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Sample records for first-time calcium oxalate

  1. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  2. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  3. Oxalate: Effect on calcium absorbability

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, R.P.; Weaver, C.M. )

    1989-10-01

    Absorption of calcium from intrinsically labeled Ca oxalate was measured in 18 normal women and compared with absorption of Ca from milk in these same subjects, both when the test substances were ingested in separate meals and when ingested together. Fractional Ca absorption from oxalate averaged 0.100 +/- 0.043 when ingested alone and 0.140 +/- 0.063 when ingested together with milk. Absorption was, as expected, substantially lower than absorption from milk (0.358 +/- 0.113). Nevertheless Ca oxalate absorbability in these women was higher than we had previously found for spinach Ca. When milk and Ca oxalate were ingested together, there was no interference of oxalate in milk Ca absorption and no evidence of tracer exchange between the two labeled Ca species.

  4. Lowering urinary oxalate excretion to decrease calcium oxalate stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Assimos, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary modifications should be considered as a first line approach in the treatment of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The amounts of oxalate and calcium consumed in the diet are significant factors in the development of the disease due to their impact on urinary oxalate excretion. There are a number of strategies that can be employed to reduce oxalate excretion. The consumption of oxalate-rich foods should be avoided and calcium intake adjusted to 1000–1200 mg/day. To encourage compliance it should be emphasized to patients that they be vigilant with this diet as a deviation in any meal or snack could potentially result in significant stone growth. The evidence underlying these two modifications is outlined and other strategies to reduce urinary oxalate excretion are reviewed. PMID:26614109

  5. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.M.; Martin, B.R.; Ebner, J.S.; Krueger, C.A.

    1987-11-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with /sup 45/Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO/sub 3/ and CaCl/sub 2/ than from CaC/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach.

  6. Oxalic acid decreases calcium absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C M; Martin, B R; Ebner, J S; Krueger, C A

    1987-11-01

    Calcium absorption from salts and foods intrinsically labeled with 45Ca was determined in the rat model. Calcium bioavailability was nearly 10 times greater for low oxalate kale, CaCO3 and CaCl2 than from CaC2O4 (calcium oxalate) and spinach (high in oxalates). Extrinsic and intrinsic labeling techniques gave a similar assessment of calcium bioavailability from kale but not from spinach.

  7. Oxalate and Sucralose Absorption in Idiopathic Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Jiang, Juquan; Wood, Kyle D.; Holmes, Ross P.; Assimos, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Oxalate has been hypothesized to undergo absorption in the large and small intestine by both paracellular and transepithelial transport. Sucralose is a chlorinated sugar that is absorbed by paracellular mechanisms. This study's objective was to better understand intestinal oxalate transport by correlating oxalate and sucralose absorption in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. Methods Idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers were recruited to provide urine specimens on both a self-selected diet and following a meal containing 90 mg of 13C2-oxalate and 5 grams of sucralose, and a stool sample for determination of Oxalobacter formigenes colonization. The 24 hour urine collections were fractionated into the first 6 hours and the subsequent 18 hours. Sucralose and oxalate excretion were measured during these periods and used to estimate absorption. Results A total of 38 subjects were evaluated. The majority of both the 13C2-oxalate and sucralose absorption occurred within the 0-6 hour collection. The 13C2-oxalate and sucralose absorptions were significantly correlated at the 0-6 hour, the 6-24 hour, and the total 24 hour time periods (p<0.04). All five oxalate hyperabsorbers(> 15% absorption) also absorbed significantly more sucralose during the 0-6 hour and whole 24 hour time points (p<0.04). Oxalobacter formigenes colonization did not significantly alter oxalate absorption. Conclusion The results suggest that the majority of oxalate is absorbed in the proximal portion of the gastrointestinal tract and that paracelluar transport is involved. Augmented paracellular transport, as evidenced by increased sucralose absorption, may also influence oxalate absorption. PMID:21676449

  8. Oxalate and sucralose absorption in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers.

    PubMed

    Knight, John; Jiang, Juquan; Wood, Kyle D; Holmes, Ross P; Assimos, Dean G

    2011-08-01

    To better understand intestinal oxalate transport by correlating oxalate and sucralose absorption in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. Oxalate has been hypothesized to undergo absorption in the large and small intestine by both paracellular and transepithelial transport. Sucralose is a chlorinated sugar that is absorbed by paracellular mechanisms. Idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers were recruited to provide urine specimens on both a self-selected diet and after a meal containing 90 mg of (13)C(2-)oxalate and 5 g of sucralose, and a stool sample for determination of Oxalobacter formigenes colonization. The 24-hour urine collections were fractionated into the first 6 hours and the subsequent 18 hours. Sucralose and oxalate excretion were measured during these periods and used to estimate absorption. Thirty-eight subjects were evaluated. The majority of both the (13)C(2-)oxalate and sucralose absorption occurred within the 0-6-hour collection. The (13)C(2-)oxalate and sucralose absorptions were significantly correlated at the 0-6 hour, the 6-24 hour, and the total 24-hour time periods (P <.04). All 5 oxalate hyperabsorbers(>15% absorption) also absorbed significantly more sucralose during the 0-6 hour and whole 24-hour time points (P <.04). Oxalobacter formigenes colonization did not significantly alter oxalate absorption. The results suggest that most oxalate is absorbed in the proximal portion of the gastrointestinal tract and that paracellular transport is involved. Augmented paracellular transport, as evidenced by increased sucralose absorption, may also influence oxalate absorption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  10. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-07-01

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal-accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of this approach hinged on the ability to transform Arabidopsis genetically into a calcium oxalate crystal-accumulating plant. To accomplish this transformation, two oxalic acid biosynthetic genes, obcA and obcB, from the oxalate-secreting phytopathogen, Burkholderia glumae were inserted into the Arabidopsis genome. The co-expression of these two bacterial genes in Arabidopsis conferred the ability not only to produce a measurable amount of oxalate but also to form crystals of calcium oxalate. Biochemical and cellular studies of crystal accumulation in Arabidopsis revealed features that are similar to those observed in the cells of crystal-forming plants. Thus, it appears that at least some of the basic components that comprise the calcium oxalate crystal formation machinery are conserved even in non-crystal-accumulating plants.

  11. The Interaction between Enterobacteriaceae and Calcium Oxalate Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Barr-Beare, Evan; Saxena, Vijay; Hilt, Evann E.; Thomas-White, Krystal; Schober, Megan; Li, Birong; Becknell, Brian; Hains, David S.; Wolfe, Alan J.; Schwaderer, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of calcium oxalate crystals and deposits in UTI pathogenesis has not been established. The objectives of this study were to identify bacteria present in pediatric urolithiasis and, using in vitro and in vivo models, to determine the relevance of calcium oxalate deposits during experimental pyelonephritis. Methods Pediatric kidney stones and urine were collected and both cultured and sequenced for bacteria. Bacterial adhesion to calcium oxalate was compared. Murine kidney calcium oxalate deposits were induced by intraperitoneal glyoxalate injection and kidneys were transurethrally inoculated with uropathogenic Escherichia coli to induce pyelonephritis Results E. coli of the family Enterobacteriaceae was identified in patients by calcium oxalate stone culture. Additionally Enterobacteriaceae DNA was sequenced from multiple calcium oxalate kidney stones. E. coli selectively aggregated on and around calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals. Mice inoculated with glyoxalate and uropathogenic E. coli had higher bacterial burdens, increased kidney calcium oxalate deposits and an increased kidney innate immune response compared to mice with only calcium oxalate deposits or only pyelonephritis. Conclusions In a murine model, the presence of calcium oxalate deposits increases pyelonephritis risk, likely due to preferential aggregation of bacteria on and around calcium oxalate crystals. When both calcium oxalate deposits and uropathogenic bacteria were present, calcium oxalate deposit number increased along with renal gene transcription of inner stone core matrix proteins increased. Therefore renal calcium oxalate deposits may be a modifiable risk factor for infections of the kidney and urinary tract. Furthermore, bacteria may be present in calcium oxalate deposits and potentially contribute to calcium oxalate renal disease. PMID:26448465

  12. Impact of Dietary Calcium and Oxalate, and Oxalobacter Formigenes Colonization on Urinary Oxalate Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Juquan; Knight, John; Easter, Linda H.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Holmes, Ross P.; Assimos, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Enteric colonization with Oxalobacter formigenes, a bacterium whose main energy source is oxalate, has been demonstrated to decrease the risk of recurrent calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. We assessed the impact of diets controlled in calcium and oxalate contents on urinary and fecal analytes in healthy subjects who were naturally colonized with O. formigenes or not colonized with O. formigenes. Materials and Methods A total of 11 O. formigenes colonized and 11 noncolonized subjects were administered diets controlled in calcium and oxalate contents. We assayed 24-hour urine collections and stool samples obtained on the last 4 days of each 1-week diet for stone risk parameters and O. formigenes levels. Mixed model analysis was used to determine the effects of colonization status on these variables. Results Urinary calcium and oxalate excretion were significantly altered by the dietary changes in O. formigenes colonized and noncolonized individuals. Mixed model analysis showed significant interaction between colonization status and oxalate excretion on a low calcium (400 mg daily)/moderate oxalate (250 mg daily) diet (p = 0.026). Urinary oxalate excretion was 19.5% lower in O. formigenes colonized subjects than in noncolonized subjects on the low calcium/moderate oxalate diet (mean ± SE 34.9 ± 2.6 vs 43.6 ± 2.6 mg, p = 0.031). Conclusions Results suggest that O. formigenes colonization decreases oxalate excretion during periods of low calcium and moderate oxalate intake. PMID:21575973

  13. Characterization of Medicago truncatula reduced calcium oxalate crystal mutant alleles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation is common in plants. Formation of these crystals has been shown to function in plant defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. Although calcium oxalate is common and plays important roles in plant development, our understanding of how these crystals form ...

  14. Identification of calcium oxalate crystals using alizarin red S stain.

    PubMed

    Proia, A D; Brinn, N T

    1985-02-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals stain with alizarin red S at a pH of 7.0 but not at a pH of 4.2. In contrast, calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate stain at a pH of both 7.0 and 4.2. This difference allows presumptive identification of calcium oxalate deposits. The identity of calcium oxalate can then be confirmed by its insolubility in 2M acetic acid, since both calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate are soluble. We have applied this procedure for several years and have found it to be a rapid, reliable, and technically simple procedure for distinguishing calcium oxalate from other calcium deposits.

  15. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  16. Calcium Oxalate Accumulation in Malpighian Tubules of Silkworm (Bombyx mori)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Aaron J.; Webb, Mary Alice

    2007-04-01

    Silkworm provides an ideal model system for study of calcium oxalate crystallization in kidney-like organs, called Malpighian tubules. During their growth and development, silkworm larvae accumulate massive amounts of calcium oxalate crystals in their Malpighian tubules with no apparent harm to the organism. This manuscript reports studies of crystal structure in the tubules along with analyses identifying molecular constituents of tubule exudate.

  17. Addition of calcium compounds to reduce soluble oxalate in a high oxalate food system.

    PubMed

    Bong, Wen-Chun; Vanhanen, Leo P; Savage, Geoffrey P

    2017-04-15

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is often used as a base vegetable to make green juices that are promoted as healthy dietary alternatives. Spinach is known to contain significant amounts of oxalates, which are toxic and, if consumed regularly, can lead to the development of kidney stones. This research investigates adding 50-500mg increments of calcium carbonate, calcium chloride, calcium citrate and calcium sulphate to 100g of raw homogenates of spinach to determine whether calcium would combine with the soluble oxalate present in the spinach. Calcium chloride was the most effective additive while calcium carbonate was the least effective. The formation of insoluble oxalate after incubation at 25°C for 30min is a simple practical step that can be incorporated into the juicing process. This would make the juice considerably safer to consume on a regular basis.

  18. Patterns of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization in complex biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Korol’kov, V. V.; Kuimova, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the features of calcium oxalate crystallization in the presence of additives revealed through experimental modeling. The patterns of phase formation are shown for the Ca2+ – C2O4 2– – H2O and Ca2+ – C2O4 2– – PO4 3– – H2O systems with the components and pH of the saline varying over a wide concentrations range. The effect of additives on crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate was investigated. It was found that the ionic strength and magnesium ions are inhibitors, and calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite crystals are catalysts of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization. The basic calcium phosphate (apatite) was found to be most thermodynamically stable, which indicates its special role in kidney stone formation since it is found in virtually all stones.

  19. Calcium Oxalate Biomineralization by Piloderma fallax in Response to Various Levels of Calcium and Phosphorus▿

    PubMed Central

    Tuason, Melissa Marie S.; Arocena, Joselito M.

    2009-01-01

    Piloderma fallax is an ectomycorrhizal fungus commonly associated with several conifer and hardwood species. We examined the formation of calcium oxalate crystals by P. fallax in response to calcium (0.0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 mM) and phosphorus (0.1 and 6 mM) additions in modified Melin-Norkrans agar medium. Both calcium and phosphorus supplementation significantly affected the amount of calcium oxalate formed. More calcium oxalate was formed at high P levels. Concentrations of soluble oxalate in the fungus and medium were higher at low P levels. There was a strong positive linear relationship between Ca level and calcium oxalate but only under conditions of phosphorus limitation. Calcium oxalate crystals were identified as the monohydrate form (calcium oxalate monohydrate [COM] whewellite) by X-ray diffraction analysis. Prismatic, styloid, and raphide forms of the crystals, characteristic COM, were observed on the surface of fungal hyphae by scanning electron microscopy. P. fallax may be capable of dissolving hyphal calcium oxalate under conditions of limited Ca. The biomineralization of calcium oxalate by fungi may be an important step in the translocation and cycling of Ca and P in soil. PMID:19783744

  20. Impact of dietary calcium and oxalate ratio on urinary stone formation in rats.

    PubMed

    Morozumi, M; Ogawa, Y

    2000-01-01

    Calcium interferes with oxalate absorption in the gut. We studied stone formation in rats fed diets containing various amounts of oxalate and calcium. In one experiment, male Wistar rats were fed one of five experimental diets: basal diet (292 mM calcium + 8 mM oxalate) or basal diet plus either 100, 300, 500, or 1000 mM oxalate. In the other experiments, rats were given one of five diets: calcium-free diet alone or calcium-free diet plus 300 mM oxalate and either 0, 100, 200, or 300 mM calcium. Urine specimens were collected every week up to week 4. The kidneys were examined for stone formation and used for determination of tissue oxalate concentration by ion chromatography. Calcium and magnesium were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The higher the amount of oxalate in relation to calcium in the diet, the higher the urinary oxalate excretion. A low calcium level in the intestine enhanced the uptake of oxalate, leading to hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate stone formation. The bioavailability of dietary oxalate in rats depends mainly on the relative intestinal calcium level. Hyperoxaluria without hyperabsorption of calcium could be induced by oral administration of a relatively high-oxalate and low-calcium (oxalate:calcium >1 [mol/mol]) diet. Exaggerated hyperabsorption of oxalate persists for several weeks and leads to calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

  1. Aluminum Citrate Prevents Renal Injury from Calcium Oxalate Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Besenhofer, Lauren M.; Cain, Marie C.; Dunning, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals are responsible for the kidney injury associated with exposure to ethylene glycol or severe hyperoxaluria. Current treatment strategies target the formation of calcium oxalate but not its interaction with kidney tissue. Because aluminum citrate blocks calcium oxalate binding and toxicity in human kidney cells, it may provide a different therapeutic approach to calcium oxalate-induced injury. Here, we tested the effects of aluminum citrate and sodium citrate in a Wistar rat model of acute high-dose ethylene glycol exposure. Aluminum citrate, but not sodium citrate, attenuated increases in urea nitrogen, creatinine, and the ratio of kidney to body weight in ethylene glycol–treated rats. Compared with ethylene glycol alone, the addition of aluminum citrate significantly increased the urinary excretion of both crystalline calcium and crystalline oxalate and decreased the deposition of crystals in renal tissue. In vitro, aluminum citrate interacted directly with oxalate crystals to inhibit their uptake by proximal tubule cells. These results suggest that treating with aluminum citrate attenuates renal injury in rats with severe ethylene glycol toxicity, apparently by inhibiting calcium oxalate’s interaction with, and retention by, the kidney epithelium. PMID:23138489

  2. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this pote...

  3. Calcium oxalate content affects the nutritional availability of calcium from Medicago truncatula leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is known that oxalate, present in edible plants, can bind calcium in a crystalline form that reduces the availability of the bound calcium for nutritional absorption by humans. It is unknown, however, the degree to which the calcium oxalate content of a plant can be genetically altered and how mu...

  4. Calcium Oxalate Induces Renal Injury through Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoran; Ma, Junhai; Shi, Wei; Su, Yu; Fu, Xu; Yang, Yanlin; Lu, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) plays a role in calcium-oxalate-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods. HK-2 cells and rats were treated with calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals with or without pretreatment with the CaSR-specific agonist gadolinium chloride (GdCl3) or the CaSR-specific antagonist NPS2390. Changes in oxidative stress (OS) in HK-2 cells and rat kidneys were assessed. In addition, CaSR, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), and p38 expression was determined. Further, crystal adhesion assay was performed in vitro, and the serum urea and creatinine levels and crystal deposition in the kidneys were also examined. Results. CaOx increased CaSR, ERK, JNK, and p38 protein expression and OS in vitro and in vivo. These deleterious changes were further enhanced upon pretreatment with the CaSR agonist GdCl3 but were attenuated by the specific CaSR inhibitor NPS2390 compared with CaOx treatment alone. Pretreatment with GdCl3 further increased in vitro and in vivo crystal adhesion and renal hypofunction. In contrast, pretreatment with NPS2390 decreased in vitro and in vivo crystal adhesion and renal hypofunction. Conclusions. CaOx-induced renal injury is related to CaSR-mediated OS and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, which subsequently leads to CaOx crystal adhesion. PMID:27965733

  5. Controlled metabolic diet reduces calcium oxalate supersaturation but not oxalate excretion after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ran; Linnes, Michael P; O'Connor, Helen M; Li, Xujian; Bergstralh, Eric; Lieske, John C

    2012-08-01

    To identify the effect of a controlled metabolic diet on reducing urinary calcium oxalate (CaOx) supersaturation in subjects with hyperoxaluric nephrolithiasis after potentially malabsorptive forms of bariatric surgery. Subjects with a history of CaOx kidney stones and mild hyperoxaluria after bariatric surgery (n = 9) collected baseline 24-hour urine samples while consuming a free choice diet. They were then instructed to consume a controlled diet low in oxalate (70-80 mg/d), normal in calcium (1000 mg/d), and moderate in protein before 2 final 24-hour urine collections. Overall, the urinary CaOx supersaturation decreased from 1.97 ± 0.49 delta Gibbs (DG) with the free choice diet to 1.13 ± 0.75 DG with the controlled diet (P < .01). This occurred in the absence of a significant change in urinary oxalate excretion (0.69 ± 0.29 mmol/d with the free choice diet compared with 0.66 ± 0.38 mmol/d with the controlled diet). Urinary volume, citrate, and pH all increased, although not significantly (P > .05), contributing to the significant CaOx supersaturation change. A controlled metabolic diet normal in calcium, moderate in protein, and reduced in oxalate can positively affect urinary CaOx supersaturation after bariatric surgery. However, this diet did not appear to decrease urinary oxalate excretion. Therefore, restriction of dietary oxalate alone might not be enough to reduce urinary oxalate excretion to normal levels in this group of patients with known enteric hyperoxaluria. Additional strategies could be necessary, such as the use of oral calcium supplements as oxalate binders and a lower fat diet. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A CONTROLLED METABOLIC DIET REDUCES CALCIUM OXALATE SUPERSATURATION BUT NOT OXALATE EXCRETION AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ran; Linnes, Michael; O’Connor, Helen M.; Li, Xujian; Bergstralh, Eric; Lieske, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify the effect of controlled metabolic diet on reducing urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation in subjects with hyperoxaluric nephrolithiasis after potentially malabsorptive forms of bariatric surgery. Materials and Methods Subjects with a history of CaOx kidney stones and mild hyperoxaluria after bariatric surgery (n=9) collected baseline 24-hour urine samples while on a free choice diet. They were then placed on a controlled diet low in oxalate (70 – 80 mg/day), normal in calcium (1000 mg/day), and moderate in protein prior to 2 final 24-hour urine collections. Results Overall urinary CaOx supersaturation fell from 1.97 ± 0.49 delta Gibbs (DG) on the free choice diet to 1.13 ± 0.75 DG on the controlled diet (P<0.01). This happened in the absence of a significant change in urinary oxalate excretion, (0.69 ± 0.29 mmol/day) on the free choice diet compared to (0.66 ± 0.38 mmol/day) on the controlled diet. Urinary volume, citrate and pH all increased, although not significantly (p>0.05), contributing to the significant CaOx supersaturation change. Conclusions A controlled metabolic diet normal in calcium, moderate in protein and reduced in oxalate can positively impact urinary CaOx supersaturation after bariatric surgery. However, this diet did not appear to decrease urinary oxalate excretion. Therefore, restriction of dietary oxalate alone may not be enough to reduce urinary oxalate excretion to normal levels in this group of known enteric hyperoxaluric patients. Additional strategies may be necessary, such as use of oral calcium supplements as oxalate binders and a lower fat diet. PMID:22554593

  7. Proteomic analysis of a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Matsuta, Yosuke; Moriyama, Manabu; Yasuda, Makoto; Chishima, Noriharu; Yamaoka, Noriko; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the matrix protein of a rare urinary stone that contained calcium carbonate. A urinary stone was extracted from a 34-year-old male patient with metabolic alkalosis. After X-ray diffractometry and infrared analysis of the stone, proteomic analysis was carried out. The resulting mass spectra were evaluated with protein search software, and matrix proteins were identified. X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis confirmed that the stone contained calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Of the identified 53 proteins, 24 have not been previously reported from calcium oxalate- or calcium phosphate-containing stones. The protease inhibitors and several proteins related to cell adhesion or the cytoskeleton were identified for the first time. We analyzed in detail a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Considering the formation of a calcium carbonate stone, the new identified proteins should play an important role on the urolithiasis process in alkaline condition. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Peptides of Matrix Gla Protein Inhibit Nucleation and Growth of Hydroxyapatite and Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Goiko, Maria; Dierolf, Joshua; Gleberzon, Jared S.; Liao, Yinyin; Grohe, Bernd; Goldberg, Harvey A.; de Bruyn, John R.; Hunter, Graeme K.

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated protein that has been shown to prevent the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the walls of blood vessels. MGP is also expressed in kidney and may inhibit the formation of kidney stones, which mainly consist of another crystalline phase, calcium oxalate monohydrate. To determine the mechanism by which MGP prevents soft-tissue calcification, we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated sequences of human MGP in both post-translationally modified and non-modified forms. The effects of these peptides on hydroxyapatite formation and calcium oxalate crystallization were quantified using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Peptides YGlapS (MGP1-14: YγEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YEpS (YEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YGlaS (YγESHESMESYELNP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56: SKPVHγELNRγEACDD) inhibited formation of hydroxyapatite in order of potency YGlapS > YEpS > YGlaS > SK-Gla. The effects of YGlapS, YEpS and YGlaS on hydroxyapatite formation were on both crystal nucleation and growth; the effect of SK-Gla was on nucleation. YGlapS and YEpS significantly inhibited the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, while simultaneously promoting the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate. The effects of these phosphopeptides on calcium oxalate monohydrate formation were on growth of crystals rather than nucleation. We have shown that the use of dynamic light scattering allows inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth to be distinguished. We have also demonstrated for the first time that MGP peptides inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate. Based on the latter finding, we propose that MGP function not only to prevent blood-vessel calcification but also to inhibit stone formation in kidney. PMID:24265810

  9. Peptides of Matrix Gla protein inhibit nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals.

    PubMed

    Goiko, Maria; Dierolf, Joshua; Gleberzon, Jared S; Liao, Yinyin; Grohe, Bernd; Goldberg, Harvey A; de Bruyn, John R; Hunter, Graeme K

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated protein that has been shown to prevent the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the walls of blood vessels. MGP is also expressed in kidney and may inhibit the formation of kidney stones, which mainly consist of another crystalline phase, calcium oxalate monohydrate. To determine the mechanism by which MGP prevents soft-tissue calcification, we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated sequences of human MGP in both post-translationally modified and non-modified forms. The effects of these peptides on hydroxyapatite formation and calcium oxalate crystallization were quantified using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Peptides YGlapS (MGP1-14: YγEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YEpS (YEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YGlaS (YγESHESMESYELNP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56: SKPVHγELNRγEACDD) inhibited formation of hydroxyapatite in order of potency YGlapS > YEpS > YGlaS > SK-Gla. The effects of YGlapS, YEpS and YGlaS on hydroxyapatite formation were on both crystal nucleation and growth; the effect of SK-Gla was on nucleation. YGlapS and YEpS significantly inhibited the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, while simultaneously promoting the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate. The effects of these phosphopeptides on calcium oxalate monohydrate formation were on growth of crystals rather than nucleation. We have shown that the use of dynamic light scattering allows inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth to be distinguished. We have also demonstrated for the first time that MGP peptides inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate. Based on the latter finding, we propose that MGP function not only to prevent blood-vessel calcification but also to inhibit stone formation in kidney.

  10. Modulation of polyepoxysuccinic acid on crystallization of calcium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanqing; Tang, Yongming; Xu, Jinqiu; Zhang, Dongqin; Lu, Gang; Jing, Wenheng

    2015-11-15

    The influence of polyepoxysuccinic acid (PESA) on the phase composition and crystal morphology of calcium oxalate was investigated in this paper. It was found that the presence of PESA inhibited the growth of the monoclinic calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal and promoted the nucleation of the tetragonal calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). In addition, with the increase in PESA concentration, the aggregation of COD crystals was reduced but the particle size was increased. Under the conditions of low calcium-to-oxalate ratio and high CaOx concentration, PESA could not effectively stabilize the formation of COD. Based on molecular dynamic simulations, the adsorption of PESA on CaOx crystal faces was confirmed. - Graphical abstract: Introduction of PESA into crystallization solutions promotes the formation of calcium oxalate dehydrate and modifies the morphology of crystals. - Highlights: • PESA induces the formation of COD at low supersaturation. • Establishment of Ca-rich surface augments the adsorption of PESA. • At Ca/Ox=0.5 PESA cannot induce the formation of COD compared with Ca/Ox=2. • Interaction of PESA with COM faces is stronger than that with COD faces.

  11. Calcium extraction from brine water and seawater using oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natasha, Nadia Chrisayu; Lalasari, Latifa Hanum

    2017-01-01

    Calcium can be extracted not only from rocks but also from natural liquor such as seawater and brine water. In order to extract the calcium from seawater and brine water, oxalic acid was used in this research. Effect of variations of the volume of the oxalic acid at a constant concentration in seawater and brine water to produce calcium was investigated. The concentration of oxalic acid was 100 g/l and the variations of its volume were 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml, and 50 ml. The used seawater and brine water were firstly evaporated from 100 ml into 50 ml and then the oxalic acid was added into them with mixing to produce the calcium precipitates. The precipitates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The SEM analysis showed that the precipitates from brine water were consisted of only calcium compound while from seawater sodium one was also found along with calcium compound. The XRD analysis showed that the calcium was present in the form of calcium oxalate for both seawater and brine water. The ICP-OES analysis of the filtrate from seawater precipitation showed that the its calcium content was decreased from 826.20 ppm to 0.04 ppm while from brine water, it decreased from 170.06 ppm to 1.96 ppm. These results showed that both seawater and brine water have the potential to be a raw material for calcium production.

  12. Calcium oxalate contribution to calcium cycling in forests of contrasting nutrient status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (Ca oxalate) is an insoluble biomineral that forms in plants and fungi, and occurs in soils across many types of ecosystems. Assessing how Ca oxalate may shape ecosystem Ca cycling requires information on the distribution of Ca oxalate among plant biomass, detritus, and mineral soil, and how it varies with ecosystem Ca status. We compared two Douglas-fir forests of contrasting ecosystem Ca availability, and found that Ca oxalate was partitioned similarly among plant biomass, detritus and mineral soil major ecosystem compartments at both sites, and total pools of Ca oxalate were greater in the high-Ca forest. However, the proportional importance of Ca oxalate was greater in the low-Ca than high-Ca forest (18% versus 4% of actively cycling ecosystem Ca, respectively). And calcium oxalate in mineral soil, which is of particular interest as a potential long-term Ca reservoir, was a larger portion of total available Ca (exchangeable Ca plus Ca oxalate Ca) in the low-Ca site than the high-Ca site (9% versus 1% of available soil Ca, respectively). Calcium oxalate was the dominant form of Ca returned from plants to soil as leaf litterfall at the high-Ca site, yet calcium oxalate disappeared rapidly from decomposing litter (0.28 yr−1 or faster) at both sites. We conclude that accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest ecosystems appears most closely related to overall Ca supply for live biomass pools, and that the accumulation of Ca oxalate in forest floor and mineral soil is limited by rapid microbial degradation of putatively unavailable Ca oxalate.

  13. The influence of scale inhibitors on calcium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.

    1999-11-01

    Precipitation of calcium oxalate is a common occurrence in mammalian urinary tract deposits and in various industrial processes such as paper making, brewery fermentation, sugar evaporation, and tannin concentration. Between pH 3.5 to 4.5 the driving force for calcium oxalate precipitation increases almost by three fold. It is a complicated process to predict both the nature of a deposit and at which stage of a multi-effect evaporator a particular mineral will deposit, as this depends on temperature, pH, total solids, and kinetics of mineralization. It is quite a challenge to inhibit calcium oxalate precipitation in the pH range of 4--6. Al{sup 3+} ions provide excellent threshold inhibition in this pH range and can be used to augment traditional inhibitors such as polyphosphates and polycarboxylates.

  14. Microelectrophoretic study of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1987-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopolysaccharides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  15. Microelectrophoretic study of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1987-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopolysaccharides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  16. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control.

  17. Characterization of calcium oxalate biominerals in Pereskia species (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Monje, Paula V; Baran, Enrique J

    2009-01-01

    Calcium oxalate druses were isolated from the stems and leaves of six Pereskioideae family members and investigated by infrared spectroscopy, showing that in all samples the biomineral was present in the form of whewellite, CaC2O4 x H2O. As Pereskia is thought to represent the "ancestral" condition of the leafless stem-succulent cacti, these results suggest that the biomineralization of calcium oxalate in Cactaceae represents a primitive characteristic of the group and also support a close genetic relationship between Pereskia and Opuntia.

  18. In vitro and clinical study of oxalate influence on calcium oxalate crystal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berland, Y.; Olmer, M.; Grandvuillemin, M.; Lundager Madsen, H. E.; Boistelle, R.

    1988-03-01

    The nucleation field of calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx) was determined in urine at 37°C, in vitro, as a function of calcium [Ca] and oxalate [Ox] concentrations, and supersaturation β defined as a multiple of the thermodynamic solubility product of CaOx monohydrate. The diagram β = f[Ox] is clearly divided into two main fields by a curve above which CaOx crystals nucleate and grow. To each [Ox], corresponds therefore a minimal β below which nucleation does not occur. There is also a critical [Ox], about 0.16 mM, below which the nucleation of calcium oxalate crystals does not occur even at very large β values. We have next plotted, on the nucleation domain of CaOx defined in vitro, the individual calculated values of β and the measured [Ox] of 66 hypercalciuric stone formers. Fifty five percent of the patients were in the zone where nucleation has a high probability. After a calcium and oxalate restricted diet of respectively 400 mg/day and 40-70 mg/day, calciuria decreased while oxaluria and supersaturation either increased, decreased, or remained stable. Such variations allow to individualize patients with high or low lithogen risk.

  19. Evidence that serum calcium oxalate supersaturation is a consequence of oxalate retention in patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Worcester, E M; Nakagawa, Y; Bushinsky, D A; Coe, F L

    1986-01-01

    Serum oxalate rises in uremia because of decreased renal clearance, and crystals of calcium oxalate occur in the tissues of uremic patients. Crystal formation suggests that either uremic serum is supersaturated with calcium oxalate, or local oxalate production or accumulation causes regional supersaturation. To test the first alternative, we ultrafiltered uremic serum and measured supersaturation with two different methods previously used to study supersaturation in urine. First, the relative saturation ratio (RSR), the ratio of the dissolved calcium oxalate complex to the thermodynamic calcium oxalate solubility product, was estimated for 11 uremic (before and after dialysis) and 4 normal serum samples using a computer program. Mean ultrafiltrate oxalate predialysis was 89 +/- 8 microM/liter (+/- SEM), 31 +/- 4 postdialysis, and 10 +/- 3 in normals. Mean RSR was 1.7 +/- 0.1 (predialysis), 0.7 +/- 0.1 (postdialysis), and 0.2 +/- 0.1 (normal), where values greater than 1 denote supersaturation, less than 1, undersaturation. Second, the concentration product ratio (CPR), the ratio of the measured calcium oxalate concentration product before to that after incubation of the sample with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal, was measured in seven uremic and seven normal serum ultrafiltrates. Mean oxalate was 91 +/- 11 (uremic) and 8 +/- 3 (normal). Mean CPR was 1.4 +/- 0.2 (uremic) and 0.2 +/- 0.1 (normal). Predialysis, 17 of 18 uremic ultrafiltrates were supersaturated with respect to calcium oxalate. The degree of supersaturation was correlated with ultrafiltrate oxalate (RSR, r = 0.99, r = 29, P less than 0.001; CPR, r = 0.75, n = 11, P less than 0.001). A value of ultrafiltrate oxalate of 50 microM/liter separated undersaturated from supersaturated samples and occurred at a creatinine of approximately 9.0 mg/dl. PMID:3711339

  20. Managing calcium oxalate scale in the bleach plant

    Treesearch

    Alan Rudie; Peter Hart

    2005-01-01

    To comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's "Cluster Rule," most U.S. mills have switched from the use of chlorine to chlorine dioxide as the oxidant in the first stage of bleaching. This process change has a downside. it increases the formation of mineral scale in bleach plants. Typically, calcium oxalate forms in the chlorine dioxide...

  1. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  2. The bioavailability of calcium in spinach and calcium-oxalate to calcium-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Kikunaga, S; Arimori, M; Takahashi, M

    1988-04-01

    We estimated the utilization of calcium in spinach and calcium-oxalate to calcium-deficient rats, and the effect of oxalic acid on absorption of dietary calcium by using calcium-deficient rats. The body weight gain of the calcium-deficient rats for 8 days receiving a calcium-deficient diet supplemented with raw-powdered spinach (R-sp), boiled-powdered spinach (B-sp), or calcium-oxalate (Ca-ox), and a control diet supplemented with oxalic acid (OX-C) were 4.8, 2.8, 4.9, and 5.1 g, respectively. The calcium content in the liver and kidney of the rats receiving R-sp, B-sp, Ca-ox, and OX-C diets significantly increased as compared with the calcium-deficient rats. Significant differences in the liver calcium levels were not observed among the rats receiving various additional diets, though the content in the kidneys of the rats receiving R-sp, B-sp, Ca-ox, and OX-C diets were 28.0, 21.5, 0.11, and 0.59 mg, respectively. An especially large amount of calcium was accumulated in the kidneys of the rats receiving R-sp and B-sp diets. The calcium concentration in the serum of the rats receiving Ca-ox and OX-C diets was higher than the calcium concentration in the serum of the R-sp, B-sp, and calcium-deficient rats. The calcium content in the left tibiae of the rats receiving Ca-ox and OX-C diets was higher than that of the rats receiving R-sp and B-sp diets. The breaking force of the right tibiae of the rats was highest in the OX-C group, and higher in the R-sp and Ca-ox groups than the breaking force of the right tibiae of the rats fed on B-sp diet. The alkaline phosphatase activity in the small intestines of the rats rose in the order of the R-sp, B-sp, and Ca-ox groups, although significant differences of the activity were not observed between the Ca-ox and the OX-C groups. The calcium retention of the rats receiving the calcium-deficient, R-sp, B-sp, Ca-ox, and OX-C diets was -18.5, 35.2, 25.6, 41.6, and 45.8%, respectively. About 35% of the calcium in the spinach was

  3. Oxalate reduces calcium availability in the pads of the prickly pear cactus through formation of calcium oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    McConn, Michele M; Nakata, Paul A

    2004-03-10

    The pads (nopales) of the prickly pear cactus are considered to be a good source of minerals and other nutrients on the basis of compositional analysis. In this study, this analysis is taken a step further by assessing the availability of selected minerals in nopales using an in vitro digestion and dialysis method. The results obtained suggest that although nopales are enriched in a number of minerals, their tissue calcium is not freely available. Microscopic analysis, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, and oxalate measurements suggest that this reduction in available calcium is a result of its sequestration in the form of calcium oxalate crystals. The issue of mineral availability in plant foods is important when the dependence of many populations around the world on plant foods as their main source of minerals and other nutrients is considered.

  4. Effect of Aerva lanata on calcium oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, P; Mahesh, R; Ramesh, T; Begum, V Hazeena

    2006-12-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone was induced in rats using 0.75% of ethylene glycol in drinking water for 28 days. Ethylene glycol treated rats showed significant increase in the activities of oxalate synthesizing enzymes such as glycolic acid oxidase (GAO) in liver and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in liver and kidney. CaOx crystal deposition, as indicated by increased excretion of stone-forming constituents in urine, such as calcium, oxalate, uric acid, phosphorus and protein and decreased concentration of inhibitors, such as citrate and magnesium was observed in ethylene glycol induced urolithic rats. Histopathological studies also confirmed the deposition of CaOx crystals. Administration of Aerva lanata aqueous suspension (2g/kg body wt/dose/day for 28 days) to CaOx urolithic rats had reduced the oxalate synthesizing enzymes, diminished the markers of crystal deposition in the kidney. The results of the present study confirmed that A. lanata can be used as an curative agent for urolithiasis.

  5. Do thiazides prevent recurrent idiopathic renal calcium oxalate stones?

    PubMed

    Wolf, H; Brocks, P; Dahl, C

    1983-01-01

    In a double-blind controlled clinical trial 62 patients with recurrent idiopathic renal calcium oxalate stone formation were allocated either to treatment with bendroflumethiazide, 2.5 mg three times a day, or placebo. In each group the rate of stone formation during medication (average follow-up period 36 months) was compared with the rate of stone formation before medication (average control period 36 months). In both groups a similar striking fall in the rate of stone formation was found, indicating that thiazides in this study did not alter the spontaneous course of idiopathic renal calcium oxalate stone formation. It is doubtful whether life-long prophylaxis with thiazide is justified in patients with a moderate rate of stone formation.

  6. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1

  7. Characterization of Calcium Oxalates Generated as Biominerals in Cacti1

    PubMed Central

    Monje, Paula V.; Baran, Enrique J.

    2002-01-01

    The chemical composition and morphology of solid material isolated from various Cactaceae species have been analyzed. All of the tested specimens deposited high-purity calcium oxalate crystals in their succulent modified stems. These deposits occurred most frequently as round-shaped druses that sometimes coexist with abundant crystal sand in the tissue. The biominerals were identified either as CaC2O4.2H2O (weddellite) or as CaC2O4.H2O (whewellite). Seven different species from the Opuntioideae subfamily showed the presence of whewellite, and an equal number of species from the Cereoideae subfamily showed the deposition of weddellite. The chemical nature of these deposits was assessed by infrared spectroscopy. The crystal morphology of the crystals was visualized by both conventional light and scanning electron microscopy. Weddellite druses were made up of tetragonal crystallites, whereas those from whewellite were most often recognized by their acute points and general star-like shape. These studies clearly demonstrated that members from the main traditional subfamilies of the Cactaceae family could synthesize different chemical forms of calcium oxalate, suggesting a definite but different genetic control. The direct relationship established between a given Cactaceae species and a definite calcium oxalate biomineral seems to be a useful tool for plant identification and chemotaxonomy. PMID:11842173

  8. The electrokinetic behavior of calcium oxalate monohydrate in macromolecular solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Onoda, G. Y., Jr.; Finlayson, B.

    1988-01-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities were measured for calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) in solutions containing macromolecules. Two mucopolysaccharides (sodium heparin and chrondroitin sulfate) and two proteins (positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged bovine serum albumin) were studied as adsorbates. The effects of pH, calcium oxalate surface charge (varied by calcium or oxalate ion activity), and citrate concentration were investigated. All four macromolecules showed evidence for chemical adsorption. The macromolecule concentrations needed for reversing the surface charge indicated that the mucopopolysacchrides have greater affinity for the COM surface than the proteins. The amount of proteins that can chemically adsorb appears to be limited to approximately one monomolecular layer. When the surface charge is high, an insufficient number of proteins can chemically adsorb to neutralize or reverse the surface charge. The remaining surface charge is balanced by proteins held near the surface by longer range electrostatic forces only. Citrate ions at high concentrations appear to compete effectively with the negative protein for surface sites but show no evidence for competing with the positively charged protein.

  9. Characterization of calcium oxalates generated as biominerals in cacti.

    PubMed

    Monje, Paula V; Baran, Enrique J

    2002-02-01

    The chemical composition and morphology of solid material isolated from various Cactaceae species have been analyzed. All of the tested specimens deposited high-purity calcium oxalate crystals in their succulent modified stems. These deposits occurred most frequently as round-shaped druses that sometimes coexist with abundant crystal sand in the tissue. The biominerals were identified either as CaC(2)O(4).2H(2)O (weddellite) or as CaC(2)O(4).H(2)O (whewellite). Seven different species from the Opuntioideae subfamily showed the presence of whewellite, and an equal number of species from the Cereoideae subfamily showed the deposition of weddellite. The chemical nature of these deposits was assessed by infrared spectroscopy. The crystal morphology of the crystals was visualized by both conventional light and scanning electron microscopy. Weddellite druses were made up of tetragonal crystallites, whereas those from whewellite were most often recognized by their acute points and general star-like shape. These studies clearly demonstrated that members from the main traditional subfamilies of the Cactaceae family could synthesize different chemical forms of calcium oxalate, suggesting a definite but different genetic control. The direct relationship established between a given Cactaceae species and a definite calcium oxalate biomineral seems to be a useful tool for plant identification and chemotaxonomy.

  10. In vivo Drosophilia genetic model for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Taku; Cabrero, Pablo; Berkholz, Donald S.; Bondeson, Daniel P.; Ritman, Erik L.; Thompson, James R.; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a major public health problem with a complex and varied etiology. Most stones are composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx), with dietary excess a risk factor. Because of complexity of mammalian system, the details of stone formation remain to be understood. Here we have developed a nephrolithiasis model using the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, which has a simple, transparent kidney tubule. Drosophilia reliably develops CaOx stones upon dietary oxalate supplementation, and the nucleation and growth of microliths can be viewed in real time. The Slc26 anion transporter dPrestin (Slc26a5/6) is strongly expressed in Drosophilia kidney, and biophysical analysis shows that it is a potent oxalate transporter. When dPrestin is knocked down by RNAi in fly kidney, formation of microliths is reduced, identifying dPrestin as a key player in oxalate excretion. CaOx stone formation is an ancient conserved process across >400 My of divergent evolution (fly and human), and from this study we can conclude that the fly is a good genetic model of nephrolithiasis. PMID:22993075

  11. In vivo Drosophilia genetic model for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Taku; Cabrero, Pablo; Berkholz, Donald S; Bondeson, Daniel P; Ritman, Erik L; Thompson, James R; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2012-12-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a major public health problem with a complex and varied etiology. Most stones are composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx), with dietary excess a risk factor. Because of complexity of mammalian system, the details of stone formation remain to be understood. Here we have developed a nephrolithiasis model using the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, which has a simple, transparent kidney tubule. Drosophilia reliably develops CaOx stones upon dietary oxalate supplementation, and the nucleation and growth of microliths can be viewed in real time. The Slc26 anion transporter dPrestin (Slc26a5/6) is strongly expressed in Drosophilia kidney, and biophysical analysis shows that it is a potent oxalate transporter. When dPrestin is knocked down by RNAi in fly kidney, formation of microliths is reduced, identifying dPrestin as a key player in oxalate excretion. CaOx stone formation is an ancient conserved process across >400 My of divergent evolution (fly and human), and from this study we can conclude that the fly is a good genetic model of nephrolithiasis.

  12. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  13. Plant calcium oxalate crystal formation, function, and its impact on human health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crystals of calcium oxalate have been observed among members from most taxonomic groups of photosynthetic organisms ranging from the smallest algae to the largest trees. The biological roles for calcium oxalate crystal formation in plant growth and development include high capacity calcium regulatio...

  14. Growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate at phospholipid Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipps, Scott; Khan, Saeed R.; Jeffrey O'Palko, F.; Backov, Rénal; Talham, Daniel R.

    1998-08-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals have been nucleated from metastable solutions at Langmuir monolayers of the phospholipids dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and the fatty acid arachidic acid. The phospholipid monolayers were used as model systems for domains of pure lipid in cellular media as part of investigations of their potential role in the nucleation of calcium oxalate in the urinary tract. Crystal formation was monitored at the air/water interface using Brewster angle microscopy and in transferred films using SEM and TEM. For each Langmuir monolayer, it was observed that nucleation is heterogeneous and is selective with respect to the orientation and morphology of the precipitated crystals with up to 90% of crystals growing with the ( 1 0 1¯) face oriented towards the monolayer interface. The selectivity is attributed to calcium binding at the lipid monolayer favoring formation of the calcium-rich ( 1 0 1¯) face. The behavior at each monolayer was similar, although a higher rate of crystal formation was observed at the anionic DPPG interface.

  15. Efficacy of Mixtures of Magnesium, Citrate and Phytate as Calcium Oxalate Crystallization Inhibitors in Urine.

    PubMed

    Grases, Felix; Rodriguez, Adrian; Costa-Bauza, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mixtures of magnesium, citrate and phytate as calcium oxalate crystallization inhibitors. A turbidimetric assay in synthetic urine was performed to obtain induction times for calcium oxalate crystallization in the absence and presence of different mixtures of inhibitors. The morphology of calcium oxalate crystals in the absence or presence of inhibitors and mixtures of the inhibitors was evaluated in 2 crystallization experiments at low and high calcium oxalate supersaturation. The crystals formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Examination of crystallization induction times revealed clear inhibitory effects of magnesium, citrate and phytate on calcium oxalate crystallization, supporting usefulness in the treatment and prevention of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Significant synergistic effects between magnesium and phytate were observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that phytate is a powerful crystal growth inhibitor of calcium oxalate, totally preventing the formation of trihydrate and monohydrate. In addition to crystallization inhibition capacity, citrate and magnesium avoided calcium oxalate crystallization by decreasing its supersaturation. The synergistic effect between magnesium and phytate on calcium oxalate crystallization suggests that a combination of these 2 compounds may be highly useful as antilithiasis therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered Calcium and Vitamin D Homeostasis in First-Time Calcium Kidney Stone-Formers

    PubMed Central

    Ketha, Hemamalini; Singh, Ravinder J.; Grebe, Stefan K.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Rule, Andrew D.; Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) concentrations have been reported among cohorts of recurrent calcium (Ca) kidney stone-formers and implicated in the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria. Variations in Ca and vitamin D metabolism, and excretion of urinary solutes among first-time male and female Ca stone-formers in the community, however, have not been defined. Methods In a 4-year community-based study we measured serum Ca, phosphorus (P), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), 1,25(OH)2D, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25(OH)2D), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) concentrations in first-time Ca stone-formers and age- and gender frequency-matched controls. Results Serum Ca and 1,25(OH)2D were increased in Ca stone-formers compared to controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.001). Stone-formers had a lower serum 24,25(OH)2D/25(OH)D ratio compared to controls (P = 0.008). Serum PTH and FGF-23 concentrations were similar in the groups. Urine Ca excretion was similar in the two groups (P = 0.82). In controls, positive associations between serum 25(OH)D and 24,25(OH)2D, FGF-23 and fractional phosphate excretion, and negative associations between serum Ca and PTH, and FGF-23 and 1,25(OH)2D were observed. In SF associations between FGF-23 and fractional phosphate excretion, and FGF-23 and 1,25(OH)2D, were not observed. 1,25(OH)2D concentrations associated more weakly with FGF-23 in SF compared with C (P <0.05). Conclusions Quantitative differences in serum Ca and 1,25(OH)2D and reductions in 24-hydroxylation of vitamin D metabolites are present in first-time SF and might contribute to first-time stone risk. PMID:26332888

  17. Calcium oxalate crystal growth in human urinary stones

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.M.; Johnson, F.B.

    1981-01-01

    Calcium oxalate stones are very common and increasing. Crystal growth is no less important than the crystal nucleation in the pathogenesis of stone formation. The crystal growth was studied in human calcium oxalate stones by a combined electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The main mode of weddellite growth was interpenetration twinning of tetrahedral bipyramids. Bipyramids may form as initial crystal seeds, develop from anhedral crystals (crystals which lack flat symmetric faces) of spherular or mulberry shape, develop on the surface of preformed bipyramids by spiral dislocation mechanisms, or develop on whewellite crystal by heterogeneous nucleation and epitaxy. Heterogeneous nucleations of whewellite on weddellite, and calcium apatite on whewellite were also observed. Whewellite grew mainly by parallel twinning. Interpenetration twinning was exceptional. Transformation of anhedral to euhedral (completely bounded by flat faces that are set ar fixed angles to one another) whewellite occurred by parallel fissurations followed by brick wall like stacking of the crystals, while euhedral transformation of weddellite occurred by protrusion of bipyramids frm anhedral crystal surface. Occasionally, an evidence of crystal dissolution was noted. Although an aggregation of crystals is believed to play a pivotal role in stone nidus formation, growth in size of the formed crystals, and twinning and epitactic crystal intergrowth apparently play a significant role in the obstructive urinary stone formation.

  18. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jay; Nakata, Paul A; McConn, Michele; Brock, Amanda; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2007-07-01

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical calcium concentrations to wild-type, but contains no oxalate crystals. In this study, equal number of male and female mice were randomly grouped and then fed one of four 45Ca-containing diets: M. truncatula extrinsically or intrinsically labeled, and cod5 extrinsically or intrinsically labeled. Absorption of the tracer was determined in the legs one day after consumption. The absorption was similar in the M. truncatula and cod5 extrinsically labeled diets; however, in the intrinsically labeled diets, calcium absorption was 22.87% (P < 0.001) higher in mice fed cod5. Our study presents the first genetic evidence demonstrating the nutritional impact of removing oxalate crystals from foods.

  19. Calcium oxalate calculi-induced clusterin expression in kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Yi; Liu, Junjiang; Jiang, Junyi; Pumill, Chris; Elaiho, Cordelia; Zhang, Yunxia; Li, Shoubin; Zhou, Tie

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate clusterin expression in the kidney and evaluate the urine clusterin level in the kidney stone formers. (1) In vitro, we treated the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line with different concentrations of calcium oxalate (CaOx), and then the clusterin protein expression in the cells was evaluated by Western blotting. (2) Kidney stone patients who received percutaneous nephrolithotomy were enrolled in our study. Urine samples were collected before surgery, the kidney punctured to obtain kidney tissue guided by ultrasound intraoperatively. Clusterin expression in the human kidney tissue was evaluated by immunochemistry. The urine clusterin level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Non-kidney disease subjects were chosen as controls. In vitro, the clusterin expression was up-regulated in the MDCK cells induced by CaOx. The study included 49 patients and 41 non-kidney disease subjects. All calculi were composed of calcium oxalate monohydrate or calcium oxalate dihydrate and a few also contained protein or uric acid. Mean ± SD urine clusterin level was 17.47 ± 18.61 μg/ml in patients, and 3.31 ± 5.42 μg/ml in non-kidney disease subjects, respectively (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry revealed the clusterin was located in the cytoplasm of the renal distal and collecting tubular epithelial cells. Also the tissue clusterin expression increased significantly in the kidney stone formers compared to the control groups (p = 0.001). CaOx could induce clusterin expression in renal tubular cells, and increase clusterin levels in the kidney and urine from the kidney stone formers.

  20. Calcium oxalate crystal growth modification; investigations with confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMulkin, Calum J.; Massi, Massimiliano; Jones, Franca

    2017-06-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy (CRM) in combination with a photophysical investigation has been employed to give insight into the interaction between calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and a series of tetrazole containing crystal growth modifier's (CGM's), in conjunction with characterisation of morphological changes using scanning electron and optical microscopy. The tetrazole CGM's were found to interact by surface adsorption with minimal morphological changes to the COM crystals however, significant interactions via chemisorption were observed; it was discovered that the chemisorption is sufficiently strong for aggregation of the tetrazole species to occur within the crystal during crystallisation.

  1. Evidence for net renal tubule oxalate secretion in patients with calcium kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Anna L.; Asplin, John R.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Coe, Fredric L.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the renal handling of oxalate in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH). To explore the role of tubular oxalate handling in IH and to evaluate whether differences exist between IH and normal controls, we studied 19 IH subjects, 8 normal subjects, and 2 bariatric stone formers (BSF) during a 1-day General Clinical Research Center protocol utilizing a low-oxalate diet. Urine and blood samples were collected at 30- to 60-min intervals while subjects were fasting and after they ate three meals providing known amounts of calcium, phosphorus, sodium, protein, oxalate, and calories. Plasma oxalate concentrations and oxalate-filtered loads were similar between patients (includes IH and BSF) and controls in both the fasting and fed states. Urinary oxalate excretion was significantly higher in patients vs. controls regardless of feeding state. Fractional excretion of oxalate (FEOx) was >1, suggesting tubular secretion of oxalate, in 6 of 19 IH and both BSF, compared with none of the controls (P < 0.00001). Adjusted for water extraction along the nephron, urine oxalate rose more rapidly among patients than normal subjects with increases in plasma oxalate. Our findings identify tubular secretion of oxalate as a key mediator of hyperoxaluria in calcium stone formers, potentially as a means of maintaining plasma oxalate in a tight range. PMID:21123489

  2. Reactive oxygen species, inflammation and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saeed R

    2014-09-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones are formed attached to Randall's plaques (RPs) or Randall's plugs. Mechanisms involved in the formation and growth are poorly understood. It is our hypothesis that stone formation is a form of pathological biomineralization or ectopic calcification. Pathological calcification and plaque formation in the body is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the development of oxidative stress (OS). This review explores clinical and experimental data in support of ROS involvement in the formation of CaOx kidney stones. Under normal conditions the production of ROS is tightly controlled, increasing when and where needed. Results of clinical and experimental studies show that renal epithelial exposure to high oxalate and crystals of CaOx/calcium phosphate (CaP) generates excess ROS, causing injury and inflammation. Major markers of OS and inflammation are detectable in urine of stone patients as well as rats with experimentally induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. Antioxidant treatments reduce crystal and oxalate induced injury in tissue culture and animal models. Significantly lower serum levels of antioxidants, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthine have been found in individuals with a history of kidney stones. A diet rich in antioxidants has been shown to reduce stone episodes. ROS regulate crystal formation, growth and retention through the timely production of crystallization modulators. In the presence of abnormal calcium, citrate, oxalate, and/or phosphate, however, there is an overproduction of ROS and a decrease in the antioxidant capacity resulting in OS, renal injury and inflammation. Cellular degradation products in the urine promote crystallization in the tubular lumen at a faster rate thus blocking the tubule and plugging the tubular openings at the papillary tips forming Randall's plugs. Renal epithelial cells lining the loops of Henle/collecting ducts may become osteogenic, producing membrane vesicles at

  3. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Matlaga, Brian R.

    2007-04-05

    The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

  4. Calcium Oxalate Stones Are Frequently Found Attached to Randall's Plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlaga, Brian R.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; Lingeman, James E.

    2007-04-01

    The exact mechanisms of the crystallization processes that occur during the formation of calcium oxalate calculi are controversial. Over six decades ago, Alexander Randall reported on a series of cadaveric renal units in which he observed calcium salt deposits on the tips of the renal papilla. Randall hypothesized that these deposits, eponymously termed Randall's plaque, would be the ideal site for stone formation, and indeed in a number of specimens he noted small stones attached to the papillae. With the recent advent of digital endoscopic imaging and micro computerized tomography (CT) technology, it is now possible to inspect the renal papilla of living, human stone formers and to study the attached stone with greater scrutiny.

  5. Discrimination Between Calcium Hydroxyapatite and Calcium Oxalate Using Multienergy Spectral Photon-Counting CT.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, Tracy E; Raja, Aamir Y; Müller, Kristin; Bateman, Christopher J; Becce, Fabio; Anderson, Nigel G

    2017-08-23

    We aimed to determine whether multienergy spectral photon-counting CT could distinguish between clinically relevant calcium crystals at clinical x-ray energy ranges. Energy thresholds of 15, 22, 29, and 36 keV and tube voltages of 50, 80, and 110 kVp were selected. Images were analyzed to assess differences in linear attenuation coefficients between various concentrations of calcium hydroxyapatite (54.3, 211.7, 808.5, and 1169.3 mg/cm(3)) and calcium oxalate (2000 mg/cm(3)). The two lower concentrations of hydroxyapatite were distinguishable from oxalate at all energy thresholds and tube voltages, whereas discrimination at higher concentrations depended primarily on the energy thresholds used. Multienergy spectral photon-counting CT shows promise for distinguishing these calcium crystals.

  6. Raman spectroscopy study of calcium oxalate extracted from cacti stems.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, Claudio; Loza-Cornejo, Sofia; Terrazas, Teresa; Terrazas, Tania; Miranda-Beltrán, María de la Luz; Aparicio-Fernández, Xóchitl; López-Macías, Brenda M; Morales-Martínez, Sandra E; Ortiz-Morales, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To find markers that distinguish the different Cactaceae species, by using near infrared Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we studied the occurrence, in the stem, of solid deposits in five Cactaceae species (Coryphantha clavata, Ferocactus latispinus, Opuntia ficus-indica, O. robusta, and O. strepthacantha) collected from their natural habitats from a region of México. The deposits in the tissues usually occurred as spheroidal aggregates, druses, or prismatic crystals. From the Raman spectra, the crystals were identified either as calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC2O4·H2O) or calcium oxalate dihydrate (CaC2O4·2H2O). Opuntia species (subfamily Opuntioideae) showed the presence of CaC2O4·H2O, and the deposition of CaC2O4·2H2O was present in C. clavata and F. latispinus (subfamily Cactoideae, Cacteae tribe). As a punctual technique, Raman spectroscopy seems to be a useful tool to identify crystal composition. In addition to allowing the analysis of crystal morphology, this spectroscopic technique can be used to identify Cactaceae species and their chemotaxonomy.

  7. Characterization of calcium oxalate defective (cod) 3 mutant from Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. Assigned roles for plant crystal formation include functions in defense, calcium regulation, and aluminum tolerance. From a human health standpoint, oxalate present in edible plant tiss...

  8. Red blood cell membrane fragments but not intact red blood cells promote calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2010-08-01

    Cell membranes are thought to promote calcium oxalate kidney stone formation but to our knowledge the modulating effect of red blood cell membranes on calcium oxalate crystals has not been previously investigated. Thus, we examined the effects of red blood cell membrane fragments on calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystal growth and aggregation. Calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals were treated with red blood cell membrane fragments or intact red blood cells from a healthy donor. Phase contrast microscopy was performed to evaluate crystal morphology and aggregation. We used ImageMaster 2D Platinum software to evaluate crystal size and spectrophotometric oxalate depletion assay to monitor crystal growth. Red blood cell membrane fragments had significant promoting activity on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth with an approximately 75% increase in size and aggregation with an approximately 2.5-fold increase in aggregate number compared to the control without membrane fragments or cells. Approximately 50% of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals were adhered by red blood cell membrane fragments. Intact red blood cells had no significant effect on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth or aggregation but they could transform calcium oxalate monohydrate to calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals. Red blood cell membrane fragments and intact red blood cells had no effect on calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals. The promoting activity of red blood cell membrane fragments on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth was successfully confirmed by spectrophotometric oxalate depletion assay. To our knowledge our data provide the first direct evidence that red blood cell membrane fragments are a promoting factor for calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth and aggregation. Thus, they may aggravate calcium oxalate stone formation. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  9. Calcium oxalate crystals: an integral component of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum/Brassica carinata pathosystem.

    PubMed

    Uloth, Margaret B; Clode, Peta L; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor for disease caused by the fungal necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, yet calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have not been widely reported. B. carinata stems were infected with S. sclerotiorum and observed using light microscopy. Six hours post inoculation (hpi), CaOx crystals were evident on 46% of stem sections and by 72 hpi on 100%, demonstrating that the secretion of oxalic acid by S. sclerotiorum commences before hyphal penetration. This is the first time CaOx crystals have been reported on B. carinata infected with S. sclerotiorum. The shape of crystals varied as infection progressed. Long tetragonal rods were dominant 12 hpi (68% of crystal-containing samples), but by 72 hpi, 50% of stems displayed bipyramidal crystals, and only 23% had long rods. Scanning electron microscopy from 24 hpi revealed CaOx crystals in all samples, ranging from tiny irregular crystals (< 0.5 μm) to large (up to 40 μm) highly organized arrangements. Crystal morphology encompassed various forms, including tetragonal prisms, oval plates, crystal sand, and druses. Large conglomerates of CaOx crystals were observed in the hyphal mass 72 hpi and these are proposed as a strategy of the fungus to hold and detoxify Ca2+ions. The range of crystal morphologies suggests that S. sclerotiorum growth and infection controls the form taken by CaOx crystals.

  10. Calcium Oxalate Crystals: An Integral Component of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum/Brassica carinata Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Uloth, Margaret B.; Clode, Peta L.; You, Ming Pei; Barbetti, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxalic acid is an important virulence factor for disease caused by the fungal necrotrophic pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, yet calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals have not been widely reported. B. carinata stems were infected with S. sclerotiorum and observed using light microscopy. Six hours post inoculation (hpi), CaOx crystals were evident on 46% of stem sections and by 72 hpi on 100%, demonstrating that the secretion of oxalic acid by S. sclerotiorum commences before hyphal penetration. This is the first time CaOx crystals have been reported on B. carinata infected with S. sclerotiorum. The shape of crystals varied as infection progressed. Long tetragonal rods were dominant 12 hpi (68% of crystal-containing samples), but by 72 hpi, 50% of stems displayed bipyramidal crystals, and only 23% had long rods. Scanning electron microscopy from 24 hpi revealed CaOx crystals in all samples, ranging from tiny irregular crystals (< 0.5 μm) to large (up to 40 μm) highly organized arrangements. Crystal morphology encompassed various forms, including tetragonal prisms, oval plates, crystal sand, and druses. Large conglomerates of CaOx crystals were observed in the hyphal mass 72 hpi and these are proposed as a strategy of the fungus to hold and detoxify Ca2+ions. The range of crystal morphologies suggests that S. sclerotiorum growth and infection controls the form taken by CaOx crystals. PMID:25816022

  11. Calcium oxalate monohydrate precipitation investigation by thermometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söhnel, O.; Costa-Bauzá, A.; Velich, V.

    1993-01-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) precipitation from diluted solutions of 100 mol m -3 ionic strength at 25°C was studied by an isoperibolic reaction twin calorimeter. The molar reaction enthalpy was determined as - 17.5 kJ mol -1. Results achieved with a pure system were highly reproducible. Citrate, pyrophosphate and phytate retard COM precipitation that is manifested mainly by an induction period appearance and a decrease of the initial precipitation rate. Effect of the studied impurities on individual precipitation experiments carried out under identical conditions was to some extent "random", i.e. the reaction extent reached at arbitrary time considerably differed for individual experiments. Impurity effectiveness in retarding spontaneous precipitation increases in succession citrate < pyrophosphate < phytate.

  12. Anhydrous Amorphous Calcium Oxalate Nanoparticles from Ionic Liquids: Stable Crystallization Intermediates in the Formation of Whewellite.

    PubMed

    Gehl, Aaron; Dietzsch, Michael; Mondeshki, Mihail; Bach, Sven; Häger, Tobias; Panthöfer, Martin; Barton, Bastian; Kolb, Ute; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-12-07

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are not well understood. To test the viability and the limits of the classical crystallization, new model systems for crystallization are needed. With a view to elucidating the formation of an amorphous precursor and its subsequent crystallization, the crystallization of calcium oxalate, a biomineral widely occurring in plants, is investigated. Amorphous calcium oxalate (ACO) precipitated from an aqueous solution is described as a hydrated metastable phase, as often observed during low-temperature inorganic synthesis and biomineralization. In the presence of water, ACO rapidly transforms into hydrated whewellite (monohydrate, CaC2 O4 ⋅H2 O, COM). The problem of fast crystallization kinetics is circumvented by synthesizing anhydrous ACO from a pure ionic liquid (IL-ACO) for the first time. IL-ACO is stable in the absence of water at ambient temperature. It is obtained as well-defined, non-agglomerated particles with diameters of 15-20 nm. When exposed to water, it crystallizes to give (hydrated) COM through a dissolution/recrystallization mechanism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Effect of high-calcium diet on urinary oxalate excretion in urinary stone formers.

    PubMed

    Nakada, T; Sasagawa, I; Furuta, H; Katayama, T; Shimazaki, J

    1988-01-01

    The effect of mild high-calcium diet or regular-calcium diet on urinary calcium excretion, urinary oxalate excretion, urinary calcium/creatinine ratio, urinary oxalate/creatinine ratio, and the probability of being a stone former (PSF) were studied in 85 patients with idiopathic urolithiasis. Intake of high-calcium diet for 5-6 days reduced (p less than 0.01-p less than 0.001) urinary oxalate excretion, urinary oxalate/creatine ratio and PSF in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria. Under the regular-calcium diet, administration of 60 mg/day of pyridoxal phosphate for 3 months lowered (p less than 0.05-p less than 0.01) urinary oxalate excretion, urinary oxalate/creatinine ratio and PSF in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria alone. From these findings, intake of mild high-calcium diet appears to be beneficial to decrease the urinary oxalate excretion and PSF in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria. Pyridoxal phosphate has all the features of suppressing such risk factors for stone formation in patients with idiopathic hypercalciuria.

  14. Urinary metals in a spontaneous canine model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Molly E.; Lulich, Jody P.

    2017-01-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is a common and painful condition in people. The pathogenesis of this disease is complex and poorly understood. Laboratory animal and in vitro studies have demonstrated an effect of multiple trace metals in the crystallization process, and studies in humans have reported relationships between urinary metal concentrations and stone risk. Dogs are a spontaneous model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis, and the metal content of canine calcium oxalate stones mirrors that of human stones. The aim of this study was to test for a relationship between urinary metals and calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs. We hypothesized that urinary metals would differ between dogs with and without calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Urine from 122 dogs (71 cases and 51 stone-free controls) was analyzed for calcium and 12 other metals. The cases had higher urinary calcium, copper, iron, and vanadium and lower urinary cobalt. Higher urinary vanadium in the cases was associated with being fed a therapeutic stone-prevention diet. Urinary calcium had a strong positive correlation with strontium and moderate positive correlations with chromium, nickel, and zinc. The results of this study complement the findings of similar human studies and suggest a potential role of trace metals in calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Further investigation into how trace metals may affect stone formation is warranted. PMID:28467511

  15. Urinary metals in a spontaneous canine model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Furrow, Eva; McCue, Molly E; Lulich, Jody P

    2017-01-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is a common and painful condition in people. The pathogenesis of this disease is complex and poorly understood. Laboratory animal and in vitro studies have demonstrated an effect of multiple trace metals in the crystallization process, and studies in humans have reported relationships between urinary metal concentrations and stone risk. Dogs are a spontaneous model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis, and the metal content of canine calcium oxalate stones mirrors that of human stones. The aim of this study was to test for a relationship between urinary metals and calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs. We hypothesized that urinary metals would differ between dogs with and without calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Urine from 122 dogs (71 cases and 51 stone-free controls) was analyzed for calcium and 12 other metals. The cases had higher urinary calcium, copper, iron, and vanadium and lower urinary cobalt. Higher urinary vanadium in the cases was associated with being fed a therapeutic stone-prevention diet. Urinary calcium had a strong positive correlation with strontium and moderate positive correlations with chromium, nickel, and zinc. The results of this study complement the findings of similar human studies and suggest a potential role of trace metals in calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Further investigation into how trace metals may affect stone formation is warranted.

  16. Oxalate co-precipitation synthesis of calcium zirconate and calcium titanate powders.

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew

    2009-06-01

    Fine powders of calcium zirconate (CaZrO{sub 3}, CZ) and calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}, CT) were synthesized using a nonaqueous oxalate co-precipitation route from Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4 H{sub 2}O and group(IV) n-butoxides (Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} or Zr(OBu{sup n}){sub 4}). Several reaction conditions and batch sizes (2-35 g) were explored to determine their influence on final particle size, morphology, and phase. Characterization of the as-prepared oxalate precursors, oven dried oxalate precursors (60-90 C), and calcined powders (635-900 C) were analyzed with TGA/DTA, XRD, TEM, and SEM. Densification and sintering studies on pressed CZ pellets at 1375 and 1400 C were also performed. Through the developed oxalate co-precipitation route, densification temperatures for CZ were lowered by 125 C from the 1500 C firing temperature required for conventional mixed oxide powders. Low field electrical tests of the CZ pellets indicated excellent dielectric properties with dielectric constants of {approx}30 and a dissipation factor of 0.0004 were measured at 1 kHz.

  17. A simple method for quantitating the propensity for calcium oxalate crystallization in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wabner, C. L.; Pak, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    To assess the propensity for spontaneous crystallization of calcium oxalate in urine, the permissible increment in oxalate is calculated. The previous method required visual observation of crystallization with the addition of oxalate, this warranted the need for a large volume of urine and a sacrifice in accuracy in defining differences between small incremental changes of added oxalate. Therefore, this method has been miniaturized and spontaneous crystallization is detected from the depletion of radioactive oxalate. The new "micro" method demonstrated a marked decrease (p < 0.001) in the permissible increment in oxalate in urine of stone formers versus normal subjects. Moreover, crystallization inhibitors added to urine, in vitro (heparin or diphosphonate) or in vivo (potassium citrate administration), substantially increased the permissible increment in oxalate. Thus, the "micro" method has proven reliable and accurate in discriminating stone forming from control urine and in distinguishing changes of inhibitory activity.

  18. Exploring Calcium Oxalate Crystallization: A Constant Composition Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M.; Kleinman, Jack G.; Wesson, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Crystal growth rates have been extensively studied in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization, because COM crystals are the principal component in most kidney stones. Constant composition methods are useful for studying growth rates, but fail to differentiate concurrent nucleation and aggregation events. A constant composition method coupled with particle size determinations that addresses this deficiency was previously published for a calcium phosphate system, and this method was extended to COM crystallization in this report. A seeded constant composition experiment was combined with particle size determination and a separate near-equilibrium aggregation experiment to separate effects of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation in COM crystal formation and to test the effects of various inhibitors relevant to stone formation. With no inhibitors present, apparent COM growth rates were heavily influenced by secondary nucleation at low seed crystal additions, but growth-related aggregation increased at higher seed crystal densities. Among small molecule inhibitors, citrate demonstrated growth rate inhibition but enhanced growth-related aggregation, while magnesium did not affect COM crystallization. Polyanions (polyaspartate, polyglutamate, or osteopontin) showed strong growth rate inhibition, but large differences in nucleation and aggregation were observed. Polycations (polyarginine) did not affect COM crystal growth or aggregation. Mixtures of polyanions and polycations produced a complicated set of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation behaviors. These experiments demonstrated the power of combining particle size determinations with constant composition experiments to fully characterize COM crystallization and to obtain detailed knowledge of inhibitor properties that will be critical to understanding kidney stone formation. PMID:26016572

  19. Exploring calcium oxalate crystallization: a constant composition approach.

    PubMed

    Kolbach-Mandel, Ann M; Kleinman, Jack G; Wesson, Jeffrey A

    2015-10-01

    Crystal growth rates have been extensively studied in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystallization, because COM crystals are the principal component in most kidney stones. Constant composition methods are useful for studying growth rates, but fail to differentiate concurrent nucleation and aggregation events. A constant composition method coupled with particle size determinations that addresses this deficiency was previously published for a calcium phosphate system, and this method was extended to COM crystallization in this report. A seeded constant composition experiment was combined with particle size determination and a separate near-equilibrium aggregation experiment to separate effects of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation in COM crystal formation and to test the effects of various inhibitors relevant to stone formation. With no inhibitors present, apparent COM growth rates were heavily influenced by secondary nucleation at low seed crystal additions, but growth-related aggregation increased at higher seed crystal densities. Among small molecule inhibitors, citrate demonstrated growth rate inhibition but enhanced growth-related aggregation, while magnesium did not affect COM crystallization. Polyanions (polyaspartate, polyglutamate, or osteopontin) showed strong growth rate inhibition, but large differences in nucleation and aggregation were observed. Polycations (polyarginine) did not affect COM crystal growth or aggregation. Mixtures of polyanions and polycations produced a complicated set of growth rate, nucleation, and aggregation behaviors. These experiments demonstrated the power of combining particle size determinations with constant composition experiments to fully characterize COM crystallization and to obtain detailed knowledge of inhibitor properties that will be critical to understanding kidney stone formation.

  20. [Urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation beyond nephrolithiasis. Relationship with tubulointerstitial damage].

    PubMed

    Toblli, Jorge E; Angerosa, Margarita; Stella, Inés; Ferder, León; Inserra, Felipe

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that the urinary ion activity product (IAP) of calcium oxalate (CaOx), as an index of urinary CaOx supersaturation (SS), is higher in renal stone formers than in normal subjects. Besides, the relation between CaOx SS and lithogenesis, crystal CaOx exposition can produce tubular cell as well as renal interstitial lesions. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possible relationship between CaOx SS and tubulointerstitial (TI) damage in an animal model of hyperoxaluria. During four weeks, male Sprague-Dawley rats received: G1 (n = 8) control regular water, and G2 (n = 8) 1% ethylene glycol (ETG) (precursor for oxalates) in drinking water. In order to evaluate urinary CaOx SS, IAP assessed by Tisselius formula was performed. At the end of the study, renal lesions were evaluated by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Animals from G2 (ETG) presented higher (p < 0.01) values of: a) urinary oxalate excretion; b) urinary CaOx SS; c) crystalluria score; d) proteinuria; and lower (p < 0.01) creatinine clearance, with respect to the control group (G1). Moreover, pathology studies showed that rats from G2 (ETG), presented significant TI lesions characterized by a higher (p < 0.01) score of: a) tubular atrophy; inflammatory infiltrates (monocyte/macrophage); c) crystal deposits; d) intersticial fibrosis; e) interstitial alpha-smooth muscle actin; f) collagen type III; g) TI TGF beta 1 compared with G1 (control). Rats from G2 (ETG) presented a high correlation between urinary CaOx SS and most of the TI damage parameters evaluated, in especial with interstitial fibrosis. Both, inflammatory infiltrates and urinary CaOx SS were the most significant variables related to interstitial fibrosis. Finally, since hyperoxaluric animals showed higher urinary CaOx SS associated with higher renal TI damage, the results from this study suggest the presence of a tight link between urinary CaOx SS and renal TI damage. Considering these findings we

  1. Determination of urine oxalate level in rats with renal calcium oxalate calculus by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qiu-shi; Ba, Yuan-ming; Luo, Jun-hua; Dai, Qi

    2015-02-01

    To establish a method of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for determining the urine oxalate levle in rats with renal calcium oxalate calculus. Totally 24 SPF Wistar healthy male rats were randomly divided into control group(n=12)and ethylene glycol (EG) group (n=12). Rats in EG group were administered intragastrically with 2% ammonium chloride (AC)2 ml/rat per day+1% ethylene glycol (EG), along with free access to drinking water.The control group was fed with deionized water, along with the intragastric administration of normal saline (1 ml per day). Twenty-eight days after modelling, the 24-hour urine samples were collected, and the urine oxalic acid levels were determined using HPLC and the results were compared with those of catalytic spectrophotometry using oxidation of methyl. During the HPLC, the samples were separated on Aglient 5TC-C18 (250×4.6 mm,5 Μm), eluted with mixture of methanol (0.1 mol/L) and ammonium acetate (15:85) at 1.2 ml/min, and detected at 314 nm, with the column temperature being 20 ℃. The standard curves of high and low concentrations of oxalic acid were y=5909.1x+378730, R² =0.9984 and y=7810.5x-16635, R² =0.9967,respectively. The lowest detectable concentration in this method was 5 Μg/ml. The linear high concentration range of oxalate stood at 62.50-2000.00 Μg/ml, and the linear low concentration range of oxalate stood at 6.25-100.00 Μg/ml. Its average recovery was 95.1%, and its within-day and day-to-day precisions were 3.4%-10.8% and 3.8%-9.4%. Both HPLC and catalytic spectrophotometry showed significantly higher urinary oxalic acid concentration and 24 h urine oxalate level in EG group compared with the control group [urinary oxalic acid concentration: (736.35 ± 254.52) Μg/ml vs.(51.56 ± 36.34) Μg/ml,(687.35 ± 234.53) Μg/ml vs.(50.24 ± 42.34) Μg/ml;24 h urine oxalate level: (11.23 ± 4.12)mg vs.(0.87 ± 0.45)mg,(9.89 ± 3.55)mg vs. (0.77 ± 0.65)mg; all P<0.01]. No statistically significant difference

  2. Inhibition of crystallization of calcium oxalate by the extraction of Tamarix gallica L.

    PubMed

    Bensatal, Ahmed; Ouahrani, M R

    2008-12-01

    The main objective is to study the inhibitor effect of acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L on the crystallization of calcium oxalate. The extract of Tamarix gallica L is very rich by acid compounds that are used as an inhibitor of nephrolithiasis (calcium oxalate). Our study of the calcium oxalate crystallization is based on the model of turbidimetry by means of a spectrophotometer. The calcium oxalate formation is induced by the addition of oxalate solutions of sodium and of calcium chloride. The addition of inhibitor with various concentrations enabled us to give information on the percentage of inhibition. The comparison between the turbidimetric slopes with and without inhibitor gives the effectiveness of inhibitor for the acid fraction. By comparing the photographs of with and without inhibitor, we concluded that the extract of Tamarix gallica L acts at the stage of growth. The acid fraction of the extract of Tamarix gallica L gives an activity remarkable in the formation of urinary lithiasis (calcium oxalate); this effectiveness is due to the presence of functions of acid.

  3. Chemical modulation of crystalline state of calcium oxalate with nickel ions.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Khalida; Haq, Ikram Ul

    2013-03-15

    We explored that the presence of nickel ions in the precipitation medium affected size, shape and crystalline phase of the precipitated particles of calcium oxalate, whereas the applied synthesis conditions strongly influenced their uniformity. Aqueous solutions of oxalic acid and calcium chloride, containing varying amounts of nickel sulfate, were mixed at room temperature and allowed to sonicate for various periods of time. The obtained particles were characterized by SEM, XRD, TG/DTA, and FTIR. Results revealed that particle morphology of calcium oxalate and their hydration states were dependent upon the chemical composition of the reactant solutions. For instance, the particles precipitated out in the form of dihydrate and having prismatic, and discs shaped particle morphology, when nickel ions were introduced in the starting reactant solution in different amounts. In contrast, the calcium oxalate particles precipitated under identical conditions in the absence of nickel ions were in the form of flakes with corrugated edges. Obvious variations were also found in the XRD patterns and crystallite size of these three solids. Heat treatment produced changes in the surface morphology of these particles due to loss of material and converted them calcium oxide. Gentle mixing of aqueous solutions of calcium chloride and oxalic acid in the absence and presence of nickel ions produced precipitated particles of calcium oxalate. Chemical composition of the reactant solutions and their order of mixing were found to be the key parameters in controlling the particle morphology and their hydration/crystalline state. Heat treatment at the elevated temperature transformed the as-prepared calcium oxalate to calcium oxide with visible changes in surface features of the particles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals internalized into renal tubular cells are degraded and dissolved by endolysosomes.

    PubMed

    Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Singhto, Nilubon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-02-25

    Interaction between calcium oxalate crystals and renal tubular cells has been recognized as one of the key mechanisms for kidney stone formation. While crystal adhesion and internalization have been extensively investigated, subsequent phenomena (i.e. crystal degradation and dissolution) remained poorly understood. To explore these mechanisms, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals (1000 μg/ml of crystals/culture medium) to confirm crystal internalization into MDCK (Type II) renal tubular cells after exposure to the crystals for 1 h and to trace the internalized crystals. Crystal size, intracellular and extracellular fluorescence levels were measured using a spectrofluorometer for up to 48 h after crystal internalization. Moreover, markers for early endosome (Rab5), late endosome (Rab7) and lysosome (LAMP-2) were examined by laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry confirmed that FITC-labelled COM crystals were internalized into MDCK cells (14.83 ± 0.85%). The data also revealed a reduction of crystal size in a time-dependent manner. In concordance, intracellular and extracellular fluorescence levels were decreased and increased, respectively, indicating crystal degradation/dissolution inside the cells and the degraded products were eliminated extracellularly. Moreover, Rab5 and Rab7 were both up-regulated and were also associated with the up-regulated LAMP-2 to form large endolysosomes in the COM-treated cells at 16-h after crystal internalization. We demonstrate herein, for the first time, that COM crystals could be degraded/dissolved by endolysosomes inside renal tubular cells. These findings will be helpful to better understand the crystal fate and protective mechanism against kidney stone formation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Potassium citrate decreases urine calcium excretion in patients with hypocitraturic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Hernandez, Natalia; Shoag, Jonathan; Goldfarb, David S; Eisner, Brian H

    2016-04-01

    Two previous studies (<10 patients each) have demonstrated that alkali therapy may reduce urine calcium excretion in patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The hypothesized mechanisms are (1) a decrease in bone turnover due to systemic alkalinization by the medications; (2) binding of calcium by citrate in the gastrointestinal tract; (3) direct effects on TRPV5 activity in the distal tubule. We performed a retrospective review of patients on potassium citrate therapy to evaluate the effects of this medication on urinary calcium excretion. A retrospective review was performed of a metabolic stone database at a tertiary care academic hospital. Patients were identified with a history of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and hypocitraturia who were on potassium citrate therapy for a minimum of 3 months. 24-h urine composition was assessed prior to the initiation of potassium citrate therapy and after 3 months of therapy. Patients received 30-60 mEq potassium citrate by mouth daily. Inclusion criterion was a change in urine potassium of 20 mEq/day or greater, which suggests compliance with potassium citrate therapy. Paired t test was used to compare therapeutic effect. Twenty-two patients were evaluated. Mean age was 58.8 years (SD 14.0), mean BMI was 29.6 kg/m(2) (SD 5.9), and gender prevalence was 36.4% female:63.6% male. Mean pre-treatment 24-h urine values were as follows: citrate 280.0 mg/day, potassium 58.7 mEq/day, calcium 216.0 mg/day, pH 5.87. Potassium citrate therapy was associated with statistically significant changes in each of these parameters-citrate increased to 548.4 mg/day (p < 0.0001), potassium increased to 94.1 mEq/day (p < 0.0001), calcium decreased to 156.5 mg/day (p = 0.04), pH increased to 6.47 (p = 0.001). Urine sodium excretion was not different pre- and post-therapy (175 mEq/day pre-therapy versus 201 mEq/day post-therapy, p = NS). Urinary calcium excretion decreased by a mean of 60 mg/day on potassium citrate therapy-a nearly 30

  6. [Study on inhibitory effect of EGCG on Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in rats and its related mechanism].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Shuo; Tang, Chun-bo

    2015-04-01

    In the study, the inhibitory effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and its possible mechanism were investigated. The rat Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis model was induced through the combined oral administration of ethylene glycol and ammonium chloride, which was intervened with EGCG. Rat blood samples were collected to detect blood creatinine (Cr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and blood calcium. Rat urine samples were collected to observe and compare 24-hour urine volume, oxalic acid (Ox) and calcium in urine. Renal samples were collected to prepare tissue slices and observe the pathological changes in Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The expression of osteopontin (OPN) in renal tissues was evaluated by Real-time PCR and Western blot. According to the results, compared with normal rats, rats in the nephrolithiasis model showed significant increases in Cr, BUN, urine Calcium, urine Ox and renal OPN expression (P < 0.05), but obvious decrease in 24-hour urine volume (P < 0.05); Compared with rats with nephrolithiasis, those processed with EGCG revealed remarkable declines in Cr, BUN, urine Calcium and urine Ox (P < 0.05), with significant rise in 24-hour urine volume (P < 0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, compared with the control group, nephrolithiasis rats showed significant pathological changes in Calcium oxalate calculus. After ECCG treatment, the renal pathological changes and OPN expression attenuated significantly in a concentration-dependent manner. The results showed that EGCG inhibits the formation of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in rats and shows a notable protective effect on renal functions.

  7. The genetic composition of Oxalobacter formigenes and its relationship to colonization and calcium oxalate stone disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Deora, Rajendar; Assimos, Dean G.; Holmes, Ross P.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalobacter formigenes is a unique intestinal organism that relies on oxalate degradation to meet most of its energy and carbon needs. A lack of colonization is a risk factor for calcium oxalate stone disease. Protection against calcium oxalate stone disease appears to be due to the oxalate degradation that occurs in the gut on low calcium diets with a possible further contribution from intestinal oxalate secretion. Much remains to be learned about how the organism establishes and maintains gut colonization and the precise mechanisms by which it modifies stone risk. The sequencing and annotation of the genomes of a Group 1 and a Group 2 strain of O. formigenes should provide the informatic tools required for the identification of the genes and pathways associated with colonization and survival. In this review we have identified genes that may be involved and where appropriate suggested how they may be important in calcium oxalate stone disease. Elaborating the functional roles of these genes should accelerate our understanding of the organism and clarify its role in preventing stone formation. PMID:23632911

  8. CALCIUM OXALATE STONE FRAGMENT AND CRYSTAL PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Kusmartsev, Sergei; Dominguez-Gutierrez, Paul R.; Canales, Benjamin K.; Bird, Vincent G.; Vieweg, Johannes; Khan, Saeed R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In murine and human hyperoxaluric conditions, macrophages can be seen surrounding renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal deposits. We hypothesize that macrophages play a role in degrading and destroying these deposits and investigated inflammatory response and phagocytic mechanisms when macrophages are exposed to human kidney stones and inorganic crystals. Materials and Methods Human monocytes were differentiated into resting, fully-differentiated macrophages by treating with recombinant human M-CSF or GM-CSF for 6 days. After confirming phenotype by flow cytometry, macrophages were exposed for 20 hours to fragments of sterile human CaOx stones or CaOx crystals. Crystal uptake was determined, and supernatant cytokine and chemokine profiles were analyzed using antibody arrays. qRT-PCR was used to validate mRNA profile expression. Results Under direct-vision fluorescent microscopy, activated human macrophages were noted to surround both stone fragments and synthesized crystals and destroy them in a step-by-step process that involved clathrin-mediated endocytosis and phagocytosis. An inflammatory cascade was released by macrophages, including chemokines CCL2, CCL3, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), complement component C5/C5a and IL-8. The response patterns to stone and crystal material was dependent on macrophage phenotype and activation status. Conclusions In our in vitro study, macrophages differentiated with M-CSF displayed a greater ability to phagocytize crystal deposits than those treated with GM-CSF. Following clathrin-mediated endocytosis, macrophages released a number of cytokines crucial for inflammatory immune response, suggesting that tissue macrophages play an important role in preventing kidney stone disease by removing and digesting interstitial renal crystal deposits. PMID:26626217

  9. Prediction of calcium oxalate monohydrate stone composition during ureteroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidizedah, Reza; Melnyk, Megan; Teichman, Joel M. H.

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Prior research shows that Ho:YAG lithotripsy produces tiny dust fragments at low pulse energy (0.2J). However, calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones may not fragment at this low pulse energy setting. Stone composition is rarely known until after surgery and historically, attempts to predict stone composition on the basis of endoscopic stone appearance were unsuccessful. Current endoscopic technology permits visual details that previously were not evident. As COM appears black under ambient light, we attempt to predict COM stone composition at the time of ureteroscopy based on its endoscopic appearance. Methods: Consecutive subjects undergoing ureteroscopy for stone disease were studied. Any portion of the stone that appeared black under endoscopic vision was considered clinical evidence of COM. Predicted stone composition was correlated with post-operative calculus analysis. Results: 46 consecutive ureteroscopic stone cases were analyzed prospectively. 25 of 28 subjects (89%) with black stones had stones later proven to be COM by composition analysis, versus one of 18 patients (6%) with non-black stones that were COM (p<0.0001). A black endoscopic stone appearance had a positive predictive value for COM of 89% and a non-black endoscopic stone appearance had a negative predictive value for COM of 94% (sensitivity 96%, specificity 83%). Conclusions: COM may reasonably be predicted intra-operatively by its black endoscopic appearance. The clinical utility would be to use higher laser pulse energy settings than for non-COM compositions. This data raises the possibility that more sophisticated optical characterization of endoscopic stone appearance may prove to be a useful tool to predict stone composition.

  10. Monocyte Mitochondrial Function in Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer; Holmes, Ross P; Assimos, Dean G; Mitchell, Tanecia

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether mitochondrial function is altered in circulating immune cells from calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers compared to healthy subjects. Adult healthy subjects (n = 18) and CaOx stone formers (n = 12) were included in a pilot study. Data collection included demographic and clinical values from electronic medical records. Bioenergetic function was assessed in monocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets isolated from blood samples using the Seahorse XF96 Analyzer. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All participants were age matched (44.5 ± 3.0 years for healthy subjects vs 42.3 ± 4.8 years for CaOx stone formers, P = .6905). CaOx stone formers did not have urinary tract infection, ureteral stones, or obstructing renal stones. Monocyte mitochondrial function was decreased in CaOx stone formers compared to healthy subjects. Specifically, mitochondrial maximal respiration (P = .0011) and reserve capacity (P < .0001) were significantly lower. In contrast, lymphocyte and platelet mitochondrial function was similar between the 2 groups. The bioenergetic health index, an integrated value of mitochondrial function, was significantly lower in monocytes from CaOx stone formers compared to healthy subjects (P = .0041). Lastly, plasma IL-6 levels were significantly increased (P = .0324). The present pilot study shows that CaOx stone formers have decreased monocyte mitochondrial function. Plasma IL-6 was also increased in this cohort. These data suggest that impaired monocyte mitochondrial function and inflammation may be linked to CaOx kidney stone formation. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in a larger cohort of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Randall's plaque: pathogenesis and role in calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Evan, A; Lingeman, J; Coe, F L; Worcester, E

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of these studies was to test the hypothesis that Randall's plaque develops in unique anatomical sites of the kidney and their formation is conditioned by specific stone-forming pathophysiologies. We performed intraoperative papillary biopsies from kidneys of idiopathic-calcium oxalate (CaOx), intestinal bypass for obesity, brushite (BR) and cystine stone formers (SF) during percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Tissues were examined by infrared analysis and light and electron microscopy. Our analysis revealed a distinct pattern of mineral deposition and papillary pathology for each type of SF. CaOx SF had interstitial apatite crystals beginning at thin loops of Henle. These deposits termed Randall's plaque are thought to serve as sites for stone attachment. No tubular injury was noted. Intestinal bypass patients possessed intraluminal apatite deposits in inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) with associated cell injury. BR SF showed the most severe form of cortical and medullary changes with sites of Randall's plaque, and yellowish intraluminal deposits of apatite in IMCD. Cystine SF had plugging of ducts of Bellini with cystine crystals and apatite deposits in IMCD and loops of Henle. Intratubular sites of crystalline deposits were always associated to adjacent regions of interstitial fibrosis. The metabolic, anatomic, and surgical pathologic findings in four distinct groups of SF clearly show that 'the histology of the renal papilla from a stone former, is particular to the clinical setting'. We believe our approach to studying stone disease will provide insights into the pathogenesis of stone formation for each type of SF that will lead to improved clinical treatment.

  12. Origin and types of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Grases, Fèlix; Costa-Bauzá, Antonia; Gomila, Isabel; Conte, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Subepithelial hydroxyapatite calcification of renal papilla is thought to be involved in the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) papillary calculi. To assess the mechanism of formation, we sought to correlate the fine structure of papillary renal calculi with specific pathophysiologic conditions and urinary alterations. The study included 831 COM papillary renal calculi with established fine inner structures. A total of 24 patients with chronic stone formation were randomly selected, and their urine was collected and analyzed. The case history and lifestyle habits of these patients were obtained. The 831 papillary calculi could be classified into 1 of 4 main groups. Type I included small calculi in which COM columnar crystals begin to develop in the concave zone in close contact with papillary tissue. Type II calculi contained a hydroxyapatite core located in or near the concave zone. Type III consisted of calculi that developed on the tip of the papillae and in the concave zone, containing hydroxyapatite, calcified tissue, and calcified tubules. Type IV consisted of papillary calculi in which the core, which is situated near, but not in, the concave zone, is formed by intergrown COM crystals and organic matter. Many factors, including urinary alterations (eg, hyperoxaluria), associated diseases (eg, hypertension, diabetes), and consumption or exposure to cytotoxic substances (eg, analgesic abuse) were associated with these types of calculi. Our findings have indicated that injury is the first cause of papillary COM calculus formation, with the location of the injury determining the morphology of the resulting calculus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetically modified Medicago truncatula lacking calcium oxalate has increased calcium bioavailability and partially rescues vitamin D receptor knockout mice phenotypes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    How the distribution and sequestered form of plant macro/micro-nutrients influence their bioavailability, and ultimately impact human health, is poorly understood. The legume Medicago truncatula has a portion of its tissue calcium sequestered in the form of the calcium oxalate crystal, which reduces...

  14. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  15. Genetic evidence for differences in the pathways of druse and prismatic calcium oxalate crystal formation in Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Current evidence supports a single pathway of oxalate biosynthesis utilising ascorbic acid as the precursor. In this study, we begin to address the possibility that more than one pathway of oxalate biosynthesis and calcium oxalate formation occurs in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (cv. Jemalong genotyp...

  16. Developing precipitation modes for preventing the calcium-oxalate contamination of sugar beet pectins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoming; Meng, Hecheng; Zhu, Siming; Tang, Qiang; Pan, Runquan; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-09-01

    Effects of precipitation modes on the co-precipitation of insoluble oxalates particles during the purification of sugar beet pectins (SBP) from the extract were investigated. It was observed that soluble oxalate ions formed insoluble oxalate salts with calcium and precipitated with pectins during ethanol precipitation as pH of the medium increased and the solvent changed from water to ethanol-water mixture. Comparison among the employed precipitation methods revealed that both the dialysis-ethanol-precipitation and metal precipitation effectively prevented the calcium-oxalate contamination of SBP. Emulsifying properties of DEPP, EPP and MPP were also studied. It was observed that DEPP performed better than the remainder with respect to emulsifying ability. Based on these results, we concluded that the dialysis-ethanolic-precipitation can be a suitable method for improving the purity as well as emulsifying properties of the resulting pectins.

  17. Morphological control of calcium oxalate particles in the presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaguo; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Bei; Zhao, Xiujian

    2004-10-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) particles exhibiting different shapes and phase structures were fabricated by a simple precipitation reaction of sodium oxalate with calcium chloride in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA) as a crystal modifier at room temperature. The as-obtained products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of reaction conditions including pH, [Ca2+]/[C2O42-] ratio and concentration of PSMA and CaC2O4 on the crystal forms and morphologies of the as-obtained calcium oxalate were investigated. The results show that various crystal morphologies of calcium oxalate, such as parallelograms, plates, spheres, bipyramids etc. can be obtained depending on the experimental conditions. Higher polymer concentration favors formation of the metastable calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals. Lower pH is beneficial to the formation of plate-like CaOx crystals. Especially, the monodispersed parallelogram-like CaOx crystals can be produced by PSMA as an additive at pH 2. PSMA may act as a good inhibitor for urolithiasis since it induces the formation of COD and reduces the particle size of CaOx. This research may provide new insight into the morphological control of CaOx particles and the prevention of urolithiasis.

  18. A retrospective study of the prevalence of calcium oxalate crystals in veterinary Aspergillus cases.

    PubMed

    Payne, Courtney L; Dark, Michael J; Conway, Julia A; Farina, Lisa L

    2017-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Aspergillus are some of the most common fungal pathogens in veterinary species, primarily affecting the respiratory tract. In both human and veterinary cases, calcium oxalate crystals have been documented in sites of Aspergillus infection. Cases in multiple species (16 birds, 15 horses, 5 dogs, 1 ox, and 1 dolphin) were identified that had either positive cultures for Aspergillus sp., or had conidiophores present that could be identified as belonging to the genus Aspergillus. Histologic slides were examined to confirm the presence of oxalate crystals and how often they were identified on the original report. Calcium oxalate deposition was detected in 14 of 38 cases examined, including A. fumigatus, A. versicolor, A. niger, and unspecified Aspergillus sp. infections. Calcium oxalate crystals were identified in 11 of 16 avian cases, as well as in 1 of 1 bovine, 1 of 15 equine, and 1 of 5 canine cases. Crystals were described in only 3 of the 14 original pathology reports of these cases, indicating that identification and reporting of crystals in histologic specimens could be improved. All the tissues with crystals were respiratory tissues with air interfaces, including nasal sinus, trachea, syrinx, lung, and air sac. In cases with crystals identified on H&E-stained sections, crystals were frequently not present or were fewer in number in tissue sections stained with Gomori methenamine silver and periodic acid-Schiff. Routine polarization of slides of fungal infections, especially in the respiratory tract, should be considered to check for calcium oxalate crystals.

  19. FKBP-12 exhibits an inhibitory activity on calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Han, In Sook; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Park, Jong Wook; Suh, Min Ho; Suh, Sung Il; Shin, Song Woo; Ahn, Su Yul; Choe, Byung Kil

    2002-01-01

    Urolithiasis and calcium oxalate crystal deposition diseases are still significant medical problems. In the course of nephrocalcin cDNA cloning, we have identified FKBP-12 as an inhibitory molecule of calcium oxalate crystal growth. lambdagt 11 cDNA libraries were constructed from renal carcinoma tissues and screened for nephrocalcin cDNA clones using anti-nephrocalcin antibody as a probe. Clones expressing recombinant proteins, which appeared to be antigenically cross-reactive to nephrocalcin, were isolated and their DNA sequences and inhibitory activities on the calcium oxalate crystal growth were determined. One of the clone lambda gt 11 #31-1 had a partial fragment (80 bp) of FKBP-12 cDNA as an insert. Therefore, a full-length FKBP-12 cDNA was PCR-cloned from the lambda gt 11 renal carcinoma cDNA library and was subcloned into an expression vector. The resultant recombinant FKBP-12 exhibited an inhibitory activity on the calcium oxalate crystal growth (Kd=10(-7) M). Physiological effect of the extracellular FKBP-12 was investigated in terms of macrophage activation and proinflammatory cytokine gene induction. Extracellular FKBP-12 failed to activate macrophages even at high concentrations. FKBP-12 seems an anti-stone molecule for the oxalate crystal deposition disease and recurrent stone diseases. PMID:11850587

  20. Calcium Channels are Involved in Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Specialized Cells of Pistia stratiotes L.

    PubMed Central

    VOLK, GAYLE M.; GOSS, LENORA J.; FRANCESCHI, VINCENT R.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Pistia stratiotes produces large amounts of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals in specialized cells called crystal idioblasts. The potential involvement of Ca2+ channels in Ca oxalate crystal formation by crystal idioblasts was investigated. • Methods Anatomical, ultrastructural and physiological analyses were used on plants, fresh or fixed tissues, or protoplasts. Ca2+ uptake by protoplasts was measured with 45Ca2+, and the effect of Ca2+ channel blockers studied in intact plants. Labelled Ca2+ channel blockers and a channel protein antibody were used to determine if Ca2+ channels were associated with crystal idioblasts. • Key Results 45Ca2+ uptake was more than two orders of magnitude greater for crystal idioblast protoplasts than mesophyll protoplasts, and idioblast number increased when medium Ca was increased. Plants grown on media containing 1–50 µm of the Ca2+ channel blockers, isradipine, nifedipine or fluspirilene, showed almost complete inhibition of crystal formation. When fresh tissue sections were treated with the fluorescent dihydropyridine‐type Ca2+ channel blocker, DM‐Bodipy‐DHP, crystal idioblasts were intensely labelled compared with surrounding mesophyll, and the label appeared to be associated with the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, which is shown to be abundant in idioblasts. An antibody to a mammalian Ca2+ channel α1 subunit recognized a single band in a microsomal protein fraction but not soluble protein fraction on western blots, and it selectively and heavily labelled developing crystal idioblasts in tissue sections. • Conclusions The results demonstrate that Ca oxalate crystal idioblasts are enriched, relative to mesophyll cells, in dihydropyridine‐type Ca2+ channels and that the activity of these channels is important to transport and accumulation of Ca2+ required for crystal formation. PMID:15087302

  1. The influence of crystal morphology on the kinetics of growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millan, A.; Sohnel, O.; Grases, F.

    1997-08-01

    The growth of several calcium oxalate monohydrate seeds in the presence and absence of additives (phytate, EDTA and citrate) has been followed by potentiometry measurements. Growth rates have been calculated from precipitate curves by a cubic spline method and represented in logarithmic plots versus supersaturation. Crystal growth kinetics were found to be dependent on crystal morphology, crystal perfection and degree of aggregation. Some seeds were dissolving in supersaturated solutions. Other seeds showed an initial growth phase of high-order kinetics. The effect of the additives was also different on each seed. Three alternative mechanisms for calcium oxalate crystal growth are proposed.

  2. Characterization of calcium oxalate biominerals in some (non-Cactaceae) succulent plant species.

    PubMed

    Monje, Paula V; Baran, Enrique J

    2010-01-01

    The water-accumulating leaves of crassulacean acid metabolism plants belonging to five different families were investigated for the presence of biominerals by infrared spectroscopic and microscopic analyses. Spectroscopic results revealed that the mineral present in succulent species of Agavaceae, Aizoaceae, and Asphodelaceae was calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite, CaC2O4 x H2O). Crystals were predominantly found as raphides or solitary crystals of various morphologies. However, representative Crassulaceae members and a succulent species of Asteraceae did not show the presence of biominerals. Overall, these results suggest no correlation between calcium oxalate generation and crassulacean acid metabolism in succulent plants.

  3. Calcium oxalate crystal deposition in a patient with Aspergilloma due to Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Miku; Wakayama, Megumi; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Ogawa, Yukari; Inui, Toshiya; Yokoyama, Emi; Inoue, Manami; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Masachika; Ota, Tomohiro; Takizawa, Hajime; Goto, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Discrimination between aspergilloma and chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) based on radiological findings can difficult. We describe a patient with aspergilloma and organizing pneumonia that was possibly caused by Aspergillus niger infection and radiologically mimicked CNPA. A postmortem histological analysis showed diffuse alveolar damage that had originated in peri-cavitary lung parenchyma. Calcium oxalate or Aspergillus niger was located inside, but not outside the cavity in the right upper lobe. Calcium oxalate or other unknown hyphal bioactive components might provoke severe lung inflammation not only adjacent to the cavity, but also on the contralateral side. PMID:23991333

  4. Leaf calcium oxalate crystal structure and its role in defense against a chewing insect in Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crystals of calcium oxalate are common in plants and widely distributed among many plant families. These hard and largely insoluble crystals take on many shapes and sizes depending on the tissue and species. In Medicago truncatula, calcium oxalate crystals are abundant in leaves and accumulate in sh...

  5. Calcium oxalate crystals and oxalate induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the proximal tubular epithelial cells: Contribution to oxalate kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Convento, Marcia Bastos; Pessoa, Edson Andrade; Cruz, Edgar; da Glória, Maria Aparecida; Schor, Nestor; Borges, Fernanda Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β1 is the main mediator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Hyperoxaluria induces crystalluria, interstitial fibrosis, and progressive renal failure. This study analyzed whether hyperoxaluria is associated with TGF-β1 production and kidney fibrosis in mice and if oxalate or calcium oxalate (CaOx) could induce EMT in proximal tubule cells (HK2) and therefore contribute to the fibrotic process. Hyperoxaluria was induced by adding hydroxyproline and ethylene glycol to the mice’s drinking water for up to 60 days. Renal function and oxalate and urinary crystals were evaluated. Kidney collagen production and TGF-β1 expression were assessed. EMT was analyzed in vitro according to TGF-β1 production, phenotypic characterization, invasion, cell migration, gene and protein expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Hyperoxaluric mice showed a decrease in renal function and an increase in CaOx crystals and Ox urinary excretion. The deposition of collagen in the renal interstitium was observed. HK2 cells stimulated with Ox and CaOx exhibited a decreased expression of epithelial as well as increased expression mesenchymal markers; these cells presented mesenchymal phenotypic changes, migration, invasiveness capability and TGF-β1 production, characterizing EMT. Treatment with BMP-7 or its overexpression in HK2 cells was effective at preventing it. This mechanism may contribute to the fibrosis observed in hyperoxaluria. PMID:28387228

  6. [Calcium oxalate stones and hyperoxaluria secondary to treatment with pyridoxilate].

    PubMed

    Wolf, C; Maistre-Charransol, G; Barthélémy, C; Thomas, E; Thomas, J; Arvis, G; Steg, A

    1985-01-01

    Pyridoxilate is a salt formed from glyoxylic acid and pyridoxine. It has been used therapeutically as an antianoxic drug in the treatment of various arterial complaints. Its use is based theoretically on its ability to block the conversion of glyoxylic acid into oxalic acid. The following cases suggest, however, that pyridoxilate can cause stones. Intraperitoneal injection of glyoxylate in doses of 130 mg/kg will cause oxalate stones in rats. The same effect results from injection of 427 mg/kg pyridoxilate (i.e. an equivalent dose of glyoxylate). In human subjects, intravenous injection of 200 mg of pyridoxilate results in a fourfold increase in the urinary oxalic acid content in the two hours following the injection. Thirteen cases of chronic progressive oxalate stone disease have recently been reported in patients receiving a prolonged course of pyridoxilate at 450 to 600 mg daily. Eight of these patients had no previous history of lithiasis. Oxaluria levels of 80 to 100 mg daily are observed in all cases of lithiasis in patients receiving pyridoxilate. The levels fell after cessation of the pyridoxilate treatment, and reverted to normal (30 mg/24 hours) in all but three patients. These three patients maintained levels of close to 50 mg and all three had a previous history of urolithiasis.

  7. Curative treatment with extracts of Bombax ceiba fruit reduces risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gadge, N B; Jalalpure, S S

    2012-03-01

    Drawbacks of presently available treatments for urolithiasis necessitate finding the treatment of hyperoxaluria specifically aimed at reduction in oxalate excretion. Interestingly, many Indian tribes use Bombax ceiba L. (Bombacaceae) fruits as a traditional medicine for the treatment of urinary stones. The present study investigated the efficacy of B. ceiba fruit extracts as curative agents in experimentally induced calcium oxalate urolithiatic rats. Calcium oxalate lithiasis was induced in rats by oral administration of 0.75% ethylene glycol for 14 consecutive days. Treatments with aqueous and ethanol extract of B. ceiba fruit (400 mg/kg body weight) was performed in the same manner for further 14 consecutive days. Cystone (750 mg/kg body weight) was used as reference antiurolithiatic drug. The urinary excretion and kidney deposition of offending salt components, and serum biochemical parameters were investigated. Oral administration of ethylene glycol resulted in hyperoxaluria and increased renal excretion of calcium and phosphate. However, supplementation with aqueous and ethanol extracts of B. ceiba fruit significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the elevated urinary oxalate, showing a regulatory action on endogenous oxalate synthesis. The increased deposition of stone forming constituents in kidneys of calculogenic rats was also significantly lowered with curative treatment of aqueous and ethanol extract. The results indicate that the fruit of B. ceiba is endowed with lithontriptic activity warranting further development for curative treatment of urolithiasis.

  8. Macropinocytosis is the major mechanism for endocytosis of calcium oxalate crystals into renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-01-01

    During an initial phase of kidney stone formation, the internalization of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals by renal tubular cells has been thought to occur via endocytosis. However, the precise mechanism of CaOx crystal endocytosis remained unclear. In the present study, MDCK renal tubular cells were pretreated with inhibitors specific to individual endocytic pathways, including nystatin (lipid raft/caveolae-mediated), cytochalasin D (actin-dependent or macropinocytosis), and chlorpromazine (CPZ; clathrin-mediated) before exposure to plain (non-labeled), or fluorescence-labeled CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystals. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry revealed that pretreatment with nystatin and CPZ slightly decreased the crystal internalization, whereas the cytochalasin D pretreatment caused a marked decrease in crystal uptake. Immunofluorescence study and laser-scanning confocal microscopic examination confirmed that the cytochalasin D-pretreated cells had dramatic decrease of the internalized crystals, whereas the total number of crystals interacted with the cells was unchanged (crystals could adhere but were not internalized). These data have demonstrated for the first time that renal tubular cells endocytose COM crystals mainly via macropinocytosis. These novel findings will be useful for further tracking the endocytosed crystals inside the cells during the course of kidney stone formation.

  9. Influence of magnesium on the absorption and excretion of calcium and oxalate ions.

    PubMed

    Berg, W; Bothor, C; Pirlich, W; Janitzky, V

    1986-01-01

    In two test series additional oxalic acid excretion in urine was induced in healthy test persons by administering a spinach diet. This additional excretion could be markedly reduced by magnesium administration. Calcium and citrate excretions are largely unaffected by magnesium administration. Magnesium excretions, however, are clearly increased. The calcium oxalate crystallization rates in the 5-or 7-hour urines reveal a behavior parallel to that of the oxalic acid excretion profile. In the control urines, the crystal picture is characterized by numerous medium-sized whewellite crystals. In contrast, in the test series weddellite crystals are reduced in size and frequency after magnesium administration. New aspects of magnesium effects must be discussed; above all the possible absorption changes resulting from gastrointestinal diseases.

  10. Spectroscopic study of the inhibition of calcium oxalate calculi by Larrea tridentata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinales, Luis Alonso

    The causes of urolithiasis include such influences as diet, metabolic disorders, and genetic factors which have been documented as sources that aggravate urinary calculi depositions and aggregations, and, implicitly, as causes of urolithiasis. This study endeavors to detail the scientific mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate calculi formation, and, more importantly, their inhibition under growth conditions imposed by the traditional medicinal approach using the herbal extract, Larrea tridentata. The calculi were synthesized without and with Larrea tridentata infusion by employing the single diffusion gel technique. A visible decrease in calcium oxalate crystal growth with increasing amounts of Larrea tridentata herbal infusion was observed in photomicrographs, as well as a color change from white-transparent for pure crystals to light orange-brown for crystals with inhibitor. Analysis of the samples, which includes Raman, infrared absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques, demonstrate an overall transition in morphology of the crystals from monohydrate without herbal extract to dihydrate with inhibitor. Furthermore, the resulting data from Raman and infrared absorption support the possibilities of the influences, in this complex process, of NDGA and its derivative compounds from Larrea tridentata, and of the bonding of the magnesium of the inhibitor with the oxalate ion on the surface of the calculi crystals. This assumption corroborates well with the micrographs obtained under higher magnification, which show that the separated small crystallites consist of darker brownish cores, which we attribute to the dominance of growth inhibition by NDGA, surrounded by light transparent thin shells, which possibly correspond to passivation of the crystals by magnesium oxalate. The SEM results reveal the transformation from the dominant monoclinic structure of the calcium oxalate crystals grown alone to the tetragonal

  11. Characterization of calcium oxalate defective (cod) 6 mutant from Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants invest a considerable amount of resources and energy into the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. A number of roles for crystal formation in plant growth and development have been assigned based on their prevalence, spatial distribution, and variety of crystal shapes. These assigned...

  12. Physical characteristics of Medicago truncatula calcium oxalate crystals determine their effectiveness in insect defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant structural traits can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feeding. They ar...

  13. A study about some phosphate derivatives as inhibitors of calcium oxalate crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grases, F.; March, P.

    1989-08-01

    The kinetic of crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate seed crystals were investigated potentiometrically in the presence of several phosphate derivatives, D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate, pyrophosphate, methylene diphosphonate and phytate, and it was found that in some cases they strongly inhibited crystal growth. The inhibitory action of the different substances assayed was comparatively evaluated.

  14. Structural and chemical insect defenses in calcium oxalate defective mutants of Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant structures can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. are effective deterrents of lepidopteran feeding, and they inhibit conversion of leaves into insect ...

  15. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  16. Comparison of the x-ray attenuation properties of breast calcifications, aluminium, hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Warren, L M; Mackenzie, A; Dance, D R; Young, K C

    2013-04-07

    Aluminium is often used as a substitute material for calcifications in phantom measurements in mammography. Additionally, calcium oxalate, hydroxyapatite and aluminium are used in simulation studies. This assumes that these materials have similar attenuation properties to calcification, and this assumption is examined in this work. Sliced mastectomy samples containing calcification were imaged at ×5 magnification using a digital specimen cabinet. Images of the individual calcifications were extracted, and the diameter and contrast of each calculated. The thicknesses of aluminium required to achieve the same contrast as each calcification when imaged under the same conditions were calculated using measurements of the contrast of aluminium foils. As hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate are also used to simulate calcifications, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses of these materials were also calculated using tabulated attenuation coefficients. On average the equivalent aluminium thickness was 0.85 times the calcification diameter. For calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite, the equivalent aluminium thicknesses were 1.01 and 2.19 times the thickness of these materials respectively. Aluminium and calcium oxalate are suitable substitute materials for calcifications. Hydroxyapatite is much more attenuating than the calcifications and aluminium. Using solid hydroxyapatite as a substitute for calcification of the same size would lead to excessive contrast in the mammographic image.

  17. Wu-Ling-San formula inhibits the crystallization of calcium oxalate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Ho, Chien-Yi; Chen, Lieh-Der; Hsu, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2007-01-01

    Urinary stone disease is a common disease and has a high rate of recurrence. There is no ideal long-term medical treatment to prevent the recurrence of urinary stones. Wu-Ling-San (WLS) formula has been used for centuries in China for long-term treatment of urological diseases. However, no pharmacological studies have been conducted to evaluate its effect on urinary stone disease. Therefore, using a photospectrometer, we studied the effects of WLS on nucleation, growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate in vitro. The results showed that WLS extract significantly slowed the speed of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal nucleation. WLS extracts at concentrations of 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml inhibited nucleation of calcium oxalate crystallization by 344, 387, 543, and 943%, respectively. WLS extracts did not inhibit the growth of CaOx crystallization; however, WLS extracts at concentrations of 12.5 and 25 mg/ml significantly inhibited the aggregation of CaOx crystallization by 74.24% and 75.05%, respectively. WLS extract at a concentration of 50 mg/ml inhibited CaOx aggregation by 92.49%. In conclusion, our results indicate that WLS extract inhibited calcium oxalate nucleation and aggregation, and may have the potential to prevent stone recurrence.

  18. Morphological conversion of calcium oxalate crystals into stones is regulated by osteopontin in mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Okada, Atsushi; Nomura, Shintaro; Saeki, Yukihiko; Higashibata, Yuji; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Hirose, Masahito; Itoh, Yasunori; Yasui, Takahiro; Tozawa, Keiichi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2008-10-01

    An important process in kidney stone formation is the conversion of retentive crystals in renal tubules to concrete stones. Osteopontin (OPN) is the major component of the kidney calcium-containing stone matrix. In this study, we estimated OPN function in early morphological changes of calcium oxalate crystals using OPN knockout mice: 100 mg/kg glyoxylate was intra-abdominally injected into wildtype mice (WT) and OPN knockout mice (KO) for a week, and 24-h urine oxalate excretion showed no significant difference between WT and KO. Kidney crystal depositions were clearly detected by Pizzolato staining but not by von Kossa staining in both genotypes, and the number of crystals in KO was significantly fewer than in WT. Morphological observation by polarized light optical microphotography and scanning electron microphotography (SEM) showed large flower-shaped crystals growing in renal tubules in WT and small and uniform crystals in KO. X-ray diffraction detected the crystal components as calcium oxalate monohydrate in both genotypes. Immunohistochemical staining of OPN showed that the WT crystals contained OPN protein but not KO crystals. We concluded that OPN plays a crucial role in the morphological conversion of calcium oxalate crystals to stones in mouse kidneys.

  19. An Oxalyl-CoA Dependent Pathway of Oxalate Catabolism Plays a Role in Regulating Calcium Oxalate Crystal Accumulation and Defending against Oxalate-Secreting Phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Justin; Luo, Bin; Nakata, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants possess this activity. Recently, an Acyl Activating Enzyme 3 (AAE3), encoding an oxalyl-CoA synthetase, was identified in Arabidopsis. AAE3 has been proposed to catalyze the first step in an alternative pathway of oxalate degradation. Whether this enzyme and proposed pathway is important to other plants is unknown. Here, we identify the Medicago truncatula AAE3 (MtAAE3) and show that it encodes an oxalyl-CoA synthetase activity exhibiting high activity against oxalate with a Km = 81 ± 9 μM and Vmax = 19 ± 0.9 μmoles min-1mg protein-1. GFP-MtAAE3 localization suggested that this enzyme functions within the cytosol of the cell. Mtaae3 knock-down line showed a reduction in its ability to degrade oxalate into CO2. This reduction in the capacity to degrade oxalate resulted in the accumulation of druse crystals of calcium oxalate in the Mtaae3 knock-down line and an increased susceptibility to oxalate-secreting phytopathogens such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Taken together, these results suggest that AAE3 dependent turnover of oxalate is important to different plants and functions in the regulation of tissue calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and in defense against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens. PMID:26900946

  20. Calcium oxalate syntheses in a solution containing glucose by the atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has been attracted attention because of its characteristic high reactivity even in a low temperature so that various phenomena by the NEAPP such as a sterilization, growth promotion and so forth have been reported around the world. Previously, we reported the NEAPP irradiation generated the calcium oxalate crystals in the medium, which contains 31 kinds of organics and inorganics. The Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) which was used in previous study is composed of no oxalate. Interestingly, not only crystallization but also synthesis of the oxalate was occurred by the NEAPP irradiation. Also the crystallization details were analyzed with the X-ray diffraction (XRD). In this study, we have clarified the mechanism on the crystallization due that D-glucose, calcium ion and bicarbonate ions are minimum essential components. The oxalate synthesis was proved by the gas chromatography and mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Finally, we conclude that a supersaturation of oxalic acid synthesized in those 3 species by the NEAPP.

  1. Sensitivity and specificity of 24-hour urine chemistry levels for detecting elevated calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. Adrian; Singer, Eric A; Golijanin, Dragan J; Monk, Rebeca D; Erturk, Erdal; Bushinsky, David A

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The gold standard for determining likelihood of calcium oxalate (CaOx) and calcium phosphate (CaPhos) stone formation in urine is supersaturation of CaOx and CaPhos. Our objective was to investigate whether traditional measurement of total calcium, oxalate and phosphate in a 24-hour urine collection is sufficiently sensitive and specific for detecting elevated supersaturation to preclude the more expensive supersaturation test. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 150 consecutive patients with nephrolithiasis who underwent measurement of CaOx supersaturation (CaOxSS) and CaPhos supersaturation (CaPhosSS), as well as total calcium, oxalate and phosphate in a 24-hour urine collection. We used various cut-off values to determine sensitivity and specificity of 24-hour urine measurements for detecting elevated CaOxSS and CaPhosSS. Results In men and women, the sensitivity of 24-hour calcium for detecting elevated CaOxSS was 71% and 79%, respectively; for oxalate, sensitivity was 59% and 36%, respectively. In men and women, the sensitivity of 24-hour calcium for detecting elevated CaPhosSS was 74% and 88%, respectively; for phosphate, sensitivity was 57% and 8%, respectively. In men and women, the specificity of 24-hour calcium for detecting elevated CaOxSS was 55% and 48%, respectively; it was 60% for detecting elevated CaPhosSS in both men and women. Conclusion Traditional 24-hour urine analysis is sensitive, but not specific, for detecting elevated CaOxSS and CaPhosSS. Most patients with abnormal 24-hour urine analysis have normal supersaturation, and treatment decisions based on traditional urine analysis would lead to overtreatment in these patients. PMID:18542745

  2. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Killilea, David W.; Westropp, Jodi L.; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J.; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease. PMID:26066810

  3. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease.

    PubMed

    Killilea, David W; Westropp, Jodi L; Shiraki, Ryoji; Mellema, Matthew; Larsen, Jennifer; Kahn, Arnold J; Kapahi, Pankaj; Chi, Thomas; Stoller, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease.

  4. Therapeutic effect of Xue Niao An on glyoxylate-induced calcium oxalate crystal deposition based on urinary metabonomics approach.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhongjiang; Chen, Wei; Gao, Songyan; Su, Li; Li, Na; Wang, Li; Lou, Ziyang; Dong, Xin; Guo, Zhiyong

    2014-11-01

    The anti-nephrolithiasis effect of Xue Niao An (XNA) capsules is explored by analyzing urine metabolic profiles in mouse models, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). An animal model of calcium oxalate crystal renal deposition was established in mice by intra-abdominal injection of glyoxylate. Then, treatment with XNA by intra-gastric administration was performed. At the end of the study, calcium deposition in kidney was measured by Von Kossa staining under light microscopy, and the Von Kossa staining changes showed that XNA significantly alleviated the calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Meanwhile, urine samples for fifteen metabolites, including amino acids and fatty acids, with significant differences were detected in the calcium oxalate group, while XNA treatment attenuated metabolic imbalances. Our study indicated that the metabonomic strategy provided comprehensive insight on the metabolic response to XNA treatment of rodent renal calcium oxalate deposition.

  5. Therapeutic effect of Xue Niao An on glyoxylate-induced calcium oxalate crystal deposition based on urinary metabonomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongjiang; Chen, Wei; Gao, Songyan; Su, Li; Li, Na; Wang, Li; Lou, Ziyang; Dong, Xin; Guo, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-nephrolithiasis effect of Xue Niao An (XNA) capsules is explored by analyzing urine metabolic profiles in mouse models, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). An animal model of calcium oxalate crystal renal deposition was established in mice by intra-abdominal injection of glyoxylate. Then, treatment with XNA by intra-gastric administration was performed. At the end of the study, calcium deposition in kidney was measured by Von Kossa staining under light microscopy, and the Von Kossa staining changes showed that XNA significantly alleviated the calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Meanwhile, urine samples for fifteen metabolites, including amino acids and fatty acids, with significant differences were detected in the calcium oxalate group, while XNA treatment attenuated metabolic imbalances. Our study indicated that the metabonomic strategy provided comprehensive insight on the metabolic response to XNA treatment of rodent renal calcium oxalate deposition. PMID:25411524

  6. Isoelectric focusing of Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins: a simple tool for recognizing recurrent calcium oxalate renal stone formers.

    PubMed

    Schnierle, P; Hering, F; Seiler, H

    1996-01-01

    Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins (THPs) from healthy probands and a majority of recurrent calcium oxalate renal stone formers reveal different physicochemical properties when analyzed using isoelectric focusing (IEF). The pI values of THPs from healthy probands are approximately 3.5 while THPs from recurrent renal stone formers have pI values of between 4.5 and 6. The two groups of THPs exhibit completely different protein patterns. The differences in IEF analysis allow differentiation between THPs from healthy probands and recurrent calcium oxalate stone formers and may possibly be used as a simple diagnostic method for the recognition of recurrent calcium oxalate renal stone formers.

  7. Human dental microwear caused by calcium oxalate phytoliths in prehistoric diet of the lower Pecos region, Texas.

    PubMed

    Danielson, D R; Reinhard, K J

    1998-11-01

    Recent research demonstrates that silica phytoliths of dietary origin are associated with microwear of human teeth. Previous research has shown that severe enamel microwear and dental wear characterizes Archaic hunter-gatherers in the lower Pecos region of west Texas. Calcium oxalate crystals are especially common in Archaic coprolites. The vast majority are derived from prickly pear and agave, which were the dietary staples in west Texas for 6,000 years. The calcium oxalate phytoliths are harder than enamel. Therefore, calcium oxalate crystals are the most likely source of previously documented dental microwear and wear in the lower Pecos region.

  8. [Quantitative mineralogical analyzes of kidney stones and diagnosing metabolic disorders in female patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Kustov, A V; Moryganov, M A; Strel'nikov, A I; Zhuravleva, N I; Airapetyan, A O

    2016-02-01

    To conduct a complex examination of female patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis to detect metabolic disorders, leading to stone formation. The study was carried out using complex physical and chemical methods, including quantitative X-ray phase analysis of urinary stones, pH measurement, volumetry, urine and blood spectrophotometry. Quantitative mineralogical composition of stones, daily urine pH profile, daily urinary excretion of ions of calcium, magnesium, oxalate, phosphate, citrate and uric acid were determined in 20 female patients with calcium oxalate stones. We have shown that most of the stones comprised calcium oxalate monohydrate or mixtures of calcium oxalate dihydrate and hydroxyapatite. Among the identified abnormalities, the most frequent were hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria - 90 and 45%, respectively. Our findings revealed that the daily secretion of citrate and oxalate in patients older than 50 years was significantly lower than in younger patients. In conclusion, daily urinary citrate excretion should be measured in female patients with calcium oxalate stones. This is necessary both to determine the causes of stone formation, and to monitor the effectiveness of citrate therapy.

  9. Reinjury risk of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals on injured renal epithelial cells: aggravation of crystal adhesion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Sun, Xin-Yuan; Bhadja, Poonam; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Renal epithelial cell injury facilitates crystal adhesion to cell surface and serves as a key step in renal stone formation. However, the effects of cell injury on the adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate crystals and the nano-crystal-induced reinjury risk of injured cells remain unclear. African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were injured with H2O2 to establish a cell injury model. Cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malonaldehyde (MDA) content, propidium iodide staining, hematoxylin-eosin staining, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were determined to examine cell injury during adhesion. Changes in the surface structure of H2O2-injured cells were assessed through atomic force microscopy. The altered expression of hyaluronan during adhesion was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy. The adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Vero cells was observed through scanning electron microscopy. Nano-COM and COD binding was quantitatively determined through inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. The expression of hyaluronan on the cell surface was increased during wound healing because of Vero cell injury. The structure and function of the cell membrane were also altered by cell injury; thus, nano-crystal adhesion occurred. The ability of nano-COM to adhere to the injured Vero cells was higher than that of nano-COD crystals. The cell viability, SOD activity, and Δψm decreased when nano-crystals attached to the cell surface. By contrast, the MDA content, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death rate increased. Cell injury contributes to crystal adhesion to Vero cell surface. The attached nano-COM and COD crystals can aggravate Vero cell injury. As a consequence, crystal adhesion and aggregation are enhanced. These findings provide further insights into kidney stone formation.

  10. Reinjury risk of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals on injured renal epithelial cells: aggravation of crystal adhesion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Sun, Xin-Yuan; Bhadja, Poonam; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal epithelial cell injury facilitates crystal adhesion to cell surface and serves as a key step in renal stone formation. However, the effects of cell injury on the adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate crystals and the nano-crystal-induced reinjury risk of injured cells remain unclear. Methods African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were injured with H2O2 to establish a cell injury model. Cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malonaldehyde (MDA) content, propidium iodide staining, hematoxylin–eosin staining, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were determined to examine cell injury during adhesion. Changes in the surface structure of H2O2-injured cells were assessed through atomic force microscopy. The altered expression of hyaluronan during adhesion was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy. The adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Vero cells was observed through scanning electron microscopy. Nano-COM and COD binding was quantitatively determined through inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. Results The expression of hyaluronan on the cell surface was increased during wound healing because of Vero cell injury. The structure and function of the cell membrane were also altered by cell injury; thus, nano-crystal adhesion occurred. The ability of nano-COM to adhere to the injured Vero cells was higher than that of nano-COD crystals. The cell viability, SOD activity, and Δψm decreased when nano-crystals attached to the cell surface. By contrast, the MDA content, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death rate increased. Conclusion Cell injury contributes to crystal adhesion to Vero cell surface. The attached nano-COM and COD crystals can aggravate Vero cell injury. As a consequence, crystal adhesion and aggregation are enhanced. These findings provide further insights into kidney stone

  11. Increased 10-year cardiovascular disease and mortality risk scores in asymptomatic patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hasan; Yencilek, Faruk; Erihan, Ismet Bilger; Okan, Binnur; Sarica, Kemal

    2011-12-01

    Both the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and event rate are increased in patients with urolithiasis. Screening is recommended to all patients who have high cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to document 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in asymptomatic patients with urolithiasis. Consecutive 200 patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis were compared with 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Ten-year cardiovascular disease risk was calculated with the Framingham Risk Score and mortality risk with SCORE risk score. Calcium, oxalate, and citrate excretion were studied as urinary stone risk factors. The results indicate that patients with urolithiasis had higher total cholesterol (p < 0.0001), lower HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.0001), and higher systolic blood pressure (p < 0.0001) and hsCRP (p < 0.0001) compared with controls. Patients with urolithiasis had a higher Framingham Risk Scores [OR 8.36 (95% CI 3.81-18.65), p = 0.0001] and SCORE risk score [OR 3.02 (95% CI 1.30-7.02), p = 0.0006] compared with controls. The Framingham and SCORE risk score were significantly correlated with urinary calcium (p = 0.0001, r = 0.460, and p = 0.005, r = 0.223, respectively) and oxalate excretion (p = 0.0001, r = 0.516, p = 0.001, r = 0.290, respectively). In multiple linear regression analysis, urinary calcium and oxalate excretion, age, sex, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, hsCRP and smoking were the independent predictors of 10-year cardiovascular disease risk and urinary calcium and oxalate excretion, age, sex, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose for 10-year cardiovascular mortality. In conclusion, patients with calcium oxalate urolithiasis carry high risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. All patients should be screened at the initial diagnosis of urolithiasis for the risk factors.

  12. Cellular adaptive response of distal renal tubular cells to high-oxalate environment highlights surface alpha-enolase as the enhancer of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Fong-Ngern, Kedsarin; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-03-27

    Hyperoxaluria is one of etiologic factors of calcium oxalate kidney stone disease. However, response of renal tubular cells to high-oxalate environment remained largely unknown. We applied a gel-based proteomics approach to characterize changes in cellular proteome of MDCK cells induced by 10mM sodium oxalate. A total of 14 proteins were detected as differentially expressed proteins. The oxalate-induced up-regulation of alpha-enolase in whole cell lysate was confirmed by 2-D Western blot analysis. Interaction network analysis revealed that cellular adaptive response under high-oxalate condition involved stress response, energy production, metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Down-regulation of RhoA, which was predicted to be associated with the identified proteins, was confirmed by immunoblotting. In addition, the up-regulation of alpha-enolase on apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells was also confirmed by immunoblotting of the isolated apical membranes and immunofluorescence study. Interestingly, blockage of alpha-enolase expressed on the cell surface by antibody neutralization significantly reduced the number of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals adhered on the cells. These results strongly suggest that surface alpha-enolase plays an important role as the enhancer of COM crystal binding. The increase of alpha-enolase expressed on the cell surface may aggravate kidney stone formation in patients with hyperoxaluria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies on formation of calcium oxalate in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelmottaleb, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Plant calcium oxalate crystals occur within cells called crystal idioblasts. Important aspects of this calcification phenomenon have not been characterized. This dissertation examines some of the aspects of this ubiquitous type of calcification including (1) characterization of ultrastructural features of developing crystal idioblasts, (2) determination of the relationship of specialized ultrastructural features of the idioblasts to transport of compounds and mechanisms of crystal deposition, and (3) the biochemical relationship between ascorbic acid metabolism and production of oxalic acid used for crystal formation. Structural and cytochemical studies revealed that crystal idioblasts have dense cytoplasm, modified plastids, enlarged nuclei, extensive endoplasmic reticulum, numerous dictyosomes and vesicles, and a bundle of raphide crystals in their vacuoles. A mechanism for Ca transport and crystal precipitation is proposed, based on these results. There is a strong and dynamic relationship between Ca concentration and oxalic acid produced for crystal formation, where increasing Ca level in the growth medium lead to increased total and insoluble oxalate in the plant. Calmodulin antagonists reduced oxalic acid production.

  14. Calcium oxalate crystallization index (COCI): an alternative method for distinguishing nephrolithiasis patients from healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bowei; Dissayabutra, Thasinas; Ungjaroenwathana, Wattanachai; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Srisa-Art, Monpichar; Supaprom, Thavorn; Insin, Numpon; Boonla, Chanchai

    2014-01-01

    Urinary supersaturation triggers lithogenic crystal formation. We developed an alternative test, designated calcium oxalate crystallization index (COCI), to distinguish nephrolithiasis patients from healthy individuals based on their urinary crystallization capability. The effect of urine volume, oxalate, phosphate, citrate, potassium, and sodium on COCI values was investigated. COCI values were determined in 24-hr urine obtained from nephrolithiasis patients (n=72) and matched healthy controls (n=71). Increases in urine oxalate and phosphate and decreases in urine volume and citrate resulted in significantly increased COCI values. The urinary COCI in nephrolithiasis patients was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals. Two healthy subjects who had elevated COCI values were found to have asymptomatic kidney calculi. The receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of the urinary COCI test of 0.9499 (95%CI: 0.9131-0.9868) for distinguishing between nephrolithiasis and healthy subjects. At the cutoff of 165 mg oxalate equivalence/day, the urinary COCI test provided sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy amounts of 83.33%, 97.18%, and 90.21%, respectively. Urinary COCI values were primarily dependent on urine volume, oxalate, and phosphate. The test provided high sensitivity and specificity for clinically discriminating nephrolithiasis patients from healthy controls. It might be used to detect individuals with asymptomatic kidney calculi.

  15. Effect of hyperprotidic diet associated or not with hypercalcic diet on calcium oxalate stone formation in rat.

    PubMed

    Sakly, R; Bardaoui, M; Neffati, F; Moussa, A; Zakhama, A; Najjar, M F; Hammami, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether protein, administered alone or simultaneously with a hypercalcic diet, was able to aggravate calcium oxalate stone formation in rats. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of 8 rats each and assigned a calcium oxalate lithogenic diet added to their drinking water for 3 weeks. One group, used as reference, received a standard diet prepared in our laboratory. The second was assigned the same diet but supplemented with 7.5 g animal proteins/100 g diet. The third received a diet containing 500 mg calcium more than the standard group. The diet given to the last group was supplemented with calcium and protein at the same doses indicated previously. One day before the end of treatment, each animal was placed in a metabolic cage to collect 24-hour urine samples and determine urinary creatinine, urea, calcium, magnesium, phosphate, uric acid, citric acid and oxalate levels. Immediately thereafter, aortic blood was collected to determine the same parameters as in urine. The kidneys were also removed to determine calcium oxalate deposits. Our results showed an increased 24-hour urinary excretion of calcium, oxalate and uric acid and decreased urinary citric acid excretion only in groups that received protein supplementation. At the same time, calcium oxalate deposits were found significantly higher in hyperprotidic diets than reference or calcium-supplemented groups. According to these findings, glomerular filtration, fractional excretion of urea and reabsorption of water, calcium and magnesium were found significantly lower in hyperprotidic diets compared to other groups. These results demonstrate that proteins could seriously aggravate calcium oxalate stones and cause renal disturbances.

  16. Alarm Photosynthesis: Calcium Oxalate Crystals as an Internal CO2 Source in Plants.

    PubMed

    Tooulakou, Georgia; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Orkoula, Malvina G; Kontoyannis, Christos G; Fasseas, Costas; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Klapa, Maria I; Karabourniotis, George

    2016-08-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals are widespread among animals and plants. In land plants, crystals often reach high amounts, up to 80% of dry biomass. They are formed within specific cells, and their accumulation constitutes a normal activity rather than a pathological symptom, as occurs in animals. Despite their ubiquity, our knowledge on the formation and the possible role(s) of these crystals remains limited. We show that the mesophyll crystals of pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus) exhibit diurnal volume changes with a gradual decrease during daytime and a total recovery during the night. Moreover, stable carbon isotope composition indicated that crystals are of nonatmospheric origin. Stomatal closure (under drought conditions or exogenous application of abscisic acid) was accompanied by crystal decomposition and by increased activity of oxalate oxidase that converts oxalate into CO2 Similar results were also observed under drought stress in Dianthus chinensis, Pelargonium peltatum, and Portulacaria afra Moreover, in A. hybridus, despite closed stomata, the leaf metabolic profiles combined with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements indicated active photosynthetic metabolism. In combination, calcium oxalate crystals in leaves can act as a biochemical reservoir that collects nonatmospheric carbon, mainly during the night. During the day, crystal degradation provides subsidiary carbon for photosynthetic assimilation, especially under drought conditions. This new photosynthetic path, with the suggested name "alarm photosynthesis," seems to provide a number of adaptive advantages, such as water economy, limitation of carbon losses to the atmosphere, and a lower risk of photoinhibition, roles that justify its vast presence in plants.

  17. Synthesis of calcium oxalate crystals in culture medium irradiated with non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoko; Hori, Masaru

    2016-09-01

    Octahedral particulates several tens of microns in size were synthesized in a culture medium irradiated through contact with a plume of non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (NEAPP). The particulates were identified in the crystalline phase as calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). The original medium contained constituents such as NaCl, d-glucose, CaCl2, and NaHCO3 but not oxalate or oxalic acid. The oxalate was clearly synthesized and crystallized in the medium as thermodynamically unstable COD crystals after the NEAPP irradiation.

  18. Reevaluation of the plant "gemstones": Calcium oxalate crystals sustain photosynthesis under drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Tooulakou, Georgia; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Orkoula, Malvina G; Kontoyannis, Christos G; Fasseas, Costas; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Klapa, Maria I; Karabourniotis, George

    2016-09-01

    Land plants face the perpetual dilemma of using atmospheric carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and losing water vapors, or saving water and reducing photosynthesis and thus growth. The reason behind this dilemma is that this simultaneous exchange of gases is accomplished through the same minute pores on leaf surfaces, called stomata. In a recent study we provided evidence that pigweed, an aggressive weed, attenuates this problem exploiting large crystals of calcium oxalate as dynamic carbon pools. This plant is able to photosynthesize even under drought conditions, when stomata are closed and water losses are limited, using carbon dioxide from crystal decomposition instead from the atmosphere. Abscisic acid, an alarm signal that causes stomatal closure seems to be implicated in this function and for this reason we named this path "alarm photosynthesis." The so-far "enigmatic," but highly conserved and widespread among plant species calcium oxalate crystals seem to play a crucial role in the survival of plants.

  19. Does aridity influence the morphology, distribution and accumulation of calcium oxalate crystals in Acacia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)?

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon L; Warwick, Nigel W M; Prychid, Christina J

    2013-12-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals are a common natural feature of many plant families, including the Leguminosae. The functional role of crystals and the mechanisms that underlie their deposition remain largely unresolved. In several species, the seasonal deposition of crystals has been observed. To gain insight into the effects of rainfall on crystal formation, the morphology, distribution and accumulation of calcium oxalate crystals in phyllodes of the leguminous Acacia sect. Juliflorae (Benth.) C. Moore & Betche from four climate zones along an aridity gradient, was investigated. The shapes of crystals, which include rare Rosanoffian morphologies, were constant between species from different climate zones, implying that morphology was not affected by rainfall. The distribution and accumulation of CaOx crystals, however, did appear to be climate-related. Distribution was primarily governed by vein density, an architectural trait which has evolved in higher plants in response to increasing aridity. Furthermore, crystals were more abundant in acacias from low rainfall areas, and in phyllodes containing high concentrations of calcium, suggesting that both aridity and soil calcium levels play important roles in the precipitation of CaOx. As crystal formation appears to be calcium-induced, we propose that CaOx crystals in Acacia most likely function in bulk calcium regulation.

  20. Therapy of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Conze, Theresa; Wehrend, Axel; Exner, Cornelia; Kaminiarz, André

    2016-08-01

    A rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was presented for anuria. Examination revealed calcium oxalate concrements in the bladder. A cystotomy was performed, and a therapy with alfuzosin was conducted. Over 1 year after the treatment, the rhesus macaque had not shown any more signs of stranguria. This is the first case reporting the successful treatment of urolithiasis in a rhesus macaque. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation in urine.

    PubMed

    Laube, Norbert; Klein, Florian; Bernsmann, Falk

    2017-04-01

    It is routinely observed that persons with increased urinary stone risk factors do not necessarily form uroliths. Furthermore, stone formers can present with urinalyses that do not reflect the clinical picture. We explain this discrepancy by differences in crystallization kinetics. In 1162 urines, crystallization of Ca-oxalate was induced according to the BONN-Risk-Index (BRI) method. The urine's relative light transmissivity (RLT) was recorded from 100 % at start of titration to 95 % due to nuclei formation and crystal growth. From the RLT changes, a measure of the thermodynamic inhibition threshold of crystal formation (BRI) and of crystal growth kinetics is derived ("turbidity slope" after crystallization onset). On average, subjects presenting with a low inhibition threshold, i.e., high BRI, also present significantly higher crystal growth rates compared with subjects in lower BRI classes. Only subjects in the highest BRI class show a lower growth rate than expected, probably due to a depletion of supersaturation by massive initial nucleation. With increasing thermodynamic risk of crystal formation (i.e., increasing BRI) due to an imbalance between inhibitors and promoters of crystal formation, an increase in the imbalance between inhibitors and promoters of crystal growth (i.e., increasing growth rate) is observed. Both lead to an increased urolith formation risk. Healthy subjects with increased BRI are an exception to this trend: their urine is thermodynamically prone to form stones, but they show a kinetic inhibition preventing nuclei from significant growth.

  2. Morphological and phase changes in calcium oxalate crystals grown in the presence of sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunik, L.; Addadi, L.; Garti, N.; Füredi-Milhofer, H.

    1996-10-01

    Calcium oxalate was crystallized in the presence of the anionic surfactant dioctyl sulphosuccinate, AOT, and the phase composition of the precipitates (by X-ray diffraction powder patterns and thermal analysis) and their crystal growth morphology (by scanning electron microscopy and electron diffraction) were determined. In the control systems and in the presence of low concentrations of AOT (below the critical micellar concentration, CMC) calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC 2O 4 · H 2O, COM) was the dominant crystal phase. Crystals grown in the presence of C(AOT) > 0.75 CMC were thinner and more elongated than in the controls, indicating preferential adsorption of the surfactant at the 101 and [lcub]010[rcub] crystal faces. When the AOT concentration exceeded the critical micellar concentration, the morphological changes in COM crystals became more intense and the composition of the precipitates abruptly changed to mixtures of COM and calcium oxalate dihydrate (CaC 2O 4 · (2 + x)H 2O, x < 0.5; COD) with a {COM}/{COD} ratio up to 50 wt%. The morphology of the COD crystals was mostly unaffected. The phase change was attributed to preferential adsorption of AOT — in the form of surface aggregates — at the crystal faces of COM with the consequence of strong inhibition of nucleation and crystal growth of this crystal type and growth of the kinetically less favored COD crystals.

  3. ROLE OF INTERSTITIAL APATITE PLAQUE IN PATHOGENESIS OF THE COMMON CALCIUM OXALATE STONE

    PubMed Central

    Evan, Andrew P.; Lingeman, James E.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Using intraoperative papillary biopsy material from kidneys of idiopathic calcium oxalate, intestinal bypass for obesity, brushite, cystine, and distal renal tubular acidosis stone formers during percutaneous nephrolithotomy, we have determined that idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers appear to be the special case, though the most commonly encountered one, in which stones form external to the kidney and by processes that do not involve the epithelial compartments. It is in this one group of patients that we find not only abundant interstitial plaque, but also strong evidence that the plaque is essential to stone formation. The initial site of plaque formation is always in the papillary tip, and must be in the basement membrane of the thin loop of Henle. With time plaque spreads throughout the papilla tip to the urothelium, which under conditions we do not understand, is denuded and thereby exposes the apatite deposits to the urine. It is on this exposed apatite that a stone forms as an overgrowth, first of amorphous apatite and then layers of calcium oxalate. This process generates an attached stone fixed to the side of a papilla, allowing the ever-changing urine to dictate stone growth and composition. PMID:18359392

  4. Stone size limits the use of Hounsfield units for prediction of calcium oxalate stone composition.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Gregory; Johnson, Lewis; Ganesh, Halemane; Davenport, Daniel; Smelser, Woodson; Crispen, Paul; Venkatesh, Ramakrishna

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the role of stone size in predicting urinary calculus composition using Hounsfield units on noncontrasted computed tomography (CT) scan. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who underwent ureteroscopy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy during a 1-year period, had a stone analysis performed, and had CT imaging available for review. All CT scans were reviewed by a board-certified radiologist. Variables evaluated included age, sex, body mass index, stone size, stone location, Hounsfield units (HUs), and stone composition. We identified a total of 91 patients (41 men and 50 women) with CT imaging and stone analysis available for review. Stone analysis showed 41 calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaOxMH), 13 calcium oxalate dihydrate, 29 calcium phosphate, 5 uric acid, 2 struvite, and 1 cystine stone. Average age was 46 years, and average body mass index was 32 kg/m2. Measured HUs varied significantly with size for CaOxMH and calcium oxalate dihydrate stones (P values <.05), but not for calcium phosphate stones (P = .126). Using a CaOxMH identification value of 700-1000 HUs, 28 of 41 stone compositions (68%) would not have been correctly identified, including all 10 (100%) small (<5 mm) stones, 13 of 22 (59%) medium (5-10 mm) stones, and 5 of 9 large (>10 mm) stones (55%). For calcium stones, the ability of CT HUs to predict stone composition was limited, likely due to the mixed stone composition. Within a cohort of CaOxMH stone formers, measured HUs varied linearly with stone size. All stones <5 mm were below thresholds for CaOxMH composition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Antilithiatic Activity of phlorotannin rich extract of Sarghassum Wightii on Calcium Oxalate Urolithiais – In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sujatha, D.; Singh, Kiranpal; Vohra, Mursalin; Kumar, K. Vijay; Sunitha, S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Urolithiasis is a common urological disorder responsible for serious human affliction and cost to the society with a high recurrence rate. The aim of the present study was to systematically evaluate the phlorotannin rich extract of Sargassum wightii using suitable in vitro and in vivo models to provide scientific evidence for its antilithiatic activity. Materials and Methods: To explore the effect of Sargassum wightii on calcium oxalate crystallization, in vitro assays like crystal nucleation, aggregation and crystal growth were performed. Calcium oxalate urolithiasis was induced in male Sprague dawley rats using a combination of gentamicin and calculi producing diet (5% ammonium oxalate and rat pellet feed). The biochemical parameters like calcium, oxalate, magnesium, phosphate, sodium and potassium were evaluated in urine, serum and kidney homogenates. Histopathological studies were also done to confirm the biochemical findings. Results: The yield of Sargassum wightii extract was found to be 74.5 gm/kg and confirmed by quantitative analysis. In vitro experiments with Sargassum wightii showed concentration dependent inhibition of calcium oxalate nucleation, aggregation and growth supported by SEM analysis. In the in vivo model, Sargassum wightii reduced both calcium and oxalate supersaturation in urine, serum and deposition in the kidney. The biochemical results were supported by histopathological studies. Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that Sargassum wightii has the ability to prevent nucleation, aggregation and growth of calcium oxalate crystals. Sargassum wightii has better preventive effect on calcium oxalate stone formation indicating its strong potential to develop as a therapeutic option to prevent recurrence of urolithiasis. PMID:26200544

  6. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals.

    PubMed

    Schmalenberger, A; Duran, A L; Bray, A W; Bridge, J; Bonneville, S; Benning, L G; Romero-Gonzalez, M E; Leake, J R; Banwart, S A

    2015-07-22

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using (14)CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle.

  7. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals

    PubMed Central

    Schmalenberger, A.; Duran, A. L.; Bray, A. W.; Bridge, J.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using 14CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle. PMID:26197714

  8. Oxalate secretion by ectomycorrhizal Paxillus involutus is mineral-specific and controls calcium weathering from minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalenberger, A.; Duran, A. L.; Bray, A. W.; Bridge, J.; Bonneville, S.; Benning, L. G.; Romero-Gonzalez, M. E.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Trees and their associated rhizosphere organisms play a major role in mineral weathering driving calcium fluxes from the continents to the oceans that ultimately control long-term atmospheric CO2 and climate through the geochemical carbon cycle. Photosynthate allocation to tree roots and their mycorrhizal fungi is hypothesized to fuel the active secretion of protons and organic chelators that enhance calcium dissolution at fungal-mineral interfaces. This was tested using 14CO2 supplied to shoots of Pinus sylvestris ectomycorrhizal with the widespread fungus Paxillus involutus in monoxenic microcosms, revealing preferential allocation by the fungus of plant photoassimilate to weather grains of limestone and silicates each with a combined calcium and magnesium content of over 10 wt.%. Hyphae had acidic surfaces and linear accumulation of weathered calcium with secreted oxalate, increasing significantly in sequence: quartz, granite < basalt, olivine, limestone < gabbro. These findings confirmed the role of mineral-specific oxalate exudation in ectomycorrhizal weathering to dissolve calcium bearing minerals, thus contributing to the geochemical carbon cycle.

  9. Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro by uropontin: another member of the aspartic acid-rich protein superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Shiraga, H; Min, W; VanDusen, W J; Clayman, M D; Miner, D; Terrell, C H; Sherbotie, J R; Foreman, J W; Przysiecki, C; Neilson, E G

    1992-01-01

    The majority of human urinary stones are primarily composed of calcium salts. Although normal urine is frequently supersaturated with respect to calcium oxalate, most humans do not form stones. Inhibitors are among the multiple factors that may influence the complex process of urinary stone formation. We have isolated an inhibitor of calcium oxalate crystal growth from human urine by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and acidic amino acid content of this aspartic acid-rich protein, uropontin, are similar to those of other pontin proteins from bone, plasma, breast milk, and cells. The inhibitory effect of uropontin on calcium oxalate crystal growth in vitro supports the concept that pontins may have a regulatory role. This function would be analogous to that of other members of the aspartic acid-rich protein superfamily, which stereospecifically regulate the mineralization fronts of calcium-containing crystals. Images PMID:1729712

  10. Evaluation of urinary and serum metabolites in Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea) with calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Petrini, K R; Lulich, J P; Treschel, L; Nachreiner, R F

    1999-03-01

    Baseline renal function data was collected during 24-hr periods of feeding and fasting from three male and three female adult Asian small-clawed otters (Aonyx cinerea) with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Urine was analyzed for calcium, phosphorus, and oxalate, and urinalyses were performed. There was no evidence of glucosuria, which has been previously reported in Asian small-clawed otters with urolithiasis. Urinary oxalate levels were quite high when compared with those of dogs and humans without uroliths, and the ratio of urinary oxalate to calcium was close to 1:1 during periods of food consumption. There was no significant difference in urinary oxalate excretion between the fed and fasting states. Urinary calcium excretion was five times greater during feeding than during fasting. Calcium levels were higher in the otters than those reported for dogs without uroliths but were similar to those for normal humans. Water consumption and urine production were significantly higher during periods of food consumption. Serum chemistry analyses and electrolyte levels were also determined. There was no evidence of hypercalcemia. Fractional clearance of calcium and phosphorus and endogenous creatinine clearance were significantly higher during food consumption than during fasting. Parathyroid hormone levels were similar to those reported for dogs and cats. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D was slightly lower in the otters than in dogs.

  11. Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J; Okita, Thomas W; Franceschi, Vincent R

    2003-10-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation.

  12. MRP-1 and BCRP Promote the Externalization of Phosphatidylserine in Oxalate-treated Renal Epithelial Cells: Implications for Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Li, YiFu; Yu, ShiLiang; Gan, XiuGuo; Zhang, Ze; Wang, Yan; Wang, YingWei; An, RuiHua

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the possible involvement of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in the oxalate-induced redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) in renal epithelial cell membranes. A western blot analysis was used to examine the MRP-1 and BCRP expression levels. Surface-expressed PS was detected by the annexin V-binding assay. The cell-permeable fluorogenic probe 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used to measure the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. A rat model of hyperoxaluria was obtained using 0.5% ethylene glycol and 1.0% ammonium chloride. In addition, certain animals received verapamil (50 mg/kg body weight), which is a common inhibitor of MRP-1 and BCRP. The degree of nephrolithiasis was assessed histomorphometrically using sections stained by Pizzolato method and by measuring the calcium oxalate crystal content in the renal tissue. Oxalate produced a concentration-dependent increase in the synthesis of MRP-1 and BCRP. Treatment with MK571 and Ko143 (MRP-1- and BCRP-specific inhibitors, respectively) significantly attenuated the oxalate-induced PS externalization. Adding the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine significantly reduced MRP-1 and BCRP expression. In vivo, markedly decreased nephrocalcinosis was observed compared with that in the rat model of hyperoxaluria without verapamil treatment. Oxalate induces the upregulation of MRP-1 and BCRP, which act as phospholipid floppases causing PS externalization in the renal epithelial cell membrane. The process is mediated by intracellular ROS production. The ROS-mediated increase in the synthesis of MRP-1 and BCRP can play an important role in hyperoxaluria-promoted calcium oxalate urolithiasis by facilitating phosphatidylserine redistribution in renal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Factors affecting crystallization, dispersion, and aggregation of calcium oxalate monohydrate in various urinary environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmas, Kimberly Gail

    The mechanisms for the formation of kidney stones are not well understood. One possible mechanism is the formation of aggregates in the nephron tubules of the kidneys. However, altering the urinary environment may be a method to help prevent the recurrence of the formation of kidney stones. The primary inorganic constituent found in kidney stones of North American patients is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). In this research, studies on the effect of mixing rate on COM precipitation showed that rapid mixing compared to slow mixing produced smaller particle sizes and a narrower particle size distribution due to the more uniform supersaturation level. The findings are consistent with the general contention that mixing directly influences nucleation rate while mixing rate has relatively little influence over rate of growth in precipitation processes. Screening and central composite experimental designs are used to determine the effect of various factors on the aggregation and dispersion characteristics of previously grown calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals in artificial urinary environments of controlled variables. The variables examined are pH, calcium, oxalate, pyrophosphate, citrate, and protein concentrations in ultrapure water and artificial urine. Optical density measurements, zeta potential analysis, particle size analyzer, optical microscopy, AFM force measurements, protein adsorption, and ions and small molecule adsorption have been used to assess the state of aggregation and dispersion of the COM crystals and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in such a complex system. The data indicate that our model protein, mucin, acts as a dispersant. This is attributed to steric hindrance resulting from the adsorbed mucoprotein. Oxalate, however, promotes aggregation. Interesting interactions between protein and oxalate along with protein and citrate are observed. Such interactions (synergistic or antagonistic) are found to depend on the concentrations of

  14. Increased calcium bioavailability in mice fed genetically engineered plants lacking calcium oxalate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the model forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 M. truncatula mutant was identified which contains identical ...

  15. Urinary saturation and risk factors for calcium oxalate stone disease based on spot and 24-hour urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshihide; Yonou, Hiroyuki; Hokama, Sanehiro; Oda, Masami; Morozumi, Makoto; Sugaya, Kimio

    2003-09-01

    In 222 random spot urine specimens, the calcium concentration and calcium oxalate saturation [DG(CaOx)] were significantly higher among stone formers than among non-stone formers, while the citrate and creatinine-corrected citrate concentrations were lower. In 188 24-hour urine specimens, magnesium excretion was lower among stone formers than non-stone formers, while the creatinine-corrected calcium concentration and DG(CaOx) were higher. Among stone formers, there was no gender difference in the urinary concentrations of calcium, oxalate, citrate, magnesium, and DG(CaOx), but the creatinine-corrected calcium, citrate, and magnesium concentrations were higher in women, as well as 24-hour citrate excretion. The levels of calcium and oxalate have a major influence on DG(CaOx), while citrate and magnesium levels have a minor influence. DG(CaOx) was correlated with calcium and oxalate excretion, as well as with the creatinine-corrected calcium and oxalate concentrations. Approximately 5% of 24-hour urine specimens showed critical supersaturation, 80% showed metastable supersaturation, and 15% were unsaturated. Hypercalciuria or hyperoxaluria was fairly common (30% and 40%) in critically supersaturated urine, while it was less common (22.4% and 8.6%) in metastably supersaturated urine and was not detected in unsaturated urine. Hypocitraturia and/or hypomagnesiuria was more common (63.8-80%) at any saturation. The urinary calcium, oxalate, and citrate concentrations, as well as the creatinine-corrected calcium, oxalate, citrate, and magnesium concentrations and DG(CaOx), showed a significant correlation between 57 paired early morning spot urine and 24-hour urine specimens. The creatinine-corrected calcium and citrate concentrations of the early morning urine specimens were significantly correlated with the levels of calcium and citrate excretion in the paired 24-hour urine specimens. In conclusion, no parameter other than urinary saturation gives more than a vague

  16. Production of calcium oxalate crystals by the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of witches' broom disease of Cacao.

    PubMed

    Rio, Maria Carolina S do; de Oliveira, Bruno V; de Tomazella, Daniela P T; Silva, José A Fracassi da; Pereira, Gonçalo A G

    2008-04-01

    Oxalic acid has been shown as a virulence factor for some phytopathogenic fungi, removing calcium from pectin and favoring plant cell wall degradation. Recently, it was published that calcium oxalate accumulates in infected cacao tissues during the progression of Witches' Broom disease (WBD). In the present work we report that the hemibiotrophic basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa, the causal agent of WBD, produces calcium oxalate crystals. These crystals were initially observed by polarized light microscopy of hyphae growing on a glass slide, apparently being secreted from the cells. The analysis was refined by Scanning electron microscopy and the compositon of the crystals was confirmed by energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. The production of oxalate by M. perniciosa was reinforced by the identification of a putative gene coding for oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of oxaloacetate to oxalate and acetate. This gene was shown to be expressed in the biotrophic-like mycelia, which in planta occupy the intercellular middle-lamella space, a region filled with pectin. Taken together, our results suggest that oxalate production by M. perniciosa may play a role in the WBD pathogenesis mechanism.

  17. The nucleation and growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate on self- assembled monolayers (SAMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.A.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Graff, G.L.; Fryxell, G.E.; Rieke, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    A physical chemical approach was used to study calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) nucleation and growth on various organic interfaces. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs), containing derivatized organic functional groups, were designed to mimic various amino acid residues present in both urine and stone matrix macromolecules. Derivatized surfaces include SAMs with terminal methyl, bromo, imidazole, and thiazolidine-carboxylic acid functional groups. Pronounced differences in COM deposition were observed for the various interfaces with the imidazole and thiazolidine surfaces having the greatest effect and the methyl and bromo groups having little or no nucleating potential.

  18. [EXPERIENCE OF USE OF BLEMAREN® IN THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS IN URIC ACID AND CALCIUM OXALATE UROLITHIASIS].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, O V; Yanenko, E K

    2015-01-01

    154 patients with urolithiasis were under outpatient observation for 2-8 years. Among them there were 76 women and 78 men aged 21-66 years, of which 46 patients with uric acid urolithiasis, and 88--with calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Treatment of patients was carried out systematically, depending on their condition. Indications for the application of Blemaren® included the presence of uric acid stones, uric acid and/or oxalate crystalluria. The duration of treatment was 6.1 months. The dosage of the drug varied from 6 to 18 g per day and was selected individually, depending on the purpose of the appointment of Blemaren®. Reduction of the urine pH to 6.2- 6.8-7.2 was the criterion for properly selected dose. To dissolve uric acid stones in the presence of hyperuricemia and/or hyperuricuria, Blemaren® was administered in combination with allopurinol at a dose of 0.1 g 3-4 times a day. Besides pharmacotherapy, treatment included diet therapy. It was found that the morning urine pH in urate urolithiasis is sustainable and has a range of 5.0-6.0, in 80.4% of cases--range of 5.0-5.5. In calcium oxalate urolithiasis this parameter is also stable and has a range of 5.0-6.7, in 82.9% of cases--range of 5.5-6.0. Optimal urine pH to eliminate uric acid and oxalate crystalluria in patients with uric acid and calcium oxalate urolithiasis is the interval of 6.2-6.4. It was shown that Blemaren® is a highly effective agent for treatment and prevention of uric acid and calcium oxalate crystalluria in calcium oxalate and uric acid urolithiasis. Further, its effectiveness in dissolving of uric acid stones in the absence of an infectious inflammatory process is 82.3%.

  19. Primary Hyperoxaluria Type III Gene HOGA1 (Formerly DHDPSL) as a Possible Risk Factor for Idiopathic Calcium Oxalate Urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Sandro; Belostotsky, Ruth; Cogal, Andrea G.; Herges, Regina M.; Seide, Barbara M.; Olson, Julie B.; Bergstrahl, Eric J.; Williams, Hugh J.; Haley, William E.; Frishberg, Yaacov; Milliner, Dawn S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Primary hyperoxaluria types I and II (PHI and PHII) are rare monogenic causes of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Recently, we described type III, due to mutations in HOGA1 (formerly DHDPSL), hypothesized to cause a gain of mitochondrial 4-hydroxy-2-oxoglutarate aldolase activity, resulting in excess oxalate. Design, setting, participants, & measurements To further explore the pathophysiology of HOGA1, we screened additional non-PHI-PHII patients and performed reverse transcription PCR analysis. Postulating that HOGA1 may influence urine oxalate, we also screened 100 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. Results Of 28 unrelated hyperoxaluric patients with marked hyperoxaluria not due to PHI, PHII, or any identifiable secondary cause, we identified 10 (36%) with two HOGA1 mutations (four novel, including a nonsense variant). Reverse transcription PCR of the stop codon and two common mutations showed stable expression. From the new and our previously described PHIII cohort, 25 patients were identified for study. Urine oxalate was lower and urine calcium and uric acid were higher when compared with PHI and PHII. After 7.2 years median follow-up, mean eGFR was 116 ml/min per 1.73 m2. HOGA1 heterozygosity was found in two patients with mild hyperoxaluria and in three of 100 idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers. No HOGA1 variants were detected in 166 controls. Conclusions These findings, in the context of autosomal recessive inheritance for PHIII, support a loss-of-function mechanism for HOGA1, with potential for a dominant-negative effect. Detection of HOGA1 variants in idiopathic calcium oxalate urolithiasis also suggests HOGA1 may be a predisposing factor for this condition. PMID:21896830

  20. Renal Calcium Oxalate Deposits Induce a Pro-Atherosclerotic and Pro-Osteoporotic Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kusumi, Kirsten; Barr-Beare, Evan; Saxena, Vijay; Safedi, Fayez; Schwaderer, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Urinary stone disease (USD) is increasing in adult and pediatric populations. Adult and pediatric studies have demonstrated decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture rates. USD has also been independently linked to increased rates of myocardial infarction and cerebral vascular accidents. Although USD is a multisystem disorder involving the kidneys, bone, and vasculature, the molecular mechanisms linking these three organs remain unknown. Calcium oxalate nephropathy was induced in C57BL/6J mice with intra-peritoneal (ip) injection of sodium glyoxolate. Half of each kidney underwent Pizzalato staining and half was snap frozen for RNA extraction. RT(2) Profiler Mouse Atherosclerosis, Osteoporosis, and Calcium Signaling PCR Arrays (Qiagen) were performed. Only results that passed quality checks in PCR array reproducibility and genomic DNA contamination were included. Genes had to show at least fourfold differential expression and P < 0.01 to be considered significant. Atherosclerosis array showed upregulation of 19 genes by fourfold, 10 of which were ≥10-fold. All 19 had P ≤ 0.002. The Osteoporosis array showed fourfold upregulation of 10 genes, five showed >10-fold increase. All 10 have P ≤ 0.003. The calcium signaling array showed significant fourfold upregulation of 10 genes, four of which were ≥10-fold. All 10 have P ≤ 0.03. We have demonstrated that calcium oxalate nephropathy can induce upregulation of atherosclerotic, metabolic bone, and calcium homeostasis genes in a murine model. This may be and initial step in identifying the molecular mechanisms linking stone, bone, and cardiovascular disease. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2744-2751, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants.

  2. An Assessment of Engineered Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation on Plant Growth and Development as a Step toward Evaluating Its Use to Enhance Plant Defense

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill both these needs. As a step toward this development, this study investigates the effects of transforming a non-calcium oxalate crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, into a crystal accumulating plant. Calcium oxalate crystal accumulating A. thaliana lines were generated by ectopic expression of a single bacterial gene encoding an oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme. Biochemical and cellular studies suggested that the engineered A. thaliana lines formed crystals of calcium oxalate in a manner similar to naturally occurring crystal accumulating plants. The amount of calcium oxalate accumulated in leaves also reached levels similar to those measured in the leaves of Medicago truncatula in which the crystals are known to play a defensive role. Visual inspection of the different engineered lines, however, suggested a phenotypic consequence on plant growth and development with higher calcium oxalate concentrations. The restoration of a near wild-type plant phenotype through an enzymatic reduction of tissue oxalate supported this observation. Overall, this study is a first to provide initial insight into the potential consequences of engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in non-crystal accumulating plants. PMID:26517544

  3. Sulfate and thiosulfate inhibit oxalate transport via a dPrestin (Slc26a6)-dependent mechanism in an insect model of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Greg M; Hirata, Taku; Anderson, Jacob B; Cabrero, Pablo; Gallo, Christopher J R; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2016-01-15

    Nephrolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract disorders, with the majority of kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Given its prevalence (US occurrence 10%), it is still poorly understood, lacking progress in identifying new therapies because of its complex etiology. Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) is a recently developed model of CaOx nephrolithiasis. Effects of sulfate and thiosulfate on crystal formation were investigated using the Drosophila model, as well as electrophysiological effects on both Drosophila (Slc26a5/6; dPrestin) and mouse (mSlc26a6) oxalate transporters utilizing the Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system. Results indicate that both transport thiosulfate with a much higher affinity than sulfate Additionally, both compounds were effective at decreasing CaOx crystallization when added to the diet. However, these results were not observed when compounds were applied to Malpighian tubules ex vivo. Neither compound affected CaOx crystallization in dPrestin knockdown animals, indicating a role for principal cell-specific dPrestin in luminal oxalate transport. Furthermore, thiosulfate has a higher affinity for dPrestin and mSlc26a6 compared with oxalate These data indicate that thiosulfate's ability to act as a competitive inhibitor of oxalate via dPrestin, can explain the decrease in CaOx crystallization seen in the presence of thiosulfate, but not sulfate. Overall, our findings predict that thiosulfate or oxalate-mimics may be effective as therapeutic competitive inhibitors of CaOx crystallization.

  4. Sulfate and thiosulfate inhibit oxalate transport via a dPrestin (Slc26a6)-dependent mechanism in an insect model of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Greg M.; Hirata, Taku; Anderson, Jacob B.; Cabrero, Pablo; Gallo, Christopher J. R.; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract disorders, with the majority of kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Given its prevalence (US occurrence 10%), it is still poorly understood, lacking progress in identifying new therapies because of its complex etiology. Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) is a recently developed model of CaOx nephrolithiasis. Effects of sulfate and thiosulfate on crystal formation were investigated using the Drosophila model, as well as electrophysiological effects on both Drosophila (Slc26a5/6; dPrestin) and mouse (mSlc26a6) oxalate transporters utilizing the Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system. Results indicate that both transport thiosulfate with a much higher affinity than sulfate Additionally, both compounds were effective at decreasing CaOx crystallization when added to the diet. However, these results were not observed when compounds were applied to Malpighian tubules ex vivo. Neither compound affected CaOx crystallization in dPrestin knockdown animals, indicating a role for principal cell-specific dPrestin in luminal oxalate transport. Furthermore, thiosulfate has a higher affinity for dPrestin and mSlc26a6 compared with oxalate These data indicate that thiosulfate's ability to act as a competitive inhibitor of oxalate via dPrestin, can explain the decrease in CaOx crystallization seen in the presence of thiosulfate, but not sulfate. Overall, our findings predict that thiosulfate or oxalate-mimics may be effective as therapeutic competitive inhibitors of CaOx crystallization. PMID:26538444

  5. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vaitheeswari, S; Sriram, R; Brindha, P; Kurian, Gino A

    2015-01-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model. The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH), sodium thiosulfate (Na(2)S(2)O(3)) and sodium sulfate (Na(2)SO(4)) on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques. The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na(2)S(2)O(3)>Na(2)SO(4). Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S(2)O(3)(2)-and SO(4)(2)- moiety produced by the test compounds.

  6. Inhibition of calcium oxalate nephrotoxicity with Cymbopogon schoenanthus (Al-Ethkher).

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Saeed S; Al-Ghamdi, Abdullah A; Shammah, Ahmed A

    2007-12-01

    We investigated the effects of Cymbopogon schoenanthus herb on experimental induced kidney stones in male Wistar albino rats. Oxalate nephrotoxicity was experimentally induced by 200 mg single dose of glycolic acid given orally (gavage). Rats were divided into three groups, glycolic acid, glycolic acid plus Cymbopogon schoenanthus, and control (D. water). Urine analysis of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and calcium revealed significant differences comparing to the control. In addition, significant pathological changes were found in the kidney revealed by histopathological studies. Daily oral treatment with Cymbopogon schoenanthus (1 ml of the extract) significantly corrected the incidence of nephrotoxicity, BUN, creatinine, and calcium level differences. Moreover, optimization studies showed highly potent diuretic activity of Cymbopogon schoenanthus. After three days of experiments, four rats treated with the glycolic acid only died. The rest of animal survived and looked healthy.

  7. Size-dependent cellular uptake mechanism and cytotoxicity toward calcium oxalate on Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2017-02-02

    Urinary crystals with various sizes are present in healthy individuals and patients with kidney stone; however, the cellular uptake mechanism of calcium oxalate of various sizes has not been elucidated. This study aims to compare the internalization of nano-/micron-sized (50 nm, 100 nm, and 1 μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals in African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells. The internalization and adhesion of COM and COD crystals to Vero cells were enhanced with decreasing crystal size. Cell death rate was positively related to the amount of adhered and internalized crystals and exhibited higher correlation with internalization than that with adhesion. Vero cells mainly internalized nano-sized COM and COD crystals through clathrin-mediated pathways as well as micron-sized crystals through macropinocytosis. The internalized COM and COD crystals were distributed in the lysosomes and destroyed lysosomal integrity to some extent. The results of this study indicated that the size of crystal affected cellular uptake mechanism, and may provide an enlightenment for finding potential inhibitors of crystal uptake, thereby decreasing cell injury and the occurrence of kidney stones.

  8. Phase transformation of calcium oxalate dihydrate-monohydrate: Effects of relative humidity and new spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Claudia; Casati, Marco; Colombo, Chiara; Realini, Marco; Brambilla, Luigi; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    New data on vibrational properties of calcium oxalates and their controversial transformation mechanism are presented. We have focused on whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O) and weddellite [CaC2O4·(2 + x) H2O], the most common phases of calcium oxalate; these compounds occur in many organisms, in kidney stones and in particular kinds of films found on the surface of many works of art. Low temperature experiments carried out by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have highlighted both the high structural order in the crystalline state of whewellite and the disordered distribution of the zeolitic water molecules in weddellite. The synthesised nanocrystals of weddellite have been kept under different hygrometric conditions in order to study, by X-ray powder diffraction, the role of “external” water molecules on their stability. Moreover, in order to identify the different kinds of water molecules, a re-investigation, supported by quantum chemical calculations, of the observed vibrational spectra (IR and Raman) of whewellite has been conducted.

  9. Raman spectroscopic analysis of the calcium oxalate producing extremotolerant lichen Circinaria gyrosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, U.; Meessen, J.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Hübers, H.-W.; Rull, F.; Sánchez, F. J.; de la Torre, R.; de Vera, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of astrobiological exposure and simulation experiments in the BIOMEX project, the lichen Circinaria gyrosa was investigated by Raman microspectroscopy. Owing to the symbiotic nature of lichens and their remarkable extremotolerance, C. gyrosa represents a valid model organism in recent and current astrobiological research. Biogenic compounds of C. gyrosa were studied that may serve as biomarkers in Raman assisted remote sensing missions, e.g. ExoMars. The surface as well as different internal layers of C. gyrosa have been characterized and data on the detectability and distribution of β-carotene, chitin and calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite) are presented in this study. Raman microspectroscopy was applied on natural samples and thin sections. Although calcium oxalates can also be formed by rare geological processes it may serve as a suitable biomarker for astrobiological investigations. In the model organism C. gyrosa, it forms extracellular crystalline deposits embedded in the intra-medullary space and its function is assumed to balance water uptake and gas exchange during the rare, moist to wet environmental periods that are physiologically favourable. This is a factor that was repeatedly demonstrated to be essential for extremotolerant lichens and other organisms. Depending on the decomposition processes of whewellite under extraterrestrial environmental conditions, it may not only serve as a biomarker of recent life, but also of past and fossilized organisms.

  10. Calcium Oxalate Stone Agglomeration Inhibition [tm] Reflects Renal Stone-Forming Activity.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, J S; Cole, F E; Romani, W; Husserl, F E; Fuselier, H A; Kok, D J; Erwin, D T

    2000-04-01

    Louisiana and other Gulf South states comprise a "Stone Belt" where calcium oxalate stone formers (CaOx SFs) are found at a high rate of approximately 5%. In these patients, the agglomeration of small stone crystals, which are visible in nearly all morning urine collections, forms stones that can become trapped in the renal parenchyma and the renal pelvis. Without therapy, about half of CaOx SFs repeatedly form kidney stones, which can cause excruciating pain that can be relieved by passage, fragmentation (lithotripsy), or surgical removal. The absence of stones in "normal" patients suggests that there are stone inhibitors in "normal" urines.At the Ochsner Renal Stone Clinic, 24-hour urine samples are collected by the patient and sent to the Ochsner Renal Stone Research Program where calcium oxalate stone agglomeration inhibition [tm] measurements are performed. Urine from healthy subjects and inactive stone formers has demonstrated strongly inhibited stone growth [tm] in contrast to urine from recurrent CaOx SFs. [tm] data from 1500 visits of 700 kidney stone patients have been used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in Ochsner's CaOx SF patients. These data have also been used to demonstrate the interactive roles of certain identified urinary stone-growth inhibitors, citrate and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), which can be manipulated with medication to diminish recurrent stone formation. Our goal is to offer patients both financial and pain relief by reducing their stones with optimized medication, using medical management to avoid costly treatments.

  11. Size-dependent cellular uptake mechanism and cytotoxicity toward calcium oxalate on Vero cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Urinary crystals with various sizes are present in healthy individuals and patients with kidney stone; however, the cellular uptake mechanism of calcium oxalate of various sizes has not been elucidated. This study aims to compare the internalization of nano-/micron-sized (50 nm, 100 nm, and 1 μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals in African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells. The internalization and adhesion of COM and COD crystals to Vero cells were enhanced with decreasing crystal size. Cell death rate was positively related to the amount of adhered and internalized crystals and exhibited higher correlation with internalization than that with adhesion. Vero cells mainly internalized nano-sized COM and COD crystals through clathrin-mediated pathways as well as micron-sized crystals through macropinocytosis. The internalized COM and COD crystals were distributed in the lysosomes and destroyed lysosomal integrity to some extent. The results of this study indicated that the size of crystal affected cellular uptake mechanism, and may provide an enlightenment for finding potential inhibitors of crystal uptake, thereby decreasing cell injury and the occurrence of kidney stones. PMID:28150811

  12. Reevaluation of the plant “gemstones”: Calcium oxalate crystals sustain photosynthesis under drought conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tooulakou, Georgia; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Orkoula, Malvina G.; Kontoyannis, Christos G.; Fasseas, Costas; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Klapa, Maria I.; Karabourniotis, George

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Land plants face the perpetual dilemma of using atmospheric carbon dioxide for photosynthesis and losing water vapors, or saving water and reducing photosynthesis and thus growth. The reason behind this dilemma is that this simultaneous exchange of gases is accomplished through the same minute pores on leaf surfaces, called stomata. In a recent study we provided evidence that pigweed, an aggressive weed, attenuates this problem exploiting large crystals of calcium oxalate as dynamic carbon pools. This plant is able to photosynthesize even under drought conditions, when stomata are closed and water losses are limited, using carbon dioxide from crystal decomposition instead from the atmosphere. Abscisic acid, an alarm signal that causes stomatal closure seems to be implicated in this function and for this reason we named this path “alarm photosynthesis.” The so-far “enigmatic,” but highly conserved and widespread among plant species calcium oxalate crystals seem to play a crucial role in the survival of plants. PMID:27471886

  13. Size-dependent cellular uptake mechanism and cytotoxicity toward calcium oxalate on Vero cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Urinary crystals with various sizes are present in healthy individuals and patients with kidney stone; however, the cellular uptake mechanism of calcium oxalate of various sizes has not been elucidated. This study aims to compare the internalization of nano-/micron-sized (50 nm, 100 nm, and 1 μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals in African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells. The internalization and adhesion of COM and COD crystals to Vero cells were enhanced with decreasing crystal size. Cell death rate was positively related to the amount of adhered and internalized crystals and exhibited higher correlation with internalization than that with adhesion. Vero cells mainly internalized nano-sized COM and COD crystals through clathrin-mediated pathways as well as micron-sized crystals through macropinocytosis. The internalized COM and COD crystals were distributed in the lysosomes and destroyed lysosomal integrity to some extent. The results of this study indicated that the size of crystal affected cellular uptake mechanism, and may provide an enlightenment for finding potential inhibitors of crystal uptake, thereby decreasing cell injury and the occurrence of kidney stones.

  14. Plants defective in calcium oxalate crystal formation have more bioavailable calcium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bioavailable calcium affects bone formation and calcification. Here we investigate how a single gene mutation altering calcium partitioning in the forage crop Medicago truncatula affects calcium bioavailability. Previously, the cod5 Medicago mutant was identified which contains wild-type amounts o...

  15. Biosynthesis of L-ascorbic acid and conversion of carbons 1 and 2 of L-ascorbic acid to oxalic acid occurs within individual calcium oxalate crystal idioblasts.

    PubMed

    Kostman, T A; Tarlyn, N M; Loewus, F A; Franceschi, V R

    2001-02-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (AsA) and its metabolic precursors give rise to oxalic acid (OxA) found in calcium oxalate crystals in specialized crystal idioblast cells in plants; however, it is not known if AsA and OxA are synthesized within the crystal idioblast cell or transported in from surrounding mesophyll cells. Isolated developing crystal idioblasts from Pistia stratiotes were used to study the pathway of OxA biosynthesis and to determine if idioblasts contain the entire path and are essentially independent in OxA synthesis. Idioblasts were supplied with various (14)C-labeled compounds and examined by micro-autoradiography for incorporation of (14)C into calcium oxalate crystals. [(14)C]OxA gave heavy labeling of crystals, indicating the isolated idioblasts are functional in crystal formation. Incubation with [1-(14)C]AsA also gave heavy labeling of crystals, whereas [6-(14)C]AsA gave no labeling. Labeled precursors of AsA (L-[1-(14)C]galactose; D-[1-(14)C]mannose) also resulted in crystal labeling, as did the ascorbic acid analog, D-[1-(14)C]erythorbic acid. Intensity of labeling of isolated idioblasts followed the pattern OxA > AsA (erythorbic acid) > L-galactose > D-mannose. Our results demonstrate that P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts synthesize the OxA used for crystal formation, the OxA is derived from the number 1 and 2 carbons of AsA, and the proposed pathway of ascorbic acid synthesis via D-mannose and L-galactose is operational in individual P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts. These results are discussed with respect to fine control of calcium oxalate precipitation and the concept of crystal idioblasts as independent physiological compartments.

  16. Studies using a porcine model: what insights into human calcium oxalate stone formation mechanisms has this model facilitated?

    PubMed

    Penniston, Kristina L; Patel, Sutchin R; Schwahn, Denise J; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2017-02-01

    Animal models are useful in the study of many human diseases. Our current understanding of the biological, physiological, and biochemical aspects of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis has been greatly informed by studies using animals. Recently, limitations in the extrapolation to humans of research results derived from laboratory rodents have been identified. The use in biomedical research of a variety of organisms, including large animals, is increasingly encouraged. The purpose of this article is to review the use of pigs in biomedical and stone research, to provide a rationale for using pigs in metabolic stone research, and to describe our 8-year experience in developing a porcine platform for studying hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate urolithiasis. In this article, we share and review some of the highlights of our findings. We also report results from a recent feeding swine study that demonstrated oxalate-induced renal nephropathy. Finally, we offer ideas for future directions in urolithiasis research using swine.

  17. Are calcium oxalate crystals involved in the mechanism of acute renal failure in ethylene glycol poisoning?

    PubMed

    McMartin, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) poisoning often results in acute renal failure, particularly if treatment with fomepizole or ethanol is delayed because of late presentation or diagnosis. The mechanism has not been established but is thought to result from the production of a toxic metabolite. A literature review utilizing PubMed identified papers dealing with renal toxicity and EG or oxalate. The list of papers was culled to those relevant to the mechanism and treatment of the renal toxicity associated with either compound. ROLE OF METABOLITES: Although the "aldehyde" metabolites of EG, glycolaldehyde, and glyoxalate, have been suggested as the metabolites responsible, recent studies have shown definitively that the accumulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals in kidney tissue produces renal tubular necrosis that leads to kidney failure. In vivo studies in EG-dosed rats have correlated the severity of renal damage with the total accumulation of COM crystals in kidney tissue. Studies in cultured kidney cells, including human proximal tubule (HPT) cells, have demonstrated that only COM crystals, not the oxalate ion, glycolaldehyde, or glyoxylate, produce a necrotic cell death at toxicologically relevant concentrations. COM CRYSTAL ACCUMULATION: In EG poisoning, COM crystals accumulate to high concentrations in the kidney through a process involving adherence to tubular cell membranes, followed by internalization of the crystals. MECHANISM OF TOXICITY: COM crystals have been shown to alter membrane structure and function, to increase reactive oxygen species and to produce mitochondrial dysfunction. These processes are likely to be involved in the mechanism of cell death. Accumulation of COM crystals in the kidney is responsible for producing the renal toxicity associated with EG poisoning. The development of a pharmacological approach to reduce COM crystal adherence to tubular cells and its cellular interactions would be valuable as this would decrease the renal

  18. Medicago truncatula-derived calcium oxalate crystals have a negative impact on chewing insect performance via their physical properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant structural traits often act as defenses against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in Medicago truncatula Gaertn. (Fabaceae) leaves have previously been shown to be effective deterrents of lepidopteran insect feedi...

  19. Occurrence, types and distribution of calcium oxalate crystals in leaves and stems of some species of poisonous plants.

    PubMed

    Tütüncü Konyar, Sevil; Öztürk, Necla; Dane, Feruzan

    2014-12-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals, which are found in many organs of plants, have different morphological forms: as druses, prism, styloids, raphides and crystal sand. In this study, the distribution, type and specific location of calcium oxalate crystals in the leaves and stems of the eight species of poisonous plants and one species of nonpoisonous plant were investigated with light microscopy. During study special attention was given to the possible correlation between the presence and types of calcium oxalate crystals and toxic plant organs. The plants examined in this study were Hedera helix L. (Araliaceae), Aristolochia clematitis L. (Aristolochiaceae), Humulus lupulus L. (Cannabaceae), Saponaria officinalis L. (Caryophyllaceae), Chelidonium majus L. (Papaveraceae), Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae), Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae), Cynanchum acutum L. (Asclepiadaceae), and Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae). Three types of crystals: druses, prismatic crystals and crystal sands were observed. Druses were identified in the leaves and stems of six species of studied plants. In contrast to druses, crystal sands and prismatic crystals were rare. Prismatic crystals were observed in the leaf mesophlly cells of both Nerium oleander and Cynanchum acutum. However, crystal sands were observed only in the pith tissue of Humulus lupulus. On the other hand, leaves and stems of Chelidonium majus, Aristolochia clematitis and Hypericum perforatum were devoid of crystals. There is no absolute correlation between the presence and type of calcium oxalate crystals and toxic plant organs. However druse crystals may function as main irritant in toxic organs of the plants.

  20. Physical characteristics of calcium oxalate crystals as determinants in structural defense against chewing insects in Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In addition to the numerous chemical defenses that plants employ to fend off insect herbivores, simple structural components can also play important roles in effective protection. Our investigations have shown that plant crystals of calcium oxalate can function in insect defense. The isolation of ca...

  1. Extraction and estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate crystals in the foliage of conifer and hardwood trees

    Treesearch

    Rakesh Minocha; Bradley Chamberlain; Stephanie Long; Swathi A. Turlapati; Gloria. Quigley

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a method for the extraction and indirect estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the foliage of trees. Foliar tissue was collected from a single tree of each species (five conifers and five hardwoods) for comparison of extractions in different solvents using 10 replicates per species from the same pool of...

  2. Calcium oxalate deposition in renal allografts: morphologic spectrum and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Truong, Luan D; Yakupoglu, Ulkem; Feig, Daniel; Hicks, John; Cartwight, Joiner; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Suki, Wadi N

    2004-08-01

    Many aspects of calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition in renal transplant biopsies are not known. Review of all renal transplant biopsies performed in a 7-year period showed that CaOx deposition could be classified into three groups. Group I: Seven biopsies within a month post-transplant displayed rare CaOx foci against a background of acute tubular necrosis or acute cell-mediated rejection. At follow-up, five grafts functioned well and two failed due to chronic allograft nephropathy. CaOx in this context was an incidental finding secondary to a sudden excretion of an end-stage renal disease-induced increased body burden of CaOx. Group II: Two biopsies performed 2 and 10 months post-transplant showed rare CaOx foci against a background of chronic allograft nephropathy, leading to graft loss. CaOx in this context reflected nonspecific parenchymal deposition due to chronic renal failure regardless of causes. Group III: One biopsy with recurrent PH1 characterized by marked CaOx deposition associated with severe tubulointerstitial injury and graft loss 6 months post-transplant. There were two previously reported cases in which CaOx deposition in the renal allografts was due the antihypertensive drug naftidrofuryl oxalate or increased intestinal absorption of CaOx. CaOx deposition in renal allografts can be classified in different categories with distinctive morphologic features and clinical implications.

  3. Calcium acetate induces calcium uptake and formation of calcium-oxalate crystals in isolated leaflets of Gleditsia triacanthos L.

    PubMed

    Borchert, R

    1986-09-01

    During treatment of isolated, peeled leaflets of Gleditsia triacanthos with 0.5-2 mM [(45)Ca]acetate, saturation of the cell-wall free space with Ca(2+) occurred within 10 min and was followed by a period of 6-10 h during which there was no significant Ca-uptake into the protoplast, but apoplastic Ca(2+) was periodically released into the medium. Later, Ca(2+) was absorbed for 3-4 d at rates of up to 2.2 μmol Ca(2+)·h(-1)·(g FW)(-1) to final concentrations of 350 μmol Ca(2+)· (g FW)(-1). The distribution of absorbed Ca(2+) between cell wall, vacuole and Ca-oxalate crystals was determined during Ca-uptake. Wheras intact, cut leaflets deposited absorbed Ca(2+) as Ca-oxalate in the crystal cells, peeled leaflets lacking crystal cells accumulated at least 40-50 μmol·(g FW)(-1) soluble Ca(2+) before the absorbed Ca(2+) was precipitated as Ca-oxalate. These observations indicate that the mechanisms for the continuous uptake of Ca(2+), the synthesis of oxalate and the precipitation of Ca(2+) as Ca-oxalate are operational in the crystal cells of intact leaflets, but not in the mesophyll cells of peeled leaflets where they must be induced by exposure to Ca(2+). The precipitation of absorbed Ca(2+) as Ca-oxalate by the crystal cells of isolated Gleditsia leaflets illustrates the role of these cells in the excretion of surplus Ca(2+) which enters normal, attached leaves with the transpiration stream.In addition to acetate, only Ca-lactate and Ca-carbonate lead to Ca-uptake, but at rates well below those observed with Ca-acetate. Other small organic anions (citrate, glycolate, glyoxalate, malate) and inorganic anions (chloride, nitrate, sulfate) did not permit Ca-uptake. Acetate-(14)C was rapidly absorbed during Ca-uptake, but less than 20% was incorporated into Ca-oxalate; the rest remained mostly in the soluble fraction or was metabolized to CO2. Acetate, as a permeable weak acid, may enable rapid Ca-uptake by stimulating proton extrusion at the plasmalemma and by

  4. Thermodynamics and kinetics of calcium oxalate crystallization in the presence of amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Korol'kov, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    Specific features of the crystallization of calcium oxalates (CaC2O4) in the presence of amino acids have been established based on thermodynamic and experimental modeling. Phase formation in the Ca2+-C2O4 2--H2O-amino acid system in a wide range of variation in the component concentrations and solution pH have been theoretically investigated. The influence of pH on the thermodynamic stability of crystallizing compounds is considered. The effect of amino acids of different structures on the formation of the CaC2O4 solid phase in a prototype of physiological solution is analyzed. The kinetic crystallization parameters (induction period and rate constant) and crystallite growth are determined.

  5. The mechanism of calcium oxalate crystal-induced haemolysis of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Elferink, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals cause membrane damage in human erythrocytes, evident from K+ leakage and haemoglobin release. Whereas the hydrogen acceptor polyvinylpyridine-N-oxide is without effect on CaOx crystal-induced haemolysis, polyanions and negative proteins are strongly inhibitory. This indicates that positive charges are of importance for induction of haemolysis. These positive charges are located on the CaOx crystals. Removal of the negatively charged sialic acid from the cell surface does not affect CaOx crystal-induced haemolysis. CaOx crystals are able to release glucose from negatively charged liposomes, but not from positively charged liposomes. The results are compatible with the view that positive charges on the crystals are of predominant importance in CaOx-induced haemolysis, and that their interactions with negative charges or polarizable structures in the lipid part of the membrane leads to membrane disruption. PMID:2443155

  6. Calcium-induced patterns of calcium-oxalate crystals in isolated leaflets of Gleditsia triacanthos L. and Albizia julibrissin Durazz.

    PubMed

    Borchert, R

    1985-08-01

    For experimental induction of crystal cells (=crystal idioblasts) containing calcium-oxalate crystals, the lower epidermis was peeled from seedling leaflets of Gleditsia triacanthos L., exposing the crystal-free mesophyll and minor veins to the experimental solutions on which leaflets were floated for up to 10 d under continous light. On 0.3-2.0 mM Ca-acetate, increasing numbers of crystals, appearing 96 h after peeling, were induced. The pattern of crystal distribution changed with Ca(2+)-concentration ([Ca(2+)]): at low [Ca(2+)], crystals formed only in the non-green bundlesheath cells surrounding the veins, believed to have a relatively low Ca(2+)-extrusion capacity; at higher [Ca(2+)], crystals developed in up to 90% of the mesophyll cells, and at supraoptimal [Ca(2+)], large extracellular crystals formed on the tissue surface. By sequential treatments with solutions of different [Ca(2+)], the following three phases were identified in the induction of crystal cells: (1) during the initial 24-h period (adaptive aging), Ca(2+) is not required and crystal induction is not possible; (2) during the following 48 h (induction period), exposure to 1-2 mM Ca-acetate induces the differentiation of mesophyll cells into crystal cells; (3) crystal growth begins 72 h after the start of induction. In intact leaflets of Albizia julibrissin Durazz., calcium-oxalate crystals are found exclusively in the bundle-sheath cells of the veins, but crystals were induced in the mesophyll of peeled leaflets floating on 1 mM Ca-acetate. Exposure to inductive [Ca(2+)] will thus trigger the differentiation of mature leaf cells into crystal cells; the spatial distribution of crystals is determined by the external [Ca(2+)] and by the structural and functional properties of the cells in the tissue.

  7. Toward a new insight of calcium oxalate stones in Drosophila by micro-computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Chi; Chen, Huey-Yi; Liao, Po-Chi; Wang, Shih-Jing; Tsai, Ming-Yen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Yong

    2017-03-04

    We previously developed an animal model of calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition on the Malphigian tubules of Drosophila melanogaster as a model of urolithiasis. Here, we introduce a new tool for the study of anatomical structure for Drosophila. As a consequence of technical development, the invention of micro-computerized tomography (CT) has been introduced to the small animal, such as rat and mice. We used Drosophila as a model organism and fed the flies 0.5% lithogenic agent ethylene glycol for 3 weeks. Samples were simply prepared for further scanned by micro-CT to scan samples at 800 nm resolution. CT scanning was performed at 40 kVp of voltage, 250 μA of current, and 1750 ms of exposure time and without filter. Reconstruction of sections was carried out with the GPU-based scanner software. Specific region of interests was further analyzed by DataViewer software. Area with high radiologic density level was defined as CaOx deposition for further 3D analysis. Image of whole lithogenic Drosophila was compared with control. High radiologic density level was detected in the region of Malphigian tubules which can be identified as CaOx stones. There was no stone image in the control group. The image was the same as human non-contrast CT for the diagnosis of stone disease. Micro-CT clearly demonstrated the calcium oxalate calcifications in the Malphigian tubules of fruit fly. The image system provides that a new vision on study animal will facilitate further study of stone disease. With the development of new technology on micro-CT, more delicate and advanced image will be presented in the future.

  8. Calcium Oxalate Stone Agglomeration Inhibition [tm] Reflects Renal Stone-Forming Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Jill S.; Cole, Francis E.; Romani, William; Husserl, Fred E.; Fuselier, Harold A.; Kok, Dirk J.; Erwin, Donald T.

    2000-01-01

    Louisiana and other Gulf South states comprise a “Stone Belt” where calcium oxalate stone formers (CaOx SFs) are found at a high rate of approximately 5%. In these patients, the agglomeration of small stone crystals, which are visible in nearly all morning urine collections, forms stones that can become trapped in the renal parenchyma and the renal pelvis. Without therapy, about half of CaOx SFs repeatedly form kidney stones, which can cause excruciating pain that can be relieved by passage, fragmentation (lithotripsy), or surgical removal. The absence of stones in “normal” patients suggests that there are stone inhibitors in “normal” urines. At the Ochsner Renal Stone Clinic, 24-hour urine samples are collected by the patient and sent to the Ochsner Renal Stone Research Program where calcium oxalate stone agglomeration inhibition [tm] measurements are performed. Urine from healthy subjects and inactive stone formers has demonstrated strongly inhibited stone growth [tm] in contrast to urine from recurrent CaOx SFs. [tm] data from 1500 visits of 700 kidney stone patients have been used to evaluate the risk of recurrence in Ochsner's CaOx SF patients. These data have also been used to demonstrate the interactive roles of certain identified urinary stone-growth inhibitors, citrate and Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), which can be manipulated with medication to diminish recurrent stone formation. Our goal is to offer patients both financial and pain relief by reducing their stones with optimized medication, using medical management to avoid costly treatments. PMID:21811395

  9. Prophylactic effects of quercetin and hyperoside in a calcium oxalate stone forming rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Yun-fei; Feng, Yuan; Peng, Bo; Che, Jian-ping; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-hua

    2014-12-01

    Quercetin and hyperoside (QH) are the two main constituents of the total flavone glycosides of Flos Abelmoschus manihot, which has been prescribed for treating chronic kidney disease for decades. This study aimed to investigate the effect of QH on calcium oxalate (CaOx) formation in ethylene glycol (EG)-fed rats. Rats were divided into three groups: an untreated stone-forming group, a QH-treated stone-forming group (20 mg/kg/day) and a potassium citrate-treated stone-forming group (potassium citrate was a worldwide-recognized calculi-prophylactic medicine). Ethylene glycol (0.5 %) was administered to the rats during the last week, and vitamin D3 was force-fed to induce hyperoxaluria and kidney calcium oxalate crystal deposition. 24 h urine samples were collected before and after inducing crystal deposits. Rats were killed and both kidneys were harvested after 3 weeks. Bisected kidneys were examined under a polarized light microscope for semi-quantification of the crystal-formation. The renal tissue superoxide dismutase and catalase levels were measured by Western blot. QH and potassium citrate have the ability to alkalinize urine. The number of crystal deposits decreased significantly in the QH-treated stone-forming group as compared to the other groups. Superoxide dismutase and catalase levels also increased significantly in the QH-treated stone-forming group, as compared with the untreated stone-forming group. QH administration has an inhibitory effect on the deposition of CaOx crystal in EG-fed rats and may be effective for preventing stone-forming disease.

  10. Wu-Ling-San formula prophylaxis against recurrent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis - a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, Eugene; Ho, Lin; Lin, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Min-Ho; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Wu-Ling-San (WLS) formula has been proved to prevent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis both in vitro and in vivo. This is the first prospective, randomized and placebo-controlled clinical trial of WLS in calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis prevention. All patients who enrolled were asked to drink enough fluid to urinate at least 2 L daily during the study period. A 24-hour urine collection was performed to establish the baseline levels of multiple urinary parameters before taking the medicine. The patients were randomized and divided into two groups. The medication group took 2 gm WLS formula three times daily for 1 month. The control group took 2 gm placebo three times daily for 1 month. A 24-hour urine collection was performed to evaluate multiple urinary and serum parameters from all patients during the study period. A total of 39 patients were enrolled and 28 patients completed the study. Fourteen patients were allocated to WLS group and 14 patients to placebo group. After treatment, the mean urine output level increased to 2796.4 ± 525.7 ml/day (percentage of change, 13.9 %) in the WLS formula group. With placebo therapy, the mean decreased slightly to 2521.4 ± 762.7ml/day (percentage of change, -5.7 %). The percentage of change was significantly different between the two groups (independent t-test, P=0.02). No patient complained of side effects, such as fatigue, dizziness, musculoskeletal symptoms, or gastrointestinal disturbance. WLS formula is a promising adjunct to surgical and medical management of kidney stones. Active therapy with WLS formula has a positive effect on diuresis without leading to electrolyte imbalance.

  11. Modulation of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization by citrate through selective binding to atomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, S R; Wierzbicki, A; Salter, E A; Zepeda, S; Orme, C A; Hoyer, J R; Nancollas, G H; Cody, A M; De Yoreo, J J

    2004-10-19

    The majority of human kidney stones are composed primarily of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Thus, determining the molecular mechanisms by which urinary constituents modulate calcium oxalate crystallization is crucial for understanding and controlling urolithiassis in humans. A comprehensive molecular-scale view of COM shape modification by citrate, a common urinary constituent, obtained through a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling is now presented. We show that citrate strongly influences the growth morphology and kinetics on the (-101) face but has much lower effect on the (010) face. Moreover, binding energy calculations show that the strength of the citrate-COM interaction is much greater at steps than on terraces and is highly step-specific. The maximum binding energy, -166.5 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, occurs for the [101] step on the (-101) face. In contrast, the value is only -56.9 kJ {center_dot} mol-1 for the [012] step on the (010) face. The binding energies on the (-101) and (010) terraces are also much smaller, -65.4 and -48.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} respectively. All other binding energies lie between these extremes. This high selectivity leads to preferential binding of citrate to the acute [101] atomic steps on the (-101) face. The strong citrate-step interactions on this face leads to pinning of all steps, but the anisotropy in interaction strength results in anisotropic reductions in step kinetics. These anisotropic changes in step kinetics are, in turn, responsible for changes in the shape of macroscopic COM crystals. Thus, the molecular scale growth morphology and the bulk crystal habit in the presence of citrate are similar, and the predictions of molecular simulations are fully consistent with the experimental observations.

  12. High Sodium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Poor Anticrystallization Defense Aggravate Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Rat Hyperoxaluric Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced sodium excretion is associated with intrarenal oxidative stress. The present study evaluated whether oxidative stress caused by high sodium (HS) may be involved in calcium oxalate crystal formation. Male rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet. Normal-sodium and HS diets were achieved by providing drinking water containing 0.3% and 3% NaCl, respectively. Rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet with 5% hydroxyl-L-proline (HP) for 7 and 42 days to induce hyperoxaluria and/or calcium oxalate deposition. Compared to normal sodium, HS slightly increased calcium excretion despite diuresis; however, the result did not reach statistical significance. HS did not affect the hyperoxaluria, hypocalciuria or supersaturation caused by HP; however, it increased calcium oxalate crystal deposition soon after 7 days of co-treatment. Massive calcium oxalate formation and calcium crystal excretion in HS+HP rats were seen after 42 days of treatment. HP-mediated hypocitraturia was further exacerbated by HS. Moreover, HS aggravated HP-induced renal injury and tubular damage via increased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Increased urinary malondialdehyde excretion, in situ superoxide production, NAD(P)H oxidase and xanthine oxidase expression and activity, and decreased antioxidant enzyme expression or activity in the HS+HP kidney indicated exaggerated oxidative stress. Interestingly, this redox imbalance was associated with reduced renal osteopontin and Tamm-Horsfall protein expression (via increased excretion) and sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC-1 upregulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a HS diet induces massive crystal formation in the hyperoxaluric kidney; this is not due to increased urinary calcium excretion but is related to oxidative injury and loss of anticrystallization defense.

  13. High Sodium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Poor Anticrystallization Defense Aggravate Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Rat Hyperoxaluric Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced sodium excretion is associated with intrarenal oxidative stress. The present study evaluated whether oxidative stress caused by high sodium (HS) may be involved in calcium oxalate crystal formation. Male rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet. Normal-sodium and HS diets were achieved by providing drinking water containing 0.3% and 3% NaCl, respectively. Rats were fed a sodium-depleted diet with 5% hydroxyl-L-proline (HP) for 7 and 42 days to induce hyperoxaluria and/or calcium oxalate deposition. Compared to normal sodium, HS slightly increased calcium excretion despite diuresis; however, the result did not reach statistical significance. HS did not affect the hyperoxaluria, hypocalciuria or supersaturation caused by HP; however, it increased calcium oxalate crystal deposition soon after 7 days of co-treatment. Massive calcium oxalate formation and calcium crystal excretion in HS+HP rats were seen after 42 days of treatment. HP-mediated hypocitraturia was further exacerbated by HS. Moreover, HS aggravated HP-induced renal injury and tubular damage via increased apoptosis and oxidative stress. Increased urinary malondialdehyde excretion, in situ superoxide production, NAD(P)H oxidase and xanthine oxidase expression and activity, and decreased antioxidant enzyme expression or activity in the HS+HP kidney indicated exaggerated oxidative stress. Interestingly, this redox imbalance was associated with reduced renal osteopontin and Tamm-Horsfall protein expression (via increased excretion) and sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter NaDC-1 upregulation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that a HS diet induces massive crystal formation in the hyperoxaluric kidney; this is not due to increased urinary calcium excretion but is related to oxidative injury and loss of anticrystallization defense. PMID:26241473

  14. Effects of Orthosiphon grandiflorus, Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus extracts on risk factors for urinary calcium oxalate stones in rats.

    PubMed

    Woottisin, Surachet; Hossain, Rayhan Zubair; Yachantha, Chatchai; Sriboonlue, Pote; Ogawa, Yoshihide; Saito, Seiichi

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the antilithic effect of Orthosiphon grandiflorus, Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus extracts on known risk factors for calcium oxalate stones in rats. We divided 30 male Wistar rats into 5 equal groups. Controls were fed a standard diet and the remaining groups received a 3% glycolate diet for 4 weeks to induce hyperoxaluria. One glycolate fed group served as the untreated group and the others were given oral extracts of Orthosiphon grandiflorus, Hibiscus sabdariffa or Phyllanthus amarus at a dose of 3.5 mg daily. We collected 24-hour urine and blood samples. Kidneys were harvested for histological examination. We measured the renal tissue content of calcium and oxalate. The Hibiscus sabdariffa group showed significantly decreased serum oxalate and glycolate, and higher oxalate urinary excretion. The Phyllanthus amarus group showed significantly increased urinary citrate vs the untreated group. Histological examination revealed less CaOx crystal deposition in the kidneys of Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus treated rats than in untreated rats. Those rats also had significantly lower renal tissue calcium content than untreated rats. All parameters in the Orthosiphon grandiflorus treated group were comparable to those in the untreated group. Hibiscus sabdariffa and Phyllanthus amarus decreased calcium crystal deposition in the kidneys. The antilithic effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa may be related to decreased oxalate retention in the kidney and more excretion into urine while that of Phyllanthus amarus may depend on increased urinary citrate. In contrast, administering Orthosiphon grandiflorus had no antilithic effect. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Using MRI to detect and differentiate calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in air-bubble-free phantom.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Fan, Xiaobing; Peng, Bo; Foxley, Sean; Palgen, Jeremy; Newstead, Gillian M

    2015-12-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOX) crystals and calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA) crystals were commonly associated with breast benign and malignant lesions, respectively. In this research, CaOX (n = 6) and CaHA (n = 6) crystals in air-bubble-free agarose phantom were studied and characterized by using MRI at 9.4 T scanner. Calcium micro-crystals, with sizes that ranged from 200 to 500 µm, were made with either 99% pure CaOX or CaHA powder and embedded in agar to mimic the dimensions and calcium content of breast microcalcifications in vivo. MRI data were acquired with high spatial resolution T2-weighted (T2W) images and gradient echo images with five different echo times (TEs). The crystal areas were determined by setting the threshold relative to agarose signal. The ratio of crystal areas was calculated by the measurements from gradient echo images divided by T2W images. Then the ratios as a function of TE were fitted with the radical function. The results showed that the blooming artifacts due to magnetic susceptibility between agar and CaHA crystals were more than twice as large as the susceptibility in CaOX crystals (p < 0.05). In addition, larger bright rings were observed on gradient echo images around CaHA crystals compared to CaOX crystals. Our results suggest that MRI may provide useful information regarding breast microcalcifications by evaluating the apparent area of crystal ratios obtained between gradient echo and T2W images. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutrient intake and urine composition in calcium oxalate stone-forming dogs: comparison with healthy dogs and impact of dietary modification.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Abigail E; Blackburn, Judith M; Markwell, Peter J; Robertson, William G

    2004-01-01

    Nutrient intake and urine composition were analyzed in calcium oxalate (CaOx)stone-forming and healthy control dogs to identify factors that contribute to CaOx urolithiasis. Stone-forming dogs had significantly lower intake of sodium, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus and significantly higher urinary calcium and oxalate concentrations, calcium excretion, and CaOx relative supersaturation (RSS). Feeding a diet used in the treatment of canine lower urinary tract disease for 1 month was associated with increased intake of moisture, sodium, and fat; reduced intake of potassium and calcium; and decreased urinary calcium and oxalate concentrations, calcium excretion, and CaOx RSS. No clinical signs of disease recurrence were observed in the stone-forming dogs when the diet was fed for an additional 11 months. The results suggest that hypercalciuria and hyperoxaluria contribute to the formation of CaOx uroliths in dogs and show that dietary modifications can alter this process.

  17. Absorption kinetics of oxalate from oxalate-rich food in man

    SciTech Connect

    Prenen, J.A.; Boer, P.; Dorhout Mees, E.J.

    1984-11-01

    The absorption of oxalate was investigated in a healthy subject after ingestion of oxalate-rich meals (spinach and rhubarb) with and without addition of /sup 14/C-labeled oxalic acid and calcium oxalate, and after oxalate-free meals with addition of nonlabeled sodium oxalate and calcium oxalate. Under these conditions, calcium oxalate was absorbed to the same extent as soluble oxalate; only a small percentage (2.4 +/- 0.7) of the total oxalate load was absorbed. Significant oxalate absorption occurred within 1 to 8 h after ingestion. The results suggest that under normal conditions the proximal part of the small bowel is a major absorption site.

  18. Absorption kinetics of oxalate from oxalate-rich food in man.

    PubMed

    Prenen, J A; Boer, P; Dorhout Mees, E J

    1984-11-01

    The absorption of oxalate was investigated in a healthy subject after ingestion of oxalate-rich meals (spinach and rhubarb) with and without addition of 14C-labeled oxalic acid and calcium oxalate, and after oxalate-free meals with addition of nonlabeled sodium oxalate and calcium oxalate. Under these conditions, calcium oxalate was absorbed to the same extent as soluble oxalate; only a small percentage (2.4 +/- 0.7) of the total oxalate load was absorbed. Significant oxalate absorption occurred within 1 to 8 h after ingestion. The results suggest that under normal conditions the proximal part of the small bowel is a major absorption site.

  19. Papillary calcifications: a new prognostic factor in idiopathic calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Strohmaier, Walter Ludwig; Hörmann, Markus; Schubert, Gernot

    2013-11-01

    Metabolic evaluation is not suitable to forecast the course of the disease in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formation (iCaOxU). An important pathway in CaOx stone formation is the overgrowth on interstitial apatite papillary plaques. Therefore, we studied whether the extent of such plaques may be used as a prognostic factor in CaOxU. Prospectively, we studied n = 100 patients with iCaOxU. For stone analysis, X-ray diffraction/polarizing microscopy was used. During flexible ureteroscopy and flexible percutaneous nephrolithotomy, all the renal papillae were inspected, counted and the severity of calcifications assessed. A calcification index (CI) was calculated: sum of the No. of papillae × calcification grade (1-3) × No. of calcified/total No. of papillae. Furthermore, the following parameters were examined in all patients: age, sex, BMI, arterial blood pressure, stone episodes, DM; blood: creatinine, glucose, uric acid, calcium, sodium and potassium; urine: pH, volume, calcium, uric acid, citrate, ammonia and urea. Using the statistic programme Prism 5 (GraphPad), summary statistics and non-parametric correlations (Spearman) and their significance were calculated. The CI correlated significantly (r = 0.37; p = 0.012) with the No. of stone episodes. Apart from citrate (r = 0.51; p = 0.002), none of the conventional metabolic parameters correlated significantly with the No. of stone episodes. Paradoxically, the citrate excretion-although citrate being an inhibitor of CaOx stone formation-positively correlated to the recurrence rate. The endoscopic assessment of papillary plaques/calcifications and the calculation of the CI are a more suitable prognostic factor in CaOx than conventional metabolic evaluation.

  20. Stone composition among first-time symptomatic kidney stone formers in the community

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prince; Enders, Felicity T.; Vaughan, Lisa E.; Bergstralh, Eric J; Knoedler, John J.; Krambeck, Amy E; Lieske, John C; Rule, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the variation in kidney stone composition and its relationship to risk factors and recurrence among first-time stone formers in the general population. Patients and Methods Medical records were manually reviewed and validated for symptomatic kidney stone episodes among Olmsted County, Minnesota residents from January 1, 1984 to December 31, 2012. Clinical and laboratory characteristics and the risk of symptomatic recurrence were compared between stone compositions. Results There were 2961 validated first-time symptomatic kidney stone formers. Stone composition analysis was obtained in 1508 (51%) at the first episode. Stone formers were divided into the following mutually exclusive groups: any brushite (0.9%), any struvite (0.9%), any uric acid (4.8%), majority calcium oxalate (76%) or majority hydroxyapatite (18%). Stone composition varied with clinical characteristics. A multivariable model had a 69% probability of correctly estimating stone composition, but assuming calcium oxalate monohydrate stone was correct 65% of the time. Symptomatic recurrence at 10 years was approximately 50% for brushite, struvite, and uric acid, but approximately 30% for calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite stones (P<.001). Recurrence was similar across different proportions of calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite (P-trend=.10). However, among calcium oxalate stones, 10-year recurrence rate ranged from 38% for 100% calcium oxalate dihydrate to 26% for 100% calcium oxalate monohydrate (P-trend=.007). Conclusion Calcium stones are more common (94% of stone formers) than has been previously reported. While clinical and laboratory factors associate with the stone composition, they are of limited utility for estimating stone composition. Rarer stone compositions are more likely to recur. PMID:26349951

  1. Cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandin E2 regulate the attachment of calcium oxalate crystals to renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Takahashi, Yoshitaka; Morita, Nobuyo; Moriyama, Manabu T; Kosaka, Takeo; Nishio, Matomo; Yoshimoto, Tanihiro; Suzuki, Koji

    2012-10-01

    To determine the roles of endogenous cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandin E(2) in crystal-cell binding, which is considered to be an important step in the development of intratubular nephrocalcinosis. An expression plasmid for human cyclooxygenase 2 was introduced into Madin-Darby canine kidney cells using the lipofection method. Cyclooxygenase activity was measured using thin-layer chromatography, and the prostaglandin E(2) concentration was determined with an enzyme immunoassay. In addition, crystal attachment was evaluated with a liquid scintillation counter using [(14)C] calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, and immunohistochemistry and an enzyme immunoassay were used to analyze and quantify the expression of hyaluronan, a crystal-binding molecule. Cyclooxygenase 2-overexpressing Madin-Darby canine kidney cells produced about 10-fold more prostaglandin E(2) than wild-type Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, and their hyaluronan production was also upregulated. The attachment of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals to cyclooxygenase 2-overexpressing Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was significantly reduced compared with their attachment to wild-type and mock-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Pre-incubation of the cyclooxygenase 2-overexpressing cells, as well as the mock-transfected and wild-type cells with the cyclooxygenase 2 selective inhibitor etodolac, increased the cellular attachment of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that cyclooxygenase 2 expression and the resultant increase in endogenous prostaglandin E(2), leading to increased hyaluronan production, help to prevent nephrocalcinosis by inhibiting the attachment of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals to the surface of renal epithelial cells. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. The Use of Oxalic Acid as a Chelating Agent in the Dissolution Reaction of Calcium Molybdate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, Sedat; Kalpakli, Ahmet Orkun; Kahruman, Cem; Yusufoglu, Ibrahim

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the dissolution behavior of calcium molybdate (CaMoO4) was investigated in oxalic acid (H2C2O4) solution. The effects of stirring speed, temperature, H2C2O4 concentration, and particle size on the dissolution reaction of CaMoO4 were determined. The dissolved quantities of molybdenum and calcium were analyzed quantitatively by ICP-OES. Fractional conversion of CaMoO4 vs time and concentration of calcium vs time diagrams were plotted. It was observed that at constant temperatures and lower H2C2O4 concentrations, the dissolution increased by increasing H2C2O4 concentration, but at higher H2C2O4 concentrations, the effect of H2C2O4 concentrations was negligible. The dissolution reaction of CaMoO4 in H2C2O4 solution was performed in two steps as series-parallel type reaction. In the first step, CaMoO4 reacted with H2C2O4 to form the water-soluble calcium aqua oxalato molybdate (Ca[MoO3(C2O4)(H2O)]) intermediate chelate product. In the second step, the intermediate chelate, Ca[MoO3(C2O4)(H2O)], reacted with the reactant, H2C2O4, to yield water-soluble hydrogen oxalato dimolybdate chelate (H2[(MoO3)2(C2O4)]) and insoluble CaC2O4H2O as final products. It was found that 500 rpm was enough to eliminate the resistance of liquid film layer that surrounds the solid particles. It was concluded that the optimum temperature was 313 K (40 °C) and the optimum concentration of H2C2O4 was 1 kmol m-3 to obtain high conversion during the dissolution of CaMoO4.

  3. [Biochemical effects of potassium citrate in the treatment of calcium oxalate lithiasis].

    PubMed

    Conte Visús, A; Ibarz Servio, L; Arrabal Martín, M; Ibarz Navarro, J M; Ruiz Marcellán, F J

    1994-03-01

    The serum and urinary biochemical changes observed one month and six months after oral potassium citrate therapy (600 mEq/day) in 119 patients with calcium oxalate calculi were compared with those of 16 untreated cases with lithiasis. The patients that received treatment were previously divided into two groups: group A comprised 61 hypocitraturic patients and group B comprised 58 patients with other urinary disorders who were normo or hypocitraturic. The urinary pH increased by approximately half a point in both treated groups. In group A calciuria increased slightly from 180 +/- 8 to 216 +/- 10 mg/24 h but remained within the normal ranges. Creatinuria, oxaluria, uricosuria and diuresis showed no changes. Citraturia increased very significantly in both groups and more markedly in the hypocitraturic group of patients (from 198 +/- 13 to 476 +/- 35 mg/24 h). The LRC (lithogenic risk coefficient = Ca/Cit x Diu) dropped by 50%. The patients tolerated the treatment regimen well; of the 119 treated patients, only 11 abandoned treatment due to GI intolerance.

  4. Diversity and distribution of idioblasts producing calcium oxalate crystals in Dieffenbachia seguine (Araceae).

    PubMed

    Coté, Gary G

    2009-07-01

    Although cells that synthesize crystals are known throughout the plant kingdom, their functional significance is still unknown. Mechanical support, mineral balance, waste sequestration, and protection against herbivores have all been proposed as crystal functions. To seek clues to their role(s), I systematically examined all organs except fruit of Dieffenbachia seguine (Araceae) for crystals. Crystals were found in nearly every organ. Raphides (long, slim, pointed crystals) were most common, but druses (crystal aggregates) and prisms were also found. Raphides varied in size by a factor of 10 and also in organization from tightly bundled to loosely organized. Biforines, a type of cell capable of expelling raphides, or biforine-like cells, were found in nearly all organs, but especially in leaves, spathes, and anthers. Different organs had different crystal complements, and characteristic crystals were found at specific locations, such as among pollen, along the undersides of leaf veins, and at root branch points. All crystals appeared to be composed of calcium oxalate, based on acid solubility. Possible roles of the crystals are discussed in light of these findings.

  5. Calcium oxalate crystals induce renal inflammation by NLRP3-mediated IL-1β secretion

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Shrikant R.; Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Rupanagudi, Khader V.; Migliorini, Adriana; Darisipudi, Murthy N.; Vilaysane, Akosua; Muruve, Daniel; Shi, Yan; Munro, Fay; Liapis, Helen; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Nephrocalcinosis, acute calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephropathy, and renal stone disease can lead to inflammation and subsequent renal failure, but the underlying pathological mechanisms remain elusive. Other crystallopathies, such as gout, atherosclerosis, and asbestosis, trigger inflammation and tissue remodeling by inducing IL-1β secretion, leading us to hypothesize that CaOx crystals may induce inflammation in a similar manner. In mice, intrarenal CaOx deposition induced tubular damage, cytokine expression, neutrophil recruitment, and renal failure. We found that CaOx crystals activated murine renal DCs to secrete IL-1β through a pathway that included NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1. Despite a similar amount of crystal deposits, intrarenal inflammation, tubular damage, and renal dysfunction were abrogated in mice deficient in MyD88; NLRP3, ASC, and caspase-1; IL-1R; or IL-18. Nephropathy was attenuated by DC depletion, ATP depletion, or therapeutic IL-1 antagonism. These data demonstrated that CaOx crystals trigger IL-1β–dependent innate immunity via the NLRP3/ASC/caspase-1 axis in intrarenal mononuclear phagocytes and directly damage tubular cells, leading to the release of the NLRP3 agonist ATP. Furthermore, these results suggest that IL-1β blockade may prevent renal damage in nephrocalcinosis. PMID:23221343

  6. The Association of Household Food Insecurity and the Risk of Calcium Oxalate Stones.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Hamid; Dorosty Motlagh, Ahmad-Reza; Bagherniya, Mohammad; Daeezadeh, Atefeh; Safarian, Mohammad

    2017-08-29

    Food insecurity has been defined as 'limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods', which associated with adverse health consequences in human. Another alarming condition, which is related to several comorbidities is kidney stone. This study aimed to determine the association of household food insecurity and developing kidney stones (calcium oxalate) in adults referred to medical centers of Babol. This case-control study included 200 participants 18-65 years of ages (100 cases, 100 controls). An 18-items food insecurity questionnaire (USDA), a valid and reliable 147-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and demographic characteristics were obtained via interviewing. Sixty eight percent of cases and 40% of controls were food insecure, respectively. Food insecurity was significantly associated with the risk of kidney stone (P < .05). Furthermore, body mass index (BMI) and family history of kidney stone were significantly associated with the risk of kidney stones (P < .05). Food insecurity and BMI were significantly associated with the kidney stone, which shows the importance of availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods in prevention of the kidney stone.

  7. Associations of diet and breed with recurrence of calcium oxalate cystic calculi in dogs.

    PubMed

    Allen, Heidi S; Swecker, William S; Becvarova, Iveta; Weeth, Lisa P; Werre, Stephen R

    2015-05-15

    To evaluate the long-term risk of recurrence of calcium oxalate (CaOx) cystic calculi in dogs of various breeds fed 1 of 2 therapeutic diets. Retrospective cohort study. Animals-135 dogs with a history of CaOx cystic calculi. Medical records for 4 referral hospitals were searched to identify dogs that had had CaOx cystic calculi removed. Owners were contacted and medical records evaluated to obtain information on postoperative diet, recurrence of signs of lower urinary tract disease, and recurrence of cystic calculi. Dogs were grouped on the basis of breed (high-risk breeds, low-risk breeds, and Miniature Schnauzers) and diet fed after removal of cystic calculi (diet A, diet B, and any other diet [diet C], with diets A and B being therapeutic diets formulated to prevent recurrence of CaOx calculi). Breed group was a significant predictor of calculi recurrence (as determined by abdominal radiography or ultrasonography), with Miniature Schnauzers having 3 times the risk of recurrence as did dogs of other breeds. Dogs in diet group A had a lower prevalence of recurrence than did dogs in diet group C, but this difference was not significant in multivariable analysis. Results indicated that Miniature Schnauzers had a higher risk of CaOx cystic calculi recurrence than did dogs of other breeds. In addition, findings suggested that diet may play a role in decreasing recurrence, but future prospective studies are needed to validate these observations.

  8. Bikunin prevents adhesion of calcium oxalate crystal to renal tubular cells in human urine.

    PubMed

    Ebisuno, S; Nishihata, M; Inagaki, T; Umehara, M; Kohjimoto, Y

    1999-11-01

    Crystal-renal tubular cell interactions are important factors in crystal retention and development of kidney stones. It has been reported that human urine, especially its macromolecular fraction, distinctively prevented calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal adhesion to tubular cells. This study was designed to find and isolate a specific substance in human urine with a strong inhibitory effect against crystal adhesion. A protein from the urine was purified by two anion exchange chromatography columns and one gel filtration column. The inhibition activity for COM crystal adhesion to Madin-Darby canine kidney cells was determined quantitatively. Amino acid sequence of the protein was analyzed and then subjected to homology search in the GenBank protein database. A specific human urine protein that inhibited the COM crystal adhesion to the cells was isolated and identified. Molecular mass of the protein was approximately 35 kD. The first 20-amino acid sequence from the N-terminal of the purified protein was structurally homologous with the light chain of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor, also called bikunin. The isolated bikunin inhibited crystal adhesion at a minimum concentration of 10 ng/ml, and blocked completely at 200 ng/ml. It is concluded that bikunin may contribute to the regulation of crystal adhesion and retention within tubules during kidney stone formation.

  9. Specificity in calcium oxalate adherence to papillary epithelial cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Riese, R.J.; Riese, J.W.; Kleinman, J.G.; Wiessner, J.H.; Mandel, G.S.; Mandel, N.S. )

    1988-11-01

    Attachment of microcystallites to cellular membranes may be an important component of the pathophysiology of many diseases including urolithiasis. This study attempts to characterize the interaction of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals and apatite (AP) crystals with renal papillary collecting tubule (RPCT) cells in primary culture. Primary cultures of RPCT cells showed the characteristic monolayer growth with sporadically interspersed clumped cells. Cultures were incubated with ({sup 14}C)CaOx crystals, and the crystals that bound were quantified by microscopy and adherent radioactivity. Per unit of cross-sectional area, 32 times more CaOx crystals were bound to the clumps than to the monolayer. CaOx adherence demonstrated concentration-dependent saturation with a {beta} value (fraction of cell culture area binding CaOx crystals) of 0.179 and a 1/{alpha}{sub ox} value of 287 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}. On incubation with AP crystals, CaOx binding demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition with a 1/{alpha}{sub AP} value of 93 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}. Microcystallite adherence to RPCT cells demonstrates selectivity for cellular clumps, saturation, and inhibition. These features suggest specific binding.

  10. Inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallisation in vitro by an extract of Bergenia ciliata

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sarmistha; Verma, Ramtej J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an extract obtained from the rhizomes of Bergenia ciliata (Saxifragaceae) on the inhibition of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallisation in vitro. Materials and methods A hydro-alcoholic extract (30:70, v/v) of rhizomes of B. ciliata was prepared at different concentrations (1–10 mg/mL). The crystallisation of CaOx monohydrate (COM) was induced in a synthetic urine system. The nucleation and aggregation of COM crystals were measured using spectrophotometric methods. The rates of nucleation and aggregation were evaluated by comparing the slope of the turbidity of a control system with that of one exposed to the extract. The results were compared with a parallel study conducted with a marketed poly-herbal combination, Cystone, under identical concentrations. Crystals generated in the urine were also analysed by light microscopy. Statistical differences and percentage inhibitions were calculated and assessed. Results The extract of B. ciliata was significantly more effective in inhibiting the nucleation and aggregation of COM crystals in a dose-dependent manner than was Cystone. Moreover, the extract induced more CaOx dihydrate crystals, with a significant reduction in the number and size of COM crystals. Conclusion An extract of the traditional herb B. ciliata has an excellent inhibitory activity on crystalluria and therefore might be beneficial in dissolving urinary stones. However, further study in animal models of urolithiasis is needed to evaluate its potential anti-urolithiatic activity. PMID:26558080

  11. Contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Goodman, H. O.; Assimos, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate excreted in urine has a significant impact on calcium oxalate supersaturation and stone formation. Dietary oxalate is believed to make only a minor (10 to 20%) contribution to the amount of oxalate excreted in urine, but the validity of the experimental observations that support this conclusion can be questioned. An understanding of the actual contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion is important, as it is potentially modifiable. METHODS: We varied the amount of dietary oxalate consumed by a group of adult individuals using formula diets and controlled, solid-food diets with a known oxalate content, determined by a recently developed analytical procedure. Controlled solid-food diets were consumed containing 10, 50, and 250 mg of oxalate/2500 kcal, as well as formula diets containing 0 and 180 mg oxalate/2500 kcal. Changes in the content of oxalate and other ions were assessed in 24-hour urine collections. RESULTS: Urinary oxalate excretion increased as dietary oxalate intake increased. With oxalate-containing diets, the mean contribution of dietary oxalate to urinary oxalate excretion ranged from 24.4 +/- 15.5% on the 10 mg/2500 kcal/day diet to 41.5 +/- 9.1% on the 250 mg/2500 kcal/day diet, much higher than previously estimated. When the calcium content of a diet containing 250 mg of oxalate was reduced from 1002 mg to 391 mg, urinary oxalate excretion increased by a mean of 28.2 +/- 4.8%, and the mean dietary contribution increased to 52.6 +/- 8.6%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary oxalate makes a much greater contribution to urinary oxalate excretion than previously recognized, that dietary calcium influences the bioavailability of ingested oxalate, and that the absorption of dietary oxalate may be an important factor in calcium oxalate stone formation.

  12. Extraction and estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate crystals in the foliage of conifer and hardwood trees.

    PubMed

    Minocha, Rakesh; Chamberlain, Bradley; Long, Stephanie; Turlapati, Swathi A; Quigley, Gloria

    2015-05-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop a method for the extraction and indirect estimation of the quantity of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the foliage of trees. Foliar tissue was collected from a single tree of each species (five conifers and five hardwoods) for comparison of extractions in different solvents using 10 replicates per species from the same pool of tissue. For each species, calcium (Ca) and oxalate were extracted sequentially in double deionized water and 2N acetic acid, and finally, five replicate samples were extracted in 5% (0.83N) perchloric acid (PCA) and the other five in 2N hydrochloric acid (HCl); three cycles of freezing and thawing were used for each solvent. Total ions were extracted by microwave digestion. Calcium was quantified with an inductively coupled plasma emission spectrophotometer method and oxalate was eluted and quantified using a high performance liquid chromatography method. This experiment was repeated again with two conifer and two hardwood species using four trees per species, and two analytical replicates for each tree. We report here that, regardless of age of individual trees within a species, time of collection or species type, the third extraction in PCA or HCl resulted in near equimolar quantities of Ca and oxalate (r(2) ≥ 0.99). This method provides an easy estimate of the quantity of CaOx crystals using a small sample of foliar tissue. An additional benefit of PCA is that it precipitates the nucleic acids and proteins, allowing the quantification of several free/soluble metabolites such as amino acids, polyamines, organic acids and inorganic elements all from a single sample extract.

  13. Peeping into human renal calcium oxalate stone matrix: characterization of novel proteins involved in the intricate mechanism of urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Kanu Priya; Tandon, Simran; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of patients suffering from urolithiasis represents one of the major challenges which nephrologists face worldwide today. For enhancing therapeutic outcomes of this disease, the pathogenic basis for the formation of renal stones is the need of hour. Proteins are found as major component in human renal stone matrix and are considered to have a potential role in crystal-membrane interaction, crystal growth and stone formation but their role in urolithiasis still remains obscure. Proteins were isolated from the matrix of human CaOx containing kidney stones. Proteins having MW>3 kDa were subjected to anion exchange chromatography followed by molecular-sieve chromatography. The effect of these purified proteins was tested against CaOx nucleation and growth and on oxalate injured Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) renal epithelial cells for their activity. Proteins were identified by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF MS) followed by database search with MASCOT server. In silico molecular interaction studies with CaOx crystals were also investigated. Five proteins were identified from the matrix of calcium oxalate kidney stones by MALDI-TOF MS followed by database search with MASCOT server with the competence to control the stone formation process. Out of which two proteins were promoters, two were inhibitors and one protein had a dual activity of both inhibition and promotion towards CaOx nucleation and growth. Further molecular modelling calculations revealed the mode of interaction of these proteins with CaOx at the molecular level. We identified and characterized Ethanolamine-phosphate cytidylyltransferase, Ras GTPase-activating-like protein, UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 2, RIMS-binding protein 3A, Macrophage-capping protein as novel proteins from the matrix of human calcium oxalate stone which play a critical role in kidney stone formation. Thus, these proteins having potential to modulate calcium

  14. Critical role of oxalate restriction in association with calcium restriction to decrease the probability of being a stone former: insufficient effect in idiopathic hypercalciuria.

    PubMed

    Bataille, P; Pruna, A; Gregoire, I; Charransol, G; de Fremont, J F; Coevoet, B; Galy, C; Fournier, A

    1983-01-01

    The probability of being a stone former (PSF) was calculated according to the method of Robertson in three groups of idiopathic calcium stone formers (normocalciuria (NCa), dietary hypercalciuria (DH) and idiopathic hypercalciuria (IH] during four conditions: on a free diet; on a calcium and oxalate restricted diet for four days and after an oxalate load (200 g of spinach) while on a calcium unrestricted or calcium restricted diet. Combined calciuria (Ca) and oxaluria (Ox) restriction significantly decreased PSF only in NCa and DH whereas the decrease was not significant in IH because of a concomitant significant increase in oxalate excretion. Increase of PSF with the oxalate load was significantly greater on calcium restricted than on calcium unrestricted diets in all groups of patients (4-6-12 times greater in NCa, DH and IH respectively). This shows the critical role of oxalate restriction when calcium is restricted in order to decrease the PSF. Combined restriction is not sufficient in idiopathic hypercalciuric patients to decrease their probability of stone formation.

  15. Changes in urinary stone risk factors in hypocitraturic calcium oxalate stone formers treated with dietary sodium supplementation.

    PubMed

    Stoller, Marshall L; Chi, Thomas; Eisner, Brian H; Shami, Gina; Gentle, Donald L

    2009-03-01

    We investigated the effects of supplemental dietary sodium on risk factors for urinary stone disease in stone forming patients with hypocitraturia. Ten patients diagnosed with recurrent isolated hypocitraturic calcium urolithiasis were identified. Baseline 24-hour urinalysis was performed with patients on their regular diet, including citrate replacement with 20 mEq potassium citrate 3 times per day. Strict daily dietary logs were kept for a 7-day period, during which patients had normal oral intake and potassium citrate replacement. Patients then received supplemental sodium chloride for 1 week (1 gm orally 3 times per day), in addition to their regular diets and potassium citrate supplementation. Dietary logs were continued and 24-hour urinalysis was performed at the end of 1 week of supplemental sodium. Risk factors for urinary stone disease were compared using the Student t test and ANOVA. Two patients were unable to comply with sodium supplementation based on 24-hour urinalysis and, therefore, they were excluded from study. The remaining 8 patients were analyzed. Patients on supplemental dietary sodium demonstrated significantly increased mean urinary voided volume (933 ml per day above baseline, p <0.05) and mean urinary sodium excretion (66 mEq per day above baseline, p <0.05). There was no statistically significant change in urinary calcium, oxalate or uric acid. The urinary supersaturation relative risk ratio decreased for calcium oxalate stones (0.93 vs 0.63, p <0.05), while those of brushite, struvite and uric acid were not different before vs after supplemental sodium. Dietary sodium supplementation resulted in an increased voided urine volume and decreased the relative risk supersaturation ratio for calcium oxalate stones in patients with a history of hypocitraturic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Urinary calcium excretion as well as other urine parameters that are risk factors for nephrolithiasis was not changed. Sodium restriction may be

  16. Isolation of a Crystal Matrix Protein Associated with Calcium Oxalate Precipitation in Vacuoles of Specialized Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J.; Okita, Thomas W.; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix “ghost” that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation. PMID:14555781

  17. M1/M2-macrophage phenotypes regulate renal calcium oxalate crystal development

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Okada, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Unno, Rei; Moritoki, Yoshinobu; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Tozawa, Keiichi; Kohri, Kenjiro; Yasui, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    In our previous report, M2-macrophage (Mφs) deficient mice showed increased renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal formation; however, the role of Mφs-related-cytokines and chemokines that affect kidney stone formation remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of M1/M2s in crystal development by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. The crystal phagocytic rate of bone marrow-derived M2Mφs was higher than that of bone marrow-derived Mφs and M1Mφs and increased on co-culture with renal tubular cells (RTCs). However, the amount of crystal attachment on RTCs reduced on co-culture with M2Mφs. In six hyperoxaluric C57BL/6J mice, M1Mφ transfusion and induction by LPS and IFN-γ facilitated renal crystal formation, whereas M2Mφ transfusion and induction by IL-4 and IL-13 suppressed renal crystal formation compared with the control. These M2Mφ treatments reduced the expression of crystal-related genes, such as osteopontin and CD44, whereas M1Mφ treatment increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and adhesion-related genes such as IL-6, inducible NOS, TNF-α, C3, and VCAM-1. The expression of M2Mφ-related genes was lower whereas that of M1Mφ-related genes was higher in papillary tissue of CaOx stone formers. Overall, our results suggest that renal crystal development is facilitated by M1Mφs, but suppressed by M2Mφs. PMID:27731368

  18. Comparison of body condition score and urinalysis variables between dogs with and without calcium oxalate uroliths

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Stephanie M.; Lulich, Jody P.; Ritt, Michelle G.; Furrow, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare body condition score (BCS) and urinalysis variables between dogs with and without calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths. DESIGN Case-control study. ANIMALS 46 Miniature Schnauzers, 16 Bichons Frises, and 6 Shih Tzus. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed for Miniature Schnauzers, Bichons Frises, and Shih Tzus that were examined between January 2001 and November 2014 for another urolithiasis study or for a urolith removal procedure. Dogs with CaOx uroliths were classified as cases. Dogs without a history of urinary tract disease and with no evidence of radiopaque uroliths on abdominal radiographs were classified as controls. Each case was matched with 1 control on the basis of age (± 2 years), sex, and breed. Body condition score and urinalysis results were compared between cases and controls, and the relationship between BCS and urine pH was analyzed. RESULTS Median BCS was significantly greater for cases than controls, although the proportion of overweight dogs did not differ significantly between the 2 groups. Urine pH was negatively associated with age, but was not associated with BCS or the presence of CaOx uroliths. Cases infrequently had acidic urine or CaOx crystalluria but frequently had hematuria and proteinuria. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that dogs with CaOx uroliths had a greater median BCS than control dogs, but the clinical importance of that finding was unclear. Acidic urine and CaOx crystalluria were uncommon and not adequate predictors of CaOx urolith status. Hematuria and proteinuria were commonly observed in dogs with CaOx urolithiasis, but they are not pathognomonic for that condition. PMID:27875079

  19. Characterization of calcium oxalate crystal-induced changes in the secretome of U937 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Singhto, Nilubon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-03-01

    In kidney stone disease, migratory monocytes have been found to mediate progressive renal inflammation through the secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. However, whether calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), which is the major crystalline compound of kidney stones, has any effects on proteins secreted from monocytes remained largely unknown. The present study aimed to characterize changes in the secretome of U937 human monocytes induced by COM crystals. The viability of cells in serum/protein-free medium was serially evaluated and the data revealed that an exposure time of 16 h was optimal for this study, whereas prolonged incubation for 24 h resulted in declined cell viability. Using this optimal time-point, the secreted proteins recovered from serum/protein-free culture supernatants of controlled and COM-treated cells were resolved in 2-DE and stained with Deep Purple fluorescent dye. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed statistically significant changes in levels of 18 secreted proteins (14 increased and 4 decreased) from COM-treated cells. These significantly altered secreted proteins were then identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. Among these, the increased levels of secreted heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), HSP70 and β-actin were confirmed by Western blot analysis. The increased level of extracellular HSP90 was confirmed on the COM-treated cell surface by the immunofluorescence study, whereas the increased secretion of IFN-α was validated by ELISA. Global protein network analysis, literature search and bioinformatics revealed that these significantly altered secreted proteins were involved mainly in immune response and cell survival. Therefore, changes in the secretome of monocytes induced by COM crystals may be related, at least in part, to progressive renal inflammation found in kidney stone disease.

  20. Second prize: Comprehensive proteomic analysis of human calcium oxalate monohydrate kidney stone matrix.

    PubMed

    Canales, Benjamin K; Anderson, Lorraine; Higgins, Leeann; Slaton, Joel; Roberts, Ken P; Liu, Nathan; Monga, Manoj

    2008-06-01

    Previous efforts to identify the protein content of stone matrix have been limited by the lack of technology necessary to analyze the highly insoluble protein-crystalline complex. Our study objective is to characterize the matrix of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones using a comprehensive proteomics approach. Seven pure COM stones were powdered, and proteins were extracted using four different buffer solutions. Detergent cleanup spin columns or concentrators were used to remove detergent and to exchange buffers before trypsin digestion. Tryptic peptides were analyzed with reversed-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using a QSTAR Pulsar i quadrapole time of flight mass spectrometer. Tandem mass spectra were searched against National Center for Biotechnology Information human nonredundant database using ProteinPilot 1.0 software (Applied Biosystems, Inc.) for protein hits; peptide MS/MS spectra were manually inspected. Of the four buffers, only 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) samples had normal HPLC and MS/MS elution patterns. We identified 68 distinct proteins with 95% confidence. More than 50 of the proteins have not been previously identified in stone matrix. Of particular note, a significant number of inflammatory proteins were identified, including immunoglobulins, defensin -3, clusterin, complement C3a, kininogen, and fibrinogen. SDS reducing buffer was efficient at solubilizing proteins from stone matrix for further MS-based proteomic analysis. A variety of cellular, structural, and plasma proteins comprise COM stone matrix. Several of the stone proteins are involved in cell injury pathways, which suggests that inflammation plays a role in human COM stone formation.

  1. Protective Effects of Pistacia lentiscus L. fruit extract against calcium oxalate monohydrate induced proximal tubular injury.

    PubMed

    Cheraft-Bahloul, Nassima; Husson, Cécile; Ourtioualous, Meriam; Sinaeve, Sébastien; Atmani, Djebbar; Stévigny, Caroline; Nortier, Joëlle L; Antoine, Marie-Hélène

    2017-09-14

    The world prevalence of kidney stones is increasing and plants are frequently used to treat urolithiasis. Pistacia lentiscus L, a plant which freely grows around the Mediterranean basin areas, is widely used for various pathologies. P. lentiscus has an important impact as it has economical value on top of its pharmacological interest. Decoctions of its aerial parts and/or resin are used to treat kidney stones. To in vitro assess the potential nephroprotective effect of Pistacia lentiscus ethanolic fruit extract (PLEF) on proximal tubular cells in response to the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Human Kidney [HK]-2 cells were incubated with and without COM in the presence or absence of PLEF. Cell viability was measured by the resazurin assay. The expression of E-cadherin was analyzed by PCR. The extracellular production of H2O2 was measured by Amplex® Red H2O2 Assay. The numbers of detached or non-adherent COM crystals in the presence of PLEF were microscopically captured and counted using ImageJ software. The interaction of PLEF with COM and the effect of PLEF on crystal size were analyzed by flow cytometry. The spectrophotometric measurement of turbidity was performed for assessing the COM concentration. PLEF incubated with COM was able to increase the cell viability. The decrease of E-cadherin expression after incubation with COM was counteracted by PLEF. Overproduction of H2O2 induced by COM was also inhibited by PLEF. Observations using flow cytometry showed that interactions between PLEF and the COM crystals occurred. PLEF was also effective in reducing the particles size and in lowering COM concentration. Our data show that COM tubulotoxicity can be significantly reversed by PLEF -at least in part- via an inhibition of COM crystals adhesion onto the apical membrane. This early beneficial effect of PLEF needs to be further investigated as a useful strategy in nephrolithiasis prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  2. Strain differences in urinary factors that promote calcium oxalate crystal formation in the kidneys of ethylene glycol-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; McMartin, Kenneth E

    2009-05-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG)-induced hyperoxaluria is the most commonly employed experimental regimen as an animal model of calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formation. The variant sensitivity to CaOx among different rat strains has not been fully explored, although the Wistar rat is known to accumulate more CaOx in kidney tissue after low-dose EG exposure than in the Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Supersaturation of CaOx in tubular fluid contributes to the amount of CaOx crystal formation in the kidney. We hypothesized that the urinary supersaturation of CaOx in Wistar rats is higher than that of F344 rats, thereby allowing for greater CaOx crystal deposition in the Wistar rat. Age-matched male Wistar and F344 rats were treated with 0.75% EG or drinking water for 8 wk. Twenty-four-hour urine was collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 wk for analysis of key electrolytes to calculate the CaOx supersaturation. Plasma oxalate level was also measured. Our data confirmed the different sensitivity to renal toxicity from EG between the two rat strains (Wistar > F344). After EG treatment, the plasma oxalate level and urine oxalate excretion were markedly greater in the Wistar rats than in the F344 rats, while urine calcium was slightly decreased in Wistars. Thus, the CaOx supersaturation in urine of Wistar rats was higher, which led to a greater crystal deposition in kidney in Wistar rats. These studies suggest that during EG treatment, changes in urine electrolytes and in CaOx supersaturation occur to a greater extent in the Wistar rat, in agreement with its greater sensitivity to EG toxicity.

  3. Calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and tubular necrosis in recent metamorphs of Rana sylvatica (Lithobates sylvaticus) fed spinach during the premetamorphic (tadpole) stage.

    PubMed

    Forzán, M J; Ferguson, L V; Smith, T G

    2015-03-01

    Amphibians in the family Ranidae (true frogs) seem highly susceptible to oxalosis, particularly when fed a diet high in oxalic acid during the premetamorphic (tadpole) stage. The authors describe the mortality of 150 captive-raised wood frogs (Rana sylvatica or Lithobates sylvaticus) from oxalate nephrolithiasis and renal tubular necrosis caused by consumption of boiled spinach during tadpole development. Renal lesions were due to intraluminal transparent crystals which were birefringent under polarized light and were identified morphologically and histochemically as composed of calcium oxalate. Evidence of early fibrosis or squamous metaplasia, and a presentation at least 2 weeks after spinach consumption had ended, suggested a subacute course. Tadpole-feeding protocols should avoid plants with high oxalate content (eg, spinach and rhubarb leaves), and any episode of high mortality in captive amphibians along with nephrolithiasis should prompt an evaluation of the feed sources for material with high oxalate content.

  4. Inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate growth by citrate and the effect of the background electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Matthew L.; Qiu, S. Roger; Hoyer, John R.; Casey, William H.; Nancollas, George H.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2007-08-01

    Pathological mineralization is a common phenomenon in broad range of plants and animals. In humans, kidney stone formation is a well-known example that afflicts approximately 10% of the population. Of the various calcium salt phases that comprise human kidney stones, the primary component is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). Citrate, a naturally occurring molecule in the urinary system and a common therapeutic agent for treating stone disease, is a known inhibitor of COM. Understanding the physical mechanisms of citrate inhibition requires quantification of the effects of both background electrolytes and citrate on COM step kinetics. Here we report the results of an in situ AFM study of these effects, in which we measure the effect of the electrolytes LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl, and the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration for a range of COM supersaturations. We find that varying the background electrolyte results in significant differences in the measured step speeds and in step morphology, with KCl clearly producing the smallest impact and NaCl the largest. The kinetic coefficient for the former is nearly three times larger than for the latter, while the steps change from smooth to highly serrated when KCl is changed to NaCl. The results on the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration show that citrate produces a dead zone whose width increases with citrate concentration as well as a continual reduction in kinetic coefficient with increasing citrate level. We relate these results to a molecular-scale view of inhibition that invokes a combination of kink blocking and step pinning. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the classic step-pinning model of Cabrera and Vermilyea (C-V model) does an excellent job of predicting the effect of citrate on COM step kinetics provided the model is reformulated to more realistically account for impurity adsorption, include an expression for the Gibbs-Thomson effect that is correct for all supersaturations

  5. Exposure of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells to oxalate and calcium oxalate crystals activates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aslam; Byer, Karen; Khan, Saeed R

    2014-02-01

    To investigate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase activity in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and the production of reactive oxygen species on exposure to oxalate (Ox) or calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals. Monolayers of confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney cells were exposed to 100, 300, 500 μmol, 1 mmol Ox or 33, 66, 132 μg/cm(2) CaOx crystals for 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, or 3 hours. After specified periods of exposure to Ox and CaOx crystals, lactate dehydrogenase release, trypan blue exclusion, activation of NADPH oxidase, and superoxide production were determined using standard procedures. The production of Nox4, a membrane associated subunit of the NADPH oxidase enzyme, was determined by western blot analysis. Exposure to Ox and CaOx crystals leads to time- and concentration-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase. Western blot analysis showed an increase in the production of Nox4. The production of superoxide also changed in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with maximum increases after 30-minute exposure to the highest concentrations of Ox and CaOx crystals. Longer exposures did not change the results or resulted in decreased activities. Exposure to higher concentrations also caused increased lactate dehydrogenase release and trypan blue exclusion indicating cell damage. Results indicate that cells of the distal tubular origin are equipped with NADPH oxidase that is activated by exposures to Ox and CaOx crystals. Higher concentrations of both lead to cell injury, most probably through the increased reactive oxygen species production by the exposed cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dietary and animal-related factors associated with the rate of urinary oxalate and calcium excretion in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Dijcker, J C; Hagen-Plantinga, E A; Everts, H; Bosch, G; Kema, I P; Hendriks, W H

    2012-07-14

    This paper reports the results of a cohort study and randomised clinical trial (RCT) in cross-over design. In the cohort study, the range of urinary oxalate (Uox) and calcium (Uca) excretion was determined within a sample of the Dutch population of dogs and cats, and dietary and animal-related factors associated with these urine parameters were identified. Spot urine samples were collected from privately owned dogs (n=141) and cats (n=50). The RCT determined the effect of a commercial raw meat diet versus a dry diet on Uox and Uca excretion rate in 23 dogs. In the cohort study, Uox excretion ranged from 21.1 to 170.6 mmol oxalate/mol creatinine in dogs and 27.5 to 161.6 in cats. Urinary calcium excretion ranged from 3.4 to 462.8 mmol calcium/mol creatinine in dogs and 10.1 to 128.0 in cats. In dogs, increased Uox and Uca excretion was associated with (1) the intake of a dry diet as the primary source of energy, (2) receiving no snacks and (3) breed. Increased Uox excretion was associated with males as well. In cats, urine collection in anaesthetised subjects was identified as a confounder. In the RCT, feeding the dry diet resulted in higher Uox (P<0.001) and Uca (P=0.021) excretion rates in dogs.

  7. Urinary outputs of oxalate, calcium, and magnesium in children with intestinal disorders. Potential cause of renal calculi.

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, D; McCollum, J P; Packer, S; Manning, J; Oyesiku, J; Muller, D P; Harries, J T

    1976-01-01

    24-hour urinary outputs of oxalate, calcium, and magnesium have been determined in a total of 62 children aged 3 months to 17 years who fell into the following groups: (i) 16 normal controls, (ii) 3 with primary hyperoxaluria, (iii) 9 with small and/or large intestinal resections, (iv) 9 with untreated coeliac disease, (v) 5 with pancreatic dysfunction, and (vi) a miscellaneous group of 20 children with a variety of intestinal disorders. Taken as a whole, 58% of patients with intestinal disorders had hyperoxaluria, and of these 7% had urinary outputs of oxalate which fell within the range seen in primary hyperoxaluria. The proportion of children with hyperoxaluria in the different diagnostic groups was as follows: intestinal resections (78%), coeliac disease (67%), pancreatic dysfunction (80%), and miscellaneous (45%). 35% of the patients with hyperoxaluria had hypercalciuria, whereas magnesium excretion was normal in all subjects studied. In 2 patients treatment of the underlying condition was accompanied by a return of oxalate excretion to normal. These results indicate that hyperoxaluria and hypercalciuria are common in children with a variety of intestinal disorders, and that such children may be at risk of developing renal calculi without early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:1008583

  8. A simple diagnostic method for the differentiation of Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins from healthy probands and those from recurrent calcium oxalate renal stone formers.

    PubMed

    Schnierle, P

    1995-11-15

    Tamm-Horsfall glycoproteins (THPs)* from healthy probands, and those from a majority of recurrent calcium oxalate renal stone formers, reveal different properties when analyzed using isoelectric focusing. The pl-values of THPs from healthy probands are approximately 3.5 while THPs from recurrent renal stone formers have pl-values between 4.5 and 6. The two groups of THPs exhibit completely different protein patterns in IEF. This proves the structural difference of these THPs. The differences in IEF analysis allow the differentiation between THPs from healthy probands and those from recurrent calcium oxalate stone formers. These differences could possibly be used as a simple diagnostic method for the recognition of recurrent calcium oxalate renal stone formers.

  9. Can Randall's plug composed of calcium oxalate form via the free particle mechanism?

    PubMed

    Grases, F; Söhnel, O

    2017-09-08

    The likelihood of a Randall's plug composed of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) forming by the free particle mechanism in a model of kidney with a structure recently described by Robertson was examined at the most favourable conditions for the considered mechanism. The Robertson model of the kidney is used in the following development. The classical theory of crystallization was used for calculations. Initial COM nuclei were assumed to form at the beginning of the ascending loop of Henle where the supersaturation with respect to COM has been shown to reach the threshold level for spontaneous nucleation. Nucleation proceeds by a heterogeneous mechanism. The formed particles are transported in the nephron by a laminar flow of liquid with a parabolic velocity profile. Particles travel with a velocity dependent on their position in the cross-section of the nephron assumed to be straight tubule with smooth walls and without any sharp bends and kinks. These particles move faster with time as they grow as a result of being surrounded by the supersaturated liquid. Individual COM particles (crystals) can reach maximum diameter of 5.2 × 10(-6) m, i.e. 5.2 μm, at the opening of the CD and would thus always be washed out of the CD into the calyx regardless of the orientation of the CD. Agglomeration of COM crystals forms a fractal object with an apparent density lower than the density of solid COM. The agglomerate that can block the beginning of the CD is composed of more crystals than are available even during crystaluria. Moreover the settling velocity of agglomerate blocking the opening of the CD is lower than the liquid flow and thus such agglomerate would be washed out even from upward-draining CD. The free particle mechanism may be responsible for the formation of a Randall's plug composed by COM only in specific infrequent cases such as an abnormal structure of kidney. Majority of incidences of Randall's plug development by COM are caused by mechanism different

  10. Solubility, inhibition of crystallization and microscopic analysis of calcium oxalate crystals in the presence of fractions from Humulus lupulus L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frąckowiak, Anna; Koźlecki, Tomasz; Skibiński, PrzemysŁaw; GaweŁ, WiesŁaw; Zaczyńska, Ewa; Czarny, Anna; Piekarska, Katarzyna; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-11-01

    Procedures for obtaining noncytotoxic and nonmutagenic extracts from Humulus lupulus L. of high potency for inhibition and dissolving of model (calcium oxalate crystals) and real kidney stones, obtained from patients after surgery, are presented. Multistep extraction procedures were performed in order to obtain the preparations with the highest calcium complexing properties. The composition of obtained active fractions was analyzed by GC/MS and NMR methods. The influence of preparations on inhibition of formation and dissolution of model and real kidney stones were evaluated based on conductrometric titration, flame photometry and microscopic analysis. The "fraction soluble in methanol" obtained from water-alkaline extracts contains sugar alcohols and organic acids, and is effective in dissolving the kidney stones. The "fraction insoluble in methanol" contains only sugar derivatives and it changes the morphology of the crystals, making them "jelly-like". Both fractions are potentially effective in kidney stone therapy.

  11. An oxalyl-CoA dependent pathway of oxalate catabolism plays a role in regulating calcium oxalate crystal accumulation and defending against oxalate-secreting phytopathogens in Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Considering the widespread occurrence of oxalate in nature and its broad impact on a host of organisms, it is surprising that so little is known about the turnover of this important acid. In plants, oxalate oxidase is the most well studied enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, but not all plants pos...

  12. Herbal extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata inhibit growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, V. S.; Parekh, B. B.; Joshi, M. J.; Vaidya, A. B.

    2005-02-01

    A large number of people in this world are suffering from urinary stone problem. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) containing stones (calculi) are commonly found. In the present study, COM crystals were grown by a double diffusion gel growth technique using U-tubes. The gel was prepared from hydrated sodium metasilicate solution. The gel framework acts like a three-dimensional crucible in which the crystal nuclei are delicately held in the position of their formation, and nutrients are supplied for the growth. This technique can be utilized as a simplified screening static model to study the growth, inhibition and dissolution of urinary stones in vitro. The action of putative litholytic medicinal plants, Tribulus terrestris Linn. ( T.t) and Bergenia ligulata Linn. ( B.l.), has been studied in the growth of COM crystals. Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata are commonly used as herbal medicines for urinary calculi in India. To verify the inhibitive effect, aqueous extracts of Tribulus terrestris and Bergenia ligulata were added along with the supernatant solutions. The growth was measured and compared, with and without the aqueous extracts. Inhibition of COM crystal growth was observed in the herbal extracts. Maximum inhibition was observed in Bergenia ligulata followed by Tribulus terrestris. The results are discussed.

  13. High calcium enhances calcium oxalate crystal binding capacity of renal tubular cells via increased surface annexin A1 but impairs their proliferation and healing.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Fong-ngern, Kedsarin; Peerapen, Paleerath; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-07-06

    Hypercalciuria is associated with kidney stone formation and impaired renal function. However, responses of renal tubular cells upon exposure to high-calcium environment remain largely unknown. We thus performed a proteomic analysis of altered proteins in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium and evaluated functional significance of these changes. MDCK cells were maintained with or without 20 mM CaCl(2) for 72 h. Cellular proteins were then analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) (n = 5 gels derived from 5 independent culture flasks per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed 20 protein spots (from a total of 700) that were differentially expressed between the two groups. These altered proteins were then identified by Q-TOF-MS and MS/MS analyses, including those involved in calcium binding, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, mitosis regulation, apoptosis, cell migration, oxidative stress, and ion transport. Protein network analysis and functional validation revealed that high-calcium-exposed cells had 36.5% increase in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal-binding capacity. This functional change was consistent to the expression data in which annexin A1 (ANXA1), a membrane-associated calcium-binding protein, was markedly increased on the apical surface of high-calcium-exposed cells. Pretreatment with anti-ANXA1 antibody could neutralize this increasing crystal-binding capacity. Moreover, high-calcium exposure caused defects in cell proliferation and wound healing. These expression and functional data demonstrate the enhanced crystal-binding capacity but impaired cell proliferation and wound healing in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium. Taken together, these phenomena may contribute, at least in part, to the pathogenic mechanisms of hypercalciuria-induced nephrolithiasis and impaired renal function. Our in vitro study offers several candidates for further

  14. Magnesium hydrogen carbonate natural mineral water enriched with K(+)-citrate and vitamin B6 improves urinary abnormalities in patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Bren, A; Kmetec, A; Kveder, R; Kaplan-Pavlovcic, S

    1998-01-01

    The influence of drinking magnesium hydrogen carbonate natural mineral water enriched with potassium citrate on urinary metabolic abnormalities was prospectively studied in 27 patients with recurrent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. The mean 24-hour urinary pH shifted from 6.34 to 6.93 (p < 0.01), the mean urinary magnesium/urinary creatinine ratio rose from 0.47 to 0.67 (p < 0.01), the mean urinary citrate/urinary creatinine ratio increased from 0.26 to 0.35 (p NS), and the mean 24-hour urinary calcium decreased from 7.98 to 6.05 mmol (p < 0.05). The effects of magnesium hydrogen carbonate natural mineral water enriched with potassium citrate were found to be favorable on urinary calcium, urinary magnesium/urinary creatinine ratio and urinary pH in patients with calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

  15. An assessment of engineered calcium oxalate crystal formation on plant growth and development as a step toward evaluating its use to enhance plant defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment of new approaches to control chewing insects has been sought not only for direct use in reducing crop loss but also in managing resistance to the pesticides already in use. Engineered formation of calcium oxalate crystals is a potential strategy that could be developed to fulfill ...

  16. Oxygen nano-bubble water reduces calcium oxalate deposits and tubular cell injury in ethylene glycol-treated rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yasuhiko; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Okada, Atsushi; Kubota, Yasue; Kawai, Noriyasu; Itoh, Yasunori; Tozawa, Keiichi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2013-08-01

    Renal tubular cell injury induced by oxalate plays an important role in kidney stone formation. Water containing oxygen nano-bubbles (nanometer-sized bubbles generated from oxygen micro-bubbles; ONB) has anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ONB water on kidney stone formation in ethylene glycol (EG)-treated rats. We divided 60 rats, aged 4 weeks, into 5 groups: control, the water-fed group; 100 % ONB, the 100 % ONB water-fed group; EG, the EG treated water-fed group; EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB, water containing EG and 50 % or 100 % ONB, respectively. Renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition, urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), and renal expression of inflammation-related proteins, oxidative stress biomarkers, and the crystal-binding molecule hyaluronic acid were compared among the 5 groups. In the control and 100 % ONB groups, no renal CaOx deposits were detected. In the EG + 50 % ONB and EG + 100 % ONB groups, ONB water significantly decreased renal CaOx deposits, urinary NAG excretion, and renal monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, osteopontin, and hyaluronic acid expression and increased renal superoxide dismutase-1 expression compared with the EG group. ONB water substantially affected kidney stone formation in the rat kidney by reducing renal tubular cell injury. ONB water is a potential prophylactic agent for kidney stones.

  17. Evaluation of sulfated polysaccharides from the brown seaweed Dictyopteris justii as antioxidant agents and as inhibitors of the formation of calcium oxalate crystals.

    PubMed

    Melo, Karoline Rachel Teodosio; Camara, Rafael Barros Gomes; Queiroz, Moacir Fernandes; Vidal, Arthur Anthunes Jacome; Lima, Camila Renata Machado; Melo-Silveira, Raniere Fagundes; Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2013-11-25

    Oxalate crystals and other types of crystals are the cause of urolithiasis, and these are related to oxidative stress. The search for new compounds with antioxidant qualities and inhibitors of these crystal formations is therefore necessary. In this study, we extracted four sulfated polysaccharides, a fucoglucoxyloglucuronan (DJ-0.3v), a heterofucan (DJ-0.4v), and two glucans (DJ-0.5v and DJ-1.2v), from the marine alga Dictyopteris justii. The presence of sulfated polysaccharides was confirmed by chemical analysis and FT-IR. All the sulfated polysaccharides presented antioxidant activity under different conditions in some of the in vitro tests and inhibited the formation of calcium oxalate crystals. Fucan DJ-0.4v was the polysaccharide that showed the best antioxidant activity and was one of the best inhibitors of the crystallization of calcium oxalate. Glucan DJ-0.5v was the second most potent inhibitor of the formation of oxalate crystals, as it stabilized dehydrated oxalate crystals (less aggressive form), preventing them from transforming into monohydrate crystals (more aggressive form). The obtained data lead us to propose that these sulfated polysaccharides are promising agents for use in the treatment of urolithiasis.

  18. CONTRASTING HISTOPATHOLOGY AND CRYSTAL DEPOSITS IN KIDNEYS OF IDIOPATHIC STONE FORMERS WHO PRODUCE HYDROXY APATITE, BRUSHITE, OR CALCIUM OXALATE STONES

    PubMed Central

    Evan, Andrew P; Lingeman, James E; Worcester, Elaine M; Sommer, Andre J; Phillips, Carrie L; Williams, James C; Coe, Fredric L

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that stone formers who form calcium phosphate (CaP) stones that contain any brushite (BRSF) have a distinctive renal histopathology and surgical anatomy when compared to idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers (ICSF). Here we report on another group of idiopathic CaP stone formers, those forming stone containing primarily hydroxyapatite, in order to clarify in what ways their pathology differs from BRSF and ICSF. Eleven hydroxyapatite stone formers (HASF) (2 males, 9 females) were studied using intra-operative digital photography and biopsy of papillary and cortical regions to measure tissue changes associated with stone formation. Our main finding is that HASF and BRSF differ significantly from each other and that both differ greatly from ICSF. Both BRSF and ICSF patients have significant levels of Randall’s plaque compared to HASF. Intra-tubular deposit number is greater in HASF than BRSF and non-existent in ICSF while deposit size is smaller in HASF than BRSF. Cortical pathology is distinctly greater in BRSF than HASF. Four attached stones were observed in HASF, three in 25 BRSF and 5–10 per ICSF patient. HASF and BRSF differ clinically in that both have higher average urine pH, supersaturation of CaP, and calcium excretion than ICSF. Our work suggests that HASF and BRSF are two distinct and separate diseases and both differ greatly from ICSF. PMID:24478243

  19. Biosynthesis of l-Ascorbic Acid and Conversion of Carbons 1 and 2 of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid Occurs within Individual Calcium Oxalate Crystal Idioblasts1

    PubMed Central

    Kostman, Todd A.; Tarlyn, Nathan M.; Loewus, Frank A.; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    2001-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid (AsA) and its metabolic precursors give rise to oxalic acid (OxA) found in calcium oxalate crystals in specialized crystal idioblast cells in plants; however, it is not known if AsA and OxA are synthesized within the crystal idioblast cell or transported in from surrounding mesophyll cells. Isolated developing crystal idioblasts from Pistia stratiotes were used to study the pathway of OxA biosynthesis and to determine if idioblasts contain the entire path and are essentially independent in OxA synthesis. Idioblasts were supplied with various 14C-labeled compounds and examined by micro-autoradiography for incorporation of 14C into calcium oxalate crystals. [14C]OxA gave heavy labeling of crystals, indicating the isolated idioblasts are functional in crystal formation. Incubation with [1-14C]AsA also gave heavy labeling of crystals, whereas [6-14C]AsA gave no labeling. Labeled precursors of AsA (l-[1-14C]galactose; d-[1-14C]mannose) also resulted in crystal labeling, as did the ascorbic acid analog, d-[1-14C]erythorbic acid. Intensity of labeling of isolated idioblasts followed the pattern OxA > AsA (erythorbic acid) > l-galactose > d-mannose. Our results demonstrate that P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts synthesize the OxA used for crystal formation, the OxA is derived from the number 1 and 2 carbons of AsA, and the proposed pathway of ascorbic acid synthesis via d-mannose and l-galactose is operational in individual P. stratiotes crystal idioblasts. These results are discussed with respect to fine control of calcium oxalate precipitation and the concept of crystal idioblasts as independent physiological compartments. PMID:11161021

  20. Influence of acidifying or alkalinizing diets on bone mineral density and urine relative supersaturation with calcium oxalate and struvite in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Bartges, Joseph W; Kirk, Claudia A; Cox, Sherry K; Moyers, Tamberlyn D

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of acidifying or alkalinizing diets on bone mineral density and urine relative supersaturation (URSS) with calcium oxalate and struvite in healthy cats. 6 castrated male and 6 spayed female cats. 3 groups of 4 cats each were fed diets for 12 months that differed only in acidifying or alkalinizing properties (alkalinizing, neutral, and acidifying). Body composition was estimated by use of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and 48-hour urine samples were collected for URSS determination. Urine pH differed significantly among diet groups, with the lowest urine pH values in the acidifying diet group and the highest values in the alkalinizing diet group. Differences were not observed in other variables except urinary ammonia excretion, which was significantly higher in the neutral diet group. Calcium oxalate URSS was highest in the acidifying diet group and lowest in the alkalinizing diet group; struvite URSS was not different among groups. Diet was not significantly associated with bone mineral content or density. Urinary undersaturation with calcium oxalate was achieved by inducing alkaluria. Feeding an alkalinizing diet was not associated with URSS with struvite. Bone mineral density and calcium content were not adversely affected by diet; therefore, release of calcium from bone caused by feeding an acidifying diet may not occur in healthy cats.

  1. Ultrastructural localization of calcium in peripheral nerve fibres undergoing Wallerian degeneration: an oxalate-pyroantimonate and X-ray microanalysis study.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A M; Ribeiro, L C

    1998-07-01

    Calcium was demonstrated ultrastructurally as an electron dense precipitate with the oxalate-pyroantimonate technique in rat sural nerves undergoing early Wallerian degeneration after surgical crush (30 h after lesion). In normal nerves (controls) the distribution of calcium precipitates in the axoplasm appeared homogeneous in unmyelinated fibres and heterogeneous (with specific domains) in myelinated ones. Calcium precipitate was also found within the smooth reticulum and mitochondria of the fibers and Schwann cells, and in endoneurial space. In nerve fibres with early degenerative alterations, there was increased calcium precipitate within membranous profiles of smooth reticulum and mitochondria (in both nerve fibres and Schwann cells) and in areas where the cytoskeletal proteins were disintegrated. This last finding confirms the participation of calcium in the disruption of axonal microtubules and neurofilaments in early Wallerian degeneration process. Fibers with intense degenerative changes lost the usual distribution for calcium. The specificity of the reaction was demonstrated using EGTA chelation and X-ray microanalysis.

  2. L-Carnitine Protects Renal Tubular Cells Against Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystals Adhesion Through Preventing Cells From Dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujue; Wu, Wenqi; Wu, Wenzheng; Duan, Xiaolu; Kong, Zhenzhen; Zeng, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals and renal tubular epithelial cells are important for renal stone formation but still unclear. This study aimed to investigate changes of epithelial cell phenotype after COM attachment and whether L-carnitine could protect cells against subsequent COM crystals adhesion. Cultured MDCK cells were employed and E-cadherin and Vimentin were used as markers to estimate the differentiate state. AlexaFluor-488-tagged COM crystals were used in crystals adhesion experiment to distinguish from the previous COM attachment, and adhesive crystals were counted under fluorescence microscope, which were also dissolved and the calcium concentration was assessed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dedifferentiated MDCK cells induced by transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) shown higher affinity to COM crystals. After exposure to COM for 48 hours, cell dedifferentiation were observed and more subsequent COM crystals could bind onto, mediated by Akt/GSK-3β/Snail signaling. L-carnitine attenuated this signaling, resulted in inhibition of cell dedifferentiation and reduction of subsequent COM crystals adhesion. COM attachment promotes subsequent COM crystals adhesion, by inducing cell dedifferentiation via Akt/GSK-3β/Snail signaling. L-carnitine partially abolishes cell dedifferentiation and resists COM crystals adhesion. L-carnitine, may be used as a potential therapeutic strategy against recurrence of urolithiasis. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. High-throughput platform for design and screening of peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanesh, Sahar; Chung, Jihae; Chandra, Divya; Sosa, Ricardo D.; Karande, Pankaj; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2013-06-01

    Crystal growth modifiers present a versatile tool for controlling crystal shape and size. Our work described here focuses on the design and screening of short peptides as inhibitors of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals using high-throughput approaches. We designed a small library of 13 peptides containing Ala and Asp amino acids arranged in varying sequences that mimic ubiquitous motifs in natural calcium-binding proteins. Peptides were screened using a quick assay to measure their efficacy for inhibiting COM crystallization. Our results show that subtle variations in the placement of Ala and Asp residues in the peptide sequence can have a profound effect on their inhibition potential. We were able to discover peptide sequences that inhibit COM crystallization more effectively than some of the well-known COM inhibitors, such as citrate. Our results also demonstrate that peptides can be engineered to bind to specific faces of COM crystals. Peptide sequences identified in this work are promising candidates for further development as therapies for biomineral-related diseases, such as kidney stone disease. Collectively, our work establishes new paradigms for the design, synthesis, and screening of peptides for controlling crystal habit with the potential to impact a variety of fields, including drug discovery, advanced materials, catalysis and separations.

  4. Osteopontin knockdown in the kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to reduction in renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobutaka; Nozawa, Masahiro; Umekawa, Tohru; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; De Velasco, Marco A.; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Khan, Saeed R.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) expression is increased in kidneys of rats with ethylene glycol (EG) induced hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephrolithiasis. The aim of this study is to clarify the effect of OPN knockdown by in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA on deposition of CaOx crystals in the kidneys. Hyperoxaluria was induced in 6-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats by administering 1.5 % EG in drinking water for 2 weeks. Four groups of six rats each were studied: Group A, untreated animals (tap water); Group B, administering 1.5 % EG; Group C, 1.5 % EG with in vivo transfection of OPN siRNA; Group D, 1.5 % EG with in vivo transfection of negative control siRNA. OPN siRNA transfections were performed on day 1 and 8 by renal sub-capsular injection. Rats were killed at day 15 and kidneys were removed. Extent of crystal deposition was determined by measuring renal calcium concentrations and counting renal crystal deposits. OPN siRNA transfection resulted in significant reduction in expression of OPN mRNA as well as protein in group C compared to group B. Reduction in OPN expression was associated with significant decrease in crystal deposition in group C compared to group B. Specific suppression of OPN mRNA expression in kidneys of hyperoxaluric rats leads to a decrease in OPN production and simultaneously inhibits renal crystal deposition. PMID:24619192

  5. Inhibition of Glycolate Oxidase With Dicer-substrate siRNA Reduces Calcium Oxalate Deposition in a Mouse Model of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Chaitali; Avitahl-Curtis, Nicole; Pursell, Natalie; Larsson Cohen, Marita; Holmes, Benjamin; Diwanji, Rohan; Zhou, Wei; Apponi, Luciano; Koser, Martin; Ying, Bo; Chen, Dongyu; Shui, Xue; Saxena, Utsav; Cyr, Wendy A; Shah, Anee; Nazef, Naim; Wang, Weimin; Abrams, Marc; Dudek, Henryk; Salido, Eduardo; Brown, Bob D; Lai, Chengjung

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is an autosomal recessive, metabolic disorder caused by mutations of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a key hepatic enzyme in the detoxification of glyoxylate arising from multiple normal metabolic pathways to glycine. Accumulation of glyoxylate, a precursor of oxalate, leads to the overproduction of oxalate in the liver, which accumulates to high levels in kidneys and urine. Crystalization of calcium oxalate (CaOx) in the kidney ultimately results in renal failure. Currently, the only treatment effective in reduction of oxalate production in patients who do not respond to high-dose vitamin B6 therapy is a combined liver/kidney transplant. We explored an alternative approach to prevent glyoxylate production using Dicer-substrate small interfering RNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting hydroxyacid oxidase 1 (HAO1) mRNA which encodes glycolate oxidase (GO), to reduce the hepatic conversion of glycolate to glyoxylate. This approach efficiently reduces GO mRNA and protein in the livers of mice and nonhuman primates. Reduction of hepatic GO leads to normalization of urine oxalate levels and reduces CaOx deposition in a preclinical mouse model of PH1. Our results support the use of DsiRNA to reduce liver GO levels as a potential therapeutic approach to treat PH1. PMID:26758691

  6. A comparison of the binding of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate and dihydrate crystals to human kidney cells in urine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Grover, Phulwinder K.; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the binding kinetics of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals to human kidney (HK-2) cells in ultra-filtered (UF), and centrifuged and filtered (CF) human urine; and to quantify the binding of COM and COD crystals to cultured HK-2 cells in UF and CF urine samples collected from different individuals. Materials and methods Urine was collected from healthy subjects, pooled, centrifuged and filtered. 14C-oxalate-labelled COM and COD crystals were precipitated from the urine by adding oxalate after adjustment of two aliquots of the urine to 2 and 8 mm Ca2+, respectively. For the kinetic study, the crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for up to 120 min in pooled CF urine adjusted to 2 and 8 mm Ca2+. Identical experiments were also carried out in UF urine samples collected from the same individuals. For the quantitative study, the same radioactively labelled COM and COD crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for 50 min in separate CF and UF urines collected from eight healthy individuals at the native Ca2+ concentrations of the urines. Field emission electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy were used to confirm crystal morphology. Results Binding of both COM and COD crystals generally bound more strongly at 8 mm than at 2 mm Ca2+. The kinetic binding curves of COM were smooth, while those of COD were consistently biphasic, suggesting that the two crystal types induce different cellular metabolic responses: HK-2 cells crystals appear to possess a transitory mechanism for detaching COD, but not COM crystals. In UF urine, COM binding was significantly greater than that of COD at 2 mm Ca2+, but at 8 mm Ca2+ the binding of COD was greater at early and late time points. COD also bound significantly more strongly at early time points in CF urine at both 2 and 8 mm Ca2+. In both CF and UF urine, there was no difference between the binding affinity of urinary COM and COD crystals. Conclusion

  7. A comparison of the binding of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate and dihydrate crystals to human kidney cells in urine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Thurgood, Lauren A; Grover, Phulwinder K; Ryall, Rosemary L

    2010-12-01

    To compare the binding kinetics of urinary calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals to human kidney (HK-2) cells in ultra-filtered (UF), and centrifuged and filtered (CF) human urine; and to quantify the binding of COM and COD crystals to cultured HK-2 cells in UF and CF urine samples collected from different individuals. Urine was collected from healthy subjects, pooled, centrifuged and filtered. (14) C-oxalate-labelled COM and COD crystals were precipitated from the urine by adding oxalate after adjustment of two aliquots of the urine to 2 and 8 mm Ca(2+), respectively. For the kinetic study, the crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for up to 120 min in pooled CF urine adjusted to 2 and 8 mm Ca(2+). Identical experiments were also carried out in UF urine samples collected from the same individuals. For the quantitative study, the same radioactively labelled COM and COD crystals were incubated with HK-2 cells for 50 min in separate CF and UF urines collected from eight healthy individuals at the native Ca(2+) concentrations of the urines. Field emission electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy were used to confirm crystal morphology. COM and COD crystals generally bound more strongly at 8 mm than at 2 mm Ca(2+). The kinetic binding curves of COM were smooth, while those of COD were consistently biphasic, suggesting that the two crystal types induce different cellular metabolic responses: HK-2 cells crystals appear to possess a transitory mechanism for detaching COD, but not COM crystals. In UF urine, COM binding was significantly greater than that of COD at 2 mm Ca(2+), but at 8 mm Ca(2+) the binding of COD was greater at early and late time points. COD also bound significantly more strongly at early time points in CF urine at both 2 and 8 mm Ca(2+). In both CF and UF urine, there was no difference between the binding affinity of urinary COM and COD crystals. Binding of both COM and COD crystals to cultured human

  8. The role of interfacial chemistry in surface nucleation and growth of calcium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.

    1993-06-01

    The surface adsorption of Ca{sup 2+} and oxalate anions (Ox{sup 2{minus}}) on SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide colloids were by electrosonic amplitude measurements. Kinetics studies of CaO{sub x} formation on the model oxide surfaces were carried out using constant composition method. Results suggested Ca{sup 2+} and Ox{sup 2{minus}} adsorptiopn was promoted on the oxide surfaces with opposite charges, and the specific adsorption of the divalent ions also resulted in surface charge reversal. For heterogeous nucleation of CaO{sub x} on the three model oxide surfaces, induction times ranged from 270 to 360 minutes compared with 1200 minutes estimated for homogeneous nucleation and 700 minutes for spontaneous or nucleation at pH 6.5 and S = 3.3. Lower nucleation barriers, 27 mJ/m{sup 2} for SiO{sub 2}, 26 mJ/m{sup 2} for TiO{sub 2}, were observed by studying the dependence of nucleation induction times as the function of solution supersaturation.

  9. Effect of A. lanata leaf extract and Vediuppu chunnam on the urinary risk factors of calcium oxalate urolithiasis during experimental hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Selvam, R; Kalaiselvi, P; Govindaraj, A; Bala Murugan, V; Sathish Kumar, A S

    2001-01-01

    Urolithiasis is one of the third most common afflictions found in humans. The efficacy of the two Siddha drugs, Aerva lanata and Vediuppu chunnam as antilithic agents using a urolithic rat model were tested in this study. Hyperoxaluria was induced in rats using 0.75% ethylene glycol in drinking water. Aerva lanata(3.0 mg kg(-1)body weight) and Vediuppu chunnam (3.5 mg kg(-1)body weight) were given orally for 28 days. Urinary risk factors of urolithiasis were monitored at the end of 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th days. Urinary volume was increased in hyperoxaluric as well as drug-treated rats. Increased urinary excretion of calcium, oxalate, uric acid, phosphorus and protein in hyperoxaluric rats was brought down significantly by the administration of A. lanata or Vediuppu chunnam. Decreased magnesium excretion in hyperoxaluric rats was normalized by drug treatment. The drug increases the urine volume, thereby reducing the solubility product with respect to calcium oxalate and other crystallizing salts such as uric acid, which may induce epitaxial deposition of calcium oxalate. Drug alone treated rats did not show any adverse effects. Combination therapy was found to be more effective and this indigenous medicine can be used successfully as an antilithic agent.

  10. A study on calcium oxalate crystals in Tinantia anomala (Commelinaceae) with special reference to ultrastructural changes during anther development.

    PubMed

    Gębura, Joanna; Winiarczyk, Krystyna

    2016-07-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals in higher plants occur in five forms: raphides, styloids, prisms, druses, and crystal sand. CaOx crystals are formed in almost all tissues in intravacuolar crystal chambers. However, the mechanism of crystallization and the role of CaOx crystals have not been clearly explained. The aim of this study was to explore the occurrence and location of CaOx crystals in organs of Tinantia anomala (Torr.) C.B. Clarke (Commelinaceae) with special attention to ultrastructural changes in the quantity of tapetal raphides during microsporogenesis. We observed various parts of the plant, that is, stems, leaves, sepals, petals, anthers, staminal trichomes and stigmatic papillae and identified CaOx crystals in all parts except staminal trichomes and stigmatic papillae in Tinantia anomala. Three morphological forms: styloids, raphides and prisms were found in different amounts in different parts of the plant. Furthermore, in this species, we identified tapetal raphides in anthers. The number of tapetal raphides changed during microsporogenesis. At the beginning of meiosis, the biosynthesis of raphides proceeded intensively in the provacuoles. These organelles were formed from the endoplasmic reticulum system. In the tetrad stage, we observed vacuoles with needle-shaped raphides (type I) always localised in the centre of the organelle. When the amoeboid tapetum was degenerating, vacuoles also began to fade. We observed a small number of raphides in the stage of mature pollen grains.

  11. Occurrence and characterisation of calcium oxalate crystals in stems and fruits of Hylocereus costaricensis and Selenicereus megalanthus (Cactaceae: Hylocereeae).

    PubMed

    Viñas, María; Jiménez, Víctor M

    2016-10-01

    Detailed description about occurrence of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals in the edible vine cactus species Hylocereus costaricensis and Selenicereus megalanthus is scarce. Therefore, we evaluated and characterized the presence, morphology and composition of CaOx crystals in both species. Crystals were isolated from greenhouse and in vitro vegetative stems, and from ripe fruit peels and pulp by enzymatic digestion and density centrifugation and quantified with a haemocytometer. Morphologies were studied using scanning electron microscopy, elemental composition with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and salt composition with X-ray powder diffraction. Analyses conducted confirmed that isolated crystals were exclusively composed by CaOx, both mono- and dihydrated. Highest crystal contents were measured in greenhouse stems, followed by the fruit peels. While very few crystals were quantified in in vitro plants, they were not detected in the fruit pulp at all, which is of advantage for its human consumption and could be linked to mechanisms of seed dispersal through animals. Different crystal morphologies were observed, sometimes varying between genotypes and tissues analysed. This is the first work known to the authors with a detailed characterization of CaOx crystals in vine cacti.

  12. Time-dependent subcellular structure injuries induced by nano-/micron-sized calcium oxalate monohydrate and dihydrate crystals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Yu, Kai; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2017-10-01

    Comparative studies were conducted to investigate the time effect of cell injury induced by nano-sized (50nm) and micron-sized (10μm) calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals in African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells. The effects of nano-/micron-sized COM and COD exposure on Vero cells were investigated by detecting the cell viability, cell morphology, LDH release, reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell cycle, and cell apoptosis, as well as the intracellular and extracellular crystal distribution. Nano-/micron-sized COM and COD exposure lead to subcellular organelle injury in varying degrees, but the injury sequence of various organelles differed. The time sequence of organelle injury presenting significant variation was described as follows: cell membrane injury (1h)

  13. Immunological detection of nitrosative stress-mediated modified Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (THP) in calcium oxalate stone formers.

    PubMed

    Pragasam, V; Kalaiselvi, P; Sumitra, K; Srinivasan, S; Anandkumar, P; Varalakshmi, P

    2006-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in hyperoxaluric condition has been proved experimentally. This may result in the formation of the cytotoxic metabolite peroxynitrite, which is capable of causing lipid peroxidation and protein modification. The presence of nitrotyrosine in proteins has been associated with several pathological conditions. The present study investigated the presence of nitrotyrosine in the stone formers Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (THP). In vitro nitration of control THP was carried out using peroxynitrite. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with peroxynitrated THP at 15-day intervals. Antisera collected following the third immunization were assayed for antibody titres using solid-phase ELISA. Antibodies were purified by affinity chromatography. The carbonyl content of control, stone formers and nitrated THP were determined. Western blotting was carried with control, stone formers and nitrated THPs. Immunodiffusion studies demonstrated cross-reaction with nitrated bovine serum albumin. Significant amounts (p < 0.001) of carbonyl content were present in both stone formers and nitrated THPs. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of nitrated amino acid 3-nitrotyrosine in stone formers, which could bring about structural and functional modifications of THP in hyperoxaluric patients. A cross-reaction with nitrated bovine serum albumin confirms that the raised antibody has certain paratopes similar to the epitope of nitrated protein molecules. Detection of 3-nitrotyrosine in stone formers THP indicates that it is one of the key factors influencing the conversion of THP to a structurally and immunologically altered form during calcium oxalate stone formation.

  14. Study of polymeric additive effect on calcium oxalate dihydrate crystal growth using real-time atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Taesung; Kim, Jong-Nam; Kim, Woo-Sik; Kyun Choi, Chang

    2011-07-01

    Microscopic events associated with crystal growth and characterization of the growth hillocks on the (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces of COD were examined by atomic force microscopy. The (1 0 0) and (1 0 1) faces of COD developed elliptical and triangular hillocks and pits, respectively. Each face exhibited hillocks with step sites that can be assigned to specific crystal planes, enabling direct determination of the growth rates along specific crystallographic directions. The addition of macromolecules with anionic side chains, poly- L-aspartate, poly- L-glutamate, and polyacrylate resulted in inhibition of growth on the hillock step planes. The magnitude of their effect depended on the macromolecule structures and identity of the step site. The isotropic shape of the COD hillocks mimicked the shape of the resulting macroscopic COD crystals based on step-specific binding of the macromolecules to the COD crystal, with stronger step pinning along the [0 1 0] direction than in the [0 0 1] direction. Electrostatic matching between the crystal faces and additives according to the ionic array of calcium oxalate in the COD structure was found to be responsible for the preferential binding of the macromolecules to terraces.

  15. Characterization of hyaluronic acid interaction with calcium oxalate crystals: implication of crystals faces, pH and citrate.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Charles-Antoine; Plante, Gérard E; Grandbois, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Interaction between hyaluronic acid (HA) present at the surface of tubular epithelial cells and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals is thought to play an important role in kidney stone formation. AFM-based force spectroscopy, where HA is covalently attached to AFM-probes, was used to quantify the interaction between HA and the surfaces of COM crystals. The work of adhesion of the HA-probe as well as the rupture force of single HA molecules were quantified in order to understand the molecular regulation of HA binding to COM crystals. Our results reveal that HA adsorbs to the crystal surface in physiological conditions. We also observed increased adhesion when the pH is lowered to a value that increases the risk of kidney stone formation. HA adhesion to the COM crystal surface can be suppressed by citrate, a physiological inhibitor of stone retention currently used in the treatment and prevention of kidney stone formation. Interestingly, we also observed preferential binding of HA onto the [100] face versus the [010] face, suggesting a major contribution of the [100] faces in the crystal retention process at the surface of tubular epithelial cells and the promotion of stone formation. Our results clearly establish a direct role for the glycosaminoglycan HA present at the surface of kidney tubular epithelium in the process of COM crystal retention. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Renal papillary calcification and the development of calcium oxalate monohydrate papillary renal calculi: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to determine in a case series (four patients) how calcified deposits in renal papillae are associated with the development of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) papillary calculi. Methods From the recently collected papillary calculi, we evaluated retrospectively patients, subjected to retrograde ureteroscopy, with COM papillary lithiasis. Results The COM papillary calculi were found to result from subepithelial injury. Many of these lesions underwent calcification by hydroxyapatite (HAP), with calculus morphology and the amount of HAP in the concave zone dependent on the location of the calcified injury. Most of these HAP deposits grew, eroding the epithelium covering the renal papillae, coming into contact with urine and starting the development of COM calculi. Subepithelial HAP plaques may alter the epithelium covering the papillae, resulting in the deposit of COM crystals directly onto the epithelium. Tissue calcification depends on a pre-existing injury, the continuation of this process is due to modulators and/or crystallization inhibitors deficiency. Conclusions Since calculus morphology and the amount of detected HAP are dependent on the location and widespread of calcified injury, all types of papillary COM calculi can be found in the same patient. All patients had subepithelial calcifications, with fewer papillary calculi, demonstrating that some subepithelial calcifications did not further evolve and were reabsorbed. A high number of subepithelial calcifications increases the likelihood that some will be transformed into COM papillary calculi. PMID:23497010

  17. Association between patient-related factors and risk of calcium oxalate and magnesium ammonium phosphate urolithiasis in cats.

    PubMed

    Lekcharoensuk, C; Lulich, J P; Osborne, C A; Koehler, L A; Urlich, L K; Carpenter, K A; Swanson, L L

    2000-08-15

    To determine whether breed, age, sex, or reproductive status (i.e., neutered versus sexually intact) was associated with the apparent increase in prevalence of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths and the decrease in prevalence of magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) uroliths in cats over time. Case-control study. Case cats consisted of cats with CaOx (n = 7,895) or MAP (7,334) uroliths evaluated at the Minnesota Urolith Center between 1981 and 1997. Control cats consisted of cats without urinary tract disease admitted to veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States and Canada during the same period (150,482). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed. British Shorthair, Exotic Shorthair, Foreign Shorthair, Havana Brown, Himalayan, Persian, Ragdoll, and Scottish Fold cats had an increased risk of developing CaOx uroliths, as did male cats and neutered cats. Chartreux, domestic shorthair, Foreign Shorthair, Himalayan, Oriental Shorthair, and Ragdoll cats had an increased risk of developing MAP uroliths, as did female cats and neutered cats. Cats with CaOx uroliths were significantly older than cats with MAP uroliths. Results suggest that changes in breed, age, sex, or reproductive status did not contribute to the apparent reciprocal relationship between prevalences of CaOx and MAP uroliths in cats during a 17-year period. However, cats of particular breeds, ages, sex, and reproductive status had an increased risk of developing CaOx and MAP uroliths.

  18. Alpha-enolase on apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells serves as a calcium oxalate crystal receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong-Ngern, Kedsarin; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-10-01

    To search for a strategy to prevent kidney stone formation/recurrence, this study addressed the role of α-enolase on apical membrane of renal tubular cells in mediating calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal adhesion. Its presence on apical membrane and in COM crystal-bound fraction was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Pretreating MDCK cells with anti-α-enolase antibody, not isotype-controlled IgG, dramatically reduced cell-crystal adhesion. Immunofluorescence staining also confirmed the direct binding of purified α-enolase to COM crystals at {121} > {100} > {010} crystal faces. Coating COM crystals with urinary proteins diminished the crystal binding capacity to cells and purified α-enolase. Moreover, α-enolase selectively bound to COM, not other crystals. Chemico-protein interactions analysis revealed that α-enolase interacted directly with Ca2+ and Mg2+. Incubating the cells with Mg2+ prior to cell-crystal adhesion assay significantly reduced crystal binding on the cell surface, whereas preincubation with EDTA, a divalent cation chelator, completely abolished Mg2+ effect, indicating that COM and Mg2+ competitively bind to α-enolase. Taken together, we successfully confirmed the role of α-enolase as a COM crystal receptor to mediate COM crystal adhesion at apical membrane of renal tubular cells. It may also serve as a target for stone prevention by blocking cell-crystal adhesion and stone nidus formation.

  19. Isolation and prevention of calcium oxalate-induced apoptotic death and oxidative stress in MDCK cells by diosgenin.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sarmistha; Goswami, Gagan; Pandrangi, Anupama

    2014-12-05

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) has been shown to be the most frequent constituent of kidney stones. The interactions of cells with COM crystals produce a variety of physiological and pathological changes including the development of oxidative stress, cellular injury and apoptosis. On the other hand, diosgenin, a steroidal sapogenin, is well known for its antioxidant activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether diosgenin protects MDCK renal epithelial cells from COM-induced apoptotic death. Diosgenin was isolated from fruits of Solanum xanthocarpum by silica gel column chromatography. It was obtained in high yields (1.23%) and the purity was ascertained by HPTLC analysis. Characterization of diosgenin was done by mp, UV-visible spectrophotometry, elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR analysis. Cells were co-incubated with COM (80μg/cm(2)) and diosgenin (2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10μg/mL) for 24h. It was found that diosgenin attenuated the apoptotic death induced by COM as measured in terms of cell viability, caspase -9/3 activities and DNA fragmentation percent. The inhibitory role of diosgenin on caspase -9/3 activities was also analyzed using molecular docking experiments, which showed interactions to their active sites by H-bonds. Diosgenin also attenuated the increase in lipid peroxidation and glutathione depletion induced by COM crystals. In conclusion, the preventive effect of diosgenin is associated to the inhibition of oxidative stress and caspases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of melamine-containing and calcium oxalate crystals in three dogs with suspected pet food-induced nephrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M E; Lewin-Smith, M R; Kalasinsky, V F; Pizzolato, K M; Fleetwood, M L; McElhaney, M R; Johnson, T O

    2008-05-01

    The histomorphologic characteristics and chemical composition of the crystals associated with suspected pet food-induced nephrotoxicosis in 3 dogs are described. Kidney specimens from 2 dogs, a 3-year-old Parson Russell Terrier and a 3-year-old Bernese Mountain Dog, were examined. Both developed acute renal failure after eating canned pet food on the 2007 Menu Foods recall list. The third case was a kidney specimen from a 1-year-old mixed-breed dog from a similar 2004 outbreak of canine renal failure in Taiwan, which occurred after eating a commercial dog food. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE), 72-hour Oil Red O (ORO72h), Alizarin Red S (pH 4.1-4.3), and Von Kossa stains; infrared (IR) spectroscopy; and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDXA) were performed to determine the histomorphologic characteristics and chemical composition of the crystals observed in each case. Histomorphologic findings in each case included acute, marked tubular degeneration and necrosis with many intratubular birefringent crystals, and lymphoplasmacytic interstitial nephritis. In each case, most of the crystals were rough, pale brown, and stained with ORO72h but did not stain with Alizarin Red S (pH 4.1-4.3) or Von Kossa stains; these features were consistent with a plastic or lipid. IR spectroscopy and SEM/EDXA results were consistent with melamine-containing crystals. A second crystal type identified in each case was smooth and platelike with staining characteristics and IR spectroscopy and SEM/EDXA results consistent with calcium oxalate crystals. Melamine-containing crystals have distinct light microscopic, histochemical, and SEM/EDXA characteristics that facilitate their identification in tissue.

  1. Solubility, structure, and morphology in the co-precipitation of cadmium and zinc with calcium-oxalate.

    PubMed

    McBride, Murray B; Frenchmeyer, Meredith; Kelch, Sabrina E; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2017-01-15

    Calcium-oxalates (Ca-Ox), which are widely produced by microorganisms and plants, are ubiquitous and persistent biominerals in the biosphere. We investigated the potential trapping of two phytotoxic metals, cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) by isomorphous substitution into the crystalline structure of Ca-Ox precipitated over a wide range of Cd(2+)/Ca(2+) or Zn(2+)/Ca(2+) ratio in solution. We employed atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and optical microscopy to evaluate our hypotheses that favorable solid-solution conditions and structural framework of crystal habits promote selective metal trapping within Ca-Ox precipitates. Chemical analysis demonstrated more effective Cd-Ox/Ca-Ox than Zn-Ox/Ca-Ox co-precipitate formation at the same trace metal mole fraction in solution. The XRD results revealed sequestration of Cd, but not Zn, within Ca-Ox monohydrate (whewellite). Comparative chemical analysis with Cd-Ox formation in the absence of Ca-Ox showed that the whewellite solid-solution formation lowered the solubility of Cd(2+) below that of pure Cd-Ox. The XRD patterns indicated that Zn(2+) precipitated as a separate pure Zn-Ox crystal that is largely excluded from the Ca-Ox structure. Furthermore, the presence of Zn(2+) in solution favored the formation of the less stable Ca-Ox dihydrate (weddellite) over whewellite. In agreement with the XRD data, visualization of the co-precipitates by optical microscopy illustrated combined mineral phases of Cd-Ox with Ca-Ox whereas Zn-Ox and Ca-Ox exhibited two distinct mineral morphologies. Our findings shed light into the structural factors that are most critical in facilitating the trapping of toxic trace metals within Ca-Ox crystals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A formal test of the hypothesis that idiopathic calcium oxalate stones grow on Randall’s plaque

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nicole L.; Gillen, Daniel L.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; Bledsoe, Sharon B.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.; Matlaga, Brian R.; Munch, Larry C.; Lingeman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To confirm that more than half of all idiopathic calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones grow on interstitial plaque, as CaOx stones can grow attached to interstitial apatite plaque but whether this is the usual mechanism of stone formation is uncertain. PATIENTS AND METHODS In nine idiopathic CaOx stone formers (ICSF) undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy or ureteroscopy all accessible renal papillae were endoscopically imaged using a digital endoscope. All stones were removed intact, and recorded by the operating surgeon as being attached or unattached; for all attached stones the surgeon determined if the site of attachment was to plaque. This determination was further verified by reviewing the intraoperative video record, and only instances where plaque was reliably seen on video were used for analysis. Surgical observations were further validated by a combination of microcomputed tomographic analysis and papillary biopsy. The results were analysed statistically using fixed-sample testing and group sequential sampling. RESULTS The nine patients had a total of 115 stones, primarily CaOx; 90 stones were attached. Of these, 81 were attached to plaque; surgeons could not visualize the site of attachment with sufficient clarity to judge in the other nine cases. Based on these data, the final point estimate for the number of stones attached to plaque was 0.754 (95% confidence interval 0.575–0.933; P = 0.013). CONCLUSIONS In ICSF most stones grow attached to papillae, on plaque, so growth on plaque is the main mechanism for stone formation in this very common group of patients. PMID:19021625

  3. Risk of nephrolithiasis, hyperoxaluria, and calcium oxalate supersaturation increased after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Upala, Sikarin; Jaruvongvanich, Veeravich; Sanguankeo, Anawin

    Earlier publications have shown renal stone complications after bariatric surgery. Multiple reports have also linked metabolic changes that alter the urinary chemistry profiles, especially hyperoxaluria, after bariatric surgery. However, evidence on change of other urine chemistry studies and type of bariatric surgery and risk of stone has been inconclusive so far. To explore the association between bariatric surgery and postoperative urinary chemistry change and risk of stone formation SETTING: A systematic review and meta-analysis. We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from their dates of inception to January 2016. The inclusion criteria were published studies of association between bariatric surgery and postoperative renal stone formation or urine chemistry profiles. We used random-effects model meta-analysis and calculated the pooled risk of renal stone and difference in 24-hour urine chemistry profiles. Twelve observational studies were included in the meta-analysis. There was significantly higher risk of stone formation after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery with pooled relative risk = 1.79 (95% CI: 1.54-2.10). In the analysis of urine chemistry profiles, there was significantly higher calcium oxalate supersaturation, lower citrate, and lower volume postoperatively compared with preoperatively. There was also higher urine oxalate in patients who had bariatric surgery compared with nonsurgery controls. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is associated with higher risk of renal stone and increased urine oxalate and calcium oxalate supersaturation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Calcium oxalate crystal production and density at different phenological stages of soybean plants (Glycine max L.) from the southeast of the Pampean Plain, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, N; Benvenuto, M L; Osterrieth, M

    2016-11-01

    Glycine max L. (soybean) is one of the major crops of the world. Although the process of biomineralisation has been reported in some organs of soybean, we now report the description and quantification of calcium oxalate crystals in vegetative and reproductive organs of soybean during its life cycle, as they act as an important source of calcium to the soil, once the harvesting is finished. Through diaphanisation, cross-sectioning, optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis of the organs, morphology, size and location of the crystals were identified. In addition, crystal density (n° crystals·mm(-2) ) and the input of crystals to soil (n° crystals·ha(-1) ) were calculated. Soybean produced prismatic calcium oxalate crystals in vegetative and reproductive organs, generally associated with vascular bundles, resulting in a potencial transfer to the soil of 81.4 x 10(7) crystals·ha(-1) throughout its life cycle. Pods were the organs with higher calcium oxalate crystal production (1112.7 ± 384.6 crystals·mm(-2) ), but with the smaller size (12.3 ± 2.1 μm long). However, cotyledons were the organs that produce the larger crystals (21.3 ± 3.5 μm long), but in lesser amounts (150.9 ± 64.4 crystals·mm(-2) ). In leaves, although crystal size did not differ from vegetative to reproductive stage (14.5 ± 4.2 and 14.5 ± 4 μm in length, respectively), the crystal density increased (293.2 and 409 crystals·mm(-2) , respectively). These results will contribute to knowledge of the amount of calcium oxalate crystals involved in the process of Ca recycling through cultivated vegetation in fields from humid plains at medium latitudes, which therefore have biological, botanical, biogeochemical and pedological relevance.

  5. OXALATE DEPOSITION ON ASBESTOS BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical and histopathologic findings in three patients with a deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos are provided. In addition, we test the hypothesis that this oxalate can be generated through a nonenzymatic o...

  6. OXALATE DEPOSITION ON ASBESTOS BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical and histopathologic findings in three patients with a deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos are provided. In addition, we test the hypothesis that this oxalate can be generated through a nonenzymatic o...

  7. Micro-CT observations of the 3D distribution of calcium oxalate crystals in cotyledons during maturation and germination in Lotus miyakojimae seeds.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Hayami, Masato; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Terada, Yasuko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takano, Hidekazu; Kagoshima, Yasushi; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2013-06-01

    The cotyledon of legume seeds is a storage organ that provides nutrients for seed germination and seedling growth. The spatial and temporal control of the degradation processes within cotyledons has not been elucidated. Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals, a common calcium deposit in plants, have often been reported to be present in legume seeds. In this study, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) was employed at the SPring-8 facility to examine the three-dimensional distribution of crystals inside cotyledons during seed maturation and germination of Lotus miyakojimae (previously Lotus japonicus accession Miyakojima MG-20). Using this technique, we could detect the outline of the embryo, void spaces in seeds and the cotyledon venation pattern. We found several sites that strongly inhibited X-ray transmission within the cotyledons. Light and polarizing microscopy confirmed that these areas corresponded to CaOx crystals. Three-dimensional observations of dry seeds indicated that the CaOx crystals in the L. miyakojimae cotyledons were distributed along lateral veins; however, their distribution was limited to the abaxial side of the procambium. The CaOx crystals appeared at stage II (seed-filling stage) of seed development, and their number increased in dry seeds. The number of crystals in cotyledons was high during germination, suggesting that CaOx crystals are not degraded for their calcium supply. Evidence for the conservation of CaOx crystals in cotyledons during the L. miyakojimae germination process was also supported by the biochemical measurement of oxalic acid levels.

  8. Multi-element analysis of milk by ICP-oa-TOF-MS after precipitation of calcium and proteins by oxalic and nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Husáková, Lenka; Urbanová, Iva; Šrámková, Jitka; Konečná, Michaela; Bohuslavová, Jana

    2013-03-15

    In this work a simple technique employing oxalic and nitric acid to cow's milk samples prior to analysis by inductively coupled plasma orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICP-oa-TOF-MS) was introduced. After the precipitation of calcium and proteins via oxalic and nitric acid, respectively, the resulting liquid phase was aspirated with a concentric glass nebulizer for ICP-TOF-MS determination of trace elements. Precipitation of proteins is essential for better separation of solid and liquid phase of modified samples. Separation of calcium as a precipitated non-soluble oxalate enables the elimination of spectral interferences originating from different calcium containing species like (40)Ca(35)Cl(+), (40)Ca(37)Cl(+), (43)Ca(16)O(+), (40)Ca(18)O(+), (44)Ca(16)O(+), (43)Ca(16)O(1)H(+) onto the determination of As, Se, Co and Ni whose assay is more difficult when using conventional quadrupole instruments. High detection capability is further an advantage as the approach enables the analysis without dilution. The methodology may serve, in addition, for a fast and sensitive determination of some other elements. After that, direct, reliable and simultaneous determination of 16 elements (Li, Be, B, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Ga, As, Se, Mo, Sn, Sb, Cs, Tl) at trace and ultra-trace levels in milk can be performed under optimum instrumental conditions and by using Rh as an internal standard. Accuracy and precision was assessed by measuring NCS ZC73015 milk powder control standard, yielding results in agreement with certified values and RSD <10%. The accuracy was also checked by comparison of the results of the proposed method with those found by a method based on a microwave-assisted digestion of real samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective Rac1 inhibition protects renal tubular epithelial cells from oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi; Menon, Mani

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate-induced oxidative cell injury is one of the major mechanisms implicated in calcium oxalate nucleation, aggregation and growth of kidney stones. We previously demonstrated that oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-derived free radicals play a significant role in renal injury. Since NADPH oxidase activation requires several regulatory proteins, the primary goal of this study was to characterize the role of Rac GTPase in oxalate-induced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative injury in renal epithelial cells. Our results show that oxalate significantly increased membrane translocation of Rac1 and NADPH oxidase activity of renal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. We found that NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac1, blocked oxalate-induced membrane translocation of Rac1 and NADPH oxidase activity. In the absence of Rac1 inhibitor, oxalate exposure significantly increased hydrogen peroxide formation and LDH release in renal epithelial cells. In contrast, Rac1 inhibitor pretreatment, significantly decreased oxalate-induced hydrogen peroxide production and LDH release. Furthermore, PKC α and δ inhibitor, oxalate exposure did not increase Rac1 protein translocation, suggesting that PKC resides upstream from Rac1 in the pathway that regulates NADPH oxidase. In conclusion, our data demonstrate for the first time that Rac1-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase might be a crucial mechanism responsible for oxalate-induced oxidative renal cell injury. These findings suggest that Rac1 signaling plays a key role in oxalate-induced renal injury, and may serve as a potential therapeutic target to prevent calcium oxalate crystal deposition in stone formers and reduce recurrence. PMID:21814770

  10. Oxalate content of cereals and cereal products.

    PubMed

    Siener, Roswitha; Hönow, Ruth; Voss, Susanne; Seidler, Ana; Hesse, Albrecht

    2006-04-19

    Detailed knowledge of food oxalate content is of essential importance for dietary treatment of recurrent calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Dietary oxalate can contribute considerably to the amount of urinary oxalate excretion. Because cereal foods play an important role in daily nutrition, the soluble and total oxalate contents of various types of cereal grains, milling products, bread, pastries, and pasta were analyzed using an HPLC-enzyme-reactor method. A high total oxalate content (>50 mg/100 g) was found in whole grain wheat species Triticum durum (76.6 mg/100 g), Triticum sativum (71.2 mg/100 g), and Triticum aestivum (53.3 mg/100 g). Total oxalate content was comparably high in whole grain products of T. aestivum, that is, wheat flakes and flour, as well as in whole grain products of T. durum, that is, couscous, bulgur, and pasta. The highest oxalate content was demonstrated for wheat bran (457.4 mg/100 g). The higher oxalate content in whole grain than in refined grain cereals suggests that oxalic acid is primarily located in the outer layers of cereal grains. Cereals and cereal products contribute to the daily oxalate intake to a considerable extent. Vegetarian diets may contain high amounts of oxalate when whole grain wheat and wheat products are ingested. Recommendations for prevention of recurrence of calcium oxalate stone disease have to take into account the oxalate content of these foodstuffs.

  11. The effect of intracrystalline and surface-bound osteopontin on the degradation and dissolution of calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals in MDCKII cells.

    PubMed

    Thurgood, Lauren A; Sørensen, Esben S; Ryall, Rosemary L

    2012-02-01

    In vivo, urinary crystals are associated with proteins located within the mineral bulk as well as upon their surfaces. Proteins incarcerated within the mineral phase of retained crystals could act as a defence against urolithiasis by rendering them more vulnerable to destruction by intracellular and interstitial proteases. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of intracrystalline and surface-bound osteopontin (OPN) on the degradation and dissolution of urinary calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals in cultured Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. [(14)C]-oxalate-labelled COD crystals with intracrystalline (IC), surface-bound (SB) and IC + SB OPN, were generated from ultrafiltered (UF) urine containing 0, 1 and 5 mg/L human milk OPN and incubated with MDCKII cells, using UF urine as the binding medium. Crystal size and degradation were assessed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and dissolution was quantified by the release of radioactivity into the culture medium. Crystal size decreased directly with OPN concentration. FESEM examination indicated that crystals covered with SB OPN were more resistant to cellular degradation than those containing IC OPN, whose degree of disruption appeared to be related to OPN concentration. Whether bound to the crystal surface or incarcerated within the mineral interior, OPN inhibited crystal dissolution in direct proportion to its concentration. Under physiological conditions OPN may routinely protect against stone formation by inhibiting the growth of COD crystals, which would encourage their excretion in urine and thereby perhaps partly explain why, compared with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, COD crystals are more prevalent in urine, but less common in kidney stones.

  12. Effects of a low-salt diet on idiopathic hypercalciuria in calcium-oxalate stone formers: a 3-mo randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nouvenne, Antonio; Meschi, Tiziana; Prati, Beatrice; Guerra, Angela; Allegri, Franca; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Gambaro, Giovanni; Maggiore, Umberto; Borghi, Loris

    2010-03-01

    A direct relation exists between sodium and calcium excretion, but randomized studies evaluating the sustained effect of a low-salt diet on idiopathic hypercalciuria, one of the main risk factors for calcium-oxalate stone formation, are still lacking. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of a low-salt diet on urinary calcium excretion in patients affected by idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis. Patients affected by idiopathic calcium stone disease and hypercalciuria (>300 mg Ca/d in men and >250 mg Ca/d in women) were randomly assigned to receive either water therapy alone (control diet) or water therapy and a low-salt diet (low-sodium diet) for 3 mo. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were obtained twice from all patients: one sample at baseline on a free diet and one sample after 3 mo of treatment. A total of 210 patients were randomly assigned to receive a control diet (n = 102) or a low-sodium diet (n = 108); 13 patients (2 on the control diet, 11 on the low-sodium diet) withdrew from the trial. At the follow-up visit, patients on the low-sodium diet had lower urinary sodium (mean +/- SD: 68 +/- 43 mmol/d at 3 mo compared with 228 +/- 57 mmol/d at baseline; P < 0.001). Concomitant with this change, they showed lower urinary calcium (271 +/- 86 mg/d at 3 mo compared with 361 +/- 129 mg/d on the control diet, P < 0.001) and lower oxalate excretion (28 +/- 8 mg/d at 3 mo compared with 32 +/- 10 mg/d on the control diet, P = 0.001). Urinary calcium was within the normal range in 61.9% of the patients on the low-salt diet and in 34.0% of those on the control diet (difference: +27.9%; 95% CI: +14.4%, +41.3%; P < 0.001). A low-salt diet can reduce calcium excretion in hypercalciuric stone formers. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01005082.

  13. The role of polymer nanosurface roughness and submicron pores in improving bladder urothelial cell density and inhibiting calcium oxalate stone formation.

    PubMed

    Chun, Young Wook; Khang, Dongwoo; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-02-25

    Synthetic polymers have been proposed for replacing resected cancerous bladder tissue. However, conventional (or nanosmooth) polymers used in such applications (such as poly(ether) urethane (PU) and poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)) often fail clinically due to poor bladder tissue regeneration, low cytocompatibility properties, and excessive calcium stone formation. For the successful reconstruction of bladder tissue, polymer surfaces should be modified to combat these common problems. Along these lines, implementing nanoscale surface features that mimic the natural roughness of bladder tissue on polymer surfaces can promote appropriate cell growth, accelerate bladder tissue regeneration and inhibit bladder calcium stone formation. To test this hypothesis, in this study, the cytocompatibility properties of both a non-biodegradable polymer (PU) and a biodegradable polymer (PLGA) were investigated after etching in chemicals (HNO(3) and NaOH, respectively) to create nanoscale surface features. After chemical etching, PU possessed submicron sized pores and numerous nanometer surface features while PLGA possessed few pores and large amounts of nanometer surface roughness. Results from this study strongly supported the assertion that nanometer scale surface roughness produced on PU and PLGA promoted the density of urothelial cells (cells that line the interior of the bladder), with the greatest urothelial cell densities observed on nanorough PLGA. In addition, compared to respective conventional polymers, the results provided evidence that nanorough PU and PLGA inhibited calcium oxalate stone formation; submicron pored nanorough PU inhibited calcium oxalate stone formation the most. Thus, results from the present study suggest the importance of nanometer topographical cues for designing better materials for bladder tissue engineering applications.

  14. Malic acid supplementation increases urinary citrate excretion and urinary pH: implications for the potential treatment of calcium oxalate stone disease.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Allen L; Webber, Dawn; de Charmoy, Rachelle; Jackson, Graham E; Ravenscroft, Neil

    2014-02-01

    Raising urinary pH and citrate excretion with alkali citrate therapy has been a widely used treatment in calcium nephrolithiasis. Citrate lowers ionized Ca(+2) concentrations and inhibits calcium salt precipitation. Conservative alternatives containing citrate such as fruit juices have been investigated and recommended. Any compound that induces systemic alkalosis will increase citraturia. Malate, a polycarboxylic anion like citrate, is a potential candidate for chelating Ca(+2) and for inducing systemic alkalinization. We undertook to investigate these possibilities. Theoretical modeling of malic acid's effects on urinary Ca(+2) concentration and supersaturation (SS) of calcium salts was achieved using the speciation program JESS. Malic acid (1200 mg/day) was ingested for 7 days by eight healthy subjects. Urines (24 hours) were collected at baseline and on day 7. They were analyzed for routine lithogenic components, including pH and citrate. Chemical speciation and SS were calculated in both urines. Modeling showed that complexation between calcium and malate at physiological concentrations of the latter would have no effect on SS. Administration of the supplement induced statistically significant increases in pH and citraturia. The calculated concentration of Ca(+2) and concomitant SS calcium oxalate (CaOx) decreased after supplementation, but these were not statistically significant. SS for the calcium phosphate salts hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate increased significantly as a consequence of the elevation in pH, but values for brushite and octacalcium phosphate did not change significantly. We speculate that consumption of malic acid induced systemic alkalinization leading to reduced renal tubular reabsorption and metabolism of citrate, and an increase in excretion of the latter. The decrease in SS(CaOx) was caused by enhanced complexation of Ca(+2) by citrate. We conclude that malic acid supplementation may be useful for conservative treatment of

  15. Response surface methodology based extraction of Tribulus terrestris leads to an upsurge of antilithiatic potential by inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization processes.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Jyoti; Tandon, Simran; Gupta, Varun; Nayyar, Jasamrit; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2017-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris has significant antilithiatic efficacy established via both in vitro as well as in vivo studies and is used in numerous anti-urolithiatic herbal formulations viz. Cystone, Uriflow, Uritone and Neeri. However, to fully utilize its antilithiatic potential, the influence of different extraction parameters on antilithiatic ability of T. terrestris aqueous extract needs elucidation. Thus, the current study was undertaken using statistically optimized extraction conditions for aqueous extract preparation. Response surface methodology was employed to observe the influence of three variables i.e. temperature (°C), time (h) and solid: liquid ratio (S: L) on the extraction yield (%) and protein content (mg/g) of T. terrestris aqueous extract. RSM results revealed that the high S:L ratio, low temperature and reduced incubation time were optimal conditions for aqueous extraction. Under such extraction conditions the protein content reached the value of 26.6±1.22 mg/g and the obtained extraction yield was 27.32±1.62%. The assessment of antilithiatic activity of 4 selected extracts (AE1-4), revealed enhanced nucleation and aggregation inhibition of calcium oxalate crystals with AE1 and AE2, which in addition significantly altered the size and morphology of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals compared to AE3 and AE4. In vitro cell culture based studies on renal epithelial cells (MDCK, NRK-52E and PK 15) proved that the AE1 showed higher cytoprotective potency by increasing cell viability as compared to the oxalate treated group. The free radical scavenging activity of aqueous extract lowered the reactive oxygen specie's induced damage and potentially reduced the signals of programmed cell death due to oxalate injury. In addition, modulation of the COM crystal morphology was enhanced by AE1 as compared to AE2. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis of AE1, showed the presence of biomolecules which could aid in the attenuation of lithiatic process. In the light

  16. Response surface methodology based extraction of Tribulus terrestris leads to an upsurge of antilithiatic potential by inhibition of calcium oxalate crystallization processes

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Jyoti; Tandon, Simran; Gupta, Varun; Nayyar, Jasamrit; Singla, Surinder Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2017-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris has significant antilithiatic efficacy established via both in vitro as well as in vivo studies and is used in numerous anti-urolithiatic herbal formulations viz. Cystone, Uriflow, Uritone and Neeri. However, to fully utilize its antilithiatic potential, the influence of different extraction parameters on antilithiatic ability of T. terrestris aqueous extract needs elucidation. Thus, the current study was undertaken using statistically optimized extraction conditions for aqueous extract preparation. Response surface methodology was employed to observe the influence of three variables i.e. temperature (°C), time (h) and solid: liquid ratio (S: L) on the extraction yield (%) and protein content (mg/g) of T. terrestris aqueous extract. RSM results revealed that the high S:L ratio, low temperature and reduced incubation time were optimal conditions for aqueous extraction. Under such extraction conditions the protein content reached the value of 26.6±1.22 mg/g and the obtained extraction yield was 27.32±1.62%. The assessment of antilithiatic activity of 4 selected extracts (AE1-4), revealed enhanced nucleation and aggregation inhibition of calcium oxalate crystals with AE1 and AE2, which in addition significantly altered the size and morphology of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals compared to AE3 and AE4. In vitro cell culture based studies on renal epithelial cells (MDCK, NRK-52E and PK 15) proved that the AE1 showed higher cytoprotective potency by increasing cell viability as compared to the oxalate treated group. The free radical scavenging activity of aqueous extract lowered the reactive oxygen specie’s induced damage and potentially reduced the signals of programmed cell death due to oxalate injury. In addition, modulation of the COM crystal morphology was enhanced by AE1 as compared to AE2. The FTIR and GC-MS analysis of AE1, showed the presence of biomolecules which could aid in the attenuation of lithiatic process. In the light

  17. Oxalate and phytate of soy foods.

    PubMed

    Al-Wahsh, Ismail A; Horner, Harry T; Palmer, Reid G; Reddy, Manju B; Massey, Linda K

    2005-07-13

    The consumption of foods made from soybeans is increasing because of their desirable nutritional value. However, some soy foods contain high concentrations of oxalate and/or phytate. Oxalate is a component of calcium oxalate kidney stones, whereas phytate is an inhibitor of calcium kidney stone formation. Thirty tested commercial soy foods exhibited ranges of 0.02-2.06 mg oxalate/g and 0.80-18.79 mg phytate/g. Commercial soy foods contained 2-58 mg of total oxalate per serving and 76-528 mg phytate per serving. Eighteen of 19 tofu brands and two soymilk brands contained less than 10 mg oxalate per serving, defined as a low oxalate food. Soy flour, textured vegetable soy protein, vegetable soybeans, soy nuts, tempeh, and soynut butter exhibited greater than 10 mg per serving. The correlation between oxalate and phytate in the soy foods was significant (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) indicating that oxalate-rich soy foods also contain higher concentrations of phytate. There also was a significant correlation, based on molar basis, between the divalent ion binding potential of oxalate plus phytate and calcium plus magnesium (r = 0.90, P < 0.001) in soy foods. Soy foods containing small concentrations of oxalate and moderate concentrations of phytate may be advantageous for kidney stone patients or persons with a high risk of kidney stones.

  18. Irritant contact dermatitis caused by needle-like calcium oxalate crystals, raphides, in Agave tequilana among workers in tequila distilleries and agave plantations.

    PubMed

    Salinas, M L; Ogura, T; Soffchi, L

    2001-02-01

    It was found that needle-like calcium oxalate crystals, raphides, are found abundantly in all tissues of Agave tequilana plants; thus, 1 droplet (0.03 ml) of juice pressed from leaves contains 100-150 crystals, 30-500 microm in length, sharpened at both ends. In tequila distilleries, 5/6 of the workers who handle the agave stems have experienced the characteristic irritation. In contrast, only 1/3 of workers in agave plantations who harvest agave plants, complain of the irritation. It is confirmed that all the irritation suffered in both distilleries and plantations takes place at bodily locations where the plants come into contact with the worker's skin in the course of their work.

  19. [Kinetics of the growth of Ca oxalate crystals from supersaturated solutions].

    PubMed

    Leskovar, P; Hartung, R

    1979-04-01

    Several factors influencing the nucleation and growth of Ca-oxalate crystals from metastable and instable solutions were studied in some detail. Factors of interest were the absolute concentration of calcium respectively oxalate, the quotient oxalate/calcium, repeated additions of calcium and/or oxalate, the presence or absence of crystal seeds, the agitation respectively stagnation of the metastable Ca-oxalate solution, the duration of crystallization, etc. The striking findings are the eminent role of oxalate in the formation of big crystals and crystal aggregates, the distinct inhibition of crystal growth at higher and very high calcium concentrations, as well as the substantial crystal enlargement at the presistent oxalate load.

  20. Urinary Calcium and Oxalate Excretion in Healthy Adult Cats Are Not Affected by Increasing Dietary Levels of Bone Meal in a Canned Diet

    PubMed Central

    Passlack, Nadine; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of dietary calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), derived from bone meal, on the feline urine composition and the urinary pH, allowing a risk assessment for the formation of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths in cats. Eight healthy adult cats received 3 canned diets, containing 12.2 (A), 18.5 (B) and 27.0 g Ca/kg dry matter (C) and 16.1 (A), 17.6 (B) and 21.1 g P/kg dry matter (C). Each diet was fed over 17 days. After a 7 dayś adaptation period, urine and faeces were collected over 2×4 days (with a two-day rest between), and blood samples were taken. Urinary and faecal minerals, urinary oxalate (Ox), the urinary pH and the concentrations of serum Ca, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were analyzed. Moreover, the urine was microscopically examined for CaOx uroliths. The results demonstrated that increasing levels of dietary Ca led to decreased serum PTH and Ca and increased faecal Ca and P concentrations, but did not affect the urinary Ca or Ox concentrations or the urinary fasting pH. The urinary postprandial pH slightly increased when the diet C was compared to the diet B. No CaOx crystals were detected in the urine of the cats. In conclusion, urinary Ca excretion in cats seems to be widely independent of the dietary Ca levels when Ca is added as bone meal to a typical canned diet, implicating that raw materials with higher contents of bones are of subordinate importance as risk factors for the formation of urinary CaOx crystals. PMID:23940588

  1. Urinary calcium and oxalate excretion in healthy adult cats are not affected by increasing dietary levels of bone meal in a canned diet.

    PubMed

    Passlack, Nadine; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of dietary calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P), derived from bone meal, on the feline urine composition and the urinary pH, allowing a risk assessment for the formation of calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths in cats. Eight healthy adult cats received 3 canned diets, containing 12.2 (A), 18.5 (B) and 27.0 g Ca/kg dry matter (C) and 16.1 (A), 17.6 (B) and 21.1 g P/kg dry matter (C). Each diet was fed over 17 days. After a 7 dayś adaptation period, urine and faeces were collected over 2×4 days (with a two-day rest between), and blood samples were taken. Urinary and faecal minerals, urinary oxalate (Ox), the urinary pH and the concentrations of serum Ca, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were analyzed. Moreover, the urine was microscopically examined for CaOx uroliths. The results demonstrated that increasing levels of dietary Ca led to decreased serum PTH and Ca and increased faecal Ca and P concentrations, but did not affect the urinary Ca or Ox concentrations or the urinary fasting pH. The urinary postprandial pH slightly increased when the diet C was compared to the diet B. No CaOx crystals were detected in the urine of the cats. In conclusion, urinary Ca excretion in cats seems to be widely independent of the dietary Ca levels when Ca is added as bone meal to a typical canned diet, implicating that raw materials with higher contents of bones are of subordinate importance as risk factors for the formation of urinary CaOx crystals.

  2. Analysis of Altered MicroRNA Expression Profiles in Proximal Renal Tubular Cells in Response to Calcium Oxalate Monohydrate Crystal Adhesion: Implications for Kidney Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bohan; Wu, Bolin; Liu, Jun; Yao, Weimin; Xia, Ding; Li, Lu; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Zhangqun; Yu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) is the major crystalline component in kidney stones and its adhesion to renal tubular cells leads to tubular injury. However, COM-induced toxic effects in renal tubular cells remain ambiguous. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in gene regulation at the posttranscriptional levels. Objective The present study aimed to assess the potential changes in microRNAs of proximal renal tubular cells in response to the adhesion of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals. Methodology Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and DAPI staining were used to measure the toxic effects of HK-2 cells exposed to COM crystals. MicroRNA microarray and mRNA microarray were applied to evaluate the expression of HK-2 cells exposed to COM crystals. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) technology was used to validate the microarray results. Target prediction, Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and pathway analysis were applied to predict the potential roles of microRNAs in biological processes. Principal Findings Our study showed that COM crystals significantly altered the global expression profile of miRNAs in vitro. After 24 h treatment with a dose (1 mmol/L), 25 miRNAs were differentially expressed with a more than 1.5-fold change, of these miRNAs, 16 were up-regulated and 9 were down-regulated. A majority of these differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with cell death, mitochondrion and metabolic process. Target prediction and GO analysis suggested that these differentially expressed miRNAs potentially targeted many genes which were related to apoptosis, regulation of metabolic process, intracellular signaling cascade, insulin signaling pathway and type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Our study provides new insights into the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis associated with nephrolithiasis. PMID:24983625

  3. Genome Wide Analysis of Differentially Expressed Genes in HK-2 Cells, a Line of Human Kidney Epithelial Cells in Response to Oxalate

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Sweaty; Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Meacham, Randall B.; Koul, Hari K.

    2012-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a multi-factorial disease which, in the majority of cases, involves the renal deposition of calcium oxalate. Oxalate is a metabolic end product excreted primarily by the kidney. Previous studies have shown that elevated levels of oxalate are detrimental to the renal epithelial cells; however, oxalate renal epithelial cell interactions are not completely understood. In this study, we utilized an unbiased approach of gene expression profiling using Affymetrix HG_U133_plus2 gene chips to understand the global gene expression changes in human renal epithelial cells [HK-2] after exposure to oxalate. We analyzed the expression of 47,000 transcripts and variants, including 38,500 well characterized human genes, in the HK2 cells after 4 hours and 24 hours of oxalate exposure. Gene expression was compared among replicates as per the Affymetrix statistical program. Gene expression among various groups was compared using various analytical tools, and differentially expressed genes were classified according to the Gene Ontology Functional Category. The results from this study show that oxalate exposure induces significant expression changes in many genes. We show for the first time that oxalate exposure induces as well as shuts off genes differentially. We found 750 up-regulated and 2276 down-regulated genes which have not been reported before. Our results also show that renal cells exposed to oxalate results in the regulation of genes that are associated with specific molecular function, biological processes, and other cellular components. In addition we have identified a set of 20 genes that is differentially regulated by oxalate irrespective of duration of exposure and may be useful in monitoring oxalate nephrotoxicity. Taken together our studies profile global gene expression changes and provide a unique insight into oxalate renal cell interactions and oxalate nephrotoxicity. PMID:23028475

  4. The First Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Beth

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author narrates her experience of meeting a Montessori kid for the first time and shares the characteristics she observed in Montessori students. The author was working as director of academic resources in university housing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and met Jason, a pre-med sophomore who was the resident…

  5. The First Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Beth

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author narrates her experience of meeting a Montessori kid for the first time and shares the characteristics she observed in Montessori students. The author was working as director of academic resources in university housing at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and met Jason, a pre-med sophomore who was the resident…

  6. Metabolomics analysis for hydroxy-L-proline-induced calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in rats based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Songyan; Yang, Rui; Peng, Zhongjiang; Lu, Hongtao; Li, Na; Ding, Jiarong; Cui, Xingang; Chen, Wei; Dong, Xin

    2016-01-01

    About 80% of kidney stones are composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx) with variable amounts of calcium phosphate, and hyperoxaluria is considered as an important factor of CaOx nephrolithiasis. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms of CaOx nephrolithiasis remain undefined. In this study, we successfully developed a rat model with hydroxy-L-proline (HLP) -induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. Rats were continuously orally administrated with HLP for 28 days. Urine and blood samples were collected from the rats treated with or without HLP at four different time points. UPLC–Q-TOF/MS was applied to profile the abundances of metabolites. To obtain more comprehensive analysis of metabolic profiling spectrum, combination of RP-LC and HILIC were applied. We identify 42 significant differential metabolites in the urine, and 13 significant differential metabolites in the blood. Pathway analysis revealed that the pathways involved in amino acid metabolism, taurine metabolism, bile acid synthesis, energy metabolism, TCA cycle, purine metabolism, vitamin metabolism, nicotinic acid and nicotinamide metabolism have been modulated by HLP treatment. This study suggested that a number of metabolic pathways are dysfunctional in the HLP induced crystal kidney injury, and further studies on those pathways are warranted to better understand the metabolic mechanism of CaOx nephrolithiasis. PMID:27443631

  7. Estimation of the oxalate content of foods and daily oxalate intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Kennedy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate ingested may be an important risk factor in the development of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Reliable food tables listing the oxalate content of foods are currently not available. The aim of this research was to develop an accurate and reliable method to measure the food content of oxalate. METHODS: Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) were compared as direct techniques for the estimation of the oxalate content of foods. Foods were thoroughly homogenized in acid, heat extracted, and clarified by centrifugation and filtration before dilution in water for analysis. Five individuals consuming self-selected diets maintained food records for three days to determine their mean daily oxalate intakes. RESULTS: Both techniques were capable of adequately measuring the oxalate in foods with a significant oxalate content. With foods of very low oxalate content (<1.8 mg/100 g), IC was more reliable than CE. The mean daily intake of oxalate by the five individuals tested was 152 +/- 83 mg, ranging from 44 to 352 mg/day. CONCLUSIONS: CE appears to be the method of choice over IC for estimating the oxalate content of foods with a medium (>10 mg/100 g) to high oxalate content due to a faster analysis time and lower running costs, whereas IC may be better suited for the analysis of foods with a low oxalate content. Accurate estimates of the oxalate content of foods should permit the role of dietary oxalate in urinary oxalate excretion and stone formation to be clarified. Other factors, apart from the amount of oxalate ingested, appear to exert a major influence over the amount of oxalate excreted in the urine.

  8. Estimation of the oxalate content of foods and daily oxalate intake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. P.; Kennedy, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The amount of oxalate ingested may be an important risk factor in the development of idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Reliable food tables listing the oxalate content of foods are currently not available. The aim of this research was to develop an accurate and reliable method to measure the food content of oxalate. METHODS: Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ion chromatography (IC) were compared as direct techniques for the estimation of the oxalate content of foods. Foods were thoroughly homogenized in acid, heat extracted, and clarified by centrifugation and filtration before dilution in water for analysis. Five individuals consuming self-selected diets maintained food records for three days to determine their mean daily oxalate intakes. RESULTS: Both techniques were capable of adequately measuring the oxalate in foods with a significant oxalate content. With foods of very low oxalate content (<1.8 mg/100 g), IC was more reliable than CE. The mean daily intake of oxalate by the five individuals tested was 152 +/- 83 mg, ranging from 44 to 352 mg/day. CONCLUSIONS: CE appears to be the method of choice over IC for estimating the oxalate content of foods with a medium (>10 mg/100 g) to high oxalate content due to a faster analysis time and lower running costs, whereas IC may be better suited for the analysis of foods with a low oxalate content. Accurate estimates of the oxalate content of foods should permit the role of dietary oxalate in urinary oxalate excretion and stone formation to be clarified. Other factors, apart from the amount of oxalate ingested, appear to exert a major influence over the amount of oxalate excreted in the urine.

  9. Effect of dietary moisture and sodium content on urine composition and calcium oxalate relative supersaturation in healthy miniature schnauzers and labrador retrievers.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, A E; Hynds, W K; Markwell, P J

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this series of studies was to evaluate two possible feeding strategies as methods for reducing the risk of calcium oxalate (CaOx) formation in two breeds of healthy dog. The studies compared the effect of dietary moisture (Study 1) and dietary sodium (Na), (Study 2) on urine composition of labrador retrievers (LR) and miniature schnauzers (MS). A nutritionally complete dry dog food was fed to 16 dogs (eight LR, eight MS; Study 1) and 15 dogs (seven LR, eight MS; Study 2) for 24 days (Study 1), or 36 days (Study 2). The dogs were fed the diet alone (7% moisture, 0.06 g Na/100 kcal), or supplemented with deionised water to 73% moisture (Study 1), or dietary Na, to deliver 0.20 or 0.30 g Na per 100 kcal (Study 2). Urine pH, volume, specific gravity, and concentrations of 12 analytes were measured for each dog. Urinary relative supersaturations (RSS) with CaOx were calculated from these values. The effects of supplemental Na or water were established using t tests (Study 1) or analysis of variance, and multiple range tests (least significant difference) (Study 2); P<0.05 was considered significant. Increasing dietary moisture significantly increased total moisture intake (P=0.001), and reduced urine specific gravity (P=0.003), urinary oxalate concentration (P=0.04), and CaOx relative supersaturation (P=0.04) in the MS. Urinary parameters remained unchanged in the LR, indicating that feeding a high moisture diet may reduce the risk of CaOx formation in high-risk breeds. Increasing dietary Na led to production of urine with a significantly lower CaOx RSS in both breeds, indicating that sodium supplementation to dry diet formats may reduce the risk of CaOx formation. These feeding strategies should be considered when evaluating methods for preventing CaOx formation within high-risk groups.

  10. Influence of a low- and a high-oxalate vegetarian diet on intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary excretion.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E; von Unruh, G E; Hesse, A

    2008-09-01

    To compare quantitatively the effect of a low- and a high-oxalate vegetarian diet on intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary excretion. Eight healthy volunteers (three men and five women, mean age 28.6+/-6.3) were studied. Each volunteer performed the [(13)C(2)]oxalate absorption test thrice on a low-oxalate mixed diet, thrice on a low-oxalate vegetarian diet and thrice on a high-oxalate vegetarian diet. For each test, the volunteers had to adhere to an identical diet and collect their 24-h urines. In the morning of the second day, a capsule containing [(13)C(2)]oxalate was ingested. On the low-oxalate vegetarian diet, mean intestinal oxalate absorption and urinary oxalate excretion increased significantly to 15.8+/-2.9% (P=0.012) and 0.414+/-0.126 mmol/day (P=0.012), compared to the mixed diet. On the high-oxalate vegetarian diet, oxalate absorption (12.5+/-4.6%, P=0.161) and urinary excretion (0.340+/-0.077 mmol/day, P=0.093) did not change significantly, compared to the mixed diet. A vegetarian diet can only be recommended for calcium oxalate stone patients, if the diet (1) contains the recommended amounts of divalent cations such as calcium and its timing of ingestion to a meal rich in oxalate is considered and (2) excludes foodstuffs with a high content of nutritional factors, such as phytic acid, which are able to chelate calcium.

  11. Ozone-Induced Responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): Metabolic Cross-Talk between Volatile Organic Compounds and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3. PMID:25165889

  12. Ozone-induced responses in Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae): metabolic cross-talk between volatile organic compounds and calcium oxalate crystal formation.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Gustavson, Poliana; Bolsoni, Vanessa Palermo; de Oliveira, Debora Pinheiro; Guaratini, Maria Tereza Gromboni; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Marabesi, Mauro Alexandre; Alves, Edenise Segala; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we proposed that volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically methyl salicylate (MeSA), mediate the formation of calcium oxalate crystals (COC) in the defence against ozone (O3) oxidative damage. We performed experiments using Croton floribundus, a pioneer tree species that is tolerant to O3 and widely distributed in the Brazilian forest. This species constitutively produces COC. We exposed plants to a controlled fumigation experiment and assessed biochemical, physiological, and morphological parameters. O3 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of constitutive oxygenated compounds, MeSA and terpenoids as well as in COC number. Our analysis supported the hypothesis that ozone-induced VOC (mainly MeSA) regulate ROS formation in a way that promotes the opening of calcium channels and the subsequent formation of COC in a fast and stable manner to stop the consequences of the reactive oxygen species in the tissue, indeed immobilising the excess calcium (caused by acute exposition to O3) that can be dangerous to the plant. To test this hypothesis, we performed an independent experiment spraying MeSA over C. floribundus plants and observed an increase in the number of COC, indicating that this compound has a potential to directly induce their formation. Thus, the tolerance of C. floribundus to O3 oxidative stress could be a consequence of a higher capacity for the production of VOC and COC rather than the modulation of antioxidant balance. We also present some insights into constitutive morphological features that may be related to the tolerance that this species exhibits to O3.

  13. Fat Malabsorption and Increased Intestinal Oxalate Absorption are Common after Rouxen-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajiv; Lieske, John C.; Collazo-Clavell, Maria L.; Sarr, Michael G.; Olson, Ellen R.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Li, Xujian

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperoxaluria and increased calcium oxalate stone formation occur after Rouxen- Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery for morbid obesity. The etiology of this hyperoxaluria is unknown. We hypothesized that after bariatric surgery, intestinal hyperabsorption of oxalate contributes to increases in plasma oxalate and urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation. Methods We prospectively examined oxalate metabolism in 11 morbidly obese subjects prior to and 6 and 12 months after RYGB (n = 9) and biliopancreatic diversion-duodenal switch (n =2). We measured 24 hour urinary supersaturations for calcium oxalate, apatite, brushite, uric acid, and sodium urate, fasting plasma oxalate, 72 hour fecal fat, and increases in urine oxalate following an oral oxalate load. Results Six and 12 months after RYGB surgery, plasma oxalate and urine calcium oxalate supersaturation increased significantly compared to similar measurements obtained prior to surgery (P values all ≤0.02). Fecal fat excretion at 6 and 12 months was increased (P-value, 0.026 and 0.055, 0 vs 6 and 12 months). An increase in urine oxalate excretion after an oral dose of oxalate was observed at 6 and 12 months (P-values ≤0.02 each). Therefore, after bariatric surgery, increases in fecal fat excretion, urinary oxalate excretion after an oral oxalate load, plasma oxalate, and urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation values were observed. Conclusions Enteric hyperoxaluria is often present in patients after the operations of RYGB and BPD-DS that utilize an element of intestinal malabsorption as a mechanism for weight loss. PMID:21295813

  14. Oxalate content of foods and its effect on humans.

    PubMed

    Noonan, S C; Savage, G P

    1999-03-01

    Oxalic acid and its salts occur as end products of metabolism in a number of plant tissues. When these plants are eaten they may have an adverse effect because oxalates bind calcium and other minerals. While oxalic acid is a normal end product of mammalian metabolism, the consumption of additional oxalic acid may cause stone formation in the urinary tract when the acid is excreted in the urine. Soaking and cooking of foodstuffs high in oxalate will reduce the oxalate content by leaching. The mean daily intake of oxalate in English diets has been calculated to be 70-150 mg, with tea appearing to contribute the greatest proportion of oxalate in these diets; rhubarb, spinach and beet are other common high oxalate-content foods. Vegetarians who consume greater amounts of vegetables will have a higher intake of oxalates, which may reduce calcium availability. This may be an increased risk factor for women, who require greater amounts of calcium in the diet. In humans, diets low in calcium and high in oxalates are not recommended but the occasional consumption of high oxalate foods as part of a nuritious diet does not pose any particular problem.

  15. Diet, but not oral probiotics, effectively reduces urinary oxalate excretion and calciumoxalate supersaturation

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, John C.; Tremaine, William J.; De Simone, Claudio; O’Connor, Helen M.; Li, Xujian; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effect of a controlled diet and two probiotic preparations on urinary oxalate excretion, a risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stone formation, in patients with mild hyperoxaluria. Patients were randomized to a placebo, a probiotic, or a synbiotic preparation. This tested whether these probiotic preparations can increase oxalate metabolism in the intestine and/or decrease oxalate absorption from the gut. Patients were maintained on a controlled diet to remove the confounding variable of differing oxalate intake from food. Urinary oxalate excretion and calcium oxalate supersaturation on the controlled diet were significantly lower compared with baseline on a free-choice diet. Neither study preparation reduced urinary oxalate excretion nor calcium oxalate supersaturation. Fecal lactobacilli colony counts increased on both preparations, whereas enterococcal and yeast colony counts were increased on the synbiotic. Total urine volume and the excretion of oxalate and calcium were all strong independent determinants of urinary calcium oxalate supersaturation. Hence, dietary oxalate restriction reduced urinary oxalate excretion, but the tested probiotics did not influence urinary oxalate levels in patients on a restricted oxalate diet. However, this study suggests that dietary oxalate restriction is useful for kidney stone prevention. PMID:20736987

  16. Artificial photosynthesis of oxalate and oxalate-based polymer by a photovoltaic reactor

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Shan; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Lijie; Zou, Qingsong; Li, Shiqiang; Mo, Haitao; Zhu, Pingchuan; Cen, Weijian; Wang, Shuangfei

    2014-01-01

    A photovoltaic reactor was designed for artificial photosynthesis, based on the reactions involved in high energy hydrogen atoms, which were produced from water electrolysis. Water and CO2, under the conditions studied, were converted to oxalate (H2C2O4) and a polymer. This was the first time that the oxalates and oxalate-based polymer were produced from the artificial photosynthesis process. PMID:24389750

  17. Artificial photosynthesis of oxalate and oxalate-based polymer by a photovoltaic reactor.

    PubMed

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Shan; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Lijie; Zou, Qingsong; Li, Shiqiang; Mo, Haitao; Zhu, Pingchuan; Cen, Weijian; Wang, Shuangfei

    2014-01-06

    A photovoltaic reactor was designed for artificial photosynthesis, based on the reactions involved in high energy hydrogen atoms, which were produced from water electrolysis. Water and CO2, under the conditions studied, were converted to oxalate (H2C2O4) and a polymer. This was the first time that the oxalates and oxalate-based polymer were produced from the artificial photosynthesis process.

  18. Artificial photosynthesis of oxalate and oxalate-based polymer by a photovoltaic reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Shan; Xu, Yuanjin; Huang, Lijie; Zou, Qingsong; Li, Shiqiang; Mo, Haitao; Zhu, Pingchuan; Cen, Weijian; Wang, Shuangfei

    2014-01-01

    A photovoltaic reactor was designed for artificial photosynthesis, based on the reactions involved in high energy hydrogen atoms, which were produced from water electrolysis. Water and CO2, under the conditions studied, were converted to oxalate (H2C2O4) and a polymer. This was the first time that the oxalates and oxalate-based polymer were produced from the artificial photosynthesis process.

  19. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  20. The paradoxical role of urinary macromolecules in the aggregation of calcium oxalate: a further plea to increase diuresis in stone metaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Baumann, J M; Affolter, B

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to get information on aggregation (AGN) of urinary calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx) which seems to occur in stone formation despite a protecting coat of urinary macromolecules (UMs). CaOx crystallization was directly produced in urine, control and albumin solution by Ox titration and was spectrophotometrically followed. A rapid decrease of optical density indicating AGN was absent in 14 of 15 freshly voided urines of 5 healthy controls. However, in the presence of UM-coated hydroxyapatite all urines with relative high sodium concentration, being an indicator of concentrated urine, showed a pronounced AGN which was abolished when these urines were diluted. Albumin relatively found to be an inhibitor of AGN showed after temporary adsorption on Ca Phosphate (CaP) massive self-AGN and changed to a promoter of CaOx AGN. Self-AGN after adsorption on surfaces especially of CaP, being an important compound of Randall's plaques, can thus explain this paradoxical behavior of UMs. Aggregated UMs probably bridge zones of electrostatic repulsion between UM-coated crystals with identical electrical surface charge. These zones extend by urine dilution which decreases ionic strength. Diminution of urinary concentration by increasing diuresis seems, therefore, to be important in stone metaphylaxis.

  1. Loss of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Impairs Intestinal Oxalate Secretion.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Felix; Thomson, Robert B; Heneghan, John F; Jiang, Zhirong; Adebamiro, Adedotun; Thomson, Claire L; Barone, Christina; Asplin, John R; Egan, Marie E; Alper, Seth L; Aronson, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have an increased incidence of hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Net intestinal absorption of dietary oxalate results from passive paracellular oxalate absorption as modified by oxalate back secretion mediated by the SLC26A6 oxalate transporter. We used mice deficient in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (Cftr) to test the hypothesis that SLC26A6-mediated oxalate secretion is defective in cystic fibrosis. We mounted isolated intestinal tissue from C57BL/6 (wild-type) and Cftr(-/-) mice in Ussing chambers and measured transcellular secretion of [(14)C]oxalate. Intestinal tissue isolated from Cftr(-/-) mice exhibited significantly less transcellular oxalate secretion than intestinal tissue of wild-type mice. However, glucose absorption, another representative intestinal transport process, did not differ in Cftr(-/-) tissue. Compared with wild-type mice, Cftr(-/-) mice showed reduced expression of SLC26A6 in duodenum by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, coexpression of CFTR stimulated SLC26A6-mediated Cl(-)-oxalate exchange in Xenopus oocytes. In association with the profound defect in intestinal oxalate secretion, Cftr(-/-) mice had serum and urine oxalate levels 2.5-fold greater than those of wild-type mice. We conclude that defective intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by SLC26A6 may contribute to the hyperoxaluria observed in this mouse model of cystic fibrosis. Future studies are needed to address whether similar mechanisms contribute to the increased risk for calcium oxalate stone formation observed in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  2. Enrofloxacinium oxalate.

    PubMed

    Yamuna, Thammarse S; Kaur, Manpreet; Anderson, Brian J; Jasinski, Jerry P; Yathirajan, H S

    2014-02-01

    The title salt, 2C19H23FN3O3 (+)·C2O4 (2-) {systematic name: bis-[4-(3-carb-oxy-1-cyclo-propyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-1,4-di-hydro-quino-lin-7-yl)-1-ethyl-piperazin-1-ium] oxalate}, crystallizes with two independent monocations (A and B) and an oxalate dianion (C) in the asymmetric unit. The piperazinium ring in both the cations adopts a slightly disordered chair conformation. The dihedral angles between the mean planes of the cyclo-propyl ring and the 10-membered quinoline ring are 50.6 (5)° (A) and 62.2 (5)° (B). In each of the cations, a single O-H⋯O intra-molecular hydrogen bond is observed. In the crystal, the oxalate anions inter-act with the cations through N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak C-H⋯O inter-actions, forming R 2 (2)(8) graph-set ring motifs. Weak C-H⋯F inter-actions along with further C-H⋯O inter-actions are observed between the cations, forming zigzag chains along [001]. In addition, π-π stacking inter-actions are observed with centroid-centroid distances of 3.5089 (13), 3.5583 (13), 3.7900 (13) and 3.7991 (13) Å.

  3. Novel antilithiatic cationic proteins from human calcium oxalate renal stone matrix identified by MALDI-TOF-MS endowed with cytoprotective potential: an insight into the molecular mechanism of urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Kanu Priya; Tandon, Simran; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2013-01-16

    No substantial work has been conducted to date in context to cationic proteins with antilithiatic activity. We explored the antilithiatic cationic proteins present in human calcium oxalate (CaOx) stones and also examined their molecular interactions with calcium oxalate crystals in silico. Proteins were isolated from the matrix of human CaOx containing kidney stones. Proteins having MW>3 kDa were subjected to cation exchange chromatography followed by molecular-sieve chromatography. The effect of these purified cationic proteins was tested against CaOx nucleation and growth and on oxalate injured MDCK cells for their activity. Proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS. Molecular interaction studies with COM crystals in silico were also investigated. Three antilithiatic cationic proteins were identified as histone-lysine N-methyltransferase, inward rectifier K channel and protein Wnt-2 (MW~53, ~44, and ~42 kDa respectively) by MALDI-TOF MS based on database search with MASCOT server. Further molecular modeling calculations revealed the mode of interaction of these proteins with CaOx at the molecular level. We identified histone-lysine N-methyltransferase, inward rectifier K channel and protein Wnt-2 as novel antilithiatic proteins which play a vital role in the kidney function and have been associated with various kidney diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of calcium oxalate dihydrate growth by selective crystal-face binding of phosphorylated osteopontin and polyaspartate peptide showing occlusion by sectoral (compositional) zoning.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yung-Ching; Masica, David L; Gray, Jeffrey J; Nguyen, Sarah; Vali, Hojatollah; McKee, Marc D

    2009-08-28

    Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) mineral and the urinary protein osteopontin/uropontin (OPN) are commonly found in kidney stones. To investigate the effects of OPN on COD growth, COD crystals were grown with phosphorylated OPN or a polyaspartic acid-rich peptide of OPN (DDLDDDDD, poly-Asp(86-93)). Crystals grown with OPN showed increased dimensions of the {110} prismatic faces attributable to selective inhibition at this crystallographic face. At high concentrations of OPN, elongated crystals with dominant {110} faces were produced, often with intergrown, interpenetrating twin crystals. Poly-Asp(86-93) dose-dependently elongated crystal morphology along the {110} faces in a manner similar to OPN. In crystal growth studies using fluorescently tagged poly-Asp(86-93) followed by imaging of crystal interiors using confocal microscopy, sectoral (compositional) zoning in COD was observed resulting from selective binding and incorporation (occlusion) of peptide exclusively into {110} crystal sectors. Computational modeling of poly-Asp(86-93) adsorption to COD {110} and {101} surfaces also suggests increased stabilization of the COD {110} surface and negligible change to the natively stable {101} surface. Ultrastructural, colloidal-gold immunolocalization of OPN by transmission electron microscopy in human stones confirmed an intracrystalline distribution of OPN. In summary, OPN and its poly-Asp(86-93) sequence similarly affect COD mineral growth; the {110} crystallographic faces become enhanced and dominant attributable to {110} face inhibition by the protein/peptide, and peptides can incorporate into the mineral phase. We, thus, conclude that the poly-Asp(86-93) domain is central to the OPN ability to interact with the {110} faces of COD, where it binds to inhibit crystal growth with subsequent intracrystalline incorporation (occlusion).

  5. CT visible internal stone structure, but not Hounsfield unit value, of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) calculi predicts lithotripsy fragility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zarse, Chad A; Hameed, Tariq A; Jackson, Molly E; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Lingeman, James E; McAteer, James A; Williams, James C

    2007-08-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones are often resistant to breakage using shock wave (SW) lithotripsy. It would be useful to identify by computed tomography (CT) those COM stones that are susceptible to SW's. For this study, 47 COM stones (4-10 mm in diameter) were scanned with micro CT to verify composition and also for assessment of heterogeneity (presence of pronounced lobulation, voids, or apatite inclusions) by blinded observers. Stones were then placed in water and scanned using 64-channel helical CT. As with micro CT, heterogeneity was assessed by blinded observers, using high-bone viewing windows. Then stones were broken in a lithotripter (Dornier Doli-50) over 2 mm mesh, and SW's counted. Results showed that classification of stones using micro CT was highly repeatable among observers (kappa = 0.81), and also predictive of stone fragility. Stones graded as homogeneous required 1,874 +/- 821 SW/g for comminution, while stones with visible structure required half as many SW/g, 912 +/- 678. Similarly, when stones were graded by appearance on helical CT, classification was repeatable (kappa = 0.40), and homogeneous stones required more SW's for comminution than did heterogeneous stones (1,702 +/- 993 SW/g, compared to 907 +/- 773). Stone fragility normalized to stone size did not correlate with Hounsfield units (P = 0.85). In conclusion, COM stones of homogeneous structure require almost twice as many SW's to comminute than stones of similar mineral composition that exhibit internal structural features that are visible by CT. This suggests that stone fragility in patients could be predicted using pre-treatment CT imaging. The findings also show that Hounsfield unit values of COM stones did not correlate with stone fragility. Thus, it is stone morphology, rather than X-ray attenuation, which correlates with fragility to SW's in this common stone type.

  6. The osteopontin-controlled switching of calcium oxalate monohydrate morphologies in artificial urine provides insights into the formation of papillary kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Langdon, Aaron; Grohe, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The protein osteopontin (OPN) plays an important role in preventing the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) kidney stones. To gain insight into these mechanisms, crystallization was induced by addition of human kidney OPN to artificial urine (ionic strength comparable to urine; without citrate), and the OPN-COM interaction studied using a combination of scanning electron (SEM) and confocal microscopy. By SEM, we found that increasing OPN concentrations formed large monoclinic penetration twins (no protein added) and, at higher concentrations (1-, 2μg/ml OPN), super and hyper twins with crystal habits not found in previous studies. For instance, the hyper twins indicate well-facetted gearwheel-like habits with "teeth" developed in all crystallographic directions. At OPN concentrations ≥2μg/ml, a switching to small dumbbell-shaped COM habits with fine-textured surfaces occurred. Confocal microscopy of these dumbbells indicates protein incorporation in almost the entire crystal structure (in contrast to facetted COM), proposing a threshold concentration of ∼2μg/ml OPN for the facetted to the non-facetted habit transformation. Both the gearwheel-like and the dumbbell-shaped habit are again found side-by-side (presumably triggered by OPN concentration gradients within the sample) in in-vitro formed conglomerates, which resemble cross-sections of papillary kidney stones. The abrupt transformation from facetted to non-facetted habits and the unique compliance of the two in-vitro formed habits with the two main morphologies found in papillary kidney stones propose that OPN is a main effector in direct stone-forming processes. Moreover, stone structures which exhibit these two morphologies side-by-side might serve as a novel indicator for OPN concentrations surrounding those structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differentiating calcium oxalate and hydroxyapatite stones in vivo using dual-energy CT and urine supersaturation and pH values.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Qu, Mingliang; Carter, Rickey E; Leng, Shuai; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Jaramillo, Giselle; Krambeck, Amy E; Lieske, John C; Vrtiska, Terri J; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of urinary stone composition can guide therapeutic intervention for patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) or hydroxyapatite (HA) stones. In this study, we determined the accuracy of noninvasive differentiation of these two stone types using dual-energy CT (DECT) and urine supersaturation (SS) and pH values. Patients who underwent clinically indicated DECT scanning for stone disease and subsequent surgical intervention were enrolled. Stone composition was determined using infrared spectroscopy. DECT images were processed using custom-developed software that evaluated the ratio of CT numbers between low- and high-energy images. Clinical information, including patient age, gender, and urine pH and supersaturation profile, was obtained from electronic medical records. Simple and multiple logistic regressions were used to determine if the ratio of CT numbers could discriminate CaOx from HA stones alone or in conjunction with urine supersaturation and pH. Urinary stones (CaOx n = 43, HA n = 18) from 61 patients were included in this study. In a univariate model, DECT data, urine SS-HA, and urine pH had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.91, P = .016), 0.76 (95% CI 0.61-0.91, P = .003), and 0.60 (95% CI 0.44-0.75, P = .20), respectively, for predicting stone composition. The combination of CT data and the urinary SS-HA had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.79 (95% CI 0.66-0.92, P = .007) for correctly differentiating these two stone types. DECT differentiated between CaOx and HA stones similarly to SS-HA, whereas pH was a poor discriminator. The combination of DECT and urine SS or pH data did not improve this performance. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of Calcium Oxalate Dihydrate Growth by Selective Crystal-face Binding of Phosphorylated Osteopontin and Polyaspartate Peptide Showing Occlusion by Sectoral (Compositional) Zoning*

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Yung-Ching; Masica, David L.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Nguyen, Sarah; Vali, Hojatollah; McKee, Marc D.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) mineral and the urinary protein osteopontin/uropontin (OPN) are commonly found in kidney stones. To investigate the effects of OPN on COD growth, COD crystals were grown with phosphorylated OPN or a polyaspartic acid-rich peptide of OPN (DDLDDDDD, poly-Asp86–93). Crystals grown with OPN showed increased dimensions of the {110} prismatic faces attributable to selective inhibition at this crystallographic face. At high concentrations of OPN, elongated crystals with dominant {110} faces were produced, often with intergrown, interpenetrating twin crystals. Poly-Asp86–93 dose-dependently elongated crystal morphology along the {110} faces in a manner similar to OPN. In crystal growth studies using fluorescently tagged poly-Asp86–93 followed by imaging of crystal interiors using confocal microscopy, sectoral (compositional) zoning in COD was observed resulting from selective binding and incorporation (occlusion) of peptide exclusively into {110} crystal sectors. Computational modeling of poly-Asp86–93 adsorption to COD {110} and {101} surfaces also suggests increased stabilization of the COD {110} surface and negligible change to the natively stable {101} surface. Ultrastructural, colloidal-gold immunolocalization of OPN by transmission electron microscopy in human stones confirmed an intracrystalline distribution of OPN. In summary, OPN and its poly-Asp86–93 sequence similarly affect COD mineral growth; the {110} crystallographic faces become enhanced and dominant attributable to {110} face inhibition by the protein/peptide, and peptides can incorporate into the mineral phase. We, thus, conclude that the poly-Asp86–93 domain is central to the OPN ability to interact with the {110} faces of COD, where it binds to inhibit crystal growth with subsequent intracrystalline incorporation (occlusion). PMID:19581305

  9. Calcium oxalate crystals induces tight junction disruption in distal renal tubular epithelial cells by activating ROS/Akt/p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Gan, Xiuguo; Liu, Xukun; An, Ruihua

    2017-11-01

    Tight junction plays important roles in regulating paracellular transports and maintaining cell polarity. Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals, the major crystalline composition of kidney stones, have been demonstrated to be able to cause tight junction disruption to accelerate renal cell injury. However, the cellular signaling involved in COM crystal-induced tight junction disruption remains largely to be investigated. In the present study, we proved that COM crystals induced tight junction disruption by activating ROS/Akt/p38 MAPK pathway. Treating Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells with COM crystals induced a substantial increasing of ROS generation and activation of Akt that triggered subsequential activation of ASK1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Western blot revealed a significantly decreased expression of ZO-1 and occludin, two important structural proteins of tight junction. Besides, redistribution and dissociation of ZO-1 were observed by COM crystals treatment. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) attenuated the activation of Akt, ASK1, p38 MAPK, and down-regulation of ZO-1 and occludin. The redistribution and dissociation of ZO-1 were also alleviated by NAC treatment. These results indicated that ROS were involved in the regulation of tight junction disruption induced by COM crystals. In addition, the down-regulation of ZO-1 and occludin, the phosphorylation of ASK1 and p38 MAPK were also attenuated by MK-2206, an inhibitor of Akt kinase, implying Akt was involved in the disruption of tight junction upstream of p38 MAPK. Thus, these results suggested that ROS-Akt-p38 MAPK signaling pathway was activated in COM crystal-induced disruption of tight junction in MDCK cells.

  10. High calcium concentration and calcium oxalate crystals cause significant inaccuracies in the measurement of urinary osteopontin by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Thurgood, Lauren A; Grover, Phulwinder K; Ryall, Rosemary Lyons

    2008-05-01

    Strong evidence that osteopontin (OPN) is a determinant of urolithiasis has prompted studies comparing the protein's urinary excretion in healthy subjects and stone formers. However, reported mean urinary values have varied widely, from <1 microg/mL to more than 20 times that value. Since OPN binds to CaOx crystals, the presence of crystals in urine may cause underestimation of its urinary levels. Using a commercial ELISA, we measured urinary OPN levels in the presence of endogenous or exogenous CaOx monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) crystals. OPN concentrations decreased in the presence of endogenous and exogenous CaOx crystals, but never below 2 microg/mL. Increasing the urinary calcium concentration decreased detectable OPN levels, possibly as a result of changes in the three-dimensional conformation of the protein. Because calcium concentration and the formation of CaOx crystals cannot be controlled in urine, the use of urinary OPN levels as a biomarker for any human pathology must be seriously questioned, but particularly for the investigation of stone formers in whom hypercalciuria and crystalluria are more common than in healthy subjects.

  11. Evaluation of Oxalate Concentration in the U.S. Spinach Germplasm Collection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In addition to its high nutrient content, spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is also known to have greater amount of oxalic acid than most crops. Oxalic acid may form crystals with minerals to reduce the bioavailability and absorption of calcium and iron in diets, and calcium oxalate may deposit in the...

  12. Increased protein intake on controlled oxalate diets does not increase urinary oxalate excretion

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Linda H.; Neiberg, Rebecca; Assimos, Dean G.; Holmes, Ross P.

    2009-01-01

    High animal protein intake is a risk factor for calcium oxalate stone disease. The effect of dietary protein on the urinary excretion of calcium, acid and citrate is well established. However, its effect on oxalate excretion is unclear, due in part to an inadequate control of dietary oxalate intake in previous studies. This relationship warrants clarification due to the proposed important role of the metabolism of amino acids in endogenous oxalate synthesis. In this study, 11 normal subjects consumed controlled oxalate diets containing 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8 g protein/kg body weight/day. The analysis of 24 h urine collections confirmed that as protein intake increased, urinary calcium and glycolate increased and urinary pH and citrate decreased. The increased glycolate excretion was due in part to an increased hydroxyproline, but not glycolate consumption. Total daily urinary oxalate excretion did not change. When indexed to creatinine there was a small but significant decrease in oxalate excretion. This is most likely due to hyperfiltration. These results indicate that as dietary protein intake increases, the catabolism of diet-derived amino acids is not associated with an increased endogenous oxalate synthesis in normal subjects. PMID:19183980

  13. Oxalobacter formigenes Colonization and Oxalate Dynamics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingsheng; Ellis, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Animal and human studies have provided compelling evidence that colonization of the intestine with Oxalobacter formigenes reduces urinary oxalate excretion and lowers the risk of forming calcium oxalate kidney stones. The mechanism providing protection appears to be related to the unique ability of O. formigenes to rely on oxalate as a major source of carbon and energy for growth. However, much is not known about the factors that influence colonization and host-bacterium interactions. We have colonized mice with O. formigenes OxCC13 and systematically investigated the impacts of diets with different levels of calcium and oxalate on O. formigenes intestinal densities and urinary and intestinal oxalate levels. Measurement of intestinal oxalate levels in mice colonized or not colonized with O. formigenes demonstrated the highly efficient degradation of soluble oxalate by O. formigenes relative to other microbiota. The ratio of calcium to oxalate in diets was important in determining colonization densities and conditions where urinary oxalate and fecal oxalate excretion were modified, and the results were consistent with those from studies we have performed with colonized and noncolonized humans. The use of low-oxalate purified diets showed that 80% of animals retained O. formigenes colonization after a 1-week dietary oxalate deprivation. Animals not colonized with O. formigenes excreted two times more oxalate in feces than they had ingested. This nondietary source of oxalate may play an important role in the survival of O. formigenes during periods of dietary oxalate deprivation. These studies suggest that the mouse will be a useful model to further characterize interactions between O. formigenes and the host and factors that impact colonization. PMID:25979889

  14. Oxalate Content of Taro Leaves Grown in Central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Du Thanh, Hang; Phan Vu, Hai; Vu Van, Hai; Le Duc, Ngoan; Le Minh, Tuan; Savage, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Leaves were harvested from four different cultivars of Colocasia esculenta and three cultivars of Alocasia odora that were growing on nine different farms in central Vietnam. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the leaves were extracted and measured using HPLC chromatography. Total calcium determinations were also carried out on the same samples. The total oxalate content of the leaves ranged from 433.8 to 856.1 mg/100 g wet matter (WM) while the soluble oxalate ranged from 147.8 to 339.7 mg/100 g WM. The proportion of soluble oxalate ranged from 28% to 41% (overall mean 35%) of the total oxalate content of the leaves. The equivalent insoluble oxalate proportion ranged from 59% to 72% of the total (overall mean 65%). There was little difference between the Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia odora taro cultivars, although the total oxalate content was significantly higher in Alocasia odora cultivars. The overall mean total calcium content was 279.5 mg/100 WM and the percentage of insoluble calcium bound as calcium oxalate ranged from 31.7% to 57.3% of the total calcium content (overall mean 47.1%). The oxalate content in taro leaves is a major factor to consider when different cultivars of taro are recommended for human or animal consumption.

  15. Oxalate Content of Taro Leaves Grown in Central Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Du Thanh, Hang; Phan Vu, Hai; Vu Van, Hai; Le Duc, Ngoan; Le Minh, Tuan; Savage, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Leaves were harvested from four different cultivars of Colocasia esculenta and three cultivars of Alocasia odora that were growing on nine different farms in central Vietnam. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the leaves were extracted and measured using HPLC chromatography. Total calcium determinations were also carried out on the same samples. The total oxalate content of the leaves ranged from 433.8 to 856.1 mg/100 g wet matter (WM) while the soluble oxalate ranged from 147.8 to 339.7 mg/100 g WM. The proportion of soluble oxalate ranged from 28% to 41% (overall mean 35%) of the total oxalate content of the leaves. The equivalent insoluble oxalate proportion ranged from 59% to 72% of the total (overall mean 65%). There was little difference between the Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia odora taro cultivars, although the total oxalate content was significantly higher in Alocasia odora cultivars. The overall mean total calcium content was 279.5 mg/100 WM and the percentage of insoluble calcium bound as calcium oxalate ranged from 31.7% to 57.3% of the total calcium content (overall mean 47.1%). The oxalate content in taro leaves is a major factor to consider when different cultivars of taro are recommended for human or animal consumption. PMID:28231080

  16. Experimental oxalate urolith formation in rats.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, G H; Belling, G B; Bulman, F H

    1979-06-01

    Urinary calculi composed of calcium oxalate were produced in male hooded Wistar rats fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet over 16 weeks. This basic diet was modified by doubling the phosphate content or loading with vitamin C or D3 in three treatment groups. The number of rats developing oxalate stones was not altered by the addition of vitamin D3 or phosphate, but there was a significant increase in total weight of stone formed and histological evidence of extensive renal damage in rats on the high vitamin D3 diet. The addition of vitamin C to the vitamin B6 deficient rats resulted in a reduction in the number of rats with uroliths and a fall in urinary oxalate excretion, while similarly loaded vitamin B6 supplemented controls were free of oxalate calculi. It is concluded that the oxalate urolithiasis induced by vitamin B6 deficiency was exacerbated by added vitamin D3 and reduced by vitamin C.

  17. Enzymatic hydrolysis of phytate and effects on soluble oxalate concentration in foods.

    PubMed

    Israr, Beenish; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2017-01-01

    Soluble oxalate in foods is major concern for kidney stone formers due to its tendency to increase urinary oxalate concentration. Phytate forms complexes with cations, which increases soluble oxalate by making cations unavailable to precipitate oxalate. Thus, in order to reduce soluble oxalate, bran samples (wheat, oat and barley) and bean samples (red kidney bean and white bean) were treated with phytase. Release of phosphate after phytate degradation and its association with calcium was determined. Phosphate concentration increased after application of phytase in all samples, but effect on soluble oxalate concentration varied. Wheat and oat bran showed significant reduction (P<0.05) in soluble oxalate compared to bean samples. Wheat bran, oat bran and white bean had a lower calcium:phosphate ratio than barley bran and red kidney beans. Correlation of the calcium:phosphate molar ratio with release of phosphate depends on concentration of calcium ions and this influences soluble oxalate concentration.

  18. Bioavailability of oxalic acid from spinach, sugar beet fibre and a solution of sodium oxalate consumed by female volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hanson, C F; Frankos, V H; Thompson, W O

    1989-03-01

    Oxalate bioavailability from sugar beet fibre (40 g), spinach (25 g) and a solution of sodium oxalate (182 mg) was tested in nine women using a triplicated 3 x 3 Latin square arrangement. Each test substance provided 120 mg oxalic acid. Throughout the study the volunteers consumed a control diet and the test substances were administered at breakfast on specified days. After an initial 2-day control period, oxalate was administered in three test periods that consisted of one test day followed by one control day. Urine collected during 24-hr periods was analysed daily for oxalate. Oxalate excretion did not differ among the five control days and was not increased significantly following the ingestion of sugar beet fibre by the volunteers. Oxalate excretion was greater (P less than 0.0001) for the mean of the spinach and sodium oxalate solution diets than for the mean of the sugar beet fibre and control diets. Oxalate bioavailability from sugar beet fibre was 0.7% compared with bioavailabilities of 4.5 and 6.2% for spinach and oxalate solutions, respectively. The low bioavailability of oxalate from sugar beet fibre may be attributable to its high ratio of minerals (calcium and magnesium) to oxalate, its complex fibre matrix or the loss of the soluble oxalate during processing of sugar beets.

  19. Do teas rich in antioxidants reduce the physicochemical and peroxidative risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis in humans? Pilot studies with Rooibos herbal tea and Japanese green tea.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, A; Mokoena, M; Durbach, I; Lazarus, J; de Jager, S; Ackermann, H; Breytenbach, I; Okada, A; Usami, M; Hirose, Y; Ando, R; Yasui, T; Kohri, K

    2016-08-01

    Several experimental and animal studies have demonstrated that substances rich in antioxidants can reduce the physicochemical and peroxidative risk factors for calcium oxalate (CaOx) renal stone formation in urine and blood. However, there are very few such investigations in humans. In the present pilot study, two varieties of tea, a green one from Japan (JGT) and a herbal one from South Africa (Rooibos) (RT), both rich in antioxidants, were administered to a group of CaOx stone formers (SF) (n = 8) for 30 days. Both teas were analysed for polyphenols by high-performance liquid chromatography and for minerals by plasma atomic and optical emission spectroscopy. 24 h urines (baseline and day 30) were analysed for lithogenic factors. CaOx metastable limits and crystal nucleation and growth kinetics were also determined in each urine sample. Deposited crystals were inspected by scanning electron microscopy. Blood samples were collected (baseline and day 30). Biomarkers of oxidative stress including plasma and urinary thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) were also determined. Urinary physicochemical risk factors were also investigated after ingestion of RT for 30 days in two control groups (CG1 and CG2), the latter one of which consisted of habitual JGT drinkers. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon signed rank tests and Mann-Whitney tests for paired and independent measurements, respectively. Several flavonoids and catechins were quantified in RT and JGT, respectively, confirming that both teas are rich sources of antioxidants. Mineral content was found to be far below dietary reference intakes. There were no significant changes in any of the urinary physicochemical or peroxidative risk factors in the control groups or in SF, except for the supersaturation (SS) of brushite (Bru) which decreased in the latter group after ingestion of JGT. Crystal morphology showed a tendency to change from

  20. Differentiating Calcium Oxalate and Hydroxyapatite Stones In Vivo Using Dual-Energy CT and Urine Supersaturation and pH Values

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Qu, Mingliang; Carter, Rickey E.; Leng, Shuai; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Jaramillo, Giselle; Krambeck, Amy E.; Lieske, John C.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Knowledge of urinary stone composition can guide therapeutic intervention for patients with calcium oxalate (CaOx) or hydroxyapatite (HA) stones. In this study, we determined the accuracy of noninvasive differentiation of these two stone types using dual-energy CT (DECT) and urine supersaturation (SS) and pH values. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent clinically indicated DECT scanning for stone disease and subsequent surgical intervention were enrolled. Stone composition was determined using infrared spectroscopy. DECT images were processed using custom-developed software that evaluated the ratio of CT numbers between low- and high-energy images. Clinical information, including patient age, gender, and urine pH and supersaturation profile, was obtained from electronic medical records. Simple and multiple logistic regressions were used to determine if the ratio of CT numbers could discriminate CaOx from HA stones alone or in conjunction with urine supersaturation and pH. Results Urinary stones (CaOx n = 43, HA n = 18) from 61 patients were included in this study. In a univariate model, DECT data, urine SS-HA, and urine pH had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66–0.91, P = .016), 0.76 (95%CI 0.61–0.91, P = .003), and 0.60 (95% CI 0.44–0.75, P = .20), respectively, for predicting stone composition. The combination of CT data and the urinary SS-HA had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.79 (95%CI 0.66–0.92, P = .007) for correctly differentiating these two stone types. Conclusions DECT differentiated between CaOx and HA stones similarly to SS-HA, whereas pH was a poor discriminator. The combination of DECT and urine SS or pH data did not improve this performance. PMID:24200478

  1. Oxalate urinary calculi in beef steers.

    PubMed

    Huntington, G B; Emerick, R J

    1984-01-01

    Hereford X Angus steers (10/treatment) were fed 90% concentrate diets containing 0.3%, 0.6%, 0.9%, or 1.2% of calcium for 92 days (trial 1) or 114 days (trial 2). Ground limestone was the supplemental calcium source. At slaughter, 12 of 20 steers fed 0.3% calcium had calculi in the urinary bladder or kidneys, compared with 5 of 20 fed 0.6% calcium, 5 of 20 fed 0.9% calcium, and 4 of 20 fed 1.2% calcium. Analyses of calculi indicated they were oxalate calculi. During the first 49 days of trial 2, plasma hydroxyproline concentrations were higher (P less than 0.10) for steers fed 0.3% calcium than for steers fed higher calcium concentrations. Increased bone resorption in steers fed concentrations of 0.3% calcium, resulting in increased plasma hydroxyproline, an oxalate precursor, was indicated as a source of oxalate in calculi and as an explanation of lower occurrence of calculi in steers fed higher concentrations of calcium.

  2. Metabolism of Fructose to Oxalate and Glycolate

    PubMed Central

    Knight, J.; Assimos, D. G.; Easter, L.; Holmes, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    Much attention has been recently directed at fructose consumption because of its association with obesity and subsequent development of chronic diseases. It was recently reported that an increased fructose intake increases the risk of forming kidney stones. It was postulated that fructose consumption may increase urinary oxalate, a risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stone disease. However, conflicting results have been obtained in human studies examining the relationship between fructose metabolism and oxalate synthesis. To test whether fructose intake influences urinary excretions impacting kidney stone risk, healthy subjects consumed diets controlled in their contents of fructose, oxalate, calcium, and other nutrients. Subjects consumed diets containing 4, 13, and 21% of calories as fructose in a randomized order. No changes in the excretions of oxalate, calcium, and uric acid were observed. In vitro investigations with cultured liver cells incubated with 13C-labeled sugars indicated that neither fructose nor glucose was converted to oxalate by these cells. Fructose metabolism accounted for 12.4 ± 1.6% of the glycolate detected in the culture medium and glucose 6.4 ± 0.9%. Our results suggest that mechanisms for stone risk associated with fructose intake may lie in factors other than those affecting the major stone risk parameters in urine. PMID:20842614

  3. Metabolism of fructose to oxalate and glycolate.

    PubMed

    Knight, J; Assimos, D G; Easter, L; Holmes, R P

    2010-11-01

    Much attention has been recently directed at fructose consumption because of its association with obesity and subsequent development of chronic diseases. It was recently reported that an increased fructose intake increases the risk of forming kidney stones. It was postulated that fructose consumption may increase urinary oxalate, a risk factor for calcium oxalate kidney stone disease. However, conflicting results have been obtained in human studies examining the relationship between fructose metabolism and oxalate synthesis. To test whether fructose intake influences urinary excretions impacting kidney stone risk, healthy subjects consumed diets controlled in their contents of fructose, oxalate, calcium, and other nutrients. Subjects consumed diets containing 4, 13, and 21% of calories as fructose in a randomized order. No changes in the excretions of oxalate, calcium, and uric acid were observed. In vitro investigations with cultured liver cells incubated with (13)C-labeled sugars indicated that neither fructose nor glucose was converted to oxalate by these cells. Fructose metabolism accounted for 12.4 ± 1.6% of the glycolate detected in the culture medium and glucose 6.4 ± 0.9%. Our results suggest that mechanisms for stone risk associated with fructose intake may lie in factors other than those affecting the major stone risk parameters in urine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. NALP3-mediated inflammation is a principal cause of progressive renal failure in oxalate nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Felix; Asplin, John R.; Granja, Ignacio; Schmidt, Insa M.; Moeckel, Gilbert; David, Rachel; Flavell, Richard A.; Aronson, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxalate nephropathy with renal failure is caused by multiple disorders causing hyperoxaluria due to either overproduction of oxalate (primary hyperoxaluria) or excessive absorption of dietary oxalate (enteric hyperoxaluria). To study the etiology of renal failure in crystal-induced kidney disease, we created a model of progressive oxalate nephropathy by feeding mice a diet high in soluble oxalate (high oxalate in the absence of dietary calcium). Renal histology was characterized by intratubular calcium-oxalate crystal deposition with an inflammatory response in the surrounding interstitium. Oxalate nephropathy was not found in mice fed a high oxalate diet that also contained calcium. NALP3, also known as cryopyrin, has been implicated in crystal-associated diseases such as gout and silicosis. Mice fed the diet high in soluble oxalate demonstrated increased NALP3 expression in the kidney. Nalp3-null mice were completely protected from the progressive renal failure and death that occurred in wild-type mice fed the diet high in soluble oxalate. NALP3-deficiency did not affect oxalate homeostasis, thereby excluding differences in intestinal oxalate handling to explain the observed phenotype. Thus, progressive renal failure in oxalate nephropathy results primarily from NALP3-mediated inflammation. PMID:23739234

  5. Vibrational spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Maria C; Torres, María M; Palacios, Daniel; González-Baró, Ana C; Baran, Enrique J

    2015-02-25

    The infrared and Raman spectra of the two hydrates of strontium oxalate, SrC2O4⋅H2O and SrC2O4⋅2H2O, were recorded and discussed on the basis of their structural peculiarities and in comparison with the spectra of the related calcium oxalates and other previously investigated metallic oxalates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The function of oxalic acid in the human metabolism.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Daniel Stewart

    2011-09-01

    Biochemical reactions in cells which involve oxalic acid are described. It is shown that this compound is required for the formation of uracil and orotic acid. The former is a component of RNA which is common to all cells in the human metabolism. On the basis of the biochemical reactions described a possible treatment to relieve the effects of calcium oxalate renal calculi whose origin is related to the metabolic concentration of oxalic acid is proposed.

  7. Sequestration of Sr(II) By Calcium Oxalate - a Batch Uptake Study And EXAFS Analysis of Model Compounds And Reaction Products

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, D.M.; Johnson, S.B.; Catalano, J.G.; Farges, F.; Brown, G.E.; Jr.

    2009-05-26

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (CaC{sub 2}O{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O -- abbreviated as CaOx) is produced by two-thirds of all plant families, comprising up to 80 wt.% of the plant tissue and found in many surface environments. It is unclear, however, how CaOx in plants and soils interacts with metal ions and possibly sequesters them. This study examines the speciation of Sr(II){sub aq} following its reaction with CaOx. Batch uptake experiments were conducted over the pH range 4--10, with initial Sr solution concentrations, [Sr]{sub aq}, ranging from 1 x 10{sup -4} to 1 x 10{sup -3} M and ionic strengths ranging of 0.001--0.1 M, using NaCl as the background electrolyte. Experimental results indicate that Sr uptake is independent of pH and ionic strength over these ranges. After exposure of CaOx to Sr{sub aq} for two days, the solution Ca concentration, [Ca]{sup aq}, increased for all samples relative to the control CaOx suspension (with no Sr added). The amount of Sr{sub aq} removed from solution was nearly equal to the total [Ca]{sup aq} after exposure of CaOx to Sr. These results suggest that nearly 90% of the Sr is removed from solution to a solid phase as Ca is released into solution. We suggest that the other 10% is sequestered through surface adsorption on a solid phase, although we have no direct evidence for this. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to determine the molecular-level speciation of Sr in the reaction products. Deconvolutions of the Sr K-edge EXAFS spectra were performed to identify multi-electron excitation (MEE) features. MEE effects were found to give rise to low-frequency peaks in the Fourier transform before the first shell of oxygen atoms and do not affect EXAFS fitting results. Because of potential problems caused by asymmetric distributions of Sr-O distances when fitting Sr K-edge EXAFS data using the standard harmonic model, we also employed a cumulant expansion model and an asymmetric analytical model

  8. Potential role of fluctuations in the composition of renal tubular fluid through the nephron in the initiation of Randall's plugs and calcium oxalate crystalluria in a computer model of renal function.

    PubMed

    Robertson, W G

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an updated computer model which attempts to simulate known renal reabsorption and secretion activity through the nephron (NEPHROSIM) and its possible relevance to the initiation of calcium-containing renal stones. The model shows that, under certain conditions of plasma composition, de novo nucleation of both calcium oxalate (CaOx) and calcium phosphate (CaP) can take place at the end of the descending limb of the Loop of Henle (DLH), particularly in untreated, recurrent idiopathic CaOx stone-formers (RSF). The model incorporates a number of hydrodynamic factors that may influence the subsequent growth of crystals nucleated at the end of the DLH as they progress down the renal tubules. These include the fact that (a) crystals of either CaOx or CaP nucleated at the end of the DLH and travelling close to the walls of the tubule travel at slower velocities than the fluid flowing at the central axis of the tubule, (b) the transit of CaOx crystals travelling close to the tubule walls may be delayed for up to at least 25 min, during which time the crystals may continue to grow if the relative supersaturation with respect to CaOx (RSS CaOx) is high enough and (c) such CaOx crystals may stop moving or even fall back in upward-draining collecting ducts (CD) owing to the Stokes gravitational effect. The model predicts, firstly, that for small, transient increases in plasma oxalate concentration, crystallisation only takes place in the CD and leads to the formation of small crystals which are comfortably passed in the urine and, secondly, that for slightly greater increases in the filtered load of oxalate, spontaneous and/or heterogeneous nucleation of CaOx may occur both at the end of the DLH and in the CD. This latter situation leads to the passage in the final urine of a mixture of large crystals of CaOx (arising from nucleation at the end of the DLH) and small crystals of CaOx (as a result of nucleation originating in the CD). As a result of the

  9. Oxalate catabolism in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxalic acid is found in most plant species and can serve beneficial roles that protect the plant from a variety of environmental stresses. Excessive amounts of oxalate, however, can be detrimental to plant health. Thus, careful coordination of oxalate metabolism is needed. Despite the important impa...

  10. A review of oxalate poisoning in domestic animals: tolerance and performance aspects.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Abdullah, R B; Wan Khadijah, W E

    2013-08-01

    Published data on oxalate poisoning in domestic animals are reviewed, with a focus on tolerance and performance. Oxalic acid is one of a number of anti-nutrients found in forage. It can bind with dietary calcium (Ca) or magnesium (Mg) to form insoluble Ca or Mg oxalate, which then may lead to low serum Ca or Mg levels as well as to renal failure because of precipitation of these salts in the kidneys. Dietary oxalate plays an important role in the formation of Ca oxalate, and a high dietary intake of Ca may decrease oxalate absorption and its subsequent urinary excretion. Oxalate-rich plants can be supplemented with other plants as forage for domestic animals, which may help to reduce the overall intake of oxalate-rich plants. Non-ruminants appear to be more sensitive to oxalate than ruminants because in the latter, rumen bacteria help to degrade oxalate. If ruminants are slowly exposed to a diet high in oxalate, the population of oxalate-degrading bacteria in the rumen increases sufficiently to prevent oxalate poisoning. However, if large quantities of oxalate-rich plants are eaten, the rumen is overwhelmed and unable to metabolize the oxalate and oxalate-poisoning results. Based on published data, we consider that <2.0% soluble oxalate would be an appropriate level to avoid oxalate poisoning in ruminants, although blood Ca level may decrease. In the case of non-ruminants, <0.5% soluble oxalate may be acceptable. However, these proposed safe levels of soluble oxalate should be regarded as preliminary. Further studies, especially long-term studies, are needed to validate and improve the recommended safe levels in animals. This review will encourage further research on the relationships between dietary oxalate, other dietary factors and renal failure in domestic animals.

  11. Oxalic Acid Has an Additional, Detoxifying Function in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Annerose; Witt-Geiges, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the diseases caused by the necrotroph plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is not well understood. To investigate the role of oxalic acid during infection high resolution, light-, scanning-, transmission electron microscopy and various histochemical staining methods were used. Our inoculation method allowed us to follow degradation of host plant tissue around single hyphae and to observe the reaction of host cells in direct contact with single invading hyphae. After penetration the outer epidermal cell wall matrix appeared degraded around subcuticular hyphae (12-24 hpi). Calcium oxalate crystals were detected in advanced (36-48 hpi) and late (72 hpi) infection stages, but not in early stages. In early infection stages, surprisingly, no toxic effect of oxalic acid eventually secreted by S. sclerotiorum was observed. As oxalic acid is a common metabolite in plants, we propose that attacked host cells are able to metabolize oxalic acid in the early infection stage and translocate it to their vacuoles where it is stored as calcium oxalate. The effects, observed on healthy tissue upon external application of oxalic acid to non-infected, living tissue and cell wall degradation of dead host cells starting at the inner side of the walls support this idea. The results indicate that oxalic acid concentrations in the early stage of infection stay below the toxic level. In plant and fungi oxalic acid/calcium oxalate plays an important role in calcium regulation. Oxalic acid likely could quench calcium ions released during cell wall breakdown to protect growing hyphae from toxic calcium concentrations in the infection area. As calcium antimonate-precipitates were found in vesicles of young hyphae, we propose that calcium is translocated to the older parts of hyphae and detoxified by building non-toxic, stable oxalate crystals. We propose an infection model where oxalic acid plays a detoxifying role in late infection stages. PMID:23951305

  12. Oxalic acid has an additional, detoxifying function in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heller, Annerose; Witt-Geiges, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of the diseases caused by the necrotroph plant pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is not well understood. To investigate the role of oxalic acid during infection high resolution, light-, scanning-, transmission electron microscopy and various histochemical staining methods were used. Our inoculation method allowed us to follow degradation of host plant tissue around single hyphae and to observe the reaction of host cells in direct contact with single invading hyphae. After penetration the outer epidermal cell wall matrix appeared degraded around subcuticular hyphae (12-24 hpi). Calcium oxalate crystals were detected in advanced (36-48 hpi) and late (72 hpi) infection stages, but not in early stages. In early infection stages, surprisingly, no toxic effect of oxalic acid eventually secreted by S. sclerotiorum was observed. As oxalic acid is a common metabolite in plants, we propose that attacked host cells are able to metabolize oxalic acid in the early infection stage and translocate it to their vacuoles where it is stored as calcium oxalate. The effects, observed on healthy tissue upon external application of oxalic acid to non-infected, living tissue and cell wall degradation of dead host cells starting at the inner side of the walls support this idea. The results indicate that oxalic acid concentrations in the early stage of infection stay below the toxic level. In plant and fungi oxalic acid/calcium oxalate plays an important role in calcium regulation. Oxalic acid likely could quench calcium ions released during cell wall breakdown to protect growing hyphae from toxic calcium concentrations in the infection area. As calcium antimonate-precipitates were found in vesicles of young hyphae, we propose that calcium is translocated to the older parts of hyphae and detoxified by building non-toxic, stable oxalate crystals. We propose an infection model where oxalic acid plays a detoxifying role in late infection stages.

  13. Growth Conditions To Reduce Oxalic Acid Content of Spinach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Rutzke, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    A controlled-environment agricultural (CEA) technique to increase the nutritive value of spinach has been developed. This technique makes it possible to reduce the concentration of oxalic acid in spinach leaves. It is desirable to reduce the oxalic acid content because oxalic acid acts as an anti-nutritive calcium-binding component. More than 30 years ago, an enzyme (an oxidase) that breaks down oxalic acid into CO2 and H2O2 was discovered and found to be naturally present in spinach leaves. However, nitrate, which can also be present because of the use of common nitratebased fertilizers, inactivates the enzyme. In the CEA technique, one cuts off the supply of nitrate and keeps the spinach plants cool while providing sufficient oxygen. This technique provides the precise environment that enables the enzyme to naturally break down oxalate. The result of application of this technique is that the oxalate content is reduced by 2/3 in one week.

  14. Screening of Oxalate Degrading Lactic Acid Bacteria of Food Origin.

    PubMed

    Murru, Nicoletta; Blaiotta, Giuseppe; Peruzy, Maria Francesca; Santonicola, Serena; Mercogliano, Raffaelina; Aponte, Maria

    2017-04-13

    A screening for oxalate degrading abilities was initially carried on within Lactic Acid Bacteria cultures of different food origin. Seventy-nine strains were drop-inoculated onto MRS agar plates containing calcium oxalate. By comparing colonies diameters, 31 strains were used to inoculate, in parallel, MRS and MRS modified by sodium oxalate addition. Differences in the strains' growth were assessed by colony forming unit counts. For two strains, the growth in oxalate enriched medium was significantly higher; while, for eleven strains an opposite behaviour was recorded. Two strains - probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus LbGG and Enterococcus faecalis 59 - were chosen. The first strain appeared to be able to metabolize oxalate more efficiently than the other tested cultures, while strain 59 appeared unable to gather advantage by oxalates and, indeed, appeared to be inhibited by the salt presence in the medium. Outcomes revealed that higher glucose concentrations may favour oxalates utilization. In MRS with oxalate, but without glucose, citrate was completely metabolized. Evaluation along time confirmed that the oxalate degradation is more significant in presence of glucose. Outcomes may represent a good start for the development of a safe and even probiotic culture able to lower the oxalates content of food.

  15. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... You'll also find calcium in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables (especially collard and turnip greens, ... can enjoy good sources of calcium such as dark green, leafy vegetables, broccoli, chickpeas, and calcium-fortified ...

  16. Contrasting calcium localization and speciation in leaves of Medicago trunculata mutant COD5 analyzed via synchrotron X-ray techniques

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxalate-producing plants accumulate calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx(C)) in the range of 3-80%(w/w) of their dry weight, reducing calcium (Ca) bioavailability. The calcium oxalate deficient 5 (cod5) mutant of Medicago truncatula has been previously shown to contain similar Ca, but lower oxalate and Ca...

  17. Effects of vitamin E ingestion on plasma and urinary risk factors for calcium oxalate urolithiasis in two population groups having different stone-risk profiles: evidence of different physiological handling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Theka, Takalani; Rodgers, Allen; Lewandowski, Sonja; Webber, Dawn; Allie-Hamdulay, Shameez

    2012-04-01

    It has been demonstrated that vitamin E supplementation reduces calciuria and oxaluria and that it may also prevent oxalate-mediated peroxidative injury, all of which reduce the risk of calcium oxalate urolithiasis. In view of the significant difference in stone occurrence in black (B) and white (W) South Africans, we undertook to investigate the effects of vitamin E supplementation in subjects from these two groups. Five healthy males from each group ingested one capsule (400 IU) of vitamin E daily for 60 days. Blood and 24 h urine samples were collected at baseline and on day 60; 24 h dietary questionnaires were simultaneously completed. Urine composition was determined by routine analyses. Urinary and plasma TBARS were determined using a commercially available assay kit while plasma vitamin E was determined by reverse phase HPLC. Plasma vitamin E increased significantly in W but not in B. Urinary and plasma TBARS did not increase in either group. Urinary citrate increased significantly in both groups but the percentage increase in W (169%) was greater than that in B (82%). No other urinary parameter changed significantly. The increase in plasma vitamin E in W but not in B suggests either that the mechanism by which it is packaged into chylomicrons, which are secreted into the systemic circulation, is suppressed in the latter group or that it is differentially absorbed in the two groups. Similarly, to explain the greater increase in citraturia in W compared to B, we speculate that inhibition of lipogenesis of arachidonic acid by vitamin E, ultimately leading to an increase in citraturia, occurs to a lesser extent in B than in W.

  18. Oxalate nephropathy due to 'juicing': case report and review.

    PubMed

    Getting, Jane E; Gregoire, James R; Phul, Ashley; Kasten, Mary J

    2013-09-01

    A patient presented with oxalate-induced acute renal failure that was attributable to consumption of oxalate-rich fruit and vegetable juices obtained from juicing. We describe the case and also review the clinical presentation of 65 patients seen at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from 1985 through 2010 with renal failure and biopsy-proven renal calcium oxalate crystals. The cause of renal oxalosis was identified for all patients: a single cause for 36 patients and at least 2 causes for 29 patients. Three patients, including our index patient, had presumed diet-induced oxalate nephropathy in the context of chronic kidney disease. Identification of calcium oxalate crystals in a kidney biopsy should prompt an evaluation for causes of renal oxalosis, including a detailed dietary history. Clinicians should be aware that an oxalate-rich diet may potentially precipitate acute renal failure in patients with chronic kidney disease. Juicing followed by heavy consumption of oxalate-rich juices appears to be a potential cause of oxalate nephropathy and acute renal failure.

  19. [Analysis of oxalic acid and oxalates].

    PubMed

    Leskovar, P

    1979-08-01

    It is reported on individual methods for the estimation of the oxalic acid in body fluids, particularly in the urine. The case in question is a survey of the oxalate estimation methods, which, however, has no pretensions to completeness. The at present most actualestimation methods are brought somewhat more in detail. The data are not sufficient for the laboratorytechnical performance of the individual methods, this would transgress the possibilities of the work. However, the original papers are cited which contain all the necessary details. Some technical difficulties and disturbances in the individual estimation methods are also entered. Despite excellent work of several teams the problems of standardization, of the absolutely reliable reference methoda as well as of an objective consideration of advantages and disadvantages of individual, often subjectively judged methods is not yet solved. Comparing these methods, one gets the impression that several reliable methods of the same value are established. It seems that this estimation method brings the greatest progress which will reliably establish so small quantities of oxalate as they are in the blood or in the liquor. By this also the oxalate clearance and the renal oxalate treatment becomes more exactly establishable than up to now.

  20. Fish Oil Supplementation and Urinary Oxalate Excretion in Normal Subjects on a Low-oxalate Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Jessica N.; Mufarrij, Patrick W.; Easter, Linda; Knight, John; Holmes, Ross P.; Assimos, Dean G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if fish oil supplementation reduces endogenous oxalate synthesis in healthy subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifteen healthy non–stone-forming adults participated in this study. Subjects first abstained from using vitamins, medications, or foods enriched in omega-3 fatty acids for 30 days. Next, they collected two 24-hour urine specimens while consuming a self-selected diet. Subjects consumed an extremely low-oxalate and normal-calcium diet for 5 days and collected 24-hour urine specimens on the last 3 days of this diet. Next, the subjects took 2 fish oil capsules containing 650-mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 450-mg docosahexaenoic acid twice daily for 30 days. They consumed a self-selected diet on days 1–25 and the controlled diet on days 26–30. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected on days 28–30. Excretion levels of urinary analytes including oxalate and glycolate were analyzed. RESULTS Although there was a significant reduction in urinary oxalate, magnesium, and potassium excretions and an increase in uric acid excretion during the controlled dietary phases compared with the self-selected diet, there were no significant differences in their excretion during controlled diet phases with and without fish oil supplementation. CONCLUSION These results suggest that fish oil supplementation does not reduce endogenous oxalate synthesis or urinary oxalate excretion in normal adults during periods of extremely low oxalate intake. However, these results do not challenge the previously described reduction in urinary oxalate excretion demonstrated in normal subjects consuming a moderate amount of oxalate in conjunction with fish oil. PMID:25102784

  1. Determination of Oxalate Content in Herbal Remedies and Dietary Supplements Based on Plant Extracts.

    PubMed

    Siener, Roswitha; López-Mesas, Montserrat; Valiente, Manuel; Blanco, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Lifestyle, especially diet, is a prominent risk factor that affects the formation of calcium oxalate stones. Urinary oxalate excretion is directly related to the amount of oral intake and intestinal absorption rate of oxalate. This work evaluated the possibility of increasing oxalate ingestion, which could lead to secondary hyperoxaluria, associated with the intake of herbal remedies and dietary supplements containing plant extracts. A wide variety of 17 commercially available drugs and dietary supplements were analyzed using ion chromatography. The results showed remarkable differences in oxalate contents of the extracts. Total oxalate concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 2.2 mg/g in solid samples and from 0.005 to 0.073 mg/mL in liquid samples. The selected herbal remedies and dietary supplements containing plant extracts represent only a low risk for calcium oxalate stone formers, if the recommended daily dose is not exceeded.

  2. Sat1 is dispensable for active oxalate secretion in mouse duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Narae; Knauf, Felix; Jiang, Zhirong; Markovich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mice deficient for the apical membrane oxalate transporter SLC26A6 develop hyperoxalemia, hyperoxaluria, and calcium oxalate stones due to a defect in intestinal oxalate secretion. However, the nature of the basolateral membrane oxalate transport process that operates in series with SLC26A6 to mediate active oxalate secretion in the intestine remains unknown. Sulfate anion transporter-1 (Sat1 or SLC26A1) is a basolateral membrane anion exchanger that mediates intestinal oxalate transport. Moreover, Sat1-deficient mice also have a phenotype of hyperoxalemia, hyperoxaluria, and calcium oxalate stones. We, therefore, tested the role of Sat1 in mouse duodenum, a tissue with Sat1 expression and SLC26A6-dependent oxalate secretion. Although the active secretory flux of oxalate across mouse duodenum was strongly inhibited (>90%) by addition of the disulfonic stilbene DIDS to the basolateral solution, secretion was unaffected by changes in medium concentrations of sulfate and bicarbonate, key substrates for Sat1-mediated anion exchange. Inhibition of intracellular bicarbonate production by acetazolamide and complete removal of bicarbonate from the buffer also produced no change in oxalate secretion. Finally, active oxalate secretion was not reduced in Sat1-null mice. We conclude that a DIDS-sensitive basolateral transporter is involved in mediating oxalate secretion across mouse duodenum, but Sat1 itself is dispensable for this process. PMID:22517357

  3. Oxalic acid in saliva, teeth and tooth tartar.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R; Kallee, E

    1994-11-01

    Oxalic acid was determined in human saliva, teeth, tartar, and in animal teeth. Saliva from dentally healthy male subjects contained 0.10 +/- 0.09 mmol/l (n = 41) and those of dentally healthy female subjects 0.18 +/- 0.17 mmol/l (n = 40). Oxalic acid in tartar from 16 patients was 3.3 +/- 1.2 mmol/kg tartar. In human teeth, oxalic acid was 1.0 +/- 0.3 mmol/kg in milk teeth (n = 12) and 0.9 +/- 0.6 mmol/kg in permanent teeth (n = 60). Human teeth were sorted into age groups and into molars, incisors and premolars. In animal teeth, oxalic acid content varied widely. The formed calcium oxalate is proposed to be a 'physiological' protective mechanism for teeth.

  4. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. previous continue Working Calcium ... drinks, and cereals. Other Considerations for Building Bones Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption, so it's ...

  5. [Oxalate: a poorly soluble organic waste with consequences].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yimin; Bonny, Olivier

    2015-03-25

    Oxalate is a highly insoluble metabolic waste excreted by the kidneys. Disturbances of oxalate metabolism are encountered in enteric hyperoxaluria (secondary to malabsorption, gastric bypass or in case of insufficient Oxalobacter colonization), in hereditary hyperoxaluria and in intoxication (ethylene glycol, vitamin C). Hyperoxaluria causes a large spectrum of diseases, from isolated hyperoxaluria to kidney stones and nephrocalcinosis formation, eventually leading to kidney failure and systemic oxalosis with life-threatening deposits in vital organs. New causes of hyperoxaluria are arising recently, in particular after gastric bypass surgery, which requires regular and preemptive monitoring. The treatment of hyperoxaluria involves reduction in oxalate intake and increase in calcium intake. Optimal urine dilution and supplementation with inhibitors of kidney stone formation (citrate) are required. Some conditions may need vitamin B6 supplementation, and the addition of probiotics might be useful in the future. Primary care physicians should identify cases of recurrent calcium oxalate stones and severe hyperoxaluria. Further management of hyperoxaluria requires specialized care.

  6. Calcium

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as canned sardines and salmon Calcium-enriched foods such as breakfast cereals, fruit juices, soy and rice drinks, and tofu. Check the product labels. The exact amount of calcium you need depends on your age and other factors. Growing children and teenagers need more calcium than ...

  7. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  8. Net Intestinal Transport of Oxalate Reflects Passive Absorption and SLC26A6-mediated Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Felix; Ko, Narae; Jiang, Zhirong; Robertson, William G.; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Anderson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Mice lacking the oxalate transporter SLC26A6 develop hyperoxalemia, hyperoxaluria, and calcium-oxalate stones as a result of a defect in intestinal oxalate secretion, but what accounts for the absorptive oxalate flux remains unknown. We measured transepithelial absorption of [14C]oxalate simultaneously with the flux of [3H]mannitol, a marker of the paracellular pathway, across intestine from wild-type and Slc26a6-null mice. We used the anion transport inhibitor DIDS to investigate other members of the SLC26 family that may mediate transcellular oxalate absorption. Absorptive flux of oxalate in duodenum was similar to mannitol, insensitive to DIDS, and nonsaturable, indicating that it is predominantly passive and paracellular. In contrast, in wild-type mice, secretory flux of oxalate in duodenum exceeded that of mannitol, was sensitive to DIDS, and saturable, indicating transcellular secretion of oxalate. In Slc26a6-null mice, secretory flux of oxalate was similar to mannitol, and no net flux of oxalate occurred. Absorptive fluxes of both oxalate and mannitol varied in parallel in different segments of small and large intestine. In epithelial cell lines, modulation of the charge selectivity of the claudin-based pore pathway did not affect oxalate permeability, but knockdown of the tight-junction protein ZO-1 enhanced permeability to oxalate and mannitol in parallel. Moreover, formation of soluble complexes with cations did not affect oxalate absorption. In conclusion, absorptive oxalate flux occurs through the paracellular “leak” pathway, and net absorption of dietary oxalate depends on the relative balance between absorption and SLC26A6-dependent transcellular secretion. PMID:22021714

  9. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to 'Averrhoa bilimbi' fruit juice ingestion.

    PubMed

    Bakul, G; Unni, V N; Seethaleksmy, N V; Mathew, A; Rajesh, R; Kurien, G; Rajesh, J; Jayaraj, P M; Kishore, D S; Jose, P P

    2013-07-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management.

  10. Pathology and Epidemiology of Oxalate Nephrosis in Cheetahs.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Emily P; Church, Molly E; Nemser, Sarah M; Yakes, Betsy Jean; Evans, Eric R; Reimschuessel, Renate; Lemberger, Karin; Thompson, Peter N; Terio, Karen A

    2017-01-01

    To investigate cases of acute oxalate nephrosis without evidence of ethylene glycol exposure, archived data and tissues from cheetahs ( Acinonyx jubatus) from North America ( n = 297), southern Africa ( n = 257), and France ( n = 40) were evaluated. Renal and gastrointestinal tract lesions were characterized in a subset of animals with ( n = 100) and without ( n = 165) oxalate crystals at death. Crystals were confirmed as calcium oxalate by Raman spectroscopy in 45 of 47 cheetahs tested. Crystals were present in cheetahs from 3.7 months to 15.9 years old. Cheetahs younger than 1.5 years were less likely to have oxalates than older cheetahs ( P = .034), but young cheetahs with oxalates had more oxalate crystals than older cheetahs ( P < .001). Cheetahs with oxalate crystals were more likely to have renal amyloidosis, interstitial nephritis, or colitis and less likely to have glomerular loop thickening or gastritis than those without oxalates. Crystal number was positively associated with renal tubular necrosis ( P ≤ .001), regeneration ( P = .015), and casts ( P ≤ .001) but inversely associated with glomerulosclerosis, renal amyloidosis, and interstitial nephritis. Crystal number was unrelated to the presence or absence of colitis and was lower in southern African than American and European animals ( P = .01). This study found no evidence that coexisting chronic renal disease (amyloidosis, interstitial nephritis, or glomerulosclerosis), veno-occlusive disease, gastritis, or enterocolitis contributed significantly to oxalate nephrosis. Oxalate-related renal disease should be considered as a potential cause of acute renal failure, especially in young captive cheetahs. The role of location, diet, stress, and genetic predisposition in the pathogenesis of oxalate nephrosis in cheetahs warrants further study.

  11. The effect of intracrystalline and surface-bound osteopontin on the attachment of calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in ultrafiltered human urine.

    PubMed

    Thurgood, Lauren A; Sørensen, Esben S; Ryall, Rosemary L

    2012-04-01

    To determine the effects of intracrystalline (IC), surface-bound (SB) and combined IC + SB osteopontin (OPN) on the binding of urinary calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells in ultrafiltered (UF) human urine. (14)C-oxalic acid-labelled urinary COD crystals containing IC OPN were generated in pooled UF human urine containing human milk OPN at concentrations of 0, 1.0 and 5.0 mg/L. Additional labelled crystals were nucleated from a separate sample of the same pooled UF urine, to which were later added the same amounts of protein to produce crystals with SB OPN. COD crystals with IC+SB OPN were prepared using a combination of both techniques. Control crystals were prepared in the absence of OPN. Crystals were incubated with MDCK-II cells for up to 180 min in UF urine adjusted to 8 mm Ca(2+). Binding values for individual concentrations at specific time points and overall differences between binding curves were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Crystal morphology and attachment to the cells were confirmed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The sizes of crystals precipitated from UF urine in the presence of 0, 1 and 5 mg/L OPN were 21.9 µm, 19.3 µm and 16.5 µm, indicating that OPN had inhibited crystal growth in a dose-dependent fashion. Binding curves for control crystals were smooth, while those of the IC and IC+SB COD crystals associated with 1 and 5 mg/L OPN were bimodal, as were those of the 1 mg/L SB crystals. This suggests that OPN induces or potentiates a transient response that enables MDCK-II cells to release COD crystals after they have attached. Although OPN generally reduced the binding of urinary COD crystals to MDCK-II cells, at times it also appeared to mediate adhesion. It is possible therefore that OPN can reduce or increase crystal binding, and that our data represent the net effect of its opposing inhibitory or promotory properties. In UF urine, OPN inhibits the growth of

  12. Reduction of oxalate levels in tomato fruit and consequent metabolic remodeling following overexpression of a fungal oxalate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-05-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value.

  13. Reduction of Oxalate Levels in Tomato Fruit and Consequent Metabolic Remodeling Following Overexpression of a Fungal Oxalate Decarboxylase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value. PMID:23482874

  14. The effect of soaking and cooking on the oxalate content of taro leaves.

    PubMed

    Savage, G P; Dubois, M

    2006-01-01

    Pacific Island people commonly eat taro (Colocasia esculenta var. Schott) as a staple food in their home islands and also like to consume this familiar food when living in New Zealand. Some of these foods are imported from the islands and some attempts are, currently, being made to grow these crops in New Zealand. The taro leaves in this experiment were grown in a greenhouse in the North Island of New Zealand. The soluble oxalate content of the raw leaves was 236.10 mg oxalate/100 g wet matter (WM). Soaking the raw leaves in water for 30 min marginally reduces the soluble oxalate content by leaching into the tap water. Soaking for 18 h results in a 26% reduction in the soluble oxalate content of the raw leaves. During the soaking treatments the insoluble oxalate (calcium oxalate) content of the leaves remained constant (mean 171.64 mg oxalate/100 g WM). Boiling the taro leaves resulted in a 36% loss of soluble oxalates, while the soluble oxalate content of baked tissue was very similar to the raw tissue. The mean insoluble oxalate content of the raw, boiled and baked tissue was 226.28 mg oxalate/100 g WM. Overall, boiling the taro leaves was an effective way of reducing the soluble oxalate content of the cooked tissue.

  15. Acute oxalate nephropathy associated with orlistat.

    PubMed

    Humayun, Youshay; Ball, Kenneth C; Lewin, Jack R; Lerant, Anna A; Fülöp, Tibor

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a major world-wide epidemic which has led to a surge of various weight loss-inducing medical or surgical treatments. Orlistat is a gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor used as an adjunct treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus to induce clinically significant weight loss via fat malabsorption. We describe a case of a 76-year-old female with past medical history of chronic kidney disease (baseline serum creatinine was 1.5-2.5 mg/dL), hypertension, gout and psoriatic arthritis, who was admitted for evaluation of elevated creatinine, peaking at 5.40 mg/dL. She was started on orlistat 120 mg three times a day six weeks earlier. Initial serologic work-up remained unremarkable. Percutaneous kidney biopsy revealed massive calcium oxalate crystal depositions with acute tubular necrosis and interstitial inflammation. Serum oxalate level returned elevated at 45 mm/l (normal <27). Timed 24-hour urine collection documented increased oxalate excretion repeatedly (54-96 mg/24 hour). After five renal dialysis sessions in eighth days she gradually regained her former baseline kidney function with creatinine around 2 mg/dL. Given coexisting proton-pump inhibitor therapy, only per os calcium-citrate provided effective intestinal oxalate chelation to control hyperoxaluria. Our case underscores the potential of medically induced fat malabsorption to lead to an excessive oxalate absorption and acute kidney injury (AKI), especially in subjects with pre-existing renal impairment. Further, it emphasizes the importance of kidney biopsy to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Acute oxalate nephropathy associated with orlistat

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, Youshay; Ball, Kenneth C.; Lewin, Jack R.; Lerant, Anna A.; Fülöp, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a major world-wide epidemic which has led to a surge of various weight loss-inducing medical or surgical treatments. Orlistat is a gastrointestinal lipase inhibitor used as an adjunct treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus to induce clinically significant weight loss via fat malabsorption. Case Presentation: We describe a case of a 76-year-old female with past medical history of chronic kidney disease (baseline serum creatinine was 1.5-2.5 mg/dL), hypertension, gout and psoriatic arthritis, who was admitted for evaluation of elevated creatinine, peaking at 5.40 mg/dL. She was started on orlistat 120 mg three times a day six weeks earlier. Initial serologic work-up remained unremarkable. Percutaneous kidney biopsy revealed massive calcium oxalate crystal depositions with acute tubular necrosis and interstitial inflammation. Serum oxalate level returned elevated at 45 mm/l (normal <27). Timed 24-hour urine collection documented increased oxalate excretion repeatedly (54-96 mg/24 hour). After five renal dialysis sessions in eighth days she gradually regained her former baseline kidney function with creatinine around 2 mg/dL. Given coexisting proton-pump inhibitor therapy, only per os calcium-citrate provided effective intestinal oxalate chelation to control hyperoxaluria. Conclusions: Our case underscores the potential of medically induced fat malabsorption to lead to an excessive oxalate absorption and acute kidney injury (AKI), especially in subjects with pre-existing renal impairment. Further, it emphasizes the importance of kidney biopsy to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27152294

  17. The effect of preincubation of seed crystals of uric acid and monosodium urate with undiluted human urine to induce precipitation of calcium oxalate in vitro : implications for urinary stone formation.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Phulwinder K.; Ryall, Rosemary L.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies demonstrated that crystals of uric acid (UA) and sodium urate (NaU) can induce the precipitation of calcium oxalate (CaOx) from its inorganic metastable solutions, but similar effects have not been unequivocally shown to occur in urine. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether preincubation of these seeds with urine alter their ability to induce deposition of CaOx from solution and thus provide a possible explanation for discrepancy of results obtained from aqueous inorganic solutions and undiluted urine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The effects of commercial seed crystals of UA, NaU and CaOx (6 mg/100 ml) on CaOx crystallization were compared in a solution with the same crystals that had been preincubated for 3 hours with healthy male urine. A Coulter Counter was used to follow the crystallization and decrease in soluble (14) C-oxalate was measured to determine the deposition of CaOx. The precipitated particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The preincubated seeds were demineralized and proteins released were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). RESULTS: Analysis of (14) C-oxalate data revealed that while treated UA seeds did not affect CaOx deposition, those of NaU and CaOx inhibited the process by 51.9 (p<0.05) and 8.5% (p<0.05) relative to their respective untreated counterparts. Particle size analysis showed that the average modal sizes of particles precipitated in the presence of treated seed crystals of UA, NaU, and CaOx were very similar to those deposited in the presence of their respective untreated controls. These findings were confirmed by SEM which also showed that seed crystals of UA and NaU, untreated and treated, were attached like barnacles upon the surfaces of CaOx crystals which themselves were bigger than those precipitated in the presence of CaOx seeds. SDS-PAGE analysis of the demineralized treated seeds showed that they all selectively

  18. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    SciTech Connect

    Tamain, C.; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Rivenet, M.; Grandjean, S.; Abraham, F.

    2016-04-15

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}·xH{sub 2}O, Th(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O, M{sub 2+x}[Pu{sup IV}{sub 2−x}Pu{sup III}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 5}]·nH{sub 2}O and M{sub 1−x}[Pu{sup III}{sub 1−x}Pu{sup IV}{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}·H{sub 2}O]·nH{sub 2}O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV–visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds. - Graphical abstract: Two new single crystal growth methods dedicated to actinide oxalate compounds. - Highlights: • Use of diester as oxalate precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Use of actinide oxide as precursor for crystal growth of actinide oxalates. • Crystal growth of Pu(III) and Am(III) oxalates. • Crystal growth of mixed Pu(III)/Pu(IV) oxalates.

  19. The pathogenic white-rot fungus Heterobasidion parviporum responds to spruce xylem defense by enhanced production of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Kvaalen, Harald; Fongen, Monica; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Clarke, Nicholas; Solheim, Halvor; Hietala, Ari M

    2012-11-01

    Pathogen challenge of tree sapwood induces the formation of reaction zones with antimicrobial properties such as elevated pH and cation content. Many fungi lower substrate pH by secreting oxalic acid, its conjugate base oxalate being a reductant as well as a chelating agent for cations. To examine the role of oxalic acid in pathogenicity of white-rot fungi, we conducted spatial quantification of oxalate, transcript levels of related fungal genes, and element concentrations in heartwood of Norway spruce challenged naturally by Heterobasidion parviporum. In the pathogen-compromised reaction zone, upregulation of an oxaloacetase gene generating oxalic acid coincided with oxalate and cation accumulation and presence of calcium oxalate crystals. The colonized inner heartwood showed trace amounts of oxalate. Moreover, fungal exposure to the reaction zone under laboratory conditions induced oxaloacetase and oxalate accumulation, whereas heartwood induced a decarboxylase gene involved in degradation of oxalate. The excess level of cations in defense xylem inactivates pathogen-secreted oxalate through precipitation and, presumably, only after cation neutralization can oxalic acid participate in lignocellulose degradation. This necessitates enhanced production of oxalic acid by H. parviporum. This study is the first to determine the true influence of white-rot fungi on oxalate crystal formation in tree xylem.

  20. Oxalate mediated nephronal impairment and its inhibition by c-phycocyanin: a study on urolithic rats.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Shukkur Muhammed; Ebrahim, Abdul Shukkur; Subramhanya, Karthik Harve; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Rajesh, Nachiappa Ganesh; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan

    2006-03-01

    The assumption of oxidative stress as a mechanism in oxalate induced renal damage suggests that antioxidants might play a beneficial role against oxalate toxicity. An in vivo model was used to investigate the effect of C-phycocyanin (from aquatic micro algae; Spirulina spp.), a known antioxidant, against calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Hyperoxaluria was induced in two of the 4 groups of Wistar albino rats (n = 6 in each) by intraperitoneally injecting sodium oxalate (70 mg/kg body weight). A pretreatment of phycocyanin (100 mg/kg body weight) as a single oral dosage was given, one hour prior to oxalate challenge. An untreated control and drug control (phycocyanin alone) were employed. Phycocyanin administration resulted in a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the thiol content of renal tissue and RBC lysate via increasing glutathione and reducing malondialdehyde levels in the plasma of oxalate induced rats (p < 0.001), indicating phycocyanin's antioxidant effect on oxalate mediated oxidative stress. Administering phycocyanin after oxalate treatment significantly increased catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (p < 0.001) in RBC lysate suggesting phycocyanin as a free radical quencher. Assessing calcium oxalate crystal retention in renal tissue using polarization microscopy and renal ultrastructure by electron microscopy reveals normal features in phycocyanin-- pretreated groups. Thus the study presents positive pharmacological implications of phycocyanin against oxalate mediated nephronal impairment and warrants further work to tap this potential aquatic resource for its medicinal application.

  1. Oxalate nephropathy in free-living American bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Toshihiro; Kadekaru, Sho; Ito, Masao; Yoshida, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2015-10-27

    In February 2014, wild American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus tadpoles from an artificial pond in the Kyusyu region, Japan, presented with coelomic and subcutaneous edema and erythema within the skin. A pathological examination of 57 tadpoles of American bullfrogs in the region was conducted to evaluate the disease. Crystal deposition of varying degrees was found in the kidneys of 35 tadpoles (61.4%). The crystals were transparent, pleomorphic in shape, highly birefringent in polarized light, and arranged in a radial pattern within the renal tubular lumen. Using Alizarin Red S stain and liquid chromatography, these crystals were identified as calcium oxalate. Severe coelomic and subcutaneous edema was observed in 7 of these 35 tadpoles (20.0%). Ammonia levels in coelomic fluid were extremely elevated (>1000 µg dl(-1)) in 4 tadpoles examined. These findings suggest that oxalate deposition in kidneys causes metabolic disorder with renal nephropathy. The source of the oxalate could not be determined; however, the presence of calcium oxalates in pond sediments, as revealed by liquid chromatography, suggested that the deposition was most likely due to ingestion of oxalate materials from the environment. This is the first report of oxalate nephropathy in free-living amphibians.

  2. Oxalobacter formigenes colonization normalizes oxalate excretion in a gastric bypass model of hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Canales, Benjamin K; Hatch, Marguerite

    2017-07-01

    Hyperoxaluria and oxalate kidney stones frequently develop after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Oxalobacter formigenes can degrade ingested oxalate. Examine the effect of O. formigenes wild rat strain (OXWR) colonization on urinary oxalate excretion and intestinal oxalate transport in a hyperoxaluric RYGB model. Basic Science Laboratory, United States. At 21 weeks of age, 28 obese male Sprague-Dawley rats survived Sham (n = 10) or RYGB (n = 18) surgery and were maintained on a 1.5% potassium oxalate, 40% fat diet. At 12 weeks postoperatively, half the animals in each group were gavaged with OXWR. At 16 weeks, percent dietary fat content was lowered to 10%. Urine and stool were collected weekly to determine oxalate and colonization status, respectively. At week 20, [14 C]-oxalate fluxes and electrical parameters were measured in vitro across isolated distal colon and jejunal (Roux limb) tissue mounted in Ussing Chambers. RYGB animals lost 22% total weight while Shams gained 5%. On a moderate oxalate diet, urinary oxalate excretion was 4-fold higher in RYGB than Sham controls. OXWR colonization, obtained in all gavaged animals, reduced urinary oxalate excretion 74% in RYGB and 39% in Sham and was further augmented by lowering the percentage of dietary fat. Finally, OXWR colonization significantly enhanced basal net colonic oxalate secretion in both groups. In our model, OXWR lowered urinary oxalate by luminal oxalate degradation in concert with promotion of enteric oxalate elimination. Trials of O. formigenes colonization and low-fat diet are warranted in calcium oxalate stone formers with gastric bypass and resistant hyperoxaluria. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerium oxalate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.P.

    1987-02-01

    Cerium, a nonradioactive, common stand-in for plutonium in development work, has been used to simulate several plutonium precipitation processes at the Savannah River Laboratory. There are similarities between the plutonium trifluoride and the cerium oxalate precipitations in particle size and extent of plating, but not particle morphology. The equilibrium solubility, precipitation kinetics, particle size, extent of plating, and dissolution characteristics of cerium oxalate have been investigated. Interpretations of particle size and plating based on precipitation kinetics (i.e., nucleation and crystal growth) are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Uropontin in urinary calcium stone formation.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J R

    1994-01-01

    Normal urine is frequently supersaturated with respect to calcium oxalate. Thus, urinary inhibitors of crystallization appear to have an important role in preventing urinary stone formation. Uropontin was isolated by monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography and has the same N-terminal sequence as osteopontin derived from bone. This urinary form of osteopontin is a potent inhibitor of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth at concentrations (approximately 0.1 microM) that normally prevail in human urine. Interaction with calcium oxalate monohydrate in vivo was shown by analysis of EDTA extracts of calcium stones. Uropontin is an abundant component of calcium oxalate monohydrate stones and present in only trace quantities in calcium oxalate dihydrate and hydroxyapatite stones. However, the precise role of uropontin in the pathogenesis of urinary stone formation is not known and is the subject of ongoing investigations.

  5. Oxalate Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cartery, Claire; Karras, Alexandre; Cointault, Olivier; Buscail, Louis; Modesto, Anne; Ribes, David; Rostaing, Lionel; Chauveau, Dominique; Giraud, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Enteric overabsorption of oxalate may lead to hyperoxaluria and subsequent acute oxalate nephritis (AON). AON related to chronic pancreatitis is a rare and poorly described condition precluding early recognition and treatment. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We collected the clinical characteristics, treatment, and renal outcome of 12 patients with chronic pancreatitis–associated AON followed in four French renal units. Results Before AON, mild to moderate chronic kidney disease was present in all patients, diabetes mellitus in eight (insulin [n = 6]; oral antidiabetic drugs [n = 2]), and known chronic pancreatitis in only eight. At presentation, pancreas imaging showed gland atrophy/heterogeneity, Wirsung duct dilation, calcification, or pseudocyst. Renal findings consisted of rapidly progressive renal failure with tubulointerstitial profile. Acute modification of glomerular filtration preceded the AON (i.e., diarrhea and diuretics). Increase in urinary oxalate excretion was found in all tested patients and hypocalcemia in nine (<1.5 mmol/L in four patients). Renal biopsy showed diffuse crystal deposits, highly suggestive of oxalate crystals, with tubular necrosis and interstitial inflammatory cell infiltrates. Treatment consisted of pancreatic enzyme supplementation, oral calcium intake, and an oxalate-free diet in all patients and renal replacement therapy in five patients. After a median follow-up of 7 months, three of 12 patients reached end-stage renal disease. Conclusion AON is an under-recognized severe crystal-induced renal disease with features of tubulointerstitial nephritis that may occur in patients with a long history of chronic pancreatitis or reveal the pancreatic disease. Extrinsic triggering factors should be prevented. PMID:21737848

  6. Conjugated bile acid replacement therapy reduces urinary oxalate excretion in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Michael; Guirl, Michael J; Santa Ana, Carol A; Porter, Jack L; Neimark, Sidney; Hofmann, Alan F; Fordtran, John S

    2003-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) have steatorrhea, in part because of bile acid malabsorption that causes decreased bile acid secretion into the duodenum and consequent fat maldigestion. In SBS patients with colon in continuity, luminal calcium forms calcium fatty acid soaps rather than precipitating as insoluble calcium oxalate. Soluble oxalate is hyperabsorbed by the colon leading to hyperoxaluria and an increased risk for renal calcium oxalate stones and deposits. The authors hypothesized that oral ingestion of conjugated bile acids would increase fat absorption and thereby decrease calcium fatty acid soap formation and oxalate hyperabsorption. The effect of conjugated bile acid replacement therapy (9 g/d) on fecal fat excretion and urine oxalate excretion was measured in an appropriate patient, utilizing the metabolic balance technique. The effects of chronic bile acid replacement therapy on oxalate excretion and nutritional status also were measured in a 3-month outpatient study. Natural conjugated bile acid replacement therapy reduced fecal fat excretion from 119 to 79 g/d (Delta40 g/d), and urinary oxalate excretion from 87 to 64 mg/d (966 to 710 micromol/d; Delta23 mg/d). Cholylsarcosine, a synthetic conjugated bile acid, had similar but less powerful effects. During a 3-month outpatient trial of natural conjugated bile acids (9 g/d), urine oxalate decreased to normal levels (27 mg/d) in association with weight gain, decreased hunger, and decreased hyperphagia. Conjugated bile acid replacement therapy reduced fecal fat excretion, reduced urinary oxalate excretion, and improved nutritional status in a patient with SBS with colon in continuity, hyperoxaluria, and oxalate nephrolithiasis. Copyright 2003 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  7. Calcium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Robert J P

    2002-01-01

    This chapter describes the chemical and biological value of the calcium ion. In calcium chemistry, our main interest is in equilibria within static, nonflowing systems. Hence, we examined the way calcium formed precipitates and complex ions in solution. We observed thereafter its uses by humankind in a vast number of materials such as minerals, e.g., marble, concrete, mortars, which parallel the biological use in shells and bones. In complex formation, we noted that many combinations were of anion interaction with calcium for example in the uses of detergents and medicines. The rates of exchange of calcium from bound states were noted but they had little application. Calcium ions do not act as catalysts of organic reactions. In biological systems, interest is in the above chemistry, but extends to the fact that Ca2+ ions can carry information by flowing in one solution or from one solution to another through membranes. Hence, we became interested in the details of rates of calcium exchange. The fast exchange of this divalent ion from most organic binding sites has allowed it to develop as the dominant second messenger. Now the flow can be examined in vitro as calcium binds particular isolated proteins, which it activates as seen in physical mechanical changes or chemical changes and this piece-by-piece study of cells is common. Here, however, we have chosen to stress the whole circuit of Ca2+ action indicating that the cell is organized both at a basal and an activated state kinetic level by the steady state flow of the ion (see Fig. 11). Different time constants of exchange utilizing very similar binding constants lead to: 1) fast responses as in the muscle of an animal; or 2) slower change as in differentiation of an egg or seed. Many other changes of state may relate to Ca2+ steady-state levels of flow in the circuitry and here we point to two: 1) dormancy in reptiles and animals; and 2) sporulation in both bacteria and lower plants. In the other chapters of

  8. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  9. Isolation and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Roop-ngam, Piyachat; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Pongsakul, Nutkridta; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first large-scale characterizations of oxalate-binding kidney proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recently developed oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads were applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 38 forms of 26 unique oxalate-binding kidney proteins were identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 25/26 (96%) of identified proteins had 'L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]' domain. -- Abstract: Oxalate-binding proteins are thought to serve as potential modulators of kidney stone formation. However, only few oxalate-binding proteins have been identified from previous studies. Our present study, therefore, aimed for large-scale identification of oxalate-binding proteins in porcine kidney using an oxalate-affinity column containing oxalate-conjugated EAH Sepharose 4B beads for purification followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to resolve the recovered proteins. Comparing with those obtained from the controlled column containing uncoupled EAH-Sepharose 4B (to subtract the background of non-specific bindings), a total of 38 protein spots were defined as oxalate-binding proteins. These protein spots were successfully identified by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS) and/or tandem MS (MS/MS) as 26 unique proteins, including several nuclear proteins, mitochondrial proteins, oxidative stress regulatory proteins, metabolic enzymes and others. Identification of oxalate-binding domain using the PRATT tool revealed 'L-x(3,5)-R-x(2)-[AGILPV]' as a functional domain responsible for oxalate-binding in 25 of 26 (96%) unique identified proteins. We report herein, for the first time, large-scale identification and characterizations of oxalate-binding proteins in the kidney. The presence of positively charged arginine residue in the middle of this functional domain suggested its significance for binding to the negatively charged oxalate. These data will enhance future stone research, particularly on stone

  10. Multiorgan crystal deposition following intravenous oxalate infusion in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfrucht, M.J.; Cheeks, C.; Wedeen, R.P.

    1986-06-01

    Deposition of calcium oxalate is responsible for the pathologic manifestations of oxalosis and may contribute to multiorgan dysfunction in uremia and to the progression of renal damage after renal failure is established. We have developed a rat model of oxalosis using a single intravenous injection of sodium oxalate, 0.3 mmol./kg. body weight, in rats. Polarized light microscopy and section freeze-dry autoradiography were used to identify /sup 14/C-oxalate within the renal parenchyma and in extrarenal organs. /sup 14/C-oxalate crystals under three mu in length were identified within one min. of injection in proximal tubule lumens. Section freeze-dry autoradiography showed occasional minute crystals within glomeruli, heart, lung and liver at one hr. In contrast to concentrative cellular uptake demonstrated in rat renal cortical slices in vitro, intracellular accumulation of /sup 14/C-oxalate could not be detected in vivo. Within the first 24 hr., renal oxalate retention reached a maximum of 25 +/- 4 per cent of the injected dose/gm. kidney compared to a maximum of only 7 +/- 3 per cent/gm. kidney after intraperitoneal administration. Although less than one per cent dose/gm. kidney remained after one week, crystal fragments were scattered throughout the cortex and medulla, often surrounded by foci of interstitial nephritis. The retention of crystals in kidney and other body organs following i.v. oxalate provides a model of oxalosis which stimulates pathophysiologic events in a variety of clinical situations characterized by transiently or persistently elevated serum oxalate.

  11. Gut microbiota and oxalate homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This perspective focuses on how the gut microbiota can impact urinary oxalate excretion in the context of hyperoxaluria, a major risk factor in kidney stone disease. In the genetic disease of Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 (PH1), an increased endogenous production of oxalate, due to a deficiency of the liver enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), results in hyperoxaluria and oxalate kidney stones. The constant elevation in urinary oxalate in PH1 patients ultimately leads to tissue deposition of oxalate, renal failure and death and the only known cure for PH1 is a liver or liver-kidney transplant. The potential impact of a probiotic/therapeutic approach may be clinically significant in PH1 and could also extend to a much larger population of idiopathic oxalate stone formers who comprise ~12% of Americans, individuals with enteric hyperoxaluria, and an emerging population of hyperoxaluric patients who have undergone bariatric surgery and develop kidney stone disease as a consequence. PMID:28217701

  12. Assessment of in vitro oxalate degradation by Lactobacillus species cultured from veterinary probiotics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jenny G; Gebhart, Connie J; Furrow, Eva; Lulich, Jody P

    2015-09-01

    To culture Lactobacillus spp from veterinary probiotics and measure their in vitro oxalate-degrading capacity. 2 commercial veterinary probiotics containing Lactobacillus spp. Lactobacillus spp were cultured anaerobically on selective deMan, Rogosa, Sharpe agar medium and subcultured for speciation by 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Isolates were inoculated into broth containing sodium oxalate (5 mg/L) and incubated anaerobically for 72 hours. An oxalate-degrading isolate of Lactobacillus acidophilus (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 53544) was the positive control sample; sterile broth containing a known quantity of sodium oxalate was the negative control sample. Oxalate concentrations were detected with ion chromatography. Oxalate degradation was assessed with Dunnett tests to detect differences in mean oxalate concentration for each isolate, compared with results for the negative control. Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus casei or Lactobacillus zeae (too closely related to differentiate) were isolated from probiotic 1, and L plantarum was isolated from probiotic 2. Sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene confirmed 100% homology to type species. Lactobacillus acidophilus (ATCC 53544) and L acidophilus from probiotic 1 significantly decreased oxalate concentrations by 85.3 and 161.9 mg/L, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum from probiotics 1 and 2 significantly increased oxalate concentrations by 56.1 and 36.1 mg/L, respectively. Lactobacillus casei did not alter oxalate concentrations. Lactobacillus acidophilus isolates significantly reduced oxalate concentrations. In vivo studies are needed to determine whether probiotics containing L acidophilus decrease urine oxalate concentrations and reduce risk of urolith recurrence in dogs with a history of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

  13. Crystal morphology and carbon/carbon composition of solid oxalate in cacti.

    PubMed

    Rivera, E R; Smith, B N

    1979-12-01

    Morphology, crystal structure, and carbon isotopic composition of calcium oxalate from representative species from the family Cactaceae were determined using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Crystals from one species in the Opuntieae tribe of the Cactaceae were druses with acute points composed of the monohydrate form of calcium oxalate (whewellite). Crystals from three species in the Cereeae tribe were the dihydrate form of calcium oxalate (weddellite) forming druses made up of tetragonal and isodiametric crystallites. The oxalate was relatively enriched in (13)C isotope (-7.3 to - 8.7 per thousand) compared with woody fibers (-13.3 to 14.1 per thousand) from the same plants.

  14. Crystal Morphology and 13Carbon/12Carbon Composition of Solid Oxalate in Cacti 1

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, E. R.; Smith, B. N.

    1979-01-01

    Morphology, crystal structure, and carbon isotopic composition of calcium oxalate from representative species from the family Cactaceae were determined using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Crystals from one species in the Opuntieae tribe of the Cactaceae were druses with acute points composed of the monohydrate form of calcium oxalate (whewellite). Crystals from three species in the Cereeae tribe were the dihydrate form of calcium oxalate (weddellite) forming druses made up of tetragonal and isodiametric crystallites. The oxalate was relatively enriched in 13C isotope (-7.3 to - 8.7 ‰) compared with woody fibers (-13.3 to 14.1 ‰) from the same plants. Images PMID:16661115

  15. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  16. Production of reactive oxygen species and wound-induced resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against Botrytis cinerea are preceded and depend on a burst of calcium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wounded leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) within minutes after wounding and become resistant to the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea at a local level. This fast response of the plants to the wound is called wound-induced resistance (WIR). However the molecular mechanisms of this response and the signal cascade between the wound and ROS production are still largely unknown. Calcium is a conserved signal and it is involved in many abiotic stress responses in plants, furthermore, calcium pathways act very fast. Results The results of this study show that leaves treated with calcium channels inhibitors (verapamil) or calcium chelators (oxalate and EGTA) are impaired in ROS production. Moreover, leaves treated with verapamil, EGTA or oxalate were more susceptible to B. cinerea after wounding. The intracellular measurements of calcium changes indicated quick but transient calcium dynamics taking place few seconds after wounding in cells neighbouring the wound site. This change in the cytosolic calcium was followed in the same region by a more stable ROS burst. Conclusions These data further extend our knowledge on the connection between wounding, calcium influx and ROS production. Moreover they provide for the first time the evidence that, following wounding, calcium changes precede a burst in ROS in the same location. PMID:24134148

  17. Molecular analysis of oxalate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated apoptosis in the pathogenesis of kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Albert; Benita, Shaly; Kumari, Monika; Ganesan, Divya; Paul, Eldho; Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Mahesh, Ayyavu; Yuvaraj, Subramani; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2017-09-05

    Oxalate, a non-essential end product of metabolism, causes hyperoxaluria and eventually calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone disease. Kidney cells exposed to oxalate stress results in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and progression of stone formation. Perturbations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) result in accumulation of misfolded proteins and Ca(2+) ions homeostasis imbalance and serve as a common pathway for various diseases, including kidney disorders. ER stress induces up-regulation of pro-survival protein glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and pro-apoptotic signaling protein C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Since the association of oxalate toxicity and ER stress on renal cell damage is uncertain, the present study is an attempt to elucidate the interaction of GRP78 with oxalate by computational analysis and study the role of ER stress in oxalate-mediated apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Molecular docking results showed that GRP78-oxalate/CaOx interaction takes place. Oxalate stress significantly up-regulated expression of ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP both in vitro and in vivo. Exposure of oxalate increased ROS generation and altered antioxidant enzyme activities. N-Acetyl cysteine treatment significantly ameliorated oxalate-mediated oxidative stress and moderately attenuated ER stress marker expression. The result indicates oxalate toxicity initiated oxidative stress-induced ER stress and also activating ER stress mediated apoptosis directly. In addition, the up-regulation of transforming growth factor β-1 revealed oxalate may induce kidney fibrosis through ER stress-mediated mechanisms. The present study provide insights into the pathogenic role of oxidative and ER stress by oxalate exposure in the formation of calcium oxalate stone.

  18. Teaching Physics for the First Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Jan; Winn, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This book is designed to be a quick and easy resource for anyone teaching physics for the first time. Written after extensive research, this book is filled with reliable labs, demos and activities that work well in the classroom. Also included are lesson plans, diagrams, and teacher notes for every activity. The book is not the end--it is just a…

  19. Teaching Physics for the First Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Jan; Winn, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This book is designed to be a quick and easy resource for anyone teaching physics for the first time. Written after extensive research, this book is filled with reliable labs, demos and activities that work well in the classroom. Also included are lesson plans, diagrams, and teacher notes for every activity. The book is not the end--it is just a…

  20. Pathogenesis and treatment of calcium stones.

    PubMed

    Parks, J H; Coe, F L

    1996-09-01

    Calcium stones arise from imbalances between urinary excretions of insoluble salts and water. Idiopathic hypercalciuria and hyperparathyroidism are the calcium disorders usually associated with elevated levels of calcium in the urine. Renal tubular acidosis is associated with a disordered acid-base status that results in low urine citrate. Hypocitraturia itself is a cause of calcium stones because it leaves urine calcium free to complex with either oxalate or phosphate. Elevated urine oxalate is commonly associated with dietary excesses, bowel disease, and, rarely, primary hyperoxaluria. Hyperuricosuria, usually of dietary origin, when reversed can cause a fall in new calcium stones.

  1. The fluorimetric determination of oxalic acid in blood and other biological materials

    PubMed Central

    Zarembski, P. M.; Hodgkinson, A.

    1965-01-01

    1. Oxalic acid is separated from interfering substances by extraction with tri-n-butyl phosphate followed by co-precipitation with calcium sulphate. The precipitated oxalic acid is then reduced to glyoxylic acid, which is coupled with resorcinol to form a coloured fluorescent complex. 2. The spectrofluorometric method described is sensitive and highly specific, the minimum detectable amount of oxalic acid being 0·9μmole under the recommended conditions. 3. The concentration of oxalic acid in blood from 15 normal adults was 200–320μg./100ml. For serum the range was 135–280μg./100ml. The urinary excretion of oxalic acid by 60 normal adults on a normal diet was 9·0–28·5mg./24hr. PMID:5862411

  2. Oxalate deposition on asbestos bodies.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Roggli, Victor L; Richards, Judy H; Crissman, Kay M; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline D; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2003-08-01

    We report on a deposition of oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos demonstrated in 3 patients. We investigated the mechanism and possible significance of this deposition by testing the hypothesis that oxalate generated through nonenzymatic oxidation of ascorbate by asbestos-associated iron accounts for the deposition of the crystal on a ferruginous body. Crocidolite asbestos (1000 microg/mL) was incubated with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C. The dependence of oxalate generation on iron-catalyzed oxidant production was tested with the both the metal chelator deferoxamine and the radical scavenger dimethylthiourea. Incubation of crocidolite, H(2)O(2), and ascorbate in vitro generated approximately 42 nmol of oxalate in 24 hours. Oxalate generation was diminished significantly by the inclusion of either deferoxamine or dimethylthiourea in the reaction mixture. Incubation of asbestos bodies and uncoated fibers isolated from human lung with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C resulted in the generation of numerous oxalate crystals. We conclude that iron-catalyzed production of oxalate from ascorbate can account for the deposition of this crystal on ferruginous bodies.

  3. Oxalate analysis methodology for decayed wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; William Kenealy; Patricia K. Lebow

    2008-01-01

    Oxalate from partially decayed southern pine wood was analyzed by HPLC or colorimetric assay. Oxalate extraction efficiency, assessed by comparing analysis of whole wood cubes with ground wood, showed that both wood geometries could be extracted with comparable efficiency. To differentiate soluble oxalate from total oxalate, three extraction methods were assessed,...

  4. Acute oxalate nephropathy due to ‘Averrhoa bilimbi’ fruit juice ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Bakul, G.; Unni, V. N.; Seethaleksmy, N. V.; Mathew, A.; Rajesh, R.; Kurien, G.; Rajesh, J.; Jayaraj, P. M.; Kishore, D. S.; Jose, P. P.

    2013-01-01

    Irumban puli (Averrhoa bilimbi) is commonly used as a traditional remedy in the state of Kerala. Freshly made concentrated juice has a very high oxalic acid content and consumption carries a high risk of developing acute renal failure (ARF) by deposition of calcium oxalate crystals in renal tubules. Acute oxalate nephropathy (AON) due to secondary oxalosis after consumption of Irumban puli juice is uncommon. AON due to A. bilimbi has not been reported before. We present a series of ten patients from five hospitals in the State of Kerala who developed ARF after intake of I. puli fruit juice. Seven patients needed hemodialysis whereas the other three improved with conservative management. PMID:23960349

  5. Effect of different brewing times on soluble oxalate content of loose-packed black teas and tea bags.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Reza; Lotfi Yagin, Neda; Liebman, Michael; Nikniaz, Zeinab

    2013-02-01

    Because of the postulated role of increased dietary oxalate intake in calcium oxalate stone formation, the effect of different brewing times on soluble oxalate contents of loose-packed black tea and tea bags was studied. The oxalate content of 25 different samples of loose-packed black teas after brewing at 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 min and of ten brands of tea bags after infusion for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 min was measured by enzymatic assay. The oxalate concentration resulting from different brewing times ranged from 4.3 to 6.2 mg/240 ml for loose-packed black teas and from 2.7 to 4.8 mg/240 ml for tea bags. There was a stepwise increase in oxalate concentration associated with increased brewing times.

  6. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis decreases urinary oxalate excretion in a mouse model of primary hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Whittamore, Jonathan M.; Hatch, Marguerite

    2015-01-01

    Hyperoxaluria significantly increases the risk of calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. Since several bacteria have been shown to metabolize oxalate in vitro, including probiotic bifidobacteria, we focused on the efficiency and possible mechanisms by which bifidobacteria can infuence oxalate handling in vivo, especially in the intestines, and compared these results with the reported effects of Oxalobacter formigenes. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140 and B. adolescentis ATCC 15703 were administered to wild-type (WT) mice and to mice defcient in the hepatic enzyme alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (Agxt−/−, a mouse model of Primary Hyperoxaluria) that were fed an oxalate-supplemented diet. The administration of B. animalis subsp. lactis led to a significant decrease in urinary oxalate excretion in WT and Agxt−/− mice when compared to treatment with B. adolescent-is. Detection of B. animalis subsp. lactis in feces revealed that 3 weeks after oral gavage with the bacteria 64 % of WT mice, but only 37 % of Agxt−/− mice were colonized. Examining intestinal oxalate fuxes showed there were no significant changes to net oxalate secretion in colonized animals and were therefore not associated with the changes in urinary oxalate excretion. These results indicate that colonization with B. animalis subsp. lactis decreased urinary oxalate excretion by degrading dietary oxalate thus limiting its absorption across the intestine but it did not promote enteric oxalate excretion as reported for O. formigenes. Preventive or therapeutic administration of B. animalis subsp. lactis appears to have some potential to beneficially infuence dietary hyperoxaluria in mice. PMID:25269440

  7. Plasma biochemistry and urinalysis variables of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) with and without oxalate nephrosis.

    PubMed

    Speight, K Natasha; Haynes, Julie I; Boardman, Wayne; Breed, William G; Taggart, David A; Rich, Brian; Woolford, Lucy

    2014-06-01

    Oxalate nephrosis is a highly prevalent disease in the Mount Lofty Ranges koala population in South Australia, but associated clinicopathologic findings remain undescribed. The aims of this study were to determine plasma biochemical and urinalysis variables, particularly for renal function and urinary crystal morphology and composition, in koalas with oxalate nephrosis. Blood and urine samples from Mount Lofty Ranges koalas with oxalate nephrosis were compared with those unaffected by renal oxalate crystal deposition from Mount Lofty and Kangaroo Island, South Australia and Moggill, Queensland. Plasma and urine biochemistry variables were analyzed using a Cobas Bio analyzer, and urinary oxalate by high-performance liquid chromatography. Urinary crystal composition was determined by infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Azotemia (urea > 6.6 mmol/L, creatinine > 150 μmol/L) was found in 93% of koalas with oxalate nephrosis (n = 15). All azotemic animals had renal insufficiency (urine specific gravity [USG] < 1.035), and in 83%, USG was < 1.030. Koalas with oxalate nephrosis were hyperoxaluric compared with Queensland koalas (P < .01). Urinary crystals from koalas with oxalate nephrosis had atypical morphology and were composed of calcium oxalate. Mount Lofty Ranges koalas unaffected by renal oxalate crystal deposition had renal insufficiency (43%), although only 14% had USG < 1.030 (n = 7). Unaffected Mount Lofty Ranges and Kangaroo Island koalas were hyperoxaluric compared with Queensland koalas (P < .01). Koalas with oxalate nephrosis from the Mount Lofty Ranges had renal insufficiency, hyperoxaluria, and pathognomonic urinary crystals. The findings of this study will aid veterinary diagnosis of this disease. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Oxalate Nephropathy in Systemic Sclerosis: Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ligon, Colin B.; Hummers, Laura K.; McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To increase awareness of oxalate nephropathy as a cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) among systemic sclerosis patients with small intestinal dysmotility and malabsorption, and to prompt consideration of dietary modification and early treatment of predisposing causes of oxalate nephropathy in this population. Methods Two cases of biopsy-proven oxalate nephropathy were identified among systemic sclerosis patients in the course of direct clinical care. Subsequently, a retrospective search of the Johns Hopkins Pathology databases identified a third patient with systemic sclerosis who developed oxalate nephropathy. Results Among the three patients with qualifying biopsies, all three had systemic sclerosis with lower gastrointestinal involvement. All three presented with diarrhea, malabsorption, and AKI. In two of the three patients, diarrhea was present for at least two years before the development of AKI; in the third, incidental oxalate nephropathy was noted three years before she developed AKI and extensive oxalate nephropathy in the setting of a prolonged mycobacterium avium-intracellulare enteritis. In one case, oxalate crystals were present by urinalysis months before diagnosis by biopsy, in the second, hyperoxaluria was diagnosed by urine collection immediately after biopsy, and in the third, oxalate crystals had been noted incidentally on post-transplant renal biopsy three years before the development of fulminant oxalate nephropathy. All three patients died within a year of diagnosis. Conclusions Patients with systemic sclerosis and bowel dysmotility associated with chronic diarrhea and malabsorption may be at risk for an associated oxalate nephropathy. Regular screening of systemic sclerosis patients with small bowel malabsorption syndromes through routine urinalysis or 24 hour urine oxalate collection, should be considered. Further studies defining the prevalence of this complication in systemic sclerosis, the benefit of dietary modification on

  9. Bilateral native nephrectomy reduces systemic oxalate level after combined liver-kidney transplant: A case report.

    PubMed

    Villani, Vincenzo; Gupta, Neena; Elias, Nahel; Vagefi, Parsia A; Markmann, James F; Paul, Elahna; Traum, Avram Z; Yeh, Heidi

    2017-03-05

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare liver enzymatic defect that causes overproduction of plasma oxalate. Accumulation of oxalate in the kidney and subsequent renal failure are fatal to PH1 patients often in pediatric age. Combined liver and kidney transplantation is the therapy of choice for end-stage renal disease due to PH1. Levels of plasma oxalate remain elevated for several months after liver transplantation, as the residual body oxalate is slowly excreted. Patients with persistent hyperoxaluria after transplant often require hemodialysis, and accumulation of residual oxalate in the kidney can induce graft dysfunction. As the native kidneys are the main target of calcium oxalate accumulation, we postulated that removal of native kidneys could drastically decrease total body oxalate levels after transplantation. Here, we report a case of bilateral nephrectomy at the time of combined liver-kidney transplantation in a pediatric PH1 patient. Bilateral nephrectomy induced a rapid decrease in plasma oxalate to normal levels in less than 20 days, compared to the several months reported in the literature. Our results suggest that removal of native kidneys could be an effective strategy to decrease the need for hemodialysis and the risk of renal dysfunction after combined liver-kidney transplantation in patients with PH1.

  10. Functional characterization of the oxaloacetase encoding gene and elimination of oxalate formation in the β-lactam producer Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Gombert, A K; Veiga, T; Puig-Martinez, M; Lamboo, F; Nijland, J G; Driessen, A J M; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2011-08-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum is widely used as an industrial antibiotic producer, in particular in the synthesis of ß-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins. In industrial processes, oxalic acid formation leads to reduced product yields. Moreover, precipitation of calcium oxalate complicates product recovery. We observed oxalate production in glucose-limited chemostat cultures of P. chrysogenum grown with or without addition of adipic acid, side-chain of the cephalosporin precursor adipoyl-6-aminopenicillinic acid (ad-6-APA). Oxalate accounted for up to 5% of the consumed carbon source. In filamentous fungi, oxaloacetate hydrolase (OAH; EC3.7.1.1) is generally responsible for oxalate production. The P. chrysogenum genome harbours four orthologs of the A. niger oahA gene. Chemostat-based transcriptome analyses revealed a significant correlation between extracellular oxalate titers and expression level of the genes Pc18g05100 and Pc22g24830. To assess their possible involvement in oxalate production, both genes were cloned in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yeast that does not produce oxalate. Only the expression of Pc22g24830 led to production of oxalic acid in S. cerevisiae. Subsequent deletion of Pc22g28430 in P. chrysogenum led to complete elimination of oxalate production, whilst improving yields of the cephalosporin precursor ad-6-APA.

  11. Pathological features of oxalate nephrosis in a population of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Speight, K N; Boardman, W; Breed, W G; Taggart, D A; Woolford, L; Haynes, J I

    2013-03-01

    The wild and captive koala population of the Mt Lofty Ranges in South Australia has a high level of renal dysfunction in which crystals consistent with calcium oxalate have been observed in the kidneys. This study aimed to describe the pathological features of the renal disease in this population, confirm the composition of renal crystals as calcium oxalate, and determine whether any age or sex predispositions exist for this disease. A total of 51 koalas (28 wild rescues, 23 captive) were examined at necropsy, of which 28 (55%) were found to have gross and/or histological evidence of oxalate nephrosis. Histopathological features included intratubular and interstitial inflammation, tubule dilation, glomerular atrophy, tubule loss, and cortical fibrosis. Calcium oxalate crystals were demonstrated using a combination of polarization microscopy, alizarin red S staining, infrared spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis with scanning electron microscopy. Uric acid and phosphate deposits were also shown to be present but were associated with minimal histopathological changes. No significant differences were found between the numbers of affected captive and wild rescued koalas; also, there were no sex or age predispositions identified, but it was found that oxalate nephrosis may affect koalas <2 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that oxalate nephrosis is a leading disease in this koala population. Possible causes of this disease are currently under investigation.

  12. Raman spectra of oxalates in lichen encrustations on Renaissance frescoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Farwell, D. W.; Seaward, M. R. D.

    The vibrational Raman spectra of lichen encrustations on biodeteriorated Renaissance frescoes have been recorded using a laser Raman microprobe. The major chemical species identified in the encrustations is calcium oxalate. Other vibrational features in the Raman spectra have been assigned to fragments of the substratum incorporated from the biodeterioration process and to organic by-products of lichen metabolism such as erythrin, lecanoric acid and meso-erythritol.

  13. First time description of dismantling phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Barrer, Laurence; Gimenez, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Dismantling is a complex psychic phenomenon, which is not easy to define, and little interest has been shown in the subject. The authors of this paper want to demonstrate that dismantling is the main defense mechanism in autism, bringing about de-consensus of senses. The effects perceived in a child with autistic disorder are passivity and lack of thought. The authors’ purpose here is to define the dismantled state and reveal its underlying process. This paper will therefore describe for the first time in literature, the dismantling phenomenon and will submit a metapsychological approach of this defense mechanism. PMID:25999871

  14. Extracellular nucleotides inhibit oxalate transport by human intestinal Caco-2-BBe cells through PKC-δ activation

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Ruhul; Sharma, Sapna; Ratakonda, Sireesha

    2013-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis remains a major health problem in Western countries. Seventy to 80% of kidney stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and small changes in urinary oxalate affect risk of kidney stone formation. Intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by the anion exchanger SLC26A6 plays an essential role in preventing hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis, indicating that understanding the mechanisms regulating intestinal oxalate transport is critical for management of hyperoxaluria. Purinergic signaling modulates several intestinal processes through pathways including PKC activation, which we previously found to inhibit Slc26a6 activity in mouse duodenal tissue. We therefore examined whether purinergic stimulation with ATP and UTP affects oxalate transport by human intestinal Caco-2-BBe (C2) cells. We measured [14C]oxalate uptake in the presence of an outward Cl− gradient as an assay of Cl−/oxalate exchange activity, ≥50% of which is mediated by SLC26A6. We found that ATP and UTP significantly inhibited oxalate transport by C2 cells, an effect blocked by the PKC inhibitor Gö-6983. Utilizing pharmacological agonists and antagonists, as well as PKC-δ knockdown studies, we observed that ATP inhibits oxalate transport through the P2Y2 receptor, PLC, and PKC-δ. Biotinylation studies showed that ATP inhibits oxalate transport by lowering SLC26A6 surface expression. These findings are of potential relevance to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease-associated hyperoxaluria, where supraphysiological levels of ATP/UTP are expected and overexpression of the P2Y2 receptor has been reported. We conclude that ATP and UTP inhibit oxalate transport by lowering SLC26A6 surface expression in C2 cells through signaling pathways including the P2Y2 purinergic receptor, PLC, and PKC-δ. PMID:23596171

  15. Extracellular nucleotides inhibit oxalate transport by human intestinal Caco-2-BBe cells through PKC-δ activation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Sharma, Sapna; Ratakonda, Sireesha; Hassan, Hatim A

    2013-07-01

    Nephrolithiasis remains a major health problem in Western countries. Seventy to 80% of kidney stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and small changes in urinary oxalate affect risk of kidney stone formation. Intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by the anion exchanger SLC26A6 plays an essential role in preventing hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis, indicating that understanding the mechanisms regulating intestinal oxalate transport is critical for management of hyperoxaluria. Purinergic signaling modulates several intestinal processes through pathways including PKC activation, which we previously found to inhibit Slc26a6 activity in mouse duodenal tissue. We therefore examined whether purinergic stimulation with ATP and UTP affects oxalate transport by human intestinal Caco-2-BBe (C2) cells. We measured [¹⁴C]oxalate uptake in the presence of an outward Cl⁻ gradient as an assay of Cl⁻/oxalate exchange activity, ≥50% of which is mediated by SLC26A6. We found that ATP and UTP significantly inhibited oxalate transport by C2 cells, an effect blocked by the PKC inhibitor Gö-6983. Utilizing pharmacological agonists and antagonists, as well as PKC-δ knockdown studies, we observed that ATP inhibits oxalate transport through the P2Y₂ receptor, PLC, and PKC-δ. Biotinylation studies showed that ATP inhibits oxalate transport by lowering SLC26A6 surface expression. These findings are of potential relevance to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease-associated hyperoxaluria, where supraphysiological levels of ATP/UTP are expected and overexpression of the P2Y₂ receptor has been reported. We conclude that ATP and UTP inhibit oxalate transport by lowering SLC26A6 surface expression in C2 cells through signaling pathways including the P2Y₂ purinergic receptor, PLC, and PKC-δ.

  16. Turning sunlight into stone: the oxalate-carbonate pathway in a tropical tree ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2011-07-01

    An African oxalogenic tree, the iroko tree (Milicia excelsa), has the property to enhance carbonate precipitation in tropical oxisols, where such accumulations are not expected due to the acidic conditions in these types of soils. This uncommon process is linked to the oxalate-carbonate pathway, which increases soil pH through oxalate oxidation. In order to investigate the oxalate-carbonate pathway in the iroko system, fluxes of matter have been identified, described, and evaluated from field to microscopic scales. In the first centimeters of the soil profile, decaying of the organic matter allows the release of whewellite crystals, mainly due to the action of termites and saprophytic fungi. In addition, a concomitant flux of carbonate formed in wood tissues contributes to the carbonate flux and is identified as a direct consequence of wood feeding by termites. Nevertheless, calcite biomineralization of the tree is not a consequence of in situ oxalate consumption, but rather related to the oxalate oxidation inside the upper part of the soil. The consequence of this oxidation is the presence of carbonate ions in the soil solution pumped through the roots, leading to preferential mineralization of the roots and the trunk base. An ideal scenario for the iroko biomineralization and soil carbonate accumulation starts with oxalatization: as the iroko tree grows, the organic matter flux to the soil constitutes the litter, and an oxalate pool is formed on the forest ground. Then, wood rotting agents (mainly termites, saprophytic fungi, and bacteria) release significant amounts of oxalate crystals from decaying plant tissues. In addition, some of these agents are themselves producers of oxalate (e.g. fungi). Both processes contribute to a soil pool of "available" oxalate crystals. Oxalate consumption by oxalotrophic bacteria can then start. Carbonate and calcium ions present in the soil solution represent the end products of the oxalate-carbonate pathway. The solution is

  17. Turning sunlight into stone: the oxalate-carbonate pathway in a tropical tree ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, G.; Braissant, O.; Verrecchia, E. P.

    2011-02-01

    An African oxalogenic tree, the iroko tree (Milicia excelsa), has the property to enhance carbonate precipitation in tropical oxisols, where such accumulations are not expected due to the theoretical acidic conditions of these soils. This uncommon process is linked to the oxalate-carbonate pathway, which increases soil pH through oxalate oxidation. In order to investigate the oxalate-carbonate pathway in the iroko system, fluxes of matter have been identified, described, and evaluated from field to microscopic scales. In the first centimeters of the soil profile, decaying of the organic matter allows the release of whewellite crystals, mainly due to the action of termites and saprophytic fungi. Regarding the carbonate flux, another direct consequence of wood feeding is a concomitant flux of carbonate formed in wood tissues, which is not consumed by termites. Nevertheless, calcite biomineralization of the tree is not a consequence of in situ oxalate consumption, but rather related to the oxalate oxidation inside the upper part of the soil. The consequence of this oxidation is the presence of carbonate ions in the soil solution pumped through the roots, leading to preferential mineralization of the roots and the trunk base. An ideal scenario for the iroko biomineralization and soil carbonate accumulation starts with oxalatization: as the iroko tree grows, the organic matter flux to the soil constitutes the litter. Therefore, an oxalate pool is formed on the forest ground. Then, wood rotting gents (mainly termites, fungi, and bacteria) release significant amounts of oxalate crystals from decaying plant tissues. In addition some of these gents are themselves producers of oxalate (fungi). Both processes contribute to a soil pool of "available" oxalate crystals. Oxalate consumption by oxalotrophic bacteria can start. Carbonate and calcium ions present in the soil solution represent the end products of the oxalate-carbonate pathway. The solution is pumped through the

  18. [The evaluation of anti-nutritive components in beer on the example of oxalic acid].

    PubMed

    Salamon, Agnieszka; Baca, Elzbieta; Baranowski, Krzysztof; Michałowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Food in its composition contains anti-nutritional substances that reduces or prevents the use of valuable nutrients. The oxalic acid, as phytate and dietary fiber, occurs naturally in foods of plant origin, to which the beer is classified. The negative effect of oxalic acid is reducing the bioavailability of calcium and magnesium, and disorder of metabolism of the body's absorption of these elements from the diet. The excess of oxalic acid and its salt in the diet contributes to the formation of certain diseases, such as oxalate urolithiasis, osteoporosis, arthritis, etc. Due to the diuretic effect of beer, drinking moderate amounts of it is recommended as a preventive and support urinary tract disorders. The aim of this study was to determine and comparison the oxalic acid content in selected beers available on the Polish market. Fifty seven samples of beer were used for this study. These samples were divided into three groups depending on the alcohol concentration declared by the producers (1st group--below 5.5% vol., 2nd group--from 5.5 to 6.5% vol., 3rd group--above 6.5% vol.). The beer samples were incubated in the ultrasonic bath for 15 minutes following pH adjustments up to pH = 2 with the 1 mol/L hydrochloric acid to transform calcium oxalates into soluble form, then filtered. The oxalic acid concentration was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with conductivity detection. The concentration of oxalic acid in tested samples of beer ranged from 1.8 to 30.3 mg/L. No considerable differences between the concentration of oxalic acid in the three tested group of beer with the various content of the alcohol were found. Basing on the average concentrations of the oxalic acid in the different groups of the tested beers the positive trend in oxalic acid concentration related to the increase of alcohol could be observed. The very low concentration of oxalic acid allows to classify beer as food product safe for the human health in terms of low

  19. The oxalate-carbonate pathway: at the interface between biology and geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junier, P.; Cailleau, G.; Martin, G.; Guggiari, M.; Bravo, D.; Clerc, M.; Aragno, M.; Job, D.; Verrecchia, E.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of calcite in otherwise carbonate-free acidic soils through the biological degradation of oxalate is a mechanism termed oxalate-carbonate pathway. This pathway lies at the interface between biological and geological systems and constitutes an important, although underestimated, soil mineral carbon sink. In this case, atmospheric CO2 is fixed by the photosynthetic activity of oxalogenic plants, which is partly destined to the production of oxalate used for the chelation of metals, and particularly, calcium. Fungi are also able to produce oxalate to cope with elevated concentrations of metals. In spite of its abundance as a substrate, oxalate is a very stable organic anion that can be metabolized only by a group of bacteria that use it as carbon and energy sources. These bacteria close the biological cycle by degrading calcium oxalate, releasing Ca2+ and inducing a change in local soil pH. If parameters are favourable, the geological part of the pathway begins, because this change in pH will indirectly lead to the precipitation of secondary calcium carbonate (calcite) in unexpected geological conditions. Due to the initial acidic soil conditions, and the absence of geological carbonate in the basement, it is unexpected to find C in the form of calcite. The activity of the oxalate-carbonate pathway has now been demonstrated in several places around the world, suggesting that its importance can be even greater than expected. In addition, new roles for each of the biological players of the pathway have been revealed recently forcing us to reconsider a global biogeochemical model for oxalate cycling.

  20. Crystal growth methods dedicated to low solubility actinide oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamain, C.; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Rivenet, M.; Grandjean, S.; Abraham, F.

    2016-04-01

    Two novel crystal growth syntheses dedicated to low solubility actinide-oxalate systems and adapted to glove box handling are described. These methods based on the use of precursors of either actinide metal or oxalic acid have been optimized on lanthanide systems (analogue of actinides(III)) and then assessed on real actinide systems. They allow the synthesis of several actinide oxalate single crystals, Am2(C2O4)3(H2O)3·xH2O, Th(C2O4)2·6H2O, M2+x[PuIV2-xPuIIIx(C2O4)5]·nH2O and M1-x[PuIII1-xPuIVx(C2O4)2·H2O]·nH2O. It is the first time that these well-known compounds are formed by crystal growth methods, thus enabling direct structural studies on transuranic element systems and acquisition of basic data beyond deductions from isomorphic (or not) lanthanide compounds. Characterizations by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible solid spectroscopy, demonstrate the potentialities of these two crystal growth methods to obtain oxalate compounds.

  1. Structural variability in neptunium(V) oxalate compounds: synthesis and structural characterization of Na2NpO2(C2O4)OH.H2O.

    PubMed

    Bean, Amanda C; Garcia, Eduardo; Scott, Brian L; Runde, Wolfgang

    2004-10-04

    Reaction of a (237)Np(V) stock solution in the presence of oxalic acid, calcium chloride, and sodium hydroxide under hydrothermal conditions produces single crystals of a neptunium(V) oxalate, Na(2)NpO(2)(C(2)O(4))OH.H(2)O. The structure consists of one-dimensional chains running down the a axis and is the first example of a neptunium(V) oxalate compound containing hydroxide anions.

  2. The role of intestinal oxalate transport in hyperoxaluria and the formation of kidney stones in animals and man.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Hatch, Marguerite

    2017-02-01

    The intestine exerts a considerable influence over urinary oxalate in two ways, through the absorption of dietary oxalate and by serving as an adaptive extra-renal pathway for elimination of this waste metabolite. Knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for oxalate absorption and secretion by the intestine therefore have significant implications for understanding the etiology of hyperoxaluria, as well as offering potential targets for future treatment strategies for calcium oxalate kidney stone disease. In this review, we present the recent developments and advances in this area over the past 10 years, and put to the test some of the new ideas that have emerged during this time, using human and mouse models. A key focus for our discussion are the membrane-bound anion exchangers, belonging to the SLC26 gene family, some of which have been shown to participate in transcellular oxalate absorption and secretion. This has offered the opportunity to not only examine the roles of these specific transporters, revealing their importance to oxalate homeostasis, but to also probe the relative contributions made by the active transcellular and passive paracellular components of oxalate transport across the intestine. We also discuss some of the various physiological stimuli and signaling pathways which have been suggested to participate in the adaptation and regulation of intestinal oxalate transport. Finally, we offer an update on research into Oxalobacter formigenes, alongside recent investigations of other oxalate-degrading gut bacteria, in both laboratory animals and humans.

  3. [Factors which influence the size of calcium oxalat crystals during their formation from saturated solutions].

    PubMed

    Hartung, R; Leskovar, P

    1978-07-01

    The nucleation and growth of Ca-oxalate crystals from metastable and instable solutions was studied in some detail to find out the dependence of the crystal size on the absolute calcium resp. oxalate concentration, further on their molar ratio, on the presence resp. absence of crystal seeds, on the agitation resp. stagnation of the Ca-oxalate solution, on the duration of crystallization and on the renewing of the Ca-oxalate containing supernatant, thus simulating a prolonged (dietary) oxalate load in vivo. The most important findings are the clear inhibition of crystal growth at higher and very high calcium concentrations (in contrary to the unhindered crystal enlargement at high oxalate concentrations), further the eminent role of the oxalate in the formation of big crystals and crystal aggregates, as well as the substantial crystal enlargement at the persistent oxalate load.

  4. Effect of Kimchi Fermentation on Oxalate Levels in Silver Beet (Beta vulgaris var. cicla).

    PubMed

    Wadamori, Yukiko; Vanhanen, Leo; Savage, Geoffrey P

    2014-04-23

    Total, soluble and insoluble oxalates were extracted and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) following the preparation of kimchi using silver beet (Beta vulgaris var. cicla) stems and leaves. As silver beet contains high oxalate concentrations and consumption of high levels can cause the development of kidney stones in some people, the reduction of oxalate during preparation and fermentation of kimchi was investigated. The silver beet stems and leaves were soaked in a 10% brine solution for 11 h and then washed in cold tap water. The total, soluble and insoluble oxalate contents of the silver beet leaves were reduced by soaking in brine, from 4275.81 ± 165.48 mg/100 g to 3709.49 ± 216.51 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW). Fermenting the kimchi for 5 days at 19.3 ± 0.8 °C in 5 L ceramic jars with a water airtight seal resulted in a mean 38.50% reduction in total oxalate content and a mean 22.86% reduction in soluble oxalates. The total calcium content was essentially the same before and after the fermentation of the kimchi (mean 296.1 mg/100 g FW). The study showed that fermentation of kimchi significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the total oxalate concentration in the initial mix from 609.32 ± 15.69 to 374.71 ± 7.94 mg/100 g FW in the final mix which led to a 72.3% reduction in the amount of calcium bound to insoluble oxalate.

  5. An understanding of renal stone development in a mixed oxalate-phosphate system.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangying; Wang, Lijun; Dosen, Anja; Tang, Ruikang; Giese, Rossman F; Giocondi, Jennifer L; Orme, Christine A; Hoyer, John R; Nancollas, George H

    2008-07-15

    The in vivo formation of calcium oxalate concretions having calcium phosphate nidi is simulated in an in vitro (37 degrees C, pH 6.0) dual constant composition (DCC) system undersaturated (sigma DCPD = -0.330) with respect to brushite (DCPD, CaHPO 4 . 2H 2O) and slightly supersaturated (sigma COM = 0.328) with respect to calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM, CaC2O4 . H2O). The brushite dissolution provides calcium ions that raise the COM supersaturation, which is heterogeneously nucleated either on or near the surface of the dissolving calcium phosphate crystals. The COM crystallites may then aggregate, simulating kidney stone formation. Interestingly, two intermediate phases, anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (monetite, CaHPO4) and calcium oxalate trihydrate (COT), are also detected by X-ray diffraction during this brushite-COM transformation. In support of clinical observations, the results of these studies demonstrate the participation of calcium phosphate phases in COM crystallization providing a possible physical chemical mechanism for kidney stone formation.

  6. Genetically engineered Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 constitutively secreting heterologous oxalate decarboxylase and degrading oxalate under in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Gomathi, Sivasamy; Anbazhagan, Kolandaswamy; Baby, A Ebenezer; Sangeetha, J; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam

    2014-11-01

    Hyperoxaluria is a major risk factor for urinary stone disease, where calcium oxalate (CaOx) is the most prevalent type of kidney stones. Systemic treatments of CaOx kidney stone patients are limited and comprise drawbacks including recurrence of stone formation and kidney damages. In the present work Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) was engineered to constitutively secrete oxalate decarboxylase (OxdC) for the degradation of intestinal oxalate. The homologous promoter PldhL and signal peptide Lp_0373 of L. plantarum were used for constructing recombinant vector pLdhl0373OxdC. Results showed that homologous promoter PldhL and signal peptide Lp_0373 facilitated the production, secretion, and functional expression of OxdC protein in L. plantarum. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that 44 kDa protein OxdC was seen exceptionally in the culture supernatant of recombinant L. plantarum (WCFS1OxdC) harboring the plasmid pLdhl0373OxdC.The culture supernatant of L. plantarum WCFS1OxdC showed OxdC activity of 0.06 U/mg of protein, whereas no enzyme activity was observed in the supernatant of the wild type WCFS1 and the recombinant NC8OxdC strains. The purified recombinant OxdC from the WCFS1OxdC strain showed an activity of 19.1 U/mg protein. The recombinant L. plantarum strain secreted 25 % of OxdC protein in the supernatant. The recombinant strain degraded more than 70 % of soluble oxalate in the culture supernatant. Plasmid segregation analysis revealed that the recombinant strain lost almost 70-89 % of plasmid in 42nd and 84th generation, respectively. In conclusion, recombinant L. plantarum strain containing plasmid pLdhl0373OxdC showed constitutive secretion of bioactive OxdC and also capable of degrading externally available oxalate under in vitro conditions.

  7. Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and calcium nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Hess, B

    1994-01-01

    Available data on the effects of Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (THP) on calcium oxalate crystallization processes are apparently conflicting. With the main emphasis on calcium oxalate crystal aggregation, this review demonstrates that THP has a dual role as a modifier of crystal aggregation: in solutions with high pH, low ionic strength (IS) and low concentrations of calcium and THP itself, the glycoprotein acts as a powerful inhibitor of calcium oxalate crystal aggregation. Conversely, low pH, high IS and high concentrations of calcium and THP all favor self-aggregation of THP molecules which lowers their inhibitory activity against calcium oxalate crystal aggregation. Some patients with severely recurrent Ca stone disease excrete abnormal THPs which self-aggregate at levels of pH, IS and concentrations of Ca and THP at which normal THPs remain in monomeric form. With high Ca concentrations, such abnormal THPs become strong promoters of crystal aggregation, since conformational changes in crystal-bound THP molecules induce strong viscous binding forces which overcome repulsive electrostatic surface charges. By chelating free Ca ions, citrate reduces self-aggregation of THP molecules and turns promoting THPs into inhibitors of calcium oxalate crystal aggregation.

  8. Speed of Gravity Measured for First Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    learn about this intriguing cosmic force and its relationship to the other forces in nature," Kopeikin said. This is not the first time that Jupiter has played a part in producing a measurement of a fundamental physical constant. In 1675, Olaf Roemer, a Danish astronomer working at the Paris Observatory, made the first reasonably accurate determination of the speed of light by observing eclipses of one of Jupiter's moons. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  9. Urolithiasis in a herd of beef cattle associated with oxalate ingestion.

    PubMed

    Waltner-Toews, D; Meadows, D H

    1980-02-01

    An unusually high incidence of urinary calculi in a group of feeder cattle is described. Necropsy findings in one affected animal suggested that oxalates in the feed, specifically in fescue (Festuca spp.) seed screenings, may have been the cause. Low dietary calcium and decreased water intake by the cattle appear to have been predisposing factors. Control measures are discussed.

  10. Renal peroxidative changes mediated by oxalate: the protective role of fucoidan.

    PubMed

    Veena, Coothan Kandaswamy; Josephine, Anthony; Preetha, Sreenivasan P; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan; Sundarapandiyan, Rajaguru

    2006-10-04

    Oxalate, one of the major constituents of renal stones is known to induce free radicals which damage the renal membrane. Damaged epithelia might act as nidi for stone formation aggravating calcium oxalate precipitation during hyperoxaluria. In the present study, the beneficial effects of fucoidan on oxalate-induced free radical injury were investigated. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Hyperoxaluria was induced in two groups by administration of 0.75% ethylene glycol in drinking water for 28 days and one of them was treated with fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus at a dose of 5 mg/kg b.wt subcutaneously commencing from the 8th day of induction. A control and drug control (fucoidan alone) was also included in the study. The extent of renal injury in hyperoxaluria was evident from the increased activities of alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, beta-glucuronidase, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in urine. There was a positive correlation between plasma malondialdehyde levels and renal membrane damage indicating a striking relation between free radical formation and cellular injury. Increased protein carbonyl and decreased thiols further exemplified the oxidative milieu prevailing during hyperoxaluria. Decreased renal membrane ATPases accentuated the renal membrane damage induced by oxalate. Renal microscopic analysis showed abnormal findings in histology as an evidence of oxalate damage. The above biochemical and histopathological discrepancies were abrogated with fucoidan administration, indicating its protective role in oxalate mediated peroxidative injury.

  11. Oxalate content of food: a tangled web.

    PubMed

    Attalla, Kyrollis; De, Shubha; Monga, Manoj

    2014-09-01

    To account for variations in dietary oxalate content in resources available to hyperoxaluric patients. Our objective is to examine the heterogeneity of the oxalate content reported across various Web-based sources and smartphone applications. A search of "oxalate content of food" was performed using the Google search engine. Smartphone applications were identified by their ability to assess oxalate content. Oxalate contents were obtained, and common foods were selected for comparison. Food groups were compared to better understand how patients are guided when using these references to manipulate their diet. Thirteen sources were identified, and 8 sources (6 Web sites and 2 applications) were used to construct figures for comparison of commonly listed foods. Oxalate content was extremely variable between various sources. Fruits with the widest observed range of oxalate included oranges (2.07-10.64 mg/100 g) and bananas (0-9.9 mg/100 g). Among vegetables, the oxalate contents of spinach (364.44-1145 mg/100 g), rhubarb (511-983.61 mg/100 g), and beets (36.9-794.12 mg/100 g) were most variable. Among nuts, the oxalate content of peanuts ranged from 64.57 to 348.58 mg/100 g, and pecans ranged from 4.08 to 404.08 mg/100 g. Wide variations exist in the reported oxalate content of foods across several Web-based sources and smartphone applications, several of which are substantial and can have a sizable impact on the construction of a low oxalate diet. As dietary counseling has proven benefits, patients and caregivers should be aware of the heterogeneity that exists in the reported oxalate content of foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. OXALATE FORMATION FROM GLYOXAL IN ERYTHROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John; Wood, Kyle D.; Lange, Jessica N.; Assimos, Dean G.; Holmes, Ross P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether glyoxal can be converted to oxalate in human erythrocytes. Glyoxal synthesis is elevated in diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other diseases with significant oxidative stress. Erythrocytes are a good model system for such studies as they lack intracellular organelles and have a simplified metabolism. METHODS Erythrocytes were isolated from healthy volunteers and incubated with varying concentrations of glyoxal for different amounts of time. Metabolic inhibitors were used to help characterize metabolic steps. The conversion of glyoxal to glycolate and oxalate in the incubation medium was determined by chromatographic techniques. RESULTS The bulk of the glyoxal was converted to glycolate but ~1% was converted to oxalate. Inclusion of the pro-oxidant, menadione, in the medium increased oxalate synthesis, and the inclusion of disulfiram, an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, decreased oxalate synthesis. CONCLUSIONS The glyoxalase system, which utilizes glutathione as a cofactor, converts the majority of the glyoxal taken up by erythrocytes to glycolate but a small portion is converted to oxalate. A reduction in intracellular glutathione increases oxalate synthesis and a decrease in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity lowers oxalate synthesis and suggests that glyoxylate is an intermediate. Thus, oxidative stress in tissues could potentially increase oxalate synthesis. PMID:26546809

  13. The Relationship between Serum Oxalic Acid, Central Hemodynamic Parameters and Colonization by Oxalobacter formigenes in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Gulhan, Baris; Turkmen, Kultigin; Aydin, Merve; Gunay, Murat; Cıkman, Aytekin; Kara, Murat

    2015-06-01

    Elevated pulse wave velocity (PWV) and central aortic blood pressures are independent predictors of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Oxalic acid is a uremic retention molecule that is extensively studied in the pathogenesis of calcium oxalate stones. Oxalobacter formigenes, a member of the colon microbiota, has important roles in oxalate homeostasis. Data regarding the colonization by and the exact role of O. formigenes in the pathogenesis of oxalic acid metabolism in HD patients are scant. Hence, we aimed to determine the relationship between fecal O. formigenes colonization, serum oxalic acid and hemodynamic parameters in HD patients with regard to the colo-reno-cardiac axis. Fifty HD patients were enrolled in this study. PWV and central aortic systolic (cASBP) and diastolic blood pressures (cADBP) were measured with a Mobil-O-Graph (I.E.M. GmbH, Stolberg, Germany). Serum oxalic acid levels were assessed by ELISA, and fecal O. formigenes DNA levels were isolated and measured by real-time PCR. Isolation of fecal O. formigenes was found in only 2 HD patients. One of them had 113,609 copies/ml, the other one had 1,056 copies/ml. Serum oxalic acid levels were found to be positively correlated with PWV (r = 0.29, p = 0.03), cASBP (r = 0.33, p = 0.001) and cADBP (r = 0.42, p = 0.002) and negatively correlated with LDL (r = -0.30, p = 0.03). In multivariate linear regression analysis, PWV was independently predicted by oxalic acid, glucose and triglyceride. This is the first study that demonstrates the absence of O. formigenes as well as a relation between serum oxalic acid and cASBP, cADBP and PWV in HD patients. Replacement of O. formigenes with pre- and probiotics might decrease serum oxalic acid levels and improve cardiovascular outcomes in HD patients.

  14. Morphologies and elemental compositions of calcium crystals in phyllodes and branchlets of Acacia robeorum (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)

    PubMed Central

    He, Honghua; Bleby, Timothy M.; Veneklaas, Erik J.; Lambers, Hans; Kuo, John

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Formation of calcium oxalate crystals is common in the plant kingdom, but biogenic formation of calcium sulfate crystals in plants is rare. We investigated the morphologies and elemental compositions of crystals found in phyllodes and branchlets of Acacia robeorum, a desert shrub of north-western Australia. Methods Morphologies of crystals in phyllodes and branchlets of A. robeorum were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and elemental compositions of the crystals were identified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Distributional patterns of the crystals were studied using optical microscopy together with SEM. Key Results According to the elemental compositions, the crystals were classified into three groups: (1) calcium oxalate; (2) calcium sulfate, which is a possible mixture of calcium sulfate and calcium oxalate with calcium sulfate being the major component; and (3) calcium sulfate · magnesium oxalate, presumably mixtures of calcium sulfate, calcium oxalate, magnesium oxalate and silica. The crystals were of various morphologies, including prisms, raphides, styloids, druses, crystal sand, spheres and clusters. Both calcium oxalate and calcium sulfate crystals were observed in almost all tissues, including mesophyll, parenchyma, sclerenchyma (fibre cells), pith, pith ray and cortex; calcium sulfate · magnesium oxalate crystals were only found in mesophyll and parenchyma cells in phyllodes. Conclusions The formation of most crystals was biologically induced, as confirmed by studying the crystals formed in the phyllodes from seedlings grown in a glasshouse. The crystals may have functions in removing excess calcium, magnesium and sulfur, protecting the plants against herbivory, and detoxifying aluminium and heavy metals. PMID:22294477

  15. Fungi, bacteria and soil pH: the oxalate-carbonate pathway as a model for metabolic interaction.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gaëtan; Guggiari, Matteo; Bravo, Daniel; Zopfi, Jakob; Cailleau, Guillaume; Aragno, Michel; Job, Daniel; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2012-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway involves the oxidation of calcium oxalate to low-magnesium calcite and represents a potential long-term terrestrial sink for atmospheric CO(2). In this pathway, bacterial oxalate degradation is associated with a strong local alkalinization and subsequent carbonate precipitation. In order to test whether this process occurs in soil, the role of bacteria, fungi and calcium oxalate amendments was studied using microcosms. In a model system with sterile soil amended with laboratory cultures of oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi, the addition of calcium oxalate induced a distinct pH shift and led to the final precipitation of calcite. However, the simultaneous presence of bacteria and fungi was essential to drive this pH shift. Growth of both oxalotrophic bacteria and fungi was confirmed by qPCR on the frc (oxalotrophic bacteria) and 16S rRNA genes, and the quantification of ergosterol (active fungal biomass) respectively. The experiment was replicated in microcosms with non-sterilized soil. In this case, the bacterial and fungal contribution to oxalate degradation was evaluated by treatments with specific biocides (cycloheximide and bronopol). Results showed that the autochthonous microflora oxidized calcium oxalate and induced a significant soil alkalinization. Moreover, data confirmed the results from the model soil showing that bacteria are essentially responsible for the pH shift, but require the presence of fungi for their oxalotrophic activity. The combined results highlight that the interaction between bacteria and fungi is essential to drive metabolic processes in complex environments such as soil.

  16. Sonophotocatalysis of oxalic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hisashi; Tanaka, Hisashi

    2006-12-22

    Sonophotocatalysis of oxalic acid was performed in various atmospheric conditions. Sonophotocatalysis means a coupled reaction of sonolysis and photocatalysis. CO(2), CO and H(2) were obtained. The yield of CO(2) was twice larger than the sum of yields of photocatalysis and sonolysis in an Ar atmosphere. Namely, synergistic effect was observed. Further improvement was observed after pre-sonication. Hydrogen peroxide produced during sonication is a key material for the synergistic effect. In surroundings including O(2), however, synergistic effect could not be observed. The role of ultrasonic waves on the sonophotocatalysis of organic compounds was investigated.

  17. Organic acids in Kakadu plum (Terminalia ferdinandiana): The good (ellagic), the bad (oxalic) and the uncertain (ascorbic).

    PubMed

    Williams, David J; Edwards, David; Pun, Sharon; Chaliha, Mridusmita; Burren, Brian; Tinggi, Ujang; Sultanbawa, Yasmina

    2016-11-01

    The phenolic ellagic acid (EA) is receiving increasing attention for its nutritional and pharmacological potential as an antioxidant and antimicrobial agent. The Australian native Kakadu plum (Terminalia ferdinandiana) fruit is an abundant source of this phytochemical. The fruit also contains large amounts of vitamin C (mainly as ascorbic acid, AA) and possibly the undesirable oxalic acid (OA). Regular consumption of high oxalate foods poses a variety of health risks in humans including interference with calcium absorption and kidney stone formation. Oxalate is also the end-product of AA metabolism so that consumption of fruit with heightened AA content has the potential to elevate urinary oxalate levels. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of EA and the presence of other bioactives in other Kakadu plum tissues. Chemical analysis of Kakadu plum fruit and leaves for EA (free and total), OA (water-soluble and total), calcium (Ca) and AA indicated that EA and AA concentrations were high in the fruit while the leaves had significantly higher EA levels but little or no detectable AA. OA content in fruit and leaves was substantial with the fruit being placed in the high-Oxalate category. These findings suggest that there is potential to elevate oxalate levels in the urine of susceptible people and intake of fruit-derived products should be closely monitored. By measuring tissues collected from specific trees, high EA-producing or low OA-containing individuals were identified. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurements of oxalic acid, oxalates, malonic acid, and malonates in atmospheric particulates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Yu, Liya E

    2008-12-15

    This study systematically examined effects of analytical approaches on resultant concentrations of oxalic acid, oxalates, malonic acid, and malonates. Results demonstrated that employing separate water extraction and THF extraction is required to properly quantify dicarboxylic acids vs dicarboxylates using IC or GC-MS. Applications of the recommended methods to analyze PM2.5 collected in Singapore showed that concentrations of oxalate ranged from 361.4 to 481.4 ng m(-3), which were 10-14.7 times higher than that of oxalic acid. Unlike that of oxalates, malonate concentrations (10.5-23.4 ng m(-3)) were no more than half of malonic acid concentration (43.8-53.9 ng m(-3)) in PM2.5. Concentration ratios of oxalate-to-oxalic acid and malonate-to-malonic acid obtained from this work were applied to reported literature data; as a first approximation, in urban environments similar to that in Singapore, quantifiable oxalic acid, oxalates, malonic acid, and malonates in PM2.5 could range from 7.6 to 68.0, 82.2 to 732.8, 6.3 to 150, and 1.3 to 60 ng m(-3), respectively. Because photooxidation properties and hygroscopicity of dicarboxylic acids can substantially differ from that of dicarboxylates, more studies are needed to quantify ambient oxalic acid and malonic acid vs oxalates and malonates.

  19. Investigation with chitosan-oxalate oxidase-catalase conjugate for degrading oxalate from hyperoxaluric rat chyme.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, V; Lathika, K M; D'Souza, S J; Singh, B B; Raghavan, K G

    1997-08-01

    Enteric hyperoxaluria manifests due to hyperabsorption of dietary oxalate, secondary to a variety of chronic gastrointestinal disorders. The potential use of chitosan immobilized oxalate oxidase-catalase conjugate to deplete the oxalate content of food materials, while they are in the digestive tract has been evaluated by treating rat stomach chyme with such an enzyme preparation. Oxalate oxidase, obtained from beet stem, was adsorbed on chitosan along with catalase and then cross linked with glutaraldehyde to stabilize the derivative. This chemical modification of oxalate oxidase brought about a shift in its optimal pH from 4.2 to 3.8 with a marginal increase in its K(m). Compared to native enzyme, the modified oxalate oxidase exhibited increased storage stability, higher thermal stability and enhanced resistance to proteolytic digestion and heavy metal inactivation. These improved properties of the immobilized oxalate oxidase possibly render it suitable for oral administration under hyperoxaluric conditions.

  20. Association analysis for oxalate concentration in spinach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Screening and breeding low-oxalate germplasm is a major objective in spinach breeding. This research aims to conduct association analysis and identify SNP markers associated with oxalate concentration in spinach germplasm. A total of 310 spinach genotypes including 300 USDA germplasm accessions and ...

  1. Synthesis and spectroscopic investigation of nanostructured europium oxalate: A potential red emitting phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimal, G.; Mani, K. P.; Biju, P. R.; Joseph, C.; Unnikrishnan, N. V.; Ittyachen, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured europium oxalate was successfully synthesized for the first time by microwave assisted co-precipitation method. Structure and nanocrystalline nature of the synthesized europium oxalate was analyzed using X-ray diffraction and the results were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to identify the different functional groups present in the nanostructured europium oxalate. Detailed spectroscopic investigations were carried out using Judd-Ofelt theory to find out the spectroscopic parameters of europium oxalate. Nature of the metal-ligand bond and symmetry of the environment around Eu3+ ions, which strongly influences the luminescence characteristics of the material, were analyzed. Photoluminescence emission spectrum of the material confirmed the strong red emission predicted by the JO theoretical analysis which is further ascertained by CIE chromaticity diagram. Further analysis on the luminescence parameters such as life time, quantum efficiency and color purity of nanostructured europium oxalate revealed the suitability of this material as a potential phosphor for red emission.

  2. Discrimination of clinically significant calcium salts using MARS spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkbride, T. E.; Raja, A.; Mueller, K.; Bateman, C. J.; Becce, F.; Anderson, N.

    2017-03-01

    Calcium compounds within tissues are usually a sign of pathology, and calcium crystal type is often a pointer to the diagnosis. There are clinical advantages in being able to determine the quantity and type of calcifications non-invasively in cardiovascular, genitourinary and musculoskeletal disorders, and treatment differs depending on the crystal type and quantity. The problem arises when trying to distinguish between different calcium compounds within the same image due to their similar attenuation properties. There are spectroscopic differences between calcium salts at very low energies. As calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite can co-exist in breast and musculoskeletal pathologies of the breast, we wished to determine whether Spectral CT could distinguish between them in the same image at clinical X-ray energy ranges. Energy thresholds of 15, 22, 29 and 36keV and tube voltages of 50, 80 and 110kVp were chosen, and images were analysed to determine the percentage difference in the attenuation coefficients of calcium hydroxyapatite samples at concentrations of 54.3, 211.7, 808.5 and 1169.3mg/ml, and calcium oxalate at a concentration of 2000 mg/ml. The two lower concentrations of calcium hydroxyapatite were distinguishable from calcium oxalate at all energies and all tube voltages, whereas the ability to discriminate oxalate from hydroxyapatite at higher concentrations was dependent on the threshold energy but only mildly dependent on the tube voltage used. Spectral CT shows promise for distinguishing clinically important calcium salts.

  3. Cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic role of Terminalia arjuna on oxalate injured renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Amisha; Tandon, Simran; Singla, Surender Kumar; Tandon, Chanderdeep

    2017-02-08

    Urolithiasis is one of the painful multifactorial disorders caused by metabolic abnormalities influencing the composition of body fluids and urine. The bark of Terminalia arjuna (T. arjuna), very well known in Ayurveda for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, possesses antioxidant and diuretic activity. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antiurolithiatic efficacy of aqueous extract of bark of T. arjuna on oxalate-induced injury to renal tubular epithelial cells. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells were exposed to 2 mM oxalate for 48 h to evaluate the protective effect of T. arjuna aqueous extract on cell viability, CaOx crystal adherence and apoptotic changes caused by oxalate. The results confirmed that oxalate injured MDCK cells were protected by T. arjuna extract. On treatment with a range concentrations, the cell viability increased in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, the extract prevented the interaction of the calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals with the cell surface and reduced the number of apoptotic cells. The current data suggests that T. arjuna bark confers a cytoprotective role and based on our results it could be a potential candidate from natural plant sources against urolithiasis.

  4. Interactive Television Pointers from Three First Time Presenters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckenmyer, James A.; Kunz, David A.; Sterrett, Jack L.

    Three professors from the Harrison College of Business at Southeast Missouri State University were first-time presenters of a new ITV (interactive television) initiative at the college. This paper is an introduction to their experiences, including drawbacks and limitations of the experiences and tips for other first-time presenters. A common…

  5. Potential etiologic role of brushite in the formation of calcium (renal) stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1981-05-01

    Brushite may play an important regulatory role in the formation of calcium -containing renal stones. The urinary environment from patients with hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis is typically supersaturated and shows an increased propensity for the spontaneous nucleation of brushite. Brushite has been identified in "stone-forming" urine and in stones. This crystalline phase may undergo phase transformation to hydroxyapatite or cause heterogeneous nucleation or epitaxial growth of calcium oxalate. Thus, brushite may also participate in the formation of stones of hydroxypatite or calcium oxalate.

  6. Effects of pyruvate salts, pyruvic acid, and bicarbonate salts in preventing experimental oxalate urolithiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Yamaguchi, K; Tanaka, T; Morozumi, M

    1986-05-01

    Sodium pyruvate, potassium pyruvate, pyruvic acid, sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate were added to a calcium-oxalate lithogenic diet (a glycolic-acid diet) in order to determine their effects in preventing lithogenicity. Male Wistar-strain rats who had been fed the glycolic-acid diet developed marked urinary calculi within four weeks. Rats in the sodium and potassium pyruvate groups had, however, almost no stones in the urinary system. Rats in the bicarbonate and pyruvic-acid groups showed slightly less effect than those in the pyruvate groups. Urinary oxalate excretion was high in all the groups during the experiment. The urinary oxalate concentration was relatively higher in the sodium-pyruvate group, and significantly higher in the potassium-pyruvate group, than in the glycolic-acid group. Urinary citrate excretion was high both in the pyruvate and bicarbonate groups; the urinary citrate concentration was, however, significantly higher in the pyruvate groups than in the bicarbonate groups at the fourth experimental week. The urinary calcium and magnesium concentrations were irrelevant to the diets administered. Therefore, it can be concluded that pyruvate salts inhibit urinary calculi formation, not by decreasing oxalate synthesis, but by increasing the urinary citrate concentration; bicarbonate salts work in the same manner, but a little less effectively.

  7. Steatorrhea and hyperoxaluria occur after gastric bypass surgery in obese rats regardless of dietary fat or oxalate.

    PubMed

    Canales, Benjamin K; Ellen, Joseph; Khan, Saeed R; Hatch, Marguerite

    2013-09-01

    We determined the effect of dietary fat and oxalate on fecal fat excretion and urine parameters in a rat model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Diet induced obese Sprague-Dawley® rats underwent sham surgery as controls (16), or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (19). After recovery, rats had free access to a normal calcium, high fat (40%) diet with or without 1.5% potassium oxalate for 5 weeks and then a normal (10%) fat diet for 2 weeks. Stool and urine were collected after each period. Fecal fat was determined by gas chromatography and urine metabolites were evaluated by assay spectrophotometry. Daily fecal fat excretion remained low in controls on either diet. However, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass rats ingested a food quantity similar to that of controls but had eightfold higher fecal fat excretion (p <0.001) and heavier stools (p = 0.02). Compared to controls, gastric bypass rats on the high fat diet with potassium oxalate had a fivefold increase in urine oxalate excretion (p <0.001), while gastric bypass rats without potassium oxalate had a twofold increase in urine calcium (p <0.01). Lowering dietary fat in gastric bypass rats with potassium oxalate led to a 50% decrease in oxalate excretion (p <0.01), a 30% decrease in urine calcium and a 0.3 U increase in urine pH (p <0.001). In this Roux-en-Y gastric bypass model high fat feeding resulted in steatorrhea, hyperoxaluria and low urine pH, which were partially reversible by lowering the dietary fat and oxalate content. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass rats on normal fat and no oxalate diets excreted twice as much oxalate as age matched, sham operated controls. Although Roux-en-Y gastric bypass hyperoxaluria appears primarily mediated by gut and diet, secondary causes of oxalogenesis from liver or other mechanisms deserve further exploration. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CONCENTRATION OF Pu USING OXALATE TYPE CARRIER

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, D.M.; Black, R.P.S.

    1960-04-19

    A method is given for dissolving and reprecipitating an oxalate carrier precipitate in a carrier precipitation process for separating and recovering plutonium from an aqueous solution. Uranous oxalate, together with plutonium being carried thereby, is dissolved in an aqueous alkaline solution. Suitable alkaline reagents are the carbonates and oxulates of the alkali metals and ammonium. An oxidizing agent selected from hydroxylamine and hydrogen peroxide is then added to the alkaline solution, thereby oxidizing uranium to the hexavalent state. The resulting solution is then acidified and a source of uranous ions provided in the acidified solution, thereby forming a second plutoniumcarrying uranous oxalate precipitate.

  9. Metabolic Conversion of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid in Oxalate-accumulating Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joan C.; Loewus, Frank A.

    1975-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid-1-14C and its oxidation product, dehydro-l-ascorbic acid, produced labeled oxalic acid in oxalate-accumulating plants such as spinach seedlings (Spinacia oleracea) and the detached leaves of woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta and O. oregana), shamrock (Oxalis adenopylla), and begonia (Begonia evansiana). In O. oregana, conversion occurred equally well in the presence or absence of light. This relationship between l-ascorbic acid metabolism and oxalic acid formation must be given careful consideration in attempts to explain oxalic accumulation in plants. PMID:16659288

  10. In vivo oxalate degradation by liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in rat model of hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Tulika; Pundir, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: High level of urinary oxalate substantially increases the risk of hyperoxaluria, a significant risk factor for urolithiasis. The primary goal of this study was to reduce urinary oxalate excretion employing liposome encapsulated oxalate oxidase in animal model. Methods: A membrane bound oxalate oxidase was purified from Bougainvillea leaves. The enzyme in its native form was less effective at the physiological pH of the recipient animal. To increase its functional viability, the enzyme was immobilized on to ethylene maleic anhydride (EMA). Rats were injected with liposome encapsulated EMA- oxalate oxidase and the effect was observed on degradation of oxalic acid. Results: The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity with 60-fold purification and 31 per cent yield. The optimum pH of EMA-derivative enzyme was 6.0 and it showed 70 per cent of its optimal activity at pH 7.0. The EMA-bound enzyme encapsulated into liposome showed greater oxalate degradation in 15 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats as compared with 30 per cent casein vitamin B6 deficient fed rats and control rats. Interpretation & conclusions: EMA-oxalate oxidase encapsulated liposome caused oxalate degradation in experimental hyperoxaluria indicating that the enzyme could be used as a therapeutic agent in hyperoxaluria leading to urinary stones. PMID:23481063

  11. Metabolic Conversion of l-Ascorbic Acid to Oxalic Acid in Oxalate-accumulating Plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, J C; Loewus, F A

    1975-08-01

    l-Ascorbic acid-1-(14)C and its oxidation product, dehydro-l-ascorbic acid, produced labeled oxalic acid in oxalate-accumulating plants such as spinach seedlings (Spinacia oleracea) and the detached leaves of woodsorrel (Oxalis stricta and O. oregana), shamrock (Oxalis adenopylla), and begonia (Begonia evansiana). In O. oregana, conversion occurred equally well in the presence or absence of light. This relationship between l-ascorbic acid metabolism and oxalic acid formation must be given careful consideration in attempts to explain oxalic accumulation in plants.

  12. Fatal First-Time Heart Attacks More Common in Blacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_167101.html Fatal First-Time Heart Attacks More Common in Blacks: Study Black men are ... likely than whites to die of a first heart attack, a new analysis suggests. Two out of three ...

  13. The relationship between colonization of Oxalobacter formigenes serum oxalic acid and endothelial dysfunction in hemodialysis patients: from impaired colon to impaired endothelium.

    PubMed

    Turkmen, K; Erdur, F M

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients receiving hemodialysis (HD). Oxalic acid is a uremic retention molecule that has been extensively studied in the pathogenesis of calcium-oxalate stones. Oxalobacter formigenes (O. formigenes), a component of the colonic microbiota, plays an important role in oxalate homeostasis. Little is known regarding the colonization of HD patients by O. formigenes and the exact role of this bacterial species in oxalic acid metabolism in these patients. We hypothesized that oxalic acid may be insufficiently degraded in HD patients due to under colonization of the colon by O. formigenes in these patients. To test this hypothesis, we sought to quantitatively measure fecal O. formigenes levels and serum oxalic acid levels in HD patients. We also suggest that increased oxalic acid levels may be associated with endothelial dysfunction and aortic stiffness, both of which are commonly observed in HD patients. Increased colonization with O. formigenes via the ingestion of prebiotics and probiotics could potentially decrease serum oxalic acid levels and improve cardiovascular outcomes in HD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diet and calcium stones.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J; Norman, R W

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on the dietary modification of urinary risk factors as a means of reducing the likelihood of recurrent stone formation and to develop practical dietary recommendations that might be useful to this end. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for English-language articles published from 1983 to 1990. Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of identified articles. STUDY SELECTION: Nonrandomized trials and retrospective reviews were included because of a paucity of randomized controlled trials. DATA SYNTHESIS: Information on the dietary intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and fibre and on alcohol and fluid intake was used to develop practical guidelines on dietary modification. CONCLUSION: Dietary modification plays an important role in the reduction of urinary risk factors in patients with calcium stone disease of the urinary tract. As an initial form of prevention attention should be directed toward moderating the intake of calcium, oxalate, protein, sodium and alcohol and increasing the intake of fibre and water. Future research should include an assessment of the long-term reduction of dietary and urinary risk factors and the rates of recurrence of calcium stones. PMID:1310430

  15. Effect of Potassium Citrate on Calcium Phosphate Stones in a Model of Hypercalciuria.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Nancy S; Asplin, John R; Frick, Kevin K; Granja, Ignacio; Culbertson, Christopher D; Ng, Adeline; Grynpas, Marc D; Bushinsky, David A

    2015-12-01

    Potassium citrate is prescribed to decrease stone recurrence in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Citrate binds intestinal and urine calcium and increases urine pH. Citrate, metabolized to bicarbonate, should decrease calcium excretion by reducing bone resorption and increasing renal calcium reabsorption. However, citrate binding to intestinal calcium may increase absorption and renal excretion of both phosphate and oxalate. Thus, the effect of potassium citrate on urine calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation and stone formation is complex and difficult to predict. To study the effects of potassium citrate on urine supersaturation and stone formation, we utilized 95th-generation inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats. Rats were fed a fixed amount of a normal calcium (1.2%) diet supplemented with potassium citrate or potassium chloride (each 4 mmol/d) for 18 weeks. Urine was collected at 6, 12, and 18 weeks. At 18 weeks, stone formation was visualized by radiography. Urine citrate, phosphate, oxalate, and pH levels were higher and urine calcium level was lower in rats fed potassium citrate. Furthermore, calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation were higher with potassium citrate; however, uric acid supersaturation was lower. Both groups had similar numbers of exclusively calcium phosphate stones. Thus, potassium citrate effectively raises urine citrate levels and lowers urine calcium levels; however, the increases in urine pH, oxalate, and phosphate levels lead to increased calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation. Potassium citrate induces complex changes in urine chemistries and resultant supersaturation, which may not be beneficial in preventing calcium phosphate stone formation. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  16. Effect of Potassium Citrate on Calcium Phosphate Stones in a Model of Hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Asplin, John R.; Frick, Kevin K.; Granja, Ignacio; Culbertson, Christopher D.; Ng, Adeline; Grynpas, Marc D.; Bushinsky, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium citrate is prescribed to decrease stone recurrence in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Citrate binds intestinal and urine calcium and increases urine pH. Citrate, metabolized to bicarbonate, should decrease calcium excretion by reducing bone resorption and increasing renal calcium reabsorption. However, citrate binding to intestinal calcium may increase absorption and renal excretion of both phosphate and oxalate. Thus, the effect of potassium citrate on urine calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation and stone formation is complex and difficult to predict. To study the effects of potassium citrate on urine supersaturation and stone formation, we utilized 95th-generation inbred genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming rats. Rats were fed a fixed amount of a normal calcium (1.2%) diet supplemented with potassium citrate or potassium chloride (each 4 mmol/d) for 18 weeks. Urine was collected at 6, 12, and 18 weeks. At 18 weeks, stone formation was visualized by radiography. Urine citrate, phosphate, oxalate, and pH levels were higher and urine calcium level was lower in rats fed potassium citrate. Furthermore, calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation were higher with potassium citrate; however, uric acid supersaturation was lower. Both groups had similar numbers of exclusively calcium phosphate stones. Thus, potassium citrate effectively raises urine citrate levels and lowers urine calcium levels; however, the increases in urine pH, oxalate, and phosphate levels lead to increased calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate supersaturation. Potassium citrate induces complex changes in urine chemistries and resultant supersaturation, which may not be beneficial in preventing calcium phosphate stone formation. PMID:25855777

  17. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms.

  18. Chemical modification of oxalate decarboxylase to improve adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rihui; He, Junbin; Wu, Jia; Cai, Xinghua; Long, Han; Chen, Shengfeng; Liu, Haiqian

    2017-05-01

    In order to enhance the adsorption capacity of oxalate decarboxylase (Oxdc) on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and improve the application performance of Oxdc, chemical modification of Oxdc with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTAD) was investigated in this work. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis results demonstrated that Oxdc and EDTAD have been covalently bound, and suggested that the chemical modification occurred at the free amino of the side chain and the α-amine of the N-terminus of Oxdc. Fluorescene and circular dichroic measurement showed that the structure and conformation of Oxdc were tinily altered after modification by EDTAD. The optimum pH of EDTAD-modified Oxdc was shifted to the alkaline side about 1.5 unit and it has a higher thermostability. The analysis of kinetic parameters indicated that the EDTAD-modified Oxdc showed a higher affinity towards the substrate. Through modification the adsorption capacity of Oxdc onto CaOx monohydrate crystals was increased by 42.42%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Acute oxalate nephropathy following kidney transplantation: Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Diana; Gheissari, Alaleh; Shaabani, Pooria; Tabibian, Seyed Reza; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Seirafian, Shiva; Merrikhi, Alireza; Fesharakizadeh, Mehdi; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin

    2015-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal deposition is a common finding immediately after kidney transplantation. However, small depositions of CaOx could be benign while extensive depositions lead to poor graft outcome. Here we report three cases with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), bilateral nephrolithiasis, and unknown diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria (PH) who underwent a renal transplant and experienced an early-onset graft failure. Although an acute rejection was suspected, renal allograft biopsies and subsequent allograft nephrectomies showed extensive CaOx deposition, which raised a suspicion of PH. Even though increased urinary excretion of CaOx was found in all patients, this diagnosis could be confirmed with further tests including genetic study and metabolic assay. In conclusion, massive CaOx deposition in kidney allograft is an important cause of poor allograft survival and needs special management. Furthermore, our cases suggest patients with ESRD and a history of nephrolithiasis should be screened for elevated urinary oxalate excretion and rule out of PH. PMID:26664431

  20. Hydrogen peroxide inhibition of bicupin oxalate oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, John M.; Rana, Hassan; Ndungu, Joan; Chakrabarti, Gaurab

    2017-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase is a manganese containing enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of oxalate to carbon dioxide in a reaction that is coupled with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate oxidase from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CsOxOx) is the first fungal and bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes this reaction. Potential applications of oxalate oxidase for use in pancreatic cancer treatment, to prevent scaling in paper pulping, and in biofuel cells have highlighted the need to understand the extent of the hydrogen peroxide inhibition of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate. We apply a membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) assay to directly measure initial rates of carbon dioxide formation and oxygen consumption in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide is both a reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate and an irreversible inactivator. The build-up of the turnover-generated hydrogen peroxide product leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. The introduction of catalase to reaction mixtures protects the enzyme from inactivation allowing reactions to proceed to completion. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that no changes in global protein structure take place in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Additionally, we show that the CsOxOx catalyzed reaction with the three carbon substrate mesoxalate consumes oxygen which is in contrast to previous proposals that it catalyzed a non-oxidative decarboxylation with this substrate. PMID:28486485

  1. Hydrogen peroxide inhibition of bicupin oxalate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, John M; Rana, Hassan; Ndungu, Joan; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Moomaw, Ellen W

    2017-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase is a manganese containing enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of oxalate to carbon dioxide in a reaction that is coupled with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate oxidase from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CsOxOx) is the first fungal and bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes this reaction. Potential applications of oxalate oxidase for use in pancreatic cancer treatment, to prevent scaling in paper pulping, and in biofuel cells have highlighted the need to understand the extent of the hydrogen peroxide inhibition of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate. We apply a membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) assay to directly measure initial rates of carbon dioxide formation and oxygen consumption in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide is both a reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate and an irreversible inactivator. The build-up of the turnover-generated hydrogen peroxide product leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. The introduction of catalase to reaction mixtures protects the enzyme from inactivation allowing reactions to proceed to completion. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that no changes in global protein structure take place in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Additionally, we show that the CsOxOx catalyzed reaction with the three carbon substrate mesoxalate consumes oxygen which is in contrast to previous proposals that it catalyzed a non-oxidative decarboxylation with this substrate.

  2. Improving nutritional quality and fungal tolerance in soya bean and grass pea by expressing an oxalate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinay; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Ghosh, Sumit; Irfan, Mohammad; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra; Datta, Asis

    2016-06-01

    Soya bean (Glycine max) and grass pea (Lathyrus sativus) seeds are important sources of dietary proteins; however, they also contain antinutritional metabolite oxalic acid (OA). Excess dietary intake of OA leads to nephrolithiasis due to the formation of calcium oxalate crystals in kidneys. Besides, OA is also a known precursor of β-N-oxalyl-L-α,β-diaminopropionic acid (β-ODAP), a neurotoxin found in grass pea. Here, we report the reduction in OA level in soya bean (up to 73%) and grass pea (up to 75%) seeds by constitutive and/or seed-specific expression of an oxalate-degrading enzyme, oxalate decarboxylase (FvOXDC) of Flammulina velutipes. In addition, β-ODAP level of grass pea seeds was also reduced up to 73%. Reduced OA content was interrelated with the associated increase in seeds micronutrients such as calcium, iron and zinc. Moreover, constitutive expression of FvOXDC led to improved tolerance to the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum that requires OA during host colonization. Importantly, FvOXDC-expressing soya bean and grass pea plants were similar to the wild type with respect to the morphology and photosynthetic rates, and seed protein pool remained unaltered as revealed by the comparative proteomic analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrated improved seed quality and tolerance to the fungal pathogen in two important legume crops, by the expression of an oxalate-degrading enzyme. © 2016 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Further Studies on Oxalic Acid Biosynthesis in Oxalate-accumulating Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Nuss, Richard F.; Loewus, Frank A.

    1978-01-01

    l-Ascorbic acid functions as a precursor of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulating plants. The present study extends this observation to include Rumex crispus L. (curly dock), Amaranthus retroflexus L. (red root pigweed), Chenopodium album L. (lamb's-quarters), Beta vulgaris L. (sugar beet), Halogeton glomeratus M. Bieb. (halogeton), and Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb). Several species with low oxalate content are also examined. When l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid is supplied to young seedlings of R. crispus or H. glomeratus, a major portion of the 14C is released over a 24-hour period as 14CO2 and only a small portion is recovered as [14C]oxalate, unlike cuttings from 2- or 4-month-old plants which retain a large part of the 14C as [14C]oxalic acid and release very little 14CO2. Support for an intermediate role of oxalate in the release of 14CO2 from l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid is seen in the rapid release of 14CO2 by R. crispus and H. glomeratus seedlings labeled with [14C]oxalic acid. The common origin of oxalic acid carbon in the C1 and C2 fragment from l-ascorbic acid is demonstrated by comparison of 14C content of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulators after cuttings or seedlings are supplied equal amounts of l-[1-14C]- or l-[UL-14C]ascorbic acid. Theoretically, l-[1-14C]ascorbic acid will produce labeled oxalic acid containing three times as much 14C as l-[UL-14C]ascorbic acid when equal amounts of label are provided. Experimentally, a ratio of 2.7 ± 0.5 is obtained in duplicate experiments with six different species. PMID:16660342

  4. Further Studies on Oxalic Acid Biosynthesis in Oxalate-accumulating Plants.

    PubMed

    Nuss, R F; Loewus, F A

    1978-04-01

    l-Ascorbic acid functions as a precursor of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulating plants. The present study extends this observation to include Rumex crispus L. (curly dock), Amaranthus retroflexus L. (red root pigweed), Chenopodium album L. (lamb's-quarters), Beta vulgaris L. (sugar beet), Halogeton glomeratus M. Bieb. (halogeton), and Rheum rhabarbarum L. (rhubarb). Several species with low oxalate content are also examined.When l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid is supplied to young seedlings of R. crispus or H. glomeratus, a major portion of the (14)C is released over a 24-hour period as (14)CO(2) and only a small portion is recovered as [(14)C]oxalate, unlike cuttings from 2- or 4-month-old plants which retain a large part of the (14)C as [(14)C]oxalic acid and release very little (14)CO(2). Support for an intermediate role of oxalate in the release of (14)CO(2) from l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid is seen in the rapid release of (14)CO(2) by R. crispus and H. glomeratus seedlings labeled with [(14)C]oxalic acid.The common origin of oxalic acid carbon in the C1 and C2 fragment from l-ascorbic acid is demonstrated by comparison of (14)C content of oxalic acid in several oxalate-accumulators after cuttings or seedlings are supplied equal amounts of l-[1-(14)C]- or l-[UL-(14)C]ascorbic acid. Theoretically, l-[1-(14)C]ascorbic acid will produce labeled oxalic acid containing three times as much (14)C as l-[UL-(14)C]ascorbic acid when equal amounts of label are provided. Experimentally, a ratio of 2.7 +/- 0.5 is obtained in duplicate experiments with six different species.

  5. Chronic metabolic acidosis reduces urinary oxalate excretion and promotes intestinal oxalate secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Hatch, Marguerite

    2015-11-01

    Urinary oxalate excretion is reduced in rats during a chronic metabolic acidosis, but how this is achieved is not clear. In this report, we re-examine our prior work on the effects of a metabolic acidosis on urinary oxalate handling [Green et al., Am J Physiol Ren Physiol 289(3):F536-F543, 2005], offering a more detailed analysis and interpretation of the data, together with new, previously unpublished observations revealing a marked impact on intestinal oxalate transport. Sprague-Dawley rats were provided with 0.28 M ammonium chloride in their drinking water for either 4 or 14 days followed by 24 h urine collections, blood-gas and serum ion analysis, and measurements of (14)C-oxalate fluxes across isolated segments of the distal colon. Urinary oxalate excretion was significantly reduced by 75% after just 4 days compared to control rats, and this was similarly sustained at 14 days. Oxalate:creatinine clearance ratios indicated enhanced net re-absorption of oxalate by the kidney during a metabolic acidosis, but this was not associated with any substantive changes to serum oxalate levels. In the distal colon, oxalate transport was dramatically altered from net absorption in controls (6.20 ± 0.63 pmol cm(-2) h(-1)), to net secretion in rats with a metabolic acidosis (-5.19 ± 1.18 and -2.07 ± 1.05 pmol cm(-2) h(-1) at 4 and 14 days, respectively). Although we cannot rule out modifications to bi-directional oxalate movements along the proximal tubule, these findings support a gut-kidney axis in the management of oxalate homeostasis, where this shift in renal handling during a metabolic acidosis is associated with compensatory adaptations by the intestine.

  6. First-time viewers' comprehension of films: bridging shot transitions.

    PubMed

    Ildirar, Sermin; Schwan, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Which perceptual and cognitive prerequisites must be met in order to be able to comprehend a film is still unresolved and a controversial issue. In order to gain some insights into this issue, our field experiment investigates how first-time adult viewers extract and integrate meaningful information across film cuts. Three major types of commonalities between adjacent shots were differentiated, which may help first-time viewers with bridging the shots: pictorial, causal, and conceptual. Twenty first-time, 20 low-experienced and 20 high-experienced viewers from Turkey were shown a set of short film clips containing these three kinds of commonalities. Film clips conformed also to the principles of continuity editing. Analyses of viewers' spontaneous interpretations show that first-time viewers indeed are able to notice basic pictorial (object identity), causal (chains of activity), as well as conceptual (links between gaze direction and object attention) commonalities between shots due to their close relationship with everyday perception and cognition. However, first-time viewers' comprehension of the commonalities is to a large degree fragile, indicating the lack of a basic notion of what constitutes a film.

  7. Availability of calcium from kilkeerai (Amaranthus tricolor) and drumstick (Moringa oleifera) greens in weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Pankaja, N; Prakash, J

    1994-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the extent of calcium absorption in weanling rats from two types of greens rich in oxalates. The edible portions of greens namely kilkeerai (Amaranthus tricolor) and drumstick (Moringa oleifera) were analysed for moisture, calcium and total and soluble oxalates. Three groups of 6 male weanling albino rats were fed ad libitum on milk diet and two experimental diets containing greens. Urine and faecal samples were collected for a period of 7 days after 5 days of acclimatization period and were analysed for calcium. From the values obtained percent absorption and retention of calcium were calculated. Results revealed that calcium absorption and retention from milk diet (92 and 78%, respectively) were significantly higher than greens. Average calcium absorption and retention from greens diet were 75.5 and 60%, respectively. Presence of oxalates inhibited intestinal absorption of calcium.

  8. Oxalate Blockage of Calcium and Iron: A Student Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a student learning activity used to teach the meaning of percentage composition, mole concept, selective precipitation, and limiting factors. Presents two word problems and their solutions. (CW)

  9. Oxalate Blockage of Calcium and Iron: A Student Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a student learning activity used to teach the meaning of percentage composition, mole concept, selective precipitation, and limiting factors. Presents two word problems and their solutions. (CW)

  10. Probiotics and Other Key Determinants of Dietary Oxalate Absorption1

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Michael; Al-Wahsh, Ismail A.

    2011-01-01

    Oxalate is a common component of many foods of plant origin, including nuts, fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes, and is typically present as a salt of oxalic acid. Because virtually all absorbed oxalic acid is excreted in the urine and hyperoxaluria is known to be a considerable risk factor for urolithiasis, it is important to understand the factors that have the potential to alter the efficiency of oxalate absorption. Oxalate bioavailability, a term that has been used to refer to that portion of food-derived oxalate that is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), is estimated to range from 2 to 15% for different foods. Oxalate bioavailability appears to be decreased by concomitant food ingestion due to interactions between oxalate and coingested food components that likely result in less oxalic acid remaining in a soluble form. There is a lack of consensus in the literature as to whether efficiency of oxalate absorption is dependent on the proportion of total dietary oxalate that is in a soluble form. However, studies that directly compared foods of varying soluble oxalate contents have generally supported the proposition that the amount of soluble oxalate in food is an important determinant of oxalate bioavailability. Oxalate degradation by oxalate-degrading bacteria within the GIT is another key factor that could affect oxalate absorption and degree of oxaluria. Studies that have assessed the efficacy of oral ingestion of probiotics that provide bacteria with oxalate-degrading capacity have led to promising but generally mixed results, and this remains a fertile area for future studies. PMID:22332057

  11. Maternal depression and rapid subsequent pregnancy among first time mothers.

    PubMed

    Patchen, Loral; Lanzi, Robin Gaines

    2013-01-01

    To examine differences in prenatal depression among first-time mothers who had a subsequent pregnancy within 6 months of first birth and those who did not. Mothers with depression symptoms were expected to have a greater likelihood of rapid subsequent pregnancy. The Parenting for the First Time study is a longitudinal multisite prospective descriptive study designed to identify and understand the dynamics of subthreshold neglectful parenting behaviors among first-time mothers. Data were collected from the prenatal period through the child's first 3 years of life. The Parenting for the First Time sample consisted of 684 first-time mothers between 15 and 36 years. Data were available on prenatal depression and subsequent pregnancy at 6 months for 279 participants (n = 279). Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the odds of subsequent pregnancy within 6 months of first birth. Twelve mothers (5.9%) became pregnant within 6 months of first birth. The odds of subsequent pregnancy were 7.24 greater (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.18-24.04) among mothers with moderate-to-severe depression. White versus non-White race did not influence subsequent pregnancy (0.91, 95% CI: 0.18-4.49). Pregnancy was not significantly different between teen and adult mothers (odds ratio: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.24-3.68). In this sample of first time mothers, moderate-to-severe depression symptoms were associated with subsequent pregnancy within 6 months of first birth. Routine depression screening by nurses during the prenatal period offers opportunities for intensive contraceptive counseling and may help mothers achieve