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Sample records for fire blight pseudomonas

  1. Antagonistic potential of Pseudomonas graminis 49M against Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight.

    PubMed

    Mikiciński, Artur; Sobiczewski, Piotr; Puławska, Joanna; Malusa, Eligio

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study (Mikiciński et al. in Eur J Plant Pathol, doi: 10.1007/s10658-015-0837-y , 2015), we described the characterization of novel strain 49M of Pseudomonas graminis, isolated from the phyllosphere of apple trees in Poland showing a good protective activity against fire blight on different organs of host plants. We now report investigations to clarify the basis for this activity. Strain 49M was found to produce siderophores on a medium containing complex CAS-Fe(3+) and HDTMA, but was not able to produce N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Moreover, it formed a biofilm on polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces. Strain 49M gave a positive reaction in PCR with primers complementary to gacA, the regulatory gene influencing the production of several secondary metabolites including antibiotics. The genes prnD (encoding pyrrolnitrin), pltC, pltB (pyoluteorin), phlD (2,4-diacetyl-phloroglucinol) and phzC as well as phzD (and their homologs phzF and phzA encoding phenazine), described for antagonistic fluorescent pseudomonads, however, were not detected. Research into the biotic relationship between strain 49M and Erwinia amylovora strain Ea659 on five microbiological media showed that this strain clearly inhibited the growth of the pathogen on King's B and nutrient agar with glycerol media, to a very small extent on nutrient agar with sucrose, and not at all on Luria-Bertani agar. On medium 925, strain 49M even stimulated E. amylovora growth. The addition of ferric chloride to King's B resulted in the loss of its inhibitory ability. Testing the survival of 49M in vitro showed its resistance to drought, greater than that of E. amylovora.

  2. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens EK007-RG4, a Promising Biocontrol Agent against a Broad Range of Bacteria, Including the Fire Blight Bacterium Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Roghayeh; Tarighi, Saeed; Behravan, Javad; Taheri, Parissa; Kjøller, Annelise Helene; Brejnrod, Asker; Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the first draft whole-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain EK007-RG4, which was isolated from the phylloplane of a pear tree. P. fluorescens EK007-RG4 displays strong antagonism against Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent for fire blight disease, in addition to several other pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. PMID:28360179

  3. Control of fire blight by Pseudomonas fluorescens A506 and Pantoea vagans C9-1 applied as single strains and mixed inocula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The biological control agents Pseudomonas fluorescens A506 and Pantoea vagans C9-1 were evaluated individually and in combination for the suppression of fire blight of pear or apple in ten field trials inoculated with the pathogen Erwinia amylovora. The formulation of pathogen inoculum applied to b...

  4. Improvement of a dry formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens EPS62e for fire blight disease biocontrol by combination of culture osmoadaptation with a freeze-drying lyoprotectant.

    PubMed

    Cabrefiga, J; Francés, J; Montesinos, E; Bonaterra, A

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of lyoprotectants and osmoadaptation on viability of Pseudomonas fluorescens EPS62e during freeze-drying and storage and to evaluate the formulation in terms of efficacy in biocontrol and fitness on pear flowers. A wettable powder formulation of a biocontrol agent of fire blight was optimized by means of lyoprotectants and culture osmoadaptation. Freeze-drying was used to obtain dehydrated cells, and the best viability (70% of survival) was obtained using lactose as lyoprotectant. Survival during lyophilization was additionally improved using physiological adaptation of cells during cultivation under salt-amended medium (osmoadaptation). The procedure increased the survival of cells after freeze-drying attaining viability values close to a 100% in the lactose-formulated product (3 × 10(11) CFU g(-1) ), and through the storage period of 1 year at 4°C. The dry formulation showed also an improved biocontrol efficacy and survival of EPS62e on pear flowers under low relative humidity conditions. Cell viability after freeze-drying was improved using lactose as lyoprotectant combined with a procedure of osmoadaptation during cultivation. The powder-formulated product remained active for 12 months and retained biocontrol levels similar to that of fresh cells. The formulation showed an improved survival of EPS62e on flowers and an increase of the efficacy of biocontrol of fire blight at low relative humidity. The results have a potential value for commercial application in biocontrol agents not only of fire blight but also of other plant diseases. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Pseudomonas blight discovered on raspberry in Watsonville

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the winter (February) of 2013, a field of raspberries in Watsonville was discovered to be infected with Pseudomonas syringae, the causal agent of Pseudomonas blight disease. This was the first documentation of this disease on raspberry in our region. The infection of raspberry plants is manifeste...

  6. [Erwinia amylovora--the fire blight pathogen of trees in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, L M; Moroz, S N; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E; Gvozdiak, R I; Patyka, V F

    2014-01-01

    Niduses of fire blight of fruit and ornamental trees have been found in the Kyiv and Vinnitsa regions of Ukraine. Pathogen Erwinia amylovora was isolated between April and October. The pathogen was often accompanied by bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Artificial infection with a mixture of bacteria E. amylovora and P. syringae pv. syringae accelerates and enhances the disease process in the laboratory.

  7. Analysis of fire blight shott infection epidemics on apple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight incidence and spread of the shoot blight phase of the disease was studied in four apple cultivars in replicated blocks over four years (1994 - 1997). The cultivar ‘York’ was highly susceptible, followed by ‘Fuji’ and ‘Golden Delicious’ which were moderately susceptible, and ‘Liberty’ wh...

  8. Pseudomonas blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae on raspberry in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plantings of red raspberry (Rubus idaeus var. strigosus) exhibited symptoms of a previously undocumented disease. Lesions were observable from both adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces. As disease progressed, lesions enlarged and coalesced, resulting in significant dark brown to black blighting of the ...

  9. Assessment of the Environmental Fate of the Biological Control Agent of Fire Blight, Pseudomonas fluorescens EPS62e, on Apple by Culture and Real-Time PCR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Marta; Badosa, Esther; Manceau, Charles; Montesinos, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    The colonization of apple blossoms and leaves by Pseudomonas fluorescens EPS62e was monitored in greenhouse and field trials using cultivable cell counting and real-time PCR. The real-time PCR provided a specific quantitative method for the detection of strain EPS62e. The detection level was around 102 cells g (fresh weight)−1 and the standard curve was linear within a 5-log range. EPS62e actively colonized flowers reaching values from 107 to 108 cells per blossom. In apple flowers, no significant differences were observed between population levels obtained by real-time PCR and plating, suggesting that viable but nonculturable (VBNC) cells and residual nondegraded DNA were not present. In contrast, on apple leaves, where cultivable populations of EPS62e decreased with time, significant differences were observed between real-time PCR and plating. These differences indicate the presence of VBNC cells or nondegraded DNA after cell death. Therefore, the EPS62e population was under optimal conditions during the colonization of flowers but it was stressed and poorly survived on leaves. It was concluded that for monitoring this biological control agent, the combined use of cultivable cell count and real-time PCR is necessary. PMID:16597940

  10. Fire blight resistance in wild accessions of Malus sieversii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) is a devastating bacterial disease in apple that results in severe economic losses. Epidemics are becoming more common as susceptible cultivars and rootstocks are being planted, and control is becoming more difficult as antibiotic-resistant strains develop. Resistan...

  11. Flower biology and biologically-based integrated fire blight management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight infection is generally initiated in flowers, and thus, research has been directed to the biology and microbial ecology of flowers as related to this disease. In addition to investigations involving apple and pear flowers, Manchurian crab apple (Malus manchurica), closely related to appl...

  12. Quince (Cydonia oblonga) emerges from the ashes of fire blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The two-decade history of fire blight in Bulgaria revealed quince as one of the most frequently attacked hosts and its production on a large scale has almost been entirely eliminated. Nevertheless, this species will play an important epidemiological role as a permanent source of inoculum for other p...

  13. Integrated Control of Fire Blight with Antagonists and Oxytetracycline

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the Northwest United States, the antibiotic streptomycin provided excellent control of fire blight until resistant isolates of the pathogen arose. Oxytetracycline (Mycoshield) is now sprayed as an alternative antibiotic. We found that the durability of inhibitory activity of oxytetracycline is ...

  14. Fire blight: applied genomic insights of the pathogen and host

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The enterobacterial phytopathogen, Erwinia amylovora, causes fire blight, an invasive disease that threatens a wide range of commercial and ornamental Rosaceae host plants. The response elicited by E. amylovora in its host during disease development is similar to the hypersensitive reaction that ty...

  15. Budagovsky 9 rootstock: uncovering a novel resistance to fire blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Budagovsky 9 (B.9) apple rootstock, displayed a high level of susceptibility (similar to M.9 rootstock) to fire blight bacteria (Erwinia amylovora) when leaves of non-grafted B.9 plants were inoculated. However, when older B.9 rootstock tissue was inoculated directly with E. amylovora, rootstock tis...

  16. Field Susceptibility of Quince Hybrids to Fire Blight in Bulgaria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spread of fire blight in Bulgaria during the last 20 years has nearly eliminated commercial production of pear and quince. Damage has increased in both nurseries and orchards, yet susceptible cultivars continue to be planted. Quince is the host most frequently attacked by Erwinia amylovora in Bulgar...

  17. Integrated Control of Fire Blight with Antagonists and Oxytetracycline

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the Pacific Northwest of the United States, the antibiotic streptomycin provided excellent control of fire blight until resistant isolates of Erwinia amylovora arose. Oxytetracycline (Mycoshield) is now sprayed as an alternative antibiotic. We found that the duration of inhibitory activity of o...

  18. Integrated Control of Fire Blight with Bacterial Antagonists and Oxytetracycline

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the Pacific Northwest of the United States, the antibiotic streptomycin provided excellent control of fire blight until resistant isolates of Erwinia amylovora were prevalent. Oxytetracycline (Mycoshield) is now sprayed as an alternative antibiotic. We found that the duration of inhibitory acti...

  19. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P.; Pothier, Joël F.; Smits, Theo H. M.; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora. PMID:26883568

  20. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P; Pothier, Joël F; Smits, Theo H M; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-02-17

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora.

  1. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  2. Using functional genomics to identify molecular markers for fire blight resistance (Erwinia amylovora) in apple (Malus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea), is a destructive disease of apple (Malus), pear (Pyrus) and some woody ornamentals in the rose family (Rosaceae). The goal of this project is to use a functional genomics approach to develop tools to breed fire blight resistant apples. Six hundred fifty...

  3. Mechanistically compatible mixtures of bacterial antagonists improve biological control of fire blight of pear.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, V O; Johnson, K B; Sugar, D; Loper, J E

    2011-01-01

    Mixtures of biological control agents can be superior to individual agents in suppressing plant disease, providing enhanced efficacy and reliability from field to field relative to single biocontrol strains. Nonetheless, the efficacy of combinations of Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, a commercial biological control agent for fire blight of pear, and Pantoea vagans strain C9-1 or Pantoea agglomerans strain Eh252 rarely exceeds that of individual strains. A506 suppresses growth of the pathogen on floral colonization and infection sites through preemptive exclusion. C9-1 and Eh252 produce peptide antibiotics that contribute to disease control. In culture, A506 produces an extracellular protease that degrades the peptide antibiotics of C9-1 and Eh252. We hypothesized that strain A506 diminishes the biological control activity of C9-1 and Eh252, thereby reducing the efficacy of biocontrol mixtures. This hypothesis was tested in five replicated field trials comparing biological control of fire blight using strain A506 and A506 aprX::Tn5, an extracellular protease-deficient mutant, as individuals and combined with C9-1 or Eh252. On average, mixtures containing A506 aprX::Tn5 were superior to those containing the wild-type strain, confirming that the extracellular protease of A506 diminished the biological control activity of C9-1 and Eh252 in situ. Mixtures of A506 aprX::Tn5 and C9-1 or Eh252 were superior to oxytetracycline or single biocontrol strains in suppressing fire blight of pear. These experiments demonstrate that certain biological control agents are mechanistically incompatible, in that one strain interferes with the mechanism by which a second strain suppresses plant disease. Mixtures composed of mechanistically compatible strains of biological control agents can suppress disease more effectively than individual biological control agents.

  4. The fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora requires the rpoN gene for pathogenicity in apple.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laura S; Lehman, Brian L; Sinn, Judith P; Pfeufer, Emily E; Halbrendt, Noemi O; McNellis, Timothy W

    2013-10-01

    RpoN is a σ(54) factor regulating essential virulence gene expression in several plant pathogenic bacteria, including Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In this study, we found that mutation of rpoN in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora caused a nonpathogenic phenotype. The E. amylovora rpoN Tn5 transposon mutant rpoN1250::Tn5 did not cause fire blight disease symptoms on shoots of mature apple trees. In detached immature apple fruits, the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant failed to cause fire blight disease symptoms and grew to population levels 12 orders of magnitude lower than the wild-type. In addition, the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant failed to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into nonhost tobacco plant leaves, and rpoN1250::Tn5 cells failed to express HrpN protein when grown in hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing liquid medium. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type rpoN gene complemented all the rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant phenotypes tested. The rpoN1250::Tn5 mutant was prototrophic on minimal solid and liquid media, indicating that the rpoN1250::Tn5 nonpathogenic phenotype was not caused by a defect in basic metabolism or growth. This study provides clear genetic evidence that rpoN is an essential virulence gene of E. amylovora, suggesting that rpoN has the same function in E. amylovora as in P. syringae and Pe. carotovorum.

  5. Induction of antimicrobial 3-deoxyflavonoids in pome fruit trees controls fire blight.

    PubMed

    Halbwirth, Heidrun; Fischer, Thilo C; Roemmelt, Susanne; Spinelli, Francesco; Schlangen, Karin; Peterek, Silke; Sabatini, Emidio; Messina, Christian; Speakman, John-Bryan; Andreotti, Carlo; Rademacher, Wilhelm; Bazzi, Carlo; Costa, Guglielmo; Treutter, Dieter; Forkmann, Gert; Stich, Karl

    2003-01-01

    Fire blight, a devastating bacterial disease in pome fruits, causes severe economic losses worldwide. Hitherto, an effective control could only be achieved by using antibiotics, but this implies potential risks for human health, livestock and environment. A new approach allows transient inhibition of a step in the flavonoid pathway, thereby inducing the formation of a novel antimicrobial 3-deoxyflavonoid controlling fire blight in apple and pear leaves. This compound is closely related to natural phytoalexins in sorghum. The approach does not only provide a safe method to control fire blight: Resistance against different pathogens is also induced in other crop plants.

  6. Rootstock-regulated gene expression patterns associated with fire blight resistance in apple

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Desirable apple varieties are clonally propagated by grafting vegetative scions onto rootstocks. Rootstocks influence many phenotypic traits of the scion, including resistance to pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight, the most serious bacterial disease of apple....

  7. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Enhanced Biological Control of Phytophthora Blight of Pepper by Biosurfactant-Producing Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Özyilmaz, Ümit; Benlioglu, Kemal

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas isolates from different crop plants were screened for in vitro growth inhibition of Phytophthora capsici and production of biosurfactant. Two in vivo experiments were performed to determine the efficacy of selected Pseudomonas strains against Phytophthora blight of pepper by comparing two fungicide treatments [acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and ASM + mefenoxam]. Bacterial isolates were applied by soil drenching (1 × 109 cells/ml), ASM (0.1 μg a.i./ml) and ASM + mefenoxam (0.2 mg product/ml) were applied by foliar spraying, and P. capsici inoculum was incorporated into the pot soil three days after treatments. In the first experiment, four Pseudomonas strains resulted in significant reduction from 48.4 to 61.3% in Phytophthora blight severity. In the second experiment, bacterial treatments combining with olive oil (5 mL per plant) significantly enhanced biological control activity, resulting in a reduction of disease level ranging from 56.8 to 81.1%. ASM + mefenoxam was the most effective treatment while ASM alone was less effective in both bioassays. These results indicate that our Pseudomonas fluorescens strains (6L10, 6ba6 and 3ss9) that have biosurfactant-producing abilities are effective against P. capsici on pepper, and enhanced disease suppression could be achieved when they were used in combination with olive oil. PMID:25288970

  9. Iron homeostasis and fire blight susceptibility in transgenic pear plants overexpressing a pea ferritin gene.

    PubMed

    Djennane, Samia; Cesbron, Colette; Sourice, Sophie; Cournol, Raphael; Dupuis, Fabrice; Eychenne, Magali; Loridon, Karine; Chevreau, Elisabeth

    2011-05-01

    The bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora causes the devastating disease known as fire blight in some rosaceous plants including apple and pear. One of the pathogenicity factors affecting fire blight development is the production of a siderophore, desferrioxamine, which overcomes the limiting conditions in plant tissues and also protects bacteria against active oxygen species. In this paper we examine the effect of an iron chelator protein encoded by the pea ferritin gene on the fire blight susceptibility of pear (Pyrus communis). Transgenic pear clones expressing this gene controlled either by the constitutive promoter CaMV 35S or by the inducible promoter sgd24 promoter were produced. The transgenic clones produced were analysed by Q-RT-PCR to determine the level of expression of the pea transgene. A pathogen-inducible pattern of expression of the pea transgene was observed in sgd24-promoter transformants. Adaptation to iron deficiency in vitro was tested in some transgenic clones and different iron metabolism parameters were measured. No strong effect on iron and chlorophyll content, root reductase activity and fire blight susceptibility was detected in the transgenic lines tested. No transformants showed a significant reduction in susceptibility to fire blight in greenhouse conditions when inoculated with E. amylovora.

  10. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus 'Robusta 5' accessions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large effect QTL for fire blight resistance has been pre...

  11. Rootstock-regulated gene expression patterns associated with fire blight resistance in apple

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Desirable apple varieties are clonally propagated by grafting vegetative scions onto rootstocks. Rootstocks influence many phenotypic traits of the scion, including resistance to pathogens such as Erwinia amylovora, which causes fire blight, the most serious bacterial disease of apple. The purpose of the present study was to quantify rootstock-mediated differences in scion fire blight susceptibility and to identify transcripts in the scion whose expression levels correlated with this response. Results Rootstock influence on scion fire blight resistance was quantified by inoculating three-year old, orchard-grown apple trees, consisting of 'Gala' scions grafted to a range of rootstocks, with E. amylovora. Disease severity was measured by the extent of shoot necrosis over time. 'Gala' scions grafted to G.30 or MM.111 rootstocks showed the lowest rates of necrosis, while 'Gala' on M.27 and B.9 showed the highest rates of necrosis. 'Gala' scions on M.7, S.4 or M.9F56 had intermediate necrosis rates. Using an apple DNA microarray representing 55,230 unique transcripts, gene expression patterns were compared in healthy, un-inoculated, greenhouse-grown 'Gala' scions on the same series of rootstocks. We identified 690 transcripts whose steady-state expression levels correlated with the degree of fire blight susceptibility of the scion/rootstock combinations. Transcripts known to be differentially expressed during E. amylovora infection were disproportionately represented among these transcripts. A second-generation apple microarray representing 26,000 transcripts was developed and was used to test these correlations in an orchard-grown population of trees segregating for fire blight resistance. Of the 690 transcripts originally identified using the first-generation array, 39 had expression levels that correlated with fire blight resistance in the breeding population. Conclusions Rootstocks had significant effects on the fire blight susceptibility of 'Gala' scions

  12. Biosynthesis of the antimetabolite 6-thioguanine in Erwinia amylovora plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sébastien; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Litomska, Agnieszka; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2013-09-27

    Sulfur for fire: The molecular basis for the biosynthesis of the antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG) was unveiled in Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight. Bioinformatics, heterologous pathway reconstitution in E. coli, and mutational analyses indicate that the protein YcfA mediates guanine thionation in analogy to 2-thiouridylase. Assays in planta and in cell cultures reveal for the first time a crucial role of 6TG in fire blight pathogenesis.

  13. Controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans E325 for biocontrol of fire blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microencapsulation and controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 (E325), which is an antagonist to bacterial pathogen (Erwinia amylovora) of fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear, have been investigated. Uniform core-shell alginate microcapsules (AMCs), 60-300 µm in diamet...

  14. Pantoea applied genomics to understand and improve biocontrol activity against fire blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pantoea agglomerans and P. vagans (ex. Erwinia herbicola) are common epiphytes of pome fruit flowers and three strains (E325, P10c, C9-1) have been commercially developed as effective biocontrol products for managing fire blight (Erwinia amylovora). Antibiotics as a standard, reliable chemical optio...

  15. Using functional genomics to develop tools to breed fire blight resistant apples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of apple (Malus), pear (Pyrus) and other plants in the rose family (Rosaceae). Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) using cDNA from pathogen and mock-inoculated samples, and cDNA-AFLP analysis were used to ident...

  16. Relative Susceptibility of Quince, Pear, and Apple Cultivars to Fire Blight Following Greenhouse Inoculation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora (EA) is one of the most serious diseases of plants in the family Rosaceae, and Quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) is considered one of the most susceptible host genera. Apple (Malus sp.) and pear (Pyrus sp.) cultivars ranging from most susceptible to most resistan...

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636, a Strain with Biocontrol Capabilities against Late Blight of Potato

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Christopher K.; Novinscak, Amy; Gadkar, Vijay J.; Joly, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein provided is the full-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636. This strain is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) which produces phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, an antibiotic involved in the biocontrol of numerous plant pathogens, including late blight of potato caused by the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. PMID:27231373

  18. Multiple treatment meta-analysis of products evaluated for control of fire blight in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Ngugi, H K; Lehman, B L; Madden, L V

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this analysis was to estimate the effect sizes and consistency of products evaluated for fire blight control in the eastern United States over the last decade. Because only 3% of the 69 studies published from 2000 to 2008 explicitly presented a measure of within-study variability, a method for estimating the least significant difference (LSD) and, hence the sampling variance, for studies with at least two significant mean separations in the presented mean multiple comparisons was developed. Lin's concordance analysis indicated that the estimated LSD was an accurate predictor of the actual LSD based on 35 studies in a calibration evaluation (ρ(c) = 0.997). Separate multi-treatment random-effects meta-analyses were performed for three control categories: antibiotics, biological control, and plant defense-activating products and mean log response ratios relative to the nontreated controls ([Formula: see text]) were computed for each treatment and then back-transformed to obtain the mean percent disease control. None of the products evaluated performed as well as streptomycin, the standard product for fire blight control, for which the mean disease control was 68.6%. As a group, experimental antibiotics provided the best fire blight control with mean effect sizes ranging from 59.7 to 61.7%. Among the biological controls, the best control was noted for treatments combining the antibiotic streptomycin with a product based on Pantoea agglomerans (55.0% mean disease reduction) or Bacillus subtilis (53.9%). Mean disease control was 31.9, 25.7, and 22.6%, respectively, for products based on B. subtilis, Pantoea agglomerans, and Pseudomonas fluorescens without an antibiotic, suggesting that the higher efficacy of the combination treatments was due to the antibiotic. Among the plant defense-activating products, prohexadione calcium had the highest and most consistent effect size (50.7% control), while other products provided modest mean disease control of between 6

  19. Medfly Ceratitis capitata as Potential Vector for Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora: Survival and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Ordax, Mónica; Piquer-Salcedo, Jaime E; Santander, Ricardo D; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Biosca, Elena G; López, María M; Marco-Noales, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the ability of bacterial plant pathogens to survive in insects is required for elucidating unknown aspects of their epidemiology and for designing appropriate control strategies. Erwinia amylovora is a plant pathogenic bacterium that causes fire blight, a devastating disease in apple and pear commercial orchards. Studies on fire blight spread by insects have mainly focused on pollinating agents, such as honeybees. However, the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly) Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), one of the most damaging fruit pests worldwide, is also common in pome fruit orchards. The main objective of the study was to investigate whether E. amylovora can survive and be transmitted by the medfly. Our experimental results show: i) E. amylovora can survive for at least 8 days inside the digestive tract of the medfly and until 28 days on its external surface, and ii) medflies are able to transmit the bacteria from inoculated apples to both detached shoots and pear plants, being the pathogen recovered from lesions in both cases. This is the first report on E. amylovora internalization and survival in/on C. capitata, as well as the experimental transmission of the fire blight pathogen by this insect. Our results suggest that medfly can act as a potential vector for E. amylovora, and expand our knowledge on the possible role of these and other insects in its life cycle.

  20. Identification of gene-specific markers for resistance to Erwinia amylovora (fire blight) in Malus (apple) by a functional genomics approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea), is a destructive disease of apple (Malus), pear (Pyrus) and other plants in the rose family (Rosaceae). 650 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) associated with fire blight were identified from Ea-challenged apple leaf tissue by suppression subtractive hybrid...

  1. Development of the First Cisgenic Apple with Increased Resistance to Fire Blight

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Thomas D.; Gessler, Cesare; Jänsch, Melanie; Flachowsky, Henryk; Patocchi, Andrea; Broggini, Giovanni A. L.

    2015-01-01

    The generation and selection of novel fire blight resistant apple genotypes would greatly improve the management of this devastating disease, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Such resistant genotypes are currently developed by conventional breeding, but novel breeding technologies including cisgenesis could be an alternative approach. A cisgenic apple line C44.4.146 was regenerated using the cisgene FB_MR5 from wild apple Malus ×robusta 5 (Mr5), and the previously established method involving A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation of the fire blight susceptible cultivar ‘Gala Galaxy’ using the binary vector p9-Dao-FLPi. The line C44.4.146 was shown to carry only the cisgene FB_MR5, controlled by its native regulatory sequences and no transgenes were detected by PCR or Southern blot following heat induced recombinase-mediated elimination of the selectable markers. Although this line contains up to 452 bp of vector sequences, it still matches the original definition of cisgenesis. A single insertion of T-DNA into the genome of 'Gala Galaxy' in chromosome 16 was identified. Transcription of FB_MR5 in line C44.4.146 was similar to the transcription in classically bred descendants of Mr5. Three independent shoot inoculation experiments with a Mr5 avirulent strain of Erwinia amylovora were performed using scissors or syringe. Significantly lower disease symptoms were detected on shoots of the cisgenic line compared to those of untransformed 'Gala Galaxy'. Despite the fact that the pathogen can overcome this resistance by a single nucleotide mutation, this is, to our knowledge, the first prototype of a cisgenic apple with increased resistance to fire blight. PMID:26624292

  2. Development of the First Cisgenic Apple with Increased Resistance to Fire Blight.

    PubMed

    Kost, Thomas D; Gessler, Cesare; Jänsch, Melanie; Flachowsky, Henryk; Patocchi, Andrea; Broggini, Giovanni A L

    2015-01-01

    The generation and selection of novel fire blight resistant apple genotypes would greatly improve the management of this devastating disease, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Such resistant genotypes are currently developed by conventional breeding, but novel breeding technologies including cisgenesis could be an alternative approach. A cisgenic apple line C44.4.146 was regenerated using the cisgene FB_MR5 from wild apple Malus ×robusta 5 (Mr5), and the previously established method involving A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation of the fire blight susceptible cultivar 'Gala Galaxy' using the binary vector p9-Dao-FLPi. The line C44.4.146 was shown to carry only the cisgene FB_MR5, controlled by its native regulatory sequences and no transgenes were detected by PCR or Southern blot following heat induced recombinase-mediated elimination of the selectable markers. Although this line contains up to 452 bp of vector sequences, it still matches the original definition of cisgenesis. A single insertion of T-DNA into the genome of 'Gala Galaxy' in chromosome 16 was identified. Transcription of FB_MR5 in line C44.4.146 was similar to the transcription in classically bred descendants of Mr5. Three independent shoot inoculation experiments with a Mr5 avirulent strain of Erwinia amylovora were performed using scissors or syringe. Significantly lower disease symptoms were detected on shoots of the cisgenic line compared to those of untransformed 'Gala Galaxy'. Despite the fact that the pathogen can overcome this resistance by a single nucleotide mutation, this is, to our knowledge, the first prototype of a cisgenic apple with increased resistance to fire blight.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora CFBP 1430 and comparison to other Erwinia spp.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Frey, Jürg E; Duffy, Brion

    2010-04-01

    Fire blight, caused by the enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a devastating disease of rosaceous plants that has global economic importance for apple and pear production and trade. The complete genome of E. amylovora CFBP 1430 was sequenced, annotated, and compared with the genomes of other Erwinia spp. Several singleton and shared features of the E. amylovora CFBP 1430 genome were identified that offer a first view into evolutionary aspects within the genus Erwinia. Comparative genomics identified or clarified virulence and fitness determinants and secretion systems. Novel insights revealed in the genome of E. amylovora CFBP 1430 hold potential for exploitation to improve the design of more effective fire blight control strategies.

  4. [Polyvalence of bacteriophages isolated from fruit trees, affected by bacterial fire blight].

    PubMed

    Tovkach, F I; Moroz, S N; Korol', N A; Faĭdiuk, Iu V; Kushkina, A I

    2013-01-01

    Phage populations appearing as a result of a pathogenic process caused by Erwinia amylovora have been discovered and described. They accompany bacterial fire blight development in the process of quince, pear and apple trees vegetation in Zakarpattya region of Ukraine. Phage isolates of the affected pear and quince include polyvalent virulent phages able to develop on bacterial strains associated with plants--E. amylovora. E. "horticola" and Pantoea agglomerans. E. amylovora isolated from the plant tissues affected by the fire blight and detected at the same time as phages proved to be resistant to the viral infection. It is hard to explain now this characteristic however it was noticed that resistance to phages can change drastically in case of dissociation, lysogenization and mutagenesis of erwinia in laboratory conditions. Phage population study shows that they are heterogeneous and can obviously include not only polyvalent but also specific viruses. Further studies of biology and molecular genetics of pure lines of isolated phages will help to get closer to understanding the place and role of bacteriophages in the complicated network of relations between bacterial pathogens and plants.

  5. Preliminary results on the ability of pentatomidae to transfer fire blight Erwinia amylovora under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Peusens, G; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Belien, T

    2013-01-01

    With their piercing-sucking mouthparts stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), a major pest in especially organic orchards, create wounds in fruit of pear trees. As Erwinia amylovora (Burrill, Winslow et al.), a wide spread bacterial disease affecting many rosaceous plants including pome fruit trees and hawthorn, enters through openings in flowers, leaves, shoots and fruit, feeding punctures caused by these bugs might be inoculated with Erwinia bacteria. In order to investigate the ability of the bugs Pentotoma rufipes L. and Polomena prasina L. to transmit fire blight, insects were caught in an organically managed orchard without fire blight, brought into contact with artificially inoculated immature pear fruit/slices and transferred to healthy, mechanically wounded pear fruit/slices. After an incubation period potential transmission of bacteria was examined by evaluation of symptom expression (necrosis, ooze production). To assess the presence of bacteria on the exoskeleton of the tested bugs, all bugs were forced to walk on a semiselective nutrient agar medium. In another experiment the viability of Ea on the exoskeleton was tested -after previous contact with ooze- through washing and plating of the wash water. All experiments were conducted under optimal climatological conditions and according to quarantine standards. Results demonstrated the ability of stink bugs to transfer E. amylovora to fruit and the viability of bacteria on stink bugs externally - both under lab conditions.

  6. Survival of Pantoea agglomerans E325 as fire blight biocontrol agent when osmoadapted in high-saline medium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 is available commercially as the active ingredient in a freeze-dried product (Bloomtime FDTM) of Northwest Agricultural Products (NAP) for biological control of fire blight. Osmoadaptation, which involves the combination of Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 is available...

  7. Potential of osmoadaptation for improving Pantoea agglomerans E325 as biocontrol agent for fire blight of apple and pear

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pantoea agglomerans biocontrol strain E325 is the active ingredient in a commercial product for fire blight, a destructive disease of apple and pear initiated by Erwinia amylovora in flowers. Osmoadaptation, involving the combination of saline osmotic stress and osmolyte amendment to growth media, w...

  8. Maryblyt v. 7.1 for Windows: an improved fire blight forecasting program for apples and pears

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article describes updates found in Version 7.1 of the fire blight prediction model Maryblyt, originally developed by Paul Steiner and Gary Lightner. In addition, a brief history of the development of the Maryblyt model is given. The article ends with examples comparing the performance of Versio...

  9. Reduction in bacterial ooze formation on immature fruitlets after preventive treatments of Fosethyl-Al against fire blight Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Deckers, T; Schoofs, H; Verjans, W; De Maeyer, L

    2010-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Burill Winslow et al.), is a very important bacterial disease on apple and pear orchards with devastating effects in some production area and in some years. Fire blight control consists in a whole strategy of measures that should start with control measures in and around the fruit tree nurseries. Only the use of Vacciplant (Laminarin), an inducer of the self-defence mechanism, is registered in Belgium since 2009. In other European countries Fosethyl-Al has been registered for fire blight control. Recently, research trials have been done at Pcfruit research station for several years on the activity of ALiette (fosethyl-Al) against fire blight. Fosethyl-Al, also a plant defence enhancing molecule, applied preventively 3 times at a dose of 3.75 kg/ha standard orchard (3 x 3000 g a.i./ha standard orchard), showed a reduction in the host susceptibility and decreased the disease development on artificial inoculated flower clusters and shoots. Also a clear reduction in the ooze droplet formation on artificially inoculated immature fruitlets has been observed with this molecule. This reduction in the bacterial ooze formation is considered as a very important factor in the spread of the disease in the orchard.

  10. TRANSGENIC EXPRESSION OF THE ERWINIA AMYLOVORA (FIRE BLIGHT) EFFECTOR PROTEIN EOP1 SUPRESSES HOST BASAL DEFENSE MECHANISMS IN MALUS (APPLE)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) is the causative agent of fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear. Like many other plant and animal bacterial pathogens Ea utilizes a type three secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Once inside the host cell, effector protei...

  11. First report of bacterial blight of Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea L. var. gemmifera) caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel bacterial leaf blight was seen in commercial Brussels sprout (Brassica oleracea L. var. gemmifera) transplant production in 2006. Koch’s postulates were completed and etiology of the pathogen was determined. Physiological and molecular characterization showed that the pathogen was Pseudomona...

  12. Identification of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora, by PCR assays with chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bereswill, S; Bugert, P; Bruchmüller, I; Geider, K

    1995-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight, was identified independently from the common plasmid pEA29 by three different PCR assays with chromosomal DNA. PCR with two primers was performed with isolated DNA and with whole cells, which were directly added to the assay mixture. The oligonucleotide primers were derived from the ams region, and the PCR product comprised the amsB gene, which is involved in exopolysaccharide synthesis. The amplified fragment of 1.6 kb was analyzed, and the sequence was found to be identical for two E. amylovora strains. The identity of the PCR products was further confirmed by restriction analysis. The 1.6-kb signal was also used for detection of the fire blight pathogen in the presence of other plant-associated bacteria and in infected plant tissue. For further identification of isolated strains, the 16S rRNA gene of E. amylovora and other plant-associated bacteria was amplified and the products were digested with the restriction enzyme HaeIII. The pattern obtained for E. amylovora was different from that of other bacteria. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene was determined from a cloned fragment and was found to be closely related to the sequences of Escherichia coli and other Erwinia species. Finally, arbitrarily primed PCR with a 17-mer oligonucleotide derived from the sequence of transposon Tn5 produced a unique banding pattern for all E. amylovora strains investigated. These methods expand identification methods for E. amylovora, which include DNA hybridization and a PCR technique based on plasmid pEA29. PMID:7618876

  13. Fire Blight Control: The Struggle Goes On. A Comparison of Different Fire Blight Control Methods in Switzerland with Respect to Biosafety, Efficacy and Durability

    PubMed Central

    Gusberti, Michele; Klemm, Urs; Meier, Matthias S.; Maurhofer, Monika; Hunger-Glaser, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Fire blight (FB), caused by Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most important pome fruit pathogens worldwide. To control this devastating disease, various chemical and biological treatments are commonly applied in Switzerland, but they fail to keep the infection at an acceptable level in years of heavy disease pressure. The Swiss authorities therefore currently allow the controlled use of the antibiotic streptomycin against FB in years that are predicted to have heavy infection periods, but only one treatment per season is permitted. Another strategy for controlling Erwinia is to breed resistant/tolerant apple cultivars. One way of accelerating the breeding process is to obtain resistant cultivars by inserting one or several major resistance genes, using genetic engineering. To date, no study summarizing the impact of different FB control measures on the environment and on human health has been performed. This study consequently aims to compare different disease-control measures (biological control, chemical control, control by antibiotics and by resistant/tolerant apple cultivars obtained through conventional or molecular breeding) applied against E. amylovora, considering different protection goals (protection of human health, environment, agricultural diversity and economic interest), with special emphasis on biosafety aspects. Information on each FB control measure in relation to the specified protection goal was assessed by literature searches and by interviews with experts. Based on our results it can be concluded that the FB control measures currently applied in Switzerland are safe for consumers, workers and the environment. However, there are several gaps in our knowledge of the human health and environmental impacts analyzed: data are missing (1) on long term studies on the efficacy of most of the analyzed FB control measures; (2) on the safety of operators handling streptomycin; (3) on residue analyses of Equisetum plant extract, the copper and aluminum

  14. Fire Blight Control: The Struggle Goes On. A Comparison of Different Fire Blight Control Methods in Switzerland with Respect to Biosafety, Efficacy and Durability.

    PubMed

    Gusberti, Michele; Klemm, Urs; Meier, Matthias S; Maurhofer, Monika; Hunger-Glaser, Isabel

    2015-09-11

    Fire blight (FB), caused by Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most important pome fruit pathogens worldwide. To control this devastating disease, various chemical and biological treatments are commonly applied in Switzerland, but they fail to keep the infection at an acceptable level in years of heavy disease pressure. The Swiss authorities therefore currently allow the controlled use of the antibiotic streptomycin against FB in years that are predicted to have heavy infection periods, but only one treatment per season is permitted. Another strategy for controlling Erwinia is to breed resistant/tolerant apple cultivars. One way of accelerating the breeding process is to obtain resistant cultivars by inserting one or several major resistance genes, using genetic engineering. To date, no study summarizing the impact of different FB control measures on the environment and on human health has been performed. This study consequently aims to compare different disease-control measures (biological control, chemical control, control by antibiotics and by resistant/tolerant apple cultivars obtained through conventional or molecular breeding) applied against E. amylovora, considering different protection goals (protection of human health, environment, agricultural diversity and economic interest), with special emphasis on biosafety aspects. Information on each FB control measure in relation to the specified protection goal was assessed by literature searches and by interviews with experts. Based on our results it can be concluded that the FB control measures currently applied in Switzerland are safe for consumers, workers and the environment. However, there are several gaps in our knowledge of the human health and environmental impacts analyzed: data are missing (1) on long term studies on the efficacy of most of the analyzed FB control measures; (2) on the safety of operators handling streptomycin; (3) on residue analyses of Equisetum plant extract, the copper and aluminum

  15. The causal agent of halo blight in bean, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, attaches to stomata via its pili.

    PubMed

    Romantschuk, M; Bamford, D H

    1986-04-01

    The phytopathogenic pseudomonad Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola causes halo blight of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Initiation of infection depends on the ability of the cells to adhere to the target cell surface. P. syringae pv. phaseolicola expresses pili, which are the receptors of the lipid-containing dsRNA bacteriophage phi 6. phi 6-resistant bacterial strains can be divided into different piliation types. It was possible to show that the adhesion of the bacteria onto plant cell surface was dependent on the pili. Non-piliated bacterial stains showed a much lower adherence to the leaf surface than strains expressing phi 6 specific pili. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the piliated bacteria attached to the leaf surface at the site of stomata. Non-piliated bacteria were evenly distributed on the leaf surface. All bacterial strains used in this study were capable of causing halo blight if injected into the plant. If the bacteria were sprayed on the plants, followed by spraying of sterile buffer, only piliated bacteria caused symptoms.

  16. Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636 Alters Phytophthora infestans Growth and Late Blight Development.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher K; Arseneault, Tanya; Novinscak, Amy; Filion, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, one of the most devastating diseases affecting potato production. Alternative approaches for controlling late blight are being increasingly sought due to increasing environmental concerns over the use of chemical pesticides and the increasing resistance of P. infestans to fungicides. Our research group has isolated a new strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens (LBUM636) of biocontrol interest producing the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). Wild-type LBUM636 was shown to significantly inhibit the growth of Phytophthora infestans in in vitro confrontational assays whereas its isogenic mutant (phzC-; not producing PCA) only slightly altered the pathogen's growth. Wild-type LBUM636 but not the phzC- mutant also completely repressed disease symptom development on tubers. A pot experiment revealed that wild-type LBUM636 can significantly reduce P. infestans populations in the rhizosphere and in the roots of potato plants, as well as reduce in planta disease symptoms due to PCA production. The expression of eight common plant defense-related genes (ChtA, PR-1b, PR-2, PR-5, LOX, PIN2, PAL-2, and ERF3) was quantified in tubers, roots, and leaves by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and revealed that the biocontrol observed was not associated with the induction of a plant defense response by LBUM636. Instead, a direct interaction between P. infestans and LBUM636 is required and PCA production appears to be a key factor for LBUM636's biocontrol ability.

  17. Characterization of the bacterial stem blight pathogen of alfalfa, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial stem blight of alfalfa occurs sporadically in the central and western U.S. Yield losses of up to 50% of the first harvest can occur with some cultivars. Developing resistant cultivars is hampered by lack of information on the pathogen and a standard test for evaluating plant germplasm. Bac...

  18. Pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae causing bacterial brown spot and halo blight in phaseolus vulgaris L. are distinguishable by ribotyping.

    PubMed

    González, A J; Landeras, E; Mendoza, M C

    2000-02-01

    Ribotyping was evaluated as a method to differentiate between Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola and pv. syringae strains causing bacterial brown spot and halo blight diseases in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Ribotyping, with restriction enzymes BglI and SalI and using the Escherichia coli rrnB operon as the probe, differentiated 11 and 14 ribotypes, respectively, and a combination of data from both procedures yielded 19 combined ribotypes. Cluster analysis of the combined ribotypes differentiated the pathovars phaseolicola and syringae, as well as different clonal lineages within these pathovars. The potential of ribotyping to screen for correlations between lineages and factors such as geographical region and/or bean varieties is also reported.

  19. Pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae Causing Bacterial Brown Spot and Halo Blight in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Are Distinguishable by Ribotyping

    PubMed Central

    González, Ana J.; Landeras, Elena; Mendoza, M. Carmen

    2000-01-01

    Ribotyping was evaluated as a method to differentiate between Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola and pv. syringae strains causing bacterial brown spot and halo blight diseases in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Ribotyping, with restriction enzymes BglI and SalI and using the Escherichia coli rrnB operon as the probe, differentiated 11 and 14 ribotypes, respectively, and a combination of data from both procedures yielded 19 combined ribotypes. Cluster analysis of the combined ribotypes differentiated the pathovars phaseolicola and syringae, as well as different clonal lineages within these pathovars. The potential of ribotyping to screen for correlations between lineages and factors such as geographical region and/or bean varieties is also reported. PMID:10653764

  20. Difficidin and bacilysin produced by plant-associated Bacillus amyloliquefaciens are efficient in controlling fire blight disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, X H; Scholz, R; Borriss, M; Junge, H; Mögel, G; Kunz, S; Borriss, R

    2009-03-10

    Representatives of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were shown to possess biocontrol activity against fire blight, a serious disease of orchard trees caused by Erwinia amylovora. Genome analysis of B. amyloliquefaciens FZB42 identified gene clusters responsible for synthesis of several polyketide compounds with antibacterial action. We show here that the antibacterial polyketides difficidin and to a minor extent bacillaene act efficiently against E. amylovora. Surprisingly, a mutant strain blocked in the production of difficidin (CH8 Deltadfn) inhibited growth of E. amylovora and suppressed fire blight disease nearly in the same range as the wild type. In addition, a sfp mutant (CH3 Deltasfp) unable to synthesize non-ribosomally lipopeptides and polyketides did still suppress growth of E. amylovora, suggesting that besides action of polyketides another antagonistic principle exist. A double mutant (RS06 Deltasfp Deltabac) devoid in polyketide and bacilysin synthesis was unable to suppress growth of E. amylovora indicating that the additional inhibitory effect is due to production of bacilysin, a dipeptide whose synthesis does not depend on Sfp. We propose to use B. amyloliquefaciens strains with enhanced synthesis of difficidin and/or bacilysin for development of biocontrol agents efficient against fire blight disease.

  1. Control of plant defense mechanisms and fire blight pathogenesis through the regulation of 6-thioguanine biosynthesis in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Sébastien; Litomska, Agnieszka; Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Richter, Klaus; Beerhues, Ludger; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-02-10

    Fire blight is a devastating disease of Rosaceae plants, such as apple and pear trees. It is characterized by necrosis of plant tissue, caused by the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora. The plant pathogen produces the well-known antimetabolite 6-thioguanine (6TG), which plays a key role in fire blight pathogenesis. Here we report that YcfR, a member of the LTTR family, is a major regulator of 6TG biosynthesis in E. amylovora. Inactivation of the regulator gene (ycfR) led to dramatically decreased 6TG production. Infection assays with apple plants (Malus domestica cultivar Holsteiner Cox) and cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia (mountain ash, rowan) revealed abortive fire blight pathogenesis and reduced plant response (biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexin production). In the presence of the ΔycfR mutant, apple trees were capable of activating the abscission machinery to remove infected tissue. In addition to unveiling the regulation of 6TG biosynthesis in a major plant pathogen, we demonstrate for the first time that this antimetabolite plays a pivotal role in dysregulating the plant response to infection.

  2. The in planta proteome of wild type strains of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, M; Vrancken, K; Noben, J P; Remans, T; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Valcke, R

    2016-04-29

    Erwinia amylovora is a Gram-negative plant pathogen that causes fire blight. This disease affects most members of the Rosaceae family including apple and pear. Here, an infection model is introduced to study proteomic changes in a highly virulent E. amylovora strain upon interaction with its host as compared to a lower virulent strain. For this purpose separate shoots of apple rootstocks were wound-infected and when infection became systemic, bacterial cells were isolated and processed for analysis in a proteomics platform combining 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Comparing the proteome of the isolates, significant abundance changes were observed in proteins involved in sorbitol metabolism, amylovoran production as well as in protection against plant defense mechanisms. Furthermore several proteins associated with virulence were more abundant in the higher virulent strain. Changes at the proteome level showed good accordance at the transcript level, as was verified by RT-qPCR. In conclusion, this infection model may be a valuable tool to unravel the complexity of plant-pathogen interactions and to gain insight in the molecular mechanisms associated with virulence of E. amylovora, paving the way for the development of plant-protective interventions against this detrimental disease. During this research a first time investigation was performed on the proteome of E. amylovora, grown inside a susceptible host plant. This bacterium is the causal agent of fire blight, which can affect most members of the Rosaceae family including apple and pear. To do so, an artificial infection model on shoots of apple rootstocks was optimized and employed. When infection was systemic, bacterial cells were extracted from the plant tissue followed by extraction of the proteins from the bacteria. Further processing of the proteins was done by using a 2-D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis followed by mass spectrometry. By the use of

  3. Implications of pathogenesis by Erwinia amylovora on rosaceous stigmas to biological control of fire blight.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K B; Sawyer, T L; Stockwell, V O; Temple, T N

    2009-02-01

    As a prerequisite to infection of flowers, Erwinia amylovora grows epiphytically on stigmas, which provide a conducive habitat for bacterial growth. Stigmas also support growth of several other bacterial genera, which allows for biological control of fire blight; although, in practice, it is very difficult to exclude E. amylovora completely from this habitat. We investigated the dynamics of growth suppression of E. amylovora by comparing the ability of virulent and avirulent strains of E. amylovora to compete with each other on stigmas of pear, apple, and blackberry, and to compete with a co-inoculated mixture of effective bacterial antagonists. When strains were inoculated individually, virulent E. amylovora strain Ea153N attained the highest population size on stigmas, with population sizes that were approximately double those of an avirulent hrpL mutant of Ea153 or the bacterial antagonists. In competition experiments, growth of the avirulent derivative was suppressed by the antagonist mixture to a greater extent than the virulent strain. Unexpectedly, the virulent strain enhanced the population size of the antagonist mixture. Similarly, a small dose of virulent Ea153N added to inoculum of an avirulent hrpL mutant of Ea153 significantly increased the population size of the avirulent strain. A pathogenesis-gene reporter strain, Ea153 dspE::gfp, was applied to flowers and a subset of the population expressed the green fluorescent protein while growing epiphytically on stigmas of apple. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that virulent E. amylovora modifies the epiphytic habitat presented by the stigma through a pathogenesis-related process, which increases host resources available to itself and, coincidentally, to nonpathogenic competitors. Over nine orchard trials, avirulent Ea153 hrpL significantly suppressed the incidence of fire blight four times compared with six for the antagonist mixture. The degree of biological control achievable with an

  4. Using Pseudomonas spp. for Integrated Biological Control.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Stack, James P

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades as model organisms for biological control of plant disease. Currently, there are three commercial formulations of pseudomonads registered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for plant disease suppression, Bio-Save 10 LP, Bio-Save 11 LP, and BlightBan A506. Bio-Save 10 LP and Bio-Save 11 LP, products of Jet Harvest Solutions, Longwood, FL, contain Pseudomonas syringae strains ESC-10 and ESC-11, respectively. These products are applied in packinghouses to prevent postharvest fungal diseases during storage of citrus, pome, stone fruits, and potatoes. BlightBan A506, produced by NuFarm Americas, Burr Ridge, IL, contains P. fluorescens strain A506. BlightBan A506 is applied primarily to pear and apple trees during bloom to suppress the bacterial disease fire blight. Combining BlightBan A506 with the antibiotic streptomycin improves control of fire blight, even in areas with streptomycin-resistant populations of the pathogen. BlightBan A506 also may reduce fruit russet and mild frost injury. These biocontrol products consisting of Pseudomonas spp. provide moderate to excellent efficacy against multiple production constraints, are relatively easy to apply, and they can be integrated with conventional products for disease control. These characteristics will contribute to the adoption of these products by growers and packinghouses.

  5. Erwinia amylovora strains isolated in Romania from outbreaks of fire blight disease: phenotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Măruţescu, Luminita; Sesan, Tatiana-Eugenia; Manole, Filofteia

    2008-01-01

    The fire blight disease was described for the first time in Romania, in 1992. Since then by continuous spreading, this disease has caused severe damages of the fruit trees production, particularly of the pear and quince orchards in different regions of the country, being advantaged by certain weather conditions (high temperatures and humidity). An epidemiological surveillance of this disease that was spreading over different regions of the country, has been instituted since 2002. During the year 2005 a total number of 785 samples were collected from the affected areas. The isolation and identification of Erwinia (E.) amylovora were performed on NSA and King's media and by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) assay using monoclonal antiserum. Four hundred and fifty strains proved levan-type colonies on sucrose nutrient-agar and were IF-positive. Biochemical characterization of 46 selected strains, by help of the API 20E system, revealed a great homogeneity, for 80% of the strains, belonging to one of the two major API 20E profiles described for E. amylovora, the 20% remaining strains showing minor differences. Hypersensitivity test performed on tobacco leaves was positive. Six of the selected strains were susceptible to streptomycin. The present study can be considered as the first attempt of phenotypic characterization of E. amylovora strains isolated from Romanian area.

  6. Controlled release of Pantoea agglomerans E325 for biocontrol of fire blight disease of apple.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Yong; Pusey, Paul Lawrence; Zhao, Youfu; Korban, Schuyler S; Choi, Hyungsoo; Kim, Kyekyoon Kevin

    2012-07-10

    Microencapsulation and controlled release of the biocontrol agent Pantoea agglomerans strain E325 (E325), an antagonist to the bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora that causes fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear, have been investigated. Uniform core-shell alginate microcapsules (AMCs), 60-300 μm in diameter, were fabricated to encapsulate E325 within the core, along with nutrients, to preserve viability and promote proliferation. Controlled release of E325 was achieved by separately adjusting alginate concentrations in the shell and core solutions, and by modifying the AMC size. Viability of E325 was monitored via fluorescent staining, revealing either lack of or minimal stress during or after encapsulation. Proliferation of E325 within AMCs, followed by their subsequent release, and colonization activities within confines of apple flowers were studied under different encapsulation conditions using rfp-labeled E325 to obtain highly promising results. This study provided a 'proof of concept' of the successful use of a microencapsulated biocontrol agent, E325, against E. amylovora, and could serve as a model for further studies on the development of effective plant disease management strategies.

  7. Virulence characteristics accounting for fire blight disease severity in apple trees and seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven A; Ngugi, Henry K; Halbrendt, Noemi O; O'Keefe, Grace; Lehman, Brian; Travis, James W; Sinn, Judith P; McNellis, Timothy W

    2010-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, the most destructive bacterial disease of rosaceous plants, including apple and pear. Here, we compared the virulence levels of six E. amylovora strains (Ea273, CFBP1367, Ea581a, E2002a, E4001a, and HKN06P1) on apple trees and seedlings. The strains produced a range of disease severity, with HKN06P1 producing the greatest disease severity in every assay. We then compared virulence characteristic expression among the six strains, including growth rates in immature apple fruit, amylovoran production, levansucrase activity, biofilm formation, carbohydrate utilization, hypersensitive cell death elicitation in tobacco leaves, and protein secretion profiles. Multiple regression analysis indicated that three of the virulence characteristics (amylovoran production, biofilm formation, and growth in immature apple fruit) accounted for >70% of the variation in disease severity on apple seedlings. Furthermore, in greenhouse-grown 'Gala' trees, >75% of the variation in disease severity was accounted for by five of the virulence characteristics: amylovoran production, biofilm formation, growth in immature apple fruit, hypersensitive cell death elicitation, and sorbitol utilization. This study demonstrates that virulence factor expression levels account for differences in disease severity caused by wild isolates of E. amylovora on apple trees.

  8. Characterization of Novel Bacteriophages for Biocontrol of Bacterial Blight in Leek Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Sofie; Volckaert, Anneleen; Venneman, Sofie; Declercq, Bart; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Allonsius, Camille N.; Van Malderghem, Cinzia; Jang, Ho B.; Briers, Yves; Noben, Jean P.; Klumpp, Jochen; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri, the causative agent of bacterial blight in leek (Allium porrum), is increasingly frequent causing problems in leek cultivation. Because of the current lack of control measures, novel bacteriophages were isolated to control this pathogen using phage therapy. Five novel phages were isolated from infected fields in Flanders (vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, vB_PsyM_KIL4, and vB_PsyM_KIL5), and were complemented with one selected host range mutant phage (vB_PsyM_KIL3b). Genome analysis of the phages revealed genome sizes between 90 and 94 kb and an average GC-content of 44.8%. Phylogenomic networking classified them into a novel clade, named the “KIL-like viruses,” related to the Felixounalikevirus genus, together with phage phiPsa374 from P. syringae pv. actinidiae. In vitro characterization demonstrated the stability and lytic potential of these phages. Host range analysis confirmed heterogeneity within P. syringae pv. porri, leading to the development of a phage cocktail with a range that covers the entire set of 41 strains tested. Specific bio-assays demonstrated the in planta efficacy of phages vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, and vB_PsyM_KIL3b. In addition, two parallel field trial experiments on three locations using a phage cocktail of the six phages showed variable results. In one trial, symptom development was attenuated. These data suggest some potential for phage therapy in controlling bacterial blight of leek, pending optimization of formulation and application methods. PMID:27014204

  9. Characterization of Novel Bacteriophages for Biocontrol of Bacterial Blight in Leek Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Sofie; Volckaert, Anneleen; Venneman, Sofie; Declercq, Bart; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Allonsius, Camille N; Van Malderghem, Cinzia; Jang, Ho B; Briers, Yves; Noben, Jean P; Klumpp, Jochen; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; Lavigne, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri, the causative agent of bacterial blight in leek (Allium porrum), is increasingly frequent causing problems in leek cultivation. Because of the current lack of control measures, novel bacteriophages were isolated to control this pathogen using phage therapy. Five novel phages were isolated from infected fields in Flanders (vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, vB_PsyM_KIL4, and vB_PsyM_KIL5), and were complemented with one selected host range mutant phage (vB_PsyM_KIL3b). Genome analysis of the phages revealed genome sizes between 90 and 94 kb and an average GC-content of 44.8%. Phylogenomic networking classified them into a novel clade, named the "KIL-like viruses," related to the Felixounalikevirus genus, together with phage phiPsa374 from P. syringae pv. actinidiae. In vitro characterization demonstrated the stability and lytic potential of these phages. Host range analysis confirmed heterogeneity within P. syringae pv. porri, leading to the development of a phage cocktail with a range that covers the entire set of 41 strains tested. Specific bio-assays demonstrated the in planta efficacy of phages vB_PsyM_KIL1, vB_PsyM_KIL2, vB_PsyM_KIL3, and vB_PsyM_KIL3b. In addition, two parallel field trial experiments on three locations using a phage cocktail of the six phages showed variable results. In one trial, symptom development was attenuated. These data suggest some potential for phage therapy in controlling bacterial blight of leek, pending optimization of formulation and application methods.

  10. Control of fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) on apple trees with trunk-injected plant resistance inducers and antibiotics and assessment of induction of pathogenesis-related protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Aćimović, Srđan G.; Zeng, Quan; McGhee, Gayle C.; Sundin, George W.; Wise, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Management of fire blight is complicated by limitations on use of antibiotics in agriculture, antibiotic resistance development, and limited efficacy of alternative control agents. Even though successful in control, preventive antibiotic sprays also affect non-target bacteria, aiding the selection for resistance which could ultimately be transferred to the pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Trunk injection is a target-precise pesticide delivery method that utilizes tree xylem to distribute injected compounds. Trunk injection could decrease antibiotic usage in the open environment and increase the effectiveness of compounds in fire blight control. In field experiments, after 1–2 apple tree injections of either streptomycin, potassium phosphites (PH), or acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM), significant reduction of blossom and shoot blight symptoms was observed compared to water injected control trees. Overall disease suppression with streptomycin was lower than typically observed following spray applications to flowers. Trunk injection of oxytetracycline resulted in excellent control of shoot blight severity, suggesting that injection is a superior delivery method for this antibiotic. Injection of both ASM and PH resulted in the significant induction of PR-1, PR-2, and PR-8 protein genes in apple leaves indicating induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) under field conditions. The time separating SAR induction and fire blight symptom suppression indicated that various defensive compounds within the SAR response were synthesized and accumulated in the canopy. ASM and PH suppressed fire blight even after cessation of induced gene expression. With the development of injectable formulations and optimization of doses and injection schedules, the injection of protective compounds could serve as an effective option for fire blight control. PMID:25717330

  11. Control of fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) on apple trees with trunk-injected plant resistance inducers and antibiotics and assessment of induction of pathogenesis-related protein genes.

    PubMed

    Aćimović, Srđan G; Zeng, Quan; McGhee, Gayle C; Sundin, George W; Wise, John C

    2015-01-01

    Management of fire blight is complicated by limitations on use of antibiotics in agriculture, antibiotic resistance development, and limited efficacy of alternative control agents. Even though successful in control, preventive antibiotic sprays also affect non-target bacteria, aiding the selection for resistance which could ultimately be transferred to the pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Trunk injection is a target-precise pesticide delivery method that utilizes tree xylem to distribute injected compounds. Trunk injection could decrease antibiotic usage in the open environment and increase the effectiveness of compounds in fire blight control. In field experiments, after 1-2 apple tree injections of either streptomycin, potassium phosphites (PH), or acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM), significant reduction of blossom and shoot blight symptoms was observed compared to water injected control trees. Overall disease suppression with streptomycin was lower than typically observed following spray applications to flowers. Trunk injection of oxytetracycline resulted in excellent control of shoot blight severity, suggesting that injection is a superior delivery method for this antibiotic. Injection of both ASM and PH resulted in the significant induction of PR-1, PR-2, and PR-8 protein genes in apple leaves indicating induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) under field conditions. The time separating SAR induction and fire blight symptom suppression indicated that various defensive compounds within the SAR response were synthesized and accumulated in the canopy. ASM and PH suppressed fire blight even after cessation of induced gene expression. With the development of injectable formulations and optimization of doses and injection schedules, the injection of protective compounds could serve as an effective option for fire blight control.

  12. Identification of genetic loci associated with fire blight resistance in Malus through combined use of QTL and association mapping.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Awais; Zhao, Youfu Frank; Korban, Schuyler S

    2013-07-01

    Fire blight, incited by the enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a destructive disease of Rosaceae, particularly of apples and pears. There are reports on the molecular mechanisms underlying E. amylovora pathogenesis and how the host activates its resistance mechanism. The host's resistance mechanism is quantitatively controlled, although some major genes might also be involved. Thus far, quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and differential expression studies have been used to elucidate those genes and/or genomic regions underlying quantitative resistance present in the apple genome. In this study, an effort is undertaken to dissect the genetic basis of fire blight resistance in apple using both QTL and genome-wide association mapping. On the basis of an F1 pedigree of 'Coop 16' × 'Coop 17' and a genome-wide association study (GWAS) mapping population of Malus accessions (species, old and new cultivars and selections), new QTLs and associations have been identified. A total of three QTLs for resistance to fire blight, with above 95% significant logarithm of odds threshold value of 2.5, have been identified on linkage groups (LGs) 02, 06, and 15 of the apple genome with phenotypic variation explained values of 14.7, 20.1 and 17.4, respectively. Although elevated P-values with signals for marker-trait associations are observed for some LGs, these are not found to be significant. However, a total of 34 significant associations, with P-values ≥0.02, have been detected including 8 for lesion length at 7 days following inoculation (PL1), 14 for lesion length at 14 days following inoculation (PL2), and 12 for shoot length. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. Development of bioformulation and delivery system of Pseudomonas fluorescens against bacterial leaf blight of rice (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae).

    PubMed

    Jambhulkar, P P; Sharma, P

    2014-09-01

    Antagonistic potential of Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate RRb-11 has been evaluated against bacterial leaf blight (BLB) pathogen of rice in vitro, in vivo, microplot and field tests. RRb-11 isolate mass multiplied in substrates like talc and kaolinite powder and bran of barley, soybean and wheat to prepare suitable bioformulation. The maximum shelf life of P. fluorescens was recorded in talc based bioformulation up to 150 days after storage. In rhizosphere competence study, the root rhizosphere of talc, kaolinite and barley based bioformulation treated plants showed good survivability and competence even up to 90 days after treatment. In field study, the talc based bioformulation was applied and the best results were obtained when talc based bioformulation of P. fluorescens RRb-11 was applied as seed treatment, seedling root dip and soil application in combination which reduced the disease by 92.3 and 88.5% over control in the year 2009 and 2010, respectively. This treatment also produced maximum yield of 3.88 t ha(-1) i.e., 61% greater than control.

  14. Management of Bacterial Blight of Lilac Caused by Pseudomonas syringae by Growing Plants under Plastic Shelters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae causes some of the most economically-important bacterial diseases affecting woody perennials grown by the nursery industry in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. In this study, we evaluated a cultural control practice, placement of plants in plastic shelter...

  15. First report of bacterial blight of crucifers caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in Australia.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis is a severe pathogen of crucifers across the U.S. Strains isolated from diseased white mustard (Brassica hirta), Brassica nigra (black mustard) and rape (Brassica napus var. napus) in Australia were reported to be similar to a pathogen recently transferred to P....

  16. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1) and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90). In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY transcription factor

  17. Evaluation of kasugamycin for fire blight management, effect on nontarget bacteria, and assessment of kasugamycin resistance potential in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    McGhee, Gayle C; Sundin, George W

    2011-02-01

    The emergence and spread of streptomycin-resistant strains of Erwinia amylovora in Michigan has necessitated the evaluation of new compounds effective for fire blight control. The aminoglycoside antibiotic kasugamycin (Ks) targets the bacterial ribosome and is particularly active against E. amylovora. The efficacy of Ks formulated as Kasumin 2L for control of fire blight was evaluated in six experiments conducted over four field seasons in our experimental orchards in East Lansing, MI. Blossom blight control was statistically equivalent to the industry standard streptomycin in all experiments. E. amylovora populations remained constant on apple flower stigmas pretreated with Kasumin and were ≈100-fold lower than on stigmas treated with water. Kasumin applied to apple trees in the field also resulted in a 100-fold reduced total culturable bacterial population compared with trees treated with water. We performed a prospective analysis of the potential for kasugamycin resistance (Ks(R)) development in E. amylovora which focused on spontaneous resistance development and acquisition of a transferrable Ks(R) gene. In replicated lab experiments, the development of spontaneous resistance in E. amylovora to Ks at 250 or 500 ppm was not observed when cells were directly plated on medium containing high concentrations of the antibiotic. However, exposure to increasing concentrations of Ks in media (initial concentration 25 μg ml(-1)) resulted in the selection of Ks resistance (at 150 μg ml(-1)) in the E. amylovora strains Ea110, Ea273, and Ea1189. Analysis of mutants indicated that they harbored mutations in the kasugamycin target ksgA gene and that all mutants were impacted in relative fitness observable through a reduced growth rate in vitro and decreased virulence in immature pear fruit. The possible occurrence of a reservoir of Ks(R) genes in orchard environments was also examined. Culturable gram-negative bacteria were surveyed from six experimental apple orchards

  18. Screening low fire blight susceptible Crataegus species for host suitability to hawthorn leaf-curling aphids (Dysaphis spp.).

    PubMed

    Bribosia, E; Bylemans, D; Van Impe, G; Migon, M

    2002-01-01

    The group of hawthorn leaf-curling aphids (Dysaphis spp.) hosted by the common hawthorn Crataegus monogyna Jacq. may play an important role in the biological control of the rosy apple aphid, Dysaphis plantaginea (Passerini), by increasing reproduction opportunities for the indigenous hymenopteran parasitoid Ephedrus persicae Froggatt. Unfortunately, most fruitgrowers hesitate to introduce the common hawthorn in their orchards because they fear fire blight infections which may be transmitted by this highly susceptible hawthron species. This potential hazard led us to investigate the suitability to leaf-curling aphids of alternative Crataegus species. As representative for these closely-related aphids, the species Dysaphis apiifolia petroselini (Börner) was used in the trials. Ten Crataegus species characterized by their very low susceptibility to fire blight were examined from two angles. Firstly, aphid sexuals were introduced in autumn onto the different species to verify whether egg laying could take place. Secondly, the development of fundatrices and gall formation were followed the next spring. Although eggs and mature fundatrices could be obtained on almost all species, no fundatrice-hosting galls were recorded in spring. The possible causes of these negative results with respect to the geographical origin of the particular Crataegus species involved in this work are discussed.

  19. pA506: A conjugative plasmid of the plant epiphyte Pseudomonas fluorescens A506

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas fluorescens A506 is an plant-epiphytic bacterium that is used commercially in the United States for the biological control of fire blight disease of pear and apple. Here, we demonstrate that A506 has a 57 kB conjugative plasmid that can transfer to other strains of Pseudomonas spp. and ...

  20. First report of bacterial leaf blight on mustard greens (Brassica juncea) caused by pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in Mississippi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2010, a brassica leafy greens grower in Sunflower County, Mississippi, observed scattered outbreaks of a leaf blight disease on mustard greens (Brassica juncea) in a 180-hectare field. A severe outbreak of leaf blight occurred on mustard greens and turnip greens (Brassica rapa) in the same field...

  1. Identification of a major QTL together with several minor additive or epistatic QTLs for resistance to fire blight in apple in two related progenies.

    PubMed

    Calenge, F; Drouet, D; Denancé, C; Van de Weg, W E; Brisset, M-N; Paulin, J-P; Durel, C-E

    2005-06-01

    Although fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus x domestica) worldwide, no major, qualitative gene for resistance to this disease has been identified to date in apple. We conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis in two F(1) progenies derived from crosses between the cultivars Fiesta and either Discovery or Prima. Both progenies were inoculated in the greenhouse with the same strain of E. amylovora, and the length of necrosis was scored 7 days and 14 days after inoculation. Additive QTLs were identified using the MAPQTL: software, and digenic epistatic interactions, which are an indication of putative epistatic QTLs, were detected by two-way analyses of variance. A major QTL explaining 34.3--46.6% of the phenotypic variation was identified on linkage group (LG) 7 of Fiesta in both progenies at the same genetic position. Four minor QTLs were also identified on LGs 3, 12 and 13. In addition, several significant digenic interactions were identified in both progenies. These results confirm the complex polygenic nature of resistance to fire blight in the progenies studied and also reveal the existence of a major QTL on LG7 that is stable in two distinct genetic backgrounds. This QTL could be a valuable target in marker-assisted selection to obtain new, fire blight-resistant apple cultivars and forms a starting point for discovering the function of the genes underlying such QTLs involved in fire blight control.

  2. Expression of Biphenyl Synthase Genes and Formation of Phytoalexin Compounds in Three Fire Blight-Infected Pyrus communis Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Swiddan, Asya K.; Abdelaziz, Sahar; Gaid, Mariam; Richter, Klaus; Fischer, Thilo C.; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Pear (Pyrus communis) is an economically important fruit crop. Drops in yield and even losses of whole plantations are caused by diseases, most importantly fire blight which is triggered by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In response to the infection, biphenyls and dibenzofurans are formed as phytoalexins, biosynthesis of which is initiated by biphenyl synthase (BIS). Two PcBIS transcripts were cloned from fire blight-infected leaves and the encoded enzymes were characterized regarding substrate specificities and kinetic parameters. Expression of PcBIS1 and PcBIS2 was studied in three pear cultivars after inoculation with E. amylovora. Both PcBIS1 and PcBIS2 were expressed in ‘Harrow Sweet’, while only PcBIS2 transcripts were detected in ‘Alexander Lucas’ and ‘Conference’. Expression of the PcBIS genes was observed in both leaves and the transition zone of the stem; however, biphenyls and dibenzofurans were only detected in stems. The maximum phytoalexin level (~110 μg/g dry weight) was observed in the transition zone of ‘Harrow Sweet’, whereas the concentrations were ten times lower in ‘Conference’ and not even detectable in ‘Alexander Lucas’. In ‘Harrow Sweet’, the accumulation of the maximum phytoalexin level correlated with the halt of migration of the transition zone, whereby the residual part of the shoot survived. In contrast, the transition zones of ‘Alexander Lucas’ and ‘Conference’ advanced down to the rootstock, resulting in necrosis of the entire shoots. PMID:27410389

  3. [Electron microscopy and restriction analysis of bacteriophages isolated from quince and pear with symptoms of fire blight].

    PubMed

    Tovkach, F I; Faĭdiuk, Iu V; Korol', N A; Kushkina, A I; Moroz, S N; Muchnik, F V

    2013-01-01

    Phage populations of isolates from quince and pear affected with fire blight disease were studied using electron microscopy, restriction analysis and both agarose gel electrophoresis of particles and host range scoping method. The isolate from quince (pMA1) comprises at least three phage populations and two phage variants that can be detected on different bacterial indicators. After titration of this isolate on Erwinia amylovora the bacteriophage KEY of B1 morphotype with the genome size of 82.4 kb was identified. The isolate pMA1 also includes a unique phage population 4*, which can be identified on the test bacteria Pantoea agglomerans (Pag) g150. Two analogous populations being also present in the isolate pMA1 that appeared to be close phage variants with almost identical Hpal-restriction patterns can be identified using Pag g157 and 9/7-1. The situation is similar in the case of phage isolates from pear, pMG. Three phage populations identified in it using three different indicators represent the same phage of C1 morphotype (TT10-27) with a genome size of 71.4 kb. At least two other phage populations were also detected in the same isolate using P. agglomerans 9/7-2 as an indicator. A model system allowing the most efficient analysis of the isolates for the presence of different phage populations and phage variants in plants infected by fire blight disease has been developed. It provides for using three indicator enterobacterial species closely associated with the plants: E. amylovora, Erwinia "horticola" and Pagglomerans and ignoring of the phage cloning procedure.

  4. Detoxification of oxalic acid by pseudomonas fluorescens strain pfMDU2: implications for the biological control of rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Nagarajkumar, M; Jayaraj, J; Muthukrishnan, S; Bhaskaran, R; Velazhahan, R

    2005-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani isolates varying in their virulence were tested for their ability to produce oxalic acid (OA) in vitro. The results indicated that the virulent isolates produced more OA than the less virulent isolates. In order to isolate OA-detoxifying strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, rhizosphere soil of rice was drenched with 100 mM OA and fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated from the OA-amended soil by using King's medium B. These isolates were tested for their antagonistic effect towards growth of R. solani in vitro. Among them P. fluorescens PfMDU2 was the most effective in inhibiting the mycelial growth of R. solani. P. fluorescens PfMDU2 was capable of detoxifying OA and several proteins were detected in the culture filtrate of PfMDU2 when it was grown in medium containing OA. To investigate whether the gene(s) involved in OA-detoxification resides on the plasmids in P. fluorescens PfMDU2, a plasmid-deficient strain of P. fluorescens was generated by plasmid curing. The plasmid-deficient strain (PfMDU2P-) failed to grow in medium containing OA and did not inhibit the growth of R. solani. Both PfMDU2 and PfMDU2P- were tested for their efficacy in controlling sheath blight of rice under greenhouse conditions. Seed treatment followed by soil application of rice with P. fluorescens strain, PfMDU2, reduced the severity of sheath blight by 75% compared with the control, whereas PfMDU2P- failed to control sheath blight disease.

  5. Two distinct major QTL for resistance to fire blight co-localize on linkage group 12 in apple genotypes 'Evereste' and Malus floribunda clone 821.

    PubMed

    Durel, C-E; Denancé, C; Brisset, M-N

    2009-02-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus xdomestica) worldwide. No major, qualitative gene for resistance to this disease has been identified so far in apple. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was performed in two F1 progenies derived from two controled crosses: one between the susceptible rootstock cultivar 'MM106' and the resistant ornamental cultivar 'Evereste' and the other one between the moderately susceptible cultivar 'Golden Delicious' and the wild apple Malus floribunda clone 821, with unknown level of fire blight resistance. Both progenies were inoculated in the greenhouse with the same reference strain of E. amylovora. The length of stem necrosis was scored 7 and 14 days after inoculation. A strong QTL effect was identified in both 'Evereste' and M. floribunda 821 at a similar position on the distal region of linkage group 12 of the apple genome. From 50% to 70% of the phenotypic variation was explained by the QTL in 'Evereste' progeny according to the scored trait. More than 40% of the phenotypic variation was explained by the M. floribunda QTL in the second progeny. It was shown that 'Evereste' and M. floribunda 821 carried distinct QTL alleles at that genomic position. A small additional QTL was identified in 'Evereste' on linkage group 15, which explained about 6% of the phenotypic variation. Although it was not possible to confirm whether or not 'Evereste' and M. floribunda QTL belonged to the same locus or two distinct closely related loci, these QTL can be valuable targets in marker-assisted selection to obtain fire blight resistant apple cultivars and form a starting point for discovering the function of the genes controlling apple fire blight resistance.

  6. Molecular analyses of Erwinia amylovora strains isolated in Russia, Poland, Slovenia and Austria describing further spread of fire blight in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jock, Susanne; Wensing, Annette; Pulawska, Joanna; Drenova, Nataliya; Dreo, Tanja; Geider, Klaus

    2013-08-25

    Fire blight, a bacteriosis of apple and pear, was assayed with molecular tools to associate its origin in Russia, Slovenia and south-eastern Austria with neighboring countries. The identification of all investigated strains was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy except one. Independent isolation was verified by the level of amylovoran synthesis and by the number of short sequence DNA repeats in plasmid pEA29. DNA of gently lysed E. amylovora strains from Russia, Slovenia, Austria, Hungary, Italy, Spain, Croatia, Poland, Central Europe and Iran was treated with restriction enzymes XbaI and SpeI to create typical banding patterns for PFGE analysis. The pattern Pt2 indicated that most Russian E. amylovora strains were related to strains from Turkey and Iran. Strains from Slovenia exhibited patterns Pt3 and Pt2, both present in the neighboring countries. Strains were also probed for the recently described plasmid pEI70 detected in Pt1 strains from Poland and in Pt3 strains from other countries. The distribution of pattern Pt3 suggests distribution of fire blight from Belgium and the Netherlands to Central Spain and Northern Italy and then north to Carinthia. The PFGE patterns indicate that trade of plants may have introduced fire blight into southern parts of Europe proceeded by sequential spread.

  7. First report of bacterial blight of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel bacterial leaf blight was seen in field grown cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) in Monterey County, California in 2006. Koch’s postulates were completed and etiology of the pathogen was determined. Physiological and molecular characterization showed that the pathogen was Pseudomon...

  8. First Report of Bacterial Leaf Blight on Broccoli and Cabbage Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. alisalensis in South Carolina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In May 2009, leaf spot and leaf blight symptoms were observed on broccoli (B. oleracea var. italica) and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) on several farms in Lexington County, the major brassica-growing region of South Carolina. Affected areas ranged from scattered disease foci within fiel...

  9. Pathogenicity and infection strategies of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in Rosaceae: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, K; Holtappels, M; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Valcke, R

    2013-05-01

    Plants are host to a large amount of pathogenic bacteria. Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is an important disease in Rosaceae. Pathogenicity of E. amylovora is greatly influenced by the production of exopolysaccharides, such as amylovoran, and the use of the type III secretion system, which enables bacteria to penetrate host tissue and cause disease. When infection takes place, plants have to rely on the ability of each cell to recognize the pathogen and the signals emanating from the infection site in order to generate several defence mechanisms. These mechanisms consist of physical barriers and the production of antimicrobial components, both in a preformed and an inducible manner. Inducible defence responses are activated upon the recognition of elicitor molecules by plant cell receptors, either derived from invading micro-organisms or from pathogen-induced degradation of plant tissue. This recognition event triggers a signal transduction cascade, leading to a range of defence responses [reactive oxygen species (ROS), plant hormones, secondary metabolites, …] and redeployment of cellular energy in a fast, efficient and multiresponsive manner, which prevents further pathogen ingress. This review highlights the research that has been performed during recent years regarding this specific plant-pathogen interaction between Erwinia amylovora and Rosaceae, with a special emphasis on the pathogenicity and the infection strategy of E. amylovora and the possible defence mechanisms of the plant against this disease.

  10. Diversity, evolution, and functionality of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) regions in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2011-06-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas system confers acquired heritable immunity against mobile nucleic acid elements in prokaryotes, limiting phage infection and horizontal gene transfer of plasmids. In CRISPR arrays, characteristic repeats are interspersed with similarly sized nonrepetitive spacers derived from transmissible genetic elements and acquired when the cell is challenged with foreign DNA. New spacers are added sequentially and the number and type of CRISPR units can differ among strains, providing a record of phage/plasmid exposure within a species and giving a valuable typing tool. The aim of this work was to investigate CRISPR diversity in the highly homogeneous species Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. A total of 18 CRISPR genotypes were defined within a collection of 37 cosmopolitan strains. Strains from Spiraeoideae plants clustered in three major groups: groups II and III were composed exclusively of bacteria originating from the United States, whereas group I generally contained strains of more recent dissemination obtained in Europe, New Zealand, and the Middle East. Strains from Rosoideae and Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis indica) clustered separately and displayed a higher intrinsic diversity than that of isolates from Spiraeoideae plants. Reciprocal exclusion was generally observed between plasmid content and cognate spacer sequences, supporting the role of the CRISPR/Cas system in protecting against foreign DNA elements. However, in several group III strains, retention of plasmid pEU30 is inconsistent with a functional CRISPR/Cas system.

  11. Erwinia amylovora novel plasmid pEI70: complete sequence, biogeography, and role in aggressiveness in the fire blight phytopathogen.

    PubMed

    Llop, Pablo; Cabrefiga, Jordi; Smits, Theo H M; Dreo, Tanja; Barbé, Silvia; Pulawska, Joanna; Bultreys, Alain; Blom, Jochen; Duffy, Brion; Montesinos, Emilio; López, María M

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomics of several strains of Erwinia amylovora, a plant pathogenic bacterium causal agent of fire blight disease, revealed that its diversity is primarily attributable to the flexible genome comprised of plasmids. We recently identified and sequenced in full a novel 65.8 kb plasmid, called pEI70. Annotation revealed a lack of known virulence-related genes, but found evidence for a unique integrative conjugative element related to that of other plant and human pathogens. Comparative analyses using BLASTN showed that pEI70 is almost entirely included in plasmid pEB102 from E. billingiae, an epiphytic Erwinia of pome fruits, with sequence identities superior to 98%. A duplex PCR assay was developed to survey the prevalence of plasmid pEI70 and also that of pEA29, which had previously been described in several E. amylovora strains. Plasmid pEI70 was found widely dispersed across Europe with frequencies of 5-92%, but it was absent in E. amylovora analyzed populations from outside of Europe. Restriction analysis and hybridization demonstrated that this plasmid was identical in at least 13 strains. Curing E. amylovora strains of pEI70 reduced their aggressiveness on pear, and introducing pEI70 into low-aggressiveness strains lacking this plasmid increased symptoms development in this host. Discovery of this novel plasmid offers new insights into the biogeography, evolution and virulence determinants in E. amylovora.

  12. Molecular and physiological properties of bacteriophages from North America and Germany affecting the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Lurz, Rudi; Kube, Michael; Quedenau, Claudia; Jelkmann, Wilhelm; Geider, Klaus

    2011-11-01

    For possible control of fire blight affecting apple and pear trees, we characterized Erwinia amylovora phages from North America and Germany. The genome size determined by electron microscopy (EM) was confirmed by sequence data and major coat proteins were identified from gel bands by mass spectroscopy. By their morphology from EM data, φEa1h and φEa100 were assigned to the Podoviridae and φEa104 and φEa116 to the Myoviridae. Host ranges were essentially confined to E. amylovora, strains of the species Erwinia pyrifoliae, E. billingiae and even Pantoea stewartii were partially sensitive. The phages φEa1h and φEa100 were dependent on the amylovoran capsule of E. amylovora, φEa104 and φEa116 were not. The Myoviridae efficiently lysed their hosts and protected apple flowers significantly better than the Podoviridae against E. amylovora and should be preferred in biocontrol experiments. We have also isolated and partially characterized E. amylovora phages from apple orchards in Germany. They belong to the Podoviridae or Myoviridae with a host range similar to the phages isolated in North America. In EM measurements, the genome sizes of the Podoviridae were smaller than the genomes of the Myoviridae from North America and from Germany, which differed from each other in corresponding nucleotide sequences.

  13. Identification of QTLs for resistance to fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) in Malus sieversii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Malus sieversii (Ms) is the progenitor of the domestic apple. Ms PI613981 is elite scion material collected at a xerophytic site in Kazakhstan from a tree free of disease and insect damage. The F1 family GMAL4593 (‘Royal Gala’ X PI631981) is segregating for resistance to both apple scab and fire bl...

  14. Recovery of Bacillus and Pseudomonas spp. from the 'fired plots' under shifting cultivation in northeast India.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anita; Chaudhry, Shivaji; Sharma, Avinash; Choudhary, Vipin Singh; Malviya, Mukesh Kumar; Chamoli, Swati; Rinu, K; Trivedi, Pankaj; Palni, Lok Man S

    2011-01-01

    Soil samples, collected after the fire operations at agricultural sites under shifting cultivation in northeast India, were subjected to physico-chemical and microbial analysis. The fire affected various physico-chemical properties of the soil. Significant differences in pH and electrical conductivity were recorded in soil of fired and fallow plots. Significantly higher amounts of total organic carbon and nitrogen were estimated in fallow plots as compared to the fired. Difference in total phosphates was not significant. The fire operations resulted in stimulation of microbial communities. The bacteria were the most affected group followed by actinomycetes and fungi, respectively. The bacterial and actinomycetes counts were significantly higher in fired plots as compared to the fallow plots. The representative bacterial species recovered from the 'fired plots' belonged to the genus Bacillus and Pseudomonas. 16S rRNA analysis revealed their maximum similarity with B. clausii, B. licheniformis, B. megaterium, B. subtilis, B. thuringiensis, P. aeruginosa and P. stutzeri. Most of these species were found to be positive for phosphate solubilization and antagonism in plate based assays. In view of the importance of Bacillus and Pseudomonas species in plant growth promotion and biocontrol, recovery of these species after fire operations is indicative of the microbiological merit of shifting cultivation.

  15. Silencing of flavanone-3-hydroxylase in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) leads to accumulation of flavanones, but not to reduced fire blight susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Flachowsky, Henryk; Halbwirth, Heidi; Treutter, Dieter; Richter, Klaus; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Szankowski, Iris; Gosch, Christian; Stich, Karl; Fischer, Thilo C

    2012-02-01

    Transgenic antisense flavanone-3-hydroxylase apple plants were produced to mimic the effect of the agrochemical prohexadione-Ca on apple leaves. This enzyme inhibitor for 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases is used as a growth retardant and for control of secondary fire blight of leaves. Like using the agent, silencing of flavanone-3-hydroxylase leads to an accumulation of flavanones in leaves, but in contrast not to the formation of 3-deoxyflavonoids. In prohexadione-Ca treated leaves the 3-deoxyflavonoid luteoforol is formed from accumulating flavanones, acting as an antimicrobial compound against the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Seemingly, the silencing of just one of the 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases (in apple also flavonol synthase and anthocyanidin synthase take part downstream in the pathway) does not provide a sufficiently high ratio of flavanones to dihydroflavonols. This seems to be needed to let the dihydroflavonol-4-reductase/flavanone-4-reductase enzyme reduce flavanones to luteoforol, and to let this be reduced by the leucoanthocyanidin-4-reductase/3-deoxyleucoanthocyanidin-4-reductase, each acting with their respective weak secondary activities. Accordingly, also the intended inducible resistance to fire blight by prohexadione-Ca is not observed with the antisense flavanone-3-hydroxylase apple plants. On the other hand, for most transgenic lines with strong flavanone-4-reductase down-regulation, up-regulation of gene expression for the other flavonoid genes was found. This provides further evidence for the feedback regulation of flavonoid gene expression having been previously reported for the prohexadione-Ca inhibited apple plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic characterization of the HrpL regulon of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora reveals novel virulence factors.

    PubMed

    McNally, R Ryan; Toth, Ian K; Cock, Peter J A; Pritchard, Leighton; Hedley, Pete E; Morris, Jenny A; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2012-02-01

    The bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, an economically significant disease of apple and pear. Disease initiation by E. amylovora requires the translocation of effector proteins into host cells via the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS). The alternative sigma factor HrpL positively regulates the transcription of structural and translocated components of the T3SS via hrp promoter elements. To characterize genome-wide HrpL-dependent gene expression in E. amylovora Ea1189, wild-type and Ea1189ΔhrpL strains were cultured in hrp-inducing minimal medium, and total RNA was compared using a custom microarray designed to represent the annotated genes of E. amylovora ATCC 49946. The results revealed 24 genes differentially regulated in Ea1189ΔhrpL relative to Ea1189 with fold-change expression ratios greater than 1.5; of these, 19 genes exhibited decreased transcript abundance and five genes showed increased transcript abundance relative to Ea1189. To expand our understanding of the HrpL regulon and to elucidate direct versus indirect HrpL-mediated effects on gene expression, the genome of E. amylovora ATCC 49946 was examined in silico using a hidden Markov model assembled from known Erwinia spp. hrp promoters. This technique identified 15 putative type III novel hrp promoters, seven of which were validated with quantitative polymerase chain reaction based on expression analyses. It was found that HrpL-regulated genes encode all known components of the hrp T3SS, as well as five putative type III effectors. Eight genes displayed apparent indirect HrpL regulation, suggesting that the HrpL regulon is connected to downstream signalling networks. The construction of deletion mutants of three novel HrpL-regulated genes resulted in the identification of additional virulence factors as well as mutants displaying abnormal motility and biofilm phenotypes.

  17. Cultivar-specific avirulence and virulence functions assigned to avrPphF in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the cause of bean halo-blight disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsiamis, George; Mansfield, John W.; Hockenhull, Ruth; Jackson, Robert W.; Sesma, Ane; Athanassopoulos, Evangelos; Bennett, Mark A.; Stevens, Conrad; Vivian, Alan; Taylor, John D.; Murillo, Jesus

    2000-01-01

    The avrPphF gene was cloned from Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola (Pph) races 5 and 7, based on its ability to confer avirulence towards bean cultivars carrying the R1 gene for halo-blight resistance, such as Red Mexican. avrPphF comprised two open reading frames, which were both required for function, and was located on a 154 kb plasmid (pAV511) in Pph. Strain RW60 of Pph, lacking pAV511, displayed a loss in virulence to a range of previously susceptible cultivars such as Tendergreen and Canadian Wonder. In Tendergreen virulence was restored to RW60 by avrPphF alone, whereas subcloned avrPphF in the absence of pAV511 greatly accelerated the hypersensitive resistance reaction caused by RW60 in Canadian Wonder. A second gene from pAV511, avrPphC, which controls avirulence to soybean, was found to block the activity of avrPphF in Canadian Wonder, but not in Red Mexican. avrPphF also conferred virulence in soybean. The multiple functions of avrPphF illustrate how effector proteins from plant pathogens have evolved to be recognized by R gene products and, therefore, be classified as encoded by avirulence genes. PMID:10880434

  18. First report of the crucifer pathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis causing bacterial blight on radish (Raphanus sativus) in Germany

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis is a severe pathogen of crucifers across the U.S. We compared a strain isolated from diseased radish (Raphanus sativus) in Germany to pathotypes and additional strains of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis and P. syringae pv. maculicola. We demonstrated that the patho...

  19. Metabolic Versatility and Antibacterial Metabolite Biosynthesis Are Distinguishing Genomic Features of the Fire Blight Antagonist Pantoea vagans C9-1

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Theo H. M.; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Ishimaru, Carol A.; Frey, Jürg E.; Stockwell, Virginia O.; Duffy, Brion

    2011-01-01

    Background Pantoea vagans is a commercialized biological control agent used against the pome fruit bacterial disease fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Compared to other biocontrol agents, relatively little is currently known regarding Pantoea genetics. Better understanding of antagonist mechanisms of action and ecological fitness is critical to improving efficacy. Principal Findings Genome analysis indicated two major factors contribute to biocontrol activity: competition for limiting substrates and antibacterial metabolite production. Pathways for utilization of a broad diversity of sugars and acquisition of iron were identified. Metabolism of sorbitol by P. vagans C9-1 may be a major metabolic feature in biocontrol of fire blight. Biosynthetic genes for the antibacterial peptide pantocin A were found on a chromosomal 28-kb genomic island, and for dapdiamide E on the plasmid pPag2. There was no evidence of potential virulence factors that could enable an animal or phytopathogenic lifestyle and no indication of any genetic-based biosafety risk in the antagonist. Conclusions Identifying key determinants contributing to disease suppression allows the development of procedures to follow their expression in planta and the genome sequence contributes to rationale risk assessment regarding the use of the biocontrol strain in agricultural systems. PMID:21789243

  20. Metabolic versatility and antibacterial metabolite biosynthesis are distinguishing genomic features of the fire blight antagonist Pantoea vagans C9-1.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Rezzonico, Fabio; Kamber, Tim; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Ishimaru, Carol A; Frey, Jürg E; Stockwell, Virginia O; Duffy, Brion

    2011-01-01

    Pantoea vagans is a commercialized biological control agent used against the pome fruit bacterial disease fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora. Compared to other biocontrol agents, relatively little is currently known regarding Pantoea genetics. Better understanding of antagonist mechanisms of action and ecological fitness is critical to improving efficacy. Genome analysis indicated two major factors Contribute to biocontrol activity: competition for limiting substrates and antibacterial metabolite production. Pathways for utilization of a broad diversity of sugars and acquisition of iron were identified. Metabolism of sorbitol by P. vagans C9-1 may be a major metabolic feature in biocontrol of fire blight. Biosynthetic genes for the antibacterial peptide pantocin A were found on a chromosomal 28-kb genomic island, and for dapdiamide E on the plasmid pPag2. There was no evidence of potential virulence factors that could enable an animal or phytopathogenic lifestyle and no indication of any genetic-based biosafety risk in the antagonist. Identifying key determinants contributing to disease suppression allows the development of procedures to follow their expression in planta and the genome sequence contributes to rationale risk assessment regarding the use of the biocontrol strain in agricultural systems.

  1. The role of luxS in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora is limited to metabolism and does not involve quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Duffy, Brion

    2007-10-01

    Erwinia amylovora is a gram-negative phytopathogen that causes fire blight of pome fruit and related members of the family Rosaceae. We sequenced the putative autoinducer-2 (AI-2) synthase gene luxS from E. amylovora. Diversity analysis indicated that this gene is extremely conserved among E. amylovora strains. Quorum sensing mediated by LuxS has been implicated in coordinated gene expression, growth, and virulence in other enterobacteria; however, our evidence suggests this is not the function in E. amylovora. Mutational analysis pointed to a role in colonization of apple blossoms, the primary infection court for fire blight, although little if any role in virulence on apple shoots and pear fruit was observed. Expression of key virulence genes hrpL and dspA/E was reduced in mutants of two E. amylovora strains. Stronger effects on gene expression were observed for metabolic genes involved in the activated methyl cycle with mutants having greater levels of expression. No quorum-sensing effect was observed in coculture experiments with wild-type and mutant strains either in vitro or in apple blossoms. Known receptors essential for AI-2 quorum sensing, the LuxPQ sensor kinase or the Lsr ABC-transporter, are absent in E. amylovora, further suggesting a primarily metabolic role for luxS in this bacterium.

  2. Development of molecular markers linked to the 'Fiesta' linkage group 7 major QTL for fire blight resistance and their application for marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad A; Durel, Charles-Eric; Duffy, Brion; Drouet, Damien; Kellerhals, Markus; Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-06-01

    A fire blight resistance QTL explaining 34.3%-46.6% of the phenotypic variation was recently identified on linkage group 7 of apple cultivar 'Fiesta' (F7). However, markers flanking this QTL were AFLP and RAPD markers unsuitable for marker-assisted selection (MAS). Two RAPD markers bracketing the QTL have been transformed into SCAR (sequence-characterized amplified region) markers, and an SSR marker specific for the region was developed. Pedigree analysis of 'Fiesta' with these markers enabled tracking of the F7 QTL allele back to 'Cox's Orange Pippin'. Stability of the effect of this QTL allele in different backgrounds was analyzed by inoculating progeny plants of a cross between 'Milwa', a susceptible cultivar, and '1217', a moderately resistant cultivar, and a set of cultivars that carry or lack the allele conferring increased fire blight resistance. Progenies and cultivars that carried both markers were significantly more resistant than those that did not carry both markers, indicating high stability of the F7 QTL allele in different backgrounds. This stability and the availability of reproducible markers bracketing the QTL make this locus promising for use in MAS.

  3. The genome of the Erwinia amylovora phage PhiEaH1 reveals greater diversity and broadens the applicability of phages for the treatment of fire blight.

    PubMed

    Meczker, Katalin; Dömötör, Dóra; Vass, János; Rákhely, Gábor; Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    The enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight. This study presents the analysis of the complete genome of phage PhiEaH1, isolated from the soil surrounding an E. amylovora-infected apple tree in Hungary. Its genome is 218 kb in size, containing 244 ORFs. PhiEaH1 is the second E. amylovora infecting phage from the Siphoviridae family whose complete genome sequence was determined. Beside PhiEaH2, PhiEaH1 is the other active component of Erwiphage, the first bacteriophage-based pesticide on the market against E. amylovora. Comparative genome analysis in this study has revealed that PhiEaH1 not only differs from the 10 formerly sequenced E. amylovora bacteriophages belonging to other phage families, but also from PhiEaH2. Sequencing of more Siphoviridae phage genomes might reveal further diversity, providing opportunities for the development of even more effective biological control agents, phage cocktails against Erwinia fire blight disease of commercial fruit crops.

  4. Engineering fire blight resistance into the apple cultivar 'Gala' using the FB_MR5 CC-NBS-LRR resistance gene of Malus × robusta 5.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Giovanni A L; Wöhner, Thomas; Fahrentrapp, Johannes; Kost, Thomas D; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Maria-Viola; Richter, Klaus; Patocchi, Andrea; Gessler, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    The fire blight susceptible apple cultivar Malus × domestica Borkh. cv. 'Gala' was transformed with the candidate fire blight resistance gene FB_MR5 originating from the crab apple accession Malus × robusta 5 (Mr5). A total of five different transgenic lines were obtained. All transgenic lines were shown to be stably transformed and originate from different transgenic events. The transgenic lines express the FB_MR5 either driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter and the ocs terminator or by its native promoter and terminator sequences. Phenotyping experiments were performed with Mr5-virulent and Mr5-avirulent strains of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Significantly less disease symptoms were detected on transgenic lines after inoculation with two different Mr5-avirulent E. amylovora strains, while significantly more shoot necrosis was observed after inoculation with the Mr5-virulent mutant strain ZYRKD3_1. The results of these experiments demonstrated the ability of a single gene isolated from the native gene pool of apple to protect a susceptible cultivar from fire blight. Furthermore, this gene is confirmed to be the resistance determinant of Mr5 as the transformed lines undergo the same gene-for-gene interaction in the host-pathogen relationship Mr5-E. amylovora. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Development of PCR and TaqMan PCR Assays to Detect Pseudomonas coronafaciens, a Causal Agent of Halo Blight of Oats.

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Hye; Noh, Young-Hee; Kim, Yong-Eon; Lee, Hyok-In; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas coronafaciens causes halo blight on oats and is a plant quarantine bacterium in many countries, including the Republic of Korea. Using of the certificated seed is important for control of the disease. Since effective detection method of P. coronafaciens is not available yet, PCR and TaqMan PCR assays for specific detection of P. coronafaciens were developed in this study. PCR primers were designed from the draft genome sequence of P. coronafaciens LMG 5060 which was obtained by the next-generation sequencing in this study. The PCR primer set Pc-12-F/Pc-12-R specifically amplified 498 bp from the 13 strains of P. coronafaciens isolated in the seven different countries (Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Germany, and New Zealand) and the nested primer set Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R specifically amplified 298 bp from those strains. The target-size PCR product was not amplified from the non-target bacteria with the PCR and nested primer sets. TaqMan PCR with Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R and a TaqMan probe, Pc-taqman, which were designed inside of the nested PCR amplicon, generated Ct values which in a dose-dependent manner to the amount of the target DNA and the Ct values of all the P. coronafaciens strains were above the threshold Ct value for positive detection. The TaqMan PCR generated positive Ct values from the seed extracts of the artificially inoculated oat seeds above 10 cfu/ml inoculation level. PCR and TaqMan PCR assays developed in this study will be useful tools to detect and identify the plant quarantine pathogen, P. coronafaciens.

  6. Development of PCR and TaqMan PCR Assays to Detect Pseudomonas coronafaciens, a Causal Agent of Halo Blight of Oats

    PubMed Central

    An, Ji-Hye; Noh, Young-Hee; Kim, Yong-Eon; Lee, Hyok-In; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas coronafaciens causes halo blight on oats and is a plant quarantine bacterium in many countries, including the Republic of Korea. Using of the certificated seed is important for control of the disease. Since effective detection method of P. coronafaciens is not available yet, PCR and TaqMan PCR assays for specific detection of P. coronafaciens were developed in this study. PCR primers were designed from the draft genome sequence of P. coronafaciens LMG 5060 which was obtained by the next-generation sequencing in this study. The PCR primer set Pc-12-F/Pc-12-R specifically amplified 498 bp from the 13 strains of P. coronafaciens isolated in the seven different countries (Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Germany, and New Zealand) and the nested primer set Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R specifically amplified 298 bp from those strains. The target-size PCR product was not amplified from the non-target bacteria with the PCR and nested primer sets. TaqMan PCR with Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R and a TaqMan probe, Pc-taqman, which were designed inside of the nested PCR amplicon, generated Ct values which in a dose-dependent manner to the amount of the target DNA and the Ct values of all the P. coronafaciens strains were above the threshold Ct value for positive detection. The TaqMan PCR generated positive Ct values from the seed extracts of the artificially inoculated oat seeds above 10 cfu/ml inoculation level. PCR and TaqMan PCR assays developed in this study will be useful tools to detect and identify the plant quarantine pathogen, P. coronafaciens. PMID:25774107

  7. Transgenic apple plants overexpressing the Lc gene of maize show an altered growth habit and increased resistance to apple scab and fire blight.

    PubMed

    Flachowsky, Henryk; Szankowski, Iris; Fischer, Thilo C; Richter, Klaus; Peil, Andreas; Höfer, Monika; Dörschel, Claudia; Schmoock, Sylvia; Gau, Achim E; Halbwirth, Heidrun; Hanke, Magda-Viola

    2010-02-01

    Transgenic apple plants (Malus x domestica cv. 'Holsteiner Cox') overexpressing the Leaf Colour (Lc) gene from maize (Zea mays) exhibit strongly increased production of anthocyanins and flavan-3-ols (catechins, proanthocyanidins). Greenhouse plants investigated in this study exhibit altered phenotypes with regard to growth habit and resistance traits. Lc-transgenic plants show reduced size, transversal gravitropism of lateral shoots, reduced trichome development, and frequently reduced shoot diameter and abnormal leaf development with fused leaves. Such phenotypes seem to be in accordance with a direct or an indirect effect on polar-auxin-transport in the transgenic plants. Furthermore, leaves often develop necrotic lesions resembling hypersensitive response lesions. In tests, higher resistance against fire blight (caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora) and against scab (caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis) is observed. These phenotypes are discussed with respect to the underlying altered physiology of the Lc-transgenic plants. The results are expected to be considered in apple breeding strategies.

  8. Transgenic apple plants overexpressing the chalcone 3-hydroxylase gene of Cosmos sulphureus show increased levels of 3-hydroxyphloridzin and reduced susceptibility to apple scab and fire blight.

    PubMed

    Hutabarat, Olly Sanny; Flachowsky, Henryk; Regos, Ionela; Miosic, Silvija; Kaufmann, Christine; Faramarzi, Shadab; Alam, Mohammed Zobayer; Gosch, Christian; Peil, Andreas; Richter, Klaus; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Treutter, Dieter; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of chalcone-3-hydroxylase provokes increased accumulation of 3-hydroxyphloridzin in Malus . Decreased flavonoid concentrations but unchanged flavonoid class composition were observed. The increased 3-hydroxyphlorizin contents correlate well with reduced susceptibility to fire blight and scab. The involvement of dihydrochalcones in the apple defence mechanism against pathogens is discussed but unknown biosynthetic steps in their formation hamper studies on their physiological relevance. The formation of 3-hydroxyphloretin is one of the gaps in the pathway. Polyphenol oxidases and cytochrome P450 dependent enzymes could be involved. Hydroxylation of phloretin in position 3 has high similarity to the B-ring hydroxylation of flavonoids catalysed by the well-known flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H). Using recombinant F3'H and chalcone 3-hydroxylase (CH3H) from Cosmos sulphureus we show that F3'H and CH3H accept phloretin to some extent but higher conversion rates are obtained with CH3H. To test whether CH3H catalyzes the hydroxylation of dihydrochalcones in planta and if this could be of physiological relevance, we created transgenic apple trees harbouring CH3H from C. sulphureus. The three transgenic lines obtained showed lower polyphenol concentrations but no shift between the main polyphenol classes dihydrochalcones, flavonols, hydroxycinnamic acids and flavan 3-ols. Increase of 3-hydroxyphloridzin within the dihydrochalcones and of epicatechin/catechin within soluble flavan 3-ols were observed. Decreased activity of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase and chalcone synthase/chalcone isomerase could partially explain the lower polyphenol concentrations. In comparison to the parent line, the transgenic CH3H-lines showed a lower disease susceptibility to fire blight and apple scab that correlated with the increased 3-hydroxyphlorizin contents.

  9. Differential Expression of Biphenyl Synthase Gene Family Members in Fire-Blight-Infected Apple ‘Holsteiner Cox’ 1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Gaid, Mariam M.; Belkheir, Asma K.; Hänsch, Robert; Richter, Klaus; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a devastating disease of apple (Malus × domestica). The phytoalexins of apple are biphenyls and dibenzofurans, whose carbon skeleton is formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS), a type III polyketide synthase. In the recently published genome sequence of apple ‘Golden Delicious’, nine BIS genes and four BIS gene fragments were detected. The nine genes fall into four subfamilies, referred to as MdBIS1 to MdBIS4. In a phylogenetic tree, the BIS amino acid sequences from apple and Sorbus aucuparia formed an individual cluster within the clade of the functionally diverse type III polyketide synthases. cDNAs encoding MdBIS1 to MdBIS4 were cloned from fire-blight-infected shoots of apple ‘Holsteiner Cox,’ heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and functionally analyzed. Benzoyl-coenzyme A and salicoyl-coenzyme A were the preferred starter substrates. In response to inoculation with E. amylovora, the BIS3 gene was expressed in stems of cv Holsteiner Cox, with highest transcript levels in the transition zone between necrotic and healthy tissues. The transition zone was the accumulation site of biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins. Leaves contained transcripts for BIS2 but failed to form immunodetectable amounts of BIS protein. In cell cultures of apple ‘Cox Orange,’ expression of the BIS1 to BIS3 genes was observed after the addition of an autoclaved E. amylovora suspension. Using immunofluorescence localization under a confocal laser-scanning microscope, the BIS3 protein in the transition zone of stems was detected in the parenchyma of the bark. Dot-shaped immunofluorescence was confined to the junctions between neighboring cortical parenchyma cells. PMID:22158676

  10. Same ammo, different weapons: enzymatic extracts from two apple genotypes with contrasted susceptibilities to fire blight (Erwinia amylovora) differentially convert phloridzin and phloretin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Matthieu; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Guyot, Sylvain; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2013-11-01

    The necrogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora responsible for the fire blight disease causes cell death in apple tissues to enrich intercellular spaces with nutrients. Apple leaves contain large amounts of dihydrochalcones (DHCs), including phloridzin and its aglycone phloretin. Previous work showed an important decrease in the constitutive DHCs stock in infected leaves, probably caused by transformation reactions during the infection process. At least two flavonoid transformation pathways have been described so far: deglucosylation and oxidation. The aim of the present study was to determine whether DHCs are differentially converted in two apple genotypes displaying contrasted susceptibilities to the disease. Different analyses were performed: i) enzymatic activity assays in infected leaves, ii) identification/quantification of end-products obtained after in vitro enzymatic reactions with DHCs, iii) evaluation of the bactericidal activity of end-products. The results of the enzymatic assays showed that deglucosylation was dominant over oxidation in the susceptible genotype MM106 while the opposite was observed in the resistant genotype Evereste. These data were confirmed by LC-UV/Vis-MS analysis of in vitro reaction mixtures, especially because higher levels of o-quinoid oxidation products of phloretin were measured by using the enzymatic extracts of Evereste infected leaves. Their presence correlated well with a strong bactericidal activity of the reaction mixtures. Thus, our results suggest that a differential transformation of DHCs occur in apple genotypes with a potential involvement in the establishment of the susceptibility or the resistance to fire blight, through the release of glucose or of highly bactericidal compounds respectively.

  11. First report of bacterial blight of crucifers caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in Minnesota on arugula (Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2011, bacterial blight of arugula (Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa; cv. Roquette) was observed in organically grown plants under overhead irrigation near Delano, MN. Approximately 80 to 100% of each planting was affected. Blue-green fluorescent pseudomonads were isolated consistently on King’s Medi...

  12. Formation of biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins in the transition zones of fire blight-infected stems of Malus domestica cv. 'Holsteiner Cox' and Pyrus communis cv. 'Conference'.

    PubMed

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Khalil, Mohammed N A; Beuerle, Till; Schuehly, Wolfgang; Richter, Klaus; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-05-01

    In the rosaceous subtribe Pyrinae (formerly subfamily Maloideae), pathogen attack leads to formation of biphenyls and dibenzofurans. Accumulation of these phytoalexins was studied in greenhouse-grown grafted shoots of Malus domestica cv. 'Holsteiner Cox' and Pyrus communis cv. 'Conference' after inoculation with the fire blight bacterium, Erwinia amylovora. No phytoalexins were found in leaves. However, both classes of defence compounds were detected in the transition zone of stems. The flanking stem segments above and below this zone, which were necrotic and healthy, respectively, were devoid of detectable phytoalexins. The transition zone of apple stems contained the biphenyls 3-hydroxy-5-methoxyaucuparin, aucuparin, noraucuparin and 2'-hydroxyaucuparin and the dibenzofurans eriobofuran and noreriobofuran. In pear, aucuparin, 2'-hydroxyaucuparin, noreriobofuran and in addition 3,4,5-trimethoxybiphenyl were detected. The total phytoalexin content in the transition zone of pear was 25 times lower than that in apple. Leaves and stems of mock-inoculated apple and pear shoots lacked phytoalexins. A number of biphenyls and dibenzofurans were tested for their in vitro antibacterial activity against some Erwinia amylovora strains. The most efficient compound was 3,5-dihydroxybiphenyl (MIC=115 μg/ml), the immediate product of biphenyl synthase which initiates phytoalexin biosynthesis.

  13. Discovery of Plant Phenolic Compounds That Act as Type III Secretion System Inhibitors or Inducers of the Fire Blight Pathogen, Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. PMID:23770912

  14. Diversity, Evolution, and Functionality of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR) Regions in the Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rezzonico, Fabio; Smits, Theo H. M.; Duffy, Brion

    2011-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas system confers acquired heritable immunity against mobile nucleic acid elements in prokaryotes, limiting phage infection and horizontal gene transfer of plasmids. In CRISPR arrays, characteristic repeats are interspersed with similarly sized nonrepetitive spacers derived from transmissible genetic elements and acquired when the cell is challenged with foreign DNA. New spacers are added sequentially and the number and type of CRISPR units can differ among strains, providing a record of phage/plasmid exposure within a species and giving a valuable typing tool. The aim of this work was to investigate CRISPR diversity in the highly homogeneous species Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. A total of 18 CRISPR genotypes were defined within a collection of 37 cosmopolitan strains. Strains from Spiraeoideae plants clustered in three major groups: groups II and III were composed exclusively of bacteria originating from the United States, whereas group I generally contained strains of more recent dissemination obtained in Europe, New Zealand, and the Middle East. Strains from Rosoideae and Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis indica) clustered separately and displayed a higher intrinsic diversity than that of isolates from Spiraeoideae plants. Reciprocal exclusion was generally observed between plasmid content and cognate spacer sequences, supporting the role of the CRISPR/Cas system in protecting against foreign DNA elements. However, in several group III strains, retention of plasmid pEU30 is inconsistent with a functional CRISPR/Cas system. PMID:21460108

  15. The outer membrane protein TolC is required for phytoalexin resistance and virulence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Al-Karablieh, Nehaya; Weingart, Helge; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2009-07-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight on several plant species such as apple and pear, which produce diverse phytoalexins as defence mechanisms. An evolutionary successful pathogen thus must develop resistance mechanisms towards these toxic compounds. The E. amylovora outer membrane protein, TolC, might mediate phytoalexin resistance through its interaction with the multidrug efflux pump, AcrAB. To prove this, a tolC mutant and an acrB/tolC double mutant were constructed. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of diverse antimicrobials and phytoalexins were determined for these mutants and compared with that of a previously generated acrB mutant. The tolC and arcB/tolC mutants were considerably more susceptible than the wild type but showed similar levels as the acrB mutant. The results clearly indicated that neither TolC nor AcrAB significantly interacted with other transport systems during the efflux of the tested toxic compounds. Survival and virulence assays on inoculated apple plants showed that pathogenicity and the ability of E. amylovora to colonize plant tissue were equally impaired by mutations of tolC and acrB/tolC. Our results allowed the conclusion that TolC plays an important role as a virulence and fitness factor of E. amylovora by mediating resistance towards phytoalexins through its exclusive interaction with AcrAB.

  16. Discovery of plant phenolic compounds that act as type III secretion system inhibitors or inducers of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Khokhani, Devanshi; Zhang, Chengfang; Li, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Quan; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hutchins, William; Zhou, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xin; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2013-09-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes a devastating disease called fire blight in rosaceous plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is one of the important virulence factors utilized by E. amylovora in order to successfully infect its hosts. By using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter construct combined with a high-throughput flow cytometry assay, a library of phenolic compounds and their derivatives was studied for their ability to alter the expression of the T3SS. Based on the effectiveness of the compounds on the expression of the T3SS pilus, the T3SS inhibitors 4-methoxy-cinnamic acid (TMCA) and benzoic acid (BA) and one T3SS inducer, trans-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethenylsulfonate (EHPES), were chosen for further study. Both the T3SS inhibitors (TMCA and BA) and the T3SS inducer (EHPES) were found to alter the expression of T3SS through the HrpS-HrpL pathway. Additionally, TMCA altered T3SS expression through the rsmBEa-RsmAEa system. Finally, we found that TMCA and BA weakened the hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco by suppressing the T3SS of E. amylovora. In our study, we identified phenolic compounds that specifically targeted the T3SS. The T3SS inhibitor may offer an alternative approach to antimicrobial therapy by targeting virulence factors of bacterial pathogens.

  17. Exploring new roles for the rpoS gene in the survival and virulence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Santander, Ricardo D; Monte-Serrano, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Herva, José J; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Biosca, Elena G

    2014-12-01

    Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight in economically important plants of the family Rosaceae. This bacterial pathogen spends part of its life cycle coping with starvation and other fluctuating environmental conditions. In many Gram-negative bacteria, starvation and other stress responses are regulated by the sigma factor RpoS. We obtained an E. amylovora rpoS mutant to explore the role of this gene in starvation responses and its potential implication in other processes not yet studied in this pathogen. Results showed that E. amylovora needs rpoS to develop normal starvation survival and viable but nonculturable (VBNC) responses. Furthermore, this gene contributed to stationary phase cross-protection against oxidative, osmotic, and acid stresses and was essential for cross-protection against heat shock, but nonessential against acid shock. RpoS also mediated regulation of motility, exopolysaccharide synthesis, and virulence in immature loquats, but not in pear plantlets, and contributed to E. amylovora survival in nonhost tissues during incompatible interactions. Our results reveal some unique roles for the rpoS gene in E. amylovora and provide new knowledge on the regulation of different processes related to its ecology, including survival in different environments and virulence in immature fruits.

  18. Erwinia amylovora loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid pathogen detection and on-site diagnosis of fire blight.

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, Andreas; Pothier, Joël F; Rezzonico, Fabio; Smits, Theo H M; Andreou, Michael; Boonham, Neil; Duffy, Brion; Frey, Jürg E

    2013-03-01

    Several molecular methods have been developed for the detection of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight in pear and apple, but none are truly applicable for on-site use in the field. We developed a fast, reliable and field applicable detection method using a novel target on the E. amylovora chromosome that we identified by applying a comparative genomic pipeline. The target coding sequences (CDSs) are both uniquely specific for and all-inclusive of E. amylovora genotypes. This avoids potential false negatives that can occur with most commonly used methods based on amplification of plasmid gene targets, which can vary among strains. Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) with OptiGene Genie II chemistry and instrumentation proved to be an exceptionally rapid (under 15 min) and robust method for detecting E. amylovora in orchards, as well as simple to use in the plant diagnostic laboratory. Comparative validation results using plant samples from inoculated greenhouse trials and from natural field infections (of regional and temporal diverse origin) showed that our LAMP had an equivalent or greater performance regarding sensitivity, specificity, speed and simplicity than real-time PCR (TaqMan), other LAMP assays, immunoassays and plating, demonstrating its utility for routine testing.

  19. A Statistical Comparison of the Blossom Blight Forecasts of MARYBLYT and Cougarblight with Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blossom blight forecasting is an important aspect of fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, management for both apple and pear. A comparison of the forecast accuracy of two common fire blight forecasters, MARYBLYT and Cougarblight, was performed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve ...

  20. Characterization of AcrD, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pump from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug efflux pumps are membrane translocases that have the ability to extrude a variety of structurally unrelated compounds from the cell. AcrD, a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) transporter, was shown to be involved in efflux of highly hydrophilic aminoglycosides and a limited number of amphiphilic compounds in E. coli. Here, a homologue of AcrD in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora was identified. Results The substrate specificity of AcrD was studied by overexpression of the corresponding gene from a high-copy plasmid in E. amylovora Ea1189-3, which is hypersensitive to many drugs due to a deficiency of the major multidrug pump AcrB. AcrD mediated resistance to several amphiphilic compounds including clotrimazole and luteolin, two compounds hitherto not described as substrates of AcrD in enterobacteria. However, AcrD was not able to expel aminoglycosides. An acrD mutant exhibited full virulence on apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. RT-PCR analysis revealed an induction of acrD expression in infected apple tissue but not on pear fruits. Moreover, a direct binding of BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component regulatory system BaeSR, to the acrD promoter was observed as has already been shown in other enterobacteria. Conclusions AcrD from E. amylovora is involved in resistance to a limited number of amphiphilic compounds, but in contrast to AcrD of E. coli, it is not involved in resistance to aminoglycosides. The expression of acrD was up-regulated by addition of the substrates deoxycholate, naringenin, tetracycline and zinc. AcrD appears to be regulated by the BaeSR two-component system, an envelope stress signal transduction pathway. PMID:24443882

  1. AraC/XylS Family Stress Response Regulators Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA in the Fire Blight Pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Pletzer, Daniel; Schweizer, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators of the AraC/XylS family have been associated with multidrug resistance, organic solvent tolerance, oxidative stress, and virulence in clinically relevant enterobacteria. In the present study, we identified four homologous AraC/XylS regulators, Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA, from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora Ea1189. Previous studies have shown that the regulators MarA, Rob, and SoxS from Escherichia coli mediate multiple-antibiotic resistance, primarily by upregulating the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. However, none of the four AraC/XylS regulators from E. amylovora was able to induce a multidrug resistance phenotype in the plant pathogen. Overexpression of rob led to a 2-fold increased expression of the acrA gene. However, the rob-overexpressing strain showed increased resistance to only a limited number of antibiotics. Furthermore, Rob was able to induce tolerance to organic solvents in E. amylovora by mechanisms other than efflux. We demonstrated that SoxS from E. amylovora is involved in superoxide resistance. A soxS-deficient mutant of Ea1189 was not able to grow on agar plates supplemented with the superoxide-generating agent paraquat. Furthermore, expression of soxS was induced by redox cycling agents. We identified two novel members of the AraC/XylS family in E. amylovora. PliA was highly upregulated during the early infection phase in apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. Multiple compounds were able to induce the expression of pliA, including apple leaf extracts, phenolic compounds, redox cycling agents, heavy metals, and decanoate. OpiA was shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic and alkaline pH stress responses. PMID:24936054

  2. Conventional and Real-Time PCRs for Detection of Erwinia piriflorinigrans Allow Its Distinction from the Fire Blight Pathogen, Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Barbé, Silvia; Bertolini, Edson; Roselló, Montserrat; Llop, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Erwinia piriflorinigrans is a new pathogenic species of the bacterial genus Erwinia that has been described recently in Spain. Accurate detection and identification of E. piriflorinigrans are challenging because its symptoms on pear blossoms are similar to those caused by Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Moreover, these two species share phenotypic and molecular characteristics. Two specific and sensitive conventional and real-time PCR protocols were developed to identify and detect E. piriflorinigrans and to differentiate it from E. amylovora and other species of this genus. These protocols were based on sequences from plasmid pEPIR37, which is present in all strains of E. piriflorinigrans analyzed. After the stability of the plasmid was demonstrated, the specificities of the protocols were confirmed by the amplification of all E. piriflorinigrans strains tested, whereas 304 closely related pathogenic and nonpathogenic Erwinia strains and microbiota from pear trees were not amplified. In sensitivity assays, 103 cells/ml extract were detected in spiked plant material by conventional or real-time PCR, and 102 cells/ml were detected in DNA extracted from spiked plant material by real-time PCR. The protocols developed here succeeded in detecting E. piriflorinigrans in 102 out of 564 symptomatic and asymptomatic naturally infected pear samples (flowers, cortex stem tissue, leaves, shoots, and fruitlets), in necrotic Pyracantha sp. blossoms, and in necrotic pear and apple tissues infected with both E. amylovora and E. piriflorinigrans. Therefore, these new tools can be used in epidemiological studies that will enhance our understanding of the life cycle of E. piriflorinigrans in different hosts and plant tissues and its interaction with E. amylovora. PMID:24509928

  3. AraC/XylS family stress response regulators Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA in the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Daniel; Schweizer, Gabriel; Weingart, Helge

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional regulators of the AraC/XylS family have been associated with multidrug resistance, organic solvent tolerance, oxidative stress, and virulence in clinically relevant enterobacteria. In the present study, we identified four homologous AraC/XylS regulators, Rob, SoxS, PliA, and OpiA, from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora Ea1189. Previous studies have shown that the regulators MarA, Rob, and SoxS from Escherichia coli mediate multiple-antibiotic resistance, primarily by upregulating the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. However, none of the four AraC/XylS regulators from E. amylovora was able to induce a multidrug resistance phenotype in the plant pathogen. Overexpression of rob led to a 2-fold increased expression of the acrA gene. However, the rob-overexpressing strain showed increased resistance to only a limited number of antibiotics. Furthermore, Rob was able to induce tolerance to organic solvents in E. amylovora by mechanisms other than efflux. We demonstrated that SoxS from E. amylovora is involved in superoxide resistance. A soxS-deficient mutant of Ea1189 was not able to grow on agar plates supplemented with the superoxide-generating agent paraquat. Furthermore, expression of soxS was induced by redox cycling agents. We identified two novel members of the AraC/XylS family in E. amylovora. PliA was highly upregulated during the early infection phase in apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. Multiple compounds were able to induce the expression of pliA, including apple leaf extracts, phenolic compounds, redox cycling agents, heavy metals, and decanoate. OpiA was shown to play a role in the regulation of osmotic and alkaline pH stress responses.

  4. Conventional and real-time PCRs for detection of Erwinia piriflorinigrans allow its distinction from the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Barbé, Silvia; Bertolini, Edson; Roselló, Montserrat; Llop, Pablo; López, María M

    2014-04-01

    Erwinia piriflorinigrans is a new pathogenic species of the bacterial genus Erwinia that has been described recently in Spain. Accurate detection and identification of E. piriflorinigrans are challenging because its symptoms on pear blossoms are similar to those caused by Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Moreover, these two species share phenotypic and molecular characteristics. Two specific and sensitive conventional and real-time PCR protocols were developed to identify and detect E. piriflorinigrans and to differentiate it from E. amylovora and other species of this genus. These protocols were based on sequences from plasmid pEPIR37, which is present in all strains of E. piriflorinigrans analyzed. After the stability of the plasmid was demonstrated, the specificities of the protocols were confirmed by the amplification of all E. piriflorinigrans strains tested, whereas 304 closely related pathogenic and nonpathogenic Erwinia strains and microbiota from pear trees were not amplified. In sensitivity assays, 10(3) cells/ml extract were detected in spiked plant material by conventional or real-time PCR, and 10(2) cells/ml were detected in DNA extracted from spiked plant material by real-time PCR. The protocols developed here succeeded in detecting E. piriflorinigrans in 102 out of 564 symptomatic and asymptomatic naturally infected pear samples (flowers, cortex stem tissue, leaves, shoots, and fruitlets), in necrotic Pyracantha sp. blossoms, and in necrotic pear and apple tissues infected with both E. amylovora and E. piriflorinigrans. Therefore, these new tools can be used in epidemiological studies that will enhance our understanding of the life cycle of E. piriflorinigrans in different hosts and plant tissues and its interaction with E. amylovora.

  5. Corn blight watch experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The corn blight problem is briefly described how the experiment was organized and conducted, the effect of the blight on the 1971 crop, and some conclusions that may be drawn as a result of the experiment. The information is based on preliminary reports of the Corn Blight Watch Steering Committee and incorporates much illustrative material conceived at Purdue University.

  6. Engineering of Bacteriophages Y2::dpoL1-C and Y2::luxAB for Efficient Control and Rapid Detection of the Fire Blight Pathogen, Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Born, Yannick; Fieseler, Lars; Thöny, Valentin; Leimer, Nadja; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J

    2017-06-15

    Erwinia amylovora is the causative agent of fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting members of the Rosaceae Alternatives to antibiotics for control of fire blight symptoms and outbreaks are highly desirable, due to increasing drug resistance and tight regulatory restrictions. Moreover, the available diagnostic methods either lack sensitivity, lack speed, or are unable to discriminate between live and dead bacteria. Owing to their extreme biological specificity, bacteriophages are promising alternatives for both aims. In this study, the virulent broad-host-range E. amylovora virus Y2 was engineered to enhance its killing activity and for use as a luciferase reporter phage, respectively. Toward these aims, a depolymerase gene of E. amylovora virus L1 (dpoL1-C) or a bacterial luxAB fusion was introduced into the genome of Y2 by homologous recombination. The genes were placed downstream of the major capsid protein orf68, under the control of the native promoter. The modifications did not affect viability of infectivity of the recombinant viruses. Phage Y2::dpoL1-C demonstrated synergistic activity between the depolymerase degrading the exopolysaccharide capsule and phage infection, which greatly enhanced bacterial killing. It also significantly reduced the ability of E. amylovora to colonize the surface of detached flowers. The reporter phage Y2::luxAB transduced bacterial luciferase into host cells and induced synthesis of large amounts of a LuxAB luciferase fusion. After the addition of aldehyde substrate, bioluminescence could be readily monitored, and this enabled rapid and specific detection of low numbers of viable bacteria, without enrichment, both in vitro and in plant material.IMPORTANCE Fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, is the major threat to global pome fruit production, with high economic losses every year. Bacteriophages represent promising alternatives to not only control the disease, but also for rapid diagnostics. To enhance

  7. Suppression of bacterial blight on mustard greens with host plant resistance and Acibenzolar-S-Methyl

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, attacks the leaves of most brassica vegetables, including mustard greens (Brassica juncea). ‘Carolina Broadleaf,’ a new mustard cultivar, is resistant to bacterial blight. Acibenzolar-S-methyl (trade name Actigard) has been used to m...

  8. Early changes in apoplast composition associated with defence and disease in interactions between Phaseolus vulgaris and the halo blight pathogen Pseudomonas syringae Pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Brendan M.; Neale, Helen C.; Geilfus, Christoph‐Martin; Jackson, Robert W.; Arnold, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The apoplast is the arena in which endophytic pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae grow and interact with plant cells. Using metabolomic and ion analysis techniques, this study shows how the composition of Phaseolus vulgaris leaf apoplastic fluid changes during the first six hours of compatible and incompatible interactions with two strains of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) that differ in the presence of the genomic island PPHGI‐1. Leaf inoculation with the avirulent island‐carrying strain Pph 1302A elicited effector‐triggered immunity (ETI) and resulted in specific changes in apoplast composition, including increases in conductivity, pH, citrate, γ‐aminobutyrate (GABA) and K+, that are linked to the onset of plant defence responses. Other apoplastic changes, including increases in Ca2+, Fe2/3+ Mg2+, sucrose, β‐cyanoalanine and several amino acids, occurred to a relatively similar extent in interactions with both Pph 1302A and the virulent, island‐less strain Pph RJ3. Metabolic footprinting experiments established that Pph preferentially metabolizes malate, glucose and glutamate, but excludes certain other abundant apoplastic metabolites, including citrate and GABA, until preferred metabolites are depleted. These results demonstrate that Pph is well‐adapted to the leaf apoplast metabolic environment and that loss of PPHGI‐1 enables Pph to avoid changes in apoplast composition linked to plant defences. PMID:27239727

  9. Sphaeropsis Shoot Blight

    Treesearch

    Jill D. Pokorny

    1998-01-01

    Sphaeropsis shoot blight, formerly called Diplodia shoot blight, is worldwide in distribution and can infect many conifer hosts. Although many pine species are reported hosts, this disease causes severe damage only to trees that are predisposed by unfavorable environmental conditions. Non-native, exotic pine species growing outside their natural range are especially...

  10. Rhizoctonia web blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizoctonia web blight, caused by several Rhizoctonia spp., is an important disease of evergreen azaleas and other ornamental plants in nurseries. The primary pathogens causing web blight are binucleate Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups (AG) (= Ceratobasidium D.P. Rogers, teleomorph). In southern AL an...

  11. Citrus blight research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With HLB now occurring throughout Florida citrus groves, citrus blight has been getting less attention even though the problem still exists. In fact, the combination of HLB and citrus blight has compounded the problem that the citrus industry is facing with decreased yields, small fruit size and tre...

  12. Sirococcus Shoot Blight

    Treesearch

    Thomas H. Nicholls; Kathryn Robbins

    1984-01-01

    Sirococcus shoot blight, caused by the fungus Sirococcus strobilinus Preuss, affects conifers in the Northern United States and southern Canada. The fungus infects the new shoots; diseased seedlings and saplings are especially affected. In the United States, sirococcus shoot blight has become increasingly widespread since the early 1970's. When favorable...

  13. Ascochyta blight of peas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification, taxonomy & nomenclature, epidemiology, symptoms, host ranges, and management are described for three fungal pathogens which collectively and individually cause Ascochyta blight of field pea (Pisum sativum): Ascochyta pisi, Ascochyta pinodes, and Ascochyta pinodella. The first two are...

  14. Phomopsis Blight of Junipers

    Treesearch

    Glenn W. Peterson; C. S. Jr. Hidges

    1982-01-01

    Phomopsis blight has been a serious problem for more than 75 years in nurseries producing juniper seedlings and grafts. Phomopsis juniperovora Hahn, the fungus causing this disease, is widespread in the United States.

  15. What Causes a Blighted Ovum?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovum: What causes it? What causes a blighted ovum? What symptoms can I expect? Answers from Yvonne Butler Tobah, M.D. A blighted ovum, also called an anembryonic pregnancy or anembryonic gestation, ...

  16. Fire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1996-01-01

    The number of school fires is up nationwide. This article describes unsafe school conditions, problems with new fire codes, and the factors that contribute to school fires. Installation of sprinkler systems is recommended. A fire-safety checklist is included. (LMI)

  17. Ascochyta blight of chickpeas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chickpea is becoming increasingly important as a rotational crop in cereal production systems. Ascochyta blight is the most devastating disease of chickpea and must be appropriately managed to minimize its damage to crops and increase chickpea yield. The disease is caused by the fungus Ascochyta r...

  18. Disease Alert: Stemphylium Blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lentil leaves showing symptoms of Stemphylium blight were collected from a lentil field northeast of Garfield (near Idaho border) on July 8, 2013, and incubation of the diseased leaves showed typical spores of the pathogen Stemphylium botryosum or other Stemphylium sp. The field was planted with ‘Mo...

  19. Development of an engineered ‘bioluminescent’ reporter phage for the detection of bacterial blight of crucifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassica family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as peppery leaf spot, a much less severe disease caused by the closely related pathogen Pseudomonas syrin...

  20. Fire

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    In some areas, many aspen stands are all the same age, dating from a single great fire or a year of widespread fires (fig. 1). The 1879 fire in the Jackson Hole region of Wyoming (Loope and Gruell 1973) and the 1904 fires in Arizona's White Mountains (Kallander 1969) are examples. Choate (1966) found that almost all aspen stands in New Mexico were even-aged, many...

  1. FIRE

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-16

    Projects:  FIRE Definition/Description:  The F irst I SCCP R egional E xperiments (FIRE) have been designed to improve data products and cloud/radiation ... circulation models (GCMs). Specifically, the goals of FIRE are (1) to improve basic understanding of the interaction of physical ...

  2. Characterization and regulation of the Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pumps MdtABC and MdtUVW from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the devastating disease fire blight in rosaceous plants such as apple, pear, quince, raspberry, and cotoneaster. In order to survive and multiply in a host, microbes must be able to circumvent the toxic effects of antimicrobial plant compounds, such as flavonoids and tannins. E. amylovora uses multidrug efflux transporters that recognize and actively export toxic compounds out of the cells. Here, two heterotrimeric resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux pumps, MdtABC and MdtUVW, from E. amylovora were identified. These RND systems are unusual in that they contain two different RND proteins forming a functional pump. Results To find the substrate specificities of the two efflux systems, we overexpressed the transporters in a hypersensitive mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB. Both transporters mediated resistance to several flavonoids, fusidic acid and novobiocin. Additionally, MdtABC mediated resistance towards josamycin, bile salts and silver nitrate, and MdtUVW towards clotrimazole. The ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock was reduced. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of the transporter genes was induced during infection of apple rootstock. The polyphenolic plant compound tannin, as well as the heavy metal salt tungstate was found to induce the expression of mdtABC. Finally, the expression of the mdtABC genes was shown to be regulated by BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component system BaeSR, a cell envelope stress response system that controls the adaptive responses to changes in the environment. Conclusions The expression of MdtABC and MdtUVW is induced during growth of E. amylovora in planta. We identified the plant polyphenol tannin as inducer of mdtABC expression. The reduced ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock suggests that the

  3. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid inhibits growth of Erwinia amylovora and acts as a seed germination-arrest factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xiaoyun; Azevedo, Mark D; Armstrong, Donald J; Banowetz, Gary M; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2013-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa antimetabolite L-2-amino-4-methoxy-trans-3-butenoic acid (AMB) shares biological activities with 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, a related molecule produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6. We found that culture filtrates of a P. aeruginosa strain overproducing AMB weakly interfered with seed germination of the grassy weed Poa annua and strongly inhibited growth of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the devastating orchard crop disease known as fire blight. AMB was active against a 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine-resistant isolate of E. amylovora, suggesting that the molecular targets of the two oxyvinylglycines in Erwinia do not, or not entirely, overlap. The AMB biosynthesis and transport genes were shown to be organized in two separate transcriptional units, ambA and ambBCDE, which were successfully expressed from IPTG-inducible tac promoters in the heterologous host P. fluorescens CHA0. Engineered AMB production enabled this model biocontrol strain to become inhibitory against E. amylovora and to weakly interfere with the germination of several graminaceous seeds. We conclude that AMB production requires no additional genes besides ambABCDE and we speculate that their expression in marketed fire blight biocontrol strains could potentially contribute to disease control.

  4. Fire

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Scott L. Goodrick

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsClimate forecasts indicate that the South’s spring and fall wildfire seasons will be extended.Prescribed fires, currently conducted on roughly a 3 to 5 year rotation across much of the South, would need to become more frequent if conditions become drier.Major wildfire events, such as the 2007...

  5. Late blight – Is resistance futile?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article will provide an overview of late blight resistance research that has been done within the USDA/ARS and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The article is meant to be an informative look at the history of late blight resistance and the ability of the late blight pathogen to overcome res...

  6. Tagging and mapping Pse-1 gene for resistance to halo blight in common bean differential cultivar UI-3

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Halo blight [caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psp)] is a serious seed-borne bacterial disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). A few R genes and QTL provide control to one or more races of the pathogen. To better understand monogenic resistance and improve breeding efficienc...

  7. Identification of Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis previously isolated from diseased crucifers in Australia.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis causes bacterial blight on crucifers, a severe disease which can reduce crucifer yields and result in economic losses in the US. Prior to the late 1990s P. cannabina pv. alisalensis was not distinguished from the pepper spot pathogen of crucifers, Pseudomonas s...

  8. Dothistroma Needle Blight of Pines

    Treesearch

    Glenn W. Peterson

    1982-01-01

    Dothistroma blight is a devastating foliar disease of a wide range of pine species. The causal fungus, Dothistroma pini Hulbary, infects and kills needles. Premature defoliation caused by this fungus has resulted in complete failure of most ponderosa pine plantings in States east of the Great Plains. In the central and southern Great Plains, D. pini damages Austrian...

  9. Needle blight of ponderosa pine.

    Treesearch

    T.W. Childs

    1955-01-01

    This progress report describes the appearance and behavior of needle blight of pondersoa pine as it has been observed in central and eastern Oregon since 1945. Sorts and extent of damage are briefly discussed, results to date are presented from continuing studies, and timber marking and improvement practices are recommended for infected stands.

  10. Late blight and early blight resistance from Solanum hougasii introgressed into Solanum tuberosum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, and early blight, incited by Alternaria solani,are the two most widely occurring foliar diseases of potato in the U.S. Resistance to both diseases is necessary if growers are to reduce fungicide applications. Field resistance to late blight has previous...

  11. The 1971 corn blight watch experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The successful fulfillment of the objectives for the 1971 corn blight watch experiment is reported. The objectives were: (1) detect the development and spread of corn blight during the growing season across the Corn Belt; (2) assess different levels of infection in the Corn Belt; (3) amplify data acquired by ground observations to better appraise current blight status and the probable impact on crop production; and (4) estimate through extrapolation the applicability of these techniques to similar situations occurring in the future.

  12. Testing American chestnuts for blight resistance

    Treesearch

    Jesse D. Diller

    1957-01-01

    It has now been over half a century since chestnut blight, caused by the fungus Endothia parasitica (Murr.) A. & A., was introduced into America from the Orient. In that time the blight has spread relentlessly and has destroyed all of our commercial stands of this once most valuable hardwood species of the East.

  13. The corn blight problem: 1970 and 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    Southern corn leaf blight is caused by the fungus, Helminthosporium maydis. Race T of H maydis adapted itself to the Texas male sterile cytoplasm corn. The problems caused by this variety of the blight in 1970 and 1971 are discussed, as well as the symptoms and development of the disease.

  14. pA506, a Conjugative Plasmid of the Plant Epiphyte Pseudomonas fluorescens A506

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Virginia O.; Davis, Edward W.; Carey, Alyssa; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Hassan, Karl A.; Hockett, Kevin; Thomashow, Linda S.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugative plasmids are known to facilitate the acquisition and dispersal of genes contributing to the fitness of Pseudomonas spp. Here, we report the characterization of pA506, the 57-kb conjugative plasmid of Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, a plant epiphyte used in the United States for the biological control of fire blight disease of pear and apple. Twenty-nine of the 67 open reading frames (ORFs) of pA506 have putative functions in conjugation, including a type IV secretion system related to that of MOBP6 family plasmids and a gene cluster for type IV pili. We demonstrate that pA506 is self-transmissible via conjugation between A506 and strains of Pseudomonas spp. or the Enterobacteriaceae. The origin of vegetative replication (oriV) of pA506 is typical of those in pPT23A family plasmids, which are present in many pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae, but pA506 lacks repA, a defining locus for pPT23A plasmids, and has a novel partitioning region. We selected a plasmid-cured derivative of A506 and compared it to the wild type to identify plasmid-encoded phenotypes. pA506 conferred UV resistance, presumably due to the plasmid-borne rulAB genes, but did not influence epiphytic fitness of A506 on pear or apple blossoms in the field. pA506 does not appear to confer resistance to antibiotics or other toxic elements. Based on the conjugative nature of pA506 and the large number of its genes that are shared with plasmids from diverse groups of environmental bacteria, the plasmid is likely to serve as a vehicle for genetic exchange between A506 and its coinhabitants on plant surfaces. PMID:23811504

  15. A Statistical Comparison of the Blossom Blight Forecasts of MARYBLYT and Cougarblight with Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dewdney, M M; Biggs, A R; Turechek, W W

    2007-09-01

    ABSTRACT Blossom blight forecasting is an important aspect of fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, management for both apple and pear. A comparison of the forecast accuracy of two common fire blight forecasters, MARYBLYT and Cougarblight, was performed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and 243 data sets. The rain threshold of Cougarblight was analyzed as a separate model termed Cougarblight and rain. Data were used as a whole and then grouped into geographic regions and cultivar susceptibilities. Frequency distributions of cases and controls, orchards or regions (depending on the data set), with and without observed disease, respectively, in all data sets overlapped. MARYBLYT, Cougarblight, and Cougarblight and rain all predicted blossom blight infection better than chance (P = 0.05). It was found that the blossom blight forecasters performed equivalently in the geographic regions of the east and west coasts of North America and moderately susceptible cultivars based on the 95% confidence intervals and pairwise contrasts of the area under the ROC curve. Significant differences (P < 0.05) between the forecasts of Cougarblight and MARYBLYT were found with pairwise contrasts in the England and very susceptible cultivar data sets. Youden's index was used to determine the optimal cutpoint of both forecasters. The greatest sensitivity and specificity for MARYBLYT coincided with the use of the highest risk threshold for predictions of infection; with Cougarblight, there was no clear single risk threshold across all data sets.

  16. Pyramiding transgenic resistance in elite indica rice cultivars against the sheath blight and bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Maruthasalam, S; Kalpana, K; Kumar, K K; Loganathan, M; Poovannan, K; Raja, J A J; Kokiladevi, E; Samiyappan, R; Sudhakar, D; Balasubramanian, P

    2007-06-01

    Elite indica rice cultivars were cotransformed with genes expressing a rice chitinase (chi11) and a thaumatin-like protein (tlp) conferring resistance to fungal pathogens and a serine-threonine kinase (Xa21) conferring bacterial blight resistance, through particle bombardment, with a view to pyramiding sheath blight and bacterial blight resistance. Molecular analyses of putative transgenic lines by polymerase chain reaction, Southern Blot hybridization, and Western Blotting revealed stable integration and expression of the transgenes in a few independent transgenic lines. Progeny analyses showed the stable inheritance of transgenes to their progeny. Coexpression of chitinase and thaumatin-like protein in the progenies of a transgenic Pusa Basmati1 line revealed an enhanced resistance to the sheath blight pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani, as compared to that in the lines expressing the individual genes. A transgenic Pusa Basmati1 line pyramided with chi11, tlp, and Xa21 showed an enhanced resistance to both sheath blight and bacterial blight.

  17. Development of an engineered bioluminescent reporter phage for detection of bacterial blight of crucifers.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Bull, Carolee T; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant "light"-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis.

  18. Development of an Engineered Bioluminescent Reporter Phage for Detection of Bacterial Blight of Crucifers

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Carolee T.; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W. Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant “light”-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis. PMID:22427491

  19. Colonizing ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens 2112, among collections of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens spp. in pea rhizosphere.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 2112, isolated in Korea as an indigenous antagonistic bacteria, can produce 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and the siderophore pyoveridin2112 for the control of Phytophthora blight of red-pepper. P. fluorescens 2112 was classified into a new genotype C among the 17 gen...

  20. Selection of bean lines that combine resistance to web blight and common bacterial blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Web blight caused by Thanatephorus cucumeris Frank (Donk) causes significant reductions in the yield and quality of beans produced in the humid, lowland tropics. A total of 644 lines from different breeding programs were evaluated for reaction to web blight and other diseases using conventional plan...

  1. Bacterial blight of soybean: Regulation of a pathogen gene determining host cultivar specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, T.V.; Dahlbeck, D.; Staskawicz, B.J. )

    1989-09-22

    Soybean cultivars resistant to Pseudomonas syringae pathovar glycinea (Psg), the causal agent of bacterial blight, exhibit a hypersensitive (necrosis) reaction (HR) to infection. Psg strains carrying the avrB gene elicit the HR in soybean cultivars carrying the resistance gene Rpg1. Psg expressing avrB at a high level and capable of eliciting the HR in the absence of de novo bacterial RNA synthesis have been obtained in in vitro culture. Nutritional signals and regions within the Psg hrp gene cluster, an approximately 20-kilobase genomic region also necessary for pathogenicity, control avrB transcription.

  2. Disease Alert: Chickpea Ascochyta blight has shown up early

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The manuscript describes the early appearance of Ascochyta blight in north Idaho, provides pictorial guide for identification of the disease, discusses the disease cycle, and advises chickpea growers options in managing Ascochyta blight....

  3. Improved High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens KENGFT3.

    PubMed

    Town, Jennifer; Cui, Nina; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Sue; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2016-05-26

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KENGFT3 inhibits the growth of Phytophthora infestans and is a potentially useful biopesticide for plant diseases, including potato late blight. We sequenced the 6.2-Mbp genome of this strain and assembled it into a single scaffold with 9 contigs. KENGFT3 is related to previously sequenced strains of P. fluorescens. Copyright © 2016 Town et al.

  4. Improved High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens KENGFT3

    PubMed Central

    Town, Jennifer; Cui, Nina; Audy, Patrice; Boyetchko, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KENGFT3 inhibits the growth of Phytophthora infestans and is a potentially useful biopesticide for plant diseases, including potato late blight. We sequenced the 6.2-Mbp genome of this strain and assembled it into a single scaffold with 9 contigs. KENGFT3 is related to previously sequenced strains of P. fluorescens. PMID:27231365

  5. Irrigation water is an unlikely source of inoculum of Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis causes severe bacterial blight on crucifers across the United States. These experiments examined the potential of irrigation water as a source of inoculum for P. cannabina pv. alisalensis. Water samples were collected from multiple irrigation reservoirs and spri...

  6. Results of the 1971 Corn Blight Watch experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.; Allen, R. D.; Bauer, M. E.; Clifton, J. W.; Frickson, J. D.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced remote sensing techniques are used to: (1)Detect development and spread of corn leaf blight during the growing season; (2) assess the extent and severity of blight infection; (3) assess the impact of blight on corn production; and (4) estimate the applicability of these techniques to similar situations occurring in the future.

  7. Validation of a tuber blight (Phytophthora infestans) prediction model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato tuber blight caused by Phytophthora infestans accounts for significant losses in storage. There is limited published quantitative data on predicting tuber blight. We validated a tuber blight prediction model developed in New York with cultivars Allegany, NY 101, and Katahdin using independent...

  8. Visual Blight in America, Resource Paper No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Peirce F.; And Others

    Five articles comprise this resource paper that considers "visual blight" in the United States and the role that geographers can play in preserving the physical environment. The first article contends that visual blight is a proper subject for debate for geographers. The second article interprets causes and effects of visual blight and suggests…

  9. Visual Blight in America, Resource Paper No. 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Peirce F.; And Others

    Five articles comprise this resource paper that considers "visual blight" in the United States and the role that geographers can play in preserving the physical environment. The first article contends that visual blight is a proper subject for debate for geographers. The second article interprets causes and effects of visual blight and suggests…

  10. Race nonspecific resistance for potato late blight.

    PubMed

    Staples, Richard C

    2004-01-01

    The late blight fungus (Phytophthora infestans) rots susceptible species of potato plants. None of the major varieties of potato (Solanum tuberosum) grown in the USA is resistant to US-8, the most prevalent genotype of the fungus. Now, Junqi Song, James Bradeen and colleagues have cloned the RB gene from the wild diploid potato species, Solanum bulbocastanum, using a map-based approach in combination with long-range PCR. Transgenic plants containing the gene, normally fully susceptible, displayed broad-spectrum late blight resistance.

  11. Pole blight of western white pine

    Treesearch

    Charles D. Leaphart; Otis L. Copeland; Donald P. Graham

    1957-01-01

    Pole blight is one of the most serious diseases of western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl.) and is restricted to that species. The disease is given this name because it affects pole-size trees primarily, usually those within the 40- to 100-year age class, although trees both younger and older are occasionally affected.

  12. Brown-Spot Needle Blight of Pines

    Treesearch

    W.R. Phelps; A.G. Kais; T.H. Nicholls

    1978-01-01

    Brown-spot needle blight, caused by Scirrhia acicola (Dearn.) Siggers, delays growth and causes mortality of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Brown spot reduces total annual growth of southern pines by more than 16 million cubic feet (0.453 million cubic meters) of timber. Damage is most severe on longleaf seedlings in the grass stage; i.e., those that have not...

  13. A functional gene cluster for toxoflavin biosynthesis in the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Toxoflavin is a broad-spectrum toxin best known for its role in virulence of Burkholderia glumae, which causes panicle blight of rice. A gene cluster containing homologs of toxoflavin biosynthesis genes (toxA-E) of B. glumae is present in the genome of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, a biological contr...

  14. Pseudomonas chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Inmaculada; Parales, Rebecca E; Krell, Tino; Hill, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonads sense changes in the concentration of chemicals in their environment and exhibit a behavioral response mediated by flagella or pili coupled with a chemosensory system. The two known chemotaxis pathways, a flagella-mediated pathway and a putative pili-mediated system, are described in this review. Pseudomonas shows chemotaxis response toward a wide range of chemicals, and this review includes a summary of them organized by chemical structure. The assays used to measure positive and negative chemotaxis swimming and twitching Pseudomonas as well as improvements to those assays and new assays are also described. This review demonstrates that there is ample research and intellectual space for future investigators to elucidate the role of chemotaxis in important processes such as pathogenesis, bioremediation, and the bioprotection of plants and animals. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  15. The 2009 late blight pandemic in eastern USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tomato late blight pandemic of 2009 made late blight into a household term in much of the eastern United States. Many home gardeners and organic producers lost most, if not all, of their tomato crop, and their experiences were reported in the mainstream press. This article, which is written for ...

  16. Distribution of pole blight of western white pine

    Treesearch

    Donald P. Graham

    1955-01-01

    Disease surveys conducted in 1953 and 1954 to determine the distribution of pole blight of western white pine (Pinus monticola, Dougl.) reveal that most areas of damage have now been found. During 1953 extensive surveys of pole blight distribution disclosed 20 new diseased areas and a number of affected stands adjacent to or near old disease centers. The 1954...

  17. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici.

    PubMed

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-06-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Phytophthora blight without influencing rhizosphere microbial populations; they showed similar or better levels of disease suppressions than in metalaxyl treatment in the 2007 and 2009 tests, but not in the 2008 test. In the 2-year plastic house tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit.

  18. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced Phytophthora blight without influencing rhizosphere microbial populations; they showed similar or better levels of disease suppressions than in metalaxyl treatment in the 2007 and 2009 tests, but not in the 2008 test. In the 2-year plastic house tests, all the selected strains significantly (P < 0.05) reduced anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit. PMID:25288942

  19. Detection of early blight and late blight diseases on tomato leaves using hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuanqi; Shao, Yongni; Li, Xiaoli; He, Yong

    2015-11-17

    This study investigated the potential of using hyperspectral imaging for detecting different diseases on tomato leaves. One hundred and twenty healthy, one hundred and twenty early blight and seventy late blight diseased leaves were selected to obtain hyperspectral images covering spectral wavelengths from 380 to 1023 nm. An extreme learning machine (ELM) classifier model was established based on full wavelengths. Successive projections algorithm (SPA) was used to identify the most important wavelengths. Based on the five selected wavelengths (442, 508, 573, 696 and 715 nm), an ELM model was re-established. Then, eight texture features (mean, variance, homogeneity, contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, second moment and correlation) based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) at the five effective wavelengths were extracted to establish detection models. Among the models which were established based on spectral information, all performed excellently with the overall classification accuracy ranging from 97.1% to 100% in testing sets. Among the eight texture features, dissimilarity, second moment and entropy carried most of the effective information with the classification accuracy of 71.8%, 70.9% and 69.9% in the ELM models. The results demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging has the potential as a non-invasive method to identify early blight and late blight diseases on tomato leaves.

  20. Detection of early blight and late blight diseases on tomato leaves using hyperspectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuanqi; Shao, Yongni; Li, Xiaoli; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of using hyperspectral imaging for detecting different diseases on tomato leaves. One hundred and twenty healthy, one hundred and twenty early blight and seventy late blight diseased leaves were selected to obtain hyperspectral images covering spectral wavelengths from 380 to 1023 nm. An extreme learning machine (ELM) classifier model was established based on full wavelengths. Successive projections algorithm (SPA) was used to identify the most important wavelengths. Based on the five selected wavelengths (442, 508, 573, 696 and 715 nm), an ELM model was re-established. Then, eight texture features (mean, variance, homogeneity, contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, second moment and correlation) based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) at the five effective wavelengths were extracted to establish detection models. Among the models which were established based on spectral information, all performed excellently with the overall classification accuracy ranging from 97.1% to 100% in testing sets. Among the eight texture features, dissimilarity, second moment and entropy carried most of the effective information with the classification accuracy of 71.8%, 70.9% and 69.9% in the ELM models. The results demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging has the potential as a non-invasive method to identify early blight and late blight diseases on tomato leaves. PMID:26572857

  1. Comparative study on the effect of chemicals on Alternaria blight in Indian mustard--a multi-location study in India.

    PubMed

    Meena, P D; Chattopadhyay, C; Kumar, A; Awasthi, R P; Singh, R; Kaur, S; Thomas, L; Goyal, P; Chand, P

    2011-05-01

    High severity of Altemaria blight disease is a major constraint in production of rapeseed-mustard in India. The aim of this study was to investigate the suppressive potential of chemicals viz., zinc sulphate, borax, sulphur, potash and calcium sulphate, aqueous extracts viz., Eucalyptus globosus (50 g l-1) leaf extract and garlic (Allium sativum) bulb (20 g l-1) extract, cow urine and bio-agents Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas fluorescence in comparison with the recommended chemical fungicide (mancozeb), against foliar disease Alternaria blight of Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. and Coss] under five different geographical locations of India. Mancozeb recorded the lowest mean severity (leaf: 33.1%; pod: 26.3%) of Alternaria blight with efficacy of garlic bulb extract alone (leaf = 34.4%; pod = 27.3%) or in combination with cow urine (leaf = 34.2%; pod = 28.6%) being statistically at par with the recommended chemical fungicide. Chemicals also proved effective in reducing Alternaria blight severity on leaves and pods of Indian mustard (leaf = 36.3-37.9%; pod = 27.5-30.1%). The effective treatments besides providing significant reduction in disease severity also enabled increase in dry seed yield of the crop (mancozeb = 2052 kg ha-1; garlic = 2006 kg ha-1; control = 1561 kg ha-1).

  2. Effects of Mulch and Potato Hilling on Development of Foliar Blight (Phytophthora infestans) and Control of Tuber Blight Infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Foliar and tuber blight caused by Phytophthora infestans accounts for significant losses in potatoes in field and storage, however; limited research has documented the effect of cultural practices on late blight control. Field experiments were conducted for two years on Howard gravely loam soil in N...

  3. PGPR and entomopathogenic fungus bioformulation for the synchronous management of leaffolder pest and sheath blight disease of rice.

    PubMed

    Karthiba, Loganathan; Saveetha, Kandasamy; Suresh, Seetharaman; Raguchander, Thiruvengadam; Saravanakumar, Duraisamy; Samiyappan, Ramasamy

    2010-05-01

    The biological control of plant pests and diseases using a single organism has been reported to give inconsistent and poor performance. To improve the efficacy, bioformulations were developed possessing mixtures of bioagents. Bioformulations combining Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula strains Pf1 and AH1 and Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuill. isolate B2 were developed and tested for their efficacy against leaffolder pest and sheath blight disease on rice under glasshouse and field conditions. The combination of Pf1, AH1 and B2 effectively reduced the incidence of leaffolder insect and sheath blight disease on rice compared with other treatments. An in vitro assay of leaffolder preference to rice leaf tissues treated with Pf1 + AH1 + B2 biformulation showed variation from normal growth and development of leaffolder larvae. Plants treated with the Pf1 + AH1 + B2 combination showed a greater accumulation of enzymes, lipoxygenase and chitinase activity against leaffolder insect compared with other treatments. Similarly, the plants showed a higher accumulation of defence enzymes, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activity against sheath blight pathogen in Pf1 + AH1 + B2 treatment compared with the untreated control. The bioformulation mixture attracted the natural enemy population of leaffolder under field conditions. In addition, a significant increase in rice grain yield was observed in Pf1 + AH1 + B2 treatment compared with the untreated control. The combination of P. fluorescens strains and B. bassiana isolate effectively reduced the incidence of leaffolder insect and sheath blight disease on rice plants and showed the possibility of controlling both pest and disease using a single bioformulation.

  4. Three potato clones incorporating combined resistances to early blight from S. palustre and late blight from S. bulbocastanum into a S. tuberosum background

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three individuals from a segregating population derived from a cross between +297 and K41 are being released as germplasm with resistance to both early blight, caused by Alternaria solani, and late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans. The source of resistance to early blight from +297 is the wi...

  5. SCREENING OF TRANSGENIC ANTHURIUMS FOR BACTERIAL BLIGHT AND NEMATODE RESISTANCE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Anthuriums exhibit limited resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae and to the nematodes Radopholus simile and Meloidogyne javanica. Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation of embryogenic calli with strains LBA4404, EHA105, and AGLO resulted in transgenic p...

  6. [Blighted ovum in subfertile patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology].

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing-Wen; Hua, Rui; Zhou, Yao; Li, Hong; Yu, Yan-Hong

    2017-07-20

    To explore the incidence and risk factors of blighted ovum in subfertile patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). This retrospective analysis was conducted among 2378 patients who were pregnant following embryo transfer at our center from January, 2012 to December, 2015, including cases of early pregnancy losses and simultaneous live births. The cases with early pregnancy losses were divided into embryonic pregnancy and blighted ovum groups based on the presence or absence of an embryonic pole before dilation and curettage. The clinical data of the 3 groups were analyzed for comparisons of the maternal age, paternal age, BMI, AFC, basal FSH, bFSH/bLH, duration of infertility, Gn dosage, Gn days, serum estradiol on the day of HCG administration, endometrium thickness, number of oocyte retrieved, proportion of high-quality embryos transferred, serum β-HCG value on the 10th to 14th days of embryo transfer, infertility type and miscarriage times. The incidences of blighted ovum were compared between cases with different cycles, embryo stages, infertile factors and methods of fertilization. Maternal age and paternal age, BMI, duration of infertility, infertility type and miscarriage times differed significantly between cases with blighted ovum and those with live births. Serum β-HCG level was the lowest in blighted ovum group followed by embryonic pregnancy group and then by live birth group. Blastocyst transfer was associated with a significantly higher incidence of blighted ovum as compared with cleavage embryo transfer (11.6% vs 5.6%, P=0.000). No significant difference was found in the other parameters among the 3 groups (P>0.05). Adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that maternal age, β-HCG level and blastocyst transfer were risk factors of blighted ovum. Advanced maternal age, low β-HCG level and blastocyst transfer may increase the risk of blighted ovum possibly in association with gene imprinting errors during the early stage of

  7. Plant Growth Promotion and Suppression of Bacterial Leaf Blight in Rice by Inoculated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zaka, Abha; Imran, Asma; Zahid, Muhammad Awais; Yousaf, Sumaira; Rasul, Ghulam; Arif, Muhammad; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rice rhizosphere associated antagonistic bacteria for growth promotion and disease suppression of bacterial leaf blight (BLB). A total of 811 rhizospheric bacteria were isolated and screened against 3 prevalent strains of BLB pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) of which five antagonistic bacteria, i.e., Pseudomonas spp. E227, E233, Rh323, Serratia sp. Rh269 and Bacillus sp. Rh219 showed antagonistic potential (zone of inhibition 1–19 mm). Production of siderophores was found to be the common biocontrol determinant and all the strains solubilized inorganic phosphate (82–116 μg mL-1) and produced indole acetic acid (0.48–1.85 mg L-1) in vitro. All antagonistic bacteria were non-pathogenic to rice, and their co-inoculation significantly improved plant health in terms of reduced diseased leaf area (80%), improved shoot length (31%), root length (41%) and plant dry weight (60%) as compared to infected control plants. Furthermore, under pathogen pressure, bacterial inoculation resulted in increased activity of defense related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and polyphenol oxidase, along with 86% increase in peroxidase and 53% increase in catalase enzyme activities in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 as well as co-inoculated plants. Bacterial strains showed good colonization potential in the rice rhizosphere up to 21 days after seed inoculation. Application of bacterial consortia in the field resulted in an increase of 31% in grain yield and 10% in straw yield over non-inoculated plots. Although, yield increase was statistically non-significant but was accomplished with overall saving of 20% chemical fertilizers. The study showed that Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 can be used to develop dual-purpose inoculum which can serve not only to suppress BLB but also to promote plant growth in rice. PMID:27532545

  8. Plant Growth Promotion and Suppression of Bacterial Leaf Blight in Rice by Inoculated Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Sumera; Zaka, Abha; Imran, Asma; Zahid, Muhammad Awais; Yousaf, Sumaira; Rasul, Ghulam; Arif, Muhammad; Mirza, Muhammad Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of rice rhizosphere associated antagonistic bacteria for growth promotion and disease suppression of bacterial leaf blight (BLB). A total of 811 rhizospheric bacteria were isolated and screened against 3 prevalent strains of BLB pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) of which five antagonistic bacteria, i.e., Pseudomonas spp. E227, E233, Rh323, Serratia sp. Rh269 and Bacillus sp. Rh219 showed antagonistic potential (zone of inhibition 1-19 mm). Production of siderophores was found to be the common biocontrol determinant and all the strains solubilized inorganic phosphate (82-116 μg mL-1) and produced indole acetic acid (0.48-1.85 mg L-1) in vitro. All antagonistic bacteria were non-pathogenic to rice, and their co-inoculation significantly improved plant health in terms of reduced diseased leaf area (80%), improved shoot length (31%), root length (41%) and plant dry weight (60%) as compared to infected control plants. Furthermore, under pathogen pressure, bacterial inoculation resulted in increased activity of defense related enzymes including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and polyphenol oxidase, along with 86% increase in peroxidase and 53% increase in catalase enzyme activities in plants inoculated with Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 as well as co-inoculated plants. Bacterial strains showed good colonization potential in the rice rhizosphere up to 21 days after seed inoculation. Application of bacterial consortia in the field resulted in an increase of 31% in grain yield and 10% in straw yield over non-inoculated plots. Although, yield increase was statistically non-significant but was accomplished with overall saving of 20% chemical fertilizers. The study showed that Pseudomonas sp. Rh323 can be used to develop dual-purpose inoculum which can serve not only to suppress BLB but also to promote plant growth in rice.

  9. Pseudomonas 2007 Meeting Review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas is an important genus of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common nosocomial pathogen in our society, associated with chronic and eventually fatal lung disease in cystic fibrosis patients, while Pseudomonas syringae species are prominent plant pathogens. The fluorescen...

  10. Conjunctively screening of biocontrol agents (BCAs) against fusarium root rot and fusarium head blight caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Yao; Xie, Yue-Shen; Cui, Yuan-Yu; Xu, Jianjun; He, Wei; Chen, Huai-Gu; Guo, Jian-Hua

    2015-08-01

    Fusarium root-rot and fusarium head blight are plant diseases caused by Fusarium sp. in different growth periods of wheat, bring heavy losses to crop production in China. This research is aiming to screen biocontrol agents conjunctively for controlling these two diseases at the same time, as well as evaluate our previous BCAs (Biological Control Agents) screening strategies in more complex situation, considering biocontrol is well concerned as an environmental-friendly plant disease controlling method. Totally 966 bacterial isolates were screened from different parts of wheat tissues, of which potential biocontrol values were detected according to their abilities in antagonism inhibition and secreting extracellular hydrolytic enzyme. Biocontrol tests against fusarium root rot and fusarium head blight were carried out on 37 bacterial isolates with potential biocontrol capacity after pre-selection through ARDRA- and BOX-PCR analysis on strains with high assessment points. We acquired 10 BCAs with obvious biocontrol efficacy (more than 40%) in greenhouse and field tests. Pseudomonas fluorescens LY1-8 performed well in both two tests (biocontrol efficacy: 44.62% and 58.31%), respectively. Overall, correlation coefficient is 0.720 between assessment values of 37 tested BCA strains and their biocontrol efficacy in trails against fusarium root rot; correlation coefficient is 0.806 between their assessment values and biocontrol efficacy in trails against fusarium head blight. We acquired 10 well-performed potential BCAs, especially P. fluorescens LY1-8 displayed good biocontrol capacity against two different diseases on wheat. Biocontrol efficacies results in both greenhouse and field tests showed high positive correlation with assessment values (0.720 and 0.806), suggesting that the BCAs screening and assessing strategy previously developed in our lab is also adaptable for conjunctively screening BCAs for controlling both root and shoot diseases on wheat caused by same

  11. The American Chestnut Blight: An Agent of Biological and Cultural Catastrophe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Eddie

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the history and habits of the fungus commonly referred to as the "chestnut blight." Considers the impact of the blight and efforts to control it, offers personal and cultural reflections on the blight, and gives tips for incorporating the information into cross-disciplinary lessons. Contains 17 references. (WRM)

  12. The American Chestnut Blight: An Agent of Biological and Cultural Catastrophe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Eddie

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the history and habits of the fungus commonly referred to as the "chestnut blight." Considers the impact of the blight and efforts to control it, offers personal and cultural reflections on the blight, and gives tips for incorporating the information into cross-disciplinary lessons. Contains 17 references. (WRM)

  13. Ascochyta blight of chickpea: production of phytotoxins and disease management.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Husnain, Tayyab; Riazuddin, Sheikh

    2008-01-01

    Ascochyta blight caused by Ascochyta rabiei (Pass.) Lab., is the most devastating disease of chickpea and can occur anywhere the crop is grown. Several epidemics of blight causing complete yield losses have been reported. Despite extensive pathological and molecular studies, the nature and extent of pathogenic variability in A. rabiei have not been clearly established. Several isolates of A. rabiei were grown in liquid culture medium which secreted phytotoxic compounds of solanapyrone A, B, C and cytochalasin D. The same fungal metabolites were also recovered from extract of naturally blight stricken chickpea plants. Toxicity of purified solanapyrones as determined by cell bioassay was in the order of solanapyrone A>solanapyrone B>solanapyrone C. However, the specificity of all three compounds was dependent on the genetic identity of the chickpea cultivars. Seed treatment and foliar application of fungicides are commonly recommended for disease management, but further information on biology and survival of A. rabiei is needed to devise more effective management strategies. A short description of chickpea blight, geographical distribution, disease cycle, symptoms, losses, production of phytotoxins and disease management practices for the control of Ascochyta blight will be discussed in this review article.

  14. Molecular identification of the turf grass rapid blight pathogen.

    PubMed

    Craven, K D; Peterson, P D; Windham, D E; Mitchell, T K; Martin, S B

    2005-01-01

    Rapid blight is a newly described disease on turf grasses, primarily found on golf courses using suboptimal water for irrigation purposes. On the basis of shared morphological characteristics, it has been proposed that the rapid blight pathogen belongs to a genus of stramenopiles, Labyrinthula, which had been known to cause disease of marine plants only. We have collected 10 isolates from four species of turf grass in five states and sequenced portions of the SSU (18S) rDNA gene from each to provide a definitive taxonomic placement for rapid blight pathogens. We also included sequences from Labyrinthuloides yorkensis, Schizochytrium aggregatum, Aplanochytrium sp., Thraustochytrium striatum, Achlya bisexualis and several nonturf-grass isolates of Labyrinthula. We found that rapid blight isolates indeed are placed firmly within the genus Labyrinthula and that they lack detectable genetic diversity in the 18S rDNA region. We propose that the rapid blight pathogens share a recent common ancestor and might have originated from a single, infected population.

  15. Niclosamide inhibits leaf blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae in rice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Il; Song, Jong Tae; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Seo, Hak Soo

    2016-01-01

    Rice leaf blight, which is caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), results in huge losses in grain yield. Here, we show that Xoo-induced rice leaf blight is effectively controlled by niclosamide, an oral antihelminthic drug and molluscicide, which also functions as an anti-tumor agent. Niclosamide directly inhibited the growth of the three Xoo strains PXO99, 10208 and K3a. Niclosamide moved long distances from the site of local application to distant rice tissues. Niclosamide also increased the levels of salicylate and induced the expression of defense-related genes such as OsPR1 and OsWRKY45, which suppressed Xoo-induced leaf wilting. Niclosamide had no detrimental effects on vegetative/reproductive growth and yield. These combined results indicate that niclosamide can be used to block bacterial leaf blight in rice with no negative side effects. PMID:26879887

  16. Role of phenazines and cyclic lipopeptides produced by pseudomonas sp. CMR12a in induced systemic resistance on rice and bean.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zongwang; Hua, Gia Khuong Hoang; Ongena, Marc; Höfte, Monica

    2016-08-25

    Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a produces two different classes of cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) (orfamides and sessilins), which all play a role in direct antagonism against soilborne pathogens. Here we show that Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a is also able to induce systemic resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae on rice and to the web blight pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG2-2 on bean. Plant assays with biosynthesis mutants of Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a impaired in the production of phenazines and/or CLPs and purified metabolites revealed that distinct bacterial determinants are responsible for inducing systemic resistance in these two pathosystems. In rice, mutants impaired in phenazine production completely lost their ability to induce systemic resistance, while a soil drench with pure phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) at a concentration of 0.1 or 1 μM was active in inducing resistance against M. oryzae. In bean, mutants that only produced phenazines, sessilins or orfamides were still able to induce systemic resistance against Rhizoctonia web blight, but a balanced production of these metabolites was needed. This study not only shows that Pseudomonas sp. CMR12a can protect rice to blast disease and bean to web blight disease, but also displays that the determinants involved in induced systemic resistance are plant, pathogen and concentration dependent.

  17. Development of late blight resistant potatoes by cisgene stacking

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Phytophthora infestans, causing late blight in potato, remains one of the most devastating pathogens in potato production and late blight resistance is a top priority in potato breeding. The introduction of multiple resistance (R) genes with different spectra from crossable species into potato varieties is required. Cisgenesis is a promising approach that introduces native genes from the crops own gene pool using GM technology, thereby retaining favourable characteristics of established varieties. Results We pursued a cisgenesis approach to introduce two broad spectrum potato late blight R genes, Rpi-sto1 and Rpi-vnt1.1 from the crossable species Solanum stoloniferum and Solanum venturii, respectively, into three different potato varieties. First, single R gene-containing transgenic plants were produced for all varieties to be used as references for the resistance levels and spectra to be expected in the respective genetic backgrounds. Next, a construct containing both cisgenic late blight R genes (Rpi-vnt1.1 and Rpi-sto1), but lacking the bacterial kanamycin resistance selection marker (NPTII) was transformed to the three selected potato varieties using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Gene transfer events were selected by PCR among regenerated shoots. Through further analyses involving morphological evaluations in the greenhouse, responsiveness to Avr genes and late blight resistance in detached leaf assays, the selection was narrowed down to eight independent events. These cisgenic events were selected because they showed broad spectrum late blight resistance due to the activity of both introduced R genes. The marker-free transformation was compared to kanamycin resistance assisted transformation in terms of T-DNA and vector backbone integration frequency. Also, differences in regeneration time and genotype dependency were evaluated. Conclusions We developed a marker-free transformation pipeline to select potato plants functionally expressing a

  18. Southern corn leaf blight a story worth retelling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Southern Corn Leaf Blight Epidemic of 1970-1971 was one of the most costly disease outbreaks to affect North American agriculture, destroying 15% of the crop at a cost of $1.0 billion (US). It resulted from an over reliance on cytoplasmic Texas male sterile (cms-T) lines in hybrid seed producti...

  19. Fusarium stalk blight and rot in sugar beet

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium stalk blight of sugar beet can cause reductions or complete loss of seed production. The causal agent is Fusarium oxysporum. In addition, Fusarium solani has been demonstrated to cause a rot of sugar beet seed stalk, and other species have been reported associated with sugar beet fruit, but...

  20. Exploring Fusarium head blight disease control by RNA interference

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology provides a novel tool to study gene function and plant protection strategies. Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which reduces crop yield and quality by producing trichothecene mycotoxins including 3-acetyl deoxynivalenol (3-ADO...

  1. Breeding Common Bean for resistance to Common Blight: A review

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common blight {caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli Smith (Dye) is a major bacterial disease causing >40% seed yield and quality losses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. Use of resistant cultivars is crucial for its effective, economical, and environment friendly integarated...

  2. Outlook for blight-resistant American chestnut trees

    Treesearch

    Paul H. Sisco

    2009-01-01

    Culminating 20 years of breeding efforts, in spring 2008, The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) delivered its first 500 chestnuts to the USDA Forest Service for testing on National Forest lands. The expectation is that these seedlings will be more resistant to chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica) than are pure American chestnut trees (

  3. Prospects for advanced late blight resistance breeding in potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is able to rapidly evolve to overcome resistance genes. The pathogen accomplishes this by secreting an arsenal of proteins, termed effectors, that function to modify host cells. Although hundreds of candidate effectors have been identified in ...

  4. Three inoculation methods for evaluating Sclerotinia blight resistance in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laboratory-based assays for screening germplasm for resistance to Sclerotinia blight in peanuts can be conducted year-round, and thus may accelerate progress in breeding for resistant plants. Three previously proposed inoculation methods (using main stems of intact plants, detached main stems, or de...

  5. Brassica cover cropping for management of sheath blight of rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is the most important disease limiting rice production in Texas and other rice-producing states. The fungal pathogen survives between crops as soilborne sclerotia and mycelium in infected plant debris. These sclerotia and colonized plant debris float on t...

  6. Genetic variability in the pistachio late blight fungus, Alternaria alternata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic variation in the pistachio late blight fungus, Alternaria alternata, was investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the rDNA region. Southern hybridization of EcoRI, HindIII, and Xbal digested fungal DNA with a RNA probe derived from Alt1, an rDNA clone isolated from ...

  7. Sheath-blight resistance QTLs and in japonica rice germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sheath blight (SB), caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most serious diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) and genetic resistance is in demand by rice breeders. With the goal of resistance-QTL discovery in U. S. japonica breeding material, a set of 197 F1 doubled-haploid lines (DHLs)...

  8. Identification of an emergent bacterial blight of garlic in Brazil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Outbreaks of a bacterial blight disease occurred on garlic (Allium sativum) cultivars Roxo Caxiense, Quiteria and Cacador in Southern Brazil, and threatened the main production regions of Rio Grande do Sul State. Symptoms were characterized by watersoaked reddish streaks along the leaf midrib, follo...

  9. Detection of bacterial blight resistance genes in basmati rice landraces.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Jamil, S; Iqbal, M Z; Shaheen, H L; Hasni, S M; Jabeen, S; Mehmood, A; Akhter, M

    2012-07-20

    Aromatic basmati rice is vulnerable to bacterial blight disease. Genes conferring resistance to bacterial blight have been identified in coarse rice; however, their incorporation into basmati varieties compromises the prized basmati aroma. We identified bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4, xa5, Xa7, and xa13 in 52 basmati landraces and five basmati cultivars using PCR markers. The Xa7 gene was found to be the most prevalent among the cultivars and landraces. The cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000 also contained the Xa4 gene; however, xa5 and xa13 were confined to landraces only. Ten landraces were found to have multiple resistance genes. Landraces Basmati-106, Basmati-189 and Basmati-208 contained Xa4 and Xa7 genes. Whereas, landraces Basmati-122, Basmati-427, Basmati-433 were observed to have xa5 and Xa7 genes. Landraces Basmati-48, Basmati-51A, Basmati-334, and Basmati-370A possessed Xa7 and xa13 genes. The use of landraces containing recessive genes xa5 and xa13 as donor parents in hybridization with cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000, which contain the genes Xa4 and Xa7, will expedite efforts to develop bacterial blight-resistant basmati rice cultivars through marker assisted selection, based on a pyramiding approach, without compromising aroma and grain quality.

  10. Ascochyta blight and insect pests of chickpeas in the Palouse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This newsletter article informs chickpea growers in the Palouse region about current disease and insect pest problems. Ascochyta blight appeared in many chickpea fields and was severe in some fields. Insect pests including loopers and armyworms were rampant. Appropriate management practices for t...

  11. TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to bacterial blight of cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial blight of cotton (BBC) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Xcm) is a destructive disease that has recently re-emerged in the U.S. Xcm injects transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that directly induce the expression of host susceptibility (S) or resistance (R) genes. ...

  12. Towards Managing Stemphylium Blight of Lentil in the Pacific Northwest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stemphylium blight of lentil, caused by the fungus Stemphylium botryosum, has recently emerged as a disease problem in the Pacific Northwest, particularly on the recently released lentil cultivar ‘Morena’. The first step toward managing the disease is to correctly identify early signs of the diseas...

  13. Fire safety

    Treesearch

    Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger

    1999-01-01

    Fire safety is an important concern in all types of construction. The high level of national concern for fire safety is reflected in limitations and design requirements in building codes. These code requirements are discussed in the context of fire safety design and evaluation in the initial section of this chapter. Since basic data on fire behavior of wood products...

  14. Pseudomonas screening assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  15. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  16. The Anti-Phytophthora Effect of Selected Potato-Associated Pseudomonas Strains: From the Laboratory to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Anouk; De Vrieze, Mout; Bönisch, Denise; Gloor, Ramona; Musa, Tomke; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Bailly, Aurélien; Weisskopf, Laure

    2015-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most devastating disease of potato. In organic farming, late blight is controlled by repeated applications of copper-based products, which negatively impact the environment. To find alternative solutions for late blight management, we have previously isolated a large collection of bacteria from the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potatoes. Here we report the antagonistic potential of these strains when co-cultivated with P. infestans as well as with other potato pathogens. We then focused on three Pseudomonas strains and compared their protective impact against late blight to that of well-known biocontrol strains in planta using a high-throughput leaf disk assay with automated picture analysis. When sprayed on the leaves of potatoes in the greenhouse, the strains were able to survive for at least 15 days. Under field conditions, populations decreased faster but all tested strains could still be retrieved after 8 days. The most active strain in vitro, P. chlororaphis R47, was also the best protectant on leaf disks from plants grown in the greenhouse experiment, but its protection potential could not be verified in the field due to unfavorable infection conditions. However, its protective effect against P. infestans in planta, its survival in the phyllosphere as well as its ability to colonize the potato rhizosphere in very high population densities, suggest a potential for field application, e.g., in the form of tuber treatment or leaf spray. PMID:26640460

  17. Fighting Fire with Fire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoor, Dana L.

    1996-01-01

    School districts are integrating security and life-safety systems into school buildings to protect students and property. This proactive approach includes sprinkler systems, fire alarms, and security systems that monitor door movement. Some school districts that are incorporating the latest life-safety technology are in Missouri, Ohio, California,…

  18. Fighting Fire with Fire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spoor, Dana L.

    1996-01-01

    School districts are integrating security and life-safety systems into school buildings to protect students and property. This proactive approach includes sprinkler systems, fire alarms, and security systems that monitor door movement. Some school districts that are incorporating the latest life-safety technology are in Missouri, Ohio, California,…

  19. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  20. Biological Control Activities of Rice-Associated Bacillus sp. Strains against Sheath Blight and Bacterial Panicle Blight of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bishnu K.; Karki, Hari Sharan; Groth, Donald E.; Jungkhun, Nootjarin; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Potential biological control agents for two major rice diseases, sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, were isolated from rice plants in this study. Rice-associated bacteria (RABs) isolated from rice plants grown in the field were tested for their antagonistic activities against the rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Burkholderia glumae, which cause sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, respectively. Twenty-nine RABs were initially screened based on their antagonistic activities against both R. solani and B. glumae. In follow-up retests, 26 RABs of the 29 RABs were confirmed to have antimicrobial activities, but the rest three RABs did not reproduce any observable antagonistic activity against R. solani or B. glumae. According to16S rDNA sequence identity, 12 of the 26 antagonistic RABs were closest to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, while seven RABs were to B. methylotrophicus and B, subtilis, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequences of the three non-antagonistic RABs were closest to Lysinibacillus sphaericus (RAB1 and RAB12) and Lysinibacillus macroides (RAB5). The five selected RABs showing highest antimicrobial activities (RAB6, RAB9, RAB16, RAB17S, and RAB18) were closest to B. amyloliquefaciens in DNA sequence of 16S rDNA and gyrB, but to B. subtilis in that of recA. These RABs were observed to inhibit the sclerotial germination of R. solani on potato dextrose agar and the lesion development on detached rice leaves by artificial inoculation of R. solani. These antagonistic RABs also significantly suppressed the disease development of sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight in a field condition, suggesting that they can be potential biological control agents for these rice diseases. However, these antagonistic RABs showed diminished disease suppression activities in the repeated field trial conducted in the following year probably due to their reduced antagonistic activities to the pathogens during the long-term storage in -70C, suggesting that

  1. Biological Control Activities of Rice-Associated Bacillus sp. Strains against Sheath Blight and Bacterial Panicle Blight of Rice.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bishnu K; Karki, Hari Sharan; Groth, Donald E; Jungkhun, Nootjarin; Ham, Jong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Potential biological control agents for two major rice diseases, sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, were isolated from rice plants in this study. Rice-associated bacteria (RABs) isolated from rice plants grown in the field were tested for their antagonistic activities against the rice pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani and Burkholderia glumae, which cause sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight, respectively. Twenty-nine RABs were initially screened based on their antagonistic activities against both R. solani and B. glumae. In follow-up retests, 26 RABs of the 29 RABs were confirmed to have antimicrobial activities, but the rest three RABs did not reproduce any observable antagonistic activity against R. solani or B. glumae. According to16S rDNA sequence identity, 12 of the 26 antagonistic RABs were closest to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, while seven RABs were to B. methylotrophicus and B, subtilis, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequences of the three non-antagonistic RABs were closest to Lysinibacillus sphaericus (RAB1 and RAB12) and Lysinibacillus macroides (RAB5). The five selected RABs showing highest antimicrobial activities (RAB6, RAB9, RAB16, RAB17S, and RAB18) were closest to B. amyloliquefaciens in DNA sequence of 16S rDNA and gyrB, but to B. subtilis in that of recA. These RABs were observed to inhibit the sclerotial germination of R. solani on potato dextrose agar and the lesion development on detached rice leaves by artificial inoculation of R. solani. These antagonistic RABs also significantly suppressed the disease development of sheath blight and bacterial panicle blight in a field condition, suggesting that they can be potential biological control agents for these rice diseases. However, these antagonistic RABs showed diminished disease suppression activities in the repeated field trial conducted in the following year probably due to their reduced antagonistic activities to the pathogens during the long-term storage in -70C, suggesting that

  2. Fire investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  3. Pole blight - a new disease of western white pine

    Treesearch

    C. A. Wellner

    1947-01-01

    Pole blight is a killer. Apparently attacking pole-size western white pine trees of any vigor or crown class, it seems to require from one to ten years to kill a tree. White pine is generally believed to be the only species susceptible, although there is a possibility that grand fir and Douglas-fir also may be attacked. Not enough time has elapsed for us to say how...

  4. Understory Fires

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The flames of understory fires in the southern Amazon reach on average only a few feet tall, but the fire type can claim anywhere from 10 to 50 percent of a burn area's trees. Credit: NASA/Doug Morton

  5. Controlling rice bacterial blight in Africa: needs and prospects.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Valérie; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Leach, Jan E

    2012-06-30

    Rice cultivation has drastically increased in Africa over the last decade. During this time, the region has also seen a rise in the incidence of rice bacterial blight caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The disease is expanding to new rice production areas and threatens food security in the region. Yield losses caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzae range from 20 to 30% and can be as high as 50% in some areas. Employing resistant cultivars is the most economical and effective way to control this disease. To facilitate development and strategic deployment of rice cultivars with resistance to bacterial blight, biotechnology tools and approaches, including marker-assisted breeding, gene combinations for disease control, and multiplex-PCR for pathogen diagnosis, have been developed. Although these technologies are routinely used elsewhere, their application in Africa remains limited, usually due to high cost and advanced technical skills required. To combat this problem, developers of the technologies at research institutions need to work with farmers from an early stage to create and promote the integration of successful, low cost applications of research biotech products. Here, we review the current knowledge and biotechnologies available to improve bacterial blight control. We will also discuss how to facilitate their application in Africa and delivery to the field.

  6. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  7. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  8. Pseudomonas orchitis in puberty.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Ambil S

    2004-10-01

    Acute epididymo-orchitis is a common cause of 'acute scrotum' in adolescence and young adults, and the common causative pathogens are Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This is a rare case of acute epididymo-orchitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a pubertal boy with a history of 'ano-receptive' intercourse. On Medline search there are no reports of pseudomonas orchitis in this age group.

  9. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  10. Bioavailability of Iron to Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain A506 on Flowers of Pear and Apple.

    PubMed

    Temple, Todd N; Stockwell, Virginia O; Loper, Joyce E; Johnson, Kenneth B

    2004-12-01

    ABSTRACT The addition of 0.1 mM FeCl(3) to a defined culture medium induces the bacterial epiphyte Pseudomonas fluorescens strain A506 (A506) to produce an antibiotic toxic to the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora. Consequently, because A506 is registered and applied as a commercial product to suppress E. amylovora before floral infection of pear and apple, the relative availability of iron to A506 on surfaces of pear and apple flowers is of potential significance. An 'iron biosensor' construct of A506 was developed by transformation with an iron-regulated promoter (pvd) fused to a promoterless ice nucleation reporter gene (inaZ). This construct, A506 (pvd-inaZ), established high populations on pear and apple flowers, ranging from 10(4) to 10(6) CFU/flower. In seven trials on pear and apple trees, A506 (pvd-inaZ) expressed high ice nucleation activity (INA) on flowers, indicating limited iron bioavailability or a low-iron environment unlikely to induce antibiotic production by A506. A506 (pvd-inaZ) also colonized flowers when mixed with chemicals containing iron: FeSO(4) or the iron chelates ferric ethylenediaminedi-(o-hydroxyphenyl-acetic) acid (FeEDDHA) and ferric diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (FeDTPA). These compounds represent an array of commercial iron formulations applied to foliage to avert iron chlorosis. Treatment of flowers with a mixture of A506 (pvd-inaZ) and 3 mM FeEDDHA or FeDTPA significantly decreased INA compared with flowers treated with A506 (pvd-inaZ) in water. Lower concentrations (0.3 mM) of FeEDDHA, however, did not consistently suppress INA. These results indicate that apple and pear flowers represent an iron-limited environment to A506 and that treatment with 3 mM FeEDDHA is needed to increase significantly the level of iron available to this bacterium.

  11. Forest fires in Pennsylvania.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Haines; William A. Main; Eugene F. McNamara

    1978-01-01

    Describes factors that contribute to forest fires in Pennsylvania. Includes an analysis of basic statistics; distribution of fires during normal, drought, and wet years; fire cause, fire activity by day-of-week; multiple-fire day; and fire climatology.

  12. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  13. Red band needle blight of pines...a tentative appraisal for California

    Treesearch

    Willis W. Wagener

    1967-01-01

    Since it first appeared in Tanganyika in 1957, red band needle blight has become a major forest disease around the world. Apparently spread by high altitude winds, the blight has been found killing Monterey and other pines in California's northwest coastal counties. About 30 pine species are susceptible. Caused by the fungus Dothistroma pini (...

  14. Breeding for resistance to early blight in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), caused by Alternaria solani, is a major cause of economic losses in many potato growing regions. We have identified two early blight resistant clones EB24-24 and EB24-3, which are hybrids between the cultivated (S. tuberosum) potato clone US-W4 (2x=24) ...

  15. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached blueberry stems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries. Field observations indicate stem blight is more severe on vigorous plants than on slower growing plants. Two studies compared the effect of two types of fertilizers applied at four rates and nine fungicides on lesion development fo...

  16. Botryosphaeria Stem Blight on Blueberries: Effect of Vaccinium Cultivar, Botryosphaeriaceae Species and Temperature

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries grown in the southern United States. Historically stem blight has been reported to be caused by the fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea. Recently, other genera in the Botryosphaeriaceae family have been identified as causal pathogens of ...

  17. Botryosphaeria stem blight of southern blueberries: effect of fertilization, temperature, and Botryosphaeriaceae species on lesion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of highbush, rabbiteye, and southern highbush blueberries in the southeastern U.S. The disease has been observed to be more severe on vigorous plants than on slower growing plants. Historically stem blight has been reported to be caused by the fu...

  18. Responses of high O/L peanut cultivars to fungicide for control of Sclerotinia blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sclerotinia blight, caused by Sclerotinia minor, remains an important disease of peanuts in Oklahoma where it causes severe damage when prolonged periods of wet weather occur during mid to late season. Progress has been made in increasing the resistance of peanut cultivars to Sclerotinia blight. S...

  19. The 2009 late blight pandemic in eastern USA – causes and results

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tomato late blight pandemic of 2009 made late blight into a household term in much of the Eastern United States. Many home gardeners and organic producers lost most if not all of their tomato crop, and their experiences were reported in the mainstream press. Some CSAs (Community Supported Agricu...

  20. Survival potential of Phytophthora infestans in relation to environmental factors and late blight occurrence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato is an important crop globally and late blight (Phytophthora infestans) often results in severe crop loss. The cost for late blight control can be in excess of $210 million in the United States. We utilized a non-parametric density distribution analysis of local temperature (Temp) and relative...

  1. Late blight-resistant tuber-bearing Solanum species in field and laboratory trials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is the most disastrous and widespread disease of potato. One of the most effective means of controlling late blight is through the use of resistant cultivars, but newly developed resistant cultivars often lose their resistance after a few years of comm...

  2. Greenhouse-based inoculation methods for Sclerotinia blight resistance in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Greenhouse-based assays for screening germplasm for resistance to Sclerotinia blight in peanuts can be conducted year-round, and thus may accelerate progress in breeding for resistant plants. Several techniques for assaying Sclerotinia blight resistance in the greenhouse have been proposed including...

  3. Long-term impact of shoot blight disease on red pine saplings

    Treesearch

    Linda M. Haugen; Michael E. Ostry

    2013-01-01

    Damage from Sirococcus and Diplodia shoot blights of red pine is widespread and periodically severe in the Lake States. An outbreak of shoot blight occurred in red pine sapling plantations across northern Wisconsin, northern Minnesota, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in 1993. We established monitoring plots in red pine sapling...

  4. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached stems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    : Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries that has not been well managed with fungicides. Field observations showed that stem blight is more severe on vigorously growing plants than on slower growing plants. Detached stem assays were used to compare the effect of fertil...

  5. Site-specific risk factors for ray blight in Tasmanian pyrethrum fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ray blight of pyrethrum, caused by Phoma ligulicola var. inoxydablis can cause significant reductions in crop growth and pyrethrin yield. Weather and site-specific disease risk factors for ray blight have not been identified or quantified in terms of relative risk, which has limited the efficiency ...

  6. Fusarium Head Blight resistance QTL in the NC-Neuse / AGS2000 recombinant inbred population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Breeding for resistance to Fusarium Head Blight is of major importance as the disease can have serious negative impacts on wheat production in warm and humid regions of the world, including the state of North Carolina. Fusarium Head Blight can cause significant grain yield reduction, but also severe...

  7. Development and characterization of RiceCAP QTL mapping population for sheath blight resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RiceCAP is a USDA CSREES funded project that has as one of its main objectives developing genetic markers associated with sheath blight resistance. Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is an important disease of rice in the southern US. Tolerance to the disease is quantitatively inherited an...

  8. Urban blight remediation as a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence

    Treesearch

    Charles C. Branas; Michelle C. Kondo; Sean M. Murphy; Eugenia C. South; Daniel Polsky; John M. MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To determine if blight remediation of abandoned buildings and vacant lots can be a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence in US cities. Methods. We performed quasi-experimental analyses of the impacts and economic returns on investment of urban blight remediation programs involving 5112 abandoned buildings and vacant lots on the occurrence of firearm...

  9. Azalea Web Blight Control: Fungicide Timing in the Nursery and Hot Water Treatment of Stem Cuttings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Azalea web blight is an annual problem on some evergreen azalea cultivars grown in containerized nursery production in the southern and eastern United States. Multiple control strategies are being investigated to control the binucleate Rhizoctonia species that cause web blight. The disease will deve...

  10. Efficiency of procedures for induction and cultivation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi L-form.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Recuenco, Margarita; van Vuurde, Jim W L

    2003-01-01

    The L-form of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola has been proved to induce resistance to bean halo blight. Various procedures were tested to induce the L-form of Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi for its potential use as biocontrol agent of pea bacterial blight. Cell-wall deficient cells were induced in a liquid medium with penicillin following a protocol described for P. s. pv. phaseolicola. Cell growth on solid induction medium developed as typical granular and vacuolated structures, and characteristic colonies were observed in the first transfer. However, there was poor growth in subsequent transfers and some reversion to the parental type. To improve the induction procedure, the following new procedures were applied: (1) viability of cells was monitored during induction. The optimum induction time in liquid medium with penicillin was lower for pv. pisi than for pv. phaseolicola. Viability of L-forms in solid induction medium with penicillin was low and decreased in time. (2) the inducer ticarcillin was combined with clavulanic acid, which prevented the reversion to the parental type and (3) a range of concentrations of penicillin and ticarcillin/clavulanic acid was applied by the spiral gradient endpoint method for calculation of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Based on the results from these tests an induction method for P. s. pv. pisi L-form is proposed and the relevance of L-form is discussed for practice.

  11. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola isolated from weeds in bean crop fields.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sanz, A M; Rodicio, M R; González, A J

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causative agent of halo blight in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), was isolated from weeds associated with bean crops in Spain. The bacterium was recovered from Fumaria sp, Mercurialis annua, Solanum nigrum and Sonchus oleraceus. Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola had previously been isolated from leguminous plants and S. nigrum, but to our knowledge, this is the first time it was recovered from the other three species. The isolates were phenotypically and genetically characterized, and they were compared with isolates recovered from common beans. Five different genotypic profiles were detected by PmeI-PFGE, two of them being of new description. Weed isolates were as pathogenic on bean plants as bean isolates, but they were not pathogenic on S. nigrum. Regarding the survival of the pathogen in weeds, Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola was isolated from So. oleraceus 11 weeks after the end of the bean crop. These results strongly support the idea of weeds as a potential source of inoculum for halo blight in bean. It has traditionally been considered that the main source of inoculum of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola causing halo blight disease in Phaseolus vulgaris are the bean seeds, and that the host range of the bacterium is almost restricted to leguminous plants. In this study, the bacterium was recovered from four nonleguminous weed species collected in bean fields, and its permanence in weeds for at least 11 weeks after the harvesting of the beans was demonstrated. We have also proved that the strains isolated from weeds were pathogenic on bean plants. Accordingly, the host range of Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola could be broader than previously thought and weeds appear to be acting as a reservoir of the pathogen until the next crop. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Mapping of Halo Blight Resistance in Common Bean to Race 6 of the Globally Important Bacterial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Tock, Andrew J.; Fourie, Deidré; Walley, Peter G.; Holub, Eric B.; Soler, Alvaro; Cichy, Karen A.; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial A.; Song, Qijian; Porch, Timothy G.; Hart, John P.; Vasconcellos, Renato C. C.; Vicente, Joana G.; Barker, Guy C.; Miklas, Phillip N.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psph) Race 6 is a globally prevalent and broadly virulent bacterial pathogen with devastating impact causing halo blight of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Common bean lines PI 150414 and CAL 143 are known sources of resistance against this pathogen. We constructed high-resolution linkage maps for three recombinant inbred populations to map resistance to Psph Race 6 derived from the two common bean lines. This was complemented with a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of Race 6 resistance in an Andean Diversity Panel of common bean. Race 6 resistance from PI 150414 maps to a single major-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL; HB4.2) on chromosome Pv04 and confers broad-spectrum resistance to eight other races of the pathogen. Resistance segregating in a Rojo × CAL 143 population maps to five chromosome arms and includes HB4.2. GWAS detected one QTL (HB5.1) on chromosome Pv05 for resistance to Race 6 with significant influence on seed yield. The same HB5.1 QTL, found in both Canadian Wonder × PI 150414 and Rojo × CAL 143 populations, was effective against Race 6 but lacks broad resistance. This study provides evidence for marker-assisted breeding for more durable halo blight control in common bean by combining alleles of race-nonspecific resistance (HB4.2 from PI 150414) and race-specific resistance (HB5.1 from cv. Rojo). PMID:28736566

  13. Production of a bioflocculant from Pseudomonas veronii L918 using the hydrolyzate of peanut hull and its application in the treatment of ash-flushing wastewater generated from coal fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weijie; Hao, Yan; Jiang, Jihong; Zhu, Aihua; Zhu, Jingrong; Dong, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    In this study, bioflocculant produced by Pseudomonas veronii L918 was applied to treat ash-flushing wastewater. The strain L918 could convert the hydrolyzate of peanut hull into bioflocculant, which can effectively reduce the production cost of bioflocculant. The yield of 3.39g/L bioflocculant MBF-L918 was achieved when 300mL/L peanut hull hydrolyzate was used as carbon source. The bioflocculant MBF-L918 contains 77.14% polysaccharides and 4.84% proteins, and the molecular weight (MW) of MBF-L918 is 24.77kDa. Furthermore, MBF-L918 showed good flocculating efficiency of 92.51% to ash-flushing wastewater when 2.83mg/L MBF-L918 was added, and thus achieved the recycling of ash-flushing wastewater. This study reported for the first time that the bioflocculant was produced using peanut hull hydrolyzate and effectively applied in the treatment of coal ash-flushing wastewater.

  14. Wildland fire limits subsequent fire occurrence

    Treesearch

    Sean A. Parks; Carol Miller; Lisa M. Holsinger; Scott Baggett; Benjamin J. Bird

    2016-01-01

    Several aspects of wildland fire are moderated by site- and landscape-level vegetation changes caused by previous fire, thereby creating a dynamic where one fire exerts a regulatory control on subsequent fire. For example, wildland fire has been shown to regulate the size and severity of subsequent fire. However, wildland fire has the potential to influence...

  15. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the latest developments in the fire clay industry, particularly in the U.S., as of June 2011. It claims that the leading fire clay producer in the U.S. is the state of Missouri. The other major producers include California, Texas and Washington. It reports that the use of heavy clay products made of fire clay like brick, cement and lightweight aggregate has increased slightly in 2010.

  16. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of fire clay is forecasted to remain around 300 kt/a.

  17. Polymicrobial ventriculitis involving Pseudomonas fulva.

    PubMed

    Rebolledo, Paulina A; Vu, Catphuong Cathy L; Carlson, Renee Donahue; Kraft, Colleen S; Anderson, Evan J; Burd, Eileen M

    2014-06-01

    Infections due to Pseudomonas fulva remain a rare but emerging concern. A case of ventriculitis due to Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas fulva following placement of an external ventricular drain is described. Similar to other reports, the organism was initially misidentified as Pseudomonas putida. The infection was successfully treated with levofloxacin.

  18. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Four companies mined fire clay in three states in 2012. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 230 kt (254,000 st) valued at $6.98 million, an increase from 215 kt (237,000 st) valued at $6.15 million in 2011. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Colorado and Texas, in decreasing order by quantity. The number of companies mining fire clay declined in 2012 because several common clay producers that occasionally mine fire clay indicated that they did not do so in 2012.

  19. Hyperspectral recognition of processing tomato early blight based on GA and SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaojun; Zhao, SiFeng

    2013-03-01

    Processing tomato early blight seriously affect the yield and quality of its.Determine the leaves spectrum of different disease severity level of processing tomato early blight.We take the sensitive bands of processing tomato early blight as support vector machine input vector.Through the genetic algorithm(GA) to optimize the parameters of SVM, We could recognize different disease severity level of processing tomato early blight.The result show:the sensitive bands of different disease severity levels of processing tomato early blight is 628-643nm and 689-692nm.The sensitive bands are as the GA and SVM input vector.We get the best penalty parameters is 0.129 and kernel function parameters is 3.479.We make classification training and testing by polynomial nuclear,radial basis function nuclear,Sigmoid nuclear.The best classification model is the radial basis function nuclear of SVM. Training accuracy is 84.615%,Testing accuracy is 80.681%.It is combined GA and SVM to achieve multi-classification of processing tomato early blight.It is provided the technical support of prediction processing tomato early blight occurrence, development and diffusion rule in large areas.

  20. Oregon Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  Smoke Plumes from the B&B Complex Fires, Oregon     View Larger Image ... of smoke originating from the B&B Complex Fires in central Oregon are captured in these September 4, 2003 views from the Multi-angle ...

  1. Fire Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  2. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Smoke Blankets Northern California     View Larger Image ... strikes sparked more than a thousand fires in northern California. This image was captured by the Multi-angle Imaging ... June 27, 2008 - Smoke from fires in northern California. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  3. Colorado Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Hayman fire and from the Ponil Complex fires south of the New Mexico-Colorado border are portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle ... x 565 kilometers. They use data from blocks 58 to 61 within World Reference System-2 path 32. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's ...

  4. Returning Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Jon B.

    2007-01-01

    Last December saw another predictable report from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a self-described watchdog group, highlighting how higher education is supposedly under siege from a politically correct plague of so-called hate-speech codes. In that report, FIRE declared that as many as 96 percent of top-ranked colleges…

  5. Fire Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denker, Deb; West, Lee

    2009-01-01

    For education administrators, campus fires are not only a distressing loss, but also a stark reminder that a campus faces risks that require special vigilance. In many ways, campuses resemble small communities, with areas for living, working and relaxing. A residence hall fire may raise the specter of careless youth, often with the complication of…

  6. Returning Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Jon B.

    2007-01-01

    Last December saw another predictable report from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a self-described watchdog group, highlighting how higher education is supposedly under siege from a politically correct plague of so-called hate-speech codes. In that report, FIRE declared that as many as 96 percent of top-ranked colleges…

  7. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length...

  8. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length...

  9. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses..., fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses. (a) Each vessel 36 feet (11.8 meters) or more in length must... fire pump on a vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be capable of delivering water...

  10. Forest-fire models

    Treesearch

    Haiganoush Preisler; Alan Ager

    2013-01-01

    For applied mathematicians forest fire models refer mainly to a non-linear dynamic system often used to simulate spread of fire. For forest managers forest fire models may pertain to any of the three phases of fire management: prefire planning (fire risk models), fire suppression (fire behavior models), and postfire evaluation (fire effects and economic models). In...

  11. Novel species of Botryosphaeriaceae associated with shoot blight of pistachio.

    PubMed

    Chen, ShuaiFei; Li, GuoQing; Liu, FeiFei; Michailides, Themis J

    2015-01-01

    Various species of phytopathogenic Botryosphaeriaceae were identified previously from pistachio trees worldwide. Disease symptoms caused by pathogens in Botryosphaeriaceae on pistachio include panicle and shoot blight, leaf defoliation, fruit discoloration and decay. In this study species of Botryosphaeriaceae were collected from blighted pistachio shoots in Arizona, USA, and Greece. The aims of this study were to identify these Botryosphaeriaceae isolates and to test their pathogenicity to pistachio. The fungi were identified based on comparisons of DNA sequence data of the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer region (ITS), a partial translation elongation factor 1-alpha gene (TEF1), a partial β-tubulin gene (TUB2) and morphological characteristics. Results indicated that some isolates collected from pistachio represent two previously undescribed species, which we described here as Lasiodiplodia americana sp. nov. from the United States and Neofusicoccum hellenicum sp. nov. from Greece. Field inoculations of L. americana and N. hellenicum on branches of four pistachio cultivars showed that both L. americana and N. hellenicum are pathogenic on pistachio. The four pistachio cultivars differed in their susceptibility to the Botryosphaeriaceae species. Results of this study suggested that the two new species of Botryosphaeriaceae need to be monitored carefully to determine the distribution of these pathogens and the possible spread to other areas.

  12. Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margle, Janice M. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Fire detection, fire standards and testing, fire extinguishment, inerting and atmospheres, fire-related medical science, aircraft fire safety, Space Station safety concerns, microgravity combustion, spacecraft material flammability testing, and metal combustion are among the topics considered.

  13. First Report of Foliar Blight on Dendropanax morbifera Caused by Alternaria panax.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian Xin; Kim, Chang Sun; Oh, Eun Sung; Yu, Seung Hun

    2010-12-01

    Leaf spot and blight disease was observed on two-year-old seedlings of Dendropanax morbifera (Korean name: Hwangchil tree) during July of 2008 in Jindo Island, Korea. Symptoms included yellow-brown to dark brown irregularly enlarged spots frequently located along the veins of leaves. The lesions were often surrounded by chlorotic haloes. Severe leaf blight and subsequent defoliation occurred when conditions favored disease outbreak. The causal organism of the disease was identified as Alternaria panax based on morphological characteristics and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA. A. panax isolates induced leaf spots and blight symptoms not only on D. morbifera but also on the other members of Araliaceae tested. This is the first report of foliar blight caused by A. panax on D. morbifera.

  14. Botryosphaeria Stem Blight of Southern Blueberries: Cultivar Susceptibility and Effect of Chemical Treatments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botryosphaeria stem blight, caused by the fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea, is a destructive disease of rabbiteye (Vaccinium ashei) and highbush (V. corymbosum) blueberries in the southeastern United States. The susceptibility of 21 southern highbush and seven rabbiteye blueberry cultivars was compar...

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis Strains Associated with Walnut Blight in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Higuera, Gastón; González-Escalona, Narjol; Véliz, Camila; Vera, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis is an important pathogen responsible for walnut blight outbreaks globally. Here, we report four draft genome sequences of X. arboricola pv. juglandis strains isolated from Chilean walnut trees. PMID:26450732

  16. Antifungal Action of Ginkgo biloba Outer Seedcoat on Rice Sheath blight

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae-Seok; Koo, Han-Mo; Yoon, Hei-Ryeo; Jeong, Nam-Su; Kim, Yeong-Jin; Kim, Chang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    From study of antifungal actions on the rice sheath blight by using the extract of Ginkgo biloba outer seedcoats, we found that the extracts of Ginkgo biloba outer seedcoats of all treatment concentrations had inhibited the rice sheath blight. Among them, the most effective concentration was 250 mg/l at which the growth of microbe was 26 mm and even at the packaging test, when sprayed the G. biloba outer seedcoats at the level of 250 mg/l, the damage rate of the rice sheath blight was identified as 13%. As a result investigating the antifungal activity by separating polysaccharides from G. biloba outer seedcoats, it showed that the clear zone of 14 mm or more was formed at the concentration of 250 mg/l or higher. Based on these results, we concluded that the G. biloba outer seedcoat is a natural substance with the antifungal activity on the rice sheath blight. PMID:25774111

  17. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... title:  Smoke from Station Fire Blankets Southern California     View Larger Image ... that had not burned in decades, and years of extended drought contributed to the explosive growth of wildfires throughout southern ...

  18. The USDA Quince and Pear Genebank in Oregon, A World Source of Fire Blight Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), has operated a genebank for temperate fruit and nut crops in Corvallis, Oregon since 1981. This facility, the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR), is devoted to conservation of many Rosaceous species that are pot...

  19. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    Five companies mined fire clay in four states in 2011. Production, based on a preliminary survey of the fire clay industry, was estimated to be 240 kt (265,000 st), valued at $7.68 million, an increase from 216 kt (238,000 st), valued at $6.12 million in 2010. Missouri was the leading producing state, followed by Texas, Washington and Ohio, in decreasing order by quantity.

  20. Control of Rhizoctonia foliar blight in forest seedling nurseries: A 3-year study

    Treesearch

    Tom E. Starkey; Scott A. Enebak; Ken McQuage; Kevin. Barfield

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and field trials have shown Proline® (prothioconazole) to be efficacious against the causal agent of Rhizoctonia foliar blight on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). A biweekly application of Proline ® at 5 fl oz/ac in nursery field tests significantly reduced Rhizoctonia foliar blight on loblolly pine when compared to applications of Abound ® azoxystrobin (24 fl...

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in disease.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Isabella, Vincent M; Lewis, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous organism that is the focus of intense research because of its prominent role in disease. Due to its relatively large genome and flexible metabolic capabilities, this organism exploits numerous environmental niches. It is an opportunistic pathogen that sets upon the human host when the normal immune defenses are disabled. Its deadliness is most apparent in cystic fibrosis patients, but it also is a major problem in burn wounds, chronic wounds, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, surface growth on implanted biomaterials, and within hospital surface and water supplies, where it poses a host of threats to vulnerable patients (Peleg and Hooper, N Engl J Med 362:1804-1813, 2010; Breathnach et al., J Hosp Infect 82:19-24, 2012). Once established in the patient, P. aeruginosa can be especially difficult to treat. The genome encodes a host of resistance genes, including multidrug efflux pumps (Poole, J Mol Microbiol Biotechnol 3:255-264, 2001) and enzymes conferring resistance to beta-lactam and aminoglycoside antibotics (Vahdani et al., Annal Burns Fire Disast 25:78-81, 2012), making therapy against this gram-negative pathogen particularly challenging due to the lack of novel antimicrobial therapeutics (Lewis, Nature 485: 439-440, 2012). This challenge is compounded by the ability of P. aeruginosa to grow in a biofilm, which may enhance its ability to cause infections by protecting bacteria from host defenses and chemotherapy. Here, we review recent studies of P. aeruginosa biofilms with a focus on how this unique mode of growth contributes to its ability to cause recalcitrant infections.

  2. Inoculation and scoring methods for rice sheath blight disease.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yulin; Liu, Guangjie; Park, Dong-Soo; Yang, Yinong

    2013-01-01

    Sheath blight disease of rice caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani has been a major disease of rice with a serious threat to stable rice production worldwide. Although various cultural practices have been used to manage the disease, it is advantageous and important to screen rice germplasm and identify resistant rice cultivars for more effective disease control. Recent advances in methods for the fungal inoculation and disease evaluation have enabled a better measurement of host resistance by minimizing confounding factors from plant architectures and environmental conditions. This chapter introduces five such methods: (1) detached leaf method; (2) micro-chamber method; (3) mist-chamber method; (4) parafilm sachet method; and (5) aluminum foil method. These methods are useful for screening and evaluating disease reactions of rice germplasm and facilitating the genetic mapping of disease resistance genes.

  3. Detection of southern corn leaf blight by remote sensing techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.; Swain, P. H.; Mroczynski, R. P.; Anuta, P. E.; Macdonald, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    Multispectral photographic and scanner data were collected over western Indiana in August and September 1970, to determine the detectability of southern corn leaf blight by remote sensing. Measurements were made at altitudes of 3000 to 7000 ft. Color, color IR, and multiband black and white photography were collected at altitudes from 3000 to 60,000 ft. Six levels of infection based on the amount of leaf damage were identified in the fields. Three levels of infection were detected with color IR photography by standard photo-interpretive techniques. Up to five levels of infection were distinguished by applying automatic pattern recognition techniques to the multispectral scanner data. The results illustrate the potential of remote sensing techniques in the detection of crop diseases.

  4. Antioxidative enzymes and isozymes analysis of taro genotypes and their implications in Phytophthora blight disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Manas Ranjan; DasGupta, Madhumita; Kole, Paresh C; Bhat, Jayant S; Mukherjee, Archana

    2007-04-01

    Assessment of the differential expression of antioxidative enzymes and their isozymes, was done in 30 day-old ex vitro raised plants of three highly resistant (DP-25, Jhankri and Duradim) and one highly susceptible (N-118) genotypes of taro [Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott]. Antioxidative enzymes were assayed in the ex vitro plants, 7 days after inoculation with the spores (15,000 spores ml(-1) water) of Phytophthora colocasiae Raciborski to induce taro leaf blight disease. Uninoculated ex vitro plants in each genotype were used as control. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) increased under induced blight condition when compared with control. Increase in antioxidative enzymes was more (67-92%) in the resistant genotypes than that (21-29%) of the susceptible genotype. The zymograms of SOD and GPX in the resistant genotypes, with pathogenic infection, showed increased activity for anodal isoform of SOD and increased expression and/or induction of either POX 1 or POX 2 isoforms of GPX. In susceptible genotype, expression of the above isoforms was faint for SOD and nearly absent for GPX under both blight free and induced blight conditions. Induction and/or increased activity of particular isoform of SOD and GPX against infection of Phytophthora colocasiae in the resistant genotypes studied led to the apparent conclusion of linkage of isozyme expression with blight resistance in taro. This might be an important criterion in breeding of taro for Phytophthora leaf blight resistance.

  5. Quantification of rice sheath blight progression caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Su'udi, Mukhamad; Park, Jong-Mi; Kang, Woo-Ri; Hwang, Duk-Ju; Kim, Soonok; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2013-06-01

    Rhizoctonia solani has a wide host range, including almost all cultivated crops and its subgroup anastomosis group (AG)-1 IA causes sheath blight in rice. An accurate measurement of pathogen's biomass is a convincing tool for enumeration of this disease. Mycological characteristics and molecular diagnosis simultaneously supported that all six strains in this study were R. solani AG-1 IA. Heterokaryons between strains Rs40104, Rs40105, and Rs45811 were stable and viable, whereas Rs40103 and Rs40106 did not form viable fused cells, except for the combination of Rs40106 and Rs40104. A primer pair was highly specific to RsAROM gene of R. solani strains and the amplified fragment exists as double copies within fungal genome. The relationship between crossing point (CP) values and the amount of fungal DNA was reliable (R (2) >0.99). Based on these results, we determined R. solani's proliferation within infected stems through real time PCR using a primer pair and a Taqman probe specific to the RsAROM gene. The amount of fungal DNA within the 250 ng of tissue DNA from rice cv. Dongjin infected with Rs40104, Rs40105, and Rs45811 were 7.436, 5.830, and 5.085 ng, respectively. In contrast, the fungal DNAs within the stems inoculated with Rs40103 and Rs40106 were 0.091 and 0.842 ng. The sheath blight symptom progression approximately coincided with the amount of fungal DNA within the symptoms. In summary, our quantitative evaluation method provided reliable and objective results reflecting the amount of fungal biomass within the infected tissues and would be useful for evaluation of resistance germplasm or fungicides and estimation of inoculum potential.

  6. ON THE RELATION BETWEEN THE KINDS OF WINTER CROPS AND THE OCCURRENCE OF THE BACTERIAL LEAF BLIGHT OF RICE PLANT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The present report, as a part of the research on the ecology of rice leaf blight , is the result of an investigation to determine whether there was a...difference in the occurrence of rice leaf blight on the post-winter crop-fields according to the variety of winter crops. In order to make comparisons...outbreak of rice leaf blight , cultivation procedures, flooding, wind and drainage systems, the winter crops were different from each other, two adjoining

  7. Bio-protective microbial agents from rhizosphere eco-systems trigger plant defense responses provide protection against sheath blight disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, Udai B; Malviya, Deepti; Wasiullah; Singh, Shailendra; Pradhan, Jatindra K; Singh, Bhanu P; Roy, Manish; Imram, Mohd; Pathak, Neelam; Baisyal, B M; Rai, Jai P; Sarma, B K; Singh, Rajiv K; Sharma, P K; Kaur, Saman Deep; Manna, M C; Sharma, Sushil K; Sharma, Arun K

    2016-11-01

    Sheath blight of rice (Oryza sativa L.) caused by Rhizoctonia solani is a major disease and attempts are being made to develop microbe based technologies for biocontrol of this pathogen. However, the mechanisms of biocontrol are not fully understood and still require indepth study in the backdrop of emerging concepts in biological systems. The present investigation was aimed at deciphering the mechanisms of biocontrol of sheath blight of rice employing Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum as model agents for biocontrol. Initially 25, 5 and 5 strains of P. fluorescens, T. viride and T. harzianum, respectively, were screened for their biocontrol potential. Out of which, six strains with higher value of percent inhibition of fungal mycelium in dual plate assay were selected. The role of P. fluorescens, T. viride and T. harzianum were investigated in induction and bioaccumulation of natural antioxidants, defence-related biomolecules and other changes in plant which lead not only to growth promotion but also protection from pathogenic stress conditions in rice. The two most promising strains, P. fluorescens PF-08 and T. harzianum UBSTH-501 selected on the basis of in planta evaluation, when applied individually or in combination, significantly enhanced the accumulation of defence-related biomolecules, enzymes and exhibited biocontrol potential against R. solani. A modified/newly developed delivery system was applied for the first time in the experiments involving inoculation of plants with both bioagents, viz. P. fluorescens PF-08 and T. harzianum UBSTH-501. Results suggested that application of P. fluorescens PF-08 and T. harzianum UBSTH-501 alone or in combination, not only helps in control of the disease but also increases plant growth along with reduction in application of toxic chemical pesticides.

  8. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.820 Fire pumps, fire mains... pump connected to a fixed piping system. This pump must be capable of delivering an effective stream...

  9. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire pumps... be equipped with a self-priming, power driven fire pump connected to a fixed piping system. (1)...

  10. Fire in the Shop!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.; Buchanan, Joseph P.

    1977-01-01

    Fire emergency preparedness measures to take to prevent school fires and to protect against injury and minimize damage when fire does occur are presented. Includes fire safety practices, extinguishers for different classes of fires and their use, and the need for fire safety training in schools. (MF)

  11. 46 CFR 28.315 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fire pump on a vessel 79 feet (24 meters) or more in length must be capable of delivering water... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses... After September 15, 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.315 Fire...

  12. Plasmid-determined copper resistance in Pseudomonas syringae from impatiens

    SciTech Connect

    Cooksey, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas syringae was recently identified as the cause of a new foliar blight of impatiens. The bacterium was resistant to copper compounds, which are used on a variety of crops for bacterial and fungal disease control. The bacterium contained a single 47-kilobase plasmid (pPSI1) that showed homology to a copper resistance operon previously cloned and characterized from P. syringae pv. tomato plasmid pPT23D (D. Cooksey, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 53:454-456, 1987). pPSI1 was transformed by electroporation into a copper-sensitive P. syringae strain, and the resulting transformants were copper resistant. A physical map of pPSI1 was constructed, and the extent of homology to pPT23D outside the copper resistance operon was determined in Southern hybridizations. The two plasmids shared approximately 20 kilobases of homologous DNA, with the remainder of each plasmid showing no detectable homology. The homologous regions hybridized strongly, but there was little or no conservation of restriction enzyme recognition sites.

  13. Fire Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... way to the nearest exit. Don't stop. Don't go back . In case of fire, do not try to rescue pets or possessions. Once you are out, do not go back in for any reason. Firefighters have the best chance of rescuing people who are trapped. Let firefighters know right away if anyone is missing. ...

  14. Idaho Fires

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-10-22

    This full-frame ASTER image, acquired August 30, 2000, covers an area of 60 by 60 km in the Salmon River Mountains, Idaho. In this color infrared composite, vegetation is red, clouds are white, and smoke from forest fires is blue. An enlargement (Figure 1) covers an area of 12 x 15 km. A thermal infrared band is displayed in red, a short wave infrared band is displayed in green, and a visible band is displayed in blue. In this combination, fires larger than about 50 m appear yellow because they are bright in both infrared bands. Smaller fires appear green because they are too small to be seen by the 90 m thermal pixels, but large enough to be detected in the 30 m short wave infrared pixels. We are able to see through the smoke in the infrared bands, whereas in the visible bands, the smoke obscures detection of the active fires. This image is located at 44.8 degrees north latitude and 114.8 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11088

  15. Appalachian Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of smoke from forest fires in Virginia, Kentucky, and West Virginia was taken by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) on November 15, 2001. Smoke is visible extending over the Chesapeake Bay. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  16. Dalhousie Fire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Fred W.

    1986-01-01

    Describes steps taken by the Weldon Law Library at Dalhousie University in salvaging books damaged in a major fire, including procedures and processes used in packing, sorting, drying, and cleaning the books. The need for a disaster plan for specific libraries is emphasized, and some suggestions are made. (CDD)

  17. GIS-based climatic regionalization of potato late blight in mountain areas of Southwest Sichuan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qing; Peng, Guozhao; Ruan, Jun; Cao, Yanqiu; Fang, Peng; Li, Dazhong; Armuzhong, .; Huang, Doumin; Hu, Qiaojuan; Chen, Yuanzhi

    2008-10-01

    Through the geographic insemination test in installments on five phases of potato late blight in four areas of Mianning and Zhaojue with the altitude of 1,600m, 1,800m, 2,100m and 2,500m respectively, this paper researches the meteorological causes, leading factors and climatic indexes for potato late blight in mountain areas of southwest Sichuan in detail. Based on that, short-term section climatic inspection data of mountain areas, observation data from meteorological post and latest data from automatic weather station are extensively collected, organized and processed by extension, based on which the Spatial Distribution Model of climatic indexes for potato late blight in mountain areas of southwest Sichuan is established in association with the routine surface observation data, y=f(h,φ,l,β). With the geographic information data of 1:250000 and GIS technology, southwest Sichuan is divided into climatic liable region of potato blight, climatic secondary liable region and climatic non-liable region by factor setting and optimization method. Providing scientific basis for selection, distribution and prevention decision making for late blight resistant species of potato in southwest Sichuan, it has important value for production and application.

  18. A test of taxonomic predictivity: resistance to early blight in wild relatives of cultivated potato.

    PubMed

    Jansky, S H; Simon, R; Spooner, D M

    2008-06-01

    Host plant resistance offers an attractive method of control for early blight (caused by the foliar fungus Alternaria solani), a widespread disease that appears annually in potato crops worldwide. We tested the assumed ability of taxonomy to predict the presence of early blight resistance genes in wild Solanum species for which resistance was observed in related species. We also tested associations to ploidy, crossing group, breeding system, and geography. As in a prior study of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (white mold) resistance, tremendous variation for resistance to early blight was found to occur within and among species. There was no discernable relationship between the distribution of resistant phenotypes and taxonomic series (based on an intuitive interpretation of morphological data), clade (based on a cladistic analysis of plastid DNA data), ploidy, breeding system, geographic distance, or climate parameters. Species and individual accessions with high proportions of early blight resistant plants were identified, but high levels of inter- and intra-accession variability were observed. Consequently, the designation of species or accessions as resistant or susceptible must take this variation into account. This study calls into question the assumption that taxonomic or geographic data can be used to predict sources of early blight resistance in wild Solanum species.

  19. Fire Detection Organizing Questions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Verified models of fire precursor transport in low and partial gravity: a. Development of models for large-scale transport in reduced gravity. b. Validated CFD simulations of transport of fire precursors. c. Evaluation of the effect of scale on transport and reduced gravity fires. Advanced fire detection system for gaseous and particulate pre-fire and fire signaturesa: a. Quantification of pre-fire pyrolysis products in microgravity. b. Suite of gas and particulate sensors. c. Reduced gravity evaluation of candidate detector technologies. d. Reduced gravity verification of advanced fire detection system. e. Validated database of fire and pre-fire signatures in low and partial gravity.

  20. Establishment of American chestnuts (Castanea dentata) bred for blight (Cryphonectria parasitica ) resistance: influence of breeding and nursery grading

    Treesearch

    Stacy L. Clark; Scott E. Schlarbaum; Arnold M. Saxton; Frederick V. Hebard

    2016-01-01

    European and American chestnut species (Castanea) have been decimated by exotic species, most notably chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica), since the early nineteenth century. Backcross breeding programs that transfer blight disease resistance from Chinese chestnut (C. mollissima) into American...

  1. Sundance Fire: an analysis of fire phenomena

    Treesearch

    Hal E. Anderson

    1968-01-01

    The Sundance Fire on September 1, 1967, made a spectacular run of 16 miles in 9 hours and destroyed more than 50,000 acres. This run became the subject of a detailed research analysis of the environmental, topographic, and vegetation variables aimed at reconstructing and describing fire phenomena. This report details the fire's progress; discusses the fire's...

  2. Dynamics of Cryphonectria hypovirus infection in chestnut blight cankers.

    PubMed

    Bryner, Sarah Franziska; Prospero, Simone; Rigling, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Virulent strains of the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica cause lethal bark cankers on chestnut trees. Infection of C. parasitica with Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 in Europe biologically controls this disease, leading to nonlethal and inactive cankers. Unexpectedly, virus-free C. parasitica strains have been isolated from inactive cankers. In this study, we compared the virulence of virus-infected and virus-free C. parasitica strains isolated from either inactive or active cankers on chestnut seedlings and sprouts. In the seedling experiment, we assessed canker growth and seedling mortality. In the sprout experiment, we also assessed canker growth and made fungal reisolations to determine virus infection and immigration of foreign vegetative compatibility (vc) types over a period of 13 years in a coppice forest. Overall, the virulence of virus-free C. parasitica strains isolated from inactive versus active cankers did not differ. Significant differences were only attributed to virus infection. Virus infection and fungal strain composition in cankers changed over time. Foreign vc types immigrated into cankers and virus-free cankers became virus-infected within a few years. Most of the cankers were callused over time and became inactive. However, we observed that the virus did not always persist in these cankers. This study demonstrates that virus spread occurs effectively in European chestnut forests and that this biocontrol system is highly dynamic.

  3. Screening Rice Cultivars for Resistance to Bacterial Leaf Blight.

    PubMed

    Fred, Agaba Kayihura; Kiswara, Gilang; Yi, Gihwan; Kim, Kyung-Min

    2016-05-28

    Bacterial leaf blight (BLB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most serious threats to rice production. In this study, screening of rice for resistance to BLB was carried out at two different times and locations; that is, in a greenhouse during winter and in an open field during summer. The pathogenicity of Xoo race K1 was tested on 32 Korean rice cultivars. Inoculation was conducted at the maximum tillering stage, and the lesion length was measured after 14 days of inoculation. Five cultivars, Hanareum, Namcheon, Samgdeok, Samgang, and Yangjo, were found to be resistant in both the greenhouse and open-field screenings. Expression of the plant defense-related genes JAmyb, OsNPR1, OsPR1a, OsWRKY45, and OsPR10b was observed in resistant and susceptible cultivars by qRT-PCR. Among the five genes tested, only OsPR10b showed coherent expression with the phenotypes. Screening of resistance to Xoo in rice was more accurate when conducted in open fields in the summer cultivation period than in greenhouses in winter. The expression of plant defenserelated genes after bacterial inoculation could give another perspective in elucidating defense mechanisms by using both resistant and susceptible individuals.

  4. Biology of Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar, Antoni; Bosch, Rafael; García-Valdés, Elena; Palleroni, Norberto J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is a nonfluorescent denitrifying bacterium widely distributed in the environment, and it has also been isolated as an opportunistic pathogen from humans. Over the past 15 years, much progress has been made in elucidating the taxonomy of this diverse taxonomical group, demonstrating the clonality of its populations. The species has received much attention because of its particular metabolic properties: it has been proposed as a model organism for denitrification studies; many strains have natural transformation properties, making it relevant for study of the transfer of genes in the environment; several strains are able to fix dinitrogen; and others participate in the degradation of pollutants or interact with toxic metals. This review considers the history of the discovery, nomenclatural changes, and early studies, together with the relevant biological and ecological properties, of P. stutzeri. PMID:16760312

  5. Cellular responses of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans to cyclic lipopeptide surfactants and their dependence on G proteins.

    PubMed

    van de Mortel, Judith E; Tran, Ha; Govers, Francine; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2009-08-01

    Oomycete pathogens cause major yield losses for many crop plants, and their control depends heavily on agrochemicals. Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) were recently discovered as a new class of natural compounds with strong activities against oomycetes. The CLP massetolide A (Mass A), produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens, has zoosporicidal activity, induces systemic resistance, and reduces late blight in tomato. To gain further insight into the modes of action of CLPs, the effects of Mass A on pore formation, mycelial growth, sporangium formation, and zoospore behavior were investigated, as was the involvement of G proteins in the sensitivity of Phytophthora infestans to Mass A. The results showed that Mass A induced the formation of transmembrane pores with an estimated size of between 1.2 and 1.8 nm. Dose-response experiments revealed that zoospores were the most sensitive to Mass A, followed by mycelium and cysts. Mass A significantly reduced sporangium formation and caused increased branching and swelling of hyphae. At relatively low concentrations, Mass A induced encystment of zoospores. It had no effect on the chemotactic response of zoospores but did adversely affect zoospore autoaggregation. A loss-of-function transformant of P. infestans lacking the G-protein alpha subunit was more sensitive to Mass A, whereas a gain-of-function transformant required a higher Mass A concentration to interfere with zoospore aggregation. Results indicate that Mass A disturbs various developmental stages in the life cycle of P. infestans and suggest that the cellular responses of P. infestans to this CLP are, in part, dependent on G-protein signaling.

  6. Fire Behavior (FB)

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Fire Behavior (FB) method is used to describe the behavior of the fire and the ambient weather and fuel conditions that influence the fire behavior. Fire behavior methods are not plot based and are collected by fire event and time-date. In general, the fire behavior data are used to interpret the fire effects documented in the plot-level sampling. Unlike the other...

  7. Fire Maintenance and Logistics Analysis (Fire Main)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    medical evacuation, (2) supply transportation, (3) fire / water bucket support, (4) troop movement, and (&) miscei~areojs. Tabi .1-1. shows the...operation. On average, for the 4-12 September fierce fire fighting period, 44 percent of the helicopters were used for fire / water bucket operations, 2P...the operation. As expected the largest percentage of the helicopters were used for fire / water bucket operations during both the fierce fire fighting

  8. Zinc-deficient sprouting blight potatoes and their possible relation with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Cevval; Taneli, Fatma; Oksel, Figen; Hakerlerler, Huseyin

    2005-01-01

    Maternal nutritional zinc deficiency is blamed in the pathogenesis of neural tube defects. In animal and plant domains zinc is required for growth and development. The objective of the present study was to show that sprouting blighted potato tuber is zinc deficient. In five potato varieties, zinc was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in wet-ashed paired slices of edible potato tuber and in its peel, in blighted potato tuber and in its sprout. Zinc contents were measured as the mean (+/- SEM) and the following values were found, 0.388 +/- 0.036, 0.623 +/- 0.059, 0.550 +/- 0.030 and 1.089 +/- 0.181 mg per 100 g wet weight, respectively. In conclusion, we believe that long-term consumption of zinc-depleted, blight potato tuber by pregnant woman could be potentially teratogenic with the consequent birth of a baby with neural tube defects.

  9. Characterization of a new pathovar of Agrobacterium vitis causing banana leaf blight in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siliang; Long, Mengling; Fu, Gang; Lin, Shanhai; Qin, Liping; Hu, Chunjin; Cen, Zhenlu; Lu, Jie; Li, Qiqin

    2015-01-01

    A new banana leaf blight was found in Nanning city, China, during a 7-year survey (2003-2009) of the bacterial diseases on banana plants. Eight bacterial strains were isolated from affected banana leaves, and identified as an intraspecific taxon of Agrobacterium vitis based on their 16S rDNA sequence similarities with those of 37 randomly selected bacterial strains registered in GenBank database. The representative strain Ag-1 was virulent on banana leaves and shared similar growth and biochemical reactions with the reference strain IAM14140 of A. vitis. The strains causing banana leaf blight were denominated as A. vitis pv. musae. The traditional A. vitis strains virulent to grapevines were proposed to be revised as A. vitis pv. vitis. This is the first record of a new type of A. vitis causing banana leaf blight in China. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Pseudomonas folliculitis in Arabian baths.

    PubMed

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ruigomez, Maria

    2013-07-14

    A 35-year-old man presented with a painful cutaneous skin eruption that was localized on the upper trunk. He stated that the previous weekend he had attended an Arabian bath. The physical examination revealed multiple hair follicle-centered papulopustules surrounded by an erythematous halo. A clinical diagnosis of pseudomonas folliculitis was made and treatment was prescribed. Afterwards Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a pustule culture. Pseudomonas folliculitis is a bacterial infection of the hair follicles. The most common reservoirs include facilities with hot water and complex piping systems that are difficult to clean, such as hot tubs and bathtubs. Despite adequate or high chlorine levels, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow within a biofilm.

  11. First report of bacterial blight of sugar beet caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. aptata in Georgia, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugarbeet [Beta vulgaris L.] is not currently a commercial crop in Georgia, but experimental plantings as a winter rotational crop are promising in terms of yield and industrial sugar production. A disease outbreak of suspected bacterial origin occurred in some plots of sugarbeet [experimental lin...

  12. ‘Carolina Broadleaf’ mustard green (Brassica juncea L.) resistant to the bacterial leaf blight pathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A leafy-green mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivar designated ‘Carolina Broadleaf’ has been released by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in 2015. This released cultivar is a narrow-based population of leafy-green mustard derived from a U.S. plant introduction (PI)...

  13. First Report of Bacterial Blight on Conventionally and Organically Grown Arugula in Nevada Caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. alisalensis.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel bacterial leaf spot was detected in commercial organic and conventional plantings of the arugula (Eruca vesicaria spp. sativa) cv. My Way in 2007. Koch’s postulates were completed and etiology of the pathogen was determined. Physiological and molecular characterization showed that the pathog...

  14. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for Resistance to Late Blight in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Panthee, Dilip R; Piotrowski, Ann; Ibrahem, Ragy

    2017-07-22

    Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans (Montagne, Bary) is a devastating disease of tomato worldwide. There are three known major genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-3, conferring resistance to late blight. In addition to these three genes, it is also believed that there are additional factors or quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring resistance to late blight. Precise molecular mapping of all those major genes and potential QTL is important in the development of suitable molecular markers and hence, marker-assisted selection (MAS). The objective of the present study was to map the genes and QTL associated with late blight resistance in a tomato population derived from intra-specific crosses. To achieve this objective, a population, derived from the crossings of NC 1CELBR × Fla. 7775, consisting of 250 individuals at F2 and F2-derived families, were evaluated in replicated trials. These were conducted at Mountain Horticultural Crops Reseach & Extension Center (MHCREC) at Mills River, NC, and Mountain Research Staion (MRS) at Waynesville, NC in 2011, 2014, and 2015. There were two major QTL associated with late blight resistance located on chromosomes 9 and 10 with likelihood of odd (LOD) scores of more than 42 and 6, explaining 67% and 14% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. The major QTLs are probably caused by the Ph-2 and Ph-3 genes. Furthermore, there was a minor QTL on chromosomes 12, which has not been reported before. This minor QTL may be novel and may be worth investigating further. Source of resistance to Ph-2, Ph-3, and this minor QTL traces back to line L3707, or Richter's Wild Tomato. The combination of major genes and minor QTL may provide a durable resistance to late blight in tomato.

  15. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Sujeet Kumar; Jain, Harsh; Tripathy, Laxmi Narayan; Basu, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms. PMID:27891039

  16. Zaca Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On August 7, 2007, the Zaca fire continued to burn in the Los Padres National Forest near Santa Barbara, California. The fire started more than a month ago, on July 4, and has burned 69,800 acres. The fire remains in steep, rocky terrain with poor access. The continued poor access makes containment difficult in the wilderness area on the eastern flank. So far only one outbuilding has been destroyed; but over 450 homes are currently threatened. Over 2300 fire personnel, aided by four air tankers and 15 helicopters, are working to contain this massive fire. Full containment is expected on September 1.

    The image covers 45.2 x 46.1 km, and is centered near 34.6 degrees north latitude, 119.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission

  17. Zaca Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On August 7, 2007, the Zaca fire continued to burn in the Los Padres National Forest near Santa Barbara, California. The fire started more than a month ago, on July 4, and has burned 69,800 acres. The fire remains in steep, rocky terrain with poor access. The continued poor access makes containment difficult in the wilderness area on the eastern flank. So far only one outbuilding has been destroyed; but over 450 homes are currently threatened. Over 2300 fire personnel, aided by four air tankers and 15 helicopters, are working to contain this massive fire. Full containment is expected on September 1.

    The image covers 45.2 x 46.1 km, and is centered near 34.6 degrees north latitude, 119.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission

  18. Where's the Fire?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    National Fire Protection Week is a perfect time for launching a fire safety learning center. The activities described here are intended to help children recognize fire hazards in their homes, play areas and public buildings; learn how to act intelligently in fire emergencies; be able to share their knowledge of fire safety with others and…

  19. Where's the Fire?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Dorothy

    1977-01-01

    National Fire Protection Week is a perfect time for launching a fire safety learning center. The activities described here are intended to help children recognize fire hazards in their homes, play areas and public buildings; learn how to act intelligently in fire emergencies; be able to share their knowledge of fire safety with others and…

  20. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM OUTDATED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, L.T.

    AN EFFICIENT FIRE ALARM SYSTEM SHOULD--(1) PROVIDE WARNING OF FIRES THAT START IN HIDDEN OR UNOCCUPIED LOCATIONS, (2) INDICATE WHERE THE FIRE IS, (3) GIVE ADVANCE WARNING TO FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION SO THAT PANIC AND CONFUSION CAN BE AVOIDED AND ORDERLY EVACUATION OCCUR, (4) AUTOMATICALLY NOTIFY CITY FIRE HEADQUARTERS OF THE FIRE, (5) OPERATE BY…

  1. FIRE ALARM SYSTEM OUTDATED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHANDLER, L.T.

    AN EFFICIENT FIRE ALARM SYSTEM SHOULD--(1) PROVIDE WARNING OF FIRES THAT START IN HIDDEN OR UNOCCUPIED LOCATIONS, (2) INDICATE WHERE THE FIRE IS, (3) GIVE ADVANCE WARNING TO FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION SO THAT PANIC AND CONFUSION CAN BE AVOIDED AND ORDERLY EVACUATION OCCUR, (4) AUTOMATICALLY NOTIFY CITY FIRE HEADQUARTERS OF THE FIRE, (5) OPERATE BY…

  2. Fire Safety Training Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Dept. of Fire and Rescue Services, Rockville, MD. Div. of Fire Prevention.

    Designed for a community fire education effort, particularly in which local volunteers present general information on fire safety to their fellow citizens, this workbook contains nine lessons. Included are an overview of the household fire problem; instruction in basic chemistry and physics of fire, flammable liquids, portable fire extinguishers,…

  3. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  4. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  5. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  6. 46 CFR 28.820 - Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire hoses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... water from a hose connected to the highest outlet. The minimum capacity of the power fire pump shall be 50 gallons per minute at a pressure of not less than 60 pounds per square inch at the pump outlet. (1... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire pumps, fire mains, fire hydrants, and fire...

  7. Fire Protection for Buildings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Jane

    1972-01-01

    Reviews attack on fire safety in high rise buildings made by a group of experts representing the iron and steel industry at a recent conference. According to one expert, fire problems are people oriented, which calls for emphasis on fire prevention rather than reliance on fire suppression and for fire pretection to be built into a structure.…

  8. Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires

    DOEpatents

    Buttrey, K.E.

    1980-12-19

    Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

  9. Current Status of Early Blight Resistance in Tomato: An Update.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Pragya; Oh, Yeonyee; Panthee, Dilip R

    2017-09-21

    Early blight (EB) is one of the dreadful diseases of tomato caused by several species of Alternaria including Alternaria linariae (which includes A. solani and A. tomatophila), as well as A. alternata. In some instances, annual economic yield losses due to EB have been estimated at 79%. Alternaria are known only to reproduce asexually, but a highly-virulent isolate has the potential to overcome existing resistance genes. Currently, cultural practices and fungicide applications are employed for the management of EB due to the lack of strong resistant cultivars. Resistance sources have been identified in wild species of tomato; some breeding lines and cultivars with moderate resistance have been developed through conventional breeding methods. Polygenic inheritance of EB resistance, insufficient resistance in cultivated species and the association of EB resistance with undesirable horticultural traits have thwarted the effective breeding of EB resistance in tomato. Several quantitative trait loci (QTL) conferring EB resistance have been detected in the populations derived from different wild species including Solanum habrochaites, Solanum arcanum and S. pimpinellifolium, but none of them could be used in EB resistance breeding due to low individual QTL effects. Pyramiding of those QTLs would provide strong resistance. More research is needed to identify additional sources of useful resistance, to incorporate resistant QTLs into breeding lines through marker-assisted selection (MAS) and to develop resistant cultivars with desirable horticultural traits including high yielding potential and early maturity. This paper will review the current understanding of causal agents of EB of tomato, resistance genetics and breeding, problems associated with breeding and future prospects.

  10. Fire weather and fire behavior in the 1966 loop fire

    Treesearch

    C.M. Countryman; M.A. Fosberg; R.C. Rothermel; M.J. Schroeder

    1968-01-01

    Southern California regularly experiences a wind condition known as the Santa Ana winds. This paper describes the phenomenon and the effects it had on fire behavior during the 1966 Loop Fire in the Angeles National Forest, which claimed the lives of 12 fire fighters.

  11. FIRE Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-11-13

    ... a series of field missions which have collected cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud parameters from aircraft, satellite and ... FIRE I - Cirrus Home Page FIRE I - Marine Stratocumulus Home Page FIRE I - Extended Time Observations ...

  12. Transcriptome analysis of root response to citrus blight based on the newly assembled Swingle citrumelo draft genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunzeng; Barthe, Gary; Grosser, Jude W; Wang, Nian

    2016-07-08

    Citrus blight is a citrus tree overall decline disease and causes serious losses in the citrus industry worldwide. Although it was described more than one hundred years ago, its causal agent remains unknown and its pathophysiology is not well determined, which hampers our understanding of the disease and design of suitable disease management. In this study, we sequenced and assembled the draft genome for Swingle citrumelo, one important citrus rootstock. The draft genome is approximately 280 Mb, which covers 74 % of the estimated Swingle citrumelo genome and the average coverage is around 15X. The draft genome of Swingle citrumelo enabled us to conduct transcriptome analysis of roots of blight and healthy Swingle citrumelo using RNA-seq. The RNA-seq was reliable as evidenced by the high consistence of RNA-seq analysis and quantitative reverse transcription PCR results (R(2) = 0.966). Comparison of the gene expression profiles between blight and healthy root samples revealed the molecular mechanism underneath the characteristic blight phenotypes including decline, starch accumulation, and drought stress. The JA and ET biosynthesis and signaling pathways showed decreased transcript abundance, whereas SA-mediated defense-related genes showed increased transcript abundance in blight trees, suggesting unclassified biotrophic pathogen was involved in this disease. Overall, the Swingle citrumelo draft genome generated in this study will advance our understanding of plant biology and contribute to the citrus breeding. Transcriptome analysis of blight and healthy trees deepened our understanding of the pathophysiology of citrus blight.

  13. Impact of siderophore production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 on epiphytic fitness and biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea 1a/96.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annette; Braun, Sascha D; Büttner, Petra; Expert, Dominique; Völksch, Beate; Ullrich, Matthias S; Weingart, Helge

    2010-05-01

    The use of naturally occurring microbial antagonists to suppress plant diseases offers a favorable alternative to classical methods of plant protection. The soybean epiphyte Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93 shows great potential for controlling P. syringae pv. glycinea, the causal agent of bacterial blight of soybean. Its activity against P. syringae pv. glycinea is highly reproducible even in field trials, and the suppression mechanisms involved are of special interest. In this work we demonstrated that P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 produced a significantly larger amount of siderophores than the pathogen P. syringae pv. glycinea produced. While P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 and P. syringae pv. glycinea produce the same siderophores, achromobactin and pyoverdin, the regulation of siderophore biosynthesis in the former organism is very different from that in the latter organism. The epiphytic fitness of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 mutants defective in siderophore biosynthesis was determined following spray inoculation of soybean leaves. The population size of the siderophore-negative mutant P. syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93DeltaSid was 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild type 10 days after inoculation. The growth deficiency was compensated for when wound inoculation was used, indicating the availability of iron in the presence of small lesions on the leaves. Our results suggest that siderophore production has an indirect effect on the biocontrol activity of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93. Although siderophore-defective mutants of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 still suppressed development of bacterial blight caused by P. syringae pv. glycinea, siderophore production enhanced the epiphytic fitness and thus the competitiveness of the antagonist.

  14. Three American tragedies: chestnut blight, butternut canker, and Dutch elm disease

    Treesearch

    Scott E. Schlarbaum; Frederick Hebard; Pauline C. Spaine; Joseph C. Kamalay

    1998-01-01

    Three North American tree species, American chestnut (Castanea dentata), butternut (Juglans cinerea), and American elm (Ulmus americana), have been devastated by exotic fungal diseases over the last century. American chestnut was eliminated from eastern forests as a dominant species by chestnut blight (...

  15. Explanation of pole blight from responses of seedlings grown in modified environments

    Treesearch

    Charles D. Leaphart; Ed F. Wicker

    1966-01-01

    Seedlings of Douglas fir, grand fir, western larch, western red cedar, and western white pine were grown in modified environments for four growing seasons to see whether characteristic growth responses of roots and shoots might suggest a cause for pole blight of white pine. Environments included three soil profiles (topsoil, hardpan, and rock) and two moisture regimes...

  16. Real-time PCR detection of the boxwood blight pathogen Calonectria pseudonaviculata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boxwood blight is a newly emergent, destructive disease of boxwood (genus Buxus), caused by the ascomycete fungus Calonectria pseudonaviculata. Initially identified in Europe in the mid-1990s, the disease was first reported in the U.S. in CT, NC and VA during October 2011. In less than four months, ...

  17. TAL effector driven induction of a SWEET gene confers susceptibility to bacterial blight of cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial blight of cotton (BBC), caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. malvacearum (Xcm), is among the most destructive diseases in cotton (Gossypium spp.). Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors from Xcm are essential for BBC disease progression. Here, we carried out whole-genome PacBio-seque...

  18. Bringing Benefits and Warding off Blights in Due Commandment (Analytic Study Compared with the Jordanian Law)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Etoum, Niebal Mohd Ibrahim; Mowafi, Hanan Sami Mohammad; Al Zubaidi, Faraj Hamad Salem

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to highlight the benefits and blights of the due commandment (intestate law) under Jordanian law for the year (2010) in the article (279). The study came in two sections, the first one dealt with the concept of due commandment, its legitimacy, verdict and terms; in the second section, I've dealt with the persons entitled to due…

  19. Greenhouse evaluation of transgenic barley expressing gastrodianin for resistance to Fusarium head blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 2010 field screening nursery, with 88 barley plots was located at UMore Park, Rosemount MN. Trial entries (n=18) and an the untransformed 2-row control Conlon (susceptible) were submitted by USDA-ARS, RRVARC Fargo. Barley lines with known reactions to Fusarium head blight (FHB) were also incl...

  20. Using barley genomics to develop Fusarium head blight resistant wheat and barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a major problem for wheat and barley growers. During infection, F. graminearum produces trichothecene mycotoxins (e.g., deoxynivalenol or DON) that increases fungal virulence and reduces grain quality and yield. Previous work in Arabidopsis sh...

  1. Fusarium head blight resistance loci in a stratified population of wheat landraces and varieties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To determine if Chinese and Japanese wheat landraces and varieties have unique sources of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance, an association mapping panel of 195 wheat accessions including both commercial varieties and landraces was genotyped with 364 genome-wide simple sequence repeat (SSR) and ...

  2. Developing hazelnuts (Corylus spp.) with durable resistance to eastern filbert blight caused by Anisogramma anomala

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Molnar; John Capik; Clayton W. Leadbetter; Ning Zhang; Guohong Cai; Bradley I. Hillman

    2012-01-01

    Eastern filbert blight (EFB) is a devastating fungal disease of European hazelnut, Corylus avellana L., and is considered to be the primary reason hazelnuts have not been developed as a commercial crop in the eastern United States. The pathogen, Anisogramma anomala, is native to a wide area east of the Rocky Mountains, where it...

  3. American chestnut persistence in southwestern Virginia 80 years after chestnut blight introduction

    Treesearch

    Katie L. Burke

    2010-01-01

    Forest disease noticeably alters spatial patterns of a species' distribution and this alteration is complex when host mortality is affected by site qualities. In the 1930s, chestnut blight (Cryphonectria parasitica) spread through southwestern Virginia, after its introduction to New York in 1904.

  4. Validation of Fusarium Head Blight Resistance QTL in US Winter Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telemorph: Gibberella zeae Schw. (Petch)], can significantly reduce the grain quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to mycotoxin contamination. Two US soft red winter wheat cultivars, Bess and NC-Neuse, have moderate...

  5. Identification of rice sheath blight QTLs in a Bengal/O. nivara advanced backcross population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice wild relatives contain novel genes for important biotic and abiotic stresses. Rice sheath blight disease, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is a very important disease of rice worldwide. We screened 67 accessions from 15 Oryza species, and identified seven moderately resistant accessions. Using the...

  6. Confirming QTLs and finding additional Loci responsible for resistance to Sheath Blight in Rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most destructive diseases of rice around the globe, causing severe losses in rice yield and quality annually. Major genes governing resistance to ShB have not been found in cultivated rice worldwide; however...

  7. Registration of four rice germplasm lines with improved resistance to sheath blight and blast diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice sheath blight (ShB) and blast caused by the fungal pathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Magnaporthe oryzae, respectively, are the two most serious diseases of rice worldwide. Four rice (Oryza sativa L.) germplasm lines designated as LJRIL103 (PI 660982), LJRIL158 (PI 660983), LJRIL186 (PI 660984),...

  8. Analysis of rice PDR-like ABC transporter genes in sheath blight resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most damaging diseases of rice worldwide. To understand the molecular mechanism of resistance, we identified 450 differentially expressed genes in a resistant rice cultivar Jasmine 85 after R. solani infection with a combination of DNA microar...

  9. Comparative population genomics of Fusarium graminearum reveals adaptive divergence among cereal head blight pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we sequenced the genomes of 60 Fusarium graminearum, the major fungal pathogen responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereal crops world-wide. To investigate adaptive evolution of FHB pathogens, we performed population-level analyses to characterize genomic structure, signatures...

  10. Polymorphic sequence-characterized codominant loci in the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica

    Treesearch

    J. E. Davis; Thomas L. Kubisiak; M. G. Milgroom

    2005-01-01

    Studies on the population biology of the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, have previously been carried out with dominant restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) fingerprinting markers. In this study, we described the development of 11 condominant markers from randomly amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs). RAPD fragments were...

  11. Elevated [CO2] compromises both Type I and Type II wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is one of the world’s most devastating wheat diseases, and results in significant yield loss and contamination of grain with harmful mycotoxins called trichothecenes. Despite emerging risks of increased mycotoxin contamination in food and feed associated with climate chang...

  12. First report of Ascochyta blight of Spotted Locoweed (Astragalus lentiginosus) caused by Ascochyta sp. in Idaho

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Characteristic Ascochyta blight lesions were observed on leaves and pods of spotted locoweed (Astragalus lentiginosus) growing at two sites in Twin Falls and Owyhee County, Idaho, USA in June 2005. Lesions appeared similar to those induced by Ascochyta spp. on other wild and cultivated legumes, i.e....

  13. Severe outbreak of bacterial panicle blight across Texas Rice Belt in 2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial panicle blight symptoms have been observed in rice fields in Texas for many years, but it was not until 1996 that Burkholderia glumae was identified as the causal agent. Although it is generally considered a minor disease, there have been years where significant losses to yield and milling...

  14. Factors influencing efficacy of plastic shelters for control of bacterial blight of lilac

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plastic shelters are thought to manage bacterial blight by protecting plants from rain and/or frost. In February to April 2008 and 2009, we studied the contribution of frost protection to efficacy of this cultural control practice. Lilacs in 1-gallon pots were exposed to four treatments: 1) plants...

  15. Characterization of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance and deoxynivalenol accumulation in hulled and hulless winter barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most serious diseases impacting the U.S. barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) industry. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) produced by the pathogen renders grain unmarketable if concentrations exceed threshold values set for end-use ma...

  16. Mapping of Fusarium Head Blight resistance QTL in winter wheat cultivar NC-Neuse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum, can significantly reduce the grain quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to mycotoxin contamination. The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for FHB resistance in the moderately resistant so...

  17. Population of Fusarium graminearum Schwabe associated with head and seedling blight in Slovakia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growth of Fusarium species associated with Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) varies depending on agronomic characters and edaphic conditions. We have identified 15 Fusarium species during the 10 years of our investigations in the Slovak Republic. The most commonly identified Fusarium species involved...

  18. Potential and optimization of genomic selection for fusarium head blight resistance in six-row barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease of barley, causing reductions in yield and quality. Marker-based selection for resistance to FHB and lowered deoxynivalenol (DON) grain concentration would save considerable costs and time associated with phenotyping. A comprehensive marker-based s...

  19. Evaluation of the USDA Rice Core Collection for sheath blight disease using micro-chamber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA rice core collection, including 1,794 accessions from 114 countries, was developed using a stratified random sampling method to represent the entire NSGC collection including over 18,000 accessions. Sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani) is one of the most important and widely distributed disea...

  20. Current progress on genetic interactions of rice with rice blast and sheath blight fungi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Analysis of genetic interactions between rice and its pathogenic fungi Magnaporthe oryzae and Rhizoctonia solani should lead to a better understanding of molecular mechanisms of host resistance, and the improvement of strategies to manage rice blast and sheath blight diseases. Presently dozens of ri...

  1. Making history: Field testing of blight-resistant American chestnut (Castanea dentata) in the Southern Region

    Treesearch

    Stacy L. Clark; Scott E. Schlarbaum; A.M. Saxton; Fred V. Hebard

    2011-01-01

    The American chestnut (Castanea dentata Marsh. Borkh.) was decimated by an exotic fungus (chestnut blight [Cryphonectria parasitica Murr. Bar]) in the early part of the 20th century. The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) uses a back-cross breeding program to produce a tree that is predicted to be American chestnut in character...

  2. Tuber blight development in potato cultivars in response to different genotypes of Phytophthora infestans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most devastating diseases in potatoes, causing significant loses under disease-conducive conditions. Migrations or introduction of new genotypes to a specific region impose a different set of criteria for consideration for potato gr...

  3. Discovering the next generation of late blight resistance genes – can we battle Phytophthora infestans evolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato late blight, caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is one of the most destructive plant diseases. RB from Solanum bulbocastanum encodes a CC-NB-LRR (CNL) protein that confers partial resistance to most P. infestans isolates through its recognition of the corresponding pathog...

  4. Modeling disease progression of camellia twig blight using a recurrent event model.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To improve control of camellia twig blight (CTB) using sanitation methods, a more complete epidemiologic understanding of this disease is necessary. Three CTB disease stages were modeled using recurrent event analysis. Wound inoculated stems were observed at regular intervals for appearance of dise...

  5. Identification of potato breeding clones that confer high levels of late blight resistance to their progeny

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since 1996, potato seedling minitubers derived from greenhouse crosses have been grown out under heavy late blight pressure in Toluca, Mexico. A total of 2500 individuals were planted each year along with cv. Alpha as a susceptible control. Percent defoliation readings were taken on a weekly basis u...

  6. Minimizing crop damage through understanding relationships between pyrethrum phenology and ray blight disease severity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The most damaging foliar disease of pyrethrum in Australia is ray blight caused by Stagonosporopsis tanaceti. The probability of growers incurring economic losses caused by this disease has been substantially reduced by the implementation of a prophylactically-applied spring fungicide program. Th...

  7. Multiple minor QTLs are responsible for Fusarium head blight resistance in Chinese wheat landrace Haiyanzhong

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe, is a devastatingve disease in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Use of host resistance is one of the most effective strategies to minimize the disease damage. Haiyanzhong (HYZ) is a Chinese wheat landrace that shows a high level of resi...

  8. Resistance to Sclerotinia blight in the U.S. Peanut Mini-Core Collection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seventy-one of the 112 accessions comprising the U.S. Peanut Mini-Core Collection were evaluated in 2013 and 2014 for resistance to Sclerotinia blight, caused by Sclerotinia minor. Susceptible cultivar Okrun, and resistant cultivars Southwest Runner, Tamnut OL06, and Tamspan 90, were included for r...

  9. Biocontrol-based sheath blight management to reduce fungicide use on rice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most important rice diseases in Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, and other southern states. The lack of complete ShB resistance in the most commonly planted varieties and the severity of this disease results in southern U.S. rice farmers ap...

  10. Multistate evaluation of Brassica cover crop, biocontrol agent, and fungicide for integrated management of sheath blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important diseases limiting rice production in the southern rice-producing states. The fungus survives between crops as sclerotia and mycelia in infected plant debris and serves as the primary inoculum. Infection starts when sclerotia a...

  11. First report of F. meridionale causing Fusarium Head Blight of wheat in Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), also known as scab, is a destructive disease of small grain cereals caused by several species belonging to the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC). Members of the FGSC produce trichothecene toxins that represent a threat to human and animal health (1). Despite the...

  12. Validation of fusarium head blight resistance QTL in US winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telemorph: Gibberella zeae Schw. (Petch)], can significantly reduce the grain quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to mycotoxin contamination. Two US soft red winter wheat cultivars, Bess and NC-Neuse, have moderate...

  13. Sweetgum blight and dieback of associated hardwoods on the Beltsville Experimental Forest in Maryland

    Treesearch

    R. H. Fenton; J. D. Diller

    1960-01-01

    In 1948, a dieback of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) was first observed and reported at College Park, Md. Since then, surveys made from Maryland southward have shown that the dieback, now termed sweetgum blight, has increased in both distribution and severity and now occurs throughout much of the species range. No pathogenic organism has been found to be...

  14. High-resolution genetic and physical mapping of eastern filbert blight resistance in hazelnut

    Treesearch

    Vidyasagar Sathuvall; Shawn A. Mehlenbacher

    2012-01-01

    Eastern filbert blight (EFB), caused by the pyrenomycete Anisogramma anomala, is a serious threat to the hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) industry in the Pacific Northwest. A dominant allele at a single locus from the obsolete pollenizer 'Gasaway' confers a very high level of resistance, and has been extensively used in...

  15. Ponderosa pine needle blight in eastern Oregon during 1955 and 1956.

    Treesearch

    John Hunt; T.W. Childs

    1957-01-01

    A survey of ponderosa pine needle blight during 1955 and 1956, principally in eastern Oregon (where the disease is much more abundant than in Washington), provided information on extent of damage and on association of infection with certain environmental factors. Observations were largely confined to localities where the disease was known to be more than ordinarily...

  16. Botryosphaeria stem blight of southern blueberries: effect of temperature on infection and lesion development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of rabbiteye (Vaccinium ashei) and highbush (V. corymbosum) blueberries in the southeastern United States. Historically this disease has been reported to be caused by the fungus Botryosphaeria dothidea. Recently other species in the Botryosphaeri...

  17. Genetic and genomic dissection of resistance genes to the rice sheath blight pathogen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice sheath blight disease caused by the anastomosis group AG1-IA of the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most serious rice diseases in the southern US and the world. The use of fungicides is a popular but costly method to control this disease worldwide. Genetic analysis of host re...

  18. Profitability of integrated management of fusarium head blight in North Carolina winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is one of the most difficult small-grain diseases to manage, due to the partial effectiveness of management techniques and the narrow window of time within which to apply fungicides profitably. The most effective management approach is to integrate cultivar resistance wit...

  19. Ranking cultivated blueberry for Mummy Berry Blight and Fruit Infection Incidence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mummy berry is an important disease of cultivated blueberry. The disease has two distinct phases; a blighting phase initiated by ascospores and a fruit infection stage initiated by conidia. In this study we investigated the resistance of more than 100 blueberry cultivar to both phases of the disease...

  20. Effect of soil biochar amendment on wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight and mycotoxin contamination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycotoxin contamination of food and feed is among the top food safety concerns. Fusarium head blight (FHB) is one of the most important diseases of wheat and other cereal grains. Fusarium graminearum, the fungal pathogen responsible for FHB, reduces crop yield and results in contamination of grain w...

  1. Weather-Based forecasting of Rhizoctonia web blight development on container-grown azalea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungicides are the only approach currently used to control Rhizoctonia web blight on container-grown azalea. The most reliable criterion for timing fungicides has been a fixed calendar date with adjustment for year-to-year differences in disease progression made by monitoring early-season increase o...

  2. Integration of fungicide application and cultivar resistance to manage fusarium head blight in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), also known as scab, is a destructive disease of wheat and other small grain cereals. Losses are compounded by the associated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) which contaminates grain. This chapter provides a brief review of FHB of wheat in North America including occurren...

  3. Population genomics of Fusarium graminearum head blight pathogens in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study we utilized comparative genomics to identify candidate adaptive alleles in the fungus Fusarium graminearum, the primary pathogen of Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereal crops. Recent epidemics of FHB have been economically devastating to agriculture, as F. graminearum reduces cereal yi...

  4. Rhizoctonia in Container Grown Azalea, and Camellia Twig Blight: Incubation and Latency Periods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizoctonia web blight is a reoccurring problem in compact varieties of container-grown azalea (Rhododendron sp.) in the Gulf Coast States. Disease severity was measured weekly in ‘Gumpo’ azalea plants spaced at distances of 0, 6, 12, 18, or 24 cm. Evaporative potential (EP), leaf wetness (LW), rela...

  5. Monitoring bacterial panicle blight disease of rice and germplasm evaluation for resistance in Arkansas in 2015

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice is a major cereal crop that contributes significantly to the global food security. Rice production is challenged by both abiotic and biotic stresses. Rice bacterial panicle blight (BPB) has been recognized as one of the major biotic factors that can cause severe yield loss in Southern rice stat...

  6. Development of Durum Wwheat Germplasm with Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight Derived from Emmer Wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum) is a unique class of commercial wheat specifically for making pasta products. Durum production has been seriously challenged by the Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease in the United States in the past decade. Although utilization of resistant cultivar...

  7. Fusarium head blight resistance in U.S. winter wheat cultivars and elite breeding lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium (Fusarium graminearum) head blight (FHB) is a destructive disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. To characterize FHB resistance in U.S. wheat germplasm, 363 U.S. winter wheat accessions were repeatedly evaluated for FHB resistance. A high correlation (r = 0.73, P < 0.001) for me...

  8. Use of mycelium and detached leaves in bioassays for assessing resistance to boxwood blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boxwood blight caused by Calonectria pseudonaviculata is a newly emergent disease of boxwood (Buxus L.) in the United States that causes leaf drop, stem lesions, and plant death. A rapid and reliable laboratory assay that enables screening hundreds of boxwood genotypes for resistance to boxwood blig...

  9. Characterization of Fusarium strains recovered from wheat with symptoms of head blight in Kentucky

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) members cause Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and small grains in the United States. The U.S. population is diverse, and includes several genetically distinct local emergent subpopulations, some more aggressive and toxigenic than...

  10. Field evaluation of fungicides for control of Ascochyta blight of chickpea, 2015

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ascochyta blight of chickpea caused by the fungal pathogen Ascochyta rabiei is one of the most important foliar diseases of chickpea in the United State and elsewhere. Management of the disease is through using moderately resistant cultivars and application of fungicides. In order to evaluate foli...

  11. Development of genetic and molecular toolboxes to control both rice blast and sheath blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rice blast and sheath blight diseases are the two major constraints for stable rice production in the Southern USA. New genetic and molecular tool boxes have been developed at the USDA-ARS Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center. Resistance (major and minor) genes from rice have been identified...

  12. RAPD markers linked to eastern filbert blight resistance in Corylus avellana

    Treesearch

    S.A. Mehlenbacher; R.N. Brown; J.W. Davis; H. Chen; N.V. Bassil; D.C. Smith; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    2004-01-01

    A total of 1,110 decamer primers were screened for RAPD markers linked to a dominant allele in hazelnut (Corylus avellana) that confers resistance to eastern filbert blight caused by Anisogramma anomnala. Twenty RAPD markers linked in coupling, and five markers linked in repulsion, were found. A seedling population was used to...

  13. Efficacy of different fungicides against Rhizoctonia brown patch and Pythium blight on turfgrass in Italy.

    PubMed

    Mocioni, M; Titone, P; Garibaldi, A; Gullino, M L

    2003-01-01

    Brown patch, incited by Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, and Pythium blight, caused by Pythium spp. are two of the diseases most frequently observed on turfgrass in high maintenance stands, as on golf courses. In such conditions the control strategies, based on chemicals, are particularly difficult due to the scarcity of fungicides registered for turf in Italy. The results obtained in experimental trials carried out to evaluate the efficacy of chemical and biological products against brown patch and Pythium blight are reported. On mature turfgrass, maintained under fairway conditions, azoxystrobin, and trifoxystrobin, not yet registered on turf, were very effective against brown patch. Tebuconazole, applied in three different formulations, was very effective against R. solani, while Trichoderma spp. and azadiractine did not control the pathogen. In greenhouse conditions on Agrostis stolonifera, in the presence of severe disease incidence, due to artificial inoculation, benalaxyl-M satisfactorily controlled Pythium blight; Trichoderma spp. as well as a commercial formulation of T. harzianum, applied one week before the inoculation, were not effective. Among the fungicides not yet registered for use on turfgrass in Italy, metalaxyl-M + mancozeb was effective against Pythium blight.

  14. First report of bacterial blight of carrot in Indiana caused by Xanthomonas hortorum pv. carotae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In summer 2012, bacterial blight symptoms were observed on leaves of carrot plants in 7 out of 70 plots of carrot breeding lines at the Purdue University Meig Horticulture Research Farm, Lafayette, IN. Symptoms included small to large, variably shaped, water soaked to dry, necrotic lesions, with or ...

  15. Molecular mapping of resistance to blight in an interspecific cross in the genus Castanea

    Treesearch

    Thomas L. Kubisiak; F.V. Hebard; C. Dana Nelson; Jiansu Zhang; R. Bernatzky; H. Huang; S.L. Anagnostakis; R.L. Doudrick

    1997-01-01

    A three-generation American chestnut x Chinese chestnut pedigree was used to construct a genetic linkage map for chestnut and to investigate the control of resistance to Endothia parasitica (chestnut blight fungus). DNA genotypes for 241 polymorphic markers (eight isozymes, 17 restriction fragment length polymorphisms [RFLPs], and 216 random...

  16. Widespread Distribution of Fungivorus Aphelenchoides spp. in Blight Cankers on American Chestnut Trees.

    PubMed

    Griffin, G J; Eisenback, J D; Oldham, K

    2012-12-01

    Previously we showed in laboratory studies that the fungivorus nematode, Aphelenchoides hylurgi, was attracted to and fed upon the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, from American chestnut bark cankers and was a carrier of biocontrol, white hypovirulent C. parasitica strains. In the present field study, we recovered Aphelenchoides spp. in almost all (97.0 %) of 133 blight canker tissue assays (three 5-g samples each) from four eastern states. High mean population densities (227 to 474 nematodes per 5 g tissue) of Aphelenchoides spp. were recovered from cankers in Virginia, West Virginia, and Tennessee but not from New Hampshire (mean = 75 nematodes per 5 g tissue). Overall, most canker assays yielded population densities less than 200 nematodes per 5 g tissue. All of 12 very small or young cankers yielded a few to many Aphelenchoides spp. Regression analysis indicated greatest recovery of Aphelenchoides spp. occurred in the month of May (r = 0.94). The results indicate that Aphelenchoides spp. appear to be widespread in blight cankers on American chestnut trees and could play a role in biocontrol of chestnut blight.

  17. A spontaneous segmental deletion from chromosome arm 3DL enhances Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Much effort has been directed at identifying sources of resistance to Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat. We sought to identify molecular markers for what we hypothesized was a new major FHB resistance locus originating from the wheat cultivar 'Freedom' and introgressed into the susceptible wheat c...

  18. Novel fusarium head blight pathogens from Nepal and Louisiana revealed by multilocus genealogical concordance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was conducted to assess evolutionary relationships, species diversity, and trichothecene toxin potential of five Fusarium graminearum complex (FGSC) isolates identified as genetically novel during prior Fusarium head blight (FHB) surveys in Nepal and Louisiana. Results of a multilocus gen...

  19. Head blight of wheat in South Africa is associated with numerous Fusarium species and chemotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat is caused by numerous Fusarium species, including trichothecene-producers. In South Africa, FHB is mostly associated with irrigated wheat rotated with maize. Twenty symptomatic wheat heads were collected from four cultivars each in irrigated fields during 2008 and...

  20. Fusarium spp. associated with head blight of wheat in South Africa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat is caused by numerous Fusarium species, including trichothecene-producers. In South Africa, FHB is mostly associated with irrigated wheat rotated with maize. Twenty symptomatic wheat heads were collected from four cultivars each in irrigated fields in the Northern...

  1. Urban Blight Remediation as a Cost-Beneficial Solution to Firearm Violence

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Michelle C.; Murphy, Sean M.; South, Eugenia C.; Polsky, Daniel; MacDonald, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To determine if blight remediation of abandoned buildings and vacant lots can be a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence in US cities. Methods. We performed quasi-experimental analyses of the impacts and economic returns on investment of urban blight remediation programs involving 5112 abandoned buildings and vacant lots on the occurrence of firearm and nonfirearm violence in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 1999 to 2013. We adjusted before–after percent changes and returns on investment in treated versus control groups for sociodemographic factors. Results. Abandoned building remediation significantly reduced firearm violence −39% (95% confidence interval [CI] = −28%, −50%; P < .05) as did vacant lot remediation (−4.6%; 95% CI = −4.2%, −5.0%; P < .001). Neither program significantly affected nonfirearm violence. Respectively, taxpayer and societal returns on investment for the prevention of firearm violence were $5 and $79 for every dollar spent on abandoned building remediation and $26 and $333 for every dollar spent on vacant lot remediation. Conclusions. Abandoned buildings and vacant lots are blighted structures seen daily by urban residents that may create physical opportunities for violence by sheltering illegal activity and illegal firearms. Urban blight remediation programs can be cost-beneficial strategies that significantly and sustainably reduce firearm violence. PMID:27736217

  2. Urban Blight Remediation as a Cost-Beneficial Solution to Firearm Violence.

    PubMed

    Branas, Charles C; Kondo, Michelle C; Murphy, Sean M; South, Eugenia C; Polsky, Daniel; MacDonald, John M

    2016-12-01

    To determine if blight remediation of abandoned buildings and vacant lots can be a cost-beneficial solution to firearm violence in US cities. We performed quasi-experimental analyses of the impacts and economic returns on investment of urban blight remediation programs involving 5112 abandoned buildings and vacant lots on the occurrence of firearm and nonfirearm violence in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from 1999 to 2013. We adjusted before-after percent changes and returns on investment in treated versus control groups for sociodemographic factors. Abandoned building remediation significantly reduced firearm violence -39% (95% confidence interval [CI] = -28%, -50%; P < .05) as did vacant lot remediation (-4.6%; 95% CI = -4.2%, -5.0%; P < .001). Neither program significantly affected nonfirearm violence. Respectively, taxpayer and societal returns on investment for the prevention of firearm violence were $5 and $79 for every dollar spent on abandoned building remediation and $26 and $333 for every dollar spent on vacant lot remediation. Abandoned buildings and vacant lots are blighted structures seen daily by urban residents that may create physical opportunities for violence by sheltering illegal activity and illegal firearms. Urban blight remediation programs can be cost-beneficial strategies that significantly and sustainably reduce firearm violence.

  3. Development of a pathology toolbox for genetic and breeding for resistance to rice sheath blight disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate evaluation of the host response of rice plants to sheath blight disease, Rhizoctonia solani, is important for genetic studies and breeding for improved resistance. In the present study, a method to evaluate the response of a recombinant inbred mapping population, consisting of 574 F10 indiv...

  4. Cyclic lipopeptide profile of three Bacillus subtilus strains; antagonists of Fusarium head blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cyclic lipopeptide profile of three Bacillus subtilis strains (AS 43.3, AS 43.4, and OH 131.1) was determined using mass spectroscopy. The strains are antagonists of Gibberella zeae and have been shown to be effective in reducing Fusarium head blight in wheat. Strains AS 43.3 and AS 43.4 produ...

  5. Neofusicoccum ribis Associated with Leaf Blight on Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Nyaka Ngobisa, A. I. C.; Zainal Abidin, M. A.; Wong, M. Y.; Wan Noordin, M. W. D.

    2013-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis is a natural source of rubber and an important plantation tree species in Malaysia. Leaf blight disease caused by Fusicoccum substantially reduces the growth and performance of H. brasiliensis. The aim of this study was to use a combination of both morphological characteristics and molecular data to clarify the taxonomic position of the fungus associated with leaf blight disease. Fusicoccum species were isolated from infected leaves collected from plantations at 3 widely separated locations – Selangor, Perak, and Johor states – in Peninsular Malaysia in 2010. All the isolates were identified according to their conidial patterns and DNA sequences generated from internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2), the 5.8S rRNA, and an unknown locus (BotF15) containing microsatellite repeats. Based on taxonomic and sequence data, Neofusicoccum ribis was identified as the main cause of leaf blight disease in H. brasiliensis in commercial plantations in Malaysia. A pathogenicity trial on detached leaves further confirmed that N. ribis causes leaf blight disease. N. ribis is an important leaf pathogen, and its detection in Malaysia has important implications for future planting of H. brasiliensis. PMID:25288924

  6. Rhizoctonia web blight development on azalea in relation to leaf wetness duration in the glasshouse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In field trials done in nurseries, temperature was identified as the primary variable for predicting web blight development, caused by binucleate Rhizoctonia spp., on container-grown azaleas (Rhododendron spp.). Moisture, in the form of very low vapor pressure deficits, provided only a minor predict...

  7. Metabolomics analysis of the effect of elevated co2 on wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Climate change is expected to intensify Fusarium head blight (FHB) contamination of wheat and increase the associated risk of mycotoxin contamination in food and feed. Rising CO2 levels are part of climate change with still unknown effects on natural wheat resistance mechanisms against Fusarium gram...

  8. Can Host Plant Resistance Protect the Quality of Wheat from Fusarium Head Blight?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) infection reduces the amount of millable grain from an infected field, reduces mill yields, and generally degrades end-use quality. In 2009, the Logan County, KY, wheat trial had extended conditions for infection with FHB resulting in extensive and uniform infection withi...

  9. Southern Blight (Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.) of Cowpea: Genetic Characterization of Two Sources of Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field studies were conducted to determine the inheritance of resistance to southern blight (caused by Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc.) exhibited by the cowpea [Vigna unguiculta (L.) Walp.] cultivars Carolina Cream and Brown Crowder, and to determine if a genetic relationship exists for this resistance betw...

  10. Germplasm Evaluation for Resistance and Monitoring Bacterial Panicle Blight Disease of Rice in Arkansas, 2016

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial panicle blight (BPB), caused by a bacterial pathogen, mainly Burkholderia glumae, has posed a higher level of threat to rice production worldwide in recent years. Here we report the response of over 300 entries evaluated by artificially inoculating with a bacterial suspension under field c...

  11. A barley UDP-glucosyltransferase inactivates nivalenol and provides Fusarium head blight resistance in transgenic wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium Head Blight is a disease of cereal crops that causes severe yield losses and mycotoxin contamination of grain. The main causal pathogen, Fusarium graminearum, produces the trichothecene toxins deoxynivalenol or nivalenol as virulence factors. Nivalenol-producing isolates are most prevalent ...

  12. Development of candidate gene markers associated to common bacterial blight resistance in common bean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap), is a major yield-limiting factor of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production around the world. Two major CBB-resistant quantitative trait loci (QTL), linked to the sequence characterized amplified region marker...

  13. Registration of common bacterial blight resistant cranberry dry bean germplasm line USCR-CBB-20

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common bacterial blight is a serious disease of dry edible beans in warm humid climates. The disease is most prominent east of the continental divide in the U.S. Large seeded dry beans from the Andean gene pool, such as those in the cranberry bean market class are very susceptible to this disease. ...

  14. Dominant gene for common bean resistance to common bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The common bacterial blight pathogen [Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Xap)] is a limiting factor for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide and resistance to the pathogen in most commercial cultivars is inadequate. Variability in virulence of the bacterial pathogen has been ob...

  15. Progress in breeding Andean common bean for resistance to common bacerial blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Common bacterial blight is a severe disease of common bean worldwide. Use of resistant cultivars is crucial for its control. The objectives were: 1. assess the progress made in breeding large-seeded Andean bean developed between 1974 and 2010, and 2. determine their resistance-linked SCAR marker com...

  16. Effect of Plant Spacing on Microclimate and Rhizoctonia Web Blight Development in Container Grown Azalea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhizoctonia web blight is a reoccurring problem in compact varieties of container-grown azalea (Rhododendron sp.) in the Gulf Coast States. During the summers of 2002 and 2003, disease severity was measured weekly in the inoculated center plant of plots consisting of 49 ‘Gumpo’ azalea plants. Plant ...

  17. A novel quantitative trait locus for Fusarium head blight resistance in chromosome 7A of wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Chinese Spring-Sumai 3 chromosome 7A disomic substitution line (CS-Sumai 3-7ADSL) was reported to have a high level of Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance for symptom spread within a spike (Type II) and low deoxynivalenol accumulation in infected kernels (Type III), but quantitative trait locus ...

  18. Quantitative trait loci for Fusarium head blight resistance in Huangcandou x 'Jagger' wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease in wheat (Triticum aestivum), and growing resistant cultivars is one of the most effective strategies to minimize its damage. Huangcandou (HCD) is a Chinese wheat landrace that shows a high level of resistance to FHB spread within a spike (type II)...

  19. Boxwood Blight: A new scourge, a new paradigm for collaborative research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genus Buxus is prized for its use as individual specimen plants, hedges, parterres and landscape groupings. In general, boxwood suffers from few pests or diseases, which is one reason the recent introduction of boxwood blight disease to Europe and North America has been so significant to people ...

  20. Validation of Fusarium head blight resistance QTL using the NC-Neuse / Bess doubled haploid population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) is one of the most damaging diseases of wheat. It lowers the grain yield and quality, and contaminates grain with the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). Genetic resistance is a critical control measure and breeding objective. Many studies have focused on the genetic basis of ...

  1. A severe epidemic of Marssonina leaf blight on quaking aspen in Northern Utah

    Treesearch

    Roy O. Harniss; David L. Nelson

    1984-01-01

    The extent of Marssonina leaf blight (Marssonina populi) on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) was observed in northern Utah and adjacent States in 1981 aand 1982. Area of the epidemic and symptoms of the disease are described. On 1,000 acres (405 hal) in northern Utah, infection levels were 6 percent slight, 12 percent light, 32 percent moderate, 16 percent...

  2. A real-time PCR assay for early detection of eastern filbert blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eastern filbert blight (EFB) is a devastating disease of European hazelnut, Corylus avellana, which causes economic losses in Oregon where 99% of the U.S. crop is produced. The causal fungus, Anisogramma anomala, is native to eastern North America, where it is found associated with the American haz...

  3. Evaluation of genomic prediction methods for fusarium head blight resistance in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance is quantitative and difficult to evaluate. Genomic selection (GS) could accelerate FHB resistance breeding. We used US cooperative FHB wheat nursery data to evaluate GS models for several FHB resistance traits including deoxynivalenol (DON) levels. For all trait...

  4. Potato agriculture, late blight science, and the molecularization of plant pathology.

    PubMed

    Turner, R Steven

    2008-01-01

    By the mid-1980s nucleic-acid based methods were penetrating the farthest reaches of biological science, triggering rivalries among practitioners, altering relationships among subfields, and transforming the research front. This article delivers a "bottom up" analysis of that transformation at work in one important area of biological science, plant pathology, by tracing the "molecularization" of efforts to understand and control one notorious plant disease -- the late blight of potatoes. It mobilizes the research literature of late blight science as a tool through which to trace the changing typography of the research front from 1983 to 2003. During these years molecularization intensified the traditional fragmentation of the late blight research community, even as it dramatically integrated study of the causal organism into broader areas of biology. In these decades the pathogen responsible for late blight, the oomycete "Phytophthora infestans," was discovered to be undergoing massive, frightening, and still largely unexplained genetic diversification -- a circumstance that lends the episode examined here an urgency that reinforces its historiographical significance as a case-study in the molecularization of the biological sciences.

  5. Iturin levels on wheat spikes linked to biological control of fusarium head blight by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The TrigoCor strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens provides consistent control against Fusarium head blight of wheat in controlled settings but there is a lack of disease and deoxynivalenol suppression in field settings. Since production of antifungal compounds is thought to be the main mode of actio...

  6. Computational fire modeling for aircraft fire research

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolette, V.F.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Sandia National Laboratories for the Federal Aviation Administration. The technical issues involved in fire modeling for aircraft fire research are identified, as well as computational fire tools for addressing those issues, and the research which is needed to advance those tools in order to address long-range needs. Fire field models are briefly reviewed, and the VULCAN model is selected for further evaluation. Calculations are performed with VULCAN to demonstrate its applicability to aircraft fire problems, and also to gain insight into the complex problem of fires involving aircraft. Simulations are conducted to investigate the influence of fire on an aircraft in a cross-wind. The interaction of the fuselage, wind, fire, and ground plane is investigated. Calculations are also performed utilizing a large eddy simulation (LES) capability to describe the large- scale turbulence instead of the more common k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Additional simulations are performed to investigate the static pressure and velocity distributions around a fuselage in a cross-wind, with and without fire. The results of these simulations provide qualitative insight into the complex interaction of a fuselage, fire, wind, and ground plane. Reasonable quantitative agreement is obtained in the few cases for which data or other modeling results exist Finally, VULCAN is used to quantify the impact of simplifying assumptions inherent in a risk assessment compatible fire model developed for open pool fire environments. The assumptions are seen to be of minor importance for the particular problem analyzed. This work demonstrates the utility of using a fire field model for assessing the limitations of simplified fire models. In conclusion, the application of computational fire modeling tools herein provides both qualitative and quantitative insights into the complex problem of aircraft in fires.

  7. Smoking and Home Fire Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Fire Protection Technology Smoking fire safety outreach materials As a member of the fire service, you ... t tip over and start a fire. Outreach materials from the U.S. Fire Administration Public service announcement: ...

  8. The Hemileia vastatrix effector HvEC-016 suppresses bacterial blight symptoms in coffee genotypes with the SH 1 rust resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Maia, Thiago; Badel, Jorge L; Marin-Ramirez, Gustavo; Rocha, Cynthia de M; Fernandes, Michelle B; da Silva, José C F; de Azevedo-Junior, Gilson M; Brommonschenkel, Sérgio H

    2017-02-01

    A number of genes that confer resistance to coffee leaf rust (SH 1-SH 9) have been identified within the genus Coffea, but despite many years of research on this pathosystem, the complementary avirulence genes of Hemileia vastatrix have not been reported. After identification of H. vastatrix effector candidate genes (HvECs) expressed at different stages of its lifecycle, we established an assay to characterize HvEC proteins by delivering them into coffee cells via the type-three secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae (Psgc). Employing a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase assay, we demonstrate that Psgc recognizes a heterologous P. syringae T3SS secretion signal which enables us to translocate HvECs into the cytoplasm of coffee cells. Using this Psgc-adapted effector detector vector (EDV) system, we found that HvEC-016 suppresses the growth of Psgc on coffee genotypes with the SH 1 resistance gene. Suppression of bacterial blight symptoms in SH 1 plants was associated with reduced bacterial multiplication. By contrast, HvEC-016 enhanced bacterial multiplication in SH 1-lacking plants. Our findings suggest that HvEC-016 may be recognized by the plant immune system in a SH 1-dependent manner. Thus, our experimental approach is an effective tool for the characterization of effector/avirulence proteins of this important pathogen. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Fire and fire ecology: Concepts and principles

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Cochrane; Kevin C. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Fire has been central to terrestrial life ever since early anaerobic microorganisms poisoned the atmosphere with oxygen and multicellular plant life moved onto land. The combination of fuels, oxygen, and heat gave birth to fire on Earth. Fire is not just another evolutionary challenge that life needed to overcome, it is, in fact, a core ecological process across much...

  10. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  11. Management of blight of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) caused by Drechslera bicolor.

    PubMed

    Jadon, Kuldeep Singh; Shah, Rakesh; Gour, Hari Narayan; Sharma, Pankaj

    Sweet or bell pepper is a member of the Solanaceae family and is regarded as one of the most popular and nutritious vegetable. Blight, in the form of leaf and fruit blight, has been observed to infect bell pepper crops cultivated at the horticulture farm in Rajasthan College of Agriculture, Udaipur, India. Based on disease severity, we attempted to curb this newly emerged problem using different fungicides, plant extracts, bio-control agents, and commercial botanicals against the fungus in laboratory and pot experiments. Bio-control agent Trichoderma viride and plant growth promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolate Neist-2 were found to be quite effective against bell pepper blight. All evaluated fungicides, botanicals, commercial botanicals, and bio-control agents in vitro were further studied as seed dressers and two foliar sprays at ten days interval in pot experiments. The combinations of Vitavax, PGPR isolate Neist-2, and Mehandi extract were found to be very effective against bell pepper blight followed by Vitavax, T. viride, and Mehandi extract used individually. All treatments in the pot experiments were found to significantly reduce seedling mortality and enhance plant biomass of bell pepper. Thus, these experimental findings suggest that a better integrated management of bell pepper blight could be achieved by conducting field trials in major bell pepper- and chilli-cultivated areas of the state. Besides fungicides, different botanicals and commercial botanicals also seem to be promising treatment options. Therefore, the outcome of the present study provides an alternate option of fungicide use in minimizing loss caused by Drechslera bicolor.

  12. Fire clay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Virta, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    Seven companies mined fire clay in four states during 2003. From 1984 to 1992, production declined to 383 kt (422,000 st) from a high of 1.04 Mt (1.14 million st) as markets for clay-based refractories declined. Since 1992, production levels have been erratic, ranging from 383 kt (422,000 st) in 1992 and 2001 to 583 kt (642,000 st) in 1995. Production in 2003, based on preliminary data, was estimated to be around 450 kt (496,000 st) with a value of about $10.5 million. This was about the same as in 2002. Missouri remained the leading producer state, followed by South Carolina, Ohio and California.

  13. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  14. Production of the antifungal compounds phenazine and pyrrolnitrin from Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 is differentially regulated by glucose.

    PubMed

    Park, J Y; Oh, S A; Anderson, A J; Neiswender, J; Kim, J-C; Kim, Y C

    2011-05-01

    To determine whether glucose in growth medium affects secondary metabolite production and biocontrol efficacy of Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The secondary metabolites pyrrolnitrin and phenazines antagonize phytopathogenic fungi. The expression of the prnA gene encoding tryptophan halogenase, the first step in pyrrolnitrin biosynthesis, required the stationary-phase sigma factor, RpoS. Mutations in rpoS and prnA in Ps. chlororaphis O6 eliminated antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium graminearum. Pyrrolnitrin production was reduced by glucose in growth media, whereas phenazine levels were increased. The efficacy of Ps. chlororaphis O6 in the biocontrol of tomato late blight was reduced by addition of glucose to the growth medium. Regulation by glucose of pyrrolnitrin production influenced the efficacy of the biocontrol of tomato leaf blight. The nutritional regulation of secondary metabolite production from a soil pseudomonad may account, at least in part, for the variability of biocontrol under field conditions. © 2011 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Fires, ecological effects of

    Treesearch

    W. J. Bond; Robert Keane

    2017-01-01

    Fire is both a natural and anthropogenic disturbance influencing the distribution, structure, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems around the world. Many plants and animals depend on fire for their continued existence. Others species, such as rainforest plants species, are extremely intolerant of burning and need protection from fire. The properties of a fire...

  16. Fire Safety Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Fire protection is one of the most important considerations in the construction and operation of industrial plants and commercial buildings. Fire insurance rates are determined by fire probability factors, such as the type of construction, ease of transporting personnel, and the quality and quantity of fire protection equipment available. Because…

  17. Children and Home Fires

    MedlinePlus

    CHILDREN AND HOME FIRES Fast Facts Children under the age of five are twice as likely to die in a home fire than the rest of the population, and child-playing fires are the leading cause of fire deaths among ...

  18. Fire Safety Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2007-01-01

    Fire protection is one of the most important considerations in the construction and operation of industrial plants and commercial buildings. Fire insurance rates are determined by fire probability factors, such as the type of construction, ease of transporting personnel, and the quality and quantity of fire protection equipment available. Because…

  19. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERNDT, WILLIAM M.; AND OTHERS

    STUDENTS MAY USE THIS REVISED MANUAL IN FIRE STATION OR TRAINING CENTER EXTENSION PROGRAMS FOR IMPROVING THE COMPETENCIES AND SKILLS OF LOCAL FIRE PERSONNEL IN THE SPECIALIZED FIELD OF FIRE SERVICE. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A STATEWIDE COMMITTEE OF FIRE-FIGHTING CONSULTANTS AND ADVISORY GROUPS. THE 26 CHAPTERS PROVIDE BOTH BASIC AND ADVANCED TECHNICAL…

  20. Inaja Fire - 1956, Pine Hills Fire - 1967...similar, yet different

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Schroeder; Bernadine B. Taylor

    1968-01-01

    Two fires burned in the same area in southern California under nearly similar weather conditions, 11 years apart. Yet the Inaja fire of 1956 was much more disastrous than the Pine Hills fire of 1967. The earlier fire claimed 11 lives, and covered an area five times larger than the 1967 fire. Differences in fuels, topography, fire behavior, fire-control action, and...

  1. Operating Room Fire Safety

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Stuart R.; Yajnik, Amit; Ashford, Jeffrey; Springer, Randy; Harvey, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Operating room fires are a rare but preventable danger in modern healthcare operating rooms. Optimal outcomes depend on all operating room personnel being familiar with their roles in fire prevention and fire management. Despite the recommendations of major safety institutes, this familiarity is not the current practice in many healthcare facilities. Members of the anesthesiology and the surgery departments are commonly not actively involved in fire safety programs, fire drills, and fire simulations that could lead to potential delays in prevention and management of intraoperative fires. PMID:21603334

  2. Mass Fire Model Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-31

    ignitions to have approximated mass fire conditions. Observer reports and ex post facto reconstructions of these events establish some qualitative and...fire behavior. A model of urban mass fire behavior, thus, cannot be totally based upon the results of full scale empirical observations . The data are...previous research and observations . From the standpoint of urban mass fires, all detailed tests have been small fires. Leaving aside, for the moment, the

  3. Fire-Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  4. Fire-Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  5. Fire fatality study: demographics of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Barillo, D J; Goode, R

    1996-03-01

    Injury or death caused by fire is frequent and largely preventable. This study was undertaken to define the populations, locations, times and behaviours associated with fatal fires. Seven hundred and twenty-seven fatalities occurring within the State of New Jersey, between the years 1985 and 1991, were examined retrospectively. Most deaths were attributed to a combination of smoke inhalation and burn injury. Five hundred and seventy-four fatalities occurred in residential fires. Smoking materials were the most common source of ignition for residential fires. More than half of the fatal residential fires started between the hours of 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Children and the elderly represented a disproportionate percentage of fire victims. Victims under the age of 11 years or over the age of 70 years constituted 22.1 per cent of the state population but 39.5 per cent of all fire fatalities. Fire-prevention efforts should target home fire safety, and should concentrate on children and the elderly. The development of fire-safe smoking materials should be encouraged.

  6. Cryphonectria parasitica, the causal agent of chestnut blight: Invasion history, population biology and disease control.

    PubMed

    Rigling, Daniel; Prospero, Simone

    2017-01-31

    Chestnut blight, caused by Cryphonectria parasitica, is a devastating disease infecting American and European chestnut trees. The pathogen is native to East Asia and was spread to other continents via infected chestnut plants. This review summarizes the current state of research on this pathogen with a special emphasis on its interaction with a hyperparasitic mycovirus that acts as a biological control agent of chestnut blight. Taxonomy: Cryphonectria parasitica (Murr.) Barr. is a Sordariomycete (ascomycete) fungus in the family Cryphonetriaceae (Order Diaporthales). Closely related species that can also be found on chestnut include Cryphonectria radicalis, Cryphonectria naterciae, and Cryphonectria japonica. Host range: Major hosts are species in the genus Castanea (Fam. Fagaceae), particularly the American chestnut (C. dentata), the European chestnut (C. sativa), the Chinese chestnut (C. mollissima), and the Japanese chestnut (C. crenata). Minor, incidental hosts include oaks (Quercus spp.), maples (Acer spp.), European hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.), and American chinkapin (Castanea pumila). Disease symptoms: C. parasitica causes perennial necrotic lesions (so-called cankers) on the bark of stems and branches of susceptible host trees, eventually leading to wilting of the plant part distal to the infection. Chestnut blight cankers are characterized by the presence of mycelial fans and fruiting bodies of the pathogen. Below the canker the tree may react by producing epicormic shoots. Non-lethal, superficial or callusing cankers on susceptible host trees are usually associated with mycovirus-induced hypovirulence. Disease control: After the introduction of C. parasitica into a new area, eradication efforts by cutting and burning the infected plants/trees have mostly failed. In Europe, the mycovirus Cryphonectria hypovirus 1 (CHV-1) acts as a successful biological control agent of chestnut blight by causing so-called hypovirulence. CHV-1 infects C. parasitica and

  7. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents

    PubMed Central

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Varadarajan, Adithi R.; Ahrens, Christian H.; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  8. Southwestern Oregon's Biscuit Fire: An Analysis of Forest Resources, Fire Severity, and Fire Hazard

    Treesearch

    David L. Azuma; Glenn A. Christensen

    2005-01-01

    This study compares pre-fire field inventory data (collected from 1993 to 1997) in relation to post-fire mapped fire severity classes and the Fire and Fuels Extension of the Forest Vegetation Simulator growth and yield model measures of fire hazard for the portion of the Siskiyou National Forest in the 2002 Biscuit fire perimeter of southwestern Oregon. Post-fire...

  9. FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System - A program for fire danger rating analysis

    Treesearch

    Patricia L. Andrews; Larry S. Bradshaw

    1997-01-01

    A computer program, FIRES: Fire Information Retrieval and Evaluation System, provides methods for evaluating the performance of fire danger rating indexes. The relationship between fire danger indexes and historical fire occurrence and size is examined through logistic regression and percentiles. Historical seasonal trends of fire danger and fire occurrence can be...

  10. Davis Fire: Fire behavior and fire effects analysis

    Treesearch

    LaWen T. Hollingsworth

    2010-01-01

    The Davis Fire presents an interesting example of fire behavior in subalpine fir, partially dead lodgepole pine with multiple age classes, and moist site Douglas-fir vegetation types. This has been summer of moderate temperatures and intermittent moisture that has kept live herbaceous and live woody moistures fairly high and dead fuel moistures at a moderate level....

  11. Fire safety in the firing line.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Broadcast on 29 January, the File on 4 programme, titled: How safe are hospitals from fires?, was aired in the wake of the fire at London's Royal Marsden Hospital on 2 January. While 79 patients and 200 staff were safely evacuated, the program me's presenter Allan Urry said that, over a month later, all five of the hospital's operating theatres and its critical care unit remained out of action; the fire's cause is still being investigated.

  12. A novel ankyrin repeat-rich gene in potato, Star, involved in response to late blight.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tian; Tian, Zhendong; Liu, Jun; Yao, Chunguang; Xie, Conghua

    2009-06-01

    The Solanum tuberosum ankyrin repeat gene (Star) is a novel gene from potato leaves challenged by Phytophthora infestans, a pathogen causing late blight disease. The gene was isolated, based on the reported expressed sequence tag, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Star contains a maximum open reading frame of 1542 bp encoding a peptide with 514 amino acids, and it encodes a RING finger ankyrin repeat protein, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase. To the authors' knowledge, it is the first RING finger ankyrin repeat gene isolated from the potato. The gene is highly expressed in roots, stems, and flowers at the transcript level. Star mRNA was strongly expressed from 24 to 72 h in potato leaves inoculated with P. infestans. The results suggested that Star may be involved in the development of organs and may play a role in late blight resistance.

  13. Spectrum and Image Texture Features Analysis for Early Blight Disease Detection on Eggplant Leaves.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuanqi; He, Yong

    2016-05-11

    This study investigated both spectrum and texture features for detecting early blight disease on eggplant leaves. Hyperspectral images for healthy and diseased samples were acquired covering the wavelengths from 380 to 1023 nm. Four gray images were identified according to the effective wavelengths (408, 535, 624 and 703 nm). Hyperspectral images were then converted into RGB, HSV and HLS images. Finally, eight texture features (mean, variance, homogeneity, contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, second moment and correlation) based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were extracted from gray images, RGB, HSV and HLS images, respectively. The dependent variables for healthy and diseased samples were set as 0 and 1. K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) and AdaBoost classification models were established for detecting healthy and infected samples. All models obtained good results with the classification rates (CRs) over 88.46% in the testing sets. The results demonstrated that spectrum and texture features were effective for early blight disease detection on eggplant leaves.

  14. [The sugar cane blight of the 1860s: science applied to agriculture].

    PubMed

    Bediaga, Begonha

    2012-12-01

    The Imperial Instituto Fluminense de Cultura (Fluminense Imperial Institute of Agriculture) encouraged debate with a view to eradicating the blight that devastated sugar cane plantations in the State of Bahia. Rural landowners, government officials and men of science participated in the discussions. The article presents the context of the sciences applied to agriculture, especially agricultural chemistry and the repercussions of the 'discoveries' of Justus Liebig in Brazil. The debate at the Imperial Instituto about the sugar cane blight was analyzed, together with the ideas espoused there and the characters involved in the issue. The procedures and solutions presented are studied, as well as the formation of knowledge networks around the agricultural sciences, which was in the process of institutionalization at the time.

  15. Antifungal effect and mechanism of chitosan against the rice sheath blight pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Tian, Wenxiao; Li, Bin; Wu, Guoxing; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Tao, Zhongyun; Wang, Yangli; Xie, Guanlin; Li, Hongye; Sun, Guochang

    2012-12-01

    The antifungal properties and mechanism of three types of chitosan against the rice sheath blight pathogen, Rhizoctonia solani, were evaluated. Each chitosan had strong antifungal activity against R. solani and protected rice seedlings from sheath blight, in particular, two types of acid-soluble chitosan caused a 60-91 % inhibition in mycelial growth, 31-84 % inhibition of disease incidence, and 66-91 % inhibition in lesion length. The mechanism of chitosan in protection of rice from R. solani pathogen was attributed to direct destruction of the mycelium, evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopic observations and pathogenicity testing; indirect induced resistance was evidenced by the changes in the activities of the defense-related phenylalanine ammonia lyase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase in rice seedling. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the antifungal activity of chitosan against rice R. solani.

  16. Occurrence of Leaf Blight on Cosmos Caused by Alternaria cosmosa in Korea.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian Xin; Lee, Ji Hye; Paul, Narayan Chandra; Cho, Hye Sun; Lee, Hyang Burm; Yu, Seung Hun

    2015-03-01

    In 2011, a leaf blight disease was observed on cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus) leaves in Nonsan, Korea. The causal pathogen was isolated and identified based on morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological characteristics of the pathogen matched well with the Alternaria cosmosa and also easily distinguishable from Alternaria zinniae reported from cosmos seeds by producing branched beak. Phylogenetically, the pathogen could not be distinguished from A. passiflorae based on the sequence analysis of a combined data set of Alt a1 and gpd genes. However, A. passiflorae was distinguished from the present species by having conidiophores with 4 to 5 conidiogenous loci. The results indicate that the present Alternaria species is A. cosmosa. Pathogenicity tests revealed that the isolate was pathogenic to the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus. This is the first report of Alternaria blight disease caused by A. cosmosa on cosmos in Korea.

  17. Screening and identification of antimicrobial compounds from Streptomyces bottropensis suppressing rice bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Park, Sait Byul; Lee, In Ae; Suh, Joo-Won; Kim, Jeong-Gu; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2011-12-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the most devastating pathogen to Oryza sativa and has been shown to cause bacterial blight. Two bioactive compounds showing antimicrobial activities against Xoo strain KACC 10331 were isolated from a Streptomyces bottropensis strain. The ethyl acetate extract was fractionated on a Sephadex LH-20 column, and then purified by preparative HPLC. The purified compounds were identified as bottromycin A2 and dunaimycin D3S by HR/MS and 1H NMR analyses. The MIC value against Xoo and the lowest concentration still capable of suppressing rice bacterial blight were 2 microgram/ml and 16 microgram/ml for bottromycin A2, and 64 microgram/ml and 0.06 microgram/ml for dunaimycin D3S, respectively. These two compounds were shown to exert different bioactivities in vitro and in rice leaf explants.

  18. Unusual case of cervical pregnancy after curettage for a presumptive diagnosis of intrauterine blighted ovum.

    PubMed

    Di Serio, C; Caccavale, C; Borriello, M; Rotondi, M; Di Serio, M; Rotondi, M; Tolino, A; Carella, C

    2003-01-01

    A case of cervical pregnancy after curettage for presumptive intrauterine blighted ovum is presented. The woman was successfully treated by vacuum evacuation and curettage. A 29-year-old woman, gravida 2, nulliparous, was admitted to our department at ten weeks and two days of gestation after a diagnosis of cervical pregnancy. She had been treated by curettage five days before for an initial diagnosis of intrauterine blighted ovum. Ultrasound scan examination revealed a gestational sac without foetus in the cervix four days after the first curettage. Vacuum evacuation and curettage of the cervical canal were performed and a Foley catheter was also inserted and left in place for three days. The patient was discharged in good condition on the fourth postoperative day.

  19. Detailed interpretation and analysis of selected corn blight watch data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F.; Morgenstern, J. P.; Brown, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed interpretation and analysis of selected corn blight data set was undertaken in order to better define the present capabilities and limitations of agricultural remote multispectral sensing and automatic processing techniques and to establish the areas of investigation needing futher attention in the development of operational survey systems. While the emphasis of this effort was directed toward the detection of various corn blight levels, problems related to the more general task of crop identification were also investigated. Since the analog recognition computer (SPARC) was fully committed to the more routine aspects of processing and since the detailed interpretation and analysis required more in the way of quantitative information, the CDC 1604 digital computer was employed.

  20. Neighborhood Blight, Stress, and Health: A Walking Trial of Urban Greening and Ambulatory Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Michelle C.; Cheney, Rose A.; Branas, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    We measured dynamic stress responses using ambulatory heart rate monitoring as participants in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania walked past vacant lots before and after a greening remediation treatment of randomly selected lots. Being in view of a greened vacant lot decreased heart rate significantly more than did being in view of a nongreened vacant lot or not in view of any vacant lot. Remediating neighborhood blight may reduce stress and improve health. PMID:25790382

  1. Data handling and analysis for the 1971 corn blight watch experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuta, P. E.; Phillips, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    The overall corn blight watch experiment data flow is described and the organization of the LARS/Purdue data center is discussed. Data analysis techniques are discussed in general and the use of statistical multispectral pattern recognition methods for automatic computer analysis of aircraft scanner data is described. Some of the results obtained are discussed and the implications of the experiment on future data communication requirements for earth resource survey systems is discussed.

  2. The applications of remote sensing to corn blight detection and crop yield forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1970-01-01

    Photography revealed the widespread and variable effects of southern corn leaf blight in Indiana. Three levels of severity of the infection could be discerned from good quality color and color infrared photography. As many as five severity levels appeared to be detectable and classifiable with multispectral scanner data and pattern recognition analysis. These conclusions are preliminary in nature, however, having been obtained from a limited amount of good quality scanner data collected over a small geographic area.

  3. Role of micronutrients in defense to white rust and Alternaria blight infecting Indian mustard.

    PubMed

    Rathi, A S; Singh, Dhiraj; Avtar, Ram; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Field experiments were carried out at Oilseeds Research Area of CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar during rabi, 2008-09 to 2011-12 to find out the possible role of soil application of different micronutrients alone and in combinations in defense to white rust and Alternaria blight diseases in Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.]. Among the sole application of micronutrients, minimum disease severity of both white rust (35.0%) and Alternaria blight (31.8%) was observed when S @ 40 kg ha in the form of Gypsum was applied as basal dose in the soil. When Gypsum was supplemented with Borax @10 kg ha(-1) or with ZnSO4 @15 kg ha(-1) the level of tolerance seems to be improved for both the diseases as compared to the sole treatment of each nutrient, i.e., ZnSO4 @ 15 kg/ha, Borax @ 10 kg ha' and Gypsum @ 250 kg ha(-1). Furthermore, minimum disease severity of both white rust (31.3 %) and Alternaria blight (26.3 %) was observed with soil application of ZnSO4 @ 15 kg ha(-1) + Borax @ 10 kg ha(-1) + Gypsum @250 kg ha(-1) as basal dose as compared to the severity of white rust (43.6%) and Alternaria blight (38.6%) in untreated check. Significant increase in seed yield (1612 kg ha(-1)) was also recorded in above mentioned treatment as compared to the yield (1337 kg ha(-1)) in untreated check. These findings will also be helpful in maintaining soil health and minimizing the losses due to both the fungal diseases for eco-friendly sustainability of Indian mustard.

  4. Sweetgum Blight as Related to Alluvial Soils of the Mississippi River Floodplain

    Treesearch

    E. Richard Toole; W. M. Broadfoot

    1959-01-01

    A BLIGHT OF UNKNOWN origin and cause has been very common throughout much of the range of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraci flua L.) since 1950. It is characterized by a gradual dying of the tree, often from the top down. The first visible indication is a thinning of a portion of the crown, caused when some buds fail to open and others produce only dwarfed, yellowish...

  5. Cyanide production by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Askeland, R A; Morrison, S M

    1983-01-01

    Of 200 water isolates screened, five strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cyanogenic. Maximum cyanogenesis by two strains of P. fluorescens in a defined growth medium occurred at 25 to 30 degrees C over a pH range of 6.6 to 8.9. Cyanide production per cell was optimum at 300 mM phosphate. A linear relationship was observed between cyanogenesis and the log of iron concentration over a range of 3 to 300 microM. The maximum rate of cyanide production occurred during the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase. Radioactive tracer experiments with [1-14C]glycine and [2-14C]glycine demonstrated that the cyanide carbon originates from the number 2 carbon of glycine for both P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa. Cyanide production was not observed in raw industrial wastewater or in sterile wastewater inoculated with pure cultures of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains. Cyanide was produced when wastewater was amended by the addition of components of the defined growth medium. PMID:6410989

  6. Cyanide production by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Askeland, R A; Morrison, S M

    1983-06-01

    Of 200 water isolates screened, five strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cyanogenic. Maximum cyanogenesis by two strains of P. fluorescens in a defined growth medium occurred at 25 to 30 degrees C over a pH range of 6.6 to 8.9. Cyanide production per cell was optimum at 300 mM phosphate. A linear relationship was observed between cyanogenesis and the log of iron concentration over a range of 3 to 300 microM. The maximum rate of cyanide production occurred during the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase. Radioactive tracer experiments with [1-14C]glycine and [2-14C]glycine demonstrated that the cyanide carbon originates from the number 2 carbon of glycine for both P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa. Cyanide production was not observed in raw industrial wastewater or in sterile wastewater inoculated with pure cultures of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains. Cyanide was produced when wastewater was amended by the addition of components of the defined growth medium.

  7. Genome mining and metabolic profiling of the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 for antimicrobial compounds

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Voort, Menno; Meijer, Harold J. G.; Schmidt, Yvonne; Watrous, Jeramie; Dekkers, Ester; Mendes, Rodrigo; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gross, Harald; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2015-01-01

    The plant microbiome represents an enormous untapped resource for discovering novel genes and bioactive compounds. Previously, we isolated Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 from the rhizosphere of sugar beet plants grown in a soil suppressive to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and showed that its antifungal activity is, in part, attributed to the production of the chlorinated 9-amino-acid lipopeptide thanamycin (Mendes et al., 2011). To get more insight into its biosynthetic repertoire, the genome of Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 was sequenced and subjected to in silico, mutational and functional analyses. The sequencing revealed a genome size of 6.3 Mb and 5579 predicted ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis placed strain SH-C52 within the Pseudomonas corrugata clade. In silico analysis for secondary metabolites revealed a total of six non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene clusters, including the two previously described NRPS clusters for thanamycin and the 2-amino acid antibacterial lipopeptide brabantamide. Here we show that thanamycin also has activity against an array of other fungi and that brabantamide A exhibits anti-oomycete activity and affects phospholipases of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Most notably, mass spectrometry led to the discovery of a third lipopeptide, designated thanapeptin, with a 22-amino-acid peptide moiety. Seven structural variants of thanapeptin were found with varying degrees of activity against P. infestans. Of the remaining four NRPS clusters, one was predicted to encode for yet another and unknown lipopeptide with a predicted peptide moiety of 8-amino acids. Collectively, these results show an enormous metabolic potential for Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52, with at least three structurally diverse lipopeptides, each with a different antimicrobial activity spectrum. PMID:26217324

  8. Comparative analysis of constitutive proteome between resistant and susceptible tomato genotypes regarding to late blight.

    PubMed

    Laurindo, Bruno Soares; Laurindo, Renata Dias Freitas; Fontes, Patrícia Pereira; Vital, Camilo Elber; Delazari, Fábio Teixeira; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; da Silva, Derly José Henriques

    2017-08-30

    Late blight is one of the most destructive diseases of the tomato, resulting in substantial economic losses. There is difficulty in controlling this disease, so the molecular characterization of tomato genotypes may help in the selection of higher resistance tomato plants against Phytophthora infestans, late blight's pathogen. The objective was to analyze the differences with regard to the constitutive proteome between the access Vegetable Germplasm Bank (BGH)-2127, resistant genotype, and Santa Clara-susceptible genotype to late blight. Proteomic analysis of leaf samples by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by identification by mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF) was performed. Nineteen proteins were identified, which were then related to metabolism and energy, photosynthesis, transcription, stress, and defenses. Approximately 90% of these proteins were more abundant in Santa Clara, a susceptible cultivar. Acidic 26 kDa endochitinase and ribonuclease T2 proteins were more abundant in BGH-2127 access. The enzymatic activity confirmed a greater abundance of chitinase in the BGH-2127 access as compared to the cultivar Santa Clara. Gene expression analyses by real-time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not correlated with the respective protein levels. Abundance of the acidic 26 kDa endochitinase and ribonuclease T2 proteins in the constitutive proteomes of BGH-2127 may be associated with the answer to the resistance of this access.

  9. Association between QTLs and morphological traits toward sheath blight resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Wickneswari, Ratnam

    2016-01-01

    Sheath blight is considered the most significant disease of rice and causes enormous yield losses over the world. Breeding for resistant varieties is the only viable option to combat the disease efficiently. Seventeen diverged rice genotypes along with 17 QTL-linked SSR markers were evaluated under greenhouse conditions. Pearson’s correlation showed only the flag leaf angle had a significant correlation with sheath blight resistance under greenhouse screening. Multivariate analysis based on UPGMA clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the flag leaf angle, flag leaf length, and plant compactness were significantly associated with the following SSR marker alleles: RM209 (116,130), RM202 (176), RM224 (126), RM257 (156), RM426 (175), and RM6971 (196), which are linked to the SB QTLs: QRlh11, qSBR11-3, qSBR11-1, qSBR9-1, qShB3-2, and qSB-9. A Mantel test suggested a weak relationship between the observed phenotypes and allelic variation patterns, implying the independent nature of morphological and molecular variations. Teqing and Tetep were found to be the most resistant cultivars. IR65482-4-136-2-2, MR219-4, and MR264 showed improved resistance potentials. These results suggest that the morphological traits and QTLs which have been found to associate with sheath blight resistance are a good choice to enhance resistance through pyramiding either 2 QTLs or QTLs and traits in susceptible rice cultivars. PMID:27795687

  10. Isolation of Enterobacter cowanii from Eucalyptus showing symptoms of bacterial blight and dieback in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Brady, C L; Venter, S N; Cleenwerck, I; Engelbeen, K; de Vos, P; Wingfield, M J; Telechea, N; Coutinho, T A

    2009-10-01

    This study was performed to identify bacterial strains isolated simultaneously with Pantoea species from Eucalyptus trees showing symptoms of bacterial blight and dieback in Uruguay. Several molecular techniques including 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization were used to characterize the gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, slime-producing bacterial strains isolated along with Pantoea species from Eucalyptus. Hypersensitivity reactions (HR) and pathogenicity tests were performed on tobacco and Eucalyptus seedlings, respectively. The isolates clustered closely with the type strain of Enterobacter cowanii in both phylogenetic trees constructed. The DNA-DNA similarity between the isolates and the type strain of Ent. cowanii ranged from 88% to 92%. A positive HR was observed on the tobacco seedlings, but no disease symptoms were visible on the inoculated Eucalyptus seedlings. Enterobacter cowanii was isolated from trees with symptoms of bacterial blight although strains of this bacterial species do not appear to be the causal agent of the disease. This study provides the first report of Ent. cowanii isolated from Eucalyptus. Its presence in Eucalyptus tissue suggests that it is an endophyte in trees showing symptoms of blight.

  11. Identification of QTLs associated with resistance to Phomopsis pod blight (Diaporthe toxica) in Lupinus albus

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Raymond; Luckett, David J.; Ash, Gavin J.; Harper, John D.I.; Vipin, Cina A.; Raman, Harsh; Ellwood, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phomopsis blight in Lupinus albus is caused by a fungal pathogen, Diaporthe toxica. It can invade all plant parts, leading to plant material becoming toxic to grazing animals, and potentially resulting in lupinosis. Identifying sources of resistance and breeding for resistance remains the best strategy for controlling Phomopsis and reducing lupinosis risks. However, loci associated with resistance to Phomopsis blight have not yet been identified. In this study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified genomic regions associated with resistance to Phomopsis pod blight (PPB) using a linkage map of L. albus constructed previously from an F8 recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between Kiev-Mutant (susceptible to PPB) and P27174 (resistant to PPB). Phenotyping was undertaken using a detached pod assay. In total, we identified eight QTLs for resistance to PPB on linkage group (LG) 3, LG6, LG10, LG12, LG17 and LG27 from different phenotyping environments. However, at least one QTL, QTL-5 on LG10 was consistently detected in both phenotyping environments and accounted for up to 28.2% of the total phenotypic variance. The results of this study showed that the QTL-2 on LG3 interacts epistatically with QTL-5 and QTL-6, which map on LG10 and LG12, respectively. PMID:24987293

  12. Association between QTLs and morphological traits toward sheath blight resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Wickneswari, Ratnam

    2016-09-01

    Sheath blight is considered the most significant disease of rice and causes enormous yield losses over the world. Breeding for resistant varieties is the only viable option to combat the disease efficiently. Seventeen diverged rice genotypes along with 17 QTL-linked SSR markers were evaluated under greenhouse conditions. Pearson's correlation showed only the flag leaf angle had a significant correlation with sheath blight resistance under greenhouse screening. Multivariate analysis based on UPGMA clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the flag leaf angle, flag leaf length, and plant compactness were significantly associated with the following SSR marker alleles: RM209 (116,130), RM202 (176), RM224 (126), RM257 (156), RM426 (175), and RM6971 (196), which are linked to the SB QTLs: QRlh11, qSBR11-3, qSBR11-1, qSBR9-1, qShB3-2, and qSB-9. A Mantel test suggested a weak relationship between the observed phenotypes and allelic variation patterns, implying the independent nature of morphological and molecular variations. Teqing and Tetep were found to be the most resistant cultivars. IR65482-4-136-2-2, MR219-4, and MR264 showed improved resistance potentials. These results suggest that the morphological traits and QTLs which have been found to associate with sheath blight resistance are a good choice to enhance resistance through pyramiding either 2 QTLs or QTLs and traits in susceptible rice cultivars.

  13. Identification of QTLs and possible candidate genes conferring sheath blight resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Shailesh; Anuradha, Ghanta; Kumar, Ravi Ranjan; Vemireddy, Lakshminaryana Reddy; Sudhakar, Ravuru; Donempudi, Krishnaveni; Venkata, Durgarani; Jabeen, Farzana; Narasimhan, Yamini Kalinati; Marathi, Balram; Siddiq, Ebrahimali Abubacker

    2015-01-01

    Sheath blight, caused by the pathogenic fungus Rhizoctonia solani Kühn, is one of the most devastating diseases in rice. Breeders have always faced challenges in acquiring reliable and absolute resistance to this disease in existing rice germplasm. In this context, 40 rice germplasm including eight wild, four landraces, twenty- six cultivated and two advanced breeding lines were screened utilizing the colonized bits of typha. Except Tetep and ARC10531 which expressed moderate level of resistance to the disease, none could be found to be authentically resistant. In order to map the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) governing the sheath blight resistance, two mapping populations (F2 and BC1F2) were developed from the cross BPT-5204/ARC10531. Utilizing composite interval mapping analysis, 9 QTLs mapped to five different chromosomes were identified with phenotypic variance ranging from 8.40 to 21.76%. Two SSR markers namely RM336 and RM205 were found to be closely associated with the major QTLs qshb7.3 and qshb9.2 respectively and were attested as well in BC1F2 population by bulk segregant analysis approach. A hypothetical β 1-3 glucanase with other 31 candidate genes were identified in silico utilizing rice database RAP-DB within the identified QTL region qshb9.2. A detailed insight into these candidate genes will facilitate at molecular level the intricate nature of sheath blight, a step forward towards functional genomics.

  14. Transfer of tuber soft rot and early blight resistances from Solanum brevidens into cultivated potato.

    PubMed

    Tek, Ahmet L; Stevenson, Walter R; Helgeson, John P; Jiang, Jiming

    2004-07-01

    Tuber soft rot and early blight are serious potato diseases. Development of potato varieties resistant to these diseases has been hindered by the scarcity of resistant germplasm. A diploid wild species, Solanum brevidens, shows significant resistance to both diseases. Numerous potato breeding lines have been developed from a potato- S. brevidens somatic hybrid, A206. A BC(3) clone, C75-5+297, derived from this somatic hybrid as well as its BC(1) and BC(2) parental lines showed resistance to both tuber soft rot and early blight. Clone C75-5+297 has consistently out-yielded common varieties under disease stress. Using both molecular and cytogenetic approaches we demonstrated that a single copy of chromosome 8 from S. brevidens replaced a potato chromosome 8 in C75-5+297. Thus, C75-5+297 represents a potato- S. brevidens chromosome substitution line. Our results suggest that the presence of a single chromosome from S. brevidens may significantly impact the resistance to multiple potato diseases. The high yield potential of C75-5+297 makes it an excellent parent for developing potato varieties with resistances to both tuber soft rot and early blight.

  15. Rewiring mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade by positive feedback confers potato blight resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamizo, Chihiro; Kuchimura, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Akira; Katou, Shinpei; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Jones, Jonathan D G; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2006-02-01

    Late blight, caused by the notorious pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and during the 1840s caused the Irish potato famine and over one million fatalities. Currently, grown potato cultivars lack adequate blight tolerance. Earlier cultivars bred for resistance used disease resistance genes that confer immunity only to some strains of the pathogen harboring corresponding avirulence gene. Specific resistance gene-mediated immunity and chemical controls are rapidly overcome in the field when new pathogen races arise through mutation, recombination, or migration from elsewhere. A mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a pivotal role in plant innate immunity. Here we show that the transgenic potato plants that carry a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase driven by a pathogen-inducible promoter of potato showed high resistance to early blight pathogen Alternaria solani as well as P. infestans. The pathogen attack provoked defense-related MAPK activation followed by induction of NADPH oxidase gene expression, which is implicated in reactive oxygen species production, and resulted in hypersensitive response-like phenotype. We propose that enhancing disease resistance through altered regulation of plant defense mechanisms should be more durable and publicly acceptable than engineering overexpression of antimicrobial proteins.

  16. Hyperparasites influence population structure of the chestnut blight pathogen, Cryphonectria parasitica.

    PubMed

    Springer, Joshua C; Davelos Baines, Anita L; Fulbright, Dennis W; Chansler, Matthew T; Jarosz, Andrew M

    2013-12-01

    Vegetative compatibility (VC) is commonly used to characterize structure and diversity in fungal populations. In the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, high VC diversity is hypothesized to be responsible for the failure of hyperparasitic mycoviruses to spread through pathogen populations in North America. To test this hypothesis, we assessed VC diversity at three recovering sites in Michigan where mycoviruses had invaded and compared them with four epidemic population sites where mycoviruses were absent. VC diversity was assessed for samples collected in 1996 and 2009, which allowed us to determine how C. parasitica populations changed with time. Twelve VC types were found in 1996 while 29 were found in 2009; 75% of types overlapped between the sample dates. Sites where mycoviruses were present had unique VC structures with the exception of the recovering population site at County Line where the main VC group was also detected at two epidemic sites. With one exception, epidemic sites contained more VC groups and displayed higher population level diversity than recovering sites. Mating-type analyses of blight populations revealed that two of three recovering populations were significantly skewed for MAT2 suggesting asexual reproduction, while epidemic sites with a long history of blight infection had ratios near 50:50 suggesting sexual reproduction. We propose that selection in the largely asexual C. parasitica populations at two recovering sites favors the most-fit fungal genotype by mycovirus combination and results in reduced diversity relative to the sexually reproducing pathogen populations at epidemic sites.

  17. Intravaginal 400 microg misoprostol for pregnancy termination in cases of blighted ovum: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kovavisarach, Ekachai; Sathapanachai, Udomsak

    2002-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness and side effects of intravaginal misoprostol 400 micrograms compared with a placebo for facilitating complete abortion in cases of blighted ovum. A prospective randomised placebo-controlled trial. Rajavithi Hospital, Thailand between 1 July 1998 and 31 January 1999. Fifty-four pregnant women with gestations of up to 12 weeks whose diagnosis of blighted ovum had been made by transvaginal ultrasound. The patients were assigned randomly into two equal groups; the study group received two tablets of vaginal misoprostol (200 micrograms/tablet), and the control group received two tablets of a vaginal placebo. The complete abortion rate was significantly higher in the women receiving misoprostol (63%) compared with those receiving the placebo (18.5%) (p < 0.05). Lower abdominal pain (74.1%) and fever (14.8%) were significantly higher in the study group than in the placebo group (22.2%) and (0%) respectively, (p < 0.05). Intravaginal 400 microg misoprostol is significantly more effective for termination of blighted ovum than placebo, but lower abdominal pain and fever are signifcantly higher in the misoprostol group.

  18. School Fires. Topical Fire Research Series. Volume 8, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Homeland Security, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Using the past 3 years of data, for 2003 to 2005, from the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) database, the yearly national fire loss for fires on nonadult school properties is estimated at $85 million. Such losses are the result of an estimated annual average of 14,700 fires that required a fire department response. Fires on school…

  19. A review of fire interactions and mass fires

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Finney; Sara S. McAllister

    2011-01-01

    The character of a wildland fire can change dramatically in the presence of another nearby fire. Understanding and predicting the changes in behavior due to fire-fire interactions cannot only be life-saving to those on the ground, but also be used to better control a prescribed fire to meet objectives. In discontinuous fuel types, such interactions may elicit fire...

  20. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS.

    PubMed

    WALKER, H; EAGON, R G

    1964-07-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25-30. 1964.-Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization.

  1. LACTIC DEHYDROGENASES OF PSEUDOMONAS NATRIEGENS

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Hazel; Eagon, R. G.

    1964-01-01

    Walker, Hazel (University of Georgia, Athens), and R. G. Eagon. Lactic dehydrogenases of Pseudomonas natriegens. J. Bacteriol. 88:25–30. 1964.—Lactic dehydrogenases specific for d- and l-lactate were demonstrated in Pseudomonas natriegens. The l-lactic dehydrogenase showed considerable heat stability, and 40% of the activity remained in extracts after heating at 60 C for 10 min. An essential thiol group for enzyme activity was noted. The results of these experiments were consistent with the view that lactate was dehydrogenated initially by a flavin cofactor and that electrons were transported through a complete terminal oxidase system to oxygen. The intracellular site of these lactic dehydrogenases was shown to be the cell membrane. It was suggested that the main physiological role of these lactic dehydrogenases is that of lactate utilization. Images PMID:14197895

  2. Host-induced gene silencing of an essential chitin synthase gene confers durable resistance to Fusarium head blight and seedling blight in wheat.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Song, Xiu-Shi; Li, He-Ping; Cao, Le-Hui; Sun, Ke; Qiu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Yu-Bin; Yang, Peng; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-12-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) and Fusarium seedling blight (FSB) of wheat, caused by Fusarium pathogens, are devastating diseases worldwide. We report the expression of RNA interference (RNAi) sequences derived from an essential Fusarium graminearum (Fg) virulence gene, chitin synthase (Chs) 3b, as a method to enhance resistance of wheat plants to fungal pathogens. Deletion of Chs3b was lethal to Fg; disruption of the other Chs gene family members generated knockout mutants with diverse impacts on Fg. Comparative expression analyses revealed that among the Chs gene family members, Chs3b had the highest expression levels during Fg colonization of wheat. Three hairpin RNAi constructs corresponding to the different regions of Chs3b were found to silence Chs3b in transgenic Fg strains. Co-expression of these three RNAi constructs in two independent elite wheat cultivar transgenic lines conferred high levels of stable, consistent resistance (combined type I and II resistance) to both FHB and FSB throughout the T3 to T5 generations. Confocal microscopy revealed profoundly restricted mycelia in Fg-infected transgenic wheat plants. Presence of the three specific short interfering RNAs in transgenic wheat plants was confirmed by Northern blotting, and these RNAs efficiently down-regulated Chs3b in the colonizing Fusarium pathogens on wheat seedlings and spikes. Our results demonstrate that host-induced gene silencing of an essential fungal chitin synthase gene is an effective strategy for enhancing resistance in crop plants under field test conditions.

  3. Phosphate taxis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kato, J; Ito, A; Nikata, T; Ohtake, H

    1992-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was shown to be attracted to phosphate. The chemotactic response was induced by phosphate starvation. The specificity of chemoreceptors for phosphate was high so that no other tested phosphorus compounds elicited a chemotactic response as strong as that elicited by phosphate. Competition experiments showed that the chemoreceptors for phosphate appeared to be different from those for the common amino acids. Mutants constitutive for alkaline phosphatase showed the chemotactic response to phosphate regardless of whether the cells were starved for phosphate.

  4. Seerley Road Fire Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A barn caught fire at on Seerley Road, Indianapolis. Five storage drums believed to contain metallic potassium were involved in the fire. EPA will perform additional sampling as part of removal operations and safe offsite transportation.

  5. Campus Fire Safety Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Reviews information on recent college and university dormitory fire fatalities, and highlights five examples of building features reported to be major contributing factors in residence-hall fires. Explains how public awareness and expectations are affecting school dormitory safety. (GR)

  6. FIRE II Cirrus Info

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-03-18

    ... Page:  FIRE II Main Grouping:  Cirrus Description:  First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) ... stratocumulus systems, the radiative properties of these clouds and their interactions. Data Products:  Cirrus ...

  7. South America Fire Observations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    From space, we can understand fires in ways that are impossible from the ground. NASA research has contributed to much improved detection of fire for scientific purposes using satellite remote sens...

  8. Fire Ant Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Serious Reaction For people with fire ant allergy, stings may cause a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis ( ... Fire ants bite with their jaws while they sting. This allows them to pull the stinger out, ...

  9. Fire Service Training. Fire Apparatus Practices. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of motorized fire apparatus. The fire fighter is instructed on the maintenance, maneuvering, and operation of equipment such as pumps, aerial ladders, and elevating platforms. Designed to be used with the Robert J. Brady…

  10. Fire Service Training. Fire Stream Practices. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of fire streams. The various types of fire streams are identified as well as the methods used to produce them, emphasizing the operation of nozzles and the different kinds of friction loss. Designed to be used with the Robert J.…

  11. Fire weather technology for fire agrometeorology operations

    Treesearch

    Francis Fujioka

    2008-01-01

    Even as the magnitude of wildfire problems increases globally, United Nations agencies are acting to mitigate the risk of wildfire disasters to members. Fire management organizations worldwide may vary considerably in operational scope, depending on the number and type of resources an organization manages. In any case, good fire weather information is vital. This paper...

  12. Hydrogen Fire Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Through NASA's Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center, two SSC engineers were able to market their hand-held fire imager. Called FIRESCAPE, the device allows firefighters to 'see' the invisible flames of hydrogen and alcohol fires in the daylight, as well as to find victims and burning embers in dense smoke and fog. SafetySCAN, which specializes in fire safety electronic products, will make the device the first affordable commercial product for fire imaging.

  13. Interagency wilderness fire management

    Treesearch

    Jim Desmond

    1995-01-01

    Wilderness fire managers are often confronted with natural fire ignitions that start and/or burn near an adjoining agency’s wilderness area boundary. Management strategies for prescribed natural fires (PNF) are often developed using the adjoining agency’s wilderness boundary as the maximum allowable perimeter (control line) for the PNF. When this occurs, fire’s natural...

  14. A world on fire

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Olson; David N. Bengston

    2015-01-01

    We live in a world on fire. In just the past few years, major wildland fires have struck at least 13 U.S. states, as well as Indonesia, Australia, China, southern Europe, Russia, Canada, Bolivia, and other parts of the world. Wildland fires are increasing in number, size, and intensity. In particular, there has been an increase in large fire events—megafires—that...

  15. Fire and forest meteorology

    Treesearch

    SA Ferguson; T.J. Brown; M. Flannigan

    2005-01-01

    The American Meteorological Society symposia series on Fire and Forest Meteorology provides biennial forums for atmospheric and fire scientists to introduce and discuss the latest and most relevant research on weather, climate and fire. This special issue highlights significant work that was presented at the Fifth Symposium in Orlando, Florida during 16-20 November...

  16. Occupancy Fire Record: Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Fire Protection Association, Boston, MA.

    The considerations of human safety and preservation of facilities are examined in relation to school fires. Various aspects of planning which would decrease the probability of fires and thereby save life and property are reviewed and include--(1) causes, (2) automatic protection devices, (3) evacuation and fire drills, and (4) construction…

  17. Fire Department Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.; Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  18. Fire Safety Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Planning and prevention is the best defense against fires in school. This is particularly true in the science laboratory due to the presence of flammable gases, liquids, combustibles, and other potential sources of fire. Teachers can prevent fires from starting by maintaining prudent lab practices when dealing with combustible and flammable…

  19. Fire as Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project that deals with fire production as an aspect of technology. The project challenges students to be survivors in a five-day classroom activity. Students research various materials and methods to produce fire without the use of matches or other modern combustion devices, then must create "fire" to keep…

  20. Equipping tomorrow's fire manager

    Treesearch

    Christopher A. Dicus

    2008-01-01

    Fire managers are challenged with an ever-increasing array of both responsibilities and critics. As in the past, fire managers must master the elements of fire behavior and ecology using the latest technologies. In addition, today’s managers must be equipped with the skills necessary to understand and liaise with a burgeoning group of vocal stakeholders while also...