.

  1. A Rare Excitatory Amino Acid from Flowers of Zonal Geranium responsible for Paralyzing the Japanese Beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    e Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) exhibits rapid paralysis after consuming flowers from zonal geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum). Activity-guided fractionations were conducted with polar flower petal extracts from Pelargonium × hortorum cv. Nittany Lion Red, which led to the isolation of a paraly...

  2. Stimulated zonal flow generation in the case of TEM and TIM microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravier, E.; Lesur, M.; Reveille, T.; Drouot, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we show that in some parameter range in gyrokinetic simulations, it is possible to apply a control method to stimulate the appearance of zonal flows while minimizing the duration of the control process and the impact on plasma parameters. For this purpose, a gyrokinetic code considering only trapped particles is used. The starting point of our work is a situation where zonal flows transiently appear after the nonlinear phase of saturation of trapped electron modes or trapped ion modes' micro-instabilities. These are observed to be strongly reduced in a later phase, permitting streamers to govern the plasma behavior in the steady-state. By intervening during this latter state (after this transient growth and decay of zonal flow), i.e., by increasing the ion/electron temperature ratio for a short time, it is found to be possible to bifurcate to a new steady-state, in which zonal flows are strongly present and are maintained indefinitely, thereby allowing a significant reduction in radial heat fluxes.

  3. Self-Organization of Zonal Jets in Outer Planet Atmospheres: Uranus and Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedson, A. James

    1997-01-01

    The statistical mechnical theory of a two-dimensional Euler fluid is appleid for the first time to explore the spontaneous self-oganization of zonal jets in outer planet atmospheres. Globally conserved integralls of motion are found to play a central role in defining jet structure.

  4. Daytime zonal drifts in the ionospheric E and 150 km regions estimated using EAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddapati, PavanChaitanya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Patra, Amit

    2016-07-01

    The Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), located at Kototabang (0.2o S, 100.32o E, mag. lat. 10.36o S), Indonesia, is capable of detecting both E region and 150 km echoes during daytime. We have conducted multi-beam observations using the EAR during daytime covering all seasons to study seasonal variations of these echoes and their dynamics. Given the facts that drifts at the 150 km region are governed primarily by electric field, drifts at the E region are governed by both electric field and neutral wind, simultaneous observations of drifts in both E and 150 km regions would help understand their variations. In this paper we present local time and seasonal variations of zonal drifts in the E and 150 km regions estimated using multi-beam observations. Zonal drifts (positive eastward) in the E and 150 km regions are found to be in the range of -10 to -60 m/s and -40 to 80 m/s, respectively. In the E region, zonal drifts show height reversal and temporal variations having tidal signature and noticeable seasonal variations. Zonal drifts in the 150 km region also show noticeable height and seasonal variations. These results are compared with model drifts and evaluated in terms of electric field and neutral wind.

  5. A walk to remember: Endocrine Society of India Torrent Young Scholar Award East Zonal round 2015

    PubMed Central

    Beatrice, Anne M.; Dutta, Deep

    2015-01-01

    This letter aims to bring out a few highlights and the experiences of the participants, audience, quizmasters, and the judges at Endocrine Society of India Torrent Young Scholar Award East Zonal round 2015 held in Kolkata on 6th September, 2015. PMID:26693440

  6. Analysis of antifungal and anticancer effects of the extract from Pelargonium zonale.

    PubMed

    Lewtak, Kinga; Fiołka, Marta J; Szczuka, Ewa; Ptaszyńska, Aneta A; Kotowicz, Natalia; Kołodziej, Przemysław; Rzymowska, Jolanta

    2014-11-01

    The extract from Pelargonium zonale stalks exhibits activity against Candida albicans and exerts an effect on the HeLa cell line. The action against C. albicans cells was analysed using light, CLSM, SEM, and TEM microscopes. The observations indicate that the extract influenced fungal cell morphology and cell metabolic activity. The morphological changes include cell wall damage, deformations of cell surfaces, and abnormalities in fungal cell shape and size. Cells of C. albicans treated with the extract exhibited disturbances in the budding pattern and a tendency to form agglomerates and multicellular chains. The P. zonale extract caused a significant decrease in the metabolic activity of C. albicans cells. Cells died via both apoptosis and necrosis. The antitumor activity of the extract was analysed using the MTT assay. The P. zonale extract exhibited minor cytotoxicity against the HeLa cell line but a dose-dependent cytopathic effect was noticed. The P. zonale extract is a promising source for the isolation of antifungal and anticancer compounds. PMID:24972056

  7. Time-varying zonal asymmetries in stratospheric nitrous oxide and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, H.; Stanford, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Previously analyses of Stratospheric And Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) data of atmospheric constituent gases have dealt almost exclusively with zonal means (and mostly monthly means), owing perhaps to concern over data quality. The purpose of this note is to show that, with care, time-dependent zonally-asymmetric features may be recovered from the SAMS nitrous oxide and methane data. As an example, we demonstrate the existence of zonal wave-1 constituent perturbations with periods of a few weeks in the middle and upper stratosphere. When the perturbations are normalized by the constituent zonal-mean mixing ratio to compensate for the slowly varying (in both space and time) background concentration of constituents, wavepacket-like features are found over all latitudes and seasons in the three-year SAMS record. One specific low-latitude case discussed had features which appear to be consistent with constituent oscillations induced by episodic equatorial Kelvin waves. Further studies are needed to better identify the nature of the plethora of observed wave-like phenomena.

  8. The importance of the eastward zonal current for generating extreme El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, WonMoo; Cai, Wenju

    2014-06-01

    Extreme El Niño (e.g., 1983/1983 and 1997/1998) causes severe weather and climate impacts globally, but the associated dynamics is not fully understood. The present study shows that advection of mean temperature by anomalous eastward zonal current plays an important role in producing such extreme events especially during the early part of the developing period. While the climatological direction of the upper oceanic current in the equatorial Pacific is westward, at times the direction reverses. These eastward current events are well distinguished from the normal, westward conditions. The upper-layer zonal current in the equatorial Pacific is basically in geostrophic balance and forced by wind stress. However, in the case of the eastward zonal current events, persistent westerly winds are observed in the Western Pacific, and the current becomes synchronized with the westerly wind stress above. The advection of the mean temperature by the anomalous zonal current in the early developing period always precedes strong El Niño, though it does not significantly contribute to the growth of La Niña, neutral, and moderate El Niño; and is the major contributor of asymmetry in the early developing phase.

  9. A Model Study of Zonal Forcing in the Equatorial Stratosphere by Convectively Induced Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Holton, James R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-dimensional cloud-resolving model is used to examine the possible role of gravity waves generated by a simulated tropical squall line in forcing the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal winds in the equatorial stratosphere. A simulation with constant background stratospheric winds is compared to simulations with background winds characteristic of the westerly and easterly QBO phases, respectively. In all three cases a broad spectrum of both eastward and westward propagating gravity waves is excited. In the constant background wind case the vertical momentum flux is nearly constant with height in the stratosphere, after correction for waves leaving the model domain. In the easterly and westerly shear cases, however, westward and eastward propagating waves, respectively, are strongly damped as they approach their critical levels, owing to the strongly scale-dependent vertical diffusion in the model. The profiles of zonal forcing induced by this wave damping are similar to profiles given by critical level absorption, but displaced slightly downward. The magnitude of the zonal forcing is of order 5 m/s/day. It is estimated that if 2% of the area of the Tropics were occupied by storms of similar magnitude, mesoscale gravity waves could provide nearly 1/4 of the zonal forcing required for the QBO.

  10. Tropical waves in a GCM with zonal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.J.J.; North, G.R. )

    1993-09-01

    Tropical wave phenomena have been examined in the last 520 days of two 15-year runs of a low-resolution general circulation model (CCMO). The model boundary conditions were simplified to all-land, perpetual equinox, and no topography. The two runs were for fixed soil moisture at 75% and 0%, the so-called [open quotes]wet[close quotes] and [open quotes]dry[close quotes] models. Both models develop well-defined ITCZs with low-level convergence erratically concentrated along the equator. Highly organized eastward-propagating waves are detectable in both models with different wave speeds depending on the presence of moisture. The wave amplitudes (in, e.g., vertical velocity) are many orders of magnitude stronger in the wet model. The waves have a definite transverse nature as precipitation (low-level convergence) patches tend to move systematically north and south across the equator. In the wet model the waves are distinctly nondispersive and the transit time for passage around the earth is about 50 days, consistent with the Madden-Julian frequency. The authors are also able to see most of the expected linear wave modes in spectral density plots in the frequency-wavenumber plane and compare them for the wet and dry cases. 28 refs., 16 figs.

  11. Effects of density stratification in driving zonal flow in gas giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.

    2011-12-01

    The banded structures at the surfaces of Jupiter and Saturn are associated with prograde and retrograde zonal flows. The depth of these jets remains however poorly known. Theoretical scenarios range from ``shallow models'', that assume that zonal flows are restricted to a very thin layer close to the surface; to ``deep models'' that suppose that the jets involve the whole molecular shell (typically 104 kms). The latter idea was supported by fully 3-D numerical simulations (e.g. Heimpel, 2005) using the Boussinesq approximation, meaning that the background properties (temperature, density, ...) are constant with radius (Christensen, 2002). While this approximation is suitable for liquid iron cores of planets, it is more questionable in the envelopes of gas giants, where density increases by several orders of magnitude (Guillot, 1999). The anelastic approximation provides a more realistic framework to simulate the dynamics of zonal flows as it allows compressibility effects, while filtering out fast acoustic waves (Lantz & Fan, 1999). Recent anelastic simulations suggest that including compressibility effects yields interesting differences to Boussinesq approaches (Jones, 2009; Showman et al., 2011). Here, we therefore adopt an anelastic formulation to simulate 3-D compressible flows in rapidly rotating shells. We have conducted a systematic parametric study on the effects of background density stratification and analysed the influences on both convective flows and zonal jets. Despite the strong dependence of convection on the density stratification (i.e. the typical lengthscale of convective flows decreases when compressibility increases), the comparison between Boussinesq and anelastic simulations reveals striking common features: the latitudinal extent, the amplitude and the number of zonal jets is found to be nearly independent of the density stratification, provided convection is strongly driven. Mass-weighted properties of the flow (and notably a mass

  12. 3D Effects in the Formation of Zonal Jets Through Inverse Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Showman, A. P.

    2006-09-01

    The atmospheric zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn are characterized by the broad, prograde, equatorial jet and the narrower, higher-latitude jets that alternate between prograde and retrograde. The question of what controls the widths and directions of those jets remains a major unsolved problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. Past studies have shown that, in shallow flows on a rotating sphere, small random vortices can undergo inverse cascade to form zonal jets with a characteristic width called the Rhines scale. Most of the studies to date use 2D non-divergent or shallow-water models in studying this zonal jet formation mechanism. However, in the parameter ranges representative of the Jovian conditions, the flows produced by 2D non-divergent models are typically dominated by strong circumpolar jets, and the shallow-water models produce a robust retrograde equatorial jet. These models' apparent inabilities in reproducing some key Jovian jet features may suggest the importance of 3D effects in controlling the jets' large-scale horizontal structures. To date, Kitamura and Matsuda (Fluid Dynamics Research, 34, 33-57, 2004) is the only published study that analyzes the 3D effects in the zonalization of fine-scale random turbulence through the inverse cascade. Their two-layer primitive equation simulations of free-evolving flows resulted in circumpolar jet dominated flows, although slower mid-latitude jets are also present. Our study is a significant extension over that by Kitamura and Matsuda and includes substantially more layers to study the zonalization process to more fully resolve relevant 3D effects in the inverse cascade. We test the flow behavior's dependence on the deformation radius and the resulting vertical structures in both spherical and beta-plane geometries. Our study uses the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) model (Dowling et al, Icarus, 32, 221-238., 1998). The research is supported by a NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant to APS.

  13. 3D Effects in the Formation of Zonal Jets Through Inverse Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, K. M.; Showman, A. P.

    2006-12-01

    The atmospheric zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn are characterized by the broad, prograde, equatorial jet and the narrower, higher-latitude jets that alternate between prograde and retrograde. The question of what controls the widths and directions of those jets remains a major unsolved problem in geophysical fluid dynamics. Past studies have shown that, in shallow flows on a rotating sphere, small random vortices can undergo inverse cascade to form zonal jets with a characteristic width called the Rhines scale. Most of the studies to date use 2D non-divergent or shallow-water models in studying this zonal jet formation mechanism. However, in the parameter ranges representative of the Jovian conditions, the flows produced by 2D non- divergent models are typically dominated by strong circumpolar jets, and the shallow-water models produce a robust retrograde equatorial jet. These models' apparent inabilities in reproducing some key Jovian jet features may suggest the importance of 3D effects in controlling the jets' large-scale horizontal structures. To date, Kitamura and Matsuda (Fluid Dynamics Research, 34, 33-57, 2004) is the only published study that analyzes the 3D effects in the zonalization of fine-scale random turbulence through the inverse cascade. Their two-layer primitive equation simulations of free-evolving flows resulted in circumpolar jet dominated flows, although slower mid-latitude jets are also present. Our study is a significant extension over that by Kitamura and Matsuda and includes substantially more layers to study the zonalization process to more fully resolve relevant 3D effects in the inverse cascade. We test the flow behavior's dependence on the deformation radius and the resulting vertical structures in both spherical and beta-plane geometries. Our study uses the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Coordinate (EPIC) model (Dowling et al, Icarus, 32, 221-238., 1998). The research is supported by a NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant to APS.

  14. Zonal jets and QBO-like oscillations on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.; Zhang, Xi; Tan, Xianyu

    2016-10-01

    At the levels of their visible cloud decks, the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn exhibit numerous east-west (zonal) jet streams with speeds ranging up to 150 m/sec on Jupiter and 400 m/sec on Saturn. Moreover, both planets exhibit long-term stratospheric oscillations involving perturbations of zonal wind and temperature that propagate downward over time on timescales of ~4 years (Jupiter) and ~15 years (Saturn). These oscillations, dubbed the Quasi Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) for Jupiter and the Semi-Annual Oscillation (SAO) on Saturn, are thought to be analogous to the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) on Earth, which is driven by upward propagation of equatorial waves from the troposphere. Here, we test the hypothesis that the zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn, as well as QBO-like oscillations, can result from interaction of the stably stratified atmosphere with an underlying convective interior. We performed global, three-dimensional, high-resolution numerical simulations of the flow in the stratosphere and upper troposphere of Jupiter-like planets. The effect of convection is parameterized by introducing thermal perturbations that randomly perturb the radiative convective boundary with some characteristic timescale, horizontal wavenumber, and amplitude. Radiative damping is represented using a Newtonian cooling scheme with a characteristic radiative time constant. In the simulations, the convective perturbations generate atmospheric waves and turbulence that interact with the rotation to produce numerous zonal jets. Moreover, the equatorial stratosphere exhibits stacked eastward and westward jets that migrate downward over time, exactly as occurs in the terrestrial QBO, Jovian QQO, and Saturnian SAO. This is the first demonstration of a QBO-like phenomenon in 3D numerical simulations of a giant planet. We will describe how the properties of the zonal jets and equatorial oscillation depend on the details of the forcing and damping. These simulations have

  15. Influence of the Basic State Zonal Flow on Convectively Coupled Equatorial Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiladis, G. N.; Dias, J.

    2014-12-01

    Observational data are used to test the hypothesis that the basic state modulates the dispersion properties of convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEWs). This hypothesis is based on shallow water theory, which predicts that the zonal speed of propagation of equatorial modes is altered by the equivalent depth and the basic zonal flow. Typical diagnostics of space-time power spectra of cloudiness data reflect the mean behavior of CCEWs in space and time. Here, localized space-time spectra are calculated to investigate how the global spectral peaks vary across the tropics, and how they are affected by the substantial variations in zonal flow observed geographically and by season. The strength of some convectively coupled mode signals are seen to vary widely across the globe, while others show much less dependence on location. For example, Kelvin waves are observed in all sectors, while mixed Rossby-gravity waves only exist with appreciable amplitude over the western and central Pacific. Doppler shifting of the phase speed of CCEWs by the barotropic component of the wind is readily detectable due to both the mean flow and temporally varying extremes in this flow. However, once the Doppler effect is taken into account, the equivalent depths of CCEWs inferred from global power-spectra are surprisingly uniform, both geographically and temporally. There does not seem to be a unique steering level for CCEWs. For instance, the phase speed of Kelvin waves appear to be more influenced by the upper tropopspheric zonal flow, while mixed Rossby-gravity waves respond more to lower tropospheric flow. There are also detectable phase speed and equivalent depth shifts that are consistent with changes in the zonal flow vertical shear. This is particularly evident for equatorial Rossby modes.

  16. Finite representations of continuum environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolak, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Understanding dissipative and decohering processes is fundamental to the study of quantum systems. An accurate and generic method for investigating these processes is to simulate both the system and environment, which, however, is computationally very demanding. We develop a novel approach to constructing finite representations of the environment based on the influence of different frequency scales on the system's dynamics. As an illustration, we analyze a solvable model of an optical mode decaying into a reservoir. The influence of the environment modes is constant for small frequencies, but drops off rapidly for large frequencies, allowing for a very sparse representation at high frequencies that gives a significant computational speedup in simulating the environment. This approach provides a general framework for simulating open quantum systems.

  17. Development of an upwind, finite-volume code with finite-rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molvik, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    Under this grant, two numerical algorithms were developed to predict the flow of viscous, hypersonic, chemically reacting gases over three-dimensional bodies. Both algorithms take advantage of the benefits of upwind differencing, total variation diminishing techniques, and a finite-volume framework, but obtain their solution in two separate manners. The first algorithm is a zonal, time-marching scheme, and is generally used to obtain solutions in the subsonic portions of the flow field. The second algorithm is a much less expensive, space-marching scheme and can be used for the computation of the larger, supersonic portion of the flow field. Both codes compute their interface fluxes with a temporal Riemann solver and the resulting schemes are made fully implicit including the chemical source terms and boundary conditions. Strong coupling is used between the fluid dynamic, chemical, and turbulence equations. These codes have been validated on numerous hypersonic test cases and have provided excellent comparison with existing data.

  18. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Fabian, Paul

    2012-03-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One key renewable resource being advanced is geothermal energy which offers an environmentally benign, reliable source of energy for the nation. To utilize this resource, water will be introduced into wells 3 to 10 km deep to create a geothermal reservoir. This approach is known as an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). The high temperatures and pressures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the development of this energy source. For example, reliable zonal isolation for high-temperature applications at high differential pressures is needed to conduct mini-fracs and other stress state diagnostics. Zonal isolation is essential for many EGS reservoir development activities. To date, the capability has not been sufficiently demonstrated to isolate sections of the wellbore to: 1) enable stimulation; and 2) seal off unwanted flow regions in unknown EGS completion schemes and high-temperature (>200°C) environments. In addition, packers and other zonal isolation tools are required to eliminate fluid loss, to help identify and mitigate short circuiting of flow from injectors to producers, and to target individual fractures or fracture networks for testing and validating reservoir models. General-purpose open-hole packers do not exist for geothermal environments, with the primary barrier being the poor stability of elastomeric seals at high temperature above 175°C. Experimental packer systems have been developed for geothermal environments but they currently only operate at low pressure, they are not retrievable, and they are not commercially available. The development of the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) zonal isolation device would provide the geothermal community with the capability to conduct mini-fracs, eliminate fluid loss, to help identify and mitigate short circuiting of flow from injectors to

  19. Electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence in finite-beta helical plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Maeyama, S.; Nakajima, N.

    2014-05-01

    A saturation mechanism for microturbulence in a regime of weak zonal flow generation is investigated by means of electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations. The study identifies a new saturation process of the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) turbulence originating from the spatial structure of the KBM instabilities in a finite-beta Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma. Specifically, the most unstable KBM in LHD has an inclined mode structure with respect to the mid-plane of a torus, i.e., it has a finite radial wave-number in flux tube coordinates, in contrast to KBMs in tokamaks as well as ion-temperature gradient modes in tokamaks and helical systems. The simulations reveal that the growth of KBMs in LHD is saturated by nonlinear interactions of oppositely inclined convection cells through mutual shearing as well as by the zonal flow. The saturation mechanism is quantitatively investigated by analysis of the nonlinear entropy transfer that shows not only the mutual shearing but also a self-interaction with an elongated mode structure along the magnetic field line.

  20. Electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence in finite-beta helical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Maeyama, S.

    2014-05-15

    A saturation mechanism for microturbulence in a regime of weak zonal flow generation is investigated by means of electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations. The study identifies a new saturation process of the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) turbulence originating from the spatial structure of the KBM instabilities in a finite-beta Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma. Specifically, the most unstable KBM in LHD has an inclined mode structure with respect to the mid-plane of a torus, i.e., it has a finite radial wave-number in flux tube coordinates, in contrast to KBMs in tokamaks as well as ion-temperature gradient modes in tokamaks and helical systems. The simulations reveal that the growth of KBMs in LHD is saturated by nonlinear interactions of oppositely inclined convection cells through mutual shearing as well as by the zonal flow. The saturation mechanism is quantitatively investigated by analysis of the nonlinear entropy transfer that shows not only the mutual shearing but also a self-interaction with an elongated mode structure along the magnetic field line.

  1. Results of a zonally truncated three-dimensional model of the Venus middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M.

    1992-01-01

    Although the equatorial rotational speed of the solid surface of Venus is only 4 m s(exp-1), the atmospheric rotational speed reaches a maximum of approximately 100 m s(exp-1) near the equatorial cloud top level (65 to 70 km). This phenomenon, known as superrotation, is the central dynamical problem of the Venus atmosphere. We report here the results of numerical simulations aimed at clarifying the mechanism for maintaining the equatorial cloud top rotation. Maintenance of an equatorial rotational speed maximum above the surface requires waves or eddies that systematically transport angular momentum against its zonal mean gradient. The zonally symmetric Hadley circulation is driven thermally and acts to reduce the rotational speed at the equatorial cloud top level; thus wave or eddy transport must counter this tendency as well as friction. Planetary waves arising from horizontal shear instability of the zonal flow (barotropic instability) could maintain the equatorial rotation by transporting angular momentum horizontally from midlatitudes toward the equator. Alternatively, vertically propagating waves could provide the required momentum source. The relative motion between the rotating atmosphere and the pattern of solar heating, which as a maximum where solar radiation is absorbed near the cloud tops, drives diurnal and semidiurnal thermal tides that propagate vertically away from the cloud top level. The effect of this wave propagation is to transport momentum toward the cloud top level at low latitudes and accelerate the mean zonal flow there. We employ a semispectral primitive equation model with a zonal mean flow and zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2. These waves correspond to the diurnal and semidiurnal tides, but they can also be excited by barotropic or baroclinic instability. Waves of higher wavenumbers and interactions between the waves are neglected. Symmetry about the equator is assumed, so the model applies to one hemisphere and covers the altitude range 30 to

  2. Effects of the magnetic activity on F region zonal and vertical plasma drifts over Jicamarca during solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Angela; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, Inez S.; Abdu, Mangalathayil; Souza, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the equatorial F region zonal plasma drifts over Jicamarca, Peru, under magnetically disturbed conditions during two solar minimum epochs, one of them being the recent prolonged solar activity minimum. The study utilizes the plasma drifts measured by the Jicamarca (11.95° S; 76.87° W) incoherent scatter radar during two events that occurred on 10 April 1997 and 24 June 2008 and model calculation of the zonal drift in a realistic ionosphere simulated by the SUPIM-INPE. Two main points are focused: (1) the connection between prompt penetration electric fields and zonal and vertical plasma drifts and (2) anomalous behavior of daytime zonal drift in the absence of any magnetic storm. A perfect anticorrelation between vertical and zonal drifts was observed during the night and in the initial and growth phases of the magnetic storm. Based on a detailed quantitative analysis we will show that this anticorrelation is driven mainly by a vertical Hall electric field induced by the primary zonal penetration electric field in the presence of enhanced nighttime E region conductivity. An increase in the field line integrated Hall-to-Pedersen conductivity ratio, arising from energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA) region is found to be capable of explaining the observed anti correlation between the vertical and zonal plasma drifts. Evidence for the particle ionization is provided from the occurrence of anomalous sporadic E layers over the SAMA region. It will also be shown that the zonal plasma drift reversal to eastward in the afternoon can occur earlier due to the weakening of the zonal wind system during the prolonged solar minimum period.

  3. Zonal variations in K+ currents in vestibular crista calyx terminals

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Frances L.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a rodent crista slice to investigate regional variations in electrophysiological properties of vestibular afferent terminals. Thin transverse slices of the gerbil crista ampullaris were made and electrical properties of calyx terminals in central zones (CZ) and peripheral zones (PZ) compared with whole cell patch clamp. Spontaneous action potential firing was observed in 25% of current-clamp recordings and was either regular or irregular in both zones. Firing was abolished when extracellular choline replaced Na+ but persisted when hair cell mechanotransduction channels or calyx AMPA receptors were blocked. This suggests that ion channels intrinsic to the calyx can generate spontaneous firing. In response to depolarizing voltage steps, outward K+ currents were observed at potentials above −60 mV. K+ currents in PZ calyces showed significantly more inactivation than currents in CZ calyces. Underlying K+ channel populations contributing to these differences were investigated. The KCNQ channel blocker XE991 dihydrochloride blocked a slowly activating, sustained outward current in both PZ and CZ calyces, indicating the presence of KCNQ channels. Mean reduction was greatest in PZ calyces. XE991 also reduced action potential firing frequency in CZ and PZ calyces and broadened mean action potential width. The K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (10–50 μM) blocked rapidly activating, moderately inactivating currents that were more prevalent in PZ calyces. α-Dendrotoxin, a selective blocker of KV1 channels, reduced outward currents in CZ calyces but not in PZ calyces. Regional variations in K+ conductances may contribute to different firing responses in calyx afferents. PMID:25343781

  4. Nilpotent -local finite groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarero, José; Scherer, Jérôme; Viruel, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    We provide characterizations of -nilpotency for fusion systems and -local finite groups that are inspired by known result for finite groups. In particular, we generalize criteria by Atiyah, Brunetti, Frobenius, Quillen, Stammbach and Tate.

  5. Generation of Large-Scale Zonal Structures by Drift Flute Waves in High-Beta HED Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Essam; Sotnikov, Vladmir; Kindel, Joseph; Onishchenko, O. G.; Leboeuf, J. N.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim is to develop a more general analysis of nonlinear dynamics of drift-flute waves, applicable to arbitrary plasma beta and arbitrary spatial scales in comparison with the ion Larmor radius. This study is of interest for fundamental plasma theory as well as for the interpretation of Z-pinch and laboratory astrophysics experiments. Description of low-frequency waves and in particular drift flute waves in a high beta plasma, generally speaking, requires a kinetic approach, based on the Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations. In the present work we show that the alternative two-fluid description can adequately describe the ion perturbations with arbitrary ratio of the characteristic spatial scales to the ion Larmor radius in so-called Pade approximation. For this purpose reduced two-fluid hydrodynamic equations which describe nonlinear dynamics of the flute waves with arbitrary spatial scales and arbitrary plasma beta are derived. The linear dispersion relation of the flute waves and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are analyzed. A general nonlinear dispersion relation which describes generation of large-scale zonal structures by the flute waves is presented and analyzed.

  6. Disturbed time observations of the temporal dependence and dynamics of TEC, scintillation, and ionospheric irregularity zonal drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muella, Marcio; de Paula, Eurico; Kintner, Paul; Kantor, Ivan; Cerruti, Alessandro; Mitchell, Cathryn; Crowley, Geoff; Smorigo, Paulo; Batista, Inez

    GPS amplitude scintillations at the L1 frequency (1.575 GHz) and integral data of total electron content (TEC) obtained from measurements of the Brazilian ground-based GPS network are used to study specific relationships between TEC, scintillations and ionospheric electron density imaged at near the southern crest of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA). Using a time-dependent tomographic model, 3-dimensional images are created to couple the geophysical quantities measured by the GPS receivers during the storm time period of November 18-23. It allows studying large variations in the temporal and spatial evolution of the electron density affecting the behavior and dynamics of the scintillations. Estimations of the ionospheric irregularity zonal drift velocities at 350 km obtained from two-spaced GPS receivers observations, and the coupling of the neutral atmosphere and the ionosphere obtained from the ASPEN- TIMEGCM model results are also used in the investigation. The model is used to analyze the north-south symmetry/asymmetry conditions in the ionization distribution of the equatorial anomaly produced by a meridional/transequatorial wind, and its effect to the development and evolution of the scintillations associated to the ionospheric irregularities. In this work we present some relevant aspects of the ionospheric dynamics and the thermosphere-ionosphere coupling system, which are some of the most important topics of study during the occurrence of geomagnetic storms.

  7. Calculation of a residual mean meridional circulation for a zonal-mean tracer transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, W.K.; Rotman, D.A.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    Because of their computational advantages, zonally-averaged chemical-radiative-transport models are widely used to investigate the distribution of chemical species and their change due to the anthropogenic chemicals in the lower and middle atmosphere. In general, the Lagrangian-mean formulation would be ideal to treat transport due to the zonal mean circulation and eddies. However, the Lagrangian formulation is difficult to use in practical applications. The most widely-used formulation for treating global atmospheric dynamics in two-dimensional models is the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) equations. The residual mean meridional circulation (RMMC) in the TEM system is used to advect tracers. In this study, the authors describe possible solution techniques for obtaining the RMMC in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model. In the first section, the formulation will be described. In sections 3 and 4, possible solution procedures will be described for a diagnostic and prognostic case, respectively.

  8. Zonal wavefront sensing using a grating array printed on a polyester film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Biswajit; Kumar, Suraj; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a zonal wavefront sensor that comprises an array of binary diffraction gratings realized on a transparent sheet (i.e., polyester film) followed by a focusing lens and a camera. The sensor works in a manner similar to that of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The fabrication of the array of gratings is immune to certain issues associated with the fabrication of the lenslet array which is commonly used in zonal wavefront sensing. Besides the sensing method offers several important advantages such as flexible dynamic range, easy configurability, and option to enhance the sensing frame rate. Here, we have demonstrated the working of the proposed sensor using a proof-of-principle experimental arrangement.

  9. Zonal wavefront sensing using a grating array printed on a polyester film.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Biswajit; Kumar, Suraj; Boruah, Bosanta R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a zonal wavefront sensor that comprises an array of binary diffraction gratings realized on a transparent sheet (i.e., polyester film) followed by a focusing lens and a camera. The sensor works in a manner similar to that of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The fabrication of the array of gratings is immune to certain issues associated with the fabrication of the lenslet array which is commonly used in zonal wavefront sensing. Besides the sensing method offers several important advantages such as flexible dynamic range, easy configurability, and option to enhance the sensing frame rate. Here, we have demonstrated the working of the proposed sensor using a proof-of-principle experimental arrangement.

  10. Zonal wavefront sensing using a grating array printed on a polyester film

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Biswajit; Boruah, Bosanta R.; Kumar, Suraj

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we describe the development of a zonal wavefront sensor that comprises an array of binary diffraction gratings realized on a transparent sheet (i.e., polyester film) followed by a focusing lens and a camera. The sensor works in a manner similar to that of a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The fabrication of the array of gratings is immune to certain issues associated with the fabrication of the lenslet array which is commonly used in zonal wavefront sensing. Besides the sensing method offers several important advantages such as flexible dynamic range, easy configurability, and option to enhance the sensing frame rate. Here, we have demonstrated the working of the proposed sensor using a proof-of-principle experimental arrangement.

  11. Earth zonal harmonics from rapid numerical analysis of long satellite arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A zonal geopotential is presented to degree 21 from evaluation of mean elements for 21 satellites including 2 of low inclination. Each satellite is represented by an arc of at least one apsidal rotation. The lengths range from 200 to 800 days. Differential correction of the initial elements in all of the arcs, together with radiation pressure and atmospheric drag coefficients, was accomplished simultaneously with the correction for the zonal harmonics. The satellite orbits and their variations are generated by numerical integration of the Lagrange equations for mean elements. Disturbances due to precession and nutation of the earth's pole, atmospheric drag, radiation pressure and luni-solar gravity are added at from 1- to 8-day intervals in the integrated orbits. The results agree well with recent solutions from other authors using different methods and different satellite sets.

  12. Mechanism of the zonal displacements of the Pacific warm pool: Implications for ENSO

    SciTech Connect

    Picaut, J.; Ioualalen, M.; Delcroix, T.

    1996-11-29

    The western equatorial Pacific warm pool is subject to strong east-west migrations on interannual time scales in phase with the Southern Oscillation Index. The dominance of surface zonal advection in this migration is demonstrated with four different current data sets and three oceans models. The eastward advection of warm and less saline water form the western Pacific together with the westward advection of cold and more saline water from the central-eastern Pacific induces a convergence of water masses at the eastern edge of the warm pool and a well-defined salinity front. The location of this convergence is zonally displaced in association with El Nino-La Nina wind-driven surface current variations. These advective processes and water-mass convergences have significant implications for understanding and simulating coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions associated with El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  13. Interaction of Moist Convection with Zonal Jets on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Liming; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Huang, Xianglei

    2006-01-01

    Observations suggest that moist convection plays an important role in the large-scale dynamics of Jupiter s and Saturn s atmospheres. Here we use a reduced-gravity quasigeostrophic model, with a parameterization of moist convection that is based on observations, to study the interaction between moist convection and zonal jets on Jupiter and Saturn. Stable jets with approximately the same width and strength as observations are generated in the model. The observed zonal jets violate the barotropic stability criterion but the modeled jets do so only if the flow in the deep underlying layer is westward. The model results suggest that a length scale and a velocity scale associated with moist convection control the width and strength of the jets. The length scale and velocity scale offer a possible explanation of why the jets of Saturn are stronger and wider than those of Jupiter.

  14. Temporal variations in low degree zonal harmonics from Starlette orbit analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, M. K.; Eanes, R. J.; Shum, C. K.; Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamical effect of temporal variations in the zonal harmonics of the earth's gravitational potential due to tidal and meteorological mass redistribution has been observed using satellite laser ranging (SLR) measurements to Starlette. The secular variations in the Earth's zonal harmonics and the year-to-year fluctuation of the even degree annual and semi-annual tides, S(a) and S(sa) have been determined from a continuous Starlette orbit spanning from 1983 through 1985. The mean values for S(a) and S(sa) tides are in good agreement with other tide solutions. The year-to-year fluctuations of the even degree S(a), deduced from Starlette node variations, are about 25 percent of the mean value obtained during the three-year Starlette orbit span.

  15. Measurement of osmotic second virial coefficients by zonal size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Winzor, Donald J

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulation of protein migration reflecting linear concentration dependence of the partition isotherm has been used to invalidate a published procedure for measuring osmotic second virial coefficients (B22) by zonal exclusion chromatography. Failure of the zonal procedure to emulate its frontal chromatographic counterpart reflects ambiguity about the solute concentration that should be used to replace the applied concentration in the rigorous quantitative expression for frontal migration; the recommended use of the peak concentration in the eluted zone is incorrect on theoretical grounds. Furthermore, the claim for its validation on empirical grounds has been traced to the use of inappropriate B22 magnitudes as the standards against which the experimentally derived values were being tested. PMID:27095059

  16. Diagnosis of medium-range predictability enhancement during anomalous winter zonal flows over western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerle, Lee A.; Paegle, Jan

    2004-09-01

    This investigation analyzes medium-range predictability enhancement during winter cases of anomalous, upper troposphere zonal flows over western North America. Time correlations based upon a 50-year record of reanalyses suggest that winters with anomalously strong zonal winds are wetter over the region, while years with anomalously weak zonal winds are relatively drier. Forecasts are selected based upon anomalously weak and strong zonal flows during January. Results from 15-day simulations using a variety of operational and research global model configurations are presented to diagnose the predictability of precipitation and large-scale features. Model forecasts of precipitation accumulation delineate qualitatively between wet and dry events at both 5 and 10 days. Anomaly correlations of the geopotential height field reveal useful predictability for some ensembles extending to 9.5 days. Uniform resolution forecasts are compared with two model configurations that employ rotated, variable resolution. Uniform and variable resolution forecasts maintain representative precipitation into the second week over the western United States. The rotated variable resolution simulations provide more precipitation detail. Diagnostics and model simulations of a small number of extreme events suggest that flow modifications associated with ambient flows exist over the orography during the winter season and that a predictable regional response may be present to ˜10 days. The persistence of the anomalies may also contribute to the improved model performance in certain cases. Improved performance may be related to the large inertia of the flow in wet events and to the persistence and increased predictability of initial, large-scale anomalies in both wet and dry events. Present conclusions are limited by the small case sampling, which will be expanded in future investigations.

  17. Zonal average earth radiation budget measurements from satellites for climate studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. S.; Haar, T. H. V.

    1976-01-01

    Data from 29 months of satellite radiation budget measurements, taken intermittently over the period 1964 through 1971, are composited into mean month, season and annual zonally averaged meridional profiles. Individual months, which comprise the 29 month set, were selected as representing the best available total flux data for compositing into large scale statistics for climate studies. A discussion of spatial resolution of the measurements along with an error analysis, including both the uncertainty and standard error of the mean, are presented.

  18. Zonal centrifuge purification of human rabies vaccine obtained on bovine fetal kidney cells. Biological results.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, P; Tsiang, H; Reculard, P; Aguilon, F; Lavergne, M; Adamovicz, P

    1978-01-01

    An inactivated human rabies vaccine prepared on bovine fetal kidney cells is concentrated and purified by zonal centrifugation. The peak of rabies particles is monitored by hemagglutination. Immunogenicity of the purified particles was evaluated by titration of specific antibodies from vaccinated animals. Protective activity of the vaccine was assayed on guinea pigs challenged with street rabies. Biological results were compared with those obtained with other tissue culture vaccines.

  19. Simulation of transonic viscous wing and wing-fuselage flows using zonal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Jolen

    1987-01-01

    The thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations are coupled with a zonal scheme (or domain-decomposition method) to develop the Transonic Navier-Stokes (TNS) wing-alone code. The TNS has a total of 4 zones and is extended to a total of 16 zones for the wing-fuselage version of the code. Results are compared on the Cray X-MP-48 and compared with experimental data.

  20. Turbulent anti-resistivity and the zonal magnetic field dynamo in drift-ballooning turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2007-11-15

    The effect of turbulent fluctuations on the zonal (flux surface averaged) magnetic field in drift-ballooning turbulence is shown to be equivalent to a turbulent anti-resistivity. The flux surface average of the convective nonlinearity in Ohm's law is proportional to the flux surface average of the current. The coefficient of proportionality can be defined as a turbulent resistivity {eta}{sub turb}. The correlation of the flux surface average of the convective nonlinearity with the negative of the flux surface average of the current is nearly 100%. Because the convective nonlinearity is correlated with the negative of the current, and not the current, the turbulent resistivity is negative. The magnitude of {eta}{sub turb} is virtually identical to the magnitude of the collisional resistivity {eta}, but opposite in sign, so that the total resistivity {eta}{sub total}={eta}+{eta}{sub turb} is nearly zero. The effect of the fluctuations is to balance the effect of collisional resistive diffusion. As a result, while the energy in the zonal flow increases to a large value as the fluctuations grow and saturate, the energy in the zonal magnetic field remains very small.

  1. MPIRUN: A Portable Loader for Multidisciplinary and Multi-Zonal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineberg, Samuel A.; Woodrow, Thomas S. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Multidisciplinary and multi-zonal applications are an important class of applications in the area of Computational Aerosciences. In these codes, two or more distinct parallel programs or copies of a single program are utilized to model a single problem. To support such applications, it is common to use a programming model where a program is divided into several single program multiple data stream (SPMD) applications, each of which solves the equations for a single physical discipline or grid zone. These SPMD applications are then bound together to form a single multidisciplinary or multi-zonal program in which the constituent parts communicate via point-to-point message passing routines. One method for implementing the message passing portion of these codes is with the new Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Unfortunately, this standard only specifies the message passing portion of an application, but does not specify any portable mechanisms for loading an application. MPIRUN was developed to provide a portable means for loading MPI programs, and was specifically targeted at multidisciplinary and multi-zonal applications. Programs using MPIRUN for loading and MPI for message passing are then portable between all machines supported by MPIRUN. MPIRUN is currently implemented for the Intel iPSC/860, TMC CM5, IBM SP-1 and SP-2, Intel Paragon, and workstation clusters. Further, MPIRUN is designed to be simple enough to port easily to any system supporting MPI.

  2. Computation of transonic separated wing flows using an Euler/Navier-Stokes zonal approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaynak, Uenver; Holst, Terry L.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1986-01-01

    A computer program called Transonic Navier Stokes (TNS) has been developed which solves the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations around wings using a zonal grid approach. In the present zonal scheme, the physical domain of interest is divided into several subdomains called zones and the governing equations are solved interactively. The advantages of the Zonal Grid approach are as follows: (1) the grid for any subdomain can be generated easily; (2) grids can be, in a sense, adapted to the solution; (3) different equation sets can be used in different zones; and, (4) this approach allows for a convenient data base organization scheme. Using this code, separated flows on a NACA 0012 section wing and on the NASA Ames WING C have been computed. First, the effects of turbulence and artificial dissipation models incorporated into the code are assessed by comparing the TNS results with other CFD codes and experiments. Then a series of flow cases is described where data are available. The computed results, including cases with shock-induced separation, are in good agreement with experimental data. Finally, some futuristic cases are presented to demonstrate the abilities of the code for massively separated cases which do not have experimental data.

  3. Interannual fluctuations of intraseasonal variance of near-equatorial zonal winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutzler, David S.

    Interannual fluctuations of intraseasonal variance are investigated in zonal wind time series from six stations in the near-equatorial eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans, in order to document the interannual variability of the Madden-Julian oscillation. Each time series is subjected to band-pass filtering that retains fluctuations with periods between about 30 and 60 days. The variance of the filtered data is calculated for each season in the data record and is compared with the variance of unfiltered wind anomalies and with the interannual variance of seasonal means. The principal systematic interannual modulation of 30- to 60-day wind variance occurs in time series of lower tropospheric winds (surface and 850 mbar) at the stations between 14°E and the international date line, where intraseasonal variance is enhanced during the well-developed stages of El Niño-Southern Oscillation warm events. No systematic interannual modulation of intraseasonal zonal wind variance is found in the records from stations west of 140°E or in 200-mbar zonal winds.

  4. Zero potential vorticity envelopes for the zonal-mean velocity of the Venus/Titan atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M.; del Genio, A. D.; Zhou, W.

    1994-03-01

    The diagnostic analysis of numerical simulations of the Venus/Titan wind regime reveals an overlooked constraint upon the latitudinal structure of their zonal-mean angular momentum. The numerical experiments, as well as the limited planetary observations, are approximately consistent with the hypothesis that within the latitudes bounded by the wind maxima the total Ertel potential vorticity associated with the zonal-mean motion is approximately well mixed with respect to the neutral equatorial value for a stable circulation. The implied latitudinal profile of angular momentum is of the form M equal to or less than Me(cos lambda)2/Ri, where lambda is the latitude and Ri the local Richardson number, generally intermediate between the two extremes of uniform angular momentum (Ri approaches infinity) and uniform angular velocity (Ri = 1). The full range of angular momentum profile variation appears to be realized within the observed meridional - vertical structure of the Venus atmosphere, at least crudely approaching the implied relationship between stratification and zonal velocity there. While not itself indicative of a particular eddy mechanism or specific to atmospheric superrotation, the zero potential vorticity (ZPV) constraint represents a limiting bound for the eddy - mean flow adjustment of a neutrally stable baroclinic circulation and may be usefully applied to the diagnostic analysis of future remote sounding and in situ measurements from planetary spacecraft.

  5. Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravatte, S. E.; Kessler, W. S.; Marin, F.

    2012-12-01

    Argo float data in the equatorial Pacific Ocean during January 2003 to August 2011 are analyzed to obtain lagrangian subsurface velocities at their parking depths. We present maps of mean zonal velocities at 1000m and 1500m. A series of alternating zonal jets with a meridional scale of 1.5° are seen from 10°S to 10°N, with mean speeds about 5 cm/s. These alternating jets are clearly present in the western and central parts of the basin, but weaken and disappear approaching the eastern coast, near 110°W at the equator. They are stronger in the southern hemisphere. The jets closer to the equator appear remarkably zonally consistent across the basin, but further poleward appear broken in several segments, with their meridional separation increasing from east to west. Along the equator at both 1000m and 1500m, a westward jet is seen. At the western boundary in the south (Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea), the alternating jets appear to connect in narrow boundary currents. The annual cycle within about ±5° latitude is a Rossby wave consistent with that previously observed in other fields.

  6. High-fidelity simulations of unsteady civil aircraft aerodynamics: stakes and perspectives. Application of zonal detached eddy simulation

    PubMed Central

    Deck, Sébastien; Gand, Fabien; Brunet, Vincent; Ben Khelil, Saloua

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of zonal detached eddy simulations (ZDES) for unsteady civil aircraft applications as a reflection on the stakes and perspectives of the use of hybrid methods in the framework of industrial aerodynamics. The issue of zonal or non-zonal treatment of turbulent flows for engineering applications is discussed. The ZDES method used in this article and based on a fluid problem-dependent zonalization is briefly presented. Some recent landmark achievements for conditions all over the flight envelope are presented, including low-speed (aeroacoustics of high-lift devices and landing gear), cruising (engine–airframe interactions), propulsive jets and off-design (transonic buffet and dive manoeuvres) applications. The implications of such results and remaining challenges in a more global framework are further discussed. PMID:25024411

  7. High-fidelity simulations of unsteady civil aircraft aerodynamics: stakes and perspectives. Application of zonal detached eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Deck, Sébastien; Gand, Fabien; Brunet, Vincent; Ben Khelil, Saloua

    2014-08-13

    This paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of zonal detached eddy simulations (ZDES) for unsteady civil aircraft applications as a reflection on the stakes and perspectives of the use of hybrid methods in the framework of industrial aerodynamics. The issue of zonal or non-zonal treatment of turbulent flows for engineering applications is discussed. The ZDES method used in this article and based on a fluid problem-dependent zonalization is briefly presented. Some recent landmark achievements for conditions all over the flight envelope are presented, including low-speed (aeroacoustics of high-lift devices and landing gear), cruising (engine-airframe interactions), propulsive jets and off-design (transonic buffet and dive manoeuvres) applications. The implications of such results and remaining challenges in a more global framework are further discussed. PMID:25024411

  8. The role of forced planetary waves in the annual cycle of the zonal mean circulation of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holton, J. R.; Wehrbein, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    A severely truncated semispectral numerical model is used to simulate the annual cycle of the zonally averaged circulation in the middle atmosphere (16-96 km). The model includes only a single zonal harmonic wave component which interacts with the mean flow; the circulation is driven by diabatic heating and by a specified perturbation in the topography of the lower boundary, which is taken to be the 100 mb surface. A comparison of the annual cycle simulated by this model with the results of an analogous two-dimensional model indicates that planetary waves have relatively little influence on the zonal mean temperature profiles and on the solstice mean zonal winds at high latitudes. The primary effects of the forced waves are in decelerating the mean winds at low latitudes in the winter hemisphere to produce a region of weak westerlies, and in generating final warmings at the spring equinoxes.

  9. High-fidelity simulations of unsteady civil aircraft aerodynamics: stakes and perspectives. Application of zonal detached eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Deck, Sébastien; Gand, Fabien; Brunet, Vincent; Ben Khelil, Saloua

    2014-08-13

    This paper provides an up-to-date survey of the use of zonal detached eddy simulations (ZDES) for unsteady civil aircraft applications as a reflection on the stakes and perspectives of the use of hybrid methods in the framework of industrial aerodynamics. The issue of zonal or non-zonal treatment of turbulent flows for engineering applications is discussed. The ZDES method used in this article and based on a fluid problem-dependent zonalization is briefly presented. Some recent landmark achievements for conditions all over the flight envelope are presented, including low-speed (aeroacoustics of high-lift devices and landing gear), cruising (engine-airframe interactions), propulsive jets and off-design (transonic buffet and dive manoeuvres) applications. The implications of such results and remaining challenges in a more global framework are further discussed.

  10. Interaction of zonal winds with the equatorial midnight pressure bulge in the earth's thermosphere - Empirical check of momentum balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, F. A.; Mayr, H. G.; Spencer, N. W.; Hedin, A. E.; Fejer, B. G.

    1985-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the effect of the equatorial midnight pressure on the nighttime zonal winds in the altitude range 300-400 km. The analysis is based on zonal momentum balance of measured quantities at the specified altitude combined with the nighttime average-pressure variations given by the Atmosphere Explorer-E (AE-E) satellite and the ion density given by the model of Chiu (1975). It is found that the nighttime pressure variation obtained from temperatures and densities measured on AE-E is consistent with the observed variations in the zonal wind and that the zonal wind decay time due to ion drag and viscosity reasonably accounts for the observed decay in velocity leading to the midnight minimum.

  11. Rossby and drift wave turbulence and zonal flows: The Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connaughton, Colm; Nazarenko, Sergey; Quinn, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma, exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form, survive in more realistic and complicated models. As such, they form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. The jets in the strongly nonlinear case further roll up into vortex streets and saturate, while for the weaker nonlinearities, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet, which is slightly inclined to the zonal direction, and a dominant primary wave. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence-zonostrophy. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively well-conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjørtoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the well-known drift wave-zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation mechanisms, extracting energy from

  12. Zonal Variations of Eddy Diffusivities in an ACC-like Channel: Discrete Transport Corridors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, A.; Thompson, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The meridional overturning circulation in a wind-driven re-entrant channel arises from a balance between an Eulerian mean overturning and an eddy overturning. These cancel to leading order in the Southern Ocean's Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). An ACC-like flow, with realistic stratification, zonal transport and distributions of eddy kinetic energy, develops even when these two overturning components cancel completely. Many studies have noted that an enhancement of the Eulerian overturning circulation, which tends to steepen isopycnals, is balanced in part by an enhancement of the eddy circulation that relaxes isopycnal tilt. Thus the domain-averaged isopycnal slope and zonal transport are relatively insensitive to changes in wind forcing. However, the response of the system's mesoscale variability and eddy fluxes is not uniform throughout the domain. We present a process study of an idealized eddy-resolving ACC-like channel with negligible residual overturning to explore how the along-stream distribution of eddy characteristics establishes a balance between wind and eddy overturning circulations. For each simulation, we decompose the overturning circulation into mean, standing and transient components. As the surface wind stress increases, the standing component balances a larger portion of the mean overturning. This in turn leads to an increasing departure from zonally-symmetric eddy characteristics. A zonal-mean, or net, eddy diffusivity Κnet is defined as the eddy diffusivity required to exactly balance the mean overturning based on the zonal-mean isopycnal slope, s. This gives Κnet=τ/ρ0fs, where τ is the wind stress, ρ0 is a reference density and f is the Coriolis parameter. Κnet is compared to local eddy diffusivities, Κlocal, diagnosed directly from the divergent component of the eddy buoyancy flux divided by the local isopycnal slope. We find that with a simple topographic ridge and moderate wind forcing, along-stream averages of

  13. Comparison of zonal elution and nonlinear chromatography in determination of the interaction between seven drugs and immobilised β(2)-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Jing; Zheng, Yuqing Yuan; Yang, Lingjian; Zhang, Yajun; Bian, Liujiao; Zheng, Jianbin; Li, Zijian; Zhao, Xinfeng; Zhang, Youyi

    2015-07-01

    Zonal elution and nonlinear chromatography are two mainstream models for the determination of drug-protein interaction in affinity chromatography. This work intended to compare the results by zonal elution with that by nonlinear chromatography when it comes to the analysis of the interaction between seven drugs and immobilised β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR). The results of the zonal elution showed that clorprenaline, clenbuterol, methoxyphenamine, salbutamol, terbutaline, tulobuterol and bambuterol have only one type of binding site on immobilised β2-AR, while nonlinear chromatography confirmed the existence of at least two types of binding sites between β2-AR and clorprenaline, clenbuterol and bambuterol. On these sites, both zonal elution and nonlinear chromatography presented the same rank order for the association constants of the seven drugs. Compared with the data from zonal elution, the association constants calculated using nonlinear chromatography gave a good linear response to the corresponding values by radio-ligand binding assay. The sampling efficiencies of nonlinear chromatography were clearly higher than zonal elution. Nonlinear chromatography will probably become a powerful alternative for the high throughput determination of drug-protein interaction.

  14. Effect of the magnetic field curvature on the generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Kovalishen, E. A.; Shirokov, M. S.; Tsypin, V. S.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2007-05-15

    The generation of zonal flows by drift-Alfven waves is studied with allowance for magnetic curvature effects. The basic plasmadynamic equations relating the electrostatic potential, vector potential, and perturbed plasma density are the vorticity equation, longitudinal Ohm's law, and continuity equation. The basic equations are analyzed by applying a parametric formalism similar to that used in the theory of the generation of convective cells. In contrast to most previous investigations on the subject, consideration is given to primary modes having an arbitrary spectrum rather than to an individual monochromatic wave packet. The parametric approach so modified makes it possible to reveal a new class of instabilities of zonal flows that are analogous to two-stream instabilities in linear theory. It is shown that, in the standard theory of zonal flows, the zonal components of the vector potential and perturbed density are not excited. It is pointed out that zonal flows can be generated both in the case of a magnetic hill and in the case of a magnetic well. In the first case, the instabilities of zonal flows are analogous to negative-mass instabilities in linear theory, and, in the second case, they are analogous to two-stream instabilities.

  15. Turbulent Deep Convection at low Rossby Number: A Model for Zonal Flow and Thermal Emissions of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, M.; Aurnou, J.; Wicht, J.

    2007-12-01

    We use numerical models to show that deep convection can result in the observed surface fluid flow and thermal emission patterns of Jupiter and Saturn. The simulations of Boussinesq convection in a spherical shell are dynamically self-consistent and generate large-scale zonal jets that interact with thermal plumes to produce the surface heat flow pattern. The surface fluid flow is dominantly zonal with a prograde equatorial jet and multiple alternating jets at higher latitudes. The zonal jet widths in our numerical models, and of Jupiter and Saturn, follow Rhines scaling. The scaling for zonal flow in a spherical shell is distinguished from that in a full sphere or a shallow layer by the effect of the tangent cylinder, which marks a reversal in the sign of the planetary β - parameter and a jump in the Rhines length. This jump is present in the numerical simulations as a sharp equator-ward increase in jet widths - a transition that is also apparent on Jupiter and Saturn. Our models generate a surface heat flow pattern with a broad minimum at the equator and peaks at the poles. The zonal jets modulate this pattern at smaller latitudinal scales. Superposing the model heat flow pattern with incoming solar radiation results in global heat flow that, similar to Jupiter and Saturn, is roughly constant in latitude. Our results support the hypothesis that the large-scale patterns of heat and zonal flow originate deep within the molecular hydrogen envelopes of the giant planets.

  16. Response of the F Region Zonal Electricfield at the Magnetic Equator to the Interplanetary Electric Filed Fluctuations during Disturbed Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvanendran, C. Bhuvanendran; Prabhakaran Nayar, S. R.; Mathew, Tiju Joseph

    The interplanetary magnetic field plays a prominent role in the transfer of energy from solar wind to the magnetosphere there after into the lower atmosphere. During magnetically dis-turbed periods, significant perturbations occur at equatorial as well as at higher latitudes. The fluctuations in the equatorial F-region electric field are thought to be due to the perturbations in the neutral air due to the presence of a variety of waves or due to the penetration of in-terplanetary electric field into the low latitude ionosphere. The simultaneous observation of electric field at the equatorial F-region (Ey) and at magnetopause (Eyy) enables us to study the relationship between them. The zonal component of the equatorial dynamo electric field Ey causes vertical plasma drifts. Large and rapid southward and northward reversals of Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field impose an east-west electric field which penetrate through the magnetosphere down to the equatorial ionosphere. The induced electric field is given by E = -V x Bz, V is the solar wind velocity and B is the IMF and would be opposite to the normal Sq electric field. In this work, the effect of the interplanetary electric field on the equatorial ionospheric zonal electric field during magnetically disturbed days has been dis-cussed. The HF radar system operated at 5.5MHz and a Multi frequency Radar operated at 2.5, 3.5 and 4.5 MHz at the Kerala University have been used for measuring vertical drifts in the equatorial F region. The interplanetary magnetic field components and solar wind velocity are obtained from IMP-8 and WIND satellites .The comparison of the fluctuations in EYY and EY presented in this work reveals that the fluctuations simultaneously present in both EYY and EY are different in magnitude and they are in anti-phase during the day-time and in phase at night. In the time interval between connection and reconnection, geomagnetic field lines are open and IEF can penetrate to the polar

  17. An analysis of finite-difference and finite-volume formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1986-01-01

    Finite-difference and finite-volume formulations are analyzed in order to clear up the confusion concerning their application to the numerical solution of conservation laws. A new coordinate-free formulation of systems of conservation laws is developed, which clearly distinguishes the role of physical vectors from that of algebraic vectors which characterize the system. The analysis considers general types of equations--potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes. Three-dimensional unsteady flows with time-varying grids are described using a single, consistent nomeclature for both formulations. Grid motion due to a non-inertial reference frame as well as flow adaptation is covered. In comparing the two formulations, it is found useful to distinguish between differences in numerical methods and differences in grid definition. The former plays a role for non-Cartesian grids, and results in only cosmetic differences in the manner in which geometric terms are handled. The differences in grid definition for the two formulations is found to be more important, since it affects the manner in which boundary conditions, zonal procedures, and grid singularities are handled at computational boundaries. The proper interpretation of strong and weak conservation-law forms for quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric flows is brought out.

  18. An analysis of finite-difference and finite-volume formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1989-01-01

    Finite-difference and finite-volume formulations are analyzed in order to clear up the confusion concerning their application to the numerical solution of conservation laws. A new coordinate-free formulation of systems of conservation laws is developed, which clearly distinguishes the role of physical vectors from that of algebraic vectors which characterize the system. The analysis considers general types of equations: potential, Euler, and Navier-Stokes. Three-dimensional unsteady flows with time-varying grids are described using a single, consistent nomenclature for both formulations. Grid motion due to a non-inertial reference frame as well as flow adaptation is covered. In comparing the two formulations, it is found useful to distinguish between differences in numerical methods and differences in grid definition. The former plays a role for non-Cartesian grids, and results in only cosmetic differences in the manner in which geometric terms are handled. The differences in grid definition for the two formulations is found to be more important, since it affects the manner in which boundary conditions, zonal procedures, and grid singularities are handled at computational boundaries. The proper interpretation of strong and weak conservation-law forms for quasi-one-dimensional and axisymmetric flows is brought out.

  19. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  20. New finite difference formulas for numerical differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ishtiaq Rasool; Ohba, Ryoji

    2000-12-01

    Conventional numerical differentiation formulas based on interpolating polynomials, operators and lozenge diagrams can be simplified to one of the finite difference approximations based on Taylor series, and closed-form expressions of these finite difference formulas have already been presented. In this paper, we present new finite difference formulas, which are more accurate than the available ones, especially for the oscillating functions having frequency components near the Nyquist frequency. Closed-form expressions of the new formulas are given for arbitrary order. A comparison of the previously available three types of approximations is given with the presented formulas. A computer program written in MATHEMATICA, based on new formulas is given in the appendix for numerical differentiation of a function at a specified mesh point.

  1. Non-Migrating Tides, with Zonally Symmetric Component, Generated in the Mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Porter, H. S.; Hines, C. O.

    2003-01-01

    For comparison with measurements from the TIMED satellite and coordinated ground based observations, we discuss results from our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) that incorporates the Doppler Spread Parameterization (Hines, 1997) for small-scale gravity waves (GWs). The NSM extends from the ground into the thermosphere and describes the major dynamical features of the atmosphere including the wave driven equatorial oscillations (QBO and SAO), and the seasonal variations of tides and planetary waves. With emphasis on the non-migrating tides, having periods of 24 and 12 hours, we discuss our modeling results that account for the classical migrating solar excitation sources only. As reported earlier, the NSM reproduces the observed seasonal variations and in particular the large equinoctial maxima in the amplitude of the migrating diurnal tide at altitudes around 90 km. Filtering of the tide by the zonal circulation and GW momentum deposition was identified as the cause. The GWs were also shown to produce a strong non-linear interaction between the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. Confined largely to the mesosphere, the NSM produces through dynamical interactions a relatively large contribution of non-migrating tides. A striking feature is seen in the diurnal and semi-diurnal oscillations of the zonal mean (m = 0). Eastward propagating tides are also generated for zonal wave numbers m = 1 to 4. When the NSM is run without GWs, the amplitudes for the non-migrating tides, including m = 0, are generally small. Planetary wave interaction and non-linear coupling that involves the filtering of GWs and related height integration of dynamical features are discussed as possible mechanisms for generating these non-migrating tides in the NSM. As is the case for the solar migrating tides, the non-migrating tides reveal persistent seasonal variations. Under the influence of the QBO and SAO, interannual variations are produced.

  2. Monthly Climatology of Thermospheric Zonal and Meridional Winds Obtained from a Kalman Filter Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherliess, L.; Lomidze, L.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the thermospheric neutral wind and its meridional and zonal components is critical for an improved understanding of the low- and mid-latitude F-region dynamics and morphology. To date, the reliable estimation of the wind and its components remains a challenge because of difficulties in both measurement and modeling. Previous methods that use ionospheric measurements to deduce winds provide their values only in the direction of the magnetic meridian. We will present the monthly climatology of the zonal and meridional components of thermospheric neutral wind at low and mid-latitudes obtained by a Kalman Filter technique. First, the climatology of the magnetic meridional wind is obtained by assimilating monthly maps of F-region ionosphere peak parameters (NmF2 and hmF2), obtained from COSMIC radio occultation data, into the Global Assimilation of Ionospheric Measurements Full Physics (GAIM-FP) model. The model provides the 3-D electron density throughout the ionosphere, together with the magnetic meridional wind. Next, the estimation of the global zonal and meridional wind components is performed using the newly developed Thermospheric Wind Assimilation Model (TWAM). TWAM combines magnetic meridional wind data obtained from GAIM-FP with a physics-based 3-D thermospheric neutral wind model using an implicit Kalman Filter technique. The ionospheric drag and ion diffusion velocities, needed for the wind calculation, are also taken from the GAIM-FP model. We present the monthly climatology of our wind estimation and compare individual horizontal wind components to their corresponding empirical model values and to measurements made by interferometers.

  3. Zonal Wind Speeds, Vortex Characteristics, and Wave Dynamics in Saturn's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, John J.; Draham, R. L.; Holmes, J. A.; Sayanagi, K. M.

    2013-10-01

    We examine images returned from Cassini spacecraft's ISS camera between 2007 and 2012 to analyze zonal wind speeds, vortex characteristics, and wave dynamics in Saturn's northern hemisphere. Our analysis focused on datasets that provided near-simultaneous coverage in the near-infrared continuum band at 752 nm (CB2 filter) and the methane bands at 727 and 890 nm (MT2 and MT3 filters). We measure the zonal wind speeds by analyzing cloud motions using one-dimensional correlation method similar to Limaye (1986). Our goal is to determine the vertical wind shear on Saturn in a manner similar to that done for Jupiter by Li et al (2006). Because the images captured in the methane bands are sensitive to higher altitudes than those in the continuum band, we are able to measure wind speeds at different altitudes. Next, we study the characteristics of multiple northern hemisphere vortices using methods similar to the analysis of a long-lived cyclonic spot in the southern hemisphere of Saturn (del Rio-Gatztelurrutia et al, 2010). We analyze the interactions and evolutions of the vortices, and compare them with the Voyager-era northern hemisphere study (Sromovsky et al, 1983). Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the wave propagating at 45 degree N planetocentric latitude in the northern flank of an eastward zonal jet that peaks at 42 degree N. This new wave is located to the north of the Ribbon wave at 42 degree N originally found during Voyager (Sromovsky et al, 1983; Godfrey and Moore, 1986); the Ribbon wave was not present in our 2007-2012 images. We calculate the Fourier components of the new wave, and compare our findings with previous analyses and prediction of the Ribbon wave (Sromovsky et al, 1983; Godfrey and Moore, 1986; Sanchez-Lavega, 2002; Sayanagi et al, 2010).

  4. Saturn Ring Mass and Zonal Gravitational Harmonics Estimate at the End of the Cassini "Grand Finale"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozovic, M.; Jacobson, R. A.; Roth, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    "Solstice" mission is the 7-year extension of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft exploration of the Saturn system that will culminate with the "Grand Finale". Beginning in mid-2017, the spacecraft is scheduled to execute 22 orbits that have their periapses between the innermost D-ring and the upper layers of Saturn's atmosphere. These orbits will be perturbed by the gravitational field of Saturn as well as by the rings. We present an analysis of simulated "Grand Finale" radiometric data, and we investigate their sensitivity to the ring mass and higher zonal gravitational harmonics of the planet. We model the data quantity with respect to the available coverage of the tracking stations on Earth, and we account for the times when the spacecraft is occulted either by Saturn or the rings. We also use different data weights to simulate changes in the data quality. The dynamical model of the spacecraft motion includes both gravitational and non-gravitational forces, such as the daily momentum management due to Reaction Wheel Assembly and radioisotope thermo-electric generator accelerations. We solve the equations of motion and use a weighted-least squares fit to obtain spacecraft's state vector, mass(es) of the ring or the individual rings, zonal harmonics, and non-gravitational accelerations. We also investigate some a-priori values of the A- and B-ring masses from Tiscareno et al. (2007) and Hedman et al. (2015) analyses. The preliminary results suggest that the "Grand Finale" orbits should remain sensitive to the ring mass even for GMring<2 km3/s2 and that they will also provide high accuracy estimates of the zonal harmonics J8, J10, and J12.

  5. In vitro anti-HMPV activity of meroditerpenoids from marine alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotales).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gabriella; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Sigiliano, Lorena; Machado, Fernanda; Kaiser, Carlos; Romeiro, Nelilma; Gestinari, Lísia; Santos, Norma; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluated the antiviral activity against HMPV replication of crude extract of the marine algae Stypopodium zonale and of two meroditerpenoids obtained from it, atomaric acid and epitaondiol, and a methyl ester derivative of atomaric acid. Their selectivity indexes were 20.78, >56.81, 49.26 and 12.82, respectively. Compared to ribavirin, the substances showed a relatively low cytotoxicity on LLC-MK2 cells, with a significant antiviral activity, inhibiting at least 90% of viral replication in vitro, which demonstrates the potential of these marine natural products to combat infections caused by HMPV in vitro. PMID:21986522

  6. Long period perturbations of earth satellite orbits. [Von Zeipel method and zonal harmonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    All the equations involved in extending the PS phi solution to include the long periodic and second order secular effects of the zonal harmonics are presented. Topics covered include DSphi elements and relations for their conconical transformation into the PS phi elements; the solution algorithm based on the Von Zeipel method; and the elimination of long periodic terms and analytical integration of primed variables. The equations were entered into the ASOP program, checked out, and verified. Comparisons with numerical integrations show the long period theory to be accurate within several meters after 800 revolutions.

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Magnetic islands and spontaneous generation of zonal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Margheriti, L.; Porcelli, F.; Tebaldi, C.

    2006-09-01

    A study of saturated magnetic island equilibria on the basis of the resistive magneto-hydro-dynamic model is presented. A bifurcation in the sequence of equilibria is found as the ratio of the width of the current layer in the initial (non-reconnected) configuration over the island periodicity length reaches a critical threshold. Below this threshold, spontaneous generation of zonal flows occurs. This result is suggestive of a possible evolution of current sheets in magnetically confined plasmas and may be relevant to the understanding of the suppression of drift-wave turbulence and the formation of internal transport barriers in tokamak experiments.

  8. Zonal flow driven by energetic particle during magneto-hydro-dynamic burst in a toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Minami, T.; Isobe, M.; Nishimura, S.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Takahashi, C.; Takeuchi, M.; Ito, T.; Watari, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.

    2007-11-01

    The internal structural measurements of electric field and density using twin heavy ion beam probes have been performed to elucidate the nonlinear evolution of the magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) bursty phenomenon driven by the interaction with high-energy particles in a toroidal plasma. The results have given the finest observation of the internal structure of plasma quantities, such as electric field, density and magnetic field distortion, which nonlinearly develop during the MHD phenomenon. In particular, the finding of a new kind of oscillating zonal flow driven by interaction between energetic particles and MHD modes should be emphasized for burning state plasmas.

  9. Recursive analytical solution describing artificial satellite motion perturbed by an arbitrary number of zonal terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical first order solution has been developed which describes the motion of an artificial satellite perturbed by an arbitrary number of zonal harmonics of the geopotential. A set of recursive relations for the solution, which was deduced from recursive relations of the geopotential, was derived. The method of solution is based on Von-Zeipel's technique applied to a canonical set of two-body elements in the extended phase space which incorporates the true anomaly as a canonical element. The elements are of Poincare type, that is, they are regular for vanishing eccentricities and inclinations. Numerical results show that this solution is accurate to within a few meters after 500 revolutions.

  10. Jupiter's zonal winds: are they bands of homogenized potential vorticity organized as a monotonic staircase?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Philip S; Shetty, Sushil

    2011-02-28

    The east-west striped pattern of clouds in Jupiter's weather layer is accompanied by a zonal flow containing 12 eastward-going jet streams alternating in latitude with westward-going jet streams. Based on theory, simulation and observations of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere, it is conjectured that Jupiter's weather layer is made of bands of constant potential vorticity (PV), where the interfaces between bands are at the latitudes of the maxima of the eastward-going jet streams. It is speculated that the mixing of PV on Jupiter is analogous to the mixing of salt in the ocean by the Phillips effect, which causes the salt density to form a monotonic 'staircase'. It is hypothesized that the PV in Jupiter's weather layer is also a staircase, decreasing from north to south. PV is a function of vorticity, as well as parameters with unknown values, e.g. the vertical stratification and the zonal flow beneath the observable weather layer. Therefore, these hypotheses cannot be tested directly. Using an atmospheric model that contains these unknown parameters, we solved the inverse problem and found values of the unknown parameters (and their uncertainties) that best fit Jovian observations. The unknown parameters influence how the zonal flow interacts with large vortices, e.g. the Great Red Spot (GRS; the largest and longest-lived Jovian vortex, centred at 23° S) and the Oval BA (the second largest vortex, centred at 33° S). Although we found that the PV distribution is approximately piecewise-constant and that the peaks of the eastward-going jet streams are at the latitudes of PV interfaces, there is also a PV interface at 20° S, where there is a westward-going jet stream. We find that the zonal PV is not a monotonic staircase due to the 'backwards' interface at 20° S. We show that this backwards interface is necessary to make the GRS nearly round, and that without that interface, the Red Spot would be highly elongated in the east-west direction and probably unstable.

  11. Representation of the tropical stratospheric zonal wind in global atmospheric reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawatani, Yoshio; Hamilton, Kevin; Miyazaki, Kazuyuki; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Anstey, James A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on a project to compare the representation of the monthly-mean zonal wind in the equatorial stratosphere among major global atmospheric reanalysis data sets. The degree of disagreement among the reanalyses is characterized by the standard deviation (SD) of the monthly-mean zonal wind and this depends on latitude, longitude, height, and the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). At each height the SD displays a prominent equatorial maximum, indicating the particularly challenging nature of the reanalysis problem in the low-latitude stratosphere. At 50-70 hPa the geographical distributions of SD are closely related to the density of radiosonde observations. The largest SD values are over the central Pacific, where few in situ observations are available. At 10-20 hPa the spread among the reanalyses and differences with in situ observations both depend significantly on the QBO phase. Notably the easterly-to-westerly phase transitions in all the reanalyses except MERRA are delayed relative to those directly observed in Singapore. In addition, the timing of the easterly-to-westerly phase transitions displays considerable variability among the different reanalyses and this spread is much larger than for the timing of the westerly-to-easterly phase changes. The eddy component in the monthly-mean zonal wind near the Equator is dominated by zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 quasi-stationary planetary waves propagating from midlatitudes in the westerly phase of the QBO. There generally is considerable disagreement among the reanalyses in the details of the quasi-stationary waves near the Equator. At each level, there is a tendency for the agreement to be best near the longitude of Singapore, suggesting that the Singapore observations act as a strong constraint on all the reanalyses. Our measures of the quality of the reanalysis clearly show systematic improvement over the period considered (1979-2012). The SD among the reanalysis declines significantly over

  12. Jupiter's zonal winds: are they bands of homogenized potential vorticity organized as a monotonic staircase?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Philip S; Shetty, Sushil

    2011-02-28

    The east-west striped pattern of clouds in Jupiter's weather layer is accompanied by a zonal flow containing 12 eastward-going jet streams alternating in latitude with westward-going jet streams. Based on theory, simulation and observations of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere, it is conjectured that Jupiter's weather layer is made of bands of constant potential vorticity (PV), where the interfaces between bands are at the latitudes of the maxima of the eastward-going jet streams. It is speculated that the mixing of PV on Jupiter is analogous to the mixing of salt in the ocean by the Phillips effect, which causes the salt density to form a monotonic 'staircase'. It is hypothesized that the PV in Jupiter's weather layer is also a staircase, decreasing from north to south. PV is a function of vorticity, as well as parameters with unknown values, e.g. the vertical stratification and the zonal flow beneath the observable weather layer. Therefore, these hypotheses cannot be tested directly. Using an atmospheric model that contains these unknown parameters, we solved the inverse problem and found values of the unknown parameters (and their uncertainties) that best fit Jovian observations. The unknown parameters influence how the zonal flow interacts with large vortices, e.g. the Great Red Spot (GRS; the largest and longest-lived Jovian vortex, centred at 23° S) and the Oval BA (the second largest vortex, centred at 33° S). Although we found that the PV distribution is approximately piecewise-constant and that the peaks of the eastward-going jet streams are at the latitudes of PV interfaces, there is also a PV interface at 20° S, where there is a westward-going jet stream. We find that the zonal PV is not a monotonic staircase due to the 'backwards' interface at 20° S. We show that this backwards interface is necessary to make the GRS nearly round, and that without that interface, the Red Spot would be highly elongated in the east-west direction and probably unstable

  13. The sensitivity of stationary waves to variations in the basic state zonal flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nigam, Sumant; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    A linear, primitive equation stationary wave model having high vertical and meridional resolution is used to examine the sensitivity of orographically forced (primarily by Himalayas) stationary waves at middle and high latitudes to variations in the basic state zonal wind distribution. We find relatively little sensitivity to the winds in high latitudes, but remarkable sensitivity to small variations in the subtropical jet. Fluctuations well within the range of observed variability in the jet can lead to large variations in the stationary waves of the high latitude stratosphere, and to large changes even in tropospheric stationary waves. Implications for both sudden warmings and large-scale weather are discussed.

  14. Can meridionally propagating inertial waves drive an oscillating zonal mean flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelig, Torsten; Harlander, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    Zonal mean flow excitation by inertial waves is studied in analogy to mean flow excitation by gravity waves [3]. In geophysical flows that are stratified and rotating, the two classes of waves correspond to the two limiting cases: gravity waves neglect rotation, inertial waves neglect stratification. The former are more relevant for fluids like the atmosphere, where stratification is dominant, the latter for the deep oceans or planet cores, where rotation dominates. In the present study waves are suggested to propagate in the meridional plane. A hierarchy of simple analytical and numerical models is considered and the results are compared with data from a laboratory experiment. The main findings can be summarised as follows: (i) when the waves are decoupled from the mean flow they just drive a retrograde (eastward) zonal mean flow, independent of the sign of the meridional phase speed; (ii) when coupling is present and the zonal mean flow is assumed to be steady, the waves can drive vertically alternating jets, but still, in contrast to the gravity wave case, the structure is independent of the sign of the meridional phase speed; (iii) when coupling is present and time-dependent zonal mean flows are considered the waves can drive vertically and temporarily oscillating mean flows. The comparison with laboratory data from a rotating annulus experiment shows a qualitative agreement. It appears that the experiment captures the basic elements of the inertial wave mean flow coupling. The results might be relevant to understand how the Equatorial Deep Jets can be maintained against dissipation [1, 2], a process currently discussed controversially. [1] Greatbatch, R., Brandt, P., Claus, M., Didwischus, S., Fu, Y.: On the width of the equatorial deep jets. Journal of Physical Oceanography 42, 1729-1740 (2012) [2] Muench, J.E., Kunze, E.: Internal wave interactions with equatorial deep jets. Part II: Acceleration of the jets. J. Phys. Oceanogr. 30, 2099-2110 (2000) [3] Plumb

  15. From international to zonal trials: the origins of the Nuremberg medical trial.

    PubMed

    Weindling, P

    2000-01-01

    This article examines how plans to have a second International Military Tribunal led to the Medical Trial at Nuremberg. While the British opposed a second international trial because of their distrust of the Soviets, they supported a plan for a series of special zonal trials to be conducted by the American authorities at Nuremberg. In December 1945 the British became aware of the extent of medical war crimes committed by the Germans. Their investigation led to an eventual handover to the Americans of a group of German doctors for trial at Nuremberg. At the same time the British and French Supported an International Scientific Commission for the Investigation of Medical War Crimes.

  16. Purification and concentration of influenza inactivated viruses by continuous-flow zonal centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Mistretta, A P; Crovari-Cuneo, P; Giacometti, G; Sacchi, G; Strozzi, F

    1975-01-01

    A mathod is described for the purification, on an industrial scale, of influenza viruses grown in allantoic cavity of embryonated eggs. The mehtod consists of combining continuous-flow centrifugation with zonal centrifugation in a sucrose (36.6 per cent-52.5 per cent w/v) density gradient. The sample flow rate is approximately 3.7 litres/h and the volumes treated vary between 3 and 33 litres of allantoic fluid. Both the recovery of the virus and the degree of concentration and purification result satisfactory.

  17. QUARKONIUM AT FINITE TEMPERATURE.

    SciTech Connect

    UMEDA, T.

    2006-06-09

    Lattice QCD studies on charmonium at finite temperature are presented After a discussion about problems for the Maximum Entropy Method applied to finite temperature lattice QCD, I show several results on charmonium spectral functions. The 'wave function' of charmonium is also discussed to study the spatial correlation between quark and anti-quark in deconfinement phase.

  18. Finite Control in Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kum Young

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores finite control in Korean. An overview of the previous studies of control shows that the mainstream literature on control has consistently argued that referential dependence between an overt matrix argument and an embedded null subject is characteristic of non-finite clauses which contain a PRO subject. Moreover, although some…

  19. The role of zonal flows and predator-prey oscillations in triggering the formation of edge and core transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Tynan, G. R.; Diamond, P. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.; Austin, M. E.; Solomon, W. M.; Wang, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present direct evidence of low frequency, radially sheared, turbulence-driven flows (zonal flows (ZFs)) triggering edge transport barrier formation preceding the L- to H-mode transition via periodic turbulence suppression in limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs), consistent with predator-prey dynamics. The final transition to edge-localized mode-free H-mode occurs after the equilibrium E × B flow shear increases due to ion pressure profile evolution. ZFs are also observed to initiate formation of an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) at the q = 2 rational surface via local suppression of electron-scale turbulence. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering (DBS) has revealed the radial structure of the ZF-induced shear layer and the E × B shearing rate, ωE×B, in both barrier types. During edge barrier formation, the shearing rate lags the turbulence envelope during the LCO by 90°, transitioning to anti-correlation (180°) when the equilibrium shear dominates the turbulence-driven flow shear due to the increasing edge pressure gradient. The time-dependent flow shear and the turbulence envelope are anti-correlated (180° out of phase) in the electron ITB. LCOs with time-reversed evolution dynamics (transitioning from an equilibrium-flow dominated to a ZF-dominated state) have also been observed during the H-L back-transition and are potentially of interest for controlled ramp-down of the plasma stored energy and pressure (normalized to the poloidal magnetic field) \\beta_{\\theta} =2\\mu_{0} n{( {T_{e} +T_{i}})}/{B_{\\theta}^{2}} in ITER.

  20. Storm time equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift reversal due to disturbance Hall electric field over the Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Souza, J. R.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Batista, I. S.; Denardini, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of equatorial ionospheric plasma bubbles over Brazilian sector during two magnetic storm events are investigated in this work. The observations were made at varying phases of magnetic disturbances when the bubble zonal drift velocity was found to reverse westward from its normally eastward velocity. Calculation of the zonal drift based on a realistic low-latitude ionosphere modeled by the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model showed on a quantitative basis a clear competition between vertical Hall electric field and disturbance zonal winds on the variations observed in the zonal velocity of the plasma bubble. The Hall electric field arising from enhanced ratio of field line-integrated conductivities, ΣH/ΣP, is most often generated by an increase in the integrated Hall conductivity, arising from enhanced energetic particle precipitation in the South American Magnetic Anomaly region for which evidence is provided from observation of anomalous sporadic E layers over Cachoeira Paulista and Fortaleza. Such sporadic E layers are also by themselves evidence for the development of the Hall electric field that modifies the zonal drift.

  1. Computation of averaged monthly zonal albedo utilizing the solar zenith angle, properties of clear and cloudy atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhuria, H.

    1981-01-01

    The zonal temporal averages of albedos at the top of the atmosphere were considered as a function of the length of the day. The length of the day were used to determine the average daily values of mu sub 0(=Cos of the solar zenith angle, theta sub 0). Polynominal fits of the slope and intercept functions of A sub s (cloud-free albedo) and A sub c(cloud albedo) as function of Cos theta sub 0 were obtained by using the sample values of albedo corresponding to solar zenith angles from 0 to 90 deg with interval of 5 deg. The daily zonal values of mu sub 0 and the surface albedos were used to compute the daily zonal values of albedos at the top of the clear and cloudy atmosphere. The monthly zonal cloud fractions were used to compute planetary albedo A at the top of the atmosphere. The global values of monthly albedos A sub s, A sub c and A were computed by using the weighting function defined as the difference of the sins of zonal values of latitudes. The computer program implementation is also described.

  2. The Brown Alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotaceae): A Potential Source of Anti-Leishmania Drugs.

    PubMed

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Szlachta, Marcella Macedo; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Soares, Angelica Ribeiro; Saraiva, Elvira Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Leishmania amazonensis activity of a lipophilic extract from the brown alga Stypopodium zonale and atomaric acid, its major compound. Our initial results revealed high inhibitory activity for intracellular amastigotes in a dose-dependent manner and an IC50 of 0.27 μg/mL. Due to its high anti-Leishmania activity and low toxicity toward host cells, we fractionated the lipophilic extract. A major meroditerpene in this extract, atomaric acid, and its methyl ester derivative, which was obtained by a methylation procedure, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both compounds inhibited intracellular amastigotes, with IC50 values of 20.2 μM (9 μg/mL) and 22.9 μM (10 μg/mL), and selectivity indexes of 8.4 μM and 11.5 μM. The leishmanicidal activity of both meroditerpenes was independent of nitric oxide (NO) production, but the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be at least partially responsible for the amastigote killing. Our results suggest that the lipophilic extract of S. zonale may represent an important source of compounds for the development of anti-Leishmania drugs. PMID:27618071

  3. The Brown Alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotaceae): A Potential Source of Anti-Leishmania Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Szlachta, Marcella Macedo; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Soares, Angelica Ribeiro; Saraiva, Elvira Maria

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Leishmania amazonensis activity of a lipophilic extract from the brown alga Stypopodium zonale and atomaric acid, its major compound. Our initial results revealed high inhibitory activity for intracellular amastigotes in a dose-dependent manner and an IC50 of 0.27 μg/mL. Due to its high anti-Leishmania activity and low toxicity toward host cells, we fractionated the lipophilic extract. A major meroditerpene in this extract, atomaric acid, and its methyl ester derivative, which was obtained by a methylation procedure, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both compounds inhibited intracellular amastigotes, with IC50 values of 20.2 μM (9 μg/mL) and 22.9 μM (10 μg/mL), and selectivity indexes of 8.4 μM and 11.5 μM. The leishmanicidal activity of both meroditerpenes was independent of nitric oxide (NO) production, but the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be at least partially responsible for the amastigote killing. Our results suggest that the lipophilic extract of S. zonale may represent an important source of compounds for the development of anti-Leishmania drugs. PMID:27618071

  4. The Brown Alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotaceae): A Potential Source of Anti-Leishmania Drugs.

    PubMed

    Soares, Deivid Costa; Szlachta, Marcella Macedo; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Soares, Angelica Ribeiro; Saraiva, Elvira Maria

    2016-09-08

    This study evaluated the anti-Leishmania amazonensis activity of a lipophilic extract from the brown alga Stypopodium zonale and atomaric acid, its major compound. Our initial results revealed high inhibitory activity for intracellular amastigotes in a dose-dependent manner and an IC50 of 0.27 μg/mL. Due to its high anti-Leishmania activity and low toxicity toward host cells, we fractionated the lipophilic extract. A major meroditerpene in this extract, atomaric acid, and its methyl ester derivative, which was obtained by a methylation procedure, were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both compounds inhibited intracellular amastigotes, with IC50 values of 20.2 μM (9 μg/mL) and 22.9 μM (10 μg/mL), and selectivity indexes of 8.4 μM and 11.5 μM. The leishmanicidal activity of both meroditerpenes was independent of nitric oxide (NO) production, but the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be at least partially responsible for the amastigote killing. Our results suggest that the lipophilic extract of S. zonale may represent an important source of compounds for the development of anti-Leishmania drugs.

  5. On the long-term variability of Jupiter and Saturn zonal winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Hueso, R.; Barrado-Izagirre, N.; Legarreta, J.; Rojas, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present an analysis of the long-term variability of Jupiter and Saturn zonal wind profiles at their upper cloud level as retrieved from cloud motion tracking on images obtained at ground-based observatories and with different spacecraft missions since 1979, encompassing about three Jovian and one Saturn years. We study the sensitivity and variability of the zonal wind profile in both planets to major planetary-scale disturbances and to seasonal forcing. We finally discuss the implications that these results have for current model efforts to explain the global tropospheric circulation in these planets. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MICIIN AYA2009-10701 with FEDER support, Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07 and UPV/EHU UFI11/55. [1] Sánchez-Lavega A., et al., Icarus, 147, 405-420 (2000). [2] García-Melendo E., Sánchez LavegaA., Icarus, 152, 316-330 (2001) [3] Sánchez-Lavega A., et al., Nature, 423, 623-625 (2003). [4] García-Melendo E., et al., Geophysical Research Letters, 37, L22204 (2010).

  6. The switching between zonal and blocked mid-latitude atmospheric circulation: a dynamical system perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faranda, Davide; Masato, Giacomo; Moloney, Nicholas; Sato, Yuzuru; Daviaud, Francois; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Yiou, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric mid-latitude circulation is dominated by a zonal, westerly flow. Such a flow is generally symmetric, but it can be occasionally broken up by blocking anticyclones. The subsequent asymmetric flow can persist for several days. In this paper, we apply new mathematical tools based on the computation of an extremal index in order to reexamine the dynamical mechanisms responsible for the transitions between zonal and blocked flows. We discard the claim that mid-latitude circulation features two distinct stable equilibria or chaotic regimes, in favor of a simpler mechanism that is well understood in dynamical systems theory: we identify the blocked flow as an unstable fixed point (or saddle point) of a single basin chaotic attractor, dominated by the westerlies regime. We also analyze the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Arctic Oscillation atmospheric indices, whose behavior is often associated with the transition between the two circulation regimes, and investigate analogies and differences with the bidimensional blocking indices. We find that the Arctic Oscillation index, which can be thought as a proxy for a hemispheric average of the Tibaldi-Molteni blocking index, tracks unstable fixed points. On the other hand, the North Atlantic Oscillation, representative only for local properties of the North Atlantic blocking dynamics, does not show any trace of the presence of unstable fixed points of the dynamics.

  7. Zonal heterogeneity of the effects of chronic ethanol feeding on hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guzman, M; Castro, J

    1990-11-01

    Periportal and perivenous hepatocytes were isolated from rats fed a high-fat, ethanol-containing diet to investigate the acinar heterogeneity of the effects of prolonged ethanol administration on lipid metabolism. Chronic feeding of ethanol caused a rather selective accumulation of triacylglycerols in the perivenous zone of the liver. In control animals the rate of lipogenesis and the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase were higher in perivenous than in periportal hepatocytes, whereas the rate of fatty acid oxidation and the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I were higher in periportal than in perivenous cells; however, no zonation was evident for very-low-density-lipoprotein-lipid secretion. Prolonged ethanol administration abolished the zonal asymmetry of the lipogenic process and inverted the acinar distribution of the fatty acid-oxidative process (i.e., in ethanol-fed animals the rate of fatty acid oxidation and the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I were higher in perivenous than in periportal hepatocytes). Moreover, chronic feeding of ethanol led to a marked and selective inhibition of very-low-density-lipoprotein-triacylglycerol secretion by the perivenous zone of the liver. Nevertheless, no zonal differences were observed between control and ethanol-fed animals with respect to the effects of acute doses of ethanol and acetaldehyde on lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our results show that chronic ethanol intake produces important alterations in the acinar distribution of the different fatty acid-metabolizing pathways.

  8. Comparison of low-latitude ion and neutral zonal drifts using DE 2 data

    SciTech Connect

    Coley, W.R.; Heelis, R.A. ); Spencer, N.W. )

    1994-01-01

    The authors have used data from the ion drift meter and the wind and temperature spectrometer on the DE 2 spacecraft to make statistical comparisons of the zonal ion and neutral drifts at dip latitudes (DLAT) in the [+-]35[degrees] range over all local times. Fourier analysis indicates that the superrotation and the diurnal components of both flows are strongly peaked at the dip equator, with the superrotation term becoming negative for [vert bar]DLAT[vert bar] [ge]20[degrees]. One interesting feature is the presence of a period (2200-0500 solar local time) in the 300-400 km altitude region near the dip equator where the ion drift is more strongly eastward than the neutral flow. This would seem to indicate the presence of an electric field source of greater strength than the F region dynamo elsewhere along the geomagnetic field line. Model calculations indicate that a possible mechanism for this source lies in the vertical shear in the zonal neutral wind in the 100-200 km altitude region. 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Interaction of alternating oceanic zonal jets and wind-driven gyres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiga, Balu; Straub, David

    2008-11-01

    Recent evidence has unmasked the presence of alternating zonal jets superimposed on the larger scale midlatitude ocean circulation. Analogous jets are well-known from β-plane turbulence and are associated w ith a halting of the 2d inverse energy cascade by Rossby wave dispersion. Both the β-plane turbulence and the gyre scale dynamics are nonlinear and it seems reasonable to anticipate that the two will inter act. Some evidence for these interactions comes from observations: e.g., jets in the N. Atlantic are aligned at an angle to latitude circles, following a direction nearly parallel to the seaward extension of the Gulf Stream. In the North Pacific, both the jets and the Kuroshio extension are more nearly zonal. How jets interact with the wind-driven cirulation is considered in the quasi-geostrophic equations in a box ge ometry forced by i) a large scale wind, ii) a small scale stochastic forcing and iii) both. The first cas e is the classic midlatitude double gyre problem, the second has previously been used to model the jets an d the third allows us to consider interactions between the two. We focus primarily on the energetics.

  10. Zonal Toroidal Harmonic Expansions of External Gravitational Fields for Ring-like Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We present an expression of the external gravitational field of a general ring-like object with axial and plane symmetries such as oval toroids or annular disks with an arbitrary density distribution. The main term is the gravitational field of a uniform, infinitely thin ring representing the limit of zero radial width and zero vertical height of the object. The additional term is derived from a zonal toroidal harmonic expansion of a general solution of Laplace’s equation outside the Brillouin toroid of the object. The special functions required are the point value and the first-order derivative of the zonal toroidal harmonics of the first kind, namely, the Legendre function of the first kind of half integer degree and an argument that is not less than unity. We developed a recursive method to compute them from two pairs of seed values explicitly expressed by some complete elliptic integrals. Numerical experiments show that appropriately truncated expansions converge rapidly outside the Brillouin toroid. The truncated expansion can be evaluated so efficiently that, for an oval toroid with an exponentially damping density profile, it is 3000–10,000 times faster than the two-dimensional numerical quadrature. A group of the Fortran 90 programs required in the new method and their sample outputs are available electronically.

  11. A two-dimensional approach to modelling the short timescale zonal flow in Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, C.; Dumberry, M.

    2015-12-01

    Reconstructions of flow in Earth's outer core based on surface magnetic data predict mean zonal accelerations on several timescales. Since accelerations in the core couple to the angular momentum of the mantle, their existence has been confirmed by length-of-day observations. Recent studies suggest that free modes of torsional oscillations are responsible for relatively weak signals with a 5-6 year period. The mechanisms responsible for stronger decadal signals are less well understood.To address the problem, we construct a quasi-geostrophic model of magnetoconvection, with thermally-driven flows perturbing a steady, imposed background magnetic field. This approach is justified by the Taylor-Proudman theorem, in which velocities in a rapidly rotating system vary little parallel to the rotational axis. Using only two dimensions allows a much more rapid exploration of parameter space than traditional three-dimensional approaches.Our model is capable of producing mean zonal accelerations similar to those predicted by the geomagnetic reconstructions of Earth. In particular, we see a clear separation in period between the free modes (short) and forced modes (long) of torsional oscillations. We then systematically run the model with a variety of parameters, attempting to extrapolate our results to the conditions found in Earth's core.

  12. Characterization of the zonal wind flow in the stratosphere of Titan with UVES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, D.; Courtin, R.; Gautier, D.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Approuchaux, T.; Ferri, F.; Lara, L.; Kaufer, A.; Hourdin, F.

    2003-05-01

    We will report on recent efforts to characterize the zonal wind flow in Titan's stratosphere. We have used the UVES echelle spectrometer mounted at ESO's VLT-UT2 to obtain high-resolution solar spectra reflected off Titan. The purpose of the observations has been to detect the differential Doppler shift induced by the zonal wind flow in the back-scattered solar radiation from the East and West limbs of Titan. Since the wind speed should not exceed 200 m/s, an absolute detection of the shift on single solar lines is not feasible due to the limited spectral resolution of UVES. This is why we apply a retrieval scheme developed for stellar accelerometry (Connes 1985, ApSS 110, 211; Martyc et al. 1999, A&A 351, 993) which makes use of the full spectral range ( ˜4200 to 6200 Angstroms for the red arm of the instrument) and takes into account all the lines present in the spectrum. Our results strongly suggest that the wind is prograde, which will allow to reduce the error ellipse of the Huygens probe by one half. DL acknowledges financial support from the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (grant SFRH/BPD/3630/2000) and from Observatoire de Paris.

  13. Characterization of the Zonal Wind Flow in the Stratosphere of Titan with UVES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, D.; Courtin, R.; Gautier, D.; Ferri, F.; Appourchaux, T.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Cabane, M.; Rannou, P.; Hourdin, F.; Lara, L.; Kaufer, A.

    2002-09-01

    We will report on recent efforts to characterize the zonal wind flow in Titan's stratosphere. We used the UVES echelle spectrometer at the focus of the UT2 of the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile, to measure the reflection spectrum of Titan between 4200 and 6200 angstrom with a resolution of 80,000. The purpose of these observations, which were carried out in February 2002, is to detect the differential Doppler shift induced by the zonal wind flow between the East and West limbs of Titan. However, because the wind speed is not expected to exceed 200 m/s, an absolute detection of the Doppler shift on isolated solar lines is not feasible, even at the spectral resolution of UVES. Therefore, we have made use of a retrieval scheme developed for absolute stellar accelerometry (Connes 1985, ApSS 110, 211; Martic et al. 1999, A&A 351, 993) to extract the velocity signal by simultaneously taking into account all the lines present in the spectrum. We will describe the method and discuss preliminary results. Research supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie" of the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers (France). D. Luz acknowledges financial support by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, ref.SFRH-BPD-3630-2000.

  14. Zonal Toroidal Harmonic Expansions of External Gravitational Fields for Ring-like Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We present an expression of the external gravitational field of a general ring-like object with axial and plane symmetries such as oval toroids or annular disks with an arbitrary density distribution. The main term is the gravitational field of a uniform, infinitely thin ring representing the limit of zero radial width and zero vertical height of the object. The additional term is derived from a zonal toroidal harmonic expansion of a general solution of Laplace’s equation outside the Brillouin toroid of the object. The special functions required are the point value and the first-order derivative of the zonal toroidal harmonics of the first kind, namely, the Legendre function of the first kind of half integer degree and an argument that is not less than unity. We developed a recursive method to compute them from two pairs of seed values explicitly expressed by some complete elliptic integrals. Numerical experiments show that appropriately truncated expansions converge rapidly outside the Brillouin toroid. The truncated expansion can be evaluated so efficiently that, for an oval toroid with an exponentially damping density profile, it is 3000-10,000 times faster than the two-dimensional numerical quadrature. A group of the Fortran 90 programs required in the new method and their sample outputs are available electronically.

  15. A parallel finite-difference method for computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisshelm, Julie M.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-difference scheme for solving complex three-dimensional aerodynamic flow on parallel-processing supercomputers is presented. The method consists of a basic flow solver with multigrid convergence acceleration, embedded grid refinements, and a zonal equation scheme. Multitasking and vectorization have been incorporated into the algorithm. Results obtained include multiprocessed flow simulations from the Cray X-MP and Cray-2. Speedups as high as 3.3 for the two-dimensional case and 3.5 for segments of the three-dimensional case have been achieved on the Cray-2. The entire solver attained a factor of 2.7 improvement over its unitasked version on the Cray-2. The performance of the parallel algorithm on each machine is analyzed.

  16. Rossby-Khantadze Electromagnetic Planetary Waves Driven by Sheared Zonal Winds in the E-Layer Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futatani, S.; Horton, W.; Kahlon, L. Z.; Kaladze, T.

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear simulations are carried out for planetary scale [ >1000 km] electromagnetic Rossby and Khantadze planetary waves in the presence of a sheared zonal flow in the weakly ionized ionospheric E-layer. A variety of sheared flow profiles are studied. We shown that the nonlinear dynamics with the sheared zonal flows provides an energy source into the vortex structures. The energy transfer through the Reynolds stress tensor produces growth of the stable vortices under a variety of conditions. The energy accumulation breaks the vortex structure into multiple species according to the non-uniformity of profile of the external zonal shear flows. S. Futatani, W. Horton, T. D. Kaladze, Phys. Plasmas 20, 102903 (2013). T. D. Kaladze, L. Z. Kahlon, W. Horton. O Pokhotelov, and O. Onishenchenko, EPL 106, A05302 (2014).

  17. Analysis of the effects of zonal averaging on reaction rate calculations in two-dimensional atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, Jack A.

    1987-01-01

    The usual assumption by which chemical reaction rates are calculated in two-dimensional atmospheric models is by using a product of zonal means of rate coefficients and constituent concentrations rather than the rigorous zonal mean of the corresponding products. This assumption has been tested for the reactions O + NO2 yields NO + O2 and NO + O3 yields NO2 + O2 using mapped limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere data from the Nimbus 7 satellite and found to be quite satisfactory for winter 1979 at 60 deg N in the upper stratosphere. Relative differences between the two-dimensional averaged rate and the more rigorous rate, calculated from the full, longitudinally varying temperatures and mixing ratios, were small (usually below 5 percent) and exceeded 15 percent only during times of strong dynamical activity. At those times or locations where stratospheric circulation is primarily zonal, the two averages agreed to within a few percent.

  18. Relationship between eastern tropical Pacific cooling and recent trends in the Southern Hemisphere zonal-mean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, Kyle R.; Renwick, James A.; McGregor, James

    2016-08-01

    During 1979-2014, eastern tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures significantly cooled, which has generally been attributed to the transition of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation to its negative phase after 1999. We find the eastern tropical Pacific cooling to be associated with: (1) an intensified Walker Circulation during austral summer (December-February, DJF) and autumn (March-May, MAM); (2) a weakened South Pacific Hadley cell and subtropical jet during MAM; and (3) a strengthening of the circumpolar westerlies between 50 and 60°S during DJF and MAM. Observed cooling in the eastern tropical Pacific is linearly congruent with 60-80 % of the observed Southern Hemisphere positive zonal-mean zonal wind trend between 50 and 60°S during DJF (~35 % of the interannual variability), and around half of the observed positive zonal-mean zonal wind trend during MAM (~15 % of the interannual variability). Although previous studies have linked the strengthened DJF and MAM circumpolar westerlies to stratospheric ozone depletion and increasing greenhouse gases, we note that the continuation of the positive SAM trends into the twenty-first century is partially associated with eastern tropical Pacific cooling, especially during MAM when zonal wind anomalies associated with eastern tropical Pacific cooling project strongly onto the observed trends. Outside of DJF and MAM, eastern tropical Pacific cooling is associated with opposing zonal wind anomalies over the Pacific and Indian sectors, which we infer is the reason for the absence of significant positive SAM trends outside of DJF and MAM despite significant eastern tropical Pacific cooling seen during all seasons.

  19. Direct evidence of stationary zonal flows and critical gradient behavior for Er during formation of the edge pedestal in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, Jon

    2015-11-01

    High spatial resolution measurements with Doppler backscattering in JET have provided new insights into the development of the edge radial electric field during pedestal formation. The characteristics of Er have been studied as a function of density at 2.5 MA plasma current and 3 T toroidal magnetic field. We observe fine-scale spatial structure in the edge Er well prior to the LH transition, consistent with stationary zonal flows. Zonal flows are a fundamental mechanism for the saturation of turbulence and this is the first direct evidence of stationary zonal flows in a tokamak. The radial wavelength of the zonal flows systematically decreases with density. The zonal flows are clearest in Ohmic conditions, weaker in L-mode, and absent in H-mode. Measurements also show that after neutral beam heating is applied, the edge Er builds up at a constant gradient into the core during L-mode, at radii where Er is mainly due to toroidal velocity. The local stability of velocity shear driven turbulence, such as the parallel velocity gradient mode, will be assessed with gyrokinetic simulations. This critical Er shear persists across the LH transition into H-mode. Surprisingly, a reduction in the apparent magnitude of the Er well depth is observed directly following the LH transition at high densities. Establishing the physics basis for the LH transition is important for projecting scalings to ITER and these observations challenge existing models based on increased Er shear or strong zonal flows as the trigger for the transition. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium and has received funding from the Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018 under grant agreement No 633053. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the European Commission.

  20. Predictions of zonal wind and angular momentum by the NMC medium-range forecast model during 1985-89

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Richard D.; Salstein, David A.; Nehrkorn, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    This paper investigates the quality of weather predictions of the atmosphere's relative angular momentum (M) made by the most recent version of the NMC medium-range forecast model (MRF88) during December 1985-1989. It was found that, compared with older versions of MRF, bias errors in the MRF88 forecasts of M became more prominent, while random errors were not affected. Both types of errors in the M forecasts could be traced to problems with forecasts in the zonal mean zonal wind in the tropics.

  1. Competition for finite resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, L. Jonathan; Zia, R. K. P.

    2012-05-01

    The resources in a cell are finite, which implies that the various components of the cell must compete for resources. One such resource is the ribosomes used during translation to create proteins. Motivated by this example, we explore this competition by connecting two totally asymmetric simple exclusion processes (TASEPs) to a finite pool of particles. Expanding on our previous work, we focus on the effects on the density and current of having different entry and exit rates.

  2. An efficient finite element solution for gear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, C. G.; Parker, R. G.; Vijayakar, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    A finite element formulation for the dynamic response of gear pairs is proposed. Following an established approach in lumped parameter gear dynamic models, the static solution is used as the excitation in a frequency domain solution of the finite element vibration model. The nonlinear finite element/contact mechanics formulation provides accurate calculation of the static solution and average mesh stiffness that are used in the dynamic simulation. The frequency domain finite element calculation of dynamic response compares well with numerically integrated (time domain) finite element dynamic results and previously published experimental results. Simulation time with the proposed formulation is two orders of magnitude lower than numerically integrated dynamic results. This formulation admits system level dynamic gearbox response, which may include multiple gear meshes, flexible shafts, rolling element bearings, housing structures, and other deformable components.

  3. Effective Frequency Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, C. Laurence; Weng, Chi Y.

    2002-01-01

    An effective monochromatic frequency technique is described to represent the effects of finite spectral bandwidth for active and passive measurements centered on an absorption line, a trough region, or a slowly varying spectral feature. For Gaussian and rectangular laser line shapes, the effective frequency is shown to have a simple form which depends only on the instrumental line shape and bandwidth and not on the absorption line profile. The technique yields accuracies better than 0.1% for bandwidths less than 0.2 times the atmospheric line width.

  4. The effect of global warming on lightning frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Colin; Rind, David

    1990-01-01

    The first attempt to model global lightning distributions by using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM is reported. Three sets of observations showing the relationship between lightning frequency and cloud top height are shown. Zonally averaged lightning frequency observed by satellite are compared with those calculated using the GISS GCM, and fair agreement is found. The change in lightning frequency for a double CO2 climate is calculated and found to be nearly 2.23 x 10 exp 6 extra lightning flashes per day.

  5. Stochastic Closures for Finite Amplitude Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. L.; Lvov, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The theoretical paradigm of a self-consistent theory for the interaction of finite amplitude oceanic internal waves and its evolution from the resonant, infinitesimal amplitude limit are considered. The two limits are investigated using ray tracing techniques, analytic approximations to kinetic equations, and solutions for moments of a diffusive approximation to the resonant kinetic equation. We focus here on high frequency internal waves interacting with larger vertical and horizontal scale waves having inertial frequency. Tracing high frequency waves in one and two inertial wave backgrounds demonstrates that the infinitesimal amplitude and finite amplitude limits are phenomenologically distinct: the finite amplitude state is characterized by the coalescing of the two small scale members of the triad and a transition to a bound wave phenomena. This coalescence marks the transition to a strongly nonlinear parameter regime. Tracing high frequency waves in a stochastic background of inertial oscillations provides estimates of the evolution of the time mean and variance of wavenumber and intrinsic frequency. These estimates are compared to the evolution of the first and second moments of a diffusive approximation of the kinetic equation. In the finite but weakly nonlinear regime we find a diffusive characterization. In the strongly nonlinear limit we find an advective characterization. We next turn to the Finescale Paramterization of Polzin (2004, J. Phys. Oceanogr.), which has been used to successfully predict observations of turbulent dissipation. The Finescale Parameterization is an advective closure, and we demonstrate how it can be derived from resonant formula, which is a diffusive characterization. We conclude by considering application to the atmospheric internal wavefield.

  6. Translation operator for finite dmensional electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.Q. Jr.

    1981-04-01

    Computation of electromagnetic fields in particular applications is usually accompanied by the adhoc assumption that the field contains a finite number of degrees of freedom. Herein, this assumption is made at the outset. It is shown that if an annular region between two closed surfaces contains no sources or sinks and is isotropic, lossless and homogeneous, a unique translation operator can be defined algebraically. Conservation of energy defines the translation operator T to within an arbitrary unitary transformation. The conditions of causality, unitarity and energy conservation are shown to uniquely determine T. Both scalar and vector fields are treated. In both of these cases, frequency and time domain transforms are computed. The transform T is compared with the analagous one as derived from the time domain Stratton-Chu Formulation. The application to a radiation condition boundary constraint on finite difference and finite element computations is discussed.

  7. Mid- and low-latitude prompt-penetration ionospheric zonal plasma drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fejer, Bela G.; Scherliess, Ludger

    We have used ion drift observations from the DE-2 satellite to determine the latitudinal variation and the temporal evolution of mid- and low-latitude prompt penetration zonal plasma drifts driven by magnetospheric electric fields. Our results indicate that sudden increases in convection lead to predominantly westward perturbation drifts which decrease equartorwards and have largest amplitudes in the dusk-midnight sector. The diurnal perturbation drift patterns shift to later local times with increasing storm time and decay to new quasi-equilibrium values in about 2 hours, as the ring current readjusts to the new polar cap potential. The daily and latitudinal variations and temporal evolution of the DE-2 prompt penetration drifts are generally in good agreement with predictions from the Rice Convection Model, although the experimental results show larger amplitudes and longer shielding time constants.

  8. The long-term behavior of near-circular orbits in a zonal gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Richard A.

    1992-01-01

    A simple solution has been developed for the long term behavior of a near-circular orbit in a zonal gravity field. The solution is obtained by linearizing the singly averaged variational equations of motion and eliminating a degree of freedom with an integral of motion. The resulting solution is expressed in semiequinoctial elements (h and k), and has either an exponential or periodic form. The type of solution is dependent upon a stability factor determined by the inclination and the values of the gravity field coefficients. Frozen orbits correspond to the equilibrium solutions of the set of simplified variational equations. An approximate expression for the location of these orbits has been developed and can be useful for certain mission design applications.

  9. Small scale coherent vortex generation in drift wave-zonal flow turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z. B. Hahm, T. S.; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-12-15

    We present a paradigm for the generation of small scale coherent vortex (SSCV) in drift wave-zonal flow (DW-ZF) turbulence. We demonstrate that phases of DWs can couple coherently, mediated by the ZF shearing. A SSCV is formed when the phases of the DWs are “attracted” to form a stable “phase cluster.” We show that the ZF shearing induces asymmetry between “attractive” and “repulsive” phase couplings, so that a net attractive phase coupling results. The turbulent DWs will (partially)synchronize into a stable SSCV at locations, where the attractive phase coupling induced by the ZF shearing exceeds the “detuning” effects by the DW dispersion and random phase scattering. We also discuss the “self-binding” effect of the newly formed SSCV.

  10. Using box models to quantify zonal distributions and emissions of halocarbons in the background atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, J. W.; Nance, J. D.; Dutton, G. S.; Montzka, S. A.; Hall, B. D.; Miller, B.; Butler, J. H.; Mondeel, D. J.; Siso, C.; Moore, F. L.; Hintsa, E. J.; Wofsy, S. C.; Rigby, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Halocarbons and other Atmospheric Trace Species (HATS) of NOAA's Global Monitoring Division started measurements of the major chlorofluorocarbons and nitrous oxide in 1977 from flask samples collected at five remote sites around the world. Our program has expanded to over 40 compounds at twelve sites, which includes six in situ instruments and twelve flask sites. The Montreal Protocol for Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer and its subsequent amendments has helped to decrease the concentrations of many of the ozone depleting compounds in the atmosphere. Our goal is to provide zonal emission estimates for these trace gases from multi-box models and their estimated atmospheric lifetimes in this presentation and make the emission values available on our web site. We plan to use our airborne measurements to calibrate the exchange times between the boxes for 5-box and 12-box models using sulfur hexafluoride where emissions are better understood.

  11. The effect of zonal gradients of sea surface temperature on the Indian Ocean winter monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, C.

    1981-01-01

    Several global climate simulations by the 7-layer, 8 x 10 GISS climate model were designed to test the contributions of various surface boundary conditions to the global climate. The model was run with the sun fixed at a perpetual January. In a comparison of run #5, in which realistic January surface boundary conditions were used, with run #4, which was the same except that a zonally symmetric climatological January sea surface temperature (SST) field was used, one of the results was that run #5 provided a better simulation of the Indian Ocean monsoon. A further comparison of the wind fields over the Indian Ocean that were generated by these two model runs is presented.

  12. Radiative modelling by the zonal method and WSGG model in inhomogeneous axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méchi, Rachid; Farhat, Habib; Said, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Nongray radiation calculations are carried out for a case problem available in the literature. The problem is a non-isothermal and inhomogeneous CO2-H2O- N2 gas mixture confined within an axisymmetric cylindrical furnace. The numerical procedure is based on the zonal method associated with the weighted sum of gray gases (WSGG) model. The effect of the wall emissivity on the heat flux losses is discussed. It is shown that this property affects strongly the furnace efficiency and that the most important heat fluxes are those leaving through the circumferential boundary. The numerical procedure adopted in this work is found to be effective and may be relied on to simulate coupled turbulent combustion-radiation in fired furnaces.

  13. A parameterization of eddy transfer coefficients for two-level seasonal statistical dynamical zonally averaged models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neeman, Binyamin U.; Ohring, George; Joseph, Joachim H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines a parameterization of a quasi-geostrophic eddy transport that takes into account the time variation of eddy transfer coefficients according to Green's (1970) theory. It was found that, in the original eddy transfer relationship of Green, connecting the integral of the northward eddy entropy flux through midlatitudes with the second power of the difference in 500-mb entropy across the region of baroclinic activity, a value of 4 for the exponent is obtained when the temperature gradients at 500 mb are used. When the gradients at 1000 mb are used, an exponent of 1.5 is obtained. The differences in the powers in the eddy transfer relation were explored in a two-level zonally averaged model. It was found that an appropriate choice of power may be of special importance if the model is devised to simulate the seasonal climate cycle or to test astronomical changes inducing different seasonalities.

  14. Computational aspects of zonal algorithms for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Thomas, S. D.; Kaynak, U.; Gundy, K. L.; Flores, J.; Chaderjian, N. M.

    1985-01-01

    Transonic flow fields about wing geometries are computed using an Euler/Navier-Stokes approach in which the flow field is divided into several zones. The flow field immediately adjacent to the wing surface is resolved with fine grid zones and solved using a Navier-Stokes algorithm. Flow field regions removed from the wing are resolved with less finely clustered grid zones and are solved with an Euler algorithm. Computational issues associated with this zonal approach, including data base management aspects, are discussed. Solutions are obtained that are in good agreement with experiment, including cases with significant wind tunnel wall effects. Additional cases with significant shock induced separation on the upper wing surface are also presented.

  15. Proposed geomagnetic control of semiannual waves in the mesospheric zonal wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belmont, A. D.; Nastrom, G. D.; Mayr, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The polar semiannual oscillation in zonal wind explains midwinter weakening of the polar vortex and the relatively short stratospheric and mesospheric summer easterlies. The phase of the wind oscillation is equinoctial, as is the phase of the semiannual component in magnetic storm activity. For a given altitude, the contours of amplitude of the semiannual wind oscillation have less variability in geomagnetic than in geographic coordinates. It is suggested that the polar wind oscillations are caused by the semiannual maxima in magnetic storm activity, which lead to electron dissociation of O2 into O, in turn increasing ozone more rapidly than the dissociation of N2 destroys ozone, and inducing a semiannual variation in the thermal and wind fields. This implies that geomagnetic processes may cause or affect the development of sudden warmings. As the tropical semiannual wind oscillation is symmetric about the geomagnetic equator, the same processes may also influence the location of the tropical wind wave.

  16. Modes of zonal mean temperature variability 20-100 km from the TIMED/SABER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Sheng, Z.; Shi, H. Q.

    2014-03-01

    In this study we investigate the spatial variabilities of the zonal mean temperature (20-100 km) from the TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics)/SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) satellite using the empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). After removing the climatological annual mean, the first three EOFs are able to explain 87.0% of temperature variabilities. The primary EOF represents 74.1% of total anomalies and is dominated by the north-south contrast. Patterns in the second and third EOFs are related to the semiannual oscillations (SAO) and mesospheric temperature inversions (MTI), respectively. The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) component is also decomposed into the seventh EOF with contributions of 1.2%. Last, we use the first three modes and annual mean temperature to reconstruct the data. The result shows small differences are in low latitude, which increase with latitude in the middle stratosphere and upper mesosphere.

  17. Present-day secular variations in the zonal harmonics of earth's geopotential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitrovica, J. X.; Peltier, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    The mathematical formulation required for predicting secular variation in the geopotential is developed for the case of a spherically symmetric, self-gravitating, viscoelastic earth model and an arbitrary surface load which can include a gravitational self-consistent ocean loading component. The theory is specifically applied to predict the present-day secular variation in the zonal harmonics of the geopotenial arising from the surface mass loading associated with the late Pleistocene glacial cycles. A procedure is outlined in which predictions of the present-day geopotential signal due to the late Pleistocene glacial cycles may be used to derive bounds on the net present-day mass flux from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets to the local oceans.

  18. Effects of energetic particles on zonal flow generation by toroidal Alfvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Zonca, F.

    2016-09-01

    Generation of zonal flow (ZF) by energetic particle (EP) driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that nonlinear resonant EP contribution dominates over the usual Reynolds and Maxwell stresses due to thermal plasma nonlinear response. ZF can be forced driven in the linear growth stage of TAE, with the growth rate being twice the TAE growth rate. The ZF generation mechanism is shown to be related to polarization induced by resonant EP nonlinearity. The generated ZF has both the usual meso-scale and micro-scale radial structures. Possible consequences of this forced driven ZF on the nonlinear dynamics of TAE are also discussed.

  19. A zonal computational procedure adapted to the optimization of two-dimensional thrust augmentor inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, T. S.; Tavella, D. A.; Roberts, L.

    1985-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interaction methodology based on a zonal description of the flowfield is developed as a mean of predicting the performance of two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejectors. An inviscid zone comprising the irrotational flow about the device is patched together with a viscous zone containing the turbulent mixing flow. The inviscid region is computed by a higher order panel method, while an integral method is used for the description of the viscous part. A non-linear, constrained optimization study is undertaken for the design of the inlet region. In this study, the viscous-inviscid analysis is complemented with a boundary layer calculation to account for flow separation from the walls of the inlet region. The thrust-based Reynolds number as well as the free stream velocity are shown to be important parameters in the design of a thrust augmentor inlet.

  20. Zonal representation-based residual-wavefront reconstruction using multiframe Shack-Hartmann measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shiping; Zhang, Rongzhi; Li, Jisheng; Zou, Jianhua; Xu, Rong; Liu, Changhai

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric turbulence-induced wavefront deformation can be only partially corrected by adaptive optics (AO) techniques in astronomical or artificial space object imaging; an accurate estimation of the residual-wavefront phase is still needed to approach the diffraction-limited resolution. The discrete phase gradients measured by Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (SHWFS) can help with the estimation. In this study, we build a dynamic average slopes measurement model for SHWFS in short-exposure AO images postprocessing; the proposed model is based on a zonal representation of the wavefront phase using Bernstein basis polynomials instead of the traditional Zernike modal expansion. Further, the turbulence's frozen flow hypothesis is adopted to update the initial model using multiframe SHWFS measurement data to achieve a more accurate reconstruction. Numerical experiments show the reconstruction errors significantly decrease even in poor seeing conditions, and show that our method is less sensitive to different SHWFS measurement noise levels.

  1. Purification of large quantities of coxiella burnetii rickettsia by density gradient zonal centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Canonico, P G; Van Zwieten, M J; Christmas, W A

    1972-05-01

    The purification of large quantities of inactivated, phase II Coxiella burnetii by isopycnic zonal centrifugation for use as diagnostic antigen and as a vaccine is described. The fractionation of egg yolk sac-derived C. burnetii vaccine resulted in the separation of two distinct populations of organisms, each devoid of microscopically and serologically recognizable components of egg yolk sac. One population of organisms, characterized by an equilibrium density of 1.240, was rod shaped (1.0 by 0.5 mumole) with a thick, densely strained wall and prominent central body. The second population, with an equilibrium density of 1.280, had a coccobacillary shape (approximately 1 mumole in diameter), granular, sometimes fibrillar cytoplasm, thin cellular walls, and lacked a prominent nucleoid.

  2. Mean zonal acceleration and heating of the 70- to 100-km region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, S.; Portnyagin, Yu.I.; Forbes, J.M. ); Solovjeva, T.V. )

    1991-02-01

    The dynamical interactions which occur in the atmospheric region around the mesopause ({approximately} 90 km) determine the boundary characteristics for the thermospheric region above. In the present work, using an empirical model of Eulerian-mean meridional motions based on monthly climatological winds from these radar data, the net vertical motions in this atmospheric regime are derived from the continuity equation. Assuming empirical prescriptions of the mean density and temperature fields, mean heat flux divergences and momentum flux divergences are estimated which exhibit very specific characteristics in the height versus latitude domain for winter, summer, and equinox conditions in both hemispheres. A numerical circulation model including gravity wave/mean flow and tide/mean flow interactions is utilized to examine possible origins of these heat and acceleration sources. At low latitudes ({le}30{degree}), it is evident that atmospheric tides represent the primary wave source contribution to zonal mean acceleration and heating of this region of the atmosphere; similarly, at middle and high latitudes ({ge}30{degree}) below about 90 km, dissipation of vertically propagating gravity waves appears to provide the dominant momentum source for the mean zonal circulation. However, above approximately 90 km and between about 40{degree} and 70{degree} latitude, very significant regions of mean heating and acceleration exist which are not accounted for by the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves and tides. The possible origins of these effects are examined. The authors suggest that the two most likely candidates to explain these observed features are (1) obliquely propagating gravity waves and/or (2) planetary scale waves.

  3. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Peter M J; Affek, Hagit P; Ivany, Linda C; Houben, Alexander J P; Sijp, Willem P; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10-17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands.

  4. A zonally averaged, coupled ocean-atmosphere model for paleoclimate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Stocker, T.F.; Mysak, L.A. ); Wright, D.G. )

    1992-08-01

    A zonally averaged ocean model for the thermohaline circulation is coupled to a zonally averaged, one-layer energy balance model of the atmosphere to form a climate model for paleoclimate studies. The emphasis of the coupled model is on the ocean's thermohaline circulation in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian oceans. Under present-day conditions, the global conveyor belt is simulated. Latitude-depth structures of modeled temperature and salinity fields, as well as depth-integrated meridional transports of heat and freshwater, compare well with estimates from observations when wind stress is included. Ekman cells are present in the upper ocean and contribute substantially to the meridional fluxes at low latitudes.The atmospheric component of the coupled climate model consists of a classical balance model. When the two components are coupled after being spun up individually, the system remains steady. If intermittent convection is operating, the coupled model shows systematic deviations of the surface salinity, which may result in reversals of the thermohaline circulation. This climate drift can be inhibited by removing intermittent convection prior to coupling. The climate model is applied to investigate the effect of excess freshwater discharge into the North Atlantic, and the influence of the parameterization of precipitation is tested. The Atlantic thermohalinc flow is sensitive to anomalous freshwater input. Reversals of the deep circulation can occur in the Atlantic, leading to a state where deep water is formed only in the Southern Ocean. A feedback mechanism is identified that may also trigger the reversal of the Pacific thermobaline circulation yielding the inverse conveyor bell as an additional steady state. In total, four different stable equilibria of the coupled model were realized.

  5. Linear coupling of planetary scale waves in ionospheric zonal shear winds: Generation of fast magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanishvili, R.; Chagelishvili, G.; Uchava, E.; Kharshiladze, O.

    2016-04-01

    Our goal is to gain new insight into the physics of wave dynamics in ionospheric zonal shear flows. We study the shear flow non-normality induced linear coupling of planetary scale (slow) modified Rossby waves and westward propagating fast magnetized (Khantadze) waves using an approach different from the existing one to the linear wave dynamics. The performed analysis allows us to separate from each other different physical processes, grasp their interplay, and, by this way, construct the basic physics of the linear coupling of the slow and fast waves in an ionospheric zonal flow with linear shear of mean velocity, U0=(S y ,0 ) . It should be noted from the beginning that we consider incompressible flow and the classified "slow" and "fast" waves are not connected with the similarly labeled magnetosonic waves in compressible heliosphere. We show that: the modified Rossby waves generate fast magnetized waves due to the coupling for a quite wide range of ionospheric and shear flow parameters; the linear transient processes are highly anisotropic in wavenumber plane; the generation of the magnetized waves/oscillations is most efficient/optimal for S ≃0.1 (S is the shear rate normalized to the combination of the angular velocity and latitude, Ω0 cos θ0 ); the streamwise wave number of the optimally generated magnetized wave harmonics decreases (the length scale increases) with increasing the Hall parameter, α. At the end, we discuss nonlinear consequences of the described anisotropic linear dynamics—they should lead to an anisotropy of nonlinear cascade processes (in wavenumber plane). In turn, an interplay of the analyzed quite strong transient growth of the fast magnetic waves with anisotropic nonlinear processes should ensure self-sustenance of (stochastic or regular) magnetic perturbations.

  6. Characterization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities with respect to zonal vegetation in a coastal dune ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Ai; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2013-10-01

    Coastal dune vegetation distributes zonally along the environmental gradients of, e.g., soil disturbance. In the preset study, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in a coastal dune ecosystem were characterized with respect to tolerance to soil disturbance. Two grass species, Elymus mollis and Miscanthus sinensis, are distributed zonally in the seaward and landward slopes, respectively, in the primary dunes in Ishikari, Japan. The seaward slope is severely disturbed by wind, while the landward slope is stabilized by the thick root system of M. sinensis. The roots and rhizosphere soils of the two grasses were collected from the slopes. The soils were sieved to destruct the fungal hyphal networks, and soil trap culture was conducted to assess tolerance of the communities to disturbance, with parallel analysis of the field communities using a molecular ecological tool. In the landward communities, large shifts in the composition and increases in diversity were observed in the trap culture compared with the field, but in the seaward communities, the impact of trap culture was minimal. The landward field community was significantly nested within the landward trap culture community, implying that most members in the field community did not disappear in the trap culture. No nestedness was observed in the seaward communities. These observations suggest that disturbance-tolerant fungi have been preferentially selected in the seaward slope due to severe disturbance in the habitat. Whereas a limited number of fungi, which are not necessarily disturbance-sensitive, dominate in the stable landward slope, but high-potential diversity has been maintained in the habitat.

  7. The Influence of the Zonal Wave Three on Antarctic Sea Ice during Ice Advance Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, H. M.; Raphael, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Previous works have looked at the influence of key atmospheric circulation patterns on sea ice in the Antarctic in terms of the atmosphere's seasonal cycle. This study examines the influence of one of these atmospheric patterns, the zonal wave three (ZW3), in terms of the sea ice's seasons from 1979-2009 in order to better understand the response of the sea ice. An index to represent the amplitude of the ZW3 was calculated using zonal anomalies of 850 hPa geopotential heights taken from the ERA-Interim data set. Sea ice concentrations (SIC), taken from the Hadley Center sea ice and sea surface temperature data set, were found to be significantly positively correlated with the ZW3 index during the ice advance season (March to August) in the Ross and Weddell Seas and off the Amery ice shelf. These regions align with where cold, southerly flow associated with the ZW3 are found. In the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas region, SIC was found to be negatively correlated with the ZW3 index, which coincides with where the warm, northerly flow of the wave is found in this region. Regression analysis showed SIC to be significantly dependent upon the ZW3 in parts of the Ross Sea, the ice edge in the Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas and off the Amery ice shelf during ice advance season. The results suggest that the ZW3 plays a role in the occurrence of the observed sea ice trends in the Ross Sea, Amundsen-Bellingshausen Seas, Weddell Sea and off the Amery ice shelf regions during the ice advance season, the critical period for sea ice growth. The results also demonstrate that re-examining the influence of relevant atmospheric patterns on sea ice in terms of the ice's seasonal cycles could allow firmer connections to be established between sea ice trends and atmospheric patterns.

  8. Development of a Sea Ice Model for Use in Zonally Averaged Energy Balance Climate Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, L. D. Danny

    1988-12-01

    A sea ice model for use in zonally averaged energy balance climate models is presented which includes the following processes: surface melting, basal freezing and melting, lateral melting from ice-flee water or growth of new ice in leads, snowfall and the formation of white ice, ice advection, and a parameterized ice and snow thickness distribution which represents the effects of small-scale dynamics. The ice growth equations of Hibler are solved analytically, thereby permitting a gradual increase in zonal ice fraction in fall and winter. Both lateral and vertical melting lead to a continuous decrease of ice fraction during ice decay.The correlation between ice thickness and ice thickness sensitivity to the upward heat flux at the ice base is of opposite sign seasonally and latitudinally. The parameterized feedback between ice thickness and the minimum permitted lead fraction is found to be very important to the ice simulation, and is a process which needs to be studied using higher resolution, dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice models. The interaction between lateral melting and advection is crucial to the simulated rapid retreat of Southern Hemisphere ice area in spring. With uniform snow on ice, the introduction of an ice-thickness distribution increases mean annual ice thickness by up to 20%, but simultaneously introducing an ice and snow thickness distribution such that the ratio of snow to ice thickness is constant for each ice thickness category leads to increase of mean ice thickness of up to 90%. The effect on mean annual sea ice thickness of the parameterized surface albedo temperature dependence tends to increase with increasing latitude, even though the length of the melt season and incident solar radiation decrease with latitude. Model sensitivity to variation of time-step length from 1 to 6 days is insignificant.

  9. The Atlantic Multi-Decadal Oscillation Climate Impact - Zonal and Meridional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Rolf; Kirillov, Andrey; Valev, Dimitar; Atanassov, Atanas; Danov, Dimitar; Guineva, Veneta

    2016-07-01

    The Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation (AMO) shows a period of about 60-70 years. Over the time span from 1860 up to 2014 the AMO has had a strong climate impact on the Northern Hemisphere. The AMO is considered to be related to the Atlantic overturning circulation, but the origin of the oscillation is not fully understood up till now. To study the AMO impact on climate, the Hadcrut4, Crut4 and HadSST3 temperature data sets have been employed in the current study. The influence of the AMO on the zonal and meridional temperature distribution has been investigated in detail. The strongest zonal AMO impact was obtained in the Arctic region. The results indicated that the AMO influence on temperature at Southern latitudes was opposite in phase compared to the temperature influence in the Northern Hemisphere, in agreement with the well known heat transfer phenomenon from South to North Atlantic. In the Northern Hemisphere the strongest AMO temperature impact was found over the Atlantic and America. In the West from American continent, over the Pacific, the AMO impact was the lowest obtained over the whole Northern Hemisphere. The Rocky Mountains and Sierra Madre, connected with it southwards, built up an atmospheric circulation barrier preventing a strong propagation of the AMO temperature signal westerly. The amplitude of the AMO index itself was greater during summer-fall. However stronger AMO influence on the Northern Hemisphere temperatures was found during the fall-winter season, when the differences between the Northern Hemisphere temperatures and the temperatures in the tropics were the greatest.

  10. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Affek, Hagit P.; Ivany, Linda C.; Houben, Alexander J. P.; Sijp, Willem P.; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10–17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  11. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Peter M J; Affek, Hagit P; Ivany, Linda C; Houben, Alexander J P; Sijp, Willem P; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10-17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  12. The jovian anticyclone BA. II. Circulation and interaction with the zonal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Legarreta, J.; García-Melendo, E.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.; Pérez-Hoyos, S.

    2009-10-01

    In this second part of our study of the large jovian anticyclone BA we present detailed measurements of its internal circulation and numerical models of its interaction with the zonal jets and nearby cyclonic regions. We characterized the flow using high-resolution observations obtained by the Cassini spacecraft in December 2000 (9 months after the genesis of BA as a result of the merger of two large White Ovals), by the ACS camera onboard HST in January 2005 and April 2006 and by the New Horizons spacecraft in February 2007. Cloud motions were derived from high-resolution images using an automatic correlator that provides a large sampling of the motions in images separated by short time intervals (30 min-2 h). The internal wind structure did not change when the oval changed its color reddening in late 2005-early 2006 and all four datasets from 2000 to 2007 consistently show a similar wind regime: an asymmetric intense anticyclonic vortex with faster winds in its Southern portion with mean speeds of 110 m/s and peak velocities of 135 m/s. These speeds are slightly higher than those measured in the three White Ovals predecessors of BA by the Voyagers [Mitchell, J.L., Beebe, R.F., Ingersoll, A.P., Garneau, G.W., 1981. J. Geophys. Res. 86, 8751-8757] and Galileo [Vasavada, A.R., and 13 colleagues, 1998. Icarus 135, 265-275] but not as much as it has been recently reported [Simon-Miller, A.A., Chanover, N.J., Orton, G.S., Sussman, M., Tsavaris, I.G., Karkoschka, E., 2006. Icarus 185, 558-562; Cheng, A.F., and 14 colleagues, 2008. Astronom. J. 135, 2446-2452]. The asymmetry of the velocities in the vortex is a consequence of the interaction of BA with the zonal circulation and emerges as a natural result in high-resolution simulations of the vortex dynamics using the EPIC model.

  13. Self-generated zonal flows in the plasma turbulence driven by trapped-ion and trapped-electron instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Collard, M.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a study of zonal flows generated by trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode micro turbulence as a function of two plasma parameters—banana width and electron temperature. For this purpose, a gyrokinetic code considering only trapped particles is used. First, an analytical equation giving the predicted level of zonal flows is derived from the quasi-neutrality equation of our model, as a function of the density fluctuation levels and the banana widths. Then, the influence of the banana width on the number of zonal flows occurring in the system is studied using the gyrokinetic code. Finally, the impact of the temperature ratio T{sub e}/T{sub i} on the reduction of zonal flows is shown and a close link is highlighted between reduction and different gyro-and-bounce-average ion and electron density fluctuation levels. This reduction is found to be due to the amplitudes of gyro-and-bounce-average density perturbations n{sub e} and n{sub i} gradually becoming closer, which is in agreement with the analytical results given by the quasi-neutrality equation.

  14. Tracking Jupiter's Quasi-Quadrennial Oscillation and Mid-Latitude Zonal Waves with High Spectral Resolution Mid-Infrared Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greathouse, Thomas K.; Orton, Glenn S.; Cosentino, Rick; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Giles, Rohini Sara; Melin, Henrik; Encrenaz, Therese A.; Fouchet, Thierry; DeWitt, Curtis N.

    2016-10-01

    We report on early results of a long term observational study to track the temporal and 3-dimensional evolution of the Quasi-Quadrennial Oscillation (QQO) and the propagation and evolution of mid-latitude zonal waves in Jupiter's stratosphere. These wave-driven phenomena affect variations in Jupiter's vertical and horizontal temperature field, which can be inferred by measuring methane emission in the thermal infrared near 1245 cm-1. Using TEXES, the Texas Echelon cross-dispersed Echelle Spectrograph, mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) we observed high-spectral resolution (R=75,000) scan maps of Jupiter's equator to mid-latitudes from January 2012 through to the present. We will present the zonally averaged inferred thermal structure within ±30° latitude of the equator and between 10 and 0.01 mbar, showing the QQO's downward progression along with inferred 3-dimensional thermal maps (latitude, longitude, pressure) displaying a multitude of independent waves and eddies at various latitudes and pressures. These results reveal a vast array of wave activity on Jupiter and will serve to: 1) significantly improve the determination of the period and vertical descent velocity of Jupiter's QQO; 2) measure the zonal wavenumbers, vertical wavelengths, zonal group velocities and lifetimes of transient mid-latitude waves; and 3) record the thermal state of Jupiter's stratosphere in detail prior to, during, and after Juno's prime mission.

  15. The response of equatorial electrojet, vertical plasma drift, and thermospheric zonal wind to enhanced solar wind input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Lühr, Hermann; Fejer, Bela G.

    2016-06-01

    In this study we used observations from the CHAMP and ROCSAT-1 satellites to investigate the solar wind effects on the equatorial electrojet (EEJ), vertical plasma drift, and thermospheric zonal wind. We show that an abrupt increase in solar wind input has a significant effect on the low-latitude ionosphere-thermosphere system, which can last for more than 24 h. The disturbance EEJ and zonal wind are mainly westward for all local times and show most prominent responses during 07-12 and 00-06 magnetic local time (MLT), respectively. The equatorial disturbance electric field is mainly eastward at night (most prominent for 00-05 MLT) and westward at daytime with small amplitudes. In this study we show for the first time that the penetration electric field is little dependent on longitude at both the day and night sides, while the disturbance zonal wind is quite different at different longitude sectors, implying a significant longitudinal dependence of the ionospheric disturbance dynamo. Our result also indicates that the F region equatorial zonal electric field reacts faster than E region dynamo, to the enhanced solar wind input.

  16. Self-generated zonal flows in the plasma turbulence driven by trapped-ion and trapped-electron instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Collard, M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a study of zonal flows generated by trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode micro turbulence as a function of two plasma parameters—banana width and electron temperature. For this purpose, a gyrokinetic code considering only trapped particles is used. First, an analytical equation giving the predicted level of zonal flows is derived from the quasi-neutrality equation of our model, as a function of the density fluctuation levels and the banana widths. Then, the influence of the banana width on the number of zonal flows occurring in the system is studied using the gyrokinetic code. Finally, the impact of the temperature ratio Te/Ti on the reduction of zonal flows is shown and a close link is highlighted between reduction and different gyro-and-bounce-average ion and electron density fluctuation levels. This reduction is found to be due to the amplitudes of gyro-and-bounce-average density perturbations ne and ni gradually becoming closer, which is in agreement with the analytical results given by the quasi-neutrality equation.

  17. Changes to Saturn's zonal-mean tropospheric thermal structure after the 2010-2011 northern hemisphere storm

    SciTech Connect

    Achterberg, R. K.; Hesman, B. E.; Gierasch, P. J.; Conrath, B. J.; Fletcher, L. N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Flasar, F. M.

    2014-05-10

    We use far-infrared (20-200 μm) data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on the Cassini spacecraft to determine the zonal-mean temperature and hydrogen para-fraction in Saturn's upper troposphere from observations taken before and after the large northern hemisphere storm in 2010-2011. During the storm, zonal mean temperatures in the latitude band between approximately 25°N and 45°N (planetographic latitude) increased by about 3 K, while the zonal mean hydrogen para-fraction decreased by about 0.04 over the same latitudes, at pressures greater than about 300 mbar. These changes occurred over the same latitude range as the disturbed cloud band seen in visible images. The observations are consistent with low para-fraction gas being brought up from the level of the water cloud by the strong convective plume associated with the storm, while being heated by condensation of water vapor, and then advected zonally by the winds near the plume tops in the upper troposphere.

  18. Development of an upwind, finite-volume code with finite-rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molvik, Gregory A.

    1995-01-01

    Under this grant, two numerical algorithms were developed to predict the flow of viscous, hypersonic, chemically reacting gases over three-dimensional bodies. Both algorithms take advantage of the benefits of upwind differencing, total variation diminishing techniques and of a finite-volume framework, but obtain their solution in two separate manners. The first algorithm is a zonal, time-marching scheme, and is generally used to obtain solutions in the subsonic portions of the flow field. The second algorithm is a much less expensive, space-marching scheme and can be used for the computation of the larger, supersonic portion of the flow field. Both codes compute their interface fluxes with a temporal Riemann solver and the resulting schemes are made fully implicit including the chemical source terms and boundary conditions. Strong coupling is used between the fluid dynamic, chemical and turbulence equations. These codes have been validated on numerous hypersonic test cases and have provided excellent comparison with existing data. This report summarizes the research that took place from August 1,1994 to January 1, 1995.

  19. A statistical analysis of longitudinal dependences of upper thermospheric zonal winds at dip equator latitudes derived from CHAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, K.; Lühr, H.; Rentz, S.; Köhler, W.

    2007-08-01

    New observations, obtained by the accelerometer onboard the CHAMP satellite, reveal a detailed picture of the thermospheric zonal wind. Based on three years of data (2002 2004) we have studied the longitudinal dependence of the zonal delta wind (deviations from the zonal average) at the dip equator. The large number of passes (˜33 750) allows to consider several aspects of the wind characteristics at the same time. For this analysis we derived the longitudinal variation of the zonal delta wind at about 400 km altitude and investigated its dependence on solar flux, magnetic activity, and season. Major longitudinal dependences are confined to the morning hours, 03-09 local time (LT). The amplitude of the delta wind is approximately proportional to the latitudinal displacement of the magnetic dip equator from the geographic equator. The direction of the delta wind reverses sign between the June and December Solstices. During Equinox seasons these large scale features are almost absent. The flux level of solar EUV has no significant influence on the longitudinal variations. A dependence on magnetic activity could only be found during the post-sunset hours, 18-21 LT. Performing a Fourier transform of our delta wind velocities revealed a dominance of the wavenumber 4 in the Equinox data at some LT sectors. The wave-4 structure is a prevailing feature in the slowly precessing satellite frame, which has been recently reported, e.g. in nonmigrating tidal temperature measurements of the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite in the Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region. Therefore, this statistical study of zonal wind longitudinal dependences provides new observational evidence for the coupling of the various atmospheric layers by nonmigrating tides.

  20. Finite q-oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakishiyev, Natig M.; Klimyk, Anatoliy U.; Wolf, Kurt Bernardo

    2004-05-01

    The finite q-oscillator is a model that obeys the dynamics of the harmonic oscillator, with the operators of position, momentum and Hamiltonian being functions of elements of the q-algebra suq(2). The spectrum of position in this discrete system, in a fixed representation j, consists of 2j + 1 'sensor'-points x_s={\\case12}[2s]_q, s\\in\\{-j,-j+1,\\ldots,j\\} , and similarly for the momentum observable. The spectrum of energies is finite and equally spaced, so the system supports coherent states. The wavefunctions involve dual q-Kravchuk polynomials, which are solutions to a finite-difference Schrödinger equation. Time evolution (times a phase) defines the fractional Fourier-q-Kravchuk transform. In the classical limit as q rarr 1 we recover the finite oscillator Lie algebra, the N = 2j rarr infin limit returns the Macfarlane-Biedenharn q-oscillator and both limits contract the generators to the standard quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator.

  1. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  2. Neptune at summer solstice: Zonal mean temperatures from ground-based observations, 2003-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; de Pater, Imke; Orton, Glenn S.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Sitko, Michael L.; Irwin, Patrick G. J.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging and spectroscopy of Neptune’s thermal infrared emission from Keck/LWS (2003), Gemini-N/MICHELLE (2005); VLT/VISIR (2006) and Gemini-S/TReCS (2007) is used to assess seasonal changes in Neptune’s zonal mean temperatures between Voyager-2 observations (1989, heliocentric longitude Ls=236°) and southern summer solstice (2005, Ls=270°). Our aim was to analyse imaging and spectroscopy from multiple different sources using a single self-consistent radiative-transfer model to assess the magnitude of seasonal variability. Globally-averaged stratospheric temperatures measured from methane emission tend towards a quasi-isothermal structure (158-164 K) above the 0.1-mbar level, and are found to be consistent with spacecraft observations of AKARI. This remarkable consistency, despite very different observing conditions, suggests that stratospheric temporal variability, if present, is <±5 K at 1 mbar and <±3 K at 0.1 mbar during this solstice period. Conversely, ethane emission is highly variable, with abundance determinations varying by more than a factor of two (from 500 to 1200 ppb at 1 mbar). The retrieved C2H6 abundances are extremely sensitive to the details of the T(p) derivation, although the underlying cause of the variable ethane emission remains unidentified. Stratospheric temperatures and ethane are found to be latitudinally uniform away from the south pole (assuming a latitudinally-uniform distribution of stratospheric methane), with no large seasonal hemispheric asymmetries evident at solstice. At low and mid-latitudes, comparisons of synthetic Voyager-era images with solstice-era observations suggest that tropospheric zonal temperatures are unchanged since the Voyager 2 encounter, with cool mid-latitudes and a warm equator and pole. A re-analysis of Voyager/IRIS 25-50 μm mapping of tropospheric temperatures and para-hydrogen disequilibrium (a tracer for vertical motions) suggests a symmetric meridional circulation with cold air rising at mid

  3. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  4. Drift zonal plasma ionospheric in the Brazilian sector during a period of extreme low solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Tardelli-Coelho, Flavia Elaine

    2016-07-01

    The zonal drift velocities of the ionospheric plasma irregularities of large scale were analyzed; these irregularities were observed using optical emission techniques OI 630.0 nm obtained by photometers imagers installed in two locations on the campus of Urbanova UNIVAP in São José dos Campos - SP designated SJC and Campus ULBRA in Palmas - TO cited as PAL. Data were collected from five years, from 2006 to 2010, low solar activity period. Of the total of 337 nights in SJC and 329 nights in PAL analyzed were selected a total of 18 nights of significant plasma bubble occurrences, 9 nights in SJC and 9 nights in PAL, and studied under two conditions: considering fixed altitude of 280 km OI emission layer of 630.0 nm and calculating the height of this variable layer over each night analyzed. To find these varying altitudes along each night we were assisted with the analysis of CADI digital ionosonde data operating in conjunction with the imaging photometer in its observatory. The radio data available in digisonde allowed to do the analysis on 12 variables altitudes of 18 nights studied for fixed altitude; this occurred because of scattering present in ionograms for those nights and times, due to the presence of plasma bubbles in the study through the of the observatory zenith. Quantitative analysis determined the drift velocity zone for each of the analyzed bubbles 18 nights during the given fixed height and 12 nights evaluating varying altitudes along each night. The means were obtained nights analyzed in each observatory for both methods; SJC in the average velocities is derived from the plasma zone 9 nights bubbles analyzed in the method is fixed altitude 84 ± 18 m / s in the case of PAL the average velocities found is 87 ± 12 m / s. In the other case with variable altitude emission to SJC 8 nights analyzed, we reached a mean value of 87 ± 12 m / s, and for PAL, 4 of 9 nights initially selected, the average speed of the zonal drift plasma bubbles were found 85

  5. Global ozone observations from the UARS MLS: An overview of zonal-mean results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe W.; Read, William G.; Elson, Lee S.; Flower, Dennis A.; Jarnot, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    Global ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented, in both vertically resolved and column abundance formats. The authors review the zonal-mean ozone variations measured over the two and a half years since launch in September 1991. Well-known features such as the annual and semiannual variations are ubiquitous. In the equatorial regions, longer-term changes are believed to be related to the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), with a strong semiannual signal above 20 hPa. Ozone values near 50 hPa exhibit an equatorial low from October 1991 to June 1992, after which the low ozone pattern splits into two subtropical lows (possibly in connection with residual circulation changes tied to the QBO) and returns to an equatorial low in September 1993. The ozone hole development at high southern latitudes is apparent in MLS column data integrated down to 100 hPa, the MLS data reinforce current knowledge of this lower-stratospheric phenomenon by providing a height-dependent view of the variations. The region from 30 deg S to 30 deg N (an area equal to half the global area) shows very little change in the ozone column from year to year and within each year. The most striking ozone changes have occurred at northern midlatitudes, with the October 1992 to July 1993 column values significantly lower than during the prior year. The zonal-mean changes manifest themselves as a slower rate of increase during the 1992/93 winter, and there is some evidence for a lower fall minimum. A recovery occurs during late summer of 1993; early 1994 values are significantly larger than during the two previous winters. The timing and latitudinal extent of the northern midlatitude decreases appear to rule out observed ClO enhancements in the Arctic vortex, with related chemical processing and ozone dilution effects, as a unique cause. Local depletion from ClO-related chemical mechanisms alone is also not sufficient, based

  6. Local Finite-Amplitude Rossby Wave Activity as a Diagnostic for Wave Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. S. Y.; Nakamura, N.

    2014-12-01

    We generalize the zonal-mean finite-amplitude Rossby wave activity proposed by Nakamura and Zhu (2010) by allowing it to be a function of longitude. Its evolution is given by the divergence of the generalized Eliassen-Palm (E-P) flux, which is readily calculable from the wind field in the conservative limit. The relationship with the previously known finite-amplitude wave activity due to Killworth and McIntyre (1985), McIntyre and Shepherd (1987), and Haynes (1988) will be described. We will illustrate with idealized models how local wave activity may be used to define and identify the occurrence of wave breaking events. A preliminary application of the diagnostic to reanalysis products will be demonstrated and compared with previous studies of wave breaking statistics.

  7. Measurements of Seasonal Changes in Saturn's Zonal Wind and Vertical Wind Shear between 2004 and 2016 from Cassini ISS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, John J.; Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Ewald, Shawn P.

    2016-10-01

    We present updated zonal wind measurements of Saturn using Cassini ISS images between 2004 and 2016. In addition, we present measurements of the vertical wind shear between the cloud levels sensed in the near-infrared continuum band at 750 nm (CB2 filter) and the methane bands at 727 and 889 nm (MT2 and MT3 filters). We previously reported that there may be small seasonal changes in Saturn's zonal wind profile but it was inconclusive due to measurement uncertainties. In our previous reports, we used the zonal standard deviation of the wind vectors as a proxy for the measurement uncertainty. However, zonal standard deviation contains contributions from both real spatial variations in the wind speed as well as uncertainties in the measurements. This raised a difficulty in distinguishing small, real changes in the wind field from the uncertainties in the measurement. We have developed a technique which isolates real spatial variations from measurement uncertainties by analyzing the correlation fields produced in the two-dimensional Correlation Imaging Velocimetry (CIV) cloud-tracking wind measurement method. In our new method, for each single wind vector measurement, we fit an ellipse to the correlation threshold contour, and define it as the uncertainty ellipse of each wind vector. The advantage of our method is that it allows quantification of the anisotropic uncertainty components of each single wind vector, i.e., using the uncertainty ellipse, we deduce the northward, southward, eastward and westward uncertainties for each wind vector from the correlation peak. Comparing the uncertainty values of each wind vector to the zonal standard deviation of all wind vectors at each latitude allows us to decouple the real spatial variations in the wind from the measurement uncertainties. Using this technique, our measurements show small seasonal variations in Saturn's zonal wind profile as well as the vertical wind shear. As a next step, we plan to apply our uncertainty

  8. Effects of zonal harmonics on the out-of-plane equilibrium points in the generalized Robe's circular restricted three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagadish; Omale, Achonu Joseph

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the effects of the zonal harmonics on the out-of-plane equilibrium points of Robe's circular restricted three-body problem when the hydrostatic equilibrium shape of the first primary is an oblate spheroid, the shape of the second primary is an oblate spheroid with oblateness coefficients up to the second zonal harmonic, and the full buoyancy of the fluid is considered. It is observed that the size of the oblateness and the zonal harmonics affect the positions of the out-of-plane equilibrium points L6 and L7. It is also observed that these points within the possible region of motion are unstable.

  9. Site characterization, visualization, and uncertainty assessment using zonal kriging and conditional simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wingle, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    When evaluating a site, whether for oil, minerals, or contaminants in ground water, a principle concern is the distribution of material properties. A traditional approach has been to apply geostatistical methods such as kriging or conditional simulation. These approaches are based on the assumption of stationarity (i.e. that the spatial variation of properties is consistent across the site). At many sites, the stationarity assumption is not valid and can lead to inaccurate results. One approach to circumvent this limitation is to divide the area into zones where the stationarity assumptions are reasonable, krige each zone, and manually merge the results together. This approach has three major draw backs, (1) boundaries between zones are abrupt, (2) the merging process is tedious, and (3) there is no way to manage{open_quote}gradational{close_quote} boundaries. An integrated system which allows a modeler to: (1) define multiple, distinct zones within a model; (2) define zonal inter-relationships (e.g. Zone A grades into zone B. Zone C and Zone D have a sharp contact), and model the results using simple or ordinary kriging, or conditional simulation is presented. This technique is integrated into a modeling package which allows users to examine basic site statistics, develop and model semivariograms, krige and simulate material properties, model ground water flow and contaminant transport, assess risk or uncertainty, and visualize results with 2D, 2-1/2D, and 3D tools.

  10. Site characterization, visualization, and uncertainty assessment using zonal kriging and conditional simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wingle, W.L. )

    1996-01-01

    When evaluating a site, whether for oil, minerals, or contaminants in ground water, a principle concern is the distribution of material properties. A traditional approach has been to apply geostatistical methods such as kriging or conditional simulation. These approaches are based on the assumption of stationarity (i.e. that the spatial variation of properties is consistent across the site). At many sites, the stationarity assumption is not valid and can lead to inaccurate results. One approach to circumvent this limitation is to divide the area into zones where the stationarity assumptions are reasonable, krige each zone, and manually merge the results together. This approach has three major draw backs, (1) boundaries between zones are abrupt, (2) the merging process is tedious, and (3) there is no way to manage[open quote]gradational[close quote] boundaries. An integrated system which allows a modeler to: (1) define multiple, distinct zones within a model; (2) define zonal inter-relationships (e.g. Zone A grades into zone B. Zone C and Zone D have a sharp contact), and model the results using simple or ordinary kriging, or conditional simulation is presented. This technique is integrated into a modeling package which allows users to examine basic site statistics, develop and model semivariograms, krige and simulate material properties, model ground water flow and contaminant transport, assess risk or uncertainty, and visualize results with 2D, 2-1/2D, and 3D tools.

  11. Simulation of deep-seated zonal jets and shallow vortices in gas giant atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, Moritz; Gastine, Thomas; Wicht, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Jupiter's banded cloud layer hosts spots of various sizes. The bands are defined by eastward and westward jet streams and the spots correspond to vortices, predominantly anticyclones, which rotate in the opposite direction of Earth's cyclonic storms. Despite 350 years of observation, the origin and dynamics of jets and vortices in the atmospheres of giant planets remain debated. Simulations of the shallow weather layer produce both features, but only reproduce observed prograde equatorial flow on Jupiter and Saturn under special conditions. In contrast, deep convection models reproduce equatorial superrotation, but lack coherent vortices. Here we combine both approaches in a three-dimensional simulation where deep convection grades into a stably stratified shallow layer. We find that steady zonal jets are driven by deep convective flows, whereas anticyclonic vortices form where upwelling plumes impinge on the shallow layer. The simulated vortex circulation consists of cool anticyclones shielded by warm downwelling cyclonic rings and filaments, in agreement with observations and theory. We find that the largest vortices form in westward anticyclonic shear flow nearest to the equatorial jet, similar to Saturn's so-called storm alley and Jupiter's Great Red Spot. We conclude that vortices have a deep origin in gas giant atmospheres.

  12. Evapotranspiration Analysis using a Zonal Temperature-Vegetation Remote Sensing Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Gorelick, S.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing methods based on temperature-vegetation relationships have been widely used to analyze regional evapotranspiration (ET) patterns. These methods essentially rely on the identification of extreme soil moisture conditions (i.e., cold and hot pixels) as determined from the outer boundaries a triangle or trapezoid-shaped scatterplot of radiometric surface temperature and vegetation fraction. However, the validity of these pixels has been increasingly questioned in studies that involve heterogeneous climatic and land cover conditions, compromising the performance of remote sensing-based ET estimates in large areas. Here we developed a geospatial analysis scheme to discretize a targeted area into climate-land zones based on precipitation, radiation, wind, humidity, soil, and vegetation factors. Zonal ET estimates based on temperature-vegetation indexes were spatially aggregated to generate regional ET estimates over different time scales. We applied this approach to Jordan using Landsat and MODIS images over the period 2005-2014 and compared the ET estimates to MOD16 ET products and pan evaporation measurements. We explored contrasting hydrological conditions across a range of bioclimatic regions. Results show that our approach is able to capture regional ET heterogeneity in both water-limited and energy-limited environments and identify the hydroclimatic controls. Our comparisons of different methods shed light on the efficient estimation of agricultural water use in data-scarce, arid/semi-arid regions based on remote sensing.

  13. Flow Optimization in the Princeton MRI Experiment and Zonal Flow Generation in HTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspary, Kyle; Burin, Michael; Gilson, Erik; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao; McNulty, Michael; Schartman, Ethan; Sloboda, Peter; Wei, Xing

    2015-11-01

    The Princeton Magneto-Rotational Instability (MRI) experiment and the Hydrodynamic Turbulence Experiment (HTX) are a pair of modified Taylor-Couette devices which explore rotating magnetohydrodynamic and hydrodynamic flows. The Princeton MRI experiment uses a GaInSn working fluid and was designed to study the MRI, which is believed to be the mechanism responsible for the rapid accretion rate observed in some magnetized accretion disks. The experiment utilizes ultrasound Doppler velocimetry to measure velocity profiles and a newly installed suite of hall sensors on the inner and outer cylinders to characterize the magnetic field. Results are presented from experiments which seek to optimize the flow by varying the inner ring speed for a given magnetic field strength. In HTX, we explore the generation of zonal flows from turbulence by flow jets with water as the working fluid. Laser Doppler velocimetry is used to measure the mean and fluctuating velocity. The generation of anisotropic mean flow by means of beta plane turbulence is investigated through the use of a sloped end-cap. The impact of varying the end cap slope, fluid height and jet flow rate will be discussed.

  14. The zonally averaged transport characteristics of the atmosphere as determined by a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Two dimensional modeling has become an established technique for the simulation of the global structure of trace constituents. Such models are simpler to formulate and cheaper to operate than three dimensional general circulation models, while avoiding some of the gross simplifications of one dimensional models. Nevertheless, the parameterization of eddy fluxes required in a 2-D model is not a trivial problem. This fact has apparently led some to interpret the shortcomings of existing 2-D models as indicating that the parameterization procedure is wrong in principle. There are grounds to believe that these shortcomings result primarily from incorrect implementations of the predictions of eddy transport theory and that a properly based parameterization may provide a good basis for atmospheric modeling. The existence of these GCM-derived coefficients affords an unprecedented opportunity to test the validity of the flux-gradient parameterization. To this end, a zonally averaged (2-D) model was developed, using these coefficients in the transport parameterization. Results from this model for a number of contrived tracer experiments were compared with the parent GCM. The generally good agreement substantially validates the flus-gradient parameterization, and thus the basic principle of 2-D modeling.

  15. Exact two-dimensional zonal wavefront reconstruction with high spatial resolution in lateral shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Fengzhao; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangzhao; Bu, Yang

    2016-05-01

    A novel zonal method is proposed for exact discrete reconstruction of a two-dimensional wavefront with high spatial resolution for lateral shearing interferometry. Four difference wavefronts measured in the x and y shear directions are required. Each of the two shear directions is measured twice with different shear amounts. The shear amounts of the second measurements of the x and y directions are Sx+1 pixels and Sy+1 pixels, where Sx pixels and Sy pixels are the shear amounts of the first measurements in the x and y directions, respectively. The shear amount in each direction can be chosen freely, provided that it is below a maximum value determined by the pupil shape and the number of samples N in that direction; thus, the choices are not limited by the more stringent condition required by previous methods, namely, that the shear amounts must be divisors of N. This method can exactly reconstruct any wavefront at evaluation points up to an arbitrary constant if the data is noiseless, and high spatial resolution can be achieved even with large shear amounts. The method is applicable not only to square pupils, but also to general pupil shapes if a sufficient number of Gerchberg iterations are employed. In this study, the validity and capability of the method were confirmed by numerical experiments. In addition, the experiments demonstrated that the method is stable with respect to noise in the difference wavefronts.

  16. Landscape vision and zonal orientation in the Equatorial sandhopper Talorchestia martensii.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Alberto; Ciofini, Alice

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of the landscape in the zonal recovery of the Equatorial sandhopper Talorchestia martensii Weber. It is known that this species uses the sun and the magnetic compasses to return to the belt of damp sand of the beach following the shortest route (the sea-land axis). However, the sun is not always easy to use at Equatorial latitudes because of astronomical reasons (its zenithal culmination and its hourly azimuthal speed) at least during the central time of the day (around noon) and close to the equinox. Our experiments were performed in Kenya, during the equinoctial period. We tested adult individuals, belonging to Malindi (Kenya) population, in a confined environment with and without the vision of the landscape of their home beach and with the vision of the prominent landscape of a different-orientated shore (Temple Point). Releases were carried out with either natural or zeroed magnetic field. Results clearly show the importance of the landscape as an orienting factor mainly during the central hours of the day when it seems to assume a greater importance than magnetic cues. PMID:26512016

  17. Version 8 SBUV Ozone Profile Trends Compared with Trends from a Zonally Averaged Chemical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.; Frith, Stacey; Stolarski, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Linear regression trends for the years 1979-2003 were computed using the new Version 8 merged Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) data set of ozone profiles. These trends were compared to trends computed using ozone profiles from the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) zonally averaged coupled model. Observed and modeled annual trends between 50 N and 50 S were a maximum in the higher latitudes of the upper stratosphere, with southern hemisphere (SH) trends greater than northern hemisphere (NH) trends. The observed upper stratospheric maximum annual trend is -5.5 +/- 0.9 % per decade (1 sigma) at 47.5 S and -3.8 +/- 0.5 % per decade at 47.5 N, to be compared with the modeled trends of -4.5 +/- 0.3 % per decade in the SH and -4.0 +/- 0.2% per decade in the NH. Both observed and modeled trends are most negative in winter and least negative in summer, although the modeled seasonal difference is less than observed. Model trends are shown to be greatest in winter due to a repartitioning of chlorine species and the increasing abundance of chlorine with time. The model results show that trend differences can occur depending on whether ozone profiles are in mixing ratio or number density coordinates, and on whether they are recorded on pressure or altitude levels.

  18. Characterisation of antioxidants in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic leaf tissues of variegated Pelargonium zonale plants.

    PubMed

    Vidović, M; Morina, F; Milić-Komić, S; Vuleta, A; Zechmann, B; Prokić, Lj; Veljović Jovanović, S

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important signalling molecule, involved in regulation of numerous metabolic processes in plants. The most important sources of H2 O2 in photosynthetically active cells are chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Here we employed variegated Pelargonium zonale to characterise and compare enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidative system in autotrophic and heterotrophic leaf tissues at (sub)cellular level under optimal growth conditions. The results revealed that both leaf tissues had specific strategies to regulate H2 O2 levels. In photosynthetic cells, the redox regulatory system was based on ascorbate, and on the activities of thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) and catalase. In this leaf tissue, ascorbate was predominantly localised in the nucleus, peroxisomes, plastids and mitochondria. On the other hand, non-photosynthetic cells contained higher glutathione content, mostly located in mitochondria. The enzymatic antioxidative system in non-photosynthetic cells relied on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and both Mn and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Interestingly, higher content of ascorbate and glutathione, and higher activities of APX in the cytosol of non-photosynthetic leaf cells compared to the photosynthetic ones, suggest the importance of this compartment in H2 O2 regulation. Together, these results imply different regulation of processes linked with H2 O2 signalling at subcellular level. Thus, we propose green-white variegated leaves as an excellent system for examination of redox signal transduction and redox communication between two cell types, autotrophic and heterotrophic, within the same organ.

  19. Vaporization and Zonal Mixing in Performance Modeling of Advanced LOX-Methane Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Stiegemeier, Benjamin R.

    2013-01-01

    Initial modeling of LOX-Methane reaction control (RCE) 100 lbf thrusters and larger, 5500 lbf thrusters with the TDK/VIPER code has shown good agreement with sea-level and altitude test data. However, the vaporization and zonal mixing upstream of the compressible flow stage of the models leveraged empirical trends to match the sea-level data. This was necessary in part because the codes are designed primarily to handle the compressible part of the flow (i.e. contraction through expansion) and in part because there was limited data on the thrusters themselves on which to base a rigorous model. A more rigorous model has been developed which includes detailed vaporization trends based on element type and geometry, radial variations in mixture ratio within each of the "zones" associated with elements and not just between zones of different element types, and, to the extent possible, updated kinetic rates. The Spray Combustion Analysis Program (SCAP) was leveraged to support assumptions in the vaporization trends. Data of both thrusters is revisited and the model maintains a good predictive capability while addressing some of the major limitations of the previous version.

  20. Transient pressure analysis of fractured well in bi-zonal gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Yong-hui; Hu, Shu-Yong; Liu, Qi-Guo

    2015-05-01

    For hydraulic fractured well, how to evaluate the properties of fracture and formation are always tough jobs and it is very complex to use the conventional method to do that, especially for partially penetrating fractured well. Although the source function is a very powerful tool to analyze the transient pressure for complex structure well, the corresponding reports on gas reservoir are rare. In this paper, the continuous point source functions in anisotropic reservoirs are derived on the basis of source function theory, Laplace transform method and Duhamel principle. Application of construction method, the continuous point source functions in bi-zonal gas reservoir with closed upper and lower boundaries are obtained. Sequentially, the physical models and transient pressure solutions are developed for fully and partially penetrating fractured vertical wells in this reservoir. Type curves of dimensionless pseudo-pressure and its derivative as function of dimensionless time are plotted as well by numerical inversion algorithm, and the flow periods and sensitive factors are also analyzed. The source functions and solutions of fractured well have both theoretical and practical application in well test interpretation for such gas reservoirs, especial for the well with stimulated reservoir volume around the well in unconventional gas reservoir by massive hydraulic fracturing which always can be described with the composite model.

  1. Landscape vision and zonal orientation in the Equatorial sandhopper Talorchestia martensii.

    PubMed

    Ugolini, Alberto; Ciofini, Alice

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the role of the landscape in the zonal recovery of the Equatorial sandhopper Talorchestia martensii Weber. It is known that this species uses the sun and the magnetic compasses to return to the belt of damp sand of the beach following the shortest route (the sea-land axis). However, the sun is not always easy to use at Equatorial latitudes because of astronomical reasons (its zenithal culmination and its hourly azimuthal speed) at least during the central time of the day (around noon) and close to the equinox. Our experiments were performed in Kenya, during the equinoctial period. We tested adult individuals, belonging to Malindi (Kenya) population, in a confined environment with and without the vision of the landscape of their home beach and with the vision of the prominent landscape of a different-orientated shore (Temple Point). Releases were carried out with either natural or zeroed magnetic field. Results clearly show the importance of the landscape as an orienting factor mainly during the central hours of the day when it seems to assume a greater importance than magnetic cues.

  2. Optimizing zonal advection of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) dynamics for Intel MIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen H.

    2014-10-01

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is the most widely used community weather forecast and research model in the world. There are two distinct varieties of WRF. The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) is an experimental, advanced research version featuring very high resolution. The WRF Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM) has been designed for forecasting operations. WRF consists of dynamics code and several physics modules. The WRF-ARW core is based on an Eulerian solver for the fully compressible nonhydrostatic equations. In the paper, we will use Intel Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture to substantially increase the performance of a zonal advection subroutine for optimization. It is of the most time consuming routines in the ARW dynamics core. Advection advances the explicit perturbation horizontal momentum equations by adding in the large-timestep tendency along with the small timestep pressure gradient tendency. We will describe the challenges we met during the development of a high-speed dynamics code subroutine for MIC architecture. Furthermore, lessons learned from the code optimization process will be discussed. The results show that the optimizations improved performance of the original code on Xeon Phi 5110P by a factor of 2.4x.

  3. Zonal Dynamic Equivalents Based on the Concept of Relative Electrical Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Rimjhim; Dhadbanjan, Thukaram

    2013-05-01

    Abstract: This article presents a systematic approach to construct the zonal dynamic equivalents of a large-power system based on the concept of relative electrical distance (RED). The task of dynamic equivalencing is to eliminate the full model of the external system and replace it with an equivalent model, which has dynamic characteristics close enough to the full model. The dynamic equivalent models are used for large-scale power system offline transient stability analysis with large disturbance. Dynamic equivalencing also helps in reducing the computation burden and memory requirements in wide area monitoring system (WAMS) for online stability assessment. The procedure is illustrated on IEEE 39 bus system and on a practical 205 bus system consisting of three zones of Indian Southern grid, where an equivalent of a zone has been constructed. The simulation results of the original system and equivalent system are compared. The proposed approach is also compared with the existing Ward equivalent method and the results are found to be similar. The simulation results show that the developed equivalent system has close accuracy in representing the dynamic characteristics of the original system.

  4. Jupiter's Zonal Jets and Turbulent Eddies: the Importance of Moist Convective Processes on a Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, R. M. B.; Read, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first results from a general circulation model of Jupiter's weather layer that includes latent heat and moist convective processes on a global scale. This model uses the MITgcm as the dynamical core with additions relevant to Jupiter such as a 2-stream radiation scheme, vertical diffusion, internal heat flux, dry convective adjustment, MHD drag, a simple parametrization of NH3, NH4SH, and H2O cloud formation and subsidence, and, most recently latent heat and moist convective processes. The model has been developed primarily to examine the physical phenomena underlying the formation and maintenance of zonal jets on Jupiter, and the interactions between these and small-scale turbulent eddies, in particular how these depend on moist convective processes. Initial work without moist convection found a strong dependence of the strength and direction of the equatorial jet on the internal heat flux, including a prograde equatorial jet, but not at the speeds observed on the planet. We will also compare our model results against recent analyses of Jupiter's turbulence using kinetic energy spectra and structure functions, which show a clear upscale transfer of energy in the 3rd order structure function on scales larger than a few times the deformation radius.

  5. Estimates of the zonal slope and seasonal transport of the Atlantic North Equatorial Countercurrent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carton, James A.; Katz, Eli J.

    1990-01-01

    Data from six inverted echo sounder moorings and the Geosat satellite altimeter are used to examine the seasonal variability of sea surface elevation. Monthly sea level maps are constructed using a contemporaneous subsurface temperature survey to provide a reference sea level field. The maps are then used to describe the origin and structure of the western tropical Atlantic North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC) during a two-year period beginning in November 1987. The data reveal a zonal current which is confined between 3 deg N and 9 deg N with a typical width of 300 km. The NECC flows strongly eastward during November and December 1986 and May 1987 through January 1988. The reappearance of the current is then delayed until August, but the current flows strongly from August until the end of the record in October 1988. Volume transport is estimated for the two-year period from surface elevation by approximating the vertical structure of the ocean as a two-layer fluid. It is found that the NECC has a maximum transport of 40 x 10 to the 6th cu m/s at 38 deg W.

  6. Zonal mean flow excitation due to inertial waves propagating in the meridional plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelig, T.; Harlander, U.; Borcia, I. D.; Egbers, C.

    2012-04-01

    The large-scale oscillation of the atmosphere and oceans is organized by many processes. Waves are a main part. They transport momentum and transfer this locally to the environment. Slowly variating mean flows come into existence, that influence the variability of weather and climate. The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and equatorial deep jets (EDJ) are prominent examples for wave-driven mean flows. The rotation of the earth and associated propagating inertial waves are of main importance for such wave-mean flow interactions. Because of that, we want tho clarify theoretically and later experimentally, wether and how a mean flow will be excitated through inertial waves. We discuss a simple model for the inertial-wave-driven mean flow obtained from the primitive equations. Plumb [1] described the generation of a 'mean zonal motion' due to momentum transport of vertically propagating gravity waves. Based on the mathematical analogy we show that in the meridional plane, propagating inertial waves can transfer their momentum in the same manner to a sheared mean flow. Even an oscillating mean flow can be driven by the inertial waves in close analogy to gravity-wave-driven mean flow variations. [1] Plumb, R. A.: Momentum transport by the thermal tide in the stratosphere of Venus. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc. 101, 763-776 (1975)

  7. Zonally averaged thermal balance and stability models for nitrogen polar caps on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stansberry, John A.; Lunine, J. I.; Porco, C. C.; Mcewen, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    Voyager four-color imaging data of Triton are analyzed to calculate the bolometric hemispheric albedo as a function of latitude and longitude. Zonal averages of these data have been incorporated into a thermal balance model involving insolation, reradiation, and latent heat of sublimation of N2 ice for the surface. The current average bolometric albedo of Triton's polar caps is 0.8, implying an effective temperature of 34.2 K and a surface pressure of N2 of 1.6 microbar for unit emissivity. This pressure is an order of magnitude lower than the surface pressure of 18 microbar inferred from Voyager data (Broadfoot et al., 1989; Conrath et al., 1989), a discrepancy that can be reconciled if the emissivity of the N2 on Triton's surface is 0.66. The model predicts that Triton's surface north of 15 deg N latitude is experiencing deposition of N2 frosts, as are the bright portions of the south polar cap near the equator. This result explains why the south cap covers nearly the entire southern hemisphere of Triton.

  8. RESOLUTION OF THREE DISTINCT POPULATIONS OF NERVE ENDINGS FROM RAT BRAIN HOMOGENATES BY ZONAL ISOPYCNIC CENTRIFUGATION

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, Ursula; Baggiolini, Marco; Hauser, Rolf; Hodel, Christian

    1974-01-01

    Conditions have been established for the fractionation of subcellular components of rat forebrain homogenates by zonal isopycnic equilibration in continuous sucrose density gradients using a B-XIV rotor. The fractions were analyzed biochemically and by ultra-structural morphometry. Starting from postnuclear supernates of forebrain homogenates, it has been possible to resolve three distinct populations of nerve endings from one another, as well as from free mitochondria and myelin fragments. The three types of nerve endings differ in their apparent specific gravity, their biochemical properties, and their ability selectively to accumulate exogenous transmitter substances in vitro. These three particle populations are likely to represent, in order of increasing modal equilibrium density, (a) cholinergic nerve endings, characterized by their high content of acetylcholine, (b) γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-containing nerve endings with high glutamate decarboxylase activity and the ability to accumulate exogenous GABA, (c) adrenergic nerve endings that accumulate exogenous dopamine and noradrenaline and exhibit high monoamine oxidase activity. PMID:4363959

  9. A New Look at Titan's Zonal Winds from Cassini Radio Occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Schinder, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    We use the existing thirteen Cassini radio'occultation soundings to construct a meridional cross section of geopotential height vs. pressure and latitude. The assumption of balanced flow permits the construction of a similar cross section of zonal winds, from near the surface to the 0.1'mbar level. In the lower troposphere, the winds are approx.10 m/s, except within 20deg of the equator, where they are much smaller. The winds increase higher up in the troposphere to nearly 40 m/s in the tropopause region, but then decay rapidly in the lower stratosphere to near'zero values at 20 mbar (approx.80 km), reminiscent of the Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment result. This null zone extends over most latitudes, except for limited bands at mid'latitudes. Higher up in the stratosphere, the winds become larger. They are highest in the northern (winter) hemisphere. We compare the occultation results with the DWE and CIRS retrievals and discuss the similarities and differences among the data sets.

  10. Zonal flow and vortices with deep convection and shallow stable stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, M. H.; Gastine, T.; Wicht, J.

    2014-12-01

    Bands and vortices are the two main features of Jupiter's cloud layer. The bands correspond to zonal jets, with strong eastward flow near the equator, and alternating east-west jets at higher latitudes. The vortices are mostly anticyclonic, including the Great Red Spot, which drifts at a southern latitude in the first anticyclonic shear zone away from the equator. Although space missions and ground based observations have revealed beautiful and detailed images of cloud layer flow and thermal emissions, fundamental questions remain unanswered. How deeply are the jets and vortices seated? Why are most jovian vortices anticyclonic, opposite to cyclones on Earth? Previous investigations of planetary flows have focussed on either jets or vortices with few studies of systems that host both features. Here we study rotating convection using the benchmarked 3D spherical anelastic dynamo code MAGIC, with flow driven by convection at depth, but with a stably stratified outer layer. Our results show that multiple jets, which are driven by convection, penetrate deeper than vortices, which are confined to the shallow stably stratified layer. Due to computational limitations requiring high viscosity, model vortices have short lifetimes. Nevertheless, similar to the Great Red Spot, the largest model vortices occur in the lowest latitude anticyclonic shear bands, which form near the outer boundary latitudes corresponding to the inner boundary tangent cylinder. The dominance of anticyclonic vortices is explained simply in that they arise from ascending (divergent) plumes which are spun in the anticyclonic direction by the Coriolis force.

  11. Dependency of the North Pacific winter storm tracks on the zonal distribution of MJO convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun-Young; Lim, Gyu-Ho

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the effects of the tropical Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) convection on the zonal location and intensity of storm activity during the boreal cool season (Nov. 1 to Feb. 28, 120 days) over the Pacific Ocean. As tropical convection shifts eastward from the eastern Indian Ocean to the western North Pacific, MJO-induced local Hadley circulation leads to an eastward displacement of extratropical Rossby Wave Source (RWS). Consequently, this influence leads to an eastward shift of the peak area of the storm track. The storm track is strongest with the MJO convection over the eastern Indian Ocean (phase 3), and it experiences the suppression when MJO convection is located over the Maritime continents (phase 4), and it increases again when the MJO propagates to the western Pacific (phase 5), after which it weakens again (phase 6). The intensity of the storm track, particularly over the western North Pacific (120°E-180°), is determined by the integrated effects of three factors: the midlatitude convective forcing (MCF), the jet stream, and RWS. These factors are associated with the locations of MJO convections. It is estimated that MJO-induced suppression accounts for only 2.5% of the total observed midwinter suppression (MWS). However, the pattern generated by the MJO is remarkably similar to the observed meridional displacement of North Pacific storm track associated with sub-seasonal variation. We conclude that the spatial distribution of MJO affects the variation of the Pacific storm track, but is not a cause of the MWS.

  12. Composition of structural fragments and the mineralization rate of organic matter in zonal soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, A. A.; Zolotareva, B. N.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.; Kvitkina, A. K.; Kaganov, V. V.; Kudeyarov, V. N.

    2015-10-01

    Comparative analysis of the climatic characteristics and the recalcitrance against decomposition of organic matter in the zonal soil series of European Russia, from peat surface-gley tundra soil to brown semidesert soil, has assessed the relationships between the period of biological activity, the content of chemically stable functional groups, and the mineralization of humus. The stability of organic matter has been determined from the ratio of functional groups using the solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy of soil samples and the direct measurements of organic matter mineralization from CO2 emission. A statistically significant correlation has been found between the period of biological activity and the humification indices: the CHA/CFA ratio, the aromaticity, and the alkyl/ O-alkyl ratio in organic matter. The closest correlation has been observed between the period of biological activity and the alkyl/ O-alkyl ratio; therefore, this parameter can be an important indicator of the soil humus status. A poor correlation between the mineralization rate and the content of chemically stable functional groups in soil organic matter has been revealed for the studied soil series. At the same time, the lowest rate of carbon mineralization has been observed in southern chernozem characterized by the maximum content of aromatic groups (21% Corg) and surface-gley peat tundra soil, where an extremely high content of unsubstituted CH2 and CH3 alkyl groups (41% Corg) has been noted.

  13. A Pluto Central-Flash Occultation: Constraints on Haze Abundances, Temperature Profiles and Zonal Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot; Young, Leslie; Olkin, Cathy; Barth, Erika

    2014-05-01

    Central flashes occur in occultation light curves when the observing station is located close to the center of the shadow path. We observed a double-peaked central flash event on 31-JUL-2007 from the Mt John Observatory in New Zealand, in two filters simultaneously. A stellar occultation by Pluto in 2002 was observed from various telescopes on Mauna Kea over wavelengths spanning B- through K-bands and showed compelling evidence of a wavelength-dependent opacity source. Unlike the 2002 results, the 2007 central flash light curve shows no difference between the 0.5 and 0.7 micron light curves, suggesting that the haze observed in 2002 is a variable phenomenon. In the absence of haze, the height of the central flash peaks must be due to differential refraction; the peaks therefore provide strong constraints on the location and magnitude of a thermal inversion in Pluto's atmosphere at the time of the event. Finally, the relative height and spacing of the two central flash peaks are extremely sensitive constraints on Pluto's oblateness, which in turn can constrain the magnitude of zonal winds.

  14. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore » of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  15. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Wellman, G.; Gartling, D.

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.

  16. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Smith, M.; Sjaardema, G.

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or to another format.

  17. Accurate Finite Difference Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Two families of finite difference algorithms for computational aeroacoustics are presented and compared. All of the algorithms are single step explicit methods, they have the same order of accuracy in both space and time, with examples up to eleventh order, and they have multidimensional extensions. One of the algorithm families has spectral like high resolution. Propagation with high order and high resolution algorithms can produce accurate results after O(10(exp 6)) periods of propagation with eight grid points per wavelength.

  18. Finite Pressure Effects on Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Kramer; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Nazikian; C.Z. Cheng

    2004-09-03

    The inclusion of finite pressure in ideal-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory can explain the Reversed magnetic Shear Alfven Eigenmodes (RSAE) (or Alfven cascades) that have been observed in several large tokamaks without the need to invoke the energetic particle mechanism for the existence of these modes. The chirping of the RSAEs is cased by changes in the minimum of the magnetic safety factor, q(sub)min, while finite pressure effects explains the observed non-zero minimum frequency of the RSAE when qmin has a rational value. Finite pressure effects also play a dominant role in the existence of the downward chirping RSAE branch.

  19. The zonal movement of the Indian-East Asian summer monsoon interface in relation to the land-sea thermal contrast anomaly over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yun; Cao, Jie; Lan, Guangdong; Su, Qin

    2016-05-01

    Based on atmospheric circulation reanalysis, global gridded precipitation, and outgoing longwave radiation datasets, this study reveals the physical process through which the land-sea thermal contrast over East Asia interrelates with the variability of the interface between the Indian summer monsoon and East Asian summer monsoon (IIE). The results indicate that the release of latent heating exerted by the low-frequency variability of anomalous land-sea thermal contrast is one of the most important physical processes correlating with the zonal movement of the IIE, in which the release of latent heating over eastern East Asia makes the greatest contribution. When a lower apparent moisture sink occurs over the South China Sea but a higher one over southern China, an anomalously positive land-sea thermal contrast is formed. An anomalous convergent zone in relation to the positive land-sea thermal contrast, located in the eastern part of the IIE, will favor the IIE to move more eastward than normal, and vice versa. An anomalous divergent zone located in the eastern part of the IIE will benefit the IIE to shift more westward than normal. Experiments using a linear baroclinic model confirm the physical processes revealed by the observational analysis.

  20. The Role of Zonal Flows and Predator-Prey Oscillations in Triggering the L-H Transition and in Internal Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Peebles, W. A.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Tynan, G. R.; Boedo, J. A.; Solomon, W. M.

    2012-10-01

    Low frequency Zonal Flows (ZFs) have been observed to trigger the L-H transition near the power threshold, by either an extended predator-prey limit cycle oscillation (LCO [1]) or a short (˜0.5-1.5 ms) ZF burst executing only part of one limit cycle. Localized turbulence suppression (kθρs˜0.5) is initiated as the ZF shearing rate approaches the turbulence decorrelation rate. Turbulence-flow correlations (via Doppler Backscattering) show that the ZF amplitude and shear initially lag the rms fluctuation level by 90^o during LCO, transitioning to 180^o as the increasing ion pressure gradient and resulting equilibrium ExB shear secure the final transition to ELM-free H-mode. In a separate experiment, localized suppression of electron-scale fluctuations (kθρs˜3) by ZF shear is also observed in an internal thermal electron transport barrier. However, in contrast to the L-H transition, here the density fluctuation level is always anti-correlated (180^o out of phase) with the ZF shearing rate. 4pt[1] L. Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 155002 (2012).

  1. Temporal variation of the earth's low-degree zonal gravitational field caused by atmospheric mass redistribution - 1980-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. Fong; Au, Andrew Y.

    1991-01-01

    Temporal variations in the low-degree zonal harmonics of the earth's gravitational field have recently been observed by satellite laser ranging. A host of geophysical processes contribute to these variations. The present paper studies quantitatively a prime contributor, atmospheric mass redistribution, using ECMWF global surface pressure data for the period of 1980-1988. The annual and semiannual amplitudes and phases of the zonal J(l) coefficient with degree l = 2-6 with and without the oceanic inverted-barometer (IB) effect are computed to obtain the predicted effects on the orbit nodal residuals of Lageos and Starlette. These predicted values are then compared with observations. It is found that the atmospheric influence, combined with the hydrological influence agree well with the Lageos observation for the annual term. The corresponding match appears poorer for Starlette.

  2. Calculation of a residual mean meridional circulation for a zonal-mean tracer transport model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, W.K.; Rotman, D.A.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Because of their computational advantages, zonally-averaged chemical-radiative-transport models are widely used to investigate the distribution of chemical species and their change due to the anthropogenic chemicals in the lower and middle atmosphere. In general, the Lagrangian-mean formulation would be ideal to treat transport due to the zonal mean circulation and eddies. However, the Lagrangian formulation is difficult to use in practical applications. The most widely-used formulation for treating global atmospheric dynamics in two-dimensional models is the transformed Eulerian mean (TEM) equations. The residual mean meridional circulation (RMMC) in the TEM system is used to advect tracers. In this study, we describe possible solution techniques for obtaining the RMMC in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model. In the next section, the formulation will be described. In sections 3 and 4, possible solution procedures will be described for a diagnostic and prognostic case, respectively.

  3. Mars atmospheric dynamics as simulated by the NASA AMES General Circulation Model. I - The zonal-mean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Barnes, J. R.; Zurek, R. W.; Leovy, C. B.; Murphy, J. R.; Lee, H.; Schaeffer, J.

    1993-02-01

    The characteristics of the zonal-mean circulation and how it responds to seasonal variations and dust loading are described. This circulation is the main momentum-containing component of the general circulation, and it plays a dominant role in the budgets of heat and momentum. It is shown that in many ways the zonal-mean circulation on Mars, at least as simulated by the model, is similar to that on earth, having Hadley and Ferrel cells and high-altitude jet streams. However, the Martian systems tend to be deeper, more intense, and much more variable with season. Furthermore, the radiative effects of suspended dust particles, even in small amounts, have a major influence on the general circulation.

  4. Evidence for wavelike anomalies with short meridional and large zonal scales in the lower stratospheric temperature field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, J. L.; Short, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Global microwave brightness temperature measurements are analyzed to investigate the range of meridional wavelengths 2000-3000 km where spectral studies reveal larger than expected variance. The data, from the TIROS-N Microwave Sounding Unit, are sensitive to lower stratospheric temperatures (30-150 mb). The results reveal striking temperature anomalies with short meridional wavelengths (2000-3000 km) and long zonal wavelengths (zonal wavenumbers 1-4). The anomalies, with amplitudes approximately 1-2 K, extend from the equatorial region to at least as high as 70 deg N and 70 deg S during January 1979. The features exhibit slow eastward movement or else are nearly stationary for several days. In the Northern Hemisphere, comparison with NMC data reveals that the strongest features tend to be associated with major jet streams.

  5. High-Pass Filtering at Vestibular Frequencies by Transducer Adaptation in Mammalian Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songer, Jocelyn E.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian saccule detects head tilt and low-frequency head accelerations as well as higher-frequency bone vibrations and sounds. It has two different hair cell types, I and II, dispersed throughout two morphologically distinct regions, the striola and extrastriola. Afferents from the two zones have distinct response dynamics which may arise partly from zonal differences in hair cell properties. We find that type II hair cells in the rat saccular epithelium adapt with a time course appropriate for influencing afferent responses to head motions. Moreover, striolar type II hair cells adapted by a greater extent than extrastriolar type II hair cells and had greater phase leads in the mid-frequency range (5-50 Hz). These differences suggest that hair cell transduction may contribute to zonal differences in the adaptation of vestibular afferents to head motions.

  6. Mixed boundary conditions versus coupling with an energy-moisture balance model for a zonally averaged ocean climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornsson, H.; Mysak, L.A.; Schmidt, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Wright and Stocker oceanic thermohaline circulation model is coupled to a recently developed zonally averaged energy moisture balance model for the atmosphere. The results obtained with this coupled model are compared with those from an ocean-only model that employs mixed boundary conditions. The ocean model geometry uses either one zonally averaged interhemispheric basin (the {open_quotes}Atlantic{close_quotes}) or two zonally averaged basins (roughly approximating the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans) connected by a parameterized Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The differences in the steady states and their linear stability are examined over a wide range of parameters. The presence of additional feedbacks between the ocean circulation and the atmosphere and hydrological cycle in the coupled model produces significant differences between the latter and the ocean-only model, in both the one-basin and two-basin geometries. The authors conclude that due to the effects produced by the feedbacks in the coupled model, they must have serious reservations about the results concerning long-term climate variability obtained from ocean-only models. Thus, to investigate long-term climatic variability a coupled model is necessary. 31 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Jolliet, S.; McMillan, B. F.; Vernay, T.; Villard, L.; Hatzky, R.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the influence of the parallel nonlinearity on zonal flows and heat transport in global particle-in-cell ion-temperature-gradient simulations is studied. Although this term is in theory orders of magnitude smaller than the others, several authors [L. Villard, P. Angelino, A. Bottino et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 46, B51 (2004); L. Villard, S. J. Allfrey, A. Bottino et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 172 (2004); J. C. Kniep, J. N. G. Leboeuf, and V. C. Decyck, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 98 (2004); J. Candy, R. E. Waltz, S. E. Parker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 074501 (2006)] found different results on its role. The study is performed using the global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell codes TORB (theta-pinch) [R. Hatzky, T. M. Tran, A. Koenies et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 898 (2002)] and ORB5 (tokamak geometry) [S. Jolliet, A. Bottino, P. Angelino et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 177, 409 (2007)]. In particular, it is demonstrated that the parallel nonlinearity, while important for energy conservation, affects the zonal electric field only if the simulation is noise dominated. When a proper convergence is reached, the influence of parallel nonlinearity on the zonal electric field, if any, is shown to be small for both the cases of decaying and driven turbulence.

  8. Sequential differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in an agarose scaffold promotes a physis-like zonal alignment of chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jacqueline Frida; See, Kwee Hua; Hua, See Kwee; Yang, Zheng; Zheng, Yang; Hui, James Hoi Po; Po, James Hui Hoi; Lee, Eng Hin; Hin, Lee Eng

    2012-11-01

    Chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth plate (physis) differentiate and mature in defined linear zones. The current study examines the differentiation of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) into zonal physeal cartilage. hBMSCs were embedded in an agarose scaffold with only the surface of the scaffold in direct contact with the culture medium. The cells were differentiated using a two-step system involving the sequential addition of TGFβ followed by BMP2. The resultant samples displayed a heterogenic population of physis-like collagen type 2 positive cells including proliferating chondrocytes and mature chondrocytes showing hypertrophy, expression of early bone markers and matrix mineralization. Histological analysis revealed a physis-like linear zonal alignment of chondrocytes in varying stages of differentiation. The less mature chondrocytes were seen at the base of the construct while hypertrophic chondrocytes and matrix mineralization was observed closer to the surface of the construct. The described differentiation protocol using hBMSCs in an agarose scaffold can be used to study the factors and conditions that influence the differentiation, proliferation, maturation, and zonal alignment of physeal chondrocytes. PMID:22517299

  9. Response of the annual and zonal mean winds and temperatures to variations in the heat and momentum sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, E. K.

    1984-01-01

    Comparisons are made among solutions to zonal-mean equations obtained with parameterized friction and radiative cooling and those forced from specified heat and momentum sources. Budget equations are defined for zonally averaged steady state responses in a thin spherically rotating atmosphere. The heat sources and sinks and mean meridional circulation that maintain observed annual and zonal mean temperatures are identified with a diagnostic calculation. Estimates are made of the surface sensible heating, atmospheric latent heating and vertical flux eddy divergences. The heat and moisture sources and sinks are varied to obtain the steady state responses. The Hadley circulation is fairly insensitive to changes in the strength of the eddy momentum flux when sufficient internal friction is present. Varying the width of the total precipitation of the intertropical convergence zone with fixed eddy fluxes and extratropical heat sources yields conditions similar to El Nino. Finally, a minimum speed is found for the jet stream after varying the horizontal eddy momentum fixing latent and eddy heat sources.

  10. Zonal management of multi-purposes groundwater utilization based on water quality and impact on the aquifer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Ping; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Chen, Ching-Fang; Chen, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Groundwater is widely used for drinking, irrigation, and aquaculture in the Pingtung Plain, Southwestern Taiwan. The overexploitation and poor quality of groundwater in some areas of the Pingtung Plain pose great challenges for the safe use and sustainable management of groundwater resources. Thus, establishing an effective management plan for multi-purpose groundwater utilization in the Pingtung Plain is imperative. Considerations of the quality of the groundwater and potential impact on the aquifer of groundwater exploitation are paramount to multi-purpose groundwater utilization management. This study proposes a zonal management plan for the multi-purpose use of groundwater in the Pingtung Plain. The zonal management plan is developed by considering the spatial variability of the groundwater quality and the impact on the aquifer, which is defined as the ratio of the actual groundwater extraction rate to transmissivity. A geostatistical Kriging approach is used to spatially delineate the safe zones based on the water quality standards applied in the three groundwater utilization sectors. Suitable zones for the impact on the aquifer are then spatially determined. The evaluation results showing the safe water quality zones for the three types of utilization demands and suitable zones for the impact on aquifer are integrated to create a zonal management map for multi-purpose groundwater utilization which can help government administrators to establish a water resource management strategy for safe and sustainable use of groundwater to meet multi-purpose groundwater utilization requirements in the Pingtung Plain.

  11. Zonal management of multi-purposes groundwater utilization based on water quality and impact on the aquifer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Ping; Jang, Cheng-Shin; Chen, Ching-Fang; Chen, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Groundwater is widely used for drinking, irrigation, and aquaculture in the Pingtung Plain, Southwestern Taiwan. The overexploitation and poor quality of groundwater in some areas of the Pingtung Plain pose great challenges for the safe use and sustainable management of groundwater resources. Thus, establishing an effective management plan for multi-purpose groundwater utilization in the Pingtung Plain is imperative. Considerations of the quality of the groundwater and potential impact on the aquifer of groundwater exploitation are paramount to multi-purpose groundwater utilization management. This study proposes a zonal management plan for the multi-purpose use of groundwater in the Pingtung Plain. The zonal management plan is developed by considering the spatial variability of the groundwater quality and the impact on the aquifer, which is defined as the ratio of the actual groundwater extraction rate to transmissivity. A geostatistical Kriging approach is used to spatially delineate the safe zones based on the water quality standards applied in the three groundwater utilization sectors. Suitable zones for the impact on the aquifer are then spatially determined. The evaluation results showing the safe water quality zones for the three types of utilization demands and suitable zones for the impact on aquifer are integrated to create a zonal management map for multi-purpose groundwater utilization which can help government administrators to establish a water resource management strategy for safe and sustainable use of groundwater to meet multi-purpose groundwater utilization requirements in the Pingtung Plain. PMID:27343131

  12. Observed nocturnal gravity wave variances and zonal momentum flux in mid-latitude mesopause region over Fort Collins, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acott, Phil E.; She, C.-Y.; Krueger, David A.; Yan, Z.-A.; Yuan, Tao; Yue, Jia; Harrell, Sean

    2011-03-01

    Twenty-nine nights including 275 h measurements of temperature, zonal and meridional winds, and zonal momentum flux in the mesopause region were made between September 2006 and April 2007 with the Colorado State University (CSU) sodium lidar at Fort Collins, CO (40.6N, 105W). Perturbations with periods between 6 min and 4 h in temperature and winds were calculated and compared to the recently reported observations by a similar lidar located at Starfire Optical Range (SOR), NM (35N, 107W), showing general agreement. The seasonal means of the observed zonal momentum flux of these wave perturbations were found to be 0.12±0.46 m2 s-2 for the equinoctial season and -0.69±0.42 m2 s-2 for the winter season. These results are compared to two such observations in mid-latitude mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) in the literature, i.e., lidar observation at SOR and radar observation near Kyoto, Japan (35N, 106E). Both magnitudes and signs of the CSU lidar observations are consistent with those published.

  13. Recent intensification of the South and East Asian monsoon contrast associated with an increase in the zonal tropical SST gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kyung-Sook; Lee, June-Yi; Ha, Kyung-Ja

    2014-07-01

    Observed analysis of the 35 years of 1979-2013 reveals considerable interdecadal change and significant recent intensification in the difference of convective precipitation between the South Asian monsoon (SAM) and East Asian monsoon (EAM) systems during the major summer monsoon season (June-July). We propose that the recent strengthening of the zonal gradient of sea surface temperature (SST) between the Indian Ocean, western Pacific, and eastern Pacific is a possible cause for the intensification of the convective precipitation contrast. It is noted that the strengthening of the zonal SST gradient associated with the recent mega-La Niña trend tends to reinforce the negative connection between SAM and EAM systems by inducing enhanced convection over the maritime continent and then facilitating the northwestward emanation of Rossby waves. Consequently, a cyclonic circulation anomaly that effectively changes the local Hadley circulation has been formed over the SAM region, resulting in the noticeable difference between the SAM and EAM. The years 2013 and 1983 are further investigated as the strongest extreme years for positive and negative phases of submonsoon contrast, respectively. The result confirms that the meridional dipole height pattern along the Asian Jet stream, which is caused by the strong zonal gradient of tropical SST, serves as a key trigger in strengthening the submonsoon contrast.

  14. A New Generalized Thermal Wind Equation and its Application to Zonal Flows on the Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Philip; Tollefson, Joshua; de Pater, Imke

    2015-11-01

    For baroclinic, rapidly-rotating flows, the Thermal Wind Equation (TWE) describes how the flow varies along the rotation axis as a function of temperature gradients. The TWE works well for many laboratory and atmospheric flows on Earth. We show that the TWE also works well for the zonal (west-to-east) flows u on Jupiter. However, our recent observations of Neptune's zonal flows not only do not fit the TWE, but also have the incorrect ``sign.'' When an atmosphere's longitudinally-averaged temperature is warmer at the equator than at the mid-latitudes, the TWE indicates that u increases with height in the atmosphere. The change in u as a function of height on Neptune has the opposite sign. Here, we show that the high-velocities of u on Neptune make the cyclostrophic terms (i.e., some of the nonlinear terms proportional to u2) large, and these terms are dropped in the standard derivation of the TWE. When the cyclostrophic terms are retained, a more generalized TWE is obtained that both qualitatively and quantitatively agrees with the observations of the change in u as a function of height in Neptune's atmosphere. We show that both the standard and generalized TWE for zonal flows can be extended to the equator despite the fact that the Coriolis force vanishes there.

  15. A finite element simulation of sound attenuation in a finite duct with a peripherally variable liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Using multimodal analysis, a variational finite element method is presented for analyzing sound attenuation in a three-dimensional finite duct with a peripherally variable liner in the absence of flow. A rectangular element, with cubic shaped functions, is employed. Once a small portion of a peripheral liner is removed, the attenuation rate near the frequency where maximum attenuation occurs drops significantly. The positioning of the liner segments affects the attenuation characteristics of the liner. Effects of the duct termination are important in the low frequency ranges. The main effect of peripheral variation of the liner is a broadening of the attenuation characteristics in the midfrequency range. Because of matrix size limitations of the presently available computer program, the eigenvalue equations should be solved out of core in order to handle realistic sources.

  16. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  17. Finite state modeling of aeroelastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vepa, R.

    1977-01-01

    A general theory of finite state modeling of aerodynamic loads on thin airfoils and lifting surfaces performing completely arbitrary, small, time-dependent motions in an airstream is developed and presented. The nature of the behavior of the unsteady airloads in the frequency domain is explained, using as raw materials any of the unsteady linearized theories that have been mechanized for simple harmonic oscillations. Each desired aerodynamic transfer function is approximated by means of an appropriate Pade approximant, that is, a rational function of finite degree polynomials in the Laplace transform variable. The modeling technique is applied to several two dimensional and three dimensional airfoils. Circular, elliptic, rectangular and tapered planforms are considered as examples. Identical functions are also obtained for control surfaces for two and three dimensional airfoils.

  18. An experimental study of multiple zonal jet formation in rotating, thermally driven convective flows on a topographic beta-plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, P. L.; Jacoby, T. N. L.; Rogberg, P. H. T.; Wordsworth, R. D.; Yamazaki, Y. H.; Miki-Yamazaki, K.; Young, R. M. B.; Sommeria, J.; Didelle, H.; Viboud, S.

    2015-08-01

    A series of rotating, thermal convection experiments were carried out on the Coriolis platform in Grenoble, France, to investigate the formation and energetics of systems of zonal jets through nonlinear eddy/wave-zonal flow interactions on a topographic β-plane. The latter was produced by a combination of a rigid, conically sloping bottom and the rotational deformation of the free upper surface. Convection was driven by a system of electrical heaters laid under the (thermally conducting) sloping bottom and led to the production of intense, convective vortices. These were observed to grow in size as each experiment proceeded and led to the development of weak but clear azimuthal jet-like flows, with a radial scale that varied according to the rotation speed of the platform. Detailed analyses reveal that the kinetic energy-weighted radial wavenumber of the zonal jets, kJy, scales quite closely either with the Rhines wavenumber as kJy ≃ 2(βT/2urms)1/2, where urms is the rms total or eddy velocity and βT is the vorticity gradient produced by the sloping topography, or the anisotropy wavenumber as k J y ≃ 1 . 25 ( βT 3 / ɛ ) 1 / 5 , where ɛ is the upscale turbulent energy transfer rate. Jets are primarily produced by the direct quasi-linear action of horizontal Reynolds stresses produced by trains of topographic Rossby waves. The nonlinear production rate of zonal kinetic energy is found to be strongly unsteady, however, with fluctuations of order 10-100 times the amplitude of the mean production rate for all cases considered. The time scale of such fluctuations is found to scale consistently with either an inertial time scale, τ p ˜ 1 . / √{ u r m s β T } , or the Ekman spin-down time scale. Kinetic energy spectra show some evidence for a k-5/3 inertial subrange in the isotropic component, suggestive of a classical Kolmogorov-Batchelor-Kraichnan upscale energy cascade and a steeper spectrum in the zonal mean flow, though not as steep as k-5, as

  19. Zonal Wave Number 2 Rossby Wave (3.5-day oscillation) Over The Martian Lower Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Thokuluwa, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    to get decreasing monotonously to the statistically significant lowest power of 20 K^2 in the height of 450 Pascal level. Similar to the 0-30E longitude region, there is no significant wave in all the heights above the 450 Pascal level. The 190-230 E region shows similar wave characteristics (both the power and height structure) as observed for the 0-30 E region. This would indicate that the here reporting 3.5 day wave might be associated with eastward propagating (observed the zonal phase speed of ~0.5 days per 30 degree longitude) wave number 2 Rossby wave as the wave shows similar characteristics in the two longitude regions of 0-30E and 190-230 E with the longitudinal interval of 180 degrees. Peculiarly, in the 250-280 E region, the wave shows maximum power (120 K^2) in the two heights of 550 and 700 Pascal levels. As a further support for the zonal wave number 2 structure, there is no significant 3.5-day oscillation in all the height levels in the 290-320 E longitude region which is similar to what observed in the 35-60E longitude sector. A detailed investigation of this 3.5 day oscillation will be presented also for other periods of different years.

  20. Landscape and zonal features of the formation of producing economy in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizovtsev, Vyacheslav; Natalia, Erman

    2016-04-01

    Based on analysis of the extensive source base, including complex landscape, component, paleogeographic and archeological published and scientific materials as well as the connected analysis of published paleogeographical, paleolandscape and historical and geographic maps of the territory of Russia landscape and zonal features of the transition from appropriating economy to producing economy were determined. All the specifics of historical changes in the landscape use of the vast areas of Russia is caused by the variety of its landscape zones and the specifics of their constituent landscapes. Human economic activities as a factor of differentiation and development of landscapes became apparent almost in all landscape zones together with the emergence of the producing type of economy from the Aeneolithic-Bronze Age (Atlantic period) in the southern steppe regions (in the northern areas of the main centers of the producing economy) and from the Bronze Age in the forest areas. The emergence of the producing economy in the forest-steppe and steppe landscape zones on the territory of Russia is dated IV (Aeneolithic) - III (Early Bronze Age) millennium BC. It is from this period that on the European part of Russia and in Siberia the so-called Neolithic revolution begins. The use of copper and bronze axes helped to develop new areas for planting crops in the forest-steppe zone. In the forest-steppe zone swidden and lea tillage cultivation develops. In the steppe and forest-steppe Eurasia depending on the local landscape conditions two ways of producing economy with a predominance of cattle-breeding developed: nomadic cattle breeding and house cattle breeding with a significant influence of agriculture in the economy and long-term settlements. The steppe areas were completely dominated by the mobile nomadic herding, breeding cattle and small cattle. Along with the valley landscapes the interfluvial landscapes were also actively explored. Almost in all the steppe areas

  1. Finite order variational bicomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitolo, Raffaele

    1999-01-01

    The theory of variational bicomplexes was established at the end of the seventies by several authors [2, 17, 23, 26, 29-32]. The idea is that the operations which take a Lagrangian into its Euler-Lagrange morphism [9, 10, 12, 24] and an Euler-Lagrange morphism into its Helmholtz' conditions of local variationality [1-3, 7, 11, 13, 18, 27] are morphisms of a (long) exact sheaf sequence. This viewpoint overcomes several problems of Lagrangian formulations in mechanics and field theories [21, 28]. To avoid technical difficulties variational bicomplexes were formulated over the space of infinite jets of a fibred manifold. But in this formalism the information relative to the order of the jet where objects are defined is lost.We refer to the recent formulation of variational bicomplexes on finite order jet spaces [13]. Here, a finite order variational sequence is obtained by quotienting the de Rham sequence on a finite order jet space with an intrinsically defined sub-sequence, whose choice is inspired by the calculus of variations. It is important to find an isomorphism of the quotient sequence with a sequence of sheaves of ‘concrete’ sections of some vector bundle. This task has already been faced locally [22, 25] and intrinsically [33] in the case of one independent variable.In this paper, we give an intrinsic isomorphism of the variational sequence (in the general case of n independent variables) with a sequence which is made by sheaves of forms on a jet space of minimal order. This yields new natural solutions to problems like the minimal order Lagrangian corresponding to a locally variational Euler-Lagrange morphism and the search of variationally trivial Lagrangians. Moreover, we give a new intrinsic formulation of Helmholtz' local variationality conditions, proving the existence of a new intrinsic geometric object which, for an Euler-Lagrange morphism, plays a role analogous to that of the momentum of a Lagrangian.

  2. Sensitive Indicators of Zonal Stipa Species to Changing Temperature and Precipitation in Inner Mongolia Grassland, China

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaomin; Zhou, Guangsheng; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xiliang

    2016-01-01

    Climate change often induces shifts in plant functional traits. However, knowledge related to sensitivity of different functional traits and sensitive indicator representing plant growth under hydrothermal change remains unclear. Inner Mongolia grassland is predicted to be one of the terrestrial ecosystems which are most vulnerable to climate change. In this study, we analyzed the response of four zonal Stipa species (S. baicalensis, S. grandis, S. breviflora, and S. bungeana) from Inner Mongolia grassland to changing temperature (control, increased 1.5, 2, 4, and 6°C), precipitation (decreased 30 and 15%, control, increased 15 and 30%) and their combined effects via climate control chambers. The relative change of functional traits in the unit of temperature and precipitation change was regarded as sensitivity coefficient and sensitive indicators were examined by pathway analysis. We found that sensitivity of the four Stipa species to changing temperature and precipitation could be ranked as follows: S. bungeana > S. grandis > S. breviflora > S. baicalensis. In particular, changes in leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio could account for 86% of the changes in plant biomass in the four Stipa species. Also these three measurements were more sensitive to hydrothermal changes than the other functional traits. These three functional indicators reflected the combination of plant production capacity (leaf area), adaptive strategy (root/shoot ratio), instantaneous environmental effects (specific leaf area), and cumulative environmental effects (leaf area and root/shoot ratio). Thus, leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio were chosen as sensitive indicators in response to changing temperature and precipitation for Stipa species. These results could provide the basis for predicting the influence of climate change on Inner Mongolia grassland based on the magnitude of changes in sensitive indicators. PMID:26904048

  3. Mercury in the North Atlantic Ocean: The U.S. GEOTRACES zonal and meridional sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Katlin L.; Hammerschmidt, Chad R.; Lamborg, Carl H.; Swarr, Gretchen

    2015-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) in the ocean undergoes many chemical transformations, including in situ production of monomethylmercury (MMHg), the form that biomagnifies in marine food webs. Because the ocean is a primary and dynamic reservoir of Hg cycling at earth's surface and the principal source of human MMHg exposures through seafood, it is important to understand the distribution of Hg and its chemical species in marine environments. We examined total Hg, elemental Hg (Hg0), MMHg, and dimethylmercury (DMHg) with fully resolved high-resolution profiles during the U.S. GEOTRACES zonal and meridional sections of the North Atlantic Ocean (GEOTRACES GA03). Total Hg in filtered water had both scavenged- and nutrient-type vertical distributions, whereas concentrations of DMHg, Hg0, and filtered MMHg were increased in the oxygen deficient zone of the permanent thermocline across the basin, relative to water above and often below. Total Hg and MMHg on suspended particles accounted for less than 10% of total concentrations. The TAG hydrothermal vent on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) was a source of total Hg and MMHg to nearby waters with apparent scavenging and Hg transformation occurring in the buoyant plume. Uniquely, we observed significant horizontal segregation of filtered total Hg and MMHg, DMHg, and Hg0 in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) between younger water on the western and older water on the eastern side of the MAR. Relative to eastern NADW, Hg concentrations in western NADW were greater, on average, by 1.14× for filtered total Hg, 1.6× for Hg0, 2.5× for filtered MMHg, and 2.6× for DMHg. Total Hg enrichment in deep water of the western basin may have resulted from downwelling of anthropogenic Hg during NADW formation. Enrichment of MMHg, DMHg, and Hg0 in western basin NADW may be explained by either greater Hg substrate availability or greater methylation and reduction potentials in younger deep waters.

  4. A zonally averaged, three-basin ocean circulation model for climate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hovine, S.; Fichefet, T.

    1994-09-01

    A two-dimensional, three-basin ocean model suitable for long-term climate studies is developed. The model is based on the zonally averaged form of the primitive equations written in spherical coordinates. The east-west density difference which arises upon averaging the momentum equations is taken to be proportional to the meridional density gradient. Lateral exchanges of heat and salt between the basins are explicitly resolved. Moreover, the model includes bottom topography and has representations of the Arctic Ocean and of the Weddell and Ross seas. Under realistic restoring boundary conditions, the model reproduces the global conveyor belt: deep water is formed in the Atlantic between 60 and 70{degree}N at a rate of about 17 Sv (1 Sv=10{sup 6} m{sup 3}S{sup {minus}1}) and in the vicinity of the Antarctic continent, while the Indian and Pacific basins show broad upwelling. Superimposed on this thermohaline circulation are vigorous wind-driven cells in the upper thermocline. The simulated temperature and salinity fields and the computed meridional heat transport compare reasonably well with the observational estimates. When mixed boundary conditions i.e., a restoring condition no sea-surface temperature and flux condition on sea-surface salinity are applied, the model exhibits an irregular behavior before reaching a steady state characterized by self-sustained oscillations of 8.5-y period. The conveyor-belt circulation always results at this stage. A series of perturbation experiments illustrates the ability of the model to reproduce different steady-state circulations under mixed boundary conditions. Finally, the model sensitivity to various factors is examined. This sensitivity study reveals that the bottom topography and the presence of a submarine meridional ridge in the zone of the Drake passage play a crucial role in determining the properties of the model bottom-water masses. The importance of the seasonality of the surface forcing is also stressed.

  5. A bow-shaped thermal structure traveling upstream of the zonal wind flow of Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Makoto; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Imamura, Takeshi; Kouyama, Toru; Nakamura, Masato; Sato, Takao M.; Ueno, Munetaka; Suzuki, Makoto; Iwagami, Naomoto; Sato, Mitsuteru; Hashimoto, George L.; Takagi, Seiko; Akatsuki Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Longwave Infrared Camera (LIR) onboard the Japanese Venus orbiter Akatsuki acquires a snap shot of Venus in the middle infrared region, and provides a brightness temperature distribution at the cloud-top altitudes of about 65 km. Hundreds of images taken by LIR have been transferred to the ground since the successful Venus orbit insertion of Akatsuki on Dec. 7, 2015. Here we report that a bow shaped thermal structure extending from the northern high latitudes to the southern high latitudes was found in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, 2015, and that it lasted for four days at least surprisingly at almost same geographical position. The bow shape structure looks symmetrical with the equator, and consists of a high temperature region in east or upstream of the background strong westward wind or the super rotation of the Venus atmosphere followed by a low temperature region in west with an amplitude of 5 K. It appeared close to the evening terminator in the dayside, and seems not to have stayed in the same local time rather to have co-rotated with the slowly rotating ground where the western part of Aphrodite Continent was below the center of the bow shape. Meridionally aligned dark filaments similar to the bow shape structure in shape but in much smaller scale were also identified in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, and they propagated upstream of the zonal wind as well. The bow shape structure disappeared when LIR observed the same local time and longitude in the earliest opportunity on Jan. 16, 2016. Similar events, though their amplitudes were less than 1 K, were found on Apr. 15 and 26, 2016, but they appeared in different local times and longitudes. A simulation of a gravity wave generated in the lower atmosphere and propagating upward reproduces the observed bow shape structure. The bow shape structure could be a signature of transferring momentum from the ground to the upper atmosphere.

  6. Characterisation of antioxidants in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic leaf tissues of variegated Pelargonium zonale plants.

    PubMed

    Vidović, M; Morina, F; Milić-Komić, S; Vuleta, A; Zechmann, B; Prokić, Lj; Veljović Jovanović, S

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important signalling molecule, involved in regulation of numerous metabolic processes in plants. The most important sources of H2 O2 in photosynthetically active cells are chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Here we employed variegated Pelargonium zonale to characterise and compare enzymatic and non-enzymatic components of the antioxidative system in autotrophic and heterotrophic leaf tissues at (sub)cellular level under optimal growth conditions. The results revealed that both leaf tissues had specific strategies to regulate H2 O2 levels. In photosynthetic cells, the redox regulatory system was based on ascorbate, and on the activities of thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase (tAPX) and catalase. In this leaf tissue, ascorbate was predominantly localised in the nucleus, peroxisomes, plastids and mitochondria. On the other hand, non-photosynthetic cells contained higher glutathione content, mostly located in mitochondria. The enzymatic antioxidative system in non-photosynthetic cells relied on the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and both Mn and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Interestingly, higher content of ascorbate and glutathione, and higher activities of APX in the cytosol of non-photosynthetic leaf cells compared to the photosynthetic ones, suggest the importance of this compartment in H2 O2 regulation. Together, these results imply different regulation of processes linked with H2 O2 signalling at subcellular level. Thus, we propose green-white variegated leaves as an excellent system for examination of redox signal transduction and redox communication between two cell types, autotrophic and heterotrophic, within the same organ. PMID:26712503

  7. Global ozone observations from the UARS MLS: An overview of zonal-mean results

    SciTech Connect

    Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Read, W.G.; Elson, L.S.; Flower, D.A.; Jarnot, R.F.

    1994-10-15

    Global ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented, in both vertically resolved and column abundance formats. The authors review the zonal-mean ozone variations measured over the two and a half years since launch in September 1991. Well-known features such as the annual and semiannual variations are ubiquitous. In the equatorial regions, longer-term changes are believed to be related to the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), with a strong semiannual signal above 20 hPa. Ozone values near 50 hPa exhibit an equatorial low from October 1991 to June 1992, after which the low ozone pattern splits into two subtropical lows (possibly in connection with residual circulation changes tied to the QBO) and returns to an equatorial low in September 1993. The ozone hole development at high southern latitudes is apparent in MLS column data integrated down to 100 hPa, with a pattern generally consistent with Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measurements of total column; the MLS data reinforce current knowledge of this lower-stratospheric phenomenon by providing a height-dependent view of the variations. The region from 30{degrees}S to 30{degrees}N (an area equal to half the global area) shows very little change in the ozone column from year to year and within each year. Finally, residual ozone values extracted from TOMS-minus-MLS column data are briefly presented as a preliminary view into the potential usefulness of such studies, with information on tropospheric ozone as an ultimate goal. 99 refs., 13 figs.

  8. Vineyard zonal management for grape quality assessment by combining airborne remote sensed imagery and soil sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, I.; Martínez De Toda, F.; Martínez-Casasnovas, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    Vineyard variability within the fields is well known by grape growers, producing different plant responses and fruit characteristics. Many technologies have been developed in last recent decades in order to assess this spatial variability, including remote sensing and soil sensors. In this paper we study the possibility of creating a stable classification system that better provides useful information for the grower, especially in terms of grape batch quality sorting. The work was carried out during 4 years in a rain-fed Tempranillo vineyard located in Rioja (Spain). NDVI was extracted from airborne imagery, and soil conductivity (EC) data was acquired by an EM38 sensor. Fifty-four vines were sampled at véraison for vegetative parameters and before harvest for yield and grape analysis. An Isocluster unsupervised classification in two classes was performed in 5 different ways, combining NDVI maps individually, collectively and combined with EC. The target vines were assigned in different zones depending on the clustering combination. Analysis of variance was performed in order to verify the ability of the combinations to provide the most accurate information. All combinations showed a similar behaviour concerning vegetative parameters. Yield parameters classify better by the EC-based clustering, whilst maturity grape parameters seemed to give more accuracy by combining all NDVIs and EC. Quality grape parameters (anthocyanins and phenolics), presented similar results for all combinations except for the NDVI map of the individual year, where the results were poorer. This results reveal that stable parameters (EC or/and NDVI all-together) clustering outcomes in better information for a vineyard zonal management strategy.

  9. Large-scale tropical transients in aquaplanet simulations with zonally symmetric sea surface temperature distributions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Spectral analyses of sub-seasonal variations of tropical convection revealed features such as convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEW) and the Madden-Julian Oscillations (MJO) over a red noise background. In this work, the super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM) is used in aquaplanet experiments forced with zonally symmetric sea surface temperature distributions to investigate the roles of various processes in shaping the tropical spectra. Control experiments with the SPCAM model were able to produce the red noise background spectrum, CCEWs, and in some Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) configurations, “MJO-like” disturbances. To unravel the roles of various processes, experiments with simplified dynamics/settings are performed. In experiments where the large-scale dynamics in the model is largely linearized and with no feedbacks from radiative heating or surface sensible/latent heat and momentum fluxes, the spectra of large-scale tropical convectively coupled transients are dominated by the CCEWs, in ways generally consistent with results from the simple model of Andersen and Kuang (2008), and there are no red noise background spectra. Additional experiments show that the red noise aspect of the spectrum is mostly due to eddy stirring of the moisture field across its meridional gradient at the edge of the ITCZ, in particular the deep dry intrusions from the subtropics to the tropics. We will also discuss the effects of surface friction and idealized moist static energy sources, and use a simple model to understand these behaviors. It is hoped that through these and additional idealized studies, the various mechanisms that shape the tropical spectra can be elucidated. Ref:Andersen, J. A., Z. Kuang, A toy model of the instability in the equatorially trapped convectively coupled waves on the equatorial beta plane, Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 65, 3736-3757, (2008)

  10. Climate contributes to zonal forest mortality in Southern California's San Jacinto Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellows, A.; Goulden, M.

    2010-12-01

    An estimated 4.6 million trees died over ~375,000 acres of Southern California forest in 2002-2004. This mortality punctuated a decline in forest health that has been attributed to air pollution, stem densification, or drought. Bark beetles were the proximate cause of most tree death but the underlying cause of this extensive mortality is arguably poor forest health. We investigated the contributions that climate, particularly drought, played in tree mortality and how physiological drought stress may have structured the observed patterns of mortality. Field surveys showed that conifer mortality was zonal in the San Jacinto Mountains of Southern California. The proportion of conifer mortality increased with decreasing elevation (p=0.01). Mid-elevation conifers (White Fir, Incense Cedar, Coulter Pine, Sugar Pine, Ponderosa and Jeffrey Pine) died in the lower portions of their respective ranges, which resulted in an upslope lean in species’ distribution and an upslope shift in species’ mean elevation. Long-term precipitation (P) is consistent with elevation over the conifer elevation range (p=0.43). Potential evapotranspiration (ET) estimated by Penman Monteith declines with elevation by nearly half over the same range. These trends suggest that ET, more than P, is critical in structuring the elevational trend in drought stress and may have contributed to the patterns of mortality that occurred in 2002-04. Physiological measurements in a mild drought year (2009) showed late summer declines in plant water availability with decreasing elevation (p < 0.01) and concomitant reductions in carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance with decreasing elevation. We tie these observations together with a simple water balance model.

  11. Factorizations in finite groups

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikov, Viktor S

    2013-02-28

    A necessary condition for uniqueness of factorizations of elements of a finite group G with factors belonging to a union of some conjugacy classes of G is given. This condition is sufficient if the number of factors belonging to each conjugacy class is big enough. The result is applied to the problem on the number of irreducible components of the Hurwitz space of degree d marked coverings of P{sup 1} with given Galois group G and fixed collection of local monodromies. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  12. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

  13. Finite Element Analysis Code

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, G.; Forsythe, C.

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases into a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.

  14. Finite Element Analysis Code

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore » a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  15. Analysis of pressure perturbation sources on a generic space launcher after-body in supersonic flow using zonal turbulence modeling and dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, Vladimir; Sayadi, Taraneh; Meinke, Matthias; Schmid, Peter; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A sparsity promoting dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) combined with a classical data-based statistical analysis is applied to the turbulent wake of a generic axisymmetric configuration of an Ariane 5-like launcher at Ma∞ = 6.0 computed via a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large-eddy simulation (RANS/LES) method. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the wake flow dynamics of the generic launcher by clarification and visualization of initially unknown pressure perturbation sources on its after-body in coherent flow patterns. The investigated wake topology is characterized by a subsonic cavity region around the cylindrical nozzle extension which is formed due to the displacement effect of the afterexpanding jet plume emanating from the rocket nozzle (Mae = 2.52, pe/p∞ = 100) and the shear layer shedding from the main body. The cavity region contains two toroidal counter-rotating large-scale vortices which extensively interact with the turbulent shear layer, jet plume, and rocket walls, leading to the shear layer instability process to be amplified. The induced velocity fluctuations in the wake and the ultimately resulting pressure perturbations on the after-body feature three global characteristic frequency ranges, depending on the streamwise position inside the cavity. The most dominant peaks are detected at SrD r3 = 0.85 ± 0.075 near the nozzle exit, while the lower frequency peaks, in the range of SrD r2 = 0.55 ± 0.05 and SrD r1 = 0.25 ± 0.05, are found to be dominant closer to the rocket's base. A sparse promoting DMD algorithm is applied to the time-resolved velocity field to clarify the origin of the detected peaks. This analysis extracts three low-frequency spatial modes at SrD = 0.27, 0.56, and 0.85. From the three-dimensional shape of the DMD modes and the reconstructed modulation of the mean flow in time, it is deduced that the detected most dominant peaks of SrD r3 ≈ 0.85 are caused by the radial flapping motion of

  16. Formation mechanism for the amplitude of interannual climate variability in subtropical northern hemisphere: relative contributions from the zonal asymmetric mean state and the interannual variability of SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Lin, Ailan; Gu, Dejun; Li, Chunhui; Zheng, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The Amplitude Interannual climate Variability (AIV) differs among the subtropical northern hemisphere, and the Western North Pacific (WNP) was claimed to exhibit the largest AIV. The robustness of the AIV pattern is investigated in this study with different atmospheric variables from multiple datasets. As consistently shown by the interannual variance patterns of precipitation and circulation, the AIV over subtropical northern hemisphere closely follows the mean state of precipitation, where higher (lower) AIV is located at moister (drier) regions. The largest AIV is seen over the broad area from South Asia to WNP, followed by a secondary local maximum over the Gulf of Mexico. To further investigate the formation mechanism for the AIV pattern, numerical simulations are performed by Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4). The zonal asymmetry of AIV is reduced if the interannual SST variability is removed, and it almost disappears if the zonal asymmetry of SST mean state is removed. The results suggest that the zonal asymmetric AIV pattern primarily originates from the zonal asymmetric SST mean state, and it is amplified by the interannual SST variability. The atmospheric convection-circulation feedback plays a key role in connecting the AIV with the mean state precipitation. In both observation and CAM4 simulations, stronger (weaker) convection-circulation feedback is seen in moister (drier) regions. By modulating the mean state precipitation and the associated intensity of convection-circulation feedback, the zonal asymmetric SST mean state accounts for the zonal asymmetry of AIV in the subtropical northern hemisphere.

  17. Finite quantum gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modesto, Leonardo; Piva, Marco; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the one-loop exact beta function for a nonlocal extension of the standard gauge theory, in particular, Yang-Mills and QED. The theory, made of a weakly nonlocal kinetic term and a local potential of the gauge field, is unitary (ghost-free) and perturbatively super-renormalizable. Moreover, in the action we can always choose the potential (consisting of one "killer operator") to make zero the beta function of the running gauge coupling constant. The outcome is a UV finite theory for any gauge interaction. Our calculations are done in D =4 , but the results can be generalized to even or odd spacetime dimensions. We compute the contribution to the beta function from two different killer operators by using two independent techniques, namely, the Feynman diagrams and the Barvinsky-Vilkovisky traces. By making the theories finite, we are able to solve also the Landau pole problems, in particular, in QED. Without any potential, the beta function of the one-loop super-renormalizable theory shows a universal Landau pole in the running coupling constant in the ultraviolet regime (UV), regardless of the specific higher-derivative structure. However, the dressed propagator shows neither the Landau pole in the UV nor the singularities in the infrared regime (IR).

  18. Experimental and finite element studies on free vibration of skew plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, C. V.; Suresh, Y. J.; Prema Kumar, W. P.

    2014-03-01

    The present paper deals with the experimental and finite element studies carried out on free vibration of isotropic and laminated composite skew plates. The natural frequencies were determined using CQUAD8 finite element of MSC/NASTRAN and comparison made between the experimental values and the finite element solution. The effects of the skew angle and aspect ratio on the natural frequencies of isotropic skew plates were studied. The effects of skew angle, aspect ratio, fiber orientation angle and laminate stacking sequence (keeping total number of layers in the laminate constant) on the natural frequencies of antisymmetric laminated composite skew plates were also studied. The experimental values of the natural frequencies are in good agreement with the finite element solution. The natural frequencies generally increase with an increase in the skew angle for any given value of aspect ratio.

  19. Dynamical observer for a flexible beam via finite element approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manitius, Andre; Xia, Hong-Xing

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this view-graph presentation is a computational investigation of the closed-loop output feedback control of a Euler-Bernoulli beam based on finite element approximation. The observer is part of the classical observer plus state feedback control, but it is finite-dimensional. In the theoretical work on the subject it is assumed (and sometimes proved) that increasing the number of finite elements will improve accuracy of the control. In applications, this may be difficult to achieve because of numerical problems. The main difficulty in computing the observer and simulating its work is the presence of high frequency eigenvalues in the finite-element model and poor numerical conditioning of some of the system matrices (e.g. poor observability properties) when the dimension of the approximating system increases. This work dealt with some of these difficulties.

  20. Finite resolution multitarget tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mušicki, Darko; Morelande, Mark R.

    2005-09-01

    Target tracking algorithms have to operate in an environment of uncertain measurement origin, due to the presence of randomly detected target measurements as well as clutter measurements from unwanted random scatterers. A majority of Bayesian multi-target tracking algorithms suffer from computational complexity which is exponential in the number of tracks and the number of shared measurements. The Linear Multi-target (LM) tracking procedure is a Bayesian multi-target tracking approximation with complexity which is linear in the number of tracks and the number of shared measurements. It also has a much simpler structure than the "optimal" Bayesian multi-target tracking, with apparently negligible decrease in performance. A vast majority of target tracking algorithms have been developed with the assumption of infinite sensor resolution, where a measurement can have only one source. This assumption is not valid for real sensors, such as radars. This paper presents a multi-target tracking algorithm which removes this restriction. The procedure utilizes a simple structure of LM tracking procedure to obtain a LM Finite Resolution (LMfr) tracking procedure which is much simpler than the previously published efforts. Instead of calculating the probability of measurement merging for each combination of potentially merging targets, we evaluate only one merging hypotheses for each measurement and each track. A simulation study is presented which compares LMfr-IPDA with LM-IPDA and IPDA target tracking in a cluttered environment utilizing a finite resolution sensor with five crossing targets. The study concentrates on the false track discrimination performance and the track retention capabilities.